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Latest podcast episodes about technically

VO BOSS Podcast
BOSS in the Booth

VO BOSS Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 31:59


Just in case you were wondering, you definitely wear all the hats now. In today's modern at-home recording world, you're the voice, engineer, customer service department, and tech wizard of each session; and some of those hats can get pretty cumbersome. In this episode, Anne and Laya discuss what it takes to be a BOSS in the booth, and how to maximize your potential success with tools, tech, and processes that work. It's not enough to just have a great voice or be an excellent performer anymore, but being a #VOBOSS in your booth is achievable. Learn how in this episode, jam-packed with ideas from these savvy bosses… Transcript >> It's time to take your business to the next level, the BOSS level! These are the premiere Business Owner Strategies and Successes being utilized by the industry's top talent today. Rock your business like a BOSS, a VO BOSS! Now let's welcome your host, Anne Ganguzza. Anne: Hey everyone. Welcome to the VO BOSS podcast. I'm your host Anne Ganguzza along with my very special guest co-host BOSS Laya Hoffman. Hey Laya, how are you? Laya: I'm great. Anne. How are you? Anne: I'm doing good. It's been a hectic week in the booth here, which is a good thing. I'm very grateful about that, but hectic in terms of I had clients who are asking a lot of me. Laya: Oh yeah? Anne: Not just voicing. Laya: Aren't they always? Anne: Yeah. Not just voicing in the booth, but they wanted playback. They wanted to invite the client in. And so I thought it would be a good day to talk about how to be the BOSS in the booth and handle these, handle the tech, handle these situations when a lot is being requested of us these days. Laya: So much, you know. Gone are the days of just stepping into the studio and all you have to do is focus on your acting -- Anne: Remember that? Laya: -- the copy and what it feels like to deliver, you know, the message. Now you have to have all the hats on -- Anne: Yup. Laya: -- simultaneously while keeping your cool and still delivering an outstanding performance. And it is harder than we realize -- Anne: Oh my gosh -- Laya: -- especially when the going gets tough. Anne: Yeah. And shout-out, okay, before anything else, a big shout-out to all the studios out there -- Laya: Yes. Anne: -- and pre-pandemic too. Like I always appreciated studios and sometimes even more so now, you never realized what a luxury it is to walk into a studio and to be directed. Laya: Yes, I miss it. Anne: Right? It is a wonderful thing. And I think there's always a place for studios, but during the pandemic, when we had to kind of up our game and get our tech in place and be able to engineer and do all that, oh, that was tough. So thank you to all of those studios. Some of my favorite studios shut down, and it's so sad, and I hope that they, you know, we're now coming back to a different place. I'm so glad when I see people in studios, and they're like, oh my gosh, I'm so happy to be back in studio, seeing people, so. Laya: Well, and it's true because even the engineers -- Anne: Yeah. Laya: -- like I have great respect for these engineers and the sound designers that are manning the board and the client in one ear. Anne: Yup. Laya: And they've got another client patched in from somewhere else. And they have really been the lead for all these years -- Anne: Oh yeah. Laya: -- to really help craft a comfortable setting for -- Anne: Yeah. Laya: -- so many of us that are dealing with our own insecurities or -- Anne: Sure. Laya: -- our own demands or our own needs that are happening on every angle of the table or the studio. And so I have a whole new respect having really had to shift that in house, but now it's, you know, it's a new skill learned, and I really haven't seen anywhere where you can learn the art of how to be your own BOSS in the booth -- Anne: Right? Laya: -- so this should be an interesting conversation. Anne: Well, I think, first of all, you have to educate yourself on some of these technologies that are -- Laya: Yep. Anne: -- that may be required of you. So number one, first of all, you've got to connect to a studio if you're doing a live direct, right? Or you have to be able to connect a client to be able to hear you. And so -- Laya: Yeah, your studio, right? Anne: Yeah. There are a lot of ways to do that. I know that prior to the pandemic, we were doing, a lot of people were doing stuff via Skype, and then Zoom kind of became a thing. I've had people connect via Zoom. Laya: Yeah. Anne: And I'm going to give a shout-out to, you know, our sponsor ipDTL, because I've always been able to connect other people to me via ipDTL and a very easy -- Laya: Yeah, flawlessly. Anne: Flawlessly, seamlessly, in a wonderful -- and the cool thing is, is that I even have a phone number, like my ipDTL, somebody can call a phone number and connect up with me via ipDTL. So on the other end, if you've got a client who's not technical -- Laya: Yep. Anne: -- at the very least, just give them a phone number and they can connect. Laya: Always. Anne: Now -- Laya: That's awesome. I didn't realize that about them. Good share, for sure. Anne: Yeah. Laya: For sure. Anne: But even before that, if you want to get even more elementary, right -- Laya: Of course. Anne: -- I used to have people connect to me in the studio by having my phone and earbuds. And so I'd have them call my cell phone, put my earbuds in my ear, and then my headphones over, right, my ears. Laya: Oh wow. Anne: And they would be in my ear. And it was like before you had to do a complicated -- there were people that would talk about having complicated phone patch in to your studio. And then thank goodness for cell phones with earbuds. Laya: Right. We still call it phone patch -- Anne: Right? Laya: -- but it's like, we're actually, we've upped the tech a little bit. Right? Anne: Yup. Laya: It's not necessarily a phone, but yeah, you're right. There's so many clients and partners out there that need to pass it on to somebody that isn't used to this program, you know, is used to just going into a studio and letting somebody else handle it. So you gotta make it easy for them with something as simple as a phone number -- Anne: Yeah. Exactly. Laya: -- or a Zoom link or something that they're used to. You got to meet them where they are. Anne: Yeah. I think that's your client non-technical person that needs to be able to hear what you're doing with their copy -- Laya: Yeah. Anne: -- is a phone patch, the cell phone number, the Zoom connection, Skype connection. And that's just something that you want to make sure that as a talent, when they are connected, they are either muted when you are obviously voicing the copy or, you know, you are muting them so that you're not getting the feedback. Or even if they're in your ear, you don't want that to bleed through. So -- Laya: Yeah. Anne: -- make sure that you have a good mute system or you know how to mute clients when you are speaking the copy. Laya: Yeah. Anne: And that I would say the very elemental client connect to us in our studio, those are some viable methods. Now what about connecting to studios? We have a couple of different options here. Laya: Yeah, we do. And I even want to go back a step if, if that's all right with you, Anne. Anne: Sure. Laya: Because I found that more and more of my clients who are used to into a studio may not be used to connecting now virtually with a studio. And so they're just coming straight to me as the voice talent saying like, how do we get this done? And so I offer a few solutions, right? I say, you know, um, I have multiple connectivity options. You can connect with me via the digital methods, which would be Skype, Google Hangouts, Zoom -- funny story as a side, I offered just to Zoom and Skype to a client that works with Google. And so they were like -- Anne: Oh wow. Laya: -- oh no, we do Google Hangouts. And I was like, oh yeah, of course -- Anne: Got to offer that. Laya: That's now, don't want to offend Google. So of course that's in the mix or phone patch, you know, I say, if you've got a conference line -- Anne: Sure. Laya: -- but right from the jump I say, you know, or I would prefer to connect with a studio of your choice, or I can recommend one for SourceConnect or ipDTL -- Anne: ipDTL. Laya: -- or anything like that that makes it easy on them. So I first put it in their court when approached with it, because I do find that so many times, they're like, uh, how do we do this? You know, at least that was the case in the very beginning. Anne: Well, I want to add to that list, in addition to your visual hangouts, if they just need an audio hangout, there's also Bodalgo Call. There's also -- Laya: Yes. Anne: Right? That they can just connect up audibly. And by the way, I had some international clients that Zoom did not work. And so they had to use Skype. And that was the only thing that -- Laya: Skype is another one, yeah. Anne: -- will work. Really depends on certain protocols, I know, of security. Laya: Yep. Anne: And so one was Skype. Another person could only connect via Zoom. The other, if it's audio only, it could be, but Bodalgo Call. There's also Open Connection. I'm trying to think what else is -- I think now, um, I'm just trying to think. There is a new capability of I -- maybe it's Mac iOS that you can connect an audio call. I'm gosh, I'm now, I'm going to, I'm going to go crazy trying to think of it. But anyways, there are those other options where if you just need an audio connection where they listen in, you can offer that, where they don't have to dial a number, but they can join in via computer. Laya: Yes. Anne: And there's audio options for any of these. Laya: Oh for sure there is. Anne: Yeah. So obviously if you don't have to have video, which I recommend, to be honest with you. I don't know if I really want people that in my booth, you know, when I'm performing -- Laya: I agree with you. Anne: -- like you don't have to look at me. Laya: I agree with you. In fact, I want to touch on that a little bit, because in addition to that, like I hear Zoom and I'm like, oh my gosh, I got to like, look presentable. Anne: Gotta do my hair. Laya: But a couple of key points there for me have been, well first, I'll ask them what their preferred connectivity, but I'll asterisk with, if you find that playback during our session is going to be essential -- Anne: Oh yes. Laya: -- for decision-making with your client -- some clients are just like, no, just send me -- I just want to listen in. And they're very low hassle, I don't know. Anne: Yep. Laya: They're easy to deal with. And so that you've worked with them in the past. It's no big deal. They just want to listen in. And sometimes they've got a lot of people on the line, and a lot of personalities and they definitely want playback. And I said, well, hey, unless we're connecting to a studio, which can absolutely engineer that -- Anne: Sure. Laya: -- the only way that my capabilities are going to allow playback are through Zoom. I haven't found any other playback capabilities, albeit I haven't looked very hard, but I'm like you, have an Apollo. I use Adobe Audition. And I have found that the only thing I can do playback on is through Zoom, if they're not using SourceConnect, of course. What are your options? Have you found any? Anne: So that's really interesting because I have an Apollo, and I use Twisted Wave. So my Apollo acts as a virtual audio output device -- Laya: Interesting. Anne: -- because I can play it within Twisted Wave, and they'll be able to hear it, which is something I didn't have until I got the Apollo. Other interfaces, they did not act as that. There's some software that you can load on your computer that can act as a virtual audio output device, like Sound Flower. The other thing too, if I need to play back for a client or a studio, I use ipDTL, which allows me to -- Laya: Right, perfect. Anne: -- play it back. But it's always like, oh, can we get playback? And I'm like, all right, but it's the raw audio. Laya: Yeah, I haven't cleaned it. Anne: I haven't edited anything out. But that's my paranoid, non-engineer, you know -- Laya: Yeah. Anne: -- going, oh my God, all right, I can play it back, but you're going to hear that mouth or something. Laya: And those curveballs can really throw you off your performance games. Anne: Yeah, yeah. Laya: So it's important to know all these avenues. And I'm so