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Best podcasts about syrian

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Latest podcast episodes about syrian

All Of It
Listening Party: Bedouine's 'Waysides'

All Of It

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 18:47


Syrian-born singer-songwriter Azniv Korkejian, known by her stage name Bedouine, has a new record, Waysides. The project is comprised of tracks that didn't find a home on either of her two previous albums. Korkejian's deliberate fingerstyle and potent lyrics, delivered in melodies that evoke a wistful strength, have earned her a notable place in the "Sad Girl Autumn" pantheon. She joins us for an All Of It Listening Party.  

The afikra Podcast
MOHAMAD HAFEZ | Art Recreating Syrian Streetscapes | Conversations

The afikra Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 29:33


In this Conversation, we talked to Mohamad Hafez about his art that reflects the political turmoil in the Middle East through the compilation of found objects, paint and scrap metal. Using his architectural skills, Hafez creates surrealistic Middle Eastern streetscapes that are architectural in their appearance yet politically charged in their content.Created & hosted by Mikey Muhanna, afikra Edited by: Ramzi RammanTheme music by: Tarek Yamani https://www.instagram.com/tarek_yamani/About the afikra Conversations:Our long-form interview series features academics, arts, ‎and media experts who are helping document and/or shape the history and culture of the Arab world through their ‎work. Our hope is that by having the guest share their expertise and story, the community still walks away with newfound curiosity - and maybe some good recommendations about new nerdy rabbit holes to dive into headfirst. ‎Following the interview, there is a moderated town-hall-style Q&A with questions coming from the live virtual audience ‎on Zoom.‎ Join the live audience: https://www.afikra.com/rsvp   FollowYoutube - Instagram (@afikra_) - Facebook - Twitter Support www.afikra.com/supportAbout afikra:‎afikra is a movement to convert passive interest in the Arab world to active intellectual curiosity. We aim to collectively reframe the dominant narrative of the region by exploring the histories and cultures of the region- past, present, and future - through conversations driven by curiosity. Read more about us on  afikra.com

Oborne & Heller on Cricket
Scyld Berry – England's greatest cricket-watcher – shares highlights from over forty years of England on tour

Oborne & Heller on Cricket

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 56:46


Scyld Berry, a former editor of Wisden, has watched nearly 500 England Test matches (more than anyone in history), and reported them for The Observer and then The Daily Telegraph.  He has just published a penetrating account of all the countries where he has seen England on tour: Beyond The Boundaries, published by Fairfield Books. He is the guest of Peter Oborne and Richard Heller on their latest cricket-themed podcast.Listeners are invited to contribute to the MCC Foundation appeal donate.thebiggive.org.uk/campaign/a056900001v5HIzAAM  It will aid the Foundation's National Hubs, which offer cricket and personal development to disadvantaged communities in Britain, and the wonderful Alsama Project in Lebanon which is transforming the lives of young Syrian refugees. The podcast featured Alsama and three of its young beneficiaries earlier this year.Episode 39: The sky is the limit for Alsama Cricket Club, where refugees from Syria get new livesAll contributions to the Appeal made between midday 30 November and midday 7 December will be doubled in value.Read the full description here: https://chiswickcalendar.co.uk/episode-72-scyld-berry-englands-greatest-cricket-watcher-shares-highlights-from-over-forty-years-of-england-on-tour/Get in contact by emailing obornehellercricket@outlook.com

Keen On Democracy
Jordan Salama on Journeying Colombia's Magdalena River

Keen On Democracy

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 38:45


In this episode of “Keen On”, Andrew is joined by Jordan Salama, the author of “Every Day the River Changes: Four Weeks Down the Magdalena”. Jordan Salama has written essays on climate change, letter-writing, and American Jewish life for The New York Times, tracked down Syrian traveling salesmen in the Andes, covered Lionel Messi and the Argentina national soccer team during the 2016 Copa América, and produced a radio feature about a cross-country railroad trip that appeared on NPR's All Things Considered. You can find his writing in The New York Times, National Geographic, Smithsonian, Scientific American, and more. Visit our website: https://lithub.com/story-type/keen-on/ Email Andrew: a.keen@me.com Watch the show live on Twitter: https://twitter.com/ajkeen Watch the show live on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/ankeen/ Watch the show live on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/lithub Watch the show on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/LiteraryHub/videos Subscribe to Andrew's newsletter: https://andrew2ec.substack.com/ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Free Library Podcast
Rabih Alameddine | The Wrong End of the Telescope with Claire Vaye Watkins | I Love You but I've Chosen Darkness

Free Library Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 63:09


Rabih Alameddine was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award and the National Book Award for An Unnecessary Woman, a ''paean to the transformative power of reading'' (LA Review of Books). His many other works include the novels The Angel of History, The Hakawati, and the short story collection The Perv. The winner of the 2019 Dos Passos Prize, Alameddine was the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship, and has had solo gallery exhibitions of his paintings on three continents. In The Wrong End of the Telescope, a steadfast Arab American trans woman aids Syrian refugees on the island of Lesbos, and forms a close bond with a Syrian matriarch who is determined to protect her children and husband. Claire Vaye Watkins' debut story collection Battleborn was named a best book of 2012 by numerous periodicals. Her other work includes Gold Fame Citrus, a novel in which two young lovers squatting in an abandoned mansion find hope in a drought-wracked future Los Angeles. Watkins is a writing professor at the University of California, Irvine, and her stories and essays have appeared in Granta, One Story, The Paris Review, Ploughshares, and Glimmer Train. I Love You but I've Chosen Darkness is the ''trippy and beautiful, slippery and seductive'' (Vogue) story of a new mother who leaves for a speaking engagement in Reno, Nevada and ends up on a transformative journey through the Mojave Desert of her youth. (recorded 11/23/2021)

Israel News Talk Radio
The Turks Divert the Public's Attention from the Economic Hardship - The Walter Bingham File

Israel News Talk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 43:13


This Programme: Gives a comprehensive explanation of the implications of global warming and what happened at COP26, the international conference on Climate Change. Who were the winners and who considered themselves to be the losers. Also, why did Israel send a 140 strong delegation? Nefesh B'Nefesh: The non profit organisation that assists prospective immigrants predominantly from English speaking countries and France to make Aliyah, to immigrate to Israel has grown into an important engine and constituent in the promotion of Aliyah. Our State President has opened their new state of the art campus in Jerusalem to facilitate the easy integration into Israeli society. Yad Ezer L'Chaver: Is another example of how ‘Chesed' , doing acts of kindness, is a pillar of life in Israel. Hear about their important work for those who lived through the horrors of the Nazis and their Beauty Pageant for Miss Holocaust Survivor to bring fun into their lives, that took place at the Friends of Zion Museum in Jerusalem, judged by famous personalities including Miss Israel 2021 Hear: About the meeting of all the Church leaders in Israel including both Chief Rabbis and their meeting with President Herzog discussing the dangers of Covid19, and to promote and encourage their communities to vaccinate. They considered it to be a holy duty for the health of the nation. The Ultra-Orthodox: Charedi Community in Israel is again being targeted by our anti-religious government. This time it's about the use of ‘kosher' telephones. Walter explains what's going on. The Turks: Are playing the hostage game. Anything to divert their public's attention from the economic hardship suffered by the indigenous population because of nearly four million Syrian refugees in the country. The Turkish populations is demonstrating in the streets. This programme discusses the implications that caused the arrest of two innocent Israeli civilians on vacation in Turkey' charged with espionage and their sudden release. Why: Did both our highest Officers of State personally phone to thank the Turks for the release, which is prove of their innocents. Should this have been used for diplomatic overtures? And: This programme asks how a career criminal slipped through the security net to be employed in the home of our Defence Minister. The Walter Bingham File 23NOV2021 - PODCAST

Moment of Clarity - Backstage of Redacted Tonight with Lee Camp
#678 [Redacted Tonight] - Massive Military Cover-Up, What They Don't Want You To Know About China & more

Moment of Clarity - Backstage of Redacted Tonight with Lee Camp

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 74:16


The U.S. Military were caught up in controversy this week when the New York Times reported that in 2019 the military covered up a bombing that killed 70 Syrian civilians. Reporting from Aaron Mate shows that the military went to extreme levels to cover up the mass murder. Li Jingjing is a reporter with the Chinese news group CGTN. The United States has entered a new era of provocation targeting China as its most significant global competitor for power.