glad you pointed out those playback options. It might just be in my lack of knowledge or education -- Anne: ipDTL. Laya: -- on the matter. So I'm going to look that up, but yeah, of course. So I'm going to offer that. They're my partner now too. Anne: But if I had my choice, if I had my choice, if I am on the line with a studio, and I'm connected via ipDTL, SourceConnect, Connection Open, and I think there's another high quality audio connection option out there right now. Forgive me that I can't think of it right now, but ipDTL and SourceConnect are the two big ones, but I -- Laya: And SessionLink, I think I've done -- Anne: Oh, SessionLink. Laya: Yep. Anne: That's it. That's the one I was thinking of. So those are options when you want to connect up to a studio, and when that happens, I love it because the studio engineer can typically do the playback. Laya: Same, same. Anne: Yeah. Laya: I'm like, yes, I can finally just focus on me -- Anne: Being an actor. Laya: Yes. Uh, I wish buyers knew what a better performance they probably get -- Anne: Right? Laya: -- and a smoother transition when they get, when you're dealing with a studio and an engineer. It really does take the pressure off. So let's talk about what happens when it doesn't go so well. Anne: You're flustered. Laya: Yeah. Anne: So number one, I'm going to say this, just from experience and just from a tech experience as well. Not just voice over, but being, being a techhead for 20 years, always have a backup plan -- Laya: Always. Anne: -- because things can fail. Connections can fail. I've been noticing recently there's been some conversations about one of the providers not working so well. I've had my days where, you know, things just happen. Like ipDTL is slow or weird or something doesn't connect, or SourceConnect, right? It's just not working the way -- maybe SourceConnect Now. Oh, that's the other one, by the way, they can do playback, probably, SourceConnect Now. Laya: Okay. Anne: So those things, what do you do if one thing doesn't work? You always have to have your backup. And you know, in the heat of the moment when the client is there, and you don't know when you can reschedule that session, you certainly don't want your interface failing. You don't want your Internet network to fail. So if you can have backup points all along the way, meaning what if your microphone, I don't know. All of a sudden your microphone like dies, right? Do you have another microphone? Can you swap it out quickly? Do you have another audio interface? Do you have another network, Internet network, like a backup Internet connection? Those are things that I think as a professional, you need to have those in place. So that during an important session, usually when it's a live directed session, I'm going to say it's probably a pretty important, not that our self-directed sessions aren't important, but when it's a live directed session, there's that added pressure. You've got the client usually on the line or the studio on the line that you're trying to make a good impression. Like, hey, I got this. And you certainly don't want to seem any less than professional or prepared -- Laya: Yes. Anne: -- when something bad might happen. So that's my first, my first advice. Laya: I can't agree with you more. And let me just share from experience. Anne: Yes. Laya: First of all, it happens to all of us -- Anne: It does. Laya: -- and we're all human. So just admitting calmly and in control to whoever may be affected -- Anne: Calmly. Laya: -- you know, we're having an issue -- exactly. Oh my God, freaking out, is not the way to go with your clients. But if you can admit, hey, you know what, I'm experiencing something that's unusual right now. Give me just a few minutes. And if we can break for five, I'll get right back to you. Sometimes -- Anne: You are like the epitome of calm. I'm just saying, like the way you just said that, I just love it. I'm not quite sure I could say it so coolly, but you just -- that was awesome. Laya: You know, just give me a moment. Anne: Just a moment. Laya: Get your meditation voice on. No, so to me, I've actually had this happen on two occasions where the power surge has gone out, like a brown-out in the middle of the afternoon for no reason. There's not even -- it's like a rolling blackouts. You know, sometimes, city's done -- that has happened to me once before. And let me tell you, I had a plan and I had a backup. Now I wasn't able to use the Apollo because that's powered, but I have -- Sound Devices has another DAW system that I use. And I was able to use -- my power was backed up -- Anne: Nice. Laya: -- and flipped on a candle. And I was able to conduct a session -- Anne: Careful in the booth with that candle. Laya: Exactly. Right, right. Having a power outage. Anne: Yeah. Laya: I mean, something as crazy as that. Anne: Yeah. Laya: And of course everyone understands, but you know, they may have a lot riding on the session as well, under deadline, with a new client and what have you. So you got to have a backup. Anne: Can I just say that absolutely the power is super important, and you may not even realize until you're live, right, and with a client, your Internet connection failing -- Laya: Yes. Yep. Anne: -- or especially when you're connected wifi. And if you're connected directly to a studio or to a client, it really does help to have that dependable, reliable Internet connection that doesn't have dropouts. Laya: Yep. Anne: And wifi, I'm sorry, guys. I know wifi is convenient and easy and not a lot of people are necessarily technical or know, but it helps to be directly connected -- Laya: Definitely. Anne: -- to your router, to your Internet at all possible costs because that is going to be one less point of failure. So. Laya: Yep, hard-wired in is the way to go for sure. As soon as you can, uh, establish that connection with your studio or with your home Internet, and even upgrade to a business Internet system where you've got more bandwidth, hopefully you, you know, maybe even got fiber in your area. Anne: Sure, yeah. Laya: That's just some key stuff. And that way you can use, if -- as your backup can be your wifi hotspot on your cell phone, if need be. That's happened to me before as well. Anne: Oh yeah, that's always my second. My second Internet connection is my wifi hotspot, which is great to have that Internet connection. Now, what about, okay, mentally, right? Technically, look, you just have to be prepared with backups, and you have to understand hopefully enough to know how to disconnect, reconnect. I always, by the way, if I'm going to finish up on the technical aspect of being prepared, take a picture of your connections into your DAW and you know what I mean? And, and into, into the whole booth, right? Your monitor's connected this way, your microphones are connected here into your audio device. And so take pictures of the back of it -- Laya: Great tip. Anne: -- label your cables and -- Laya: Oh, label my cables, that's absolutely key. Anne: Label your cables. Laya: Label the cable should be like hashtag. Anne: Label the cables. Laya: I love it. Anne: And also, well, computer backup too doesn't it hurt. So always have that second. And I use my travel rig as my backup, right? So I have a laptop, and I've got a different interface, and I've got another microphone at the ready pretty much so that I can go there. And, but if you don't, make sure that you're taking pictures of how things are connected. 'Cause even me being a technical person, you know, in the heat of the moment, you want to make sure that you can react quickly. Laya: Yeah. Anne: So now mentally, I had an experience where I had a live directed session with a very large client. One of the clients that -- a client I've always -- a dream client that I've always wanted to be connected to. And I actually experienced an engineer who was trying to, I don't even know how to say it, was trying to impress the client in his own way and made me do like, I'm going to say, three takes of every single line of a fairly large medical narration project. And it became very stressful for me because every single -- and I didn't know, he had planned on doing three takes of every line, and this what should have been an hour session turned into three and a half hours. And by the time that was done, I was exhausted. And mentally I was really frustrated, and it was starting to affect my performance. So -- Laya: Absolutely. Anne: -- mentally you need to be prepared for that kind of a pressure. And sometimes I say, it's good to have a practice session with somebody. If you've got a close connection, even a voiceover talent that you are -- have an accountability group or something, do some test sessions and have things go wrong, and see how you can react. It does help at least the preparedness or feeling better, because mentally, if your performance is suffering, that's tough. What are your -- Laya: Yeah. Anne: -- do you have some suggestions, Laya -- Laya: Oh gosh, sure. Anne: -- for mental, you know, how to recover mentally? Laya: Yeah. Well, sure, and again, that happens to everybody also, right? Anne: Yeah. Laya: Even the pros of the pros, the top people -- Anne: Yep. Laya: -- there's always sometimes just somebody in the group that's either trying to establish themselves -- Anne: Yes. Laya: -- because they're posturing for whatever reason is going on for them, maybe they haven't had the best day, or they're trying to prove themselves -- Anne: Exactly. Laya: -- in the room. And you know what? You just have to remember, you're the hired gun. Anne: Yep. Laya: You're the hired -- you, you're just there to listen and just take orders -- Anne: Yep. Laya: -- and leave your ego at the door -- Anne: Exactly. Laya: -- and just try to serve them and the copy and the client to the best of your ability. But I have been in that situation several times before, and it really doesn't come down to -- if you can remember, it really is not about your performance. Sometimes it's easy to recognize these people sometimes in a session. Anne: Yep, yep. Laya: You know, first sometimes even taking a step back, there's a lot of people coming at you. And so when I'm in a self-directed session or not a self-directed, but when I'm engineering the session myself, and I'm not connected to a studio, and if I am, sometimes there's a lot of cooks in the kitchen, and there's a lot of people coming at you with all different opinions. Anne: Sure. Laya: And sometimes I'll listen to them all. If it calms down, you know, maybe it's bubbling up for a minute or two -- if it calms down, I'm able to get the focus again. I usually come back and say, okay, so-and-so, so tell me, this is how I thought I heard that. This is my translation of that. But to keep it super clear, moving forward, do you think I can get that direction from just one person? And sometimes it's a reframe, and that sets a neutral tone -- Anne: Sure. Laya: -- for all the personalities that are on the phone. Right? Anne: Yeah. Laya: And so, because that can mess with you mentally as well. Anne: Oh yeah. Laya: And so I think establishing that and like re-getting control of the session, that can help when all those personalities are chiming it, or they're asking for multiple retakes, and you're just, you're like, well, but I'm doing it. You know? You start to second guess yourself. Anne: That's the thing that's such an -- I'm glad you brought that up because it's so important when they're asking for a different take. And sometimes the people that are asking for it, they don't know how to ask for it. Laya: Yep. They don't know the language to use. Anne: They don't know the language. Laya: Right? Anne: And hey, sometimes even people that do know the language don't know how to ask for that. And so you have to be very aware that this is something that will happen to you. And at one point, if they're asking you for so many retakes, then your confidence level starts to really fluctuate. Laya: Yeah. Anne: And I like in my head, I'm like, oh my God, did I not give them what they want? Well, I just gave them that. What, how did that not work? Really? And so that sort of conversation that you have in your head, that can really start to affect your performance. My go-to is breathing, just breathe, you know, in through the nose and exhale. I just heard my nose [phonetic]. Laya: Yeah. Anne: Breathing in deeply. And that helps a lot. Laya: Even on top of that shaking, like sometimes it's okay to say, hey, you know what? Anne: I need a minute. Laya: I needed just a moment. If you can take a break for just a few minutes, let me shake it off real quick -- Anne: Yup. Laya: -- and come right back to you with a fresh set of ears on my own, you know, in my own headphones. Anne: Yup. Laya: And maybe that will help. Anne: Yeah. Laya: 'Cause I want to make sure that you're getting exactly what you want out of this session. Anne: Exactly. Laya: And as long as you continue to put it back on them, but are humble and human enough to say, you know what? I just need a moment. Um, let me get some water, step out for just a second. And I'll be right back with you. Anne: Yeah. Laya: And sometimes that's enough to break up even them in their own headspace. Maybe they didn't even realize that's like a good way to send a signal. Like, you're overdoing it. Anne: Yup. Laya: And the talent needs to regroup. And that's a very professional thing to do. Anne: Yeah. Laya: And it's totally acceptable. Anne: And sometimes, sometimes they'll either say too much or they won't say anything and you'll be like, oh, okay. Or they'll just, you'll do a number of retakes. And then there'll be like, okay. And then you'd be like, oh my God, I didn't give them what they need. That's it. I'm done. They're never hiring me again. That's the other kind of like, self-deprecating language that might happen -- Laya: Oh, for sure. Anne: -- in your head, is like, oh, okay. They didn't react. And so what are they thinking? And so that can make it a little bit scary -- Laya: Yeah. Anne: -- in your head. So just, you know, for me, I love how, you know, let's take a moment. That always helps me and the breathing, and understand that sometimes you may be giving them exactly what they need, and they're just not responding. Laya: Yeah. Maybe they're distracted. They're something else. Anne: That's right. Laya: They're scrolling on their phone or another email's come through. Anne: That's right. Laya: That can be a challenge -- Anne: Yeah. Laya: -- when you're working virtually like this, you don't know what the other person is experiencing. Anne: Yeah. Laya: I remember one time recently I was on a call with two producers that were partners in two different states, and they clearly did not gel up. They were neck and neck. Anne: Yup. Laya: One of the producers had her kids screaming in the background. So it's in those moments that you have to kind of quickly empathize and identify where the energy source is and the chaos that may be happening for them. Anne: Sure, absolutely. Laya: Bring the calm to the mic and say, you know, what, what I'm hearing from you is this, what I'm hearing from you is this. Would you agree that it's more like this, and you want -- this is the end result here? And then also, like you said, kind of command the room to the best of your ability. You know? Anne: Yeah. Laya: Sometimes it's easy to say, to get the best performance today and I want to deliver what you want, I'm going to need everybody to mute their microphones, and let me get one source of direction or feedback going. And if they don't give it to you, like you're saying, say, okay, so can I get some feedback? You're welcome to ask the questions. And I think sometimes we forget that we can take control of those sessions. Anne: Yeah. Laya: It's one of the most empowering things to feel when you finally feel confident enough to do so. Anne: And the other thing too is just to know that these things do happen, right? It's so hard to predict what can happen in the booth when you have multiple people, what kind of like -- did you mention -- what kind of day they're having, too many people like that are hearing it differently than their head. Remember that we all hear the copy differently in our heads. The best thing you need to do is try to align that sound to what the client wants, right? And that client can differ. You could have a, I don't know, you could have a one, a marketing director or the, that hears it one way. And you could have a producer that hears it a different way. And as you mentioned, the two are clashing, and they might be at the same time directing you or even not. Let's say you've done the session. And then they come back and ask you for something different. So understand that that's absolutely something that can happen. And it has nothing to do with your performance. Laya: Right. Anne: And you could have given them exactly what they asked for. And a lot of times, I say this all the time, the way that you got the job is not always the way that you'll be directed to do the job once called upon to do it. Laya: So much so. Anne: Right? Laya: Right? That happens all the time. Anne: Because you have a different director, you have a different set of ears, and you have somebody that hears it differently directing you. So it is always very subjective to the person that is directing. And also, I'm just going to say, if you get the check, that's it. Consider it an amazing day. Laya: Yep. Anne: Consider you've given the client what they've wanted. It may not be what you agree or think is the way it should be. Right? But you've given the client what they wanted. And that's the most important thing. Laya: Yeah. And I would say that the -- in the end, no matter how the session goes, I always like to close with a big thank you. Thank you. I -- first of all -- Anne: Yes. Laya: -- I write, and I forgot to say this in the very beginning, but I've always got a notepad with me. As people are making their introductions, I always write down everyone's name so that I -- Anne: Good idea. Laya: -- call of them by name throughout the session, to the best of my ability I can call the director or the producer, whoever's calling the shots by their name, repeat their names again and again so they know that you're very focused on who you're dealing with, even though you're not in the same space. Anne: Sure. Laya: And then at the end close by being, you know, thank you very much for having me. I'm so proud that you selected me for this project. I really hope to have the opportunity to work with you again in the future. Anne: Absolutely. Laya: Good luck on your project and thanks again. Anne: And bam. Laya: And then I think the engineer, if there is one and, you know, wrap it in a nice bow -- Anne: Yep, yep. Laya: -- so they know no matter what, you left with a big smile -- Anne: Sure. Laya: -- and very grateful for their time -- Anne: Yes. Laya: -- and for selecting you. And then, you know, maybe they'll remember, you know, it, wasn't just an awkward, like, okay, thanks. Thanks, guys. Bye. Anne: Yeah. End it professionally gracefully, and you know, again, it's one of those things, then don't stay too long either at the very end. Laya: No, yeah. Anne: Don't expect -- there should be nothing, except thank you. It was a pleasure working with you and good luck with the project. They do not owe you anything else. They don't owe you praise. They don't owe you, hey, well, you know, we'll contact you for the next job. They owe you nothing -- Laya: Yeah. Anne: -- because that is a job. And ultimately, if you've done it to their satisfaction, you'll get paid for it. And so don't be, don't be emotionally affected by any of it at the end. Just close it warmly with a nice little bow. I like that. Wrap it up with a bow and onto the next one. Laya: Yep. And I would say the other thing, and I've -- I made this mistake early on. I realized very quickly it was inappropriate, but the end of the session is not a good time to say, hey, I'd love a copy of that spot when you're done. Anne: Yeah. Oh gosh. Yes, yes, exactly. Laya: Unless you really know the person -- Anne: Good point. Laya: -- or like, it's just, you one-on-one, I'd love to see what you come up with. You know, when this is thing is done. Anne: Yep. Laya: If it's not that easy and comfortable, that is not the time to be asking for anything. Just bow out gracefully. Anne: I totally agree with you right there. Totally. That makes you look a little bit, I don't know, desperate, maybe? Laya: Hungry. Yeah, a little hungry. Anne: And I would say it's a good opportunity for you maybe a month or two down the road when you know the spot's been released to maybe reconnect and then say, hey, thanks so much. Just wanted to say it was a wonderful opportunity. And by the way, if, at that point, if, hey, if you wouldn't mind, is there a way that I might be able to see the finished product? I love it when engineers and producers send me the -- that's the best when they send it to me when it's done. And I'm like, oh my God, like too few people do that. Laya: Yeah. I wish they knew how valuable that was, that currency is. Anne: Yeah. Laya: You know? Anne: I have a couple of really awesome producers that I work with who will just send me the spot, like on, I don't have to ask for it. They send me the spot when it's done. And I'm like, oh, this is so awesome. So that gives you that permission to share it. And just, it's just a good thing to see your finished product. But -- Laya: Yes. Anne: -- yeah. Laya: And I would like to mention too, that part of that follow-up process, only when appropriate -- Anne: Yes. Laya: -- but it helps to write down those names because a -- Anne: Sure. Laya; -- few weeks later, or even a few days later, in some instances -- you got to feel it out and trust your gut -- if it was appropriate for you to make contact, meaning your agent didn't book that for you -- Anne: Right. Laya: -- and there's not a middleman or anything like that -- Anne: Yeah. Laya: -- having their name or their studio affiliation, it'll at least allow you to find them or follow their studio on Instagram. Sometimes we are given the name of the studio or their production company that's working with it or the agency that's creating the piece -- Anne: Sure. Laya: -- not necessarily the client. Great time to make a followup connection, be it LinkedIn, Instagram, YouTube, and follow their work, continue to champion them and cheer them on. Anne: Yes. Laya: Or just drop them a line on LinkedIn and say, hey, I had a great session with you last week. Just wanted to say and take care of yourself. Hope all is well. Anne: Yes. Laya: I look forward to keeping an eye on your creative output, you know, in the months to come or something like that. It's a great way to follow that up too. Anne: Excellent point about if you get this work through an agent, and I just want to reiterate this, if you get work through your agent, I strongly recommend reconnecting with your agent first, before. Laya: Yes. Anne: Like don't connect the client directly -- Laya: No. Anne: -- connect to the client directly after the job or at any point, really, if it came through your agent, because that's a relationship that that agent has worked probably for a number of days, months, years, whatever, to connect and to secure. And you don't want to just kind of go in between that. So handle that professionally. Always go through your agent if the agent is the one that set that up for, if you have any questions or if you want to connect or say, do you think it would be okay if I sent them a thank you or ask for a copy of it? So excellent point. Wow. It was a great discussion today, Laya. Laya: Yeah, love these BOSSes in the booth. Anne: BOSSes in the booth. Laya: I know our listeners are going to be able to take control of those situations -- Anne: Yeah. Laya: -- because all of them can crop up. But in this day, this modern times, you really need to wear multiple hats -- Anne: That's right. Laya: -- in the booth. And that comes down to client relations, to engineering, to tack -- Anne: Yep. Laya: -- to being your actor, your best performance self, all those things with eloquence and grace, and then you'll win. Anne: There you go. Laya: You know, you'll be the BOSS in the booth. Anne: Modern BOSSes in the booth. All right, I'm going to give a great, big shout-out to my modern connectivity -- Laya: Yes. Anne: -- through ipDTL, our sponsor. We love them. Thank you so much, ipDTL, for always connecting me with BOSSes like Laya. You too can be a BOSS connected ipDTL person. Find out more at ipdtl.com. All right, guys, have an amazing week. Laya: Thanks, everybody. Anne: We'll see you next week. Bye. Laya: Bye-bye. >> Join us next week for another edition of VO BOSS with your host Anne Ganguzza. And take your business to the next level. Sign up for our mailing list at voboss.com and receive exclusive content, industry revolutionizing tips and strategies, and new ways to rock your business like a BOSS. Redistribution with permission. Coast to coast connectivity via ipDTL.