ESV: M'Cheyne Reading Plan
November 20: 1 Chronicles 15; James 2; Amos 9; Luke 4

ESV: M'Cheyne Reading Plan

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 15:36


With family: 1 Chronicles 15; James 2 1 Chronicles 15 (Listen) The Ark Brought to Jerusalem 15 David1 built houses for himself in the city of David. And he prepared a place for the ark of God and pitched a tent for it. 2 Then David said that no one but the Levites may carry the ark of God, for the LORD had chosen them to carry the ark of the LORD and to minister to him forever. 3 And David assembled all Israel at Jerusalem to bring up the ark of the LORD to its place, which he had prepared for it. 4 And David gathered together the sons of Aaron and the Levites: 5 of the sons of Kohath, Uriel the chief, with 120 of his brothers; 6 of the sons of Merari, Asaiah the chief, with 220 of his brothers; 7 of the sons of Gershom, Joel the chief, with 130 of his brothers; 8 of the sons of Elizaphan, Shemaiah the chief, with 200 of his brothers; 9 of the sons of Hebron, Eliel the chief, with 80 of his brothers; 10 of the sons of Uzziel, Amminadab the chief, with 112 of his brothers. 11 Then David summoned the priests Zadok and Abiathar, and the Levites Uriel, Asaiah, Joel, Shemaiah, Eliel, and Amminadab, 12 and said to them, “You are the heads of the fathers' houses of the Levites. Consecrate yourselves, you and your brothers, so that you may bring up the ark of the LORD, the God of Israel, to the place that I have prepared for it. 13 Because you did not carry it the first time, the LORD our God broke out against us, because we did not seek him according to the rule.” 14 So the priests and the Levites consecrated themselves to bring up the ark of the LORD, the God of Israel. 15 And the Levites carried the ark of God on their shoulders with the poles, as Moses had commanded according to the word of the LORD. 16 David also commanded the chiefs of the Levites to appoint their brothers as the singers who should play loudly on musical instruments, on harps and lyres and cymbals, to raise sounds of joy. 17 So the Levites appointed Heman the son of Joel; and of his brothers Asaph the son of Berechiah; and of the sons of Merari, their brothers, Ethan the son of Kushaiah; 18 and with them their brothers of the second order, Zechariah, Jaaziel, Shemiramoth, Jehiel, Unni, Eliab, Benaiah, Maaseiah, Mattithiah, Eliphelehu, and Mikneiah, and the gatekeepers Obed-edom and Jeiel. 19 The singers, Heman, Asaph, and Ethan, were to sound bronze cymbals; 20 Zechariah, Aziel, Shemiramoth, Jehiel, Unni, Eliab, Maaseiah, and Benaiah were to play harps according to Alamoth; 21 but Mattithiah, Eliphelehu, Mikneiah, Obed-edom, Jeiel, and Azaziah were to lead with lyres according to the Sheminith. 22 Chenaniah, leader of the Levites in music, should direct the music, for he understood it. 23 Berechiah and Elkanah were to be gatekeepers for the ark. 24 Shebaniah, Joshaphat, Nethanel, Amasai, Zechariah, Benaiah, and Eliezer, the priests, should blow the trumpets before the ark of God. Obed-edom and Jehiah were to be gatekeepers for the ark. 25 So David and the elders of Israel and the commanders of thousands went to bring up the ark of the covenant of the LORD from the house of Obed-edom with rejoicing. 26 And because God helped the Levites who were carrying the ark of the covenant of the LORD, they sacrificed seven bulls and seven rams. 27 David was clothed with a robe of fine linen, as also were all the Levites who were carrying the ark, and the singers and Chenaniah the leader of the music of the singers. And David wore a linen ephod. 28 So all Israel brought up the ark of the covenant of the LORD with shouting, to the sound of the horn, trumpets, and cymbals, and made loud music on harps and lyres. 29 And as the ark of the covenant of the LORD came to the city of David, Michal the daughter of Saul looked out of the window and saw King David dancing and celebrating, and she despised him in her heart. Footnotes [1] 15:1 Hebrew He (ESV) James 2 (Listen) The Sin of Partiality 2 My brothers,1 show no partiality as you hold the faith in our Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord of glory. 2 For if a man wearing a gold ring and fine clothing comes into your assembly, and a poor man in shabby clothing also comes in, 3 and if you pay attention to the one who wears the fine clothing and say, “You sit here in a good place,” while you say to the poor man, “You stand over there,” or, “Sit down at my feet,” 4 have you not then made distinctions among yourselves and become judges with evil thoughts? 5 Listen, my beloved brothers, has not God chosen those who are poor in the world to be rich in faith and heirs of the kingdom, which he has promised to those who love him? 6 But you have dishonored the poor man. Are not the rich the ones who oppress you, and the ones who drag you into court? 7 Are they not the ones who blaspheme the honorable name by which you were called? 8 If you really fulfill the royal law according to the Scripture, “You shall love your neighbor as yourself,” you are doing well. 9 But if you show partiality, you are committing sin and are convicted by the law as transgressors. 10 For whoever keeps the whole law but fails in one point has become guilty of all of it. 11 For he who said, “Do not commit adultery,” also said, “Do not murder.” If you do not commit adultery but do murder, you have become a transgressor of the law. 12 So speak and so act as those who are to be judged under the law of liberty. 13 For judgment is without mercy to one who has shown no mercy. Mercy triumphs over judgment. Faith Without Works Is Dead 14 What good is it, my brothers, if someone says he has faith but does not have works? Can that faith save him? 15 If a brother or sister is poorly clothed and lacking in daily food, 16 and one of you says to them, “Go in peace, be warmed and filled,” without giving them the things needed for the body, what good2 is that? 17 So also faith by itself, if it does not have works, is dead. 18 But someone will say, “You have faith and I have works.” Show me your faith apart from your works, and I will show you my faith by my works. 19 You believe that God is one; you do well. Even the demons believe—and shudder! 20 Do you want to be shown, you foolish person, that faith apart from works is useless? 21 Was not Abraham our father justified by works when he offered up his son Isaac on the altar? 22 You see that faith was active along with his works, and faith was completed by his works; 23 and the Scripture was fulfilled that says, “Abraham believed God, and it was counted to him as righteousness”—and he was called a friend of God. 24 You see that a person is justified by works and not by faith alone. 25 And in the same way was not also Rahab the prostitute justified by works when she received the messengers and sent them out by another way? 26 For as the body apart from the spirit is dead, so also faith apart from works is dead. Footnotes [1] 2:1 Or brothers and sisters; also verses 5, 14 [2] 2:16 Or benefit (ESV) In private: Amos 9; Luke 4 Amos 9 (Listen) The Destruction of Israel 9 I saw the Lord standing beside1 the altar, and he said:   “Strike the capitals until the thresholds shake,    and shatter them on the heads of all the people;2  and those who are left of them I will kill with the sword;    not one of them shall flee away;    not one of them shall escape. 2   “If they dig into Sheol,    from there shall my hand take them;  if they climb up to heaven,    from there I will bring them down.3   If they hide themselves on the top of Carmel,    from there I will search them out and take them;  and if they hide from my sight at the bottom of the sea,    there I will command the serpent, and it shall bite them.4   And if they go into captivity before their enemies,    there I will command the sword, and it shall kill them;  and I will fix my eyes upon them    for evil and not for good.” 5   The Lord GOD of hosts,  he who touches the earth and it melts,    and all who dwell in it mourn,  and all of it rises like the Nile,    and sinks again, like the Nile of Egypt;6   who builds his upper chambers in the heavens    and founds his vault upon the earth;  who calls for the waters of the sea    and pours them out upon the surface of the earth—  the LORD is his name. 7   “Are you not like the Cushites to me,    O people of Israel?” declares the LORD.  “Did I not bring up Israel from the land of Egypt,    and the Philistines from Caphtor and the Syrians from Kir?8   Behold, the eyes of the Lord GOD are upon the sinful kingdom,    and I will destroy it from the surface of the ground,    except that I will not utterly destroy the house of Jacob,”      declares the LORD. 9   “For behold, I will command,    and shake the house of Israel among all the nations  as one shakes with a sieve,    but no pebble shall fall to the earth.10   All the sinners of my people shall die by the sword,    who say, ‘Disaster shall not overtake or meet us.' The Restoration of Israel 11   “In that day I will raise up    the booth of David that is fallen  and repair its breaches,    and raise up its ruins    and rebuild it as in the days of old,12   that they may possess the remnant of Edom    and all the nations who are called by my name,”3    declares the LORD who does this. 13   “Behold, the days are coming,” declares the LORD,    “when the plowman shall overtake the reaper    and the treader of grapes him who sows the seed;  the mountains shall drip sweet wine,    and all the hills shall flow with it.14   I will restore the fortunes of my people Israel,    and they shall rebuild the ruined cities and inhabit them;  they shall plant vineyards and drink their wine,    and they shall make gardens and eat their fruit.15   I will plant them on their land,    and they shall never again be uprooted    out of the land that I have given them,”      says the LORD your God. Footnotes [1] 9:1 Or on [2] 9:1 Hebrew all of them [3] 9:12 Hebrew; Septuagint (compare Acts 15:17) that the remnant of mankind and all the nations who are called by my name may seek the Lord (ESV) Luke 4 (Listen) The Temptation of Jesus 4 And Jesus, full of the Holy Spirit, returned from the Jordan and was led by the Spirit in the wilderness 2 for forty days, being tempted by the devil. And he ate nothing during those days. And when they were ended, he was hungry. 3 The devil said to him, “If you are the Son of God, command this stone to become bread.” 4 And Jesus answered him, “It is written, ‘Man shall not live by bread alone.'” 5 And the devil took him up and showed him all the kingdoms of the world in a moment of time, 6 and said to him, “To you I will give all this authority and their glory, for it has been delivered to me, and I give it to whom I will. 7 If you, then, will worship me, it will all be yours.” 8 And Jesus answered him, “It is written,   “‘You shall worship the Lord your God,    and him only shall you serve.'” 9 And he took him to Jerusalem and set him on the pinnacle of the temple and said to him, “If you are the Son of God, throw yourself down from here, 10 for it is written,   “‘He will command his angels concerning you,    to guard you,' 11 and   “‘On their hands they will bear you up,    lest you strike your foot against a stone.'” 12 And Jesus answered him, “It is said, ‘You shall not put the Lord your God to the test.'” 13 And when the devil had ended every temptation, he departed from him until an opportune time. Jesus Begins His Ministry 14 And Jesus returned in the power of the Spirit to Galilee, and a report about him went out through all the surrounding country. 15 And he taught in their synagogues, being glorified by all. Jesus Rejected at Nazareth 16 And he came to Nazareth, where he had been brought up. And as was his custom, he went to the synagogue on the Sabbath day, and he stood up to read. 17 And the scroll of the prophet Isaiah was given to him. He unrolled the scroll and found the place where it was written, 18   “The Spirit of the Lord is upon me,    because he has anointed me    to proclaim good news to the poor.  He has sent me to proclaim liberty to the captives    and recovering of sight to the blind,    to set at liberty those who are oppressed,19   to proclaim the year of the Lord's favor.” 20 And he rolled up the scroll and gave it back to the attendant and sat down. And the eyes of all in the synagogue were fixed on him. 21 And he began to say to them, “Today this Scripture has been fulfilled in your hearing.” 22 And all spoke well of him and marveled at the gracious words that were coming from his mouth. And they said, “Is not this Joseph's son?” 23 And he said to them, “Doubtless you will quote to me this proverb, ‘“Physician, heal yourself.” What we have heard you did at Capernaum, do here in your hometown as well.'” 24 And he said, “Truly, I say to you, no prophet is acceptable in his hometown. 25 But in truth, I tell you, there were many widows in Israel in the days of Elijah, when the heavens were shut up three years and six months, and a great famine came over all the land, 26 and Elijah was sent to none of them but only to Zarephath, in the land of Sidon, to a woman who was a widow. 27 And there were many lepers1 in Israel in the time of the prophet Elisha, and none of them was cleansed, but only Naaman the Syrian.” 28 When they heard these things, all in the synagogue were filled with wrath. 29 And they rose up and drove him out of the town and brought him to the brow of the hill on which their town was built, so that they could throw him down the cliff. 30 But passing through their midst, he went away. Jesus Heals a Man with an Unclean Demon 31 And he went down to Capernaum, a city of Galilee. And he was teaching them on the Sabbath, 32 and they were astonished at his teaching, for his word possessed authority. 33 And in the synagogue there was a man who had the spirit of an unclean demon, and he cried out with a loud voice, 34 “Ha!2 What have you to do with us, Jesus of Nazareth? Have you come to destroy us? I know who you are—the Holy One of God.” 35 But Jesus rebuked him, saying, “Be silent and come out of him!” And when the demon had thrown him down in their midst, he came out of him, having done him no harm. 36 And they were all amazed and said to one another, “What is this word? For with authority and power he commands the unclean spirits, and they come out!” 37 And reports about him went out into every place in the surrounding region. Jesus Heals Many 38 And he arose and left the synagogue and entered Simon's house. Now Simon's mother-in-law was ill with a high fever, and they appealed to him on her behalf. 39 And he stood over her and rebuked the fever, and it left her, and immediately she rose and began to serve them. 40 Now when the sun was setting, all those who had any who were sick with various diseases brought them to him, and he laid his hands on every one of them and healed them. 41 And demons also came out of many, crying, “You are the Son of God!” But he rebuked them and would not allow them to speak, because they knew that he was the Christ. Jesus Preaches in Synagogues 42 And when it was day, he departed and went into a desolate place. And the people sought him and came to him, and would have kept him from leaving them, 43 but he said to them, “I must preach the good news of the kingdom of God to the other towns as well; for I was sent for this purpose.” 44 And he was preaching in the synagogues of Judea.3 Footnotes [1] 4:27 Leprosy was a term for several skin diseases; see Leviticus 13 [2] 4:34 Or Leave us alone [3] 4:44 Some manuscripts Galilee (ESV)

Branch 251
The Business of War Crimes

Branch 251

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 26:58


War is expensive. On paper, the Assad regime should be broke. And yet, its pockets seem deep enough to carry on waging a bloody war on the Syrian people. In this episode, Noor and Fritz attempt to answer the question that's probably on your mind right now: how do they do it? For more information and regular updates on the trial, follow us on https://twitter.com/Branch_251 (Twitter). Thanks to Nick Donovan for sharing insights on his research with Global Witness. The project was a joint effort between Sara Farolfi, Isobel Koshiw, Nick Donovan, Mohamed Abo-Elgheit (Global Witness), Stelios Orphanides (OCCRP), and Nidal Shikhani and colleagues at the Chemical Violations Documentation Centre of Syria.  https://www.globalwitness.org/en/campaigns/corruption-and-money-laundering/khouri-networks-global-connections/ (https://www.globalwitness.org/en/campaigns/corruption-and-money-laundering/khouri-networks-global-connections/)  https://www.globalwitness.org/en/campaigns/corruption-and-money-laundering/assads-money-men-in-moscow/ (https://www.globalwitness.org/en/campaigns/corruption-and-money-laundering/assads-money-men-in-moscow/)  Joseph Daher on https://twitter.com/josephdaher19?lang=en (Twitter) https://sldp.ngo/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/SLDP-Effectiveness-of-Sanctions-EN.pdf (Report at SLDP that Eyad Hamid wrote.) Read more about https://www.justiceinitiative.org/newsroom/german-and-belgian-prosecutors-urged-to-investigate-chemical-shipments-to-syria (the case that Steve at Open Society Justice Initiative is working on.) https://www.ecchr.eu/en/case/trial-updates-first-trial-worldwide-on-torture-in-syria/ (ECCHR trial reports) https://syriaaccountability.org/topic/trial-monitoring/updates/ (Syria Justice and Accountability Centre's monitoring of the trial) Logo design byhttp://www.laurenshebly.nl/ ( laurenshebly.nl) -- Photo by James Lawler Duggan/AFP/Getty Images. Music via Blue Dot Sessions Support for our podcast comes from German Federal Foreign Office funds that are provided by the Institut für Auslandsbeziehungen IFA's zivik Funding Programme. Support this podcast

Discover CircRes
November 2021 Discover CircRes

Discover CircRes

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 27:17


This month on Episode 30 of Discover CircRes, host Cynthia St. Hilaire highlights four original research articles featured in the October 29 and November 12 issues of Circulation Research. This episode also features a conversation with Dr Elisa Klein from the University of Maryland about her study, Laminar Flow on Endothelial Cells Suppresses eNOS O-GlcNAcylation to Promote eNOS Activity.   Article highlights:   Subramani, et al. CMA of eNOS in Ischemia-Reperfusion Liu, et al. Macrophage MST1 Regulates Cardiac Repair Van Beusecum, et al. GAS6/Axl Signaling in Hypertension Pati, et al. Exosomes Promote Efferocytosis and Cardiac Repair   Cindy St. Hilaire:        Hi and welcome to Discover CircRes, the podcast of the American Heart Association's Journal Circulation Research. I'm your host, Dr Cindy St. Hilaire from the Vascular Medicine Institute at the University of Pittsburgh and today I'll be highlighting articles presented in our October 29th and November 12th issues of Circulation Research. I also will speak with Dr Elisa Klein from the University of Maryland about her study, Laminar Flow on Endothelial Cells Suppresses eNOS O-GlcNAcylation to Promote eNOS Activity.   Cindy St. Hilaire:        The first article I want to share is titled, Chaperone-Mediated Autophagy of eNOS in Myocardial Ischemia Reperfusion Injury. The first author is Jaganathan Subramani and the corresponding author is Kumuda Das from Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center. Reestablishing blood flow to ischemic heart muscle after myocardial infarction is critical for restoring muscle function but the return of flow itself can cause damage, a so-called reperfusion injury. The generation of reactive oxygen species or ROS and loss of nitric oxide or NO both contribute to reperfusion injury.                                       Reperfusion injury is exacerbated when the NO producing enzyme, endothelial nitric oxide synthase or eNOS, produces damaging super oxide anions instead of NO. This switch in eNOS function is caused by glutathionylation of the enzyme, termed SG-eNOS. But how long this modification lasts and how it is fixed is unclear. This group used an in vitro model of ischemia reperfusion where human endothelial cells are exposed to several hours of hypoxia followed by reoxygenation. In this model, they found the level of SG-eNOS steadily increases for 16 hours and then sharply decreases. By blocking several different cellular degradation pathways, they discovered that this decrease in S-G eNOS was due to chaperone mediated autophagy with the chaperone protein, HSC70, being responsible for SG-eNOS destruction. Importantly, this team went on to show that pharmacological D-glutathionylation of eNOS in mice promoted NO production and reduced reperfusion injury, suggesting this approach may be of clinical benefit after myocardial infarction.   Cindy St. Hilaire:        The second article I want to share is titled Macrophage MST1/2 Disruption Impairs Post-Infarction Cardiac Repair via LTB4. The first author is Mingming Liu and the corresponding author is Ding Ai and they're from Tianjin Medical University. Myocardial infarction injures the heart muscle. These cells are unable to regenerate and instead a non-contractile scar forms and that fibrotic scar can lead to heart failure.                                     Cardiomyocytes specific inhibition of the kinase MST1 can prevent infarction induced death of the cells and preserve the heart function, suggesting that it may have clinical utility. However, MST1 also has anti-inflammatory properties in macrophages. So inhibition of MST1 in macrophages may delay inflammation resolution after MI and impair proper healing. Thus, targeting this enzyme for therapy is not a straightforward process. This study examined mice lacking MST1 in macrophages and found that after myocardial infarction, the inflammatory mediator leukotriene B4 was upregulated in macrophages and the animal's heart function was reduced compared to that of wild type controls. Blocking the action of leukotriene B4 in mice reduced infarction injuries in the hearts of MST1-lacking animals and enhanced repair in the injured hearts of wild type animals given an MST1 inhibitor. The results suggest that if MST1 inhibition is used as a future post infarction regenerative therapy, then leukotriene B4 blockade may prevent its inflammatory side effects.   Cindy St. Hilaire:        The next article I want to share is titled Growth Arrest Specific-6 and Axl Coordinate Inflammation and Hypertension. The first author is Justin Beusecum and the corresponding author is David Harrison and they're from Vanderbilt University. Inflammation contributes to hypertension pathology but the links of this relationship are unclear. It's thought one trigger of inflammation may be the hypertension-induced mechanical stretch of vascular endothelial cells. Mechanical stretch causes endothelial cells to release factors that convert circulating monocytes into inflammatory cells. And one such factor is the recently identified Axl and Siglec-6 positive dendritic cells, also called AS DCs.                                       AS DCs produce a large amount of inflammatory cytokines but little is known about the role of AS DCs or their cytokines in hypertension. This group found elevated levels of AS DCs in hypertensive people compared to normal tensive individuals. Mechanical stretch of human endothelial cells promoted the release of GAS6, which is an activator of the AS DC cell surface kinase, Axl. This stretch induced GAS6 release also promoted conversion of co-cultured monocytes to AS DCs. Inhibition of GAS6 or Axl in the co-cultured system prevented conversion of monocytes to AS DCs. This team went on to show that hypertensive humans and mice have elevated levels of plasma GAS6 and that blocking Axl activity in mice attenuated experimentally induced hypertension and the associated inflammation. This work highlights a new signaling pathway, driving hypertension associated inflammation and identifies possible targets to treat it.   Cindy St. Hilaire:        The last article I want to share is titled Novel Mechanisms of Exosome- Mediated Phagocytosis of Dead Cells in Injured Heart. The first author is Mallikarjun Patil and Sherin Saheera and the corresponding author is Prasanna Krishnamurthy from the University of Alabama, Birmingham. After myocardial infarction inflammation must quickly be attenuated to avoid excessive scarring and loss of muscle function. Macrophage mediated efferocytosis of dead cells is a critical part of this so-called inflammation resolution process. And resolution depends in part on the protein. MFGE8. MFGE8 helps macrophages engage with eat me signals on the dead cells and loss of macrophage MFGE8 delays inflammation resolution in mice. Because stem cell-derived exosomes promote cardiac repair after infarction and are anti-inflammatory and express MFGE8, this group hypothesized that perhaps part of a stem-cell derived exosomes proresolven activity may be due to boosting macrophage efferocytosis.                                     They showed that stem cell derived exosomes did indeed boost efferocytosis of apoptotic cardiomyocytes in vitro and in vivo. An in vitro experiments showed that if exosomes lacked MFGE8 then efferocytosis by macrophages was reduced. Furthermore, after myocardial infarction in mice, treatment with MFGE8 deficient exosomes did not reduce infarct size and did not improve heart function compared to control exosomes. These results suggest MFGE8 is important for the cardioprotective effects of stem cell-derived exosomes. And that this protein may be of interest for boosting efferocytosis after myocardial infarction and in other pathologies where inflammation is not readily resolved.   Cindy St. Hilaire         So today, Dr Elisa Klein from the Department of Biomedical Engineering at the University of Maryland is with me to discuss her study Laminar Flow on Endothelial Cells Suppresses eNOS O-GlcNAcylation to Promote eNOS Activity and this article is in our November 12th issue of Circulation Research. So Dr Klein, thank you so much for joining me today.   Elisa Klein:                 Thank you for having me.   Cindy St. Hilaire:        Yeah. So broadly your study is investigating how blood flow patterns specifically, kind of, laminar and oscillatory flow, how those blood flow patterns impact protein modifications and activity. So before we, kind of, get to the details of the paper, I was wondering if you could just introduce for us the concept of blood flow patterns, how they change in the body naturally but then how they might influence or contribute to disease pathogenesis in the vessels?   Elisa Klein:                 Sure. So obviously we have blood flow through all of our vessels and since we are complex human beings, we have complex vascular beds that turn and that split or bifurcate. And so every place we get one of these bifurcations or a turn in a vessel, the blood flow can't quite make that turn or split perfectly. So you get a little area where the flow is a oscillatory or what we call disturbed. There's lots of different kinds of disturbed flow. And the reason why that's important is because you tend to develop atherosclerotic plaques at locations where the blood flow is disturbed. So in my lab, we look a lot at what it is about that disturbed flow that makes the endothelial cells there dysfunctional and that leads to the atherosclerotic plaque development.   Cindy St. Hilaire:        That is so interesting. So I can picture how this is happening in a mouse at the bifurcation of different arteries but how are you able to model this in vitro? Can you describe the setup and then also how that setup can mirror the physiological parameters?   Elisa Klein:                 Sure. So we have a couple of different systems we can use to model this and they all have their advantages and disadvantages, right? So a few years ago we made a system that's a parallel plate flow chamber. So you basically have your cells that you see that on a microscope slide and you use a gasket that's a given shape and that either drives the flow… Usually it drives the flow straight across the cells. So that's a nice laminar steady flow. And we see that the cells align and they produce nitric oxide in that type of flow which are measures that they are responding to the flow in vitro. So, a few years ago we made a device that actually makes the flow zigzag as it goes across the endothelial cells. And that creates these little pockets of disturbed flow and we did that in our parallel plate flow chamber.                                       And that parallel plate flow chamber is really good for visualizing the cells. So you can stick it on a microscope. You can see what's happening, we can label for specific markers but it's not good for doing the things that we did in this Circ Research paper, where we want it to measure metabolism, because you need a lot more cells to measure metabolism and we needed a better media to cell ratio, so less media and more cells. So for this one, we designed and built a cone-and-plate device. So what it is, it's a cone and you spin that cone on top of a dish of endothelial cells and that cone produces flow. So it's going around in a circle. And if we just make it go around in a circle, it'll produce a steady laminar flow but if we oscillated it, so basically we kind of turn it back and forth, it'll make this oscillating disturbed flow. And then we have our dish of cells.                                     We do this in a 60-millimeter dish and then we have a small amount of media in there and a lot of cells. And we can culture the cells in there for a while.                                     Cindy St. Hilaire:        That is so neat. And so I'm assuming that then your cone system is very tuneable. You could either speed it up, slow it down or change that oscillatory rate with different, I guess, shifts of it? Elisa Klein:                 Yeah, that's exactly right. So we can do all those things. It's programmable with a motor and so we can run whatever type of flow we want. Cindy St. Hilaire:        That's great. So before your study, what was known regarding this link between hemodynamics and endothelial cell dysfunction and also endothelial cell metabolism? Because I feel like that's a really interesting space that a lot of people look at, kind of, metabolism and EC dysfunction or they just look at shear stress and EC dysfunction and you're, kind of, combining the three. So what was kind of the knowledge gap that you were hoping to investigate? Elisa Klein:                 Yeah, so we're really interested in macrovascular endothelial cell dysfunction. So this pro atherosclerotic phenotype that you can get in endothelial cells. And most of the work on endothelial cell metabolism had actually been done in the context of angiogenesis. So how much energy and how do cells get their energy to make new blood vessels? And that's more of a microvascular thing. So there was a study that came out before ours, actually, before we started this study, that was looking at how steady laminar flow could decrease endothelial cell glycolysis. And so that was after 72 hours of flow and they showed some gene expression changes at that time. Our study is shorter than that and we were still able to see a decrease in glycolysis in our cells in laminar flow. Before we started this study, no one had really looked at disturbed flow. So in the meantime, there are a few other papers that came out showing that the cells don't decrease glycolysis when they're in disturbed flow but not so much connecting them back to this function of making nitric oxide. Cindy St. Hilaire:        So we were kind of dancing to the topic of O linked N acetylglucosamine or how do you say it? Elisa Klein:                 GlcNAC. Cindy St. Hilaire:        GlcNAC? O- GlcNAC. So, O- GlcNAC is a sugar drive modification and I think it's added to Syrian and three Indian residues and proteins. Elisa Klein:                 Yup, that's right. Cindy St. Hilaire:        Okay, good. And that modification, it does help dictate a protein's function. And you were investigating the role of this moiety on endothelial nitric oxide synthase or eNOS and so what exactly does this GlcNAC do for eNOS' function and under what conditions or disease states is this modification operative? Elisa Klein:                 Yeah. So there's some really important studies from a little bit ago that showed that eNOS gets GlcNAcylated in animals with diabetes, right? So if you have constantly high sugar levels, you get this modification of eNOS. The thought was that eNOS gets GlcNAcylated at the same site where it gets phosphorylated. But a more recent study came out and said, well, maybe that's not the case but it definitely gets GlcNAcylated somewhere where it affects this phosphorylation site. So it may be near it and prevent the folding or prevent the phosphorylation site availability. So if the eNOS gets GlcNAcylated, the thought is that it can't get phosphorylated and therefore it can't make nitric oxide. Cindy St. Hilaire:        And so an interesting thing about this GlcNAcylation, which is probably the hardest thing I've ever said on this podcast, is that it's integrated with lots of different things. Obviously you need glycolysis and the substrates from the breakdown of sugars to make that substrate but also the enzymes that make that substrate are required. And so what's known about that balance in endothelial cells? Is there much known regarding the metabolic rate of the cells and this N-Glcynation? Elisa Klein:                 Yeah. So endothelial cells are thought to be highly glycolytic in terms of how they use glucose but they definitely take up glutamine to fuel the tricarboxylic acid or TCA cycle. And another paper came out a few years ago showing that quiescent and endothelial cells metabolize a lot of fatty acids. So they're fueling their energy needs that way. So there wasn't a lot known about GlcNAcylation in endothelial cells.                                     A lot of this work has been done in cancer cells, which are also highly glycolytic but their metabolism actually seems like it's maybe more diverse than people have thought for a long time. So the weird thing about GlcNAcylation, which if you're used to working with phosphorylation there's a thousand different enzymes that can phosphorolate right. But with GlcNAcylation there's one enzyme that's known to put the GlcNAC on and one enzyme that's known to take it off. And so they're global, right? So in our studies, if we say, okay, we're going to knock down that enzyme, you're effecting every single protein in the cell that's GlcNAcylated. And obviously ourselves in particular, we're not a big fan of that. Especially once you put them in flow, they were, like, nope, we're not going to make it. Cindy St. Hilaire:        Well, and that's a perfect segue to my next question because your results show that this flow really did not alter the expression of these enzymes that either add or subtract to the moiety. And rather it was the Hexosamine Biosynthetic Pathway that was decreased itself. So can you maybe give us a quick primer on what that is exactly and how that pathway feeds into the glycosylation... I think you wrote in the paper of over 4,000 proteins? So how would that fit in and why eNOS then? Elisa Klein:                 Yeah, so the Hexosamine Biosynthetic Pathway is one of these branch pathways that comes off glycolysis and there are these numbers sometimes there are these pathways out there and people say for the HBP in particular, 2% to 5% of the glucose that's going down through glycolysis gets shunted off into the HBP. We've done a lot of looking to try and figure out exactly where that 2% to 5%- Cindy St. Hilaire:        Yeah, what exact percentage? Elisa Klein:                 Yeah, but some percentage of it comes down and we really thought there were going to be changes in these enzymes that do the GlcNacylation, we thought there might be changes in the localization of the proteins and it's possible that those things do occur. We just couldn't detect them in our cells. And in the end, what we showed was the main thing was that when you have cells and steady laminar flow, you just decreased glycolysis. And therefore, that 2% to 5% goes down. So you seem to make less of this UDP- GlcNAC, which is the substrate that gets put on to eNOS in this case. The really strange thing that we could not explain despite a lot of work and obviously we don't get to put all of our experiments that didn't work in the paper- Cindy St. Hilaire:        The blood, sweat and tears gets left out. So- Elisa Klein:                 Exactly. So we tried really hard to figure out why it was eNOS specifically, right? Because in steady laminar flow, you see a lot of these like GlcNAcylated  proteins and a lot of them didn't change but eNOS changed hugely, essentially this GlcNAcylation just went away for the cells and steady laminar flow. So we couldn't quite answer that. We're still working on that part of the question and looking at some of the other proteins that maybe get GlcNAcylated more in this case and trying to figure out what they are. Cindy St. Hilaire:        I thought one of the cool results in your paper was one of the last ones. It was the one in healthy mice. In that you looked at healthy mice, just normal C57 black 6 mice that were 10 weeks old. So they just, kind of, reached maturity but you looked at their kind of these bifurcations and you looked at the inner aortic arch where there is more disturbed flow and you saw, similar to your in vitro studies, that there was this higher level of O-GlcNAcylation compared to the outer arch in the descending order. So my question is, these are healthy mice that are relatively young, they're not even full adults yet. That takes a couple more months. And so what are your thoughts about the role of this O-GlcNAcylation specifically on eNOS in driving atherogenesis. Where do you think this is happening in the disease process? It appears if it's in these wild type mice, it's already happening early. So where do you think this is most operative in the disease pathogenesis? Elisa Klein:                 I mean, I think it's very early, the effects of disturbed flow on endothelial cells. I can't imagine that there's a time when it's not having an effect on the cells. So I teach college students and I tell them all the time you think you're invincible now but these choices you're making today are going to affect your cardiovascular future in 50 years, which is very hard to accept. So I think it's very early in the process and I think it's only made worse by the things that we eat, in particular, that changed our blood sugar and our blood fatty acids and things like that. And our lab is looking into this more to try and see how when you change your blood metabolites then how does that then also affect this GlcNAcylation and the endothelial cell metabolism and then how does that affect endothelial cell function? Cindy St. Hilaire:        Yeah. And it's funny, it's really making me think of those, kinds of, extreme diets like keto diets and things like that where you're just like depleting sugar. And obviously there's lots of controversy in that field, but if you just think about the sugar aspect what is that doing to those EC cells? Why do you think endothelial cells have this response? Meaning why do you think it is that they've adapted to induce a metabolic shift in response to disturbed flow? Because, obviously it's not going to be perfect laminar flow everywhere. So what do you think it is that provides some sort of advantage in the shift? Elisa Klein:                 That's a really good question. I haven't thought about the advantage that it might provide. There are a lot of things that are going on in this area of disturbed flow. So there is the shear stress, the differential shear stress that the cells are experiencing. There's also transport issues, right? So if you have this area of disturbed flow, you have blood and the contents of the blood, including the white blood cells and the red blood cells, everything else that's, kind of, sitting around in that area and not getting washed downstream as quickly. So it is possible that maintaining glycolysis provides energy for repair or for protecting the endothelial cell from some sort of inflammatory insult or something like that, that's happening in the area of disturbed flow. And I feel like I just read something recently, it was in a different genre but... if they stopped the increased glycolysis or stop the metabolic shifts, it actually was worse.                                     Right? So I also believe that we treat humans for a single metabolic change, right? So if you have diabetes, I'm going to give you this drug and if you have high triglycerides, I'm going to give you this drug. But it's possible that if you have this metabolic abnormality, your body shifts the rest of your metabolism to protect the cells because of that metabolic abnormality. And so part of what we do as engineers is try and build computational models or we can take into account some of this complexity. So that's a really interesting question and my guess is that there are some protective aspects of this maintenance of high glycolysis and disturbed flow. Cindy St. Hilaire:        Yeah, maybe it would be perfectly fine until we get athero and then it all goes awry. So in terms of... obviously it's early days and I know you're a bioengineer but in terms of translational potential, what do you think your findings suggest about future potential therapies or future targets for which we can use to develop therapies? Is modulating this O-GlcNAcylation itself, a viable option? Elisa Klein:                 I don't think that modulating it is a super viable option, right? Because as I said, when we tried to change those enzymes ourselves did not enjoy going through flow or anything else. So it's very hard to change it overall. What I think is these things that are coming out about how metabolism may shift for endothelial cells when they're activated versus when they're quiescent, right? So when laminar flow or cells are quiescent, they decrease glycolysis, they increase fatty acid oxidation. Those things are important to take into consideration when you are treating a person who has a metabolic disorder. So that's the biggest translational piece that I think is, how do we give therapies that modify the metabolism of a cell holistically instead of trying to hit one pathway in particular.                                     We have done some studies where we tried to give endothelial cells something to inhibit a specific metabolic pathway and you see the cell shifts its entire metabolism to account for that. So we're starting to look at some of these other drugs like statins or metformin that do change endothelial cell metabolism, possibly even the SGLT2 inhibitors and trying to see not just how they change glycolysis but how they change metabolism as a whole and how that then affects endothelial cell function. Cindy St. Hilaire:        So what are you going to do next on this project? Elisa Klein:                 So on this project, so we have some stuff in the works like I said on statins and how statins work together. And one of our big goals is to sort of build a comprehensive metabolic model of the endothelial cell. So this study really focused on glucose but there are other things that endothelial cells metabolize, glutamine, and fatty acids, and trying to look at some of those and then seeing how changes in the glycolytic pathway may affect some of those other pathways. We also have some really nice mass spec data part of which is in this paper but part of which is going to go into our next work, which is looking at how laminar flow impacts some of the other side branch pathways that are in metabolism and coming off of glycolysis as well as the TCA cycle, right? So we don't think of endothelial cells as being big mitochondrial energy producers but they do use their mitochondria. And so we think it's really interesting and part of our goal of building an endothelial cell model and then hopefully a model of the complexity of the whole vascular wall. Cindy St. Hilaire:        Wow. That would be amazing. Well, Dr Elisa Klein from the University of Maryland, thank you so much for joining me today. This is an amazing study and I'm looking forward to seeing hopefully more of your future work. Elisa Klein:                 Thank you so much. It was a pleasure. Cindy St. Hilaire:        That's it for the highlights the from October 29th and November 12th issues of Circulation Research. Thank you for listening. Please check out the CircRes Facebook page and follow us on Twitter and Instagram with the handle @CircRes or #DiscoverCircRes. Thank you to our guest, Dr Elisa Klein. This podcast is produced by Asahara Ratnayaka, edited by Melissa Stoner and supported by the editorial team of Circulation Research. Some of the copy texts for highlighted articles is provided by Ruth Williams. I'm your host, Dr Cindy St. Hilaire, and this is Discover CircRes, your on-the-go source for the most exciting discoveries and basic cardiovascular research. This program is copyright of the American Heart Association, 2021. The opinions expressed by speakers on this podcast are their own and not necessarily those of the editors or of the American Heart Association. For more information, visit AHAjournals.org.