Kottke Ride Home
Wed. 01/12 - Go Ahead and Listen To This Episode at 1.5x Speed

Kottke Ride Home

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 14:16


The real physics of Wile E. Coyote's 10 billion volt electromagnet. Plus, cannabis can prevent SARS CoV-2 from spreading. Technically. And does listening to this podcast at double speed decrease your comprehension? Sponsors:Indeed, Get a free $75 sponsored job credit at Indeed.com/goodnewsLendtable, Use code KOTTKE at Lendtable.com to get an extra $50 added to your Lendtable balanceLinks:The Physics of Wile E. Coyote's 10 Billion-Volt Electromagnet (Wired)Scientists: Cannabis Can Prevent COVID-19 Infection (Vice)Oregon State research shows hemp compounds prevent coronavirus from entering human cells (EurkAlert)How much do students learn when they double the speed of their class videos? (Science Daily)Play mini golf to see how politicians tilt elections using maps (Washington Post)Kottke.OrgJackson Bird on TwitterSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Greater Than Code
266: Words Carry Power – Approaching Inclusive Language with Kate Marshall

Greater Than Code

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 58:04


01:48 - Kate's Superpower: Empathy * Absorbing Energy * Setting Healthy Energetic Boundaries * Authenticity * Intent vs Impact 10:46 - Words and Narratives Carry Power; Approaching Inclusive Language * Taking Action After Causing Harm * Get Specific, But Don't Overthink * Practice Makes Progress * Normalize Sharing Pronouns * No-CodeConf (https://webflow.com/nocodeconf) * No-CodeSchool (https://nocodeschool.co/) * Gender Expresion Does Not Always Equal Gender Identity 21:27 - Approaching Inclusive Language in the Written Word * Webflow Accessibility Checklist (https://webflow.com/accessibility/checklist) * Asking For Advice * Do Your Own Research/Work 29:18 - Creating Safe Places, Communities, and Environments * Absorbing and Asking * Authenticity (Cont'd) * Adaptation to Spaces * Shifting Energy 42:34 - Building Kula (https://kulayogadenver.com/) While Working in Tech * Community Care, Mutual Aid-Centered Model * Using Privilege to Pave the Way For More People * Alignment Reflections: John: The dichotomy between perfectionism and authenticity. Arty: Words carry power. Kate: Having an open heart is how you can put any of this into action. This episode was brought to you by @therubyrep (https://twitter.com/therubyrep) of DevReps, LLC (http://www.devreps.com/). To pledge your support and to join our awesome Slack community, visit patreon.com/greaterthancode (https://www.patreon.com/greaterthancode) To make a one-time donation so that we can continue to bring you more content and transcripts like this, please do so at paypal.me/devreps (https://www.paypal.me/devreps). You will also get an invitation to our Slack community this way as well. Transcript: PRE-ROLL: Software is broken, but it can be fixed. Test Double's superpower is improving how the world builds software by building both great software and great teams. And you can help! Test Double is hiring empathetic senior software engineers and DevOps engineers. We work in Ruby, JavaScript, Elixir and a lot more. Test Double trusts developers with autonomy and flexibility at a remote, 100% employee-owned software consulting agency. Looking for more challenges? Enjoy lots of variety while working with the best teams in tech as a developer consultant at Test Double. Find out more and check out remote openings at link.testdouble.com/greater. That's link.testdouble.com/greater. JOHN: Welcome to Greater Than Code. I'm John Sawers and I'm here with Arty Starr. ARTY: Thanks, John. And I'm here with our guest today, Kate Marshall. Kate is a copywriter and inclusivity activist living in Denver. Since entering tech 4 years ago, she's toured the marketing org from paid efforts to podcast host, eventually falling in love with the world of copy. With this work, she hopes to make the web a more welcoming place using the power of words. Outside of Webflow, you'll find Kate opening Kula, a donation-based yoga studio, and bopping around the Mile High City with her partner, Leah. Welcome to the show, Kate. KATE: Hi, thank you so much! ARTY: So we always start our shows with our famous first question. What is your superpower and how did you acquire it? KATE: My superpower, I've been thinking about this. My superpower is empathy. It can also be one of my biggest downfalls [laughs], which I actually think happens more often than not with any superpower. I once heard from a child, actually, they always seem to know best that too much of the good, good is bad, bad. [laughter] So it turns out sometimes too much empathy can be too overwhelming for my system, but it has really driven everything that I've done in my career and my personal life. As for how I acquired it, I don't know that you can really acquire empathy. I think it's just something you have, or you don't. I've always been extremely intuitive and if you're going through something, it's likely that I can feel it. So I think I'm just [laughs] I hate to steal Maybelline's line, but I think I was born with it. JOHN: You talked about having a downside there and I've heard – and I'm curious, because most people talk about empathy as a positive thing and wanting more people to develop more empathy, but I'd to love hear you talk a little bit more about what you see the downsides are. KATE: Yeah. As someone who struggles with her own mental health issues, it can be really overwhelming for me to really take on whatever it is you're going through. Especially if it's a loved one, you tend to care more about what they're feeling, or what they're going through and an empath truly does absorb the energy of what's happening around them. So although, it does influence a lot of the work that I do, both in my full-time career and opening my yoga studio and everything in between, it's also hard sometimes to set those boundaries, to set healthy, really energetic boundaries. It's hard enough to voice your boundaries to people, but setting energetic boundaries is a whole other ballgame. So it can tend to feel overwhelming at times and bring you down if the energy around you is lower than what you want it to be. ARTY: So what kind of things do you do to try and set healthy, energetic boundaries? KATE: Ah. I do a lot of what some people would call, including myself, woo-woo practices. [chuckles] Obviously, I practice yoga. I teach yoga. I'm super passionate about holistic, or energetic healing so I go to Reiki regularly. I'm in therapy, talk therapy. All of those things combined help me build this essentially an energetic shield that I can psych myself up to use any time I'm leaving the apartment. If it feels a high energy day, or if I'm meeting up with a friend who I know is going through something, I really have to set those boundaries is. Same thing kind of at work, too. So much of the time that we spend in our lives is spent at work, or interacting with coworkers or colleagues and same thing. Everyone's going through their own journey and battles, and you have to carry that energetic shield around you wherever you go. JOHN: One way I've often thought about having those sort of boundaries is the more I know who I am, the more what the limits of me are and the barrier between me and the universe is. So the work that I do, which includes therapy and other things, to understand myself better and to feel like I know what's me and what's not me, helps me have those boundaries. Because then I know if there's something going on with someone else and I can relate to it, but not get swept up by it. KATE: Yeah. It's so funny you say that because I was actually just having a conversation with a friend a couple weeks ago that has really stuck with me. I was kind of feeling like I was messing up, essentially. Like I was not fully able to honor, or notice all of the triggers of the people around me. I think especially at the end of the year and as a queer person who is surrounded by queer community, it can be really tough around the holidays. So that energy can just be generally more charged and I was finding it difficult to reconcile with my idea of perfection in that I really want to honor every person around me who has triggers, who has boundaries that maybe haven't been communicated, and it almost feels like you're almost always crossing some sort of line, especially when you're putting those perfectionism expectations on yourself. My friend was like, “I don't think it's as much about being perfect at it as much as it is feeling like you're being authentically yourself and really authentically interacting with those people.” I don't know if I can really voice what the connection is between being able to honor triggers and boundaries of the people around you and feeling like your authentic self, but there's something about it that feels really connected to me. As long as you're trying your best and feeling like you're coming from a place of love, or connection, or compassion, or empathy whatever feels most to you, that's really all we can do, right? JOHN: Yeah. I feel like that authenticity is such a tricky concept because the thoughts that you're having about wanting to be perfect and take care of everyone and make sure you're not triggering anybody and not stepping on any of your own things, that's also part of you that is authentically you. You may not want it to be that way, but it still is. [laughs]. ARTY: Yeah. JOHN: So I still don't have a really clear sense in my mind what authenticity really is. I think probably it settles down to being a little bit more in the moment, rather than up in the thinking, the judging, the worrying, and being able to be present rather than – [overtalk] ARTY: Totally. JOHN: Those other things, but it is tricky. KATE: Yeah. It can be tricky. Humans, man. [laughter] It really is like being a human and part of the human experience is going to be triggering other people. It's going to be causing harm. It's going to be causing trauma to other humans. That's just part of it. I think the more you can get comfy with that idea and then also just really feeling like you're doing everything you can to stay connected to your core, which usually is in humans is a place of love. You're rooted in love for the people around you. How could you criticize yourself too much when you know that you're coming from that place? ARTY: I feel like things change, too as you get feedback. In the context of any intimate relationship where you've got emotionally connected relationship with another person where you are more unguarded and you're having conversations about things that are more personal, that have at least the potential to hurt and cause harm. Like sometimes we do things not meaning to and we end up hurting someone else accidentally, but once that happens—and hopefully, you have an open dialogue where you have a conversation about these things and learn about these things and adapt—then I think the thing to do is honor each person as an individual of we're all peoples and then figure out well, what can we do to adapt how we operate in this relationship and look out for both people's best interests and strive for a win-win. If we don't try and do that, like if we do things that we know we're harming someone else and we're just like, “Well, you should just put up with that,” [laughs], or whatever. I think that's where it becomes problematic is at the same time, we all have our own limitations and sometimes, the best thing to do is this relationship doesn't work. The way that we interact causes mutual harm and we can't this a win-win relationship and the best thing to do sometimes is to separate, even though it hurts because it's not working. KATE: Yeah. I feel like sometimes it's a classic case of intent versus impact, too. Like what's your intention going into a conversation and then how does that end up actually impacting that person and how can you honor that and learn from that? That's actually one thing that I love so much about being a writer is that words do carry so much power—written word, spoken word, whatever it is. They hold so much power and they can cause harm whether we want them to, or not. Part of being an empath is caring a lot about people's lived experiences and I really see it as more than putting – being a writer and doing this every day, I see it so much more than just putting words on a page and hoping signs up for the beta, or watches the thing registers, or the conference. It's words can foster connection, words can build worlds for people; they can make people feel like they belong and I believe that I'm on this planet to foster that connection with each other and with ourselves. So it all connects for me. It all comes back around whether we're talking about being in a romantic relationship, or our relationship with our parents, or our caregivers, or the work that I do every day it all comes back to that connection and really wanting to make people feel more connected to themselves, to each other, and like they have a place with words. ARTY: Yeah. It's very powerful. Words and narratives, I would say too, just thinking about the stories that we tell ourselves, the stories that we tell one another that become foundational in our culture. It's all built upon were words. Words shape the ideas in our head. They shape our thoughts. They shape how we reflect on things, how we feel about things, and then when people give us their words, we absorb those and then those become part of our own reflections. KATE: Yeah. ARTY: We affect one another a lot. I think that's one of the things I'm just seeing and talking to you is just thinking about how much we affect one another through our everyday interactions. KATE: Yeah, and I think a lot of this comes down to – there's something you said earlier that resonated in that it's really about the action you take after you cause the harm, or after you say the thing that hurts the other person and it's less about – and that's what made me say intent versus impact because you see the impact, you acknowledge it, and you make a decision to lessen that next time, or to be aware, more aware next time. This is really at the core of all the work I do for inclusive language as well. It's just the core principle of the words we use carry a lot of power. And I was actually just chatting with someone in the No-Code space. We connected through Webflow a couple weeks ago and he said, “I think people are so scared to get it wrong when it comes to inclusive language,” and I experience this all the time. People freeze in their tracks because they don't know how address someone and then they're so scared to get it wrong and they're like, “Oh, so sorry, sorry, sorry, sorry,” and they're so apologetic. And then that makes it worse and it's just a whole thing. In this conversation, we were talking specifically about misgendering people. My partner is non-binary. They're misgendered every single day when we go to restaurants, when we are just out and about. So this is something that is a part of my life every day. I told him that fear is so real and I carry that fear, too because I don't want to hurt people because I want to like get it right. It comes back to that perfectionism, that expectation that I put on myself, especially as a queer person to get it right all the time. But so much of the good stuff lies in how you approach it and then how you fix it when you mess it up. Like, it's not so much about the thing, it's about the way that you approach it. If you approach inclusive language with an open mind, an open heart, and a real willingness, like true willingness to learn, that's what's important going into it and then you're already doing the work. You're already an ally. You're already however you want to put it. And then when you use an ableist word, or you use a racist word, or you misgender someone, your actions for following that speak volumes. I think we can really get caught up in the action itself and it's more about how you go into it and then how you try to fix it. ARTY: So I'm thinking for listeners that might identify with being in a situation of being in the headlights and not knowing how to respond, or what to do. Other than what you were just talking about with coming at it with an open heart, are there any specific recommendations you might have for how to approach inclusive language? KATE: Yeah. Yeah, I have a couple really, really good ones. So often, the way to speak more inclusively, or to write more inclusively is just to get more specific about what you're trying to say. So instead of saying, “Oh, that's so crazy,” which is ableist, you can say, “Oh, that's so unheard of.” That's a good example. Or instead of unnecessarily gendering something you're saying like, “Oh, I'm out of wine, call the waitress over.” It's server instead of waiter, or waitress. You kind of start to essentially practice replacing these words and these concepts that are so ingrained into who we are, into society at large, and really starting to disrupt those systems within us with challenging the way that we've described things in the past. So just