Kan English
News Flash November 17, 2021

Kan English

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 6:13


Syrian state media says Israel fired two missiles at empty building overnight. President Herzog speaks with China's president in first-ever call between the heads of state of the two countries. Shipment of pediatric coronavirus vaccines delayed. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Make Life Matter with Angela Donadio
Fractured Faith with Lina Abujamra (Ep. 133)

Make Life Matter with Angela Donadio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 39:37


What do you do when Christianity hasn't lived up to your expectations? Pediatric ER Doctor Lina Abujamra felt this same disappointment and shares her powerful story in her most recent book, Fractured Faith: Finding Your Way Back to God in an Age of Deconstruction. As a popular Bible teacher, podcaster, and Founder of Living With Power Ministries, she connects biblical answers to everyday life. Born in Beirut, Lebanon, she ministers to singles through her Moody Radio show, Today's Single Christian, and is engaged in providing medical care and humanitarian help to Syrian refugees and others in disaster areas in the Middle East.

Better Than Human
Hamsters: Pets, Wild Animals, Lab Animals and Cannibals

Better Than Human

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 58:36


Hamsters are rodents commonly kept as pets. Do you know what Hamster means? Hoard. Do you know what a group of Hamsters is called? Horde. You know what that means? Bring out the horde of hoarders! If you've ever had a pet hamster, then you probably know, they're solitary animals that dislike changes in temperature, and may resort to cannibalism if stressed. Amber isn't a fan of hamsters as pets, but we can agree that they are an interesting species in the wild, as a pet, and in laboratories. In The Good, The Bad, The NewsApparently, men with pet hamsters are more likely to cheat, according to this one random study on this website that we've never heard of before ...A 15 Million-Acre ocean superhighway was just created to preserve marine life, which is great news. And, a hamster's home is sacrosanct, even in a graveyard. Austrian developers fail to challenge protection over species.There are over 20 species of hamsters, all of which are related to mice. Five hamster species are common as pets, and wild hamsters are found throughout much of Europe and Asia. Female hamsters are very sensitive to disturbances while giving birth and after giving birth, which may lead to them eating their own babies, to the horror of many grade school children. But, if you keep them alone, in a large enough cage, with enough fresh bedding, in a non-drafty area, they can make great pets.Listen now to learn about the farmland pest who has become a common household pet.Follow us on Twitter @betterthanhuma1on Facebook @betterthanhumanpodcaston Instagram @betterthanhumanpodcasthttps://www.tiktok.com/@betterthanhumanpodcastor Email us at betterthanhumanpodcast@gmail.comWe look forward to hearing from you, and we look forward to you joining our cult of weirdness!#betterthanhuman #cultofweirdnes

KQED’s Forum
'Simple As Water' Brings Intimate Portrait of Syrian Refugee Experience to the Screen

KQED’s Forum

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 21:01


Megan Mylan's new documentary "Simple As Water" begins dreamily, as four small children laugh, jump rope and chase balloons while their mother looks on. Then tents and clotheslines come into view, and we understand that the family lives in a makeshift encampment in Greece, home to thousands of migrants fleeing the Syrian civil war. Mylan follows groups of Syrian refugees as they try to carve out lives in different parts of the world, creating a film she calls a "love story celebrating the elemental bonds between parent and child." We'll talk to the Academy Award-winning director about the film and the families she features.

Victory Life KY
Exposing The Difference

Victory Life KY

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 52:19


 Hebrews 4:12,AMP- For the word of God is living and active and full of power, making it operative, energizing, and effective.It is sharper than any two-edged sword, penetrating as far as the division of the soul and spirit, the completeness of a person, and of both joints and marrow ,the deepest parts of our nature, exposing and judging the very thoughts and intentions of the heart. A very important lesson every believer has to come to terms with is the reality that God's word is living, spiritual reality. Jesus told us His words are Spirit and life. Here's the deal, there are 2 Greek words translated word in the NT Logos- the written word of God. Our bible.Rhema- the revealed, spoken word of God. Individual revelation. It's when the written becomes the revealed that it produces change in humanity. This is when Hebrew 4 becomes effective, showing the difference between soul and spirit. As well as exposing the thoughts and intents of the heart. Something to keep in mind, spiritual truth and natural truth don't always agree. And this is where faith comes in. Accepting, believing, and acting are the fruits of faith. Romans 10:17,NKJV- So then faith comes by hearing, and hearing by the word of God.CEV- No one can have faith without hearing the message about Christ. We have to understand, the written becoming the revealed only happens through faith. And I cannot over emphasize the importance of speaking the rhema of God into our situation, into our physical world. Now when it comes to confession, it's not simply about saying something we've heard or memorized. It has to be a revelation to us. This is why Jesus made statements like, “according to your faith…”The spoken word is how spiritual realities are transferred into our physical reality. Unfortunately, the majority doesn't really believe this truth. Primarily because we've tried it and didn't see immediate results. 2 Corinthians 4:13,NKJV- And since we have the same spirit of faith, according to what is written, “I believed and therefore I spoke,” we also believe and therefore speak. Understand, Paul is writing this right in the middle of some of his most challenging situations. He's actually quoting the Psalmist who went through difficulties praising and walking out God's victory. Something else to keep in mind about this passage, this “same spirit of faith” according to Romans is the same Spirit that brought Jesus back from the dead. Remember, according to our key text, God's word is the only source exposing the difference between these two worlds we are currently living in. This is why the Holy Spirit, just a few verses later in the same chapter in 2 Corinthians makes this radical statement. 2 Corinthians 4:18,NKJV- While we do not look at the things which are seen, but at the things which are not seen. For the things which are seen are temporary, but the things which are not seen are eternal. Think about it, because we have the same spirit of faith, we choose to not look at things that are seen, and according to what is written, we believe and we speak. Is it possible that when believers exercise the rhema word of God, we're actually bringing the unseen into the seen? One of my favorite examples of this is in 2 Kings 6, Elisha and his assistant. Elisha told him, there are more with us than with them.Then he asked the Lord to open his eyes. Today, what you and I have to acknowledge, actually accept, is the reality that God's word is the doorway into Paul's unseen, the world of the spirit, the eternal. Seriously, what do you think the Holy Spirit meant when He told us to walk in the Spirit, not in the flesh? I think He's actually waiting on His people, heirs to start exercising our spiritual senses. Remember, Elisha asked God to open the eyes of his assistant. What… Think about this, how many times did Jesus say things like, “ he who has ears to hear, let him hear.” The harsh reality is, until the born again make room for transformation in our soul, we have no option but our natural senses. SPIRIT- Kingdom of God, made like Him, dominion, authority, faithSOUL- Free willBODY- intelligence, carnality, emotions, senses, unbelief And this is why faith is the absolute in the unseen world of God's Kingdom. Why would Jesus tell us things like, “all things are possible to him who believes.” Think about our story in 2 Kings, Elisha took the entire Syrian army captive by exercising the spiritual world. Hebrews 11:3,NKJV- By faith we understand that the worlds were framed by the word of God, so that the things which are seen were not made of things which are visible. You getting this, things seen didn't come from this visible world. Here's the deal, at some point we've got to stop assuming things of that world will just manifest in this one simply because we've processed it intellectually, or even memorized a scripture. We have to have revelation from Him. We've got to see it. Why? Because just like in this natural world we have to develop our sense, our abilities. It's exactly the same in the spirit world. Hebrews 4:12,AMP- For the word of God is living and active and full of power, making it operative, energizing, and effective.It is sharper than any two-edged sword, penetrating as far as the division of the soul and spirit, the completeness of a person, and of both joints and marrow ,the deepest parts of our nature, exposing and judging the very thoughts and intentions of the heart. Truth is, most of the time it's not asking God to do something, it's us transforming to the place where we begin accesses His world. Jeremiah 29:13,NKJV- You will seek Me and find Me, when you search for Me with all your heart. With all your heart is 100% spiritual. Other dimensional.Think about it, God's not hiding from us. 1 Corinthians 15:44-45,NIV- If there is a natural body, there is also a spiritual body.So it is written: “The first man Adam became a living being”; the last Adam, a life-giving spirit. Colossians 1:15-16,NLT- Christ is the visible image of the invisible God. He existed before anything was created and is supreme over all creation, for through him God created everything in the heavenly realms and on earth. He made the things we can see and the things we can't see— such as thrones, kingdoms, rulers, and authorities in the unseen world. Everything was created through him and for him. I think we should be able to have conversations about the unseen world of God, the Kingdom of Heaven without making it weird. Jesus constantly talked about it. At the same time, we've got to understand that as one of His born again, He sees, expects, and addresses each us us as heirs, in our new life, not our humanity. We have to understand, God will not violate the freedom He gave us. But without revelation from the Holy Spirit, embracing a completely new way of living will remain a mystery. Notice the first thing Jesus tells them is repent. In other words, change what you're thinking and doing. Romans 12:2,NKJV- Do not be conformed to this world, but be transformed by the renewing of your mind, that you may prove what is that good and acceptable and perfect will of God. Hebrews 4, The word of God is living, active and full of power, exposing the difference of the soul and spirit, exposing and judging the very thoughts and intentions of the heart. This is why Jesus said, My words are spirit and life.

The Libertarian Institute - All Podcasts
COI #188: Guilty of Murder? Rittenhouse, Soldiers & Police

The Libertarian Institute - All Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 70:21


On COI #188, Patrick MacFarlane joins Kyle Anzalone to break down the Kyle Rittenhouse trial. The trail has largely divided the country on political lines and could have important implications for self-defense law. The trial has produced many sensational moments that have been captured and spun by both sides. Kyle and Pat look past the headlines to what actually happened in Kenosha and how the law applies.  In Philadelphia, a district attorney has charged two teens with a murder committed by a police officer. A shooting broke out between the two boys at a highschool football game. The officers responded by firing into a crowd, killing an eight year-old girl. Pat and Kyle discuss who should be held accountable.  A recent report from the New York Times exposes how the Pentagon killed over 60 Syrian civilians and covered up their deaths. CENTCOM reports it counted the women and children as possible militants and not civilians. Officers who witnessed the killing reported it as possible war crimes. The Pentagon covered up the killing and continues to claim the bombing was legitimate. Kyle and Pat argue members of the military should be held accountable.  Odysee Rumble  Donate LBRY Credits bTTEiLoteVdMbLS7YqDVSZyjEY1eMgW7CP Donate Bitcoin 36PP4kT28jjUZcL44dXDonFwrVVDHntsrk Donate Bitcoin Cash Qp6gznu4xm97cj7j9vqepqxcfuctq2exvvqu7aamz6 Patreon Subscribe Star YouTube Facebook  Twitter  MeWe Apple Podcast  Amazon Music Google Podcasts Spotify iHeart Radio Support Our Sponsor Visit Paloma Verde and use code PEACE for 25% off our CBD  

Conflicts of Interest
Guilty of Murder? Rittenhouse, Soldiers & Police

Conflicts of Interest

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 70:22


On COI #188, Patrick MacFarlane joins Kyle Anzalone to break down the Kyle Rittenhouse trial. The trail has largely divided the country on political lines and could have important implications for self-defense law. The trial has produced many sensational moments that have been captured and spun by both sides. Kyle and Pat look past the headlines to what actually happened in Kenosha and how the law applies.  In Philadelphia, a district attorney has charged two teens with a murder committed by a police officer. A shooting broke out between the two boys at a highschool football game. The officers responded by firing into a crowd, killing an eight year-old girl. Pat and Kyle discuss who should be held accountable.  A recent report from the New York Times exposes how the Pentagon killed over 60 Syrian civilians and covered up their deaths. CENTCOM reports it counted the women and children as possible militants and not civilians. Officers who witnessed the killing reported it as possible war crimes. The Pentagon covered up the killing and continues to claim the bombing was legitimate. Kyle and Pat argue members of the military should be held accountable.  Odysee Rumble  Donate LBRY Credits bTTEiLoteVdMbLS7YqDVSZyjEY1eMgW7CP Donate Bitcoin 36PP4kT28jjUZcL44dXDonFwrVVDHntsrk Donate Bitcoin Cash Qp6gznu4xm97cj7j9vqepqxcfuctq2exvvqu7aamz6 Patreon Subscribe Star YouTube Facebook  Twitter  MeWe Apple Podcast  Amazon Music Google Podcasts Spotify iHeart Radio Support Our Sponsor Visit Paloma Verde and use code PEACE for 25% off our CBD  

From Porches To Porsches Podcast
SoSick Corner: Keepin' it real with the Syrian Missile himself, Reggie!

From Porches To Porsches Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 138:10


SoSick Corner ~ Jigz, Gio and Mishka... plus a guest! (usually) Special Guest: @soul_of_the_rs Join our Discord: https://discord.gg/fptp Twitter / IG / FB: @FPTPmedia Hosted by: @SoSickMotorsports - @NoeOneTheCreator - @MISHKAcreates

Victory Fellowship Church Podcast
Open Handed part 2: Money Problems

Victory Fellowship Church Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 39:56


Do you have “money problems”? The world says you have “money problems” when you don't have money. The Bible says you have “money problems” when money has you. In this message, Pastor Jamie Nunnally shares warnings and remedies in our struggle with money.  Being open handed is adopting a lifestyle of holding loosely to your resources so you can live a generous life.  The Bible says you have “money problems”James 1:9-10 “Believers who are poor have something to boast about, for God has honored them. And those who are rich should boast that God has humbled them." What kind of money problems does the Bible warn about?1. You will be tempted to trust in money.1 Tim 6:17 You're rich, even if you don't feel like it.·If you make more than $50K a year, you're in the top 1% of global annual incomes. · $19K a year is in the top 10%, $10K a year is in the top 20%.·You don't have to work every day in order to eat every day. ·You upgrade (replace working things) The reason why we are warned about trusting in riches is because they are untrustworthy & unstable.  God wants us to enjoy life, but success is not excess! 2. God looks at how you handle money to determine if He can trust you with spiritual things. Luke 16:10-12 You will be good at what you practice, so practice being rich now.  3. There is a spiritual war happening. 1 Tim 6:9-10 How do I know if I love money? If I am willing to depart from my convictions to get it.  Luke 16:13 Mammon is the Syrian god of wealth. He is a "master"—that means he's looking for servants. How do we overcome our money problems?1. Replace covetousness with contentment. Covetousness is wanting what someone else has. Contentment is being satisfied with what you already have.The covetous mindset: “must be nice!”1 Timothy 6:6-8 Hebrews 13:5  2. Be rich in good works. 1 Timothy 6:18-19 Instead of accumulating more stuff, accumulate good works. How? If you gather here, you store up here; if you give it here, you store up there.  3. Practice intentional giving.1 Cor. 16:2 Give to what feeds you and give to what moves you. (Pay for your meals, and support what matters.) Are you open handed?

Scientific Sense ®
Prof. Wendy Pearlman of Northwestern University on Syrian uprising and politics

Scientific Sense ®

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 58:08


Narratives of Fear in Syria, Moral Identity and Protest Cascades in Syria, Mobilizing From Scratch: Large-Scale Collective Action Without Preexisting Organization in the Syrian Uprising, Syrian Views on Obama's Red Line: The Ethical Case for Strikes against Assad, and Religion and Mobilization in the Syrian Uprising and War. Scientific Sense ® by Gill Eapen: Prof. Wendy Pearlman is Professor of Political Science at Northwestern University. Her research interests include Comparative Politics of the Middle East, Social Movements, Conflict Processes, Emotions, The Political Effects of Emigration, and The Arab-Israeli Conflict --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/scientificsense/message

Coffee House Shots
Can British troops fix Poland's migrant crisis?

Coffee House Shots

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 17:48


British troops have been deployed to the Polish border as part of a ‘reconnaissance' mission, as Poland tries to stop migrants crossing from Belarus. Belarus's president, Alexander Lukashenko, backed by Russia, is flying Syrian, Iraqi and Yemeni citizens and encouraging them to cross the border. With the United States wanting to move its focus away from Europe and the Middle East and towards Asia, does Britain think it can to take its place? Meanwhile, Britain is having its own migrant crisis, with 1,185 people crossing the English Channel by boat yesterday – a record number. It brings the number of people crossing the Channel this year to more than 23,000, three times higher than the total last year. Why can't the government get a grip on this? Max Jeffery speaks to Fraser Nelson and James Forsyth.