essentially getting more specific when we're speaking. When it comes to misgendering people specifically, it's really important to not be overly apologetic when you misgender someone. I can give an example. If a server, for example, comes up to me and my partner and says, “Can I get you ladies anything else?” And I say, “Oh, actually my partner uses they/them pronouns. They are not a lady,” and they say, “Oh my God, I'm so sorry. Oh shit!” And then that makes my partner feel bad [chuckles] for putting them in that position and then it's kind of this like ping pong back and forth of just bad feelings. The ideal scenario, the server would say, “Oh, excuse me, can I get you all anything else?” Or, “Can I get you folks anything else?” Or just, if you're speaking about someone who uses they/them pronouns and you say, “Yeah, and I heard she, I mean, they did this thing.” You just quickly correct it and move on. Don't make it into a production. It's okay. We get it. Moving on. Just try not to overthink it, basically. [laughs] Get more specific, but don't overthink it. Isn't that like, what a dichotomy. [laughter] JOHN: That ties back to what you were saying about perfectionism also, right? Like you said, you freeze up if you try and be perfect about it all the time, because you can't always know what someone's pronouns are and so, you have to make a guess at some point and maybe you're going to guess wrong. But it's how you deal with it by not making everybody uncomfortable with the situation. [laughs] KATE: Yeah. JOHN: And like you said, ping pong of bad feelings just amplifies, the whole thing blows out of proportion. You can just be like, “Oh, my apologies.” Her, they, whatever it is and then very quickly move on and then it's forgotten the next minute. Everything moves on from that, but you're not weeping and gnashing and – [laughter] KATE: Yeah. JOHN: Well, it means you don't have to keep feeling bad about it for the next 3 days either, like everyone can move on from that point. KATE: Right. Yeah, and just doing your best to not do it again. JOHN: Yeah. KATE: Once you learn, it's important to really let that try to stick. If you're having trouble, I have a friend who really has trouble with they/them pronouns and they practice with their dog. They talk to their dog about this person and they use they/them pronouns in that. Practice really does make perfect in this – not perfect, okay. Practice really does make progress in this kind of scenario and also, normalize sharing pronouns. JOHN: Yeah. KATE: It's more than just putting it in your Zoom name. It's more than just putting it in your Instagram bio. A good example of really starting this conversation was during Webflow's No-Code Conf, our yearly conference. It was mostly online and we had a live portion of it and every single time we introduced someone new, or introduced ourselves, we said, “My name is Kate Marshall, my pronouns are she/her, and I'm so happy to be here with you today.” Or just asking if you don't know, or if you're in a space with someone new, you say, “What are your pronouns?” It's really is that easy. Webflow made some year-round pride mech that we launched over the summer and we have a cute beanie that says “Ask me my pronouns.” It's like, it's cool to ask. It's fine to ask and that's so much better than unintentionally misgendering someone. It's going to take some time to get there, but normalize it. JOHN: Yeah, and I think there's one key to that that has always stuck out of my mind, which is don't ask pronouns just for the people you think might have different pronouns than you would expect. KATE: Yes. JOHN: Make it part of all the conversations so it's not just singling somebody out of a group and saying, “I want to know your pronouns because they're probably different.” That's not good. KATE: Right, because gender expression does not always equal gender identity. JOHN: Yeah. KATE: You can't know someone's gender identity from the way that they express their gender and that's also another huge misconception that I think it's time we talk more about. JOHN: So we've been talking a lot about conversations and person-to-person interactions and inclusive language there. But a lot of what you do is it on the writing level and I imagine there's some differences there. So I'm curious as to what you see as far as the things that you do to work on that in the written form. KATE: Yeah. So this is actually a really great resource that I was planning on sharing with whoever's listening, or whoever's following along this podcast. There is a really wonderful inclusive language guidelines that we have published externally at Webflow and I own it, I update it regularly as different things come in and inclusive language is constantly evolving. It will never be at a final resting point and that's also part of why I love it so much because you truly are always growing. I'm always learning something new about inclusive language, or to make someone feel more included with the words that I'm writing. This table has, or this resource has ableist language, racist language, and sexist language tables with words to avoid, why to avoid them, and some alternatives and just some general principles. I reference it constantly. Like I said, it's always evolving. I actually don't know how many words are on there, but it's a good amount and it's a lot of things have been surfaced to me that I had no idea were racist. For instance, the word gypped. Like if you say, “Oh, they gypped me” is actually racist. It's rooted in the belief that gypsy people are thieves. [chuckles] So it's things like that we really kind of go deep in there and I reference this constantly. Also, ALS language is a really big consideration, especially in the tech space. So instead of – and this can be avoided most of the time, not all of the time. We do work with a really wonderful accessibility consultant who I run things by constantly. Shout out to Michele. Oh, she was actually on the podcast at one point. Michele Williams, shout out. Lovely human. So a good example is instead of “watch now,” or “listen now,” it's “explore this thing,” “browse this thing,” “learn more”. Just try not to get so specific about the way that someone might be consuming the information that I'm putting down on the page. Stuff like that. It truly does come down to just getting more specific as just a general principle. JOHN: So it sounds to me some of the first steps you take are obviously being aware that you have to mold your language to be more accessible and inclusive, then it's informing yourself of what the common pitfalls are. As you said, you have consultants, you've got guides, you've got places where you can gather this information and then once you have that, then you build that into your mental process for writing what you're writing. KATE: Yeah, and truly just asking questions and this goes for everyone. No one would ever – if I reached out to our head of DEI, Mariah, and said, “Mariah, is this thing offensive?” Or, “How should I phrase this thing to feel more inclusive to more people?” She would never come back at me and say, “Why are you asking me this? You should already know this,” and that is the attitude across the board. I would never fault someone for coming to me and asking me how to phrase something, or how to write something to make it feel better for more people. So it's really a humbling experience [laughs] to be in this position. Again, words carry so much power and I just never take for granted, the power essentially that I have, even if it is just for a tech company. A lot of people are consuming that and I want to make them feel included. JOHN: Yeah. The written face of a company is going to tell readers a lot about the culture of the company, the culture of the community around the product. KATE: Yeah. JOHN: Whether they're going to be welcome there, like what their experience is going to be like if they invest their time to learn about it. So it's really important to have that language there and woven into everything that's written, not just off the corner on the DEI page. KATE: Yeah. That's what I was just about to say is especially if you're a company that claims to prioritize DEI, you better be paying close attention to the words that you're using in your product, on your homepage, whatever it is, your customer support. I've worked with the customer support team at Webflow to make sure that the phrasing feels good for people. It truly does trickle into every single asset of a business and it's ongoing work that does not just end at, like you said, putting it on a DEI page. Like, “We care about this,” and then not actually caring about it. That sucks. [laughs] JOHN: Oh, the other thing before we move too far on from last topic, you're talking about asking for advice. I think one of the keys there, a, being humble and just saying, “I would like to know,” and you're very unlikely to get criticized for simply asking how something can be better. But I feel like one of the keys to doing that well is also not arguing with the person you've asked after they give you an answer. KATE: Right. Yes. Especially if that person is a part of the community that your words are affecting, or that your question is affecting. It's such a tricky balance because it's really not the queer community's job to educate people who are not queer about inclusive language. But when that person is willing to share their knowledge with the you, or willing to share their experience with you, you've got to listen. Your opinions about their lived experience don't come into that conversation, or shouldn't come into that conversation. It's not questioning the information that you're given, but then it's also taking that and doing your own research and asking more people and having conversations with your friends and family trying to widen this breadth of information and knowledge as a community. Like I said, kind of dismantling the things that we're taught growing up by capitalism, by society, everything that kind of unnecessarily separates and then doing better next time. I've actually had conversations with people who are very curious, who come to me with questions and then the next time I interact with them, they're just back to factory settings. That's so disappointing and just makes me feel like my energy could have been better spent having that conversation with someone who is more receptive. So I think it really is just about being open to hearing someone's experience, not questioning it, and then really taking that in and doing the work on your own. JOHN: Yeah, and part of that doing the work is also for the things that you can Google for the things where you can look at it from the guide, do that first before asking for someone's time. KATE: Yeah. JOHN: So that they're not answering the same 101 questions every time that are just written in 15 different blog posts. KATE: Yes. Especially if you're asking a marginalized person to do the work for you. JOHN: Yeah. KATE: Intersectionality matters and putting more work on the shoulders of people who are already weighed down by so much ain't it. [laughs] ARTY: Well, I was wanting to go back to your original superpower that you talked about with empathy. We talked a lot about some of these factors that make empathy of a difficult thing of over empathizing and what kind of factors make that hard. But as a superpower, what kind of superpowers does that give you? KATE: Ah, just being able to really connect to a lot of different people. I mentioned earlier that I believe it's my purpose, it's my life's work on this planet at this time to connect people to themselves and to each other. The more asking I can do and the more absorbing I can do of other people's experiences, the better I am at being able to connect with them and being able to make them feel like they belong in whatever space I'm in. I can't connect with someone if I don't try and get it. Try and get what they're going through, or what their experiences are. That's why I do so much time just talking to people, and that's why I love yoga and why I want to start this studio and open this space. Because we live in a world where we don't have a lot of spaces, especially marginalized communities don't have a lot of spaces that feel like they're being understood, or they're truly being heard, or seen. Me being an empath, I'm able to access that in people more and therefore, bringing them closer to safer spaces, or safer people, safer communities where they really feel like they can exist and be their full, whole, and complete selves. It's really special. ARTY: We also touched this concept of authenticity and it seems like that also comes up in this context of creating these safe spaces and safe communities where people can be their whole selves. So when you think about authenticity, we talked about this being a difficult and fuzzy word, but at the same time, it does have some meaning as to what that means, and these challenges with regards to boundaries and things. But I'm curious, what does authenticity mean to you? How does that come into play with this idea of safety and creating these safe spaces for others as well? KATE: Yeah. I feel like there's so much in there. I think one of the biggest things to accept about the word authenticity, or the concept of authenticity is that it's always changing and it means something different to everyone. We are all authentic to ourselves in different ways and at different times in our lives and I think it's so important to honor the real evolution of feeling authentic. There are times and days where I'm like who even am. It's like what even, but there's always this sort of core, root part of me that I don't lose, which is what we've been talking about. This ability to connect, this feeling of empathy, of compassion, of wanting to really be a part of the human experience. That, to me, kind of always stays and I feel like that's the authentic, like the real, real, authentic parts of me. There are layers to it that are always changing and as people, we are also always evolving and always changing. So those different parts of authenticity could be what you wear that make you feel like your most authentic self. It can be how you interact with your friends, or how you interact with the person, getting your popcorn at the movies, or whatever it is. Those can all feel like parts of your authentic self. That means something different to everyone. But I think that's such a beautiful part about it and about just being human is just how often these things are changing for us and how important it is to honor someone's authenticity, whatever that means for them at that time. Even if it's completely different from what you knew about them, or how you knew them before. It's this constant curiosity of yourself and of others, really getting deeply curious about what feels like you. ARTY: I was wondering about safety because you were talking about the importance of creating these safe communities and safe environments where people could be their whole, complete selves, which sounds a lot like the authenticity thing, but you trying to create space for that for others. KATE: Yeah. Well, the reality of safety is that there's no one space that will ever be a “safe space for everyone,” and that's why I like to say safer spaces, or a safer space for people because you can never – I feel like it's all coming full circle where you can never meet every single person exactly where they need to be met in any given moment. You can just do your best to create spaces that feel safer to them and you do that with authentic connection, with getting curious about who they are and what they love, and just making sure that your heart's really in it. [chuckles] Same with inclusive language. It's all about the way you approach it to make someone feel safer. But I do think it's an I distinction to remember. You're never going to be safe for everyone. A space you create is never going to be safe for everyone. The best you can do is just make it safer for more people. ARTY: When I think about just the opposite of that, of times that I've gone into a group where I haven't felt safe being myself and then when you talk of about being your complete whole self, it's like bringing a whole another level of yourself to a space that may not really fit that space and that seems like it's okay, too. Like we don't necessarily have to bring our full self to all these different spaces, but whatever space we're a part of, we kind of sync up and adapt to it. So if I'm in one space and I feel the kind of vibe, energy, context of what's going on, how people are interacting, the energy they put forth when they speak with whatever sorts of words that they use. I'm going to feel that and adapt to that context of what feels safe and then as more people start adapting to that, it creates a norm that other people that then come and see what's going on in this group come to an understanding about what the energy in the room is like. KATE: Yeah. ARTY: And all it takes is one person to bring a different energy into that to shift the whole dynamic of things. KATE: Yeah. The reality is you'll