The Fifth Floor
Myanmar's women-only army

The Fifth Floor

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 41:07


A group of women in central Myanmar have formed their own anti-junta militia, and are fighting alongside other armed groups. Armed resistance to the military regime has been increasing since the coup nine months ago. BBC Burmese editor Soe Win Than tells us more about the Myaung Women Warriors. My Home Town: Damascus A new episode of our series 'My Home Town', in which our language service journalists share stories about the place where they grew up. Today, Dima Babilie of BBC Arabic takes us to the vine-covered alleyways of the Syrian capital Damascus to sit in cafés, drink coffee and play cards. Why are so many Brazilians emigrating to Italy? There's been a big increase in the number of Brazilians moving to Italy and applying for citizenship. Rafael Barifouse of BBC Brasil has been investigating the reasons and talking to some of those who've made the move. On Tajikistan's border with Afghanistan Known for its beautiful mountains, Tajikistan's border with Afghanistan is at the centre of a fraught political situation, with the Tajik government maintaining a hardline stance towards the Taliban regime. Olga Ivshina of BBC Russian recently went to this remote area and shares her impressions. Reporting COP26 Rubbing shoulders with world leaders, being inspired by young activists and getting to grips with haggis - just some of the experiences of our language service journalists reporting from COP26. We hear from Peter Okwoche of BBC Africa, Shakeel Anwar of BBC Bengali and Pierre-Antoine Denis of BBC Afrique. Image: Myanmar's women-only army Credit: CJ

New Books in Literature
Jordan Salama, "Every Day the River Changes: Four Weeks Down the Magdalena" (Catapult, 2021)

New Books in Literature

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 40:50


Jordan Salama's Every Day the River Changes: Four Weeks Down the Magdalena (Catapult Press, 2021) is a travelogue for a new generation about a journey along Colombia's Magdalena River, exploring life by the banks of a majestic river now at risk, and how a country recovers from conflict. An American writer of Argentine, Syrian, and Iraqi Jewish descent, Jordan Salama tells the story of the Río Magdalena, nearly one thousand miles long, the heart of Colombia. This is Gabriel García Márquez's territory—rumor has it Macondo was partly inspired by the port town of Mompox—as much as that of the Middle Eastern immigrants who run fabric stores by its banks. Following the river from its source high in the Andes to its mouth on the Caribbean coast, journeying by boat, bus, and improvised motobalinera, Salama writes against stereotype and toward the rich lives of those he meets. Among them are a canoe builder, biologists who study invasive hippopotamuses, a Queens transplant managing a failing hotel, a jeweler practicing the art of silver filigree, and a traveling librarian whose donkeys, Alfa and Beto, haul books to rural children. Joy, mourning, and humor come together in this astonishing debut, about a country too often seen as only a site of war, and a tale of lively adventure following a legendary river. Kathryn B. Carpenter is a doctoral candidate in the history of science at Princeton University. She is currently researching the history of tornado science and storm chasing in the twentieth-century United States. You can reach her on twitter, @katebcarp. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/literature

New Books in Latin American Studies
Jordan Salama, "Every Day the River Changes: Four Weeks Down the Magdalena" (Catapult, 2021)

New Books in Latin American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 40:50


Jordan Salama's Every Day the River Changes: Four Weeks Down the Magdalena (Catapult Press, 2021) is a travelogue for a new generation about a journey along Colombia's Magdalena River, exploring life by the banks of a majestic river now at risk, and how a country recovers from conflict. An American writer of Argentine, Syrian, and Iraqi Jewish descent, Jordan Salama tells the story of the Río Magdalena, nearly one thousand miles long, the heart of Colombia. This is Gabriel García Márquez's territory—rumor has it Macondo was partly inspired by the port town of Mompox—as much as that of the Middle Eastern immigrants who run fabric stores by its banks. Following the river from its source high in the Andes to its mouth on the Caribbean coast, journeying by boat, bus, and improvised motobalinera, Salama writes against stereotype and toward the rich lives of those he meets. Among them are a canoe builder, biologists who study invasive hippopotamuses, a Queens transplant managing a failing hotel, a jeweler practicing the art of silver filigree, and a traveling librarian whose donkeys, Alfa and Beto, haul books to rural children. Joy, mourning, and humor come together in this astonishing debut, about a country too often seen as only a site of war, and a tale of lively adventure following a legendary river. Kathryn B. Carpenter is a doctoral candidate in the history of science at Princeton University. She is currently researching the history of tornado science and storm chasing in the twentieth-century United States. You can reach her on twitter, @katebcarp. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/latin-american-studies

New Books in Environmental Studies
Jordan Salama, "Every Day the River Changes: Four Weeks Down the Magdalena" (Catapult, 2021)

New Books in Environmental Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 40:50


Jordan Salama's Every Day the River Changes: Four Weeks Down the Magdalena (Catapult Press, 2021) is a travelogue for a new generation about a journey along Colombia's Magdalena River, exploring life by the banks of a majestic river now at risk, and how a country recovers from conflict. An American writer of Argentine, Syrian, and Iraqi Jewish descent, Jordan Salama tells the story of the Río Magdalena, nearly one thousand miles long, the heart of Colombia. This is Gabriel García Márquez's territory—rumor has it Macondo was partly inspired by the port town of Mompox—as much as that of the Middle Eastern immigrants who run fabric stores by its banks. Following the river from its source high in the Andes to its mouth on the Caribbean coast, journeying by boat, bus, and improvised motobalinera, Salama writes against stereotype and toward the rich lives of those he meets. Among them are a canoe builder, biologists who study invasive hippopotamuses, a Queens transplant managing a failing hotel, a jeweler practicing the art of silver filigree, and a traveling librarian whose donkeys, Alfa and Beto, haul books to rural children. Joy, mourning, and humor come together in this astonishing debut, about a country too often seen as only a site of war, and a tale of lively adventure following a legendary river. Kathryn B. Carpenter is a doctoral candidate in the history of science at Princeton University. She is currently researching the history of tornado science and storm chasing in the twentieth-century United States. You can reach her on twitter, @katebcarp. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/environmental-studies

New Books Network
Jordan Salama, "Every Day the River Changes: Four Weeks Down the Magdalena" (Catapult, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 40:50


Jordan Salama's Every Day the River Changes: Four Weeks Down the Magdalena (Catapult Press, 2021) is a travelogue for a new generation about a journey along Colombia's Magdalena River, exploring life by the banks of a majestic river now at risk, and how a country recovers from conflict. An American writer of Argentine, Syrian, and Iraqi Jewish descent, Jordan Salama tells the story of the Río Magdalena, nearly one thousand miles long, the heart of Colombia. This is Gabriel García Márquez's territory—rumor has it Macondo was partly inspired by the port town of Mompox—as much as that of the Middle Eastern immigrants who run fabric stores by its banks. Following the river from its source high in the Andes to its mouth on the Caribbean coast, journeying by boat, bus, and improvised motobalinera, Salama writes against stereotype and toward the rich lives of those he meets. Among them are a canoe builder, biologists who study invasive hippopotamuses, a Queens transplant managing a failing hotel, a jeweler practicing the art of silver filigree, and a traveling librarian whose donkeys, Alfa and Beto, haul books to rural children. Joy, mourning, and humor come together in this astonishing debut, about a country too often seen as only a site of war, and a tale of lively adventure following a legendary river. Kathryn B. Carpenter is a doctoral candidate in the history of science at Princeton University. She is currently researching the history of tornado science and storm chasing in the twentieth-century United States. You can reach her on twitter, @katebcarp. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

The Week Unwrapped - with Olly Mann
#252 The VP, GPs and refugees

The Week Unwrapped - with Olly Mann

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 40:10


Why are Kamala Harris' approval ratings in freefall? Should the government be able to tell doctors where to work? And why have bananas got Syrian refugees in trouble in Turkey? Olly Mann and The Week delve behind the headlines and debate what really matters from the past seven days. With Joe Evans, Julia O'Driscoll & Abdulwahab Tahan.

The Week Unwrapped - with Olly Mann
#252 The VP, GPs and refugees

The Week Unwrapped - with Olly Mann

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 40:10


Why are Kamala Harris' approval ratings in freefall? Should the government be able to tell doctors where to work? And why have bananas got Syrian refugees in trouble in Turkey? Olly Mann and The Week delve behind the headlines and debate what really matters from the past seven days. With Joe Evans, Julia O'Driscoll & Abdulwahab Tahan.

The Week Unwrapped - with Olly Mann
#252 The VP, GPs and refugees

The Week Unwrapped - with Olly Mann

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 40:22


Why are Kamala Harris' approval ratings in freefall? Should the government be able to tell doctors where to work? And why have bananas got Syrian refugees in trouble in Turkey? Olly Mann and The Week delve behind the headlines and debate what really matters from the past seven days. With Joe Evans, Julia O'Driscoll & Abdulwahab Tahan.

SkyWatchTV Podcast
Five in Ten 11/10/21: Experts Slam CDC for Flawed Study

SkyWatchTV Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 18:00


The Centers for Disease Control published a study last week that experts say falsely claims that vaccine immunity is superior to natural immunity in those who've recovered from COVID. YouTube canceled SkyWatchTV! Please follow us on Rumble: www.rumble.com/skywatchtv 5) Russia's Ministry of Defense warns against US military buildup in Black Sea; 4) CDC touts flawed study; 3) Italian newspaper reports that only 2.9% of Italy's official death toll actually died of COVID; 2) Israeli airstrike Monday injures two Syrian soldiers; 1) Spanish man claims he's the last man on Earth and posting TikTok videos from the year 2027.

Simply The Bible
Episode 460: 2 Kings 6:8-23 – Elisha and the Syrians

Simply The Bible

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 14:15


Elisha warns the king of Israel about the Syrian raids. The king of Syria tries to arrest Elisha, but God protects him. The LORD temporarily blinds the Syrians.

UN News
PODCAST: The power and energy of women and girls – gender day at COP26

UN News

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 24:29


Little Amal, the giant puppet of a Syrian refugee girl was, literally, the biggest figure at COP26 on Tuesday, where the main theme was gender. She took to the main stage today, alongside Samoan climate activist Brianna Freuan, who reminded delegates that women and girls bear the brunt of the climate crisis. The day also focused on issues surrounding science and innovation so, in today's episode of The Lid Is On from COP26 in Glasgow, Conor Lennon and Laura Quiñones explore how hard it can be to communicate scientific information, and the potential impact of low-cost, readily available technology including…the power of dance! Music: Within the Earth, Ketsa  

Pushback with Aaron Mate
Fmr. CIA analyst on the hidden realities of Syria's war and new novel, 'Damascus Station'

Pushback with Aaron Mate

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 80:42


Support Pushback at Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/aaronmate As a CIA analyst, David McCloskey covered Syria from 2008 to 2014. He draws on his experience for his new spy thriller, "Damascus Station," set during the early years of the Syrian war. David McCloskey joins Aaron Maté to discuss "Damascus Station"; the early years of the Syrian war; the role of foreign powers including the US; the US decision to support the insurgency despite knowing that Al Qaeda and other Salafi jihadist groups were its "primary engine"; allegations of chemical weapons attacks in Syria; and the direction of US policy in post-war Syria. Guest: David McCloskey. Former CIA analyst who covered Syria for six years, from 2008 to 2014. Wrote memos for the President's Daily Brief (PDB), lived and worked in CIA field stations throughout the region, and briefed senior White House officials, members of Congress, and Arab royalty. His new book is "Damascus Station", a spy thriller set during the early years of the Syrian war. "Damascus Station", by David McCloskey https://wwnorton.com/books/9780393881042

Kan English
News Flash November 9, 2021

Kan English

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 5:33


Police bust scores of suspected gun dealers in Arab sector, Syrian reports say Israel targeted anti-aircraft batteries in overnight raid, four fires break out in north See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

No Blackout Dates
S2, Ep. 8: The New F Words: Facebook, Fake News, and Fotojournalism

No Blackout Dates

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 53:36


Traveling for tourism paints an incomplete (and sometimes wildly inaccurate) picture of the places we visit. Cengiz Yar is an international photojournalist who's traveled the world telling stories that are often right in front of our eyes, but which aren't exactly comfortable for us to digest. He specializes in conflict reporting, mass displacement, and civilian casualties of war, and his work has been featured in Rolling Stone, Vanity Fair, and The New York Times.Cengiz is here to help us explore the complicated intersection of traditional journalism and social media, the importance of media literacy, and the global consequences of disinformation. That includes ground-level insights about life under the Islamic State (ISIS), the experience of Syrian refugees, and introducing Iraqi children to photography. We also dive into a question that has plagued Cengiz throughout his career: does photojournalism -- and journalism in general -- actually improve the lives of those it covers?In Hot Takes, Eben and Melanie wonder why people decide to live in areas prone to frequent natural disasters, and ask the question that's been on your mind since 2018: does investing in Bitcoin make you a douche?News of the Week: Where to travel in 2021 if you're a Scorpio The most common second languages spoken around the world  BONUS -- Up your underwater photography game with these tips from pro photographers Related links: Cengiz' Instagram Cengiz' Website Matador Network Eben's Instagram Melanie's Instagram

Simply The Bible
Episode 458: 2 Kings 5:1-19 – Naaman is Cleansed

Simply The Bible

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 14:15


Naaman, the general of the Syrian army. goes to Elisha who cleanses him from leprosy. This pictures the cleansing we receive through faith in Christ.

Brass Tacks Podcast
Ep. 116 Queer Comedy

Brass Tacks Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 122:42


This week we check out an unsettling video of a mother and son who fell in love with each other! We also have some bad news from around the world involving a Toronto teacher who was placed on leave after showing up to class in blackface for Halloween, Syrian refugees being deported from Turkey for provocative banana eating, and a whole mess of people dead and injured at the stupid "Astro World" "music" festival. Be sure to stick around for our Bologna Boi of the week because today we have one of the most annoying and talentless stand up comedians of all time from HBO's "Queer Comedy" showcase. All of this and more in this in today's installment of Brass Tacks Podcast!

The John Batchelor Show
4/4 Damascus Station: A Novel, by David McCloskey.

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 7:10


Photo:  Syrian ten-pound note, 1947 4/4   Damascus Station: A Novel, by David McCloskey. Hardcover – October 5, 2021.   https://www.amazon.com/Damascus-Station-Novel-David-McCloskey/dp/0393881040 The CIA case officer Sam Joseph is dispatched to Paris to recruit a Syrian Palace official, Mariam Haddad. The two fall into a forbidden relationship, which supercharges Haddad's recruitment and creates unspeakable danger when they enter Damascus to find the man responsible for the disappearance of an American spy. But the cat-and-mouse chase for the killer soon leads to a trail of high-profile assassinations and the discovery of a dark secret at the heart of the Syrian regime, bringing the pair under the all-seeing eyes of Assad's spy catcher, Ali Hassan, and his brother Rustum, the head of the feared Republican Guard. Set against the backdrop of a Syria pulsing with fear and rebellion, Damascus Station is a gripping thriller that offers a textured portrayal of espionage, love, loyalty, and betrayal in one of the most difficult CIA assignments on the planet.

The John Batchelor Show
3/4 Damascus Station: A Novel, by David McCloskey.

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 16:30


Photo:   Constitution of the Syrian Republic, 14 May 1930 3/4 Damascus Station: A Novel, by David McCloskey. Hardcover – October 5, 2021.   https://www.amazon.com/Damascus-Station-Novel-David-McCloskey/dp/0393881040 The CIA case officer Sam Joseph is dispatched to Paris to recruit a Syrian Palace official, Mariam Haddad. The two fall into a forbidden relationship, which supercharges Haddad's recruitment and creates unspeakable danger when they enter Damascus to find the man responsible for the disappearance of an American spy. But the cat-and-mouse chase for the killer soon leads to a trail of high-profile assassinations and the discovery of a dark secret at the heart of the Syrian regime, bringing the pair under the all-seeing eyes of Assad's spy catcher, Ali Hassan, and his brother Rustum, the head of the feared Republican Guard. Set against the backdrop of a Syria pulsing with fear and rebellion, Damascus Station is a gripping thriller that offers a textured portrayal of espionage, love, loyalty, and betrayal in one of the most difficult CIA assignments on the planet.

The John Batchelor Show
2/4 Damascus Station: A Novel, by David McCloskey.

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 7:35


Photo:  Syrian Demonstration against French Mandate 2/4 Damascus Station: A Novel, by David McCloskey. Hardcover – October 5, 2021.  https://www.amazon.com/Damascus-Station-Novel-David-McCloskey/dp/0393881040 The CIA case officer Sam Joseph is dispatched to Paris to recruit a Syrian Palace official, Mariam Haddad. The two fall into a forbidden relationship, which supercharges Haddad's recruitment and creates unspeakable danger when they enter Damascus to find the man responsible for the disappearance of an American spy. But the cat-and-mouse chase for the killer soon leads to a trail of high-profile assassinations and the discovery of a dark secret at the heart of the Syrian regime, bringing the pair under the all-seeing eyes of Assad's spy catcher, Ali Hassan, and his brother Rustum, the head of the feared Republican Guard. Set against the backdrop of a Syria pulsing with fear and rebellion, Damascus Station is a gripping thriller that offers a textured portrayal of espionage, love, loyalty, and betrayal in one of the most difficult CIA assignments on the planet.

The John Batchelor Show
1/4 Damascus Station: A Novel, by David McCloskey.

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 14:15


Photo: 1/4 Damascus Station: A Novel, by David McCloskey. Hardcover – October 5, 2021.  https://www.amazon.com/Damascus-Station-Novel-David-McCloskey/dp/0393881040 The CIA case officer Sam Joseph is dispatched to Paris to recruit a Syrian Palace official, Mariam Haddad. The two fall into a forbidden relationship, which supercharges Haddad's recruitment and creates unspeakable danger when they enter Damascus to find the man responsible for the disappearance of an American spy. But the cat-and-mouse chase for the killer soon leads to a trail of high-profile assassinations and the discovery of a dark secret at the heart of the Syrian regime, bringing the pair under the all-seeing eyes of Assad's spy catcher, Ali Hassan, and his brother Rustum, the head of the feared Republican Guard. Set against the backdrop of a Syria pulsing with fear and rebellion, Damascus Station is a gripping thriller that offers a textured portrayal of espionage, love, loyalty, and betrayal in one of the most difficult CIA assignments on the planet.

The Fifth Floor
Who are the Oromo Liberation Army?

The Fifth Floor

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 41:23


As rebel TPLF forces advance towards the Ethiopian capital Addis Ababa, other armed groups say they are forming an alliance with them. These include the secretive Oromo Liberation Army, which first appeared in the 1970s. The BBC's Africa correspondent Catherine Byaruhanga was the first international journalist to meet them, at a desert training camp. The dispute over Scythian gold When Russian forces seized Crimea from Ukraine in 2014, a unique collection of Scythian treasures from museums in Kyiv and Crimea was being exhibited in Amsterdam. Last week, a Dutch court ruled that the objects were part of Ukraine's cultural heritage and must all return to Ukraine, not Crimea. The BBC's Daria Taradai tells us what this Scythian heritage means to Ukrainians. The banana jokes that stopped being funny A social media craze in Turkey involving Syrian refugees filming themselves with bananas quickly turned sour. What began as a joke has inflamed tensions between Syrians and Turks, and led to the arrest and threatened deportation of some of those taking part. Dima Babilie of BBC Arabic has been investigating. Pakistan's Taliban problem When the Taliban took control of Afghanistan, neighbouring Pakistan experienced a rise in extremist Islamist activity in its tribal border areas. Violence and extortion have become commonplace, as BBC Urdu's Asif Hussain discovered when he visited Orakzai and Bajaur districts in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Province. Climate change and the threat to Thailand's durians With COP26 in full swing, the BBC's language services have been looking at the impact of climate change in their own regions. BBC Thai picked an item close to their hearts - the famously pungent durian fruit. Changing weather patterns are now interfering with the growing season, as Thanyaporn Buathong explains. Image: A member of the Oromo Liberation Army Credit: BBC

ESV: Digging Deep into the Bible
November 5: Psalm 96; 2 Kings 5; Zechariah 9; John 2

ESV: Digging Deep into the Bible

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 12:22


Psalms and Wisdom: Psalm 96 Psalm 96 (Listen) Worship in the Splendor of Holiness 96   Oh sing to the LORD a new song;    sing to the LORD, all the earth!2   Sing to the LORD, bless his name;    tell of his salvation from day to day.3   Declare his glory among the nations,    his marvelous works among all the peoples!4   For great is the LORD, and greatly to be praised;    he is to be feared above all gods.5   For all the gods of the peoples are worthless idols,    but the LORD made the heavens.6   Splendor and majesty are before him;    strength and beauty are in his sanctuary. 7   Ascribe to the LORD, O families of the peoples,    ascribe to the LORD glory and strength!8   Ascribe to the LORD the glory due his name;    bring an offering, and come into his courts!9   Worship the LORD in the splendor of holiness;1    tremble before him, all the earth! 10   Say among the nations, “The LORD reigns!    Yes, the world is established; it shall never be moved;    he will judge the peoples with equity.” 11   Let the heavens be glad, and let the earth rejoice;    let the sea roar, and all that fills it;12     let the field exult, and everything in it!  Then shall all the trees of the forest sing for joy13     before the LORD, for he comes,    for he comes to judge the earth.  He will judge the world in righteousness,    and the peoples in his faithfulness. Footnotes [1] 96:9 Or in holy attire (ESV) Pentateuch and History: 2 Kings 5 2 Kings 5 (Listen) Naaman Healed of Leprosy 5 Naaman, commander of the army of the king of Syria, was a great man with his master and in high favor, because by him the LORD had given victory to Syria. He was a mighty man of valor, but he was a leper.1 2 Now the Syrians on one of their raids had carried off a little girl from the land of Israel, and she worked in the service of Naaman's wife. 3 She said to her mistress, “Would that my lord were with the prophet who is in Samaria! He would cure him of his leprosy.” 4 So Naaman went in and told his lord, “Thus and so spoke the girl from the land of Israel.” 5 And the king of Syria said, “Go now, and I will send a letter to the king of Israel.” So he went, taking with him ten talents of silver, six thousand shekels2 of gold, and ten changes of clothing. 6 And he brought the letter to the king of Israel, which read, “When this letter reaches you, know that I have sent to you Naaman my servant, that you may cure him of his leprosy.” 7 And when the king of Israel read the letter, he tore his clothes and said, “Am I God, to kill and to make alive, that this man sends word to me to cure a man of his leprosy? Only consider, and see how he is seeking a quarrel with me.” 8 But when Elisha the man of God heard that the king of Israel had torn his clothes, he sent to the king, saying, “Why have you torn your clothes? Let him come now to me, that he may know that there is a prophet in Israel.” 9 So Naaman came with his horses and chariots and stood at the door of Elisha's house. 10 And Elisha sent a messenger to him, saying, “Go and wash in the Jordan seven times, and your flesh shall be restored, and you shall be clean.” 11 But Naaman was angry and went away, saying, “Behold, I thought that he would surely come out to me and stand and call upon the name of the LORD his God, and wave his hand over the place and cure the leper. 12 Are not Abana3 and Pharpar, the rivers of Damascus, better than all the waters of Israel? Could I not wash in them and be clean?” So he turned and went away in a rage. 13 But his servants came near and said to him, “My father, it is a great word the prophet has spoken to you; will you not do it? Has he actually said to you, ‘Wash, and be clean'?” 14 So he went down and dipped himself seven times in the Jordan, according to the word of the man of God, and his flesh was restored like the flesh of a little child, and he was clean. Gehazi's Greed and Punishment 15 Then he returned to the man of God, he and all his company, and he came and stood before him. And he said, “Behold, I know that there is no God in all the earth but in Israel; so accept now a present from your servant.” 16 But he said, “As the LORD lives, before whom I stand, I will receive none.” And he urged him to take it, but he refused. 17 Then Naaman said, “If not, please let there be given to your servant two mule loads of earth, for from now on your servant will not offer burnt offering or sacrifice to any god but the LORD. 18 In this matter may the LORD pardon your servant: when my master goes into the house of Rimmon to worship there, leaning on my arm, and I bow myself in the house of Rimmon, when I bow myself in the house of Rimmon, the LORD pardon your servant in this matter.” 19 He said to him, “Go in peace.” But when Naaman had gone from him a short distance, 20 Gehazi, the servant of Elisha the man of God, said, “See, my master has spared this Naaman the Syrian, in not accepting from his hand what he brought. As the LORD lives, I will run after him and get something from him.” 21 So Gehazi followed Naaman. And when Naaman saw someone running after him, he got down from the chariot to meet him and said, “Is all well?” 22 And he said, “All is well. My master has sent me to say, ‘There have just now come to me from the hill country of Ephraim two young men of the sons of the prophets. Please give them a talent of silver and two changes of clothing.'” 23 And Naaman said, “Be pleased to accept two talents.” And he urged him and tied up two talents of silver in two bags, with two changes of clothing, and laid them on two of his servants. And they carried them before Gehazi. 24 And when he came to the hill, he took them from their hand and put them in the house, and he sent the men away, and they departed. 25 He went in and stood before his master, and Elisha said to him, “Where have you been, Gehazi?” And he said, “Your servant went nowhere.” 26 But he said to him, “Did not my heart go when the man turned from his chariot to meet you? Was it a time to accept money and garments, olive orchards and vineyards, sheep and oxen, male servants and female servants? 27 Therefore the leprosy of Naaman shall cling to you and to your descendants forever.” So he went out from his presence a leper, like snow. Footnotes [1] 5:1 Leprosy was a term for several skin diseases; see Leviticus 13 [2] 5:5 A talent was about 75 pounds or 34 kilograms; a shekel was about 2/5 ounce or 11 grams [3] 5:12 Or Amana (ESV) Chronicles and Prophets: Zechariah 9 Zechariah 9 (Listen) Judgment on Israel's Enemies 9   The oracle of the word of the LORD is against the land of Hadrach    and Damascus is its resting place.  For the LORD has an eye on mankind    and on all the tribes of Israel,12   and on Hamath also, which borders on it,    Tyre and Sidon, though they are very wise.3   Tyre has built herself a rampart    and heaped up silver like dust,    and fine gold like the mud of the streets.4   But behold, the Lord will strip her of her possessions    and strike down her power on the sea,    and she shall be devoured by fire. 5   Ashkelon shall see it, and be afraid;    Gaza too, and shall writhe in anguish;    Ekron also, because its hopes are confounded.  The king shall perish from Gaza;    Ashkelon shall be uninhabited;6   a mixed people2 shall dwell in Ashdod,    and I will cut off the pride of Philistia.7   I will take away its blood from its mouth,    and its abominations from between its teeth;  it too shall be a remnant for our God;    it shall be like a clan in Judah,    and Ekron shall be like the Jebusites.8   Then I will encamp at my house as a guard,    so that none shall march to and fro;  no oppressor shall again march over them,    for now I see with my own eyes. The Coming King of Zion 9   Rejoice greatly, O daughter of Zion!    Shout aloud, O daughter of Jerusalem!  Behold, your king is coming to you;    righteous and having salvation is he,  humble and mounted on a donkey,    on a colt, the foal of a donkey.10   I will cut off the chariot from Ephraim    and the war horse from Jerusalem;  and the battle bow shall be cut off,    and he shall speak peace to the nations;  his rule shall be from sea to sea,    and from the River3 to the ends of the earth.11   As for you also, because of the blood of my covenant with you,    I will set your prisoners free from the waterless pit.12   Return to your stronghold, O prisoners of hope;    today I declare that I will restore to you double.13   For I have bent Judah as my bow;    I have made Ephraim its arrow.  I will stir up your sons, O Zion,    against your sons, O Greece,    and wield you like a warrior's sword. The Lord Will Save His People 14   Then the LORD will appear over them,    and his arrow will go forth like lightning;  the Lord GOD will sound the trumpet    and will march forth in the whirlwinds of the south.15   The LORD of hosts will protect them,    and they shall devour, and tread down the sling stones,  and they shall drink and roar as if drunk with wine,    and be full like a bowl,    drenched like the corners of the altar. 16   On that day the LORD their God will save them,    as the flock of his people;  for like the jewels of a crown    they shall shine on his land.17   For how great is his goodness, and how great his beauty!    Grain shall make the young men flourish,    and new wine the young women. Footnotes [1] 9:1 Or For the eye of mankind, especially of all the tribes of Israel, is toward the Lord [2] 9:6 Or a foreign people; Hebrew a bastard [3] 9:10 That is, the Euphrates (ESV) Gospels and Epistles: John 2 John 2 (Listen) The Wedding at Cana 2 On the third day there was a wedding at Cana in Galilee, and the mother of Jesus was there. 2 Jesus also was invited to the wedding with his disciples. 3 When the wine ran out, the mother of Jesus said to him, “They have no wine.” 4 And Jesus said to her, “Woman, what does this have to do with me? My hour has not yet come.” 5 His mother said to the servants, “Do whatever he tells you.” 6 Now there were six stone water jars there for the Jewish rites of purification, each holding twenty or thirty gallons.1 7 Jesus said to the servants, “Fill the jars with water.” And they filled them up to the brim. 8 And he said to them, “Now draw some out and take it to the master of the feast.” So they took it. 9 When the master of the feast tasted the water now become wine, and did not know where it came from (though the servants who had drawn the water knew), the master of the feast called the bridegroom 10 and said to him, “Everyone serves the good wine first, and when people have drunk freely, then the poor wine. But you have kept the good wine until now.” 11 This, the first of his signs, Jesus did at Cana in Galilee, and manifested his glory. And his disciples believed in him. 12 After this he went down to Capernaum, with his mother and his brothers2 and his disciples, and they stayed there for a few days. Jesus Cleanses the Temple 13 The Passover of the Jews was at hand, and Jesus went up to Jerusalem. 14 In the temple he found those who were selling oxen and sheep and pigeons, and the money-changers sitting there. 15 And making a whip of cords, he drove them all out of the temple, with the sheep and oxen. And he poured out the coins of the money-changers and overturned their tables. 16 And he told those who sold the pigeons, “Take these things away; do not make my Father's house a house of trade.” 17 His disciples remembered that it was written, “Zeal for your house will consume me.” 18 So the Jews said to him, “What sign do you show us for doing these things?” 19 Jesus answered them, “Destroy this temple, and in three days I will raise it up.” 20 The Jews then said, “It has taken forty-six years to build this temple,3 and will you raise it up in three days?” 21 But he was speaking about the temple of his body. 22 When therefore he was raised from the dead, his disciples remembered that he had said this, and they believed the Scripture and the word that Jesus had spoken. Jesus Knows What Is in Man 23 Now when he was in Jerusalem at the Passover Feast, many believed in his name when they saw the signs that he was doing. 24 But Jesus on his part did not entrust himself to them, because he knew all people 25 and needed no one to bear witness about man, for he himself knew what was in man. Footnotes [1] 2:6 Greek two or three measures (metrētas); a metrētēs was about 10 gallons or 35 liters [2] 2:12 Or brothers and sisters. In New Testament usage, depending on the context, the plural Greek word adelphoi (translated “brothers”) may refer either to brothers or to brothers and sisters [3] 2:20 Or This temple was built forty-six years ago (ESV)