never be able to change every space and I think that's such a good point. It makes me feel like saying you have to be protective of your energy. If you go into a space and it just doesn't feel right, or there's someone who is in the room that doesn't feel safe to you, or that doesn't feel like they're on the same page as you, it's okay to not feel like you need to change the world in that space. Like you don't always have to go into a space and say, “I'm going to change it.” That is how change is made when you feel safe enough. That's why it's so important to foster that energy from the jump. That's just a foundational thing at a company in a yoga studio, in a home, at a restaurant. It can be changed, but it really should be part of the foundation of making a safer space, or a more inclusive space. Because otherwise, you're asking the people who don't feel safe, who are usually marginalized people, or intersectionally marginalized in some way. You're asking them essentially to put in the work to change what you should have done as the foundation of your space. So it's a such a delicate balance of being protective of your energy and really being able to feel out the places where you feel okay saying something, or making a change, or just saying, “No, this isn't worth it for me. I'm going to go find a space that actually feels a little bit better, or that I feel more community in.” ARTY: And it seems like the other people that are in the group, how those people respond to you. If you shift your energy, a lot of times the people that are in the group will shift their energy in kind. Other times, in a different space, you might try to shift energy and then there's a lot of resistance to that where people are going a different way and so, you get pushed out of the group energy wise. These sorts of dynamics, you can feel this stuff going on of just, I just got outcast out of this group. Those are the kinds of things, though that you need to protect your own energy of even if I'm not included in this group, I can still have a good relationship with me and I can still like me and I can think I'm still pretty awesome and I can find other groups of folks that like me. It definitely, at least for me, I tend to be someone who's like, I don't know, I get out grouped a lot. [laughs] But at the same time, I've gotten used to that and then I find other places where I've got friends that love me and care about me and stuff. So those are recharge places where I can go and get back to a place where I feel solid and okay with myself, and then I'm much more resilient then going into these other spaces and stuff where I might not be accepted, where I might have to be kind of shielded and guarded and just put up a front, and operate in a way that makes everyone else feel more comfortable. KATE: Yeah, and isn't it so powerful to feel cared for? ARTY: I love that. KATE: Like just to feel cared for by the people around you is everything. It's everything. That's it. Just to feel like you are wanted, or you belong. To feel cared for. It can exist everywhere is the thing. In your Slack group, or whatever, you can make people feel cared for. I have never regretted reaching out to a coworker, or a friend, or whoever an acquaintance and saying, “Hey, I love this thing about you,” or “Congratulations on this rad thing you just launched,” or whatever. It's the care that's so powerful. ARTY: I feel like this is one of those things where we can learn things from our own pain and these social interactions and stuff. One of the things that I've experienced is you're in a group and you say something and nobody responds. [laughs] KATE: Yeah. ARTY: And after doing that for a while, you feel like you're just shouting into the void and nobody hears you and it's just this feeling of like invisibility. In feeling that way myself, one of the things I go out of my way to do is if somebody says something, I at least try and respond, acknowledge them, let them know that they're heard, they're cared about, and that there's somebody there on the other side [chuckles] and they're not shouting into the wind because I hate that feeling. It's an awful feeling to feel invisible like that. KATE: Awful, yeah. ARTY: But we can learn from those experiences and then we can use those as opportunities to understand how we can give in ways that are subtle, that are often little things that are kind of ignored, but they're little things that actually make a really big difference. KATE: Yeah, the little things. It really is the little things, isn't it? [laughs] Like and it's just, you can learn from your experiences, but you can also say, “I'm not doing this right now.” You can also check out. If you are giving and giving. and find that you're in the void essentially, more often than not, you can decide that that's no longer are worth your time, your energy, your care, and you can redirect that care to somewhere else that's going to reciprocate, or that's going to give you back that same care and that's so important, too. JOHN: Yeah, and it sounds like starting a yoga studio is not a trivial undertaking and obviously, you're highly motivated to create this kind of an environment in the world. So is there anything more you'd like to say about that because that ties in very closely with what we're talking about? KATE: Yeah. It's so weird to work full-time and be so passionate about my tech job and then turn around and be like, “I'm opening a yoga studio.” It's such a weird, but again, it's all connected at the root, at the core of what I'm trying to do in this world. The thing about Kula is that it's really built on this foundational mutual aid model. So being donation-based, it's really pay what you can, if you can. And what you pay, if you're able to give an extra $10 for the class that you take, that's going to pay for someone else's experience, who is unable to financially contribute to take that class. That's the basis of community care, of mutual aid and it's really this heart-based business model that is really tricky. I'm trying to get a loan right now and [chuckles] it's really hard to prove business financials when you have a donation-based model and you say, “Well, I'm going to guess what people might donate per class on average.” So it's been a real journey, [laughs] especially with today's famous supply chain issues that you hear about constantly in every single industry. I have an empty space right now. It needs to be completely built out. Construction costs are about triple what they should be. Again, coming from this real mutual aid community care centered model, it's really hard, but I have to keep coming back. I was just telling my partner about this the other day, I have to keep coming back to this core idea, or this real feeling that I don't need to have a beautifully designed space to create what I'm trying to create. When I started this, I envisioned just a literal empty room [chuckles] with some people in it and a bathroom and that's it. So of course, once I saw the designs, I was like, “Oh, I love this can lighting that's shining down in front of the bathroom door.” It's like so whatever, stereotypical. Not stereotypical, but surface level stuff. I really have had to time and time again, return to this longing almost for a space that feels safer for me, for my community, for Black people, for disabled people, for trans people, for Asian people; we don't have a lot of spaces that feel that way and that's just the reality. So it's a real delicate balance of how do I like – this is a business and I need money, [laughs] but then I really want this to be rooted in mutual aid and community care. It comes back to that car and that inclusivity, creating authentic connections. It's tricky out there for a queer woman entrepreneur with no collateral. [laughs] It's a tricky world out there, but I think we'll flip it someday. I really think pioneering this idea, or this business model at least where I'm at in Denver, I think it's going to start the conversation in more communities and with more people who want to do similar things and my hope is that that will foster those conversations and make it more accessible to more people. JOHN: Yeah, and I think every time someone manages to muster up the energy, the capital, and the community effort to put something like this together, it makes it just slightly easier for someone else a, they can learn the lessons and b, they're more examples of this thing operating in the world. So it becomes more possible in people's minds and you can build some of that momentum there. KATE: Yeah. And of course, it's really important to note and to remember that I come from a place of immense privilege. I have a great job in tech. I'm white. I am upper middle class. Technically, I'm “straight passing,” which is a whole other concept, but it is a thing and this is the way that I'm choosing to use my privilege to hopefully pave the way for more people. I do not take for granted the opportunity that I'm given and like I said, intersectionality matters and all of that, but I still have a lot of privilege going into this that I hope turns into something good for more people. ARTY: It also takes a special kind of person to be an entrepreneur because you really have to just keep on going. No matter any obstacle that's in your way, you've just got to keep on going and have that drive, desire, and dream to go and build something and make it happen and your superpowers probably going to help you out with that, too. It sounds like we've got multiple superpowers because I think you got to have superpowers to be an entrepreneur in itself. KATE: Yeah. I don't know, man. It's such a weird feeling to have because it just feels like it's what I'm supposed to be doing. That's it. It doesn't feel like I'm like – yes, it's a calling and all of that, but it just feels like the path and that, it feels more, more natural than anything I guess, is what I'm trying to say. The more people follow that feeling, the more authentic of a world, the more connected of a world we're going to have. I see a lot of people doing this work, similar things, and it makes me so happy to see. The words of one of my therapists, one of my past therapists told me, “Always stick with me,” and it was right around the time I was kind of – so I'd started planning before COVID hit and then COVID hit and I had to pause for about a year, a little bit less than a year. It was right around the time I was filing my LLC and really starting to move forward. It was actually December 17th of last year that I filed my LLC paperwork. So it's been a little over a year now. He told me, “How much longer are you willing to wait to give the community this thing that you want to give them? How much are you willing to make them wait for this space?” And I was like, “Yesterday. Yesterday.” Like, “I want to give people this space immediately,” and that has truly carried me through. This supply chain stuff is no joke. [laughs] and it has really carried me through some of the more doubtful moments in this journey. Yeah, and I feel like, man, what powerful words. Like, I just want to keep saying them because they are such powerful words to me. How much longer are you willing to make them wait? And it's like, I don't want to. [chuckles] So I guess I'm going to go do it. [laughter] Throw caution to the wind. [laughs] JOHN: Well, I think that ties back into what you were talking about is as you were thinking about designing the space and what kind of buildout you're going to need, and that can be a guide star for what actually needs to be there. What's the actual MVP for this space? Does it need a perfect coat of paint, or is what's there good enough? Does it need all the things arranged just so in the perfect lighting, or does it just need to exist and have people in the room and you can really focus in on what's going to get you there? And then of course, you iterate like everything else, you improve over time, but. KATE: Right. JOHN: I love that concept of just cut out everything that's in the way of this happening right now as much as possible. KATE: Yeah, and what a concept, I think that can be applied to so many things. Who am I trying to serve with this thing and what do I need to do to get there? It doesn't have to be this shiny, beautiful well-designed creation. It just needs to serve people. The people that you want to serve in the best way possible, and for me, that's getting this space open and actually having it in action. ARTY: I think once you find something that feels in alignment with you, you seem to have lots of clarity around just your sense of purpose, of what you want to move toward of a deep connection with yourself. One thing I found with that is no matter how much you get rejected by various groups in the world, if you can be congruent and authentic with yourself and follow that arrow, that once you start doing that, you find other people that are in resonance with you. They're out there, but you don't find them until you align with yourself. KATE: Yeah. Community. Community is so powerful and I love that you just said alignment because that really is truly what it is. It's finding the thing that makes you feel like you're doing something good and that feels authentic to your core, to those core principles of you that never really change. The things that are rooted in love, the things that are rooted in compassion, or whatever it is you care about. Community, that alignment is absolutely key. It's also, when I say I was born with my superpower of being an empath, this desire to create this space feels, it feels like I was also born with this desire, or born with this alignment. So I feel like so many times it's just going back to the basics of who you are. ARTY: Like you're actualizing who you are. KATE: Yeah. Like full alignment, enlightenment, that all kind of falls into place when you're really making the effort to be connected to your core. ARTY: It seems like a good place to do reflections. So at the end of the show, we usually go around and do final reflections and takeaways, final thoughts that you have and you get to go last, Kate. JOHN: There are a whole lot of different things that I've been thinking about here, but I think one of the ones that's sticking with me is the dichotomy between perfectionism and authenticity, and how I feel like they really are pulling against one another and that, which isn't to say things can't be perfect and authentic at the same time. But I think perfectionism is usually a negative feeling. Like you should do something, you're putting a lot of pressure, there's a lot of anxiety around perfectionism and that is pretty much an opposition to being authentically yourself. It's hard to be in touch with yourself when you're wrapped up in all those anxieties and so, thinking about the two of them together, I hadn't made that connection before, but I think that's something that's interesting that I'll be thinking about for a while. ARTY: I think the thing that's going to stick with me, Kate is you said, “Our words carry so much power,” and I think about our conversation today out just vibes in the room and how that shifts with the energy that we bring to the room, all of these subtle undercurrent conversations that we're having, and then how a sort of energy vibe becomes established. And how powerful even these really little tiny things we do are. We had this conversation around inclusive language and you gave so many great details and specifics around what that means and how we can make little, small alterations to some of these things that are just baked into us because of our culture and the words that we hear, phrasing and things that we hear, that we're just unaware of the impact of things. Just by paying attention and those little subtle details of things and coming at things with an open heart, regardless of how we might stumble, or mess things up, how much of a difference that can make because our words, though carry so much power. KATE: Yeah. And the thing you just said about having an open heart is truly how you can put any of this into action, how you can remain open to learning about authenticity, or what it feels like to not fall into a trap of perfectionism, or how to speak, or write, or interact more inclusively with other human beings. I feel like being open, being openminded, being open-hearted, whatever it is, is just really a superpower on its own. Remaining open and vulnerable in today's world is hard work. It does not come naturally to so many people, especially when you're dealing with your own traumas and your own individual interactions and maybe being forced into spaces where you don't feel safe. To remain open is such a tool for making other people feel cared for. So if that's the goal, I would say just being open is truly your superpower. JOHN: I think that's the quote I'm going to take with me: being open is the key to making people feel cared for. KATE: Yes. I love that. ARTY: Well, thank you for joining us on the show, Kate. It's been a pleasure to have you here. KATE: Thank you so much. This has been just the energy boost I needed. Special Guest: Kate Marshall.