Wake Up Late with Dougie Show
Nov 2, 2021 with Dougie Almeida, Brian Dunkleman & Marc Yaffe

Wake Up Late with Dougie Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 53:12


Today's Topics Facebook changes it's name to "Meta", Southwest Pilot being investigated for starting, "Let's Go Brandon" chant, on SW flight, Ice Cube walks of set of Sony Movie, "Ah, Hell No" due to vaccine mandate, The McRib is back & Brian explains what happened at "American Idol"  Things To Know Clueless Kaepernick, equates NFL Draft to Slavery. Major League Baseball considers Robot Umpires & the Kyle Rittenhouse Trial begins The News is a Joke "Suspect who stole U-Haul calls police and asks for deputies to stop chasing him", "A 33-year-old California man says he was able to pay off his student loans by surviving off of two meals a day at Six Flags for years", "A Chinese millionaire said he withdrew $780,000 and made bank staff count the notes by hand after security guards were rude to him", "Turkey plans to deport Syrian refugees for posting TikTok videos of them eating bananas in a provacative way", "Dutch university's rare penis plant blooms", & Round heads are all the rage in China, so some Chinese parents are putting their babies in pricey head gear to make their skulls more round" Thanks For Listening & Please Like our Facebook FanPage & Subscribe to our Youtube Channel 

The Beirut Banyan
Ep.282 (Video): What's at Stake

The Beirut Banyan

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 8:56


Click to watch: https://youtu.be/6YFqWn7ny4M I discuss what's at stake when it comes to reformists and next year's parliamentary elections, regional and international posturing vis-a-vis Iran and the increasingly likely return of (Russian-based) Syrian influence over Lebanon, and why any country with leverage over the Iranian regime and negotiating over their nuclear program must place our sovereignty on the table. Help support The Beirut Banyan by contributing via PayPal: https://www.paypal.me/walkbeirut Or donating through our Patreon page: https://www.patreon.com/thebeirutbanyan Subscribe to our podcast from your preferred platform. Follow us on Facebook, Instagram & Twitter: @thebeirutbanyan And check out our website: www.ronniechatah.com Music by Marc Codsi. Animation & illustration by Sana Chaaban.

The Greek Current
Growing concerns over another Turkish offensive in Syria

The Greek Current

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 12:23


There are growing concerns that Turkey could launch another incursion into Syria, and reports indicate that the Turkish army has stepped up its presence in areas controlled by the Syrian opposition in northeastern Syria, amid ongoing Turkish threats against Kurdish forces in the area. In the meantime, Turkey's parliament approved a motion late last month extending Erdogan's mandate to send troops to Syria for another two years. Turkey is also reportedly negotiating with Russia over a Turkish operation in the Kobani area. Expert David Phillips joins The Greek Current to look into the concerning reports about another possible Turkish incursion into Syria, Turkey's negotiations with Russia over this operation, and what steps the US can take to deter Turkey.David Phillips is the Director of the Program on Human Rights and Peace-building at Columbia University. Phillips is also a former senior adviser to the UN Secretariat and US State Department, and the author of the books Frontline Syria: From Revolution to Proxy War, The Great Betrayal: How America Abandoned the Kurds and Lost the Middle East, and An Uncertain Ally: Turkey Under Erdogan's Dictatorship. 

Frank Film Club with Maisie Williams
Limbo (2020) featuring Amir El-Masry

Frank Film Club with Maisie Williams

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 33:40


This week we're talking about Limbo (2020), a British indie film written and directed by Ben Sharrock. It's a story about a Syrian musician, Omar, who is seeking asylum in the UK on a (very cold) Scottish island. He and his three housemates take cultural awareness classes and wait in a near-empty house for their asylum claims to be processed. We chat about the deadpan humour, the characters and the unexpected 'Friends' cameo. We were also lucky enough to ask Amir El-Masry, who plays Omar, some questions about his time preparing for the role and shooting the film. It sounded like a lot of fun. Enjoy!Limbo is available to watch on MUBINext episode's film: Ponyo (2008) directed by Hayao MiyazakiPonyo is available to watch on Netflix (UK) See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Madigan's Pubcast
Episode 63: To-Go Cocktails, Counterfeit Coupons, & Class Action Pop-Tarts

Madigan's Pubcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 94:17


Kathleen opens the show drinking a Waterslides IPA from 3 Sheeps Brewing in Wisconsin, and a Skrewball peanut butter whiskey shot.“GOOD BAD FOOD”: In her quest for new and delicious not-so-nutritious junk food AND in continuing her search for the best Ranch, Kathleen samples Lays Wavy Funyuns Onion flavored chips, which she thinks just taste like a “mild” sour cream-n-onion flavor. She moves on to taste Sir Kensington's Pizza Ranch Dressing, which she likes but thinks is WAY too tangy, and then she finishes her tasting menu with Hellman's Spicy Dipping Sauce, which she summarizes with an “umm, No.”KATHLEEN'S QUEEN'S COURT: Kathleen provides an update on the Court, reporting that although it's been a quiet week, Cher is commenting on the Twitter account @cherdoingthings.UPDATES: Kathleen gives updates on Facebook's company name change, the duping of Betsy DeVos's family by Elizabeth Holmes, the whereabouts of the missing zebras in Maryland, more bad news for supporters of Christopher Columbus, the release of a flying motorcycle in Japan, and South Dakota becomes a notable tax shelter. CLASS ACTION POP-TARTS: Kathleen laughs as she reads an article advising that a class-action lawsuit has been filed by plaintiff Anita Harris claiming that Kellogg's advertising misleads consumers about the amount of actual fruit in the food and that the presence of Red 40, a synthetic food dye, makes the product's filling "look bright red like it has more strawberries than it does.”THE LEGEND OF POLAND'S SOLDIER BEAR: Kathleen is thrilled to share the story of Wojtek, a Syrian brown bear cub who was by Polish II Corps soldiers who had been evacuated from the Soviet Union and aided in fighting the Nazis. In order to provide for his rations and transportation, he was officially enlisted as a soldier with the rank of private and was subsequently promoted to corporal. KROENKE ABANDONS NFL LAWSUIT: Kathleen isn't surprised reading an article advising that LA Rams' owner Stan Kroenke has informed NFL team owners that he will no longer pay legal fees associated with the Rams move from St. Louis in 2016. Kroenke originally agreed to cover legal fees involved in the relocation, and those bills have stacked up as the NFL has lost multiple motions to the St. Louis Regional Convention and Sports Complex Authority.EXTREME COUPON SCAM: Kathleen reads an article about a couple arrested by the FBI in Virginia Beach over their $31.8 million counterfeit coupon scheme. They have been handed a prison sentence for nearly 20 years, combined.TO-GO COCKTAILS BY STATE: Kathleen loves a cocktail, especially one that she can wander with. She updates listeners on a study from the National Restaurant Association, reporting that 26 states - most of the ones that permitted to-go cocktails during the pandemic - have allowed the practice to continue. PANDORA PAPERS: Kathleen reads an article outlining the structure of a new trove of 11.9 million documents, dubbed the Pandora Papers, that contain explosive details about how global elites and billionaires hide their assets. The Pandora Papers are the result of extensive research by the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (ICIJ), which expose 600 celebrities and world leaders who stalled their money – or had it done for them – in tax havens. HOMESTEAD ACT – Kathleen is excited to read an article detailing where efforts are being made to take advantage of the growing work-from-home culture to try to revitalize rural communities that are in decline. Financial and tax incentives to new residents are proving to benefit many towns seeking to reverse population loss and rejuvenate their economies.JD SALINGER VOICE RECORDING BURNED: Kathleen reports that the only known recording of J.D. Salinger's voice, created during a 1980 interview with the writer, has been burned. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Impossible Network
Natasha Freidus - The Social Entrepreneur Applying Tech To Remove The Chaos In Crisis Relief

The Impossible Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 58:52


Sometimes circumstances beyond our control set us on a path we could never have conceived. This was the case for this week's guest, social entrepreneur Natasha Freidus when during the Syrian refugee crisis in 2015, she witnessed the chaos of crisis response first hand. While most donate money and time, Natasha instead formed a tech start-up to match those in need with those able to give and deliver goods and supplies locally through an online marketplace, initially hacked together using Wedding registry software.Now almost six years on Natasha's startup NeedsList is bringing efficiency and intelligence to the NGO and philanthropic sector and in doing so is delivering more accountability and transparency.In this interview, Natasha describes her backstory, the vital steps along her life path that prepared her to be able to execute and lead such a start-up, the innovations she is now driving, and her vision to leverage AI and huge data sets to enable better preparation for relief before a crisis even hits.I hope Natasha's story inspires someone else to take on what others may consider impossible.Social Links Instagram FacebookTwitter Links in the Show Needslist BrownESL Paulo Freire Saul AlinskyCreative NarrationsDecathlon Public Benefit CorpIRC David MillibandFemaFabrice Grinda Winners Take All Only Murders In the Building See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Intelligence Matters
The Syria Conflict: Former CIA Analyst David McCloskey

Intelligence Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 36:09


In this episode of Intelligence Matters, host Michael Morell speaks with David McCloskey, a former CIA analyst and author of "Damascus Station," a fictional spy novel centered on the civil war in Syria. Morell and McCloskey discuss the history of the Syrian conflict and the United States' engagement there, including key inflection points and how policy decisions made during the Obama administration paved the way for realities on the ground today. McCloskey details his time as an analyst at the agency and decision to become an author. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.