Like attracts Like podcast
Master Manifesting- You Can Understand How Today!

Like attracts Like podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2022 15:37


Daily News Brief
Daily News Brief for Friday, January 7th 2022

Daily News Brief

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 19:46


Evangelical worship in the House of Representatives … and more on today's CrossPolitic Daily News Brief. This is Toby Sumpter. Today is Friday, January 7, 2022. Yesterday, Nancy Pelosi led the House of Representatives in a worship service: 6:19-6:33, There was a prayer to some unnamed deity: 8:23-8:29 A homily: 9:14-9:33 Concluding with a moment of silence: 13:49-13:55 And at some point there was a praise song: 3:08-3:45 So pretty much it was exactly like most evangelical worship services in this country. You are the light of the world, and what the church does, the world follows suit. We've been worshiping idols, and so our nation worships idols. We say Lord, Lord, Lord, Lord, Lord, and we don't know who the Hell we're talking about. And so, neither do our leaders. We sing stupid songs to our idols in our church services, and so Nancy Pelosi leads the House Democrats in singing stupid songs to their idols. Supreme Court to Hear Case for Federal VAX Mandate https://www.wsj.com/articles/supreme-court-to-weigh-vaccine-requirements-for-the-workplace-11641481822?mod=hp_lead_pos5 From the WSJ: The Supreme Court will hold a special session today to consider whether the Biden administration can enforce vaccine-and-testing rules for large private employers and a vaccine mandate for most healthcare workers. The issues come to the court on an emergency basis during a record increase in U.S. Covid-19 infections. In a departure from its usual procedures, the court is hearing arguments on cases that haven't been fully aired in lower courts. Technically, the justices—all of whom, according to a court spokeswoman, are fully vaccinated and have received booster shots—don't have to issue a definitive decision on whether the administration's vaccine rules are lawful. Instead, they are considering whether President Biden's team can implement them now while more detailed litigation continues. The cases, however, will require the justices to assess whether the White House has credible claims that it stayed within legal boundaries as it has sought to use longstanding laws to implement aggressive rules in the name of public health. The answer is likely to decide the fate of the administration's current approach to a virus that has killed more than 800,000 Americans and infected more than 50 million. Moreover, the court's decisions could reset the public-health playbook for years to come. The Supreme Court's conservative majority is skeptical of broad claims of federal power and has been considering arguments for reining it in, said Michael Greenberger, a law professor and director of the Center for Health and Homeland Security at the University of Maryland. But with the vaccine cases, the justices “are walking into the jaws of the pandemic,” he said. “And there may be enough justices who would worry that pulling back [the mandates] in the middle of the pandemic is a dangerous thing to do.” Mr. Biden in September introduced several interrelated mandates on vaccination against Covid-19. The private-employer and healthcare rules, both formally issued in November, are coming before the justices while other requirements, including vaccination mandates for federal workers and contractors who do business with the federal government, remain in lower courts. The regulations for large employers, issued by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, require businesses with 100 or more employees to ensure that their workers are vaccinated or tested each week for Covid-19. The policy covers some 84 million workers. The administration intended the rules to go into effect in early January, but because of legal uncertainties, OSHA recently said it would give employers until Feb. 9 before fully enforcing them. One federal appeals court blocked the rules nationwide in November, but another court reinstated the requirements last month. The vaccination mandate for healthcare workers comes from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, which said facilities that accept money from those programs must comply. The mandate covers more than 10 million healthcare workers. Lower courts have blocked that mandate in half of the states, but the agency is preparing to begin implementing it this month in states where it is allowed to do so. A Little History Lesson Long ago, the Supreme Court upheld the power of state governments to mandate vaccinations. In the 1905 case, Jacobson v. Massachusetts, the justices upheld the state's authority to require that individuals vaccinate against smallpox. “The liberty secured by the Constitution…does not import an absolute right in each person to be, at all times and in all circumstances, wholly freed from restraint,” Justice John Marshall Harlan wrote for the court. In 1922, the court upheld the city of San Antonio's power to require proof of vaccination to enroll in public school. During the coronavirus pandemic, the justices already have turned down several challenges to orders from state officials requiring that healthcare workers and returning college students obtain vaccines. The current legal challenges to the Biden administration's vaccine rules covering employers and healthcare facilities are based less on their substance than their source: the executive branch of the federal government. The challengers argue that Congress never granted the power for such mandates to the secretaries of labor and of health and human services. For support, they look to the Supreme Court's decisions last year that terminated a moratorium on evictions ordered by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, on the grounds that the ban exceeded the agency's authority. The Supreme Court is considering emergency requests by 26 business groups and 27 states to block the vaccine-and-testing rules for private employers. The business litigants, including trade associations representing retailers, wholesalers and transportation and energy companies, said Covid-19 vaccines “are undeniable marvels of modern medicine” that companies have promoted to their workforces. “But the reality is that tens of millions of Americans remain unpersuaded,” they said in court papers. Companies, they said, will either have to absorb testing costs and pass them along to consumers, or make unvaccinated workers responsible, “who will quit en masse rather than suffer additional testing costs each week.” A Kaiser Family Foundation survey in November found that 49% of employees in relevant workplaces in November opposed the federal vaccine-or-testing mandate and 49% supported it. A far higher proportion of Democrats and vaccinated employees backed the measure. The business groups and the states, nearly all led by Republican attorneys general, argue that Congress never clearly gave OSHA the power to conscript businesses into implementing a vaccine-and-testing mandate. They also say the agency unlawfully adopted the mandate without first formally seeking input from the public. The states separately argue that if OSHA's mandate is permissible under federal workplace-safety law, then the regulations raise constitutional problems, because public health-and-safety initiatives are powers reserved for the states, not the federal government. In response, the Justice Department, representing the administration, said OSHA has a clear grant of authority from Congress to ensure that all workers have safe and healthy working conditions. And the vaccine-and-testing rules raise no constitutional problems, the department said, because the federal government has the power to regulate businesses that participate in interstate commerce. Blocking the OSHA rules “would cost many worker lives and result in thousands of worker hospitalizations—all the more so as the pandemic's most recent surge drives case counts to new highs,” U.S. Solicitor General Elizabeth Prelogar wrote in court papers. It was the Biden administration that filed the emergency appeals to the Supreme Court in the healthcare cases after it lost some lower-court rulings to state attorneys general who sued to challenge that mandate. There, the administration argues that it has the power to ensure that Medicare and Medicaid providers meet the needed health and safety standards to protect patients. And it said the government has clear authority to impose conditions—including vaccine requirements—on facilities that accept federal healthcare funds. The states challenging the policy say it will exacerbate an already critical shortage of healthcare workers, particularly in rural communities. There is no set timetable for the Supreme Court to issue its decisions, but given the time-sensitive nature of the disputes, rulings are likely in a matter of weeks, if not days. While you're waiting for that decision, have you subscribed to the Fight Laugh Magazine. I'm holding the brand new Christmas Issue in my hands. Fight Laugh Feast Magazine DNB Our Fight Laugh Feast Magazine is a quarterly issue that packs a punch like a 21 year Balvenie, no ice. We don't water down our theology, why would we water down our scotch? Order a yearly subscription for yourself and then send a couple yearly subscriptions to your friends who have been drinking luke-warm evangelical cool-aid. Every quarter we promise quality food for the soul, wine for the heart, and some Red Bull for turning over tables. Our magazine will include cultural commentary, a Psalm of the quarter, recipes for feasting, laughter sprinkled through out the glossy pages, and more. Seattle-Area Prosecutor Slammed for Mocking Rehabilitation Legislation https://www.foxnews.com/us/seattle-area-prosecutor-juvenile-restorative-justice-program-guns-school A Seattle-area prosecutor was slammed over a recent presentation to law enforcement officials in which he insisted police should "get used to" the district attorney's office allowing juvenile suspects – even those accused of bringing a gun to school – to avoid jail time. Ben Carr, senior deputy prosecuting attorney for King County, made a recent Zoom presentation on "considerations for juvenile suspects." "Even for serious offenses the primary focus will be on rehabilitation," Carr wrote, adding in parentheses, "get used to this concept." The prosecutor presented a scenario where "young Timmy brings a pistol to school, brandishes it during a confrontation and causes panic," before debating whether a crime was committed, whether the juvenile court has jurisdiction in this case and what will happen to the kid "in Juvie." That slide in particular drew ire from officials in the Seattle suburb of Federal Way, which has seen at least six instances over the past year of guns confiscated at schools in its district. According to the presentation, if a student enters juvenile court, the case will result in "most likely, no time in custody and no ultimate conviction." Carr then presented on a "new concept of diversion," after King County Council recently approved a "restorative community pathways" program for juveniles. Juveniles or adults charged with a first-time "non-violent felony offense" may be offered an opportunity to skirt appearing before a judge and instead face a "non-profit community panel" to decide how they "can be held accountable for their crime." Carr was forced to explain to his boss why the slideshow featured a popular meme of a dog sipping coffee in a burning building. "This is fine," the dog says ironically, surrounded by flames. KTTH said those groups that submitted the program proposal are run by liberal activists, many of whom have advocated for either abolishing or defunding the Seattle Police Department. According to Carr's presentation, juveniles accused of assault, burglary, criminal trespassing, felony harassment, obstructing a law enforcement officer or second-degree unlawful possession of a firearm can still be referred to the restorative justice program and avoid appearing before a judge. Now as best as I can tell, this is a great example of Right and Left feeding right into one another's narratives and ruts. Like an old argumentative couple, the Left and Right in this narrative actually need each other and feed off one another's hypocrisies. It's a little convoluted, but it looks like a Righty mocked a Lefty proposal for Rehabilitation for juvenile delinquents. Rightys think Leftys go soft on crime. And that's because they do. And they do because they have rejected Original Sin, and they think people do bad things because they didn't have enough chocolate milk when they were little or maybe they had too much chocolate milk, I can't remember. But the Rightys have their own problems. They want to be tough on crime, but that isn't the same thing as being biblical about crime. The Leftys right that incarceration doesn't solve problems. In fact, there's virtually no place for imprisonment in biblical law. Basically, you have two options for crimes: restitution or the death penalty. If it can be paid back or restored in some fashion, then pay back what you stole, what you damaged, plus double or more depending on how egregious the crime was. And if you took a life, then your life is forfeit. No mass incarceration. And so when it comes to non-violent juvenile delinquents, I'm in the odd position of agreeing with the Leftys while not trusting them to do any good with their rehabilitation classes and maybe even making the delinquents more violent. Because man, what makes a person more frustrated that having to listen to liberals preach about morals they know nothing about. And remember there are a bunch of kids were talking about here whose fathers have abandoned them. Men and churches need to step and step in. So what we need is a Psalm. Psalm of the Day: 10 0:00-0:55 You are the helper of the fatherless. Amen. Remember you can always find the links to our news stories and these psalms at crosspolitic dot com – just click on the daily news brief and follow the links. This is Toby Sumpter with Crosspolitic News. A reminder: Support Rowdy Christian media, and share this show or become a Fight Laugh Feast Club Member. Remember if you didn't make it to the Fight Laugh Feast Conferences, club members have access to all the talks from Douglas Wilson, Joe Boot, Jeff Durbin, Glenn Sunshine, Nate Wilson, David Bahnsen, Voddie Baucham, Ben Merkle, and many more. Join today and have a great day.

RCR Wireless News
Well, technically... telcos can only grow by moving into the enterprise (Ep. 60)

RCR Wireless News

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 16:48


On this episode, Marisa Viveros, vice president of Strategy & Offerings for the Telecom, Media and Entertainment Industry at IBM defines the IBM telco cloud network ecosystem, delves into the specifics of the company's recent cloud partnerships with Verizon and Telefonica and explains how Open RAN fits into the larger telco cloud conversation.

All Through a Lens: A Podcast About Film Photography
Dev Party - Technically Technical Almost Panchromatic

All Through a Lens: A Podcast About Film Photography

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 43:04


Full show notes and photos at www.allthroughalens.com   On the first Dev Party of 2022, Eric dips a little bit into Kodak Technical Pan, aka, Techpan! Meanwhile, Vania develops some Ilford FP4+ she shot through her Voightlander Väg. Eric developed Techpan (for some reason) in PMK; 5+10+450 for 12mins. Since the film had expired in October of 1992, he shot it at 6iso. The entire roll was very overexposed, and he probably could have gotten away with shooting it at box speed (25 or 32iso). Nevertheless, here are a few of his photos:   Vania devved the FP4+ in PMK as well - 1+2+100 for 10mins. Here are some of her's:   PATREON Thank you to everyone who supports us! Check out our Patreon for bonus episodes, extended interviews, early drops. Tons of stuff! patreon.com/allthroughalens THE CREDITS OF ENDING Music by Last Regiment of Syncopated Drummers Vania: IG, Flickr, Zines Eric: IG, Flickr, Zines, ECN-2 Kits Tiffen: IG All Through a Lens: IG, Website, Patreon, Spotify Playlists

Technically Drinking
Best of Technically Drinking - Stan Lee Fantasy Draft

Technically Drinking

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 64:07


Happy New Year!  The debate team is taking a holiday and we have one of our most popular podcasts for you this week.   The Stan Lee Fantasy draft was made right after STan Lee died and it is one of the first podcasts where we started to become what we consider at least, to be a real podcast. Hope you enjoy! Please subscribe to our patreon at http://www.patreon.com/technicallydrinking

Mike's Hard Game Cast
Hugh Manatee & The News

Mike's Hard Game Cast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 37:58


It's the first podcast of 2022! Listen to us talk to you from the past! Technically every recording is from the past... just like how every picture is of you when you were younger. #mitchhedbergHelp support your bits and this podcast by visiting GetaThreads.com!And shoutouts to our wonderful editor! He may have edited out our effusive praise from the podcast, but he can't edit these episode descriptions!

Fustistic Enlightenment
Love is technically energy

Fustistic Enlightenment

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2022 8:41


Love is technically energy. The majical mysteries of lights. Enough with the whiner's - grow up. Sometimes we need to clean house. Comedy is great. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/unispirical-muse/support

MarTech Podcast // Marketing + Technology = Business Growth
A Marketers Guide To Becoming Technically Independent -- Clark Richey // FactGem

MarTech Podcast // Marketing + Technology = Business Growth

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2022 15:51


Today we're going to talk about the no code trend in marketing. Joining us is Clark Richey, the Chief Technology Officer at Factgem, which helps organizations develop a deeper understanding of their key business drivers and their associated relationships to power. In part 2 of our conversation, Clark is going to walk us through his guide to becoming technically independent. Show NotesConnect With: Clark Richey: Website // LinkedInThe MarTech Podcast: Email // LinkedIn // TwitterBenjamin Shapiro: Website // LinkedIn // TwitterSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

We Have Fun: The Podcast
Kevin Gets Poisoned

We Have Fun: The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 74:50


Technically the New Years episode! The Fellas are talking teenage displays of unified insubordination, unfortunate cocktails, just high school memories in general, Kevin's new love of operatic vocal stylings, as well as all things succession with as few spoilers as humanly possible. Oh, and the night Kevin was poisoned in a trusted place.

Technically Speaking | A Keller Schroeder Podcast Series
Win a $100 Visa Gift Card – Your Feedback Matters

Technically Speaking | A Keller Schroeder Podcast Series

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 1:27


As Technically Speaking's first year comes to a close, we would like to thank all of our listeners for their support, and we are excited to announce that Technically Speaking will continue to produce episodes for 2022! In order to ensure that we are providing our listeners with valuable content, we would like to partner with you. Tune in to hear how you can be entered to win a $100 Visa gift card by providing your feedback and suggestions*. Visit kellerschroeder.com/podcast to listen to the full episode and learn more.*The last day to submit your entry is January 30th.

The Big Interview with Graham Hunter
'Tenacious, technically brilliant and utterly fearless' The winner is... TBI Oscars 2021 (part one)

The Big Interview with Graham Hunter

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 33:32


Welcome to our annual Oscars show, where our listeners - as well as Graham and Pete - decide who wins categories including best performer in a lead role and best director (of football). It's the only review of 2021 that comes with red carpet, evening wear and tapas. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Zero Fox Left
An Omicron Corporation Christmas

Zero Fox Left

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2021 22:12


Technically recorded Christmas Eve Eve but regardless I posted it today. This is yet another rant about the Dos XX Bug and more so the NPCs that have fallen for this propaganda. Enjoy or Fox yourself

Blocked and Reported
Episode 96: Just Enough Fresh Content That It's Not *Technically* A Clip Show Under U.S. Podcasting Law

Blocked and Reported

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 114:15


Let’s look back on the last year and run down listeners’ top five favorite segments. If you’d like to discuss this episode with other paying subscribers, click here.Episodes clipped from:Image: Feet in wool socks near fireplace - stock photo (Via Getty) This is a public episode. Get access to private episodes at www.blockedandreported.org/subscribe

J & Lazy N Ramble On...
about Billy & Mandy Save Christmas

J & Lazy N Ramble On...

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 91:03


With guest host Tori! Wherein Grim takes Billy and Mandy to the North Pole so he can prove to Mandy that Santa is real, but once up there they discover things are not as they should be and they end up having to save Santa, and Christmas, from an infestation of vampires. Technically considered a Christmas Special, Billy & Mandy Save Christmas originally aired at 8:30pm on Friday, December 16, 2005 as the 53th episode, aka S4E13, of The Grim Adventures of Billy & Mandy. Originally recorded 11 December 2021. Originally released 24 December 2021. Dual release on J and Lazy N Ramble On... and IWTRW's Patreon. As mentioned in the episode: J and Lazy N Ramble On... I Want To Rewatch: An X-Files Podcast I Want To Rewatch: An X-Files (Adjacent) Podcast (Patreon Exclusive) Vampires Ruined My Life Our theme music is "Back to the Grind" by friend of the podcast, Billie Stevens. You can find J and Lazy N Ramble On... at jandlazyn.com, or subscribe wherever you currently subscribe to podcasts. You can tell us we're wrong on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook. We probably won't see it, but it is an option. You can also leave us a voice message, or just email us at jandlazyn@gmail.com. We also have merch! Peruse our warez @ TeePublic. Buy a shirt! Buy a mask! Buy a mothafuckin' coffee cup. Or support us directly at paypal.me/jandlazyn --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

No Highway Option
INTO THE SPIDER-THON (Aka Merry Thwip-mas!)

No Highway Option

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 78:34


11 Movies. Technically 5 different series. 8 Spider-People/Pigs. 2 Venoms. 1 week. 1 podcast. Let's do this. The boys watch every theatrically released movie in the Spider-Man franchise! That's right, from the Raimis to the Webbs to the Wattses to the Flescher to the Persichetti/Ramsey/Rothman to the Serkis. We watched them all. It was a chore, but since we split them up among a week instead of a day like the Fast-a-thon, thankfully, it wasn't as draining. But of course it wasn't going to be draining! It's Spider-Man! We loves the Spider-Man! Join them as they answer questions such as: Do our thoughts on the nostalgic ones change? Are there any huge surprises? What's our Spidey movie ranking? How was No Way Home? among others... Thank you for listening! Please review us on your podcast provider and share us with your friends, we really appreciate it! CALL THE HIGHWAY PATROL TIPLINE! (301) 941-7493 (SIZE) It's the Highway Tip Patrol Hotline! Say whatever you want, we'll use it in an episode! Follow our socials: Facebook/Twitter/Instagram: @NoHighwayPod YouTube: No Highway Option Theme Music composed by Ian C. Weber. Find more of Ian's projects here: https://www.iancweber.com/ --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/no-highway-option/support

A VO's Journey: Voiceover and more voice over
Ep. 230: Where I Am Now And The Studio I Never Expected

A VO's Journey: Voiceover and more voice over

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 31:27


Where I Am Now And The Studio I Never ExpectedThese last few weeks have been pretty crazy.  We sold our home and bought 12 acres so my wife and I could start a horse business (Technically her) and we had to buy a property that needed work in order to afford it.Because of this, we are renovating the home right now so we are staying with friends. We are truly blessed to have such wonderful friends, but it has definitely been crazy trying to record and run the business without a studio.In this podcast, I share with you how things are going, what tips and tricks I am using to be portable with my recording voice over studio, and things you can do if you are in a similar situation. Learn more about my MAKE $20K ON FIVERR FOR VOICE OVER: https://www.avosjourney.com/how-to-make-20k-on-fiverr-for-voice-overIf you would like to learn more about getting a professional demo at an affordable price, check out the link here: https://www.avosjourney.com/demo-productionWe have a great community of voice actors that share content and information about becoming a better voice-over artist at - https://www.facebook.com/groups/avosjourney/Check out voice-over courses, groups, and learn more about how to work with me at - https://www.avosjourney.com  Social Links: Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/anthony_pica_vo/Twitter - https://twitter.com/AVOsJOURNEYFacebook - https://www.facebook.com/groups/avosjourney/ LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/anthonypicavo/Support the show (https://www.facebook.com/groups/avosjourney/)

Backyard Ecology
Top 10 Backyard Ecology Podcast Episodes in 2021

Backyard Ecology

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 9:28


The first “real” episode of the Backyard Ecology podcast went live on December 3, 2020. (Technically that was episode 2, but I don't count the introduction episode as a “real” episode because all I was doing was telling you that I was going to start the Backyard Ecology podcast.) This is episode 40, and we are fast approaching 25,000 total downloads. I am excited by how both the Backyard Ecology blog and the Backyard Ecology podcast have grown over the last year, and I am thankful to all my listeners and readers. In this episode of the Backyard Ecology podcast, I thought it would be fun to review the top 10 most downloaded episodes in 2021. Maybe you'll find one that you missed, or be reminded of one that you wanted to listen to but then forgot about. Hopefully, you'll also be reminded of some of the episodes that you really enjoyed. Also, let me know in the comments what your favorite episode was this year. Was it one of these? Or was it another one that didn't make the top 10 list? I know there were a lot of good episodes that didn't quite make the top 10 list. Top 10 most downloaded Backyard Ecology podcast episodes this year 10) NRCS Programs for Pollinators and Wildlife - https://www.backyardecology.net/nrcs-programs-for-pollinators-and-wildlife/ 9) Deer Ticks and Lyme Disease - https://www.backyardecology.net/deer-ticks-and-lyme-disease-why-is-lyme-disease-more-common-in-the-north/ 8) Winter Hummingbirds in the Eastern U.S. - https://www.backyardecology.net/winter-hummingbirds-in-the-eastern-u-s/ 7) Bats and Bat Houses - https://www.backyardecology.net/bats-and-bat-houses/ 6) Acorns, Birds, Reptiles, Amphibians and More: Responses to Forest Disturbances - https://www.backyardecology.net/acorns-birds-reptiles-amphibians-and-more-responses-to-forest-disturbances/ 5) Mysterious Bird Deaths of 2021 - https://www.backyardecology.net/mysterious-bird-deaths-of-2021-digging-deeper-into-the-bird-mortality-event/ 4) Growing Native Plants in Small Yards - https://www.backyardecology.net/growing-native-plants-in-small-yards/ 3) Growing Native Plants: Insights and Stories from 3 Native Plant Nurseries - https://www.backyardecology.net/growing-native-plants-insights-and-stories-from-3-native-plant-nurseries/ 2) A Conversation with the Co-Hosts of the Native Plants, Healthy Planet Podcast - https://www.backyardecology.net/a-conversation-with-the-co-hosts-of-the-native-plants-healthy-planet-podcast/ 1) Factors that Make Pollinator Gardens More Attractive to Pollinators - https://www.backyardecology.net/factors-that-make-pollinator-gardens-more-attractive-to-pollinators/ Bonus episode: Some people prefer listening to podcasts on YouTube, but YouTube views don't count as downloads. So, for a bonus, I wanted to share the most viewed episode on YouTube. That episode is: Milkweeds in Urban and Suburban Monarch Waystations with Dr. Adam Baker -https://www.backyardecology.net/milkweeds-in-urban-and-suburban-monarch-waystations-with-dr-adam-baker/.

The Brewing Network Presents | Dr. Homebrew
Dr. Homebrew | Episode #204: German Pilsner and Traditional African Ale

The Brewing Network Presents | Dr. Homebrew

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 64:20


Ok yeah, we've all heard of a German Pils, but this marks the first appearance of a homebrew take on a Traditional African Ale. Technically entered as an Experimental Ale, this unique beer really had the judges working hard to identify flavors and ingredients. It was a fun judge! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Be With Me: 7 Minutes of Biblical Wonder
CRISIS Of A Man OUT OF FELLOWSHIP S5e57 Acts9:9

Be With Me: 7 Minutes of Biblical Wonder

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 7:52


Anyone outside of FELLOWSHIP is in CRISIS.  There is essentially NO SUCH THING in the functioning Body of Christ. Fellowship is defined today as sitting KNEE TO KNEE with those in His church. When Saul is converted, he has no Christian friends.  ZERO.  Nada.In fact, he's been arresting those who "call on His name."  Technically, Saul should arrest himself, but that is another matter.  What the picture to take home today is Saul, blind, hungry, thirsty and ALONE.  He's one of the only guys in history to get SAVED OUTSIDE the body of Christ; outside of the functioning Church.  Looking at him before he gets connected with the Church is such a poignant tableau.  We would do best to stare at it for a moment.Are you outside of His body of believers?  Do you sit KNEE TO KNEE with people at church?  If you are just sitting shoulder to shoulder, you are doing exactly ½ of what you are supposed to be doing. You are ½ of Saul sitting there hungry, thirsty, and ALL ALONE.  Who do you sit knee to knee with?  Send them this podcast.  Share, like, repost, bewithme.us

Technically Speaking | A Keller Schroeder Podcast Series

This week on Technically Speaking, Mallory is joined by Jeff Gorman, President of Keller Schroeder. Tune in as Jeff speaks on Keller Schroeder's mission of utilizing technology to improve business performance and make positive, personal impacts. He also shares his 2021 holiday message, which reflects on gratitude, relationships, and more. You can read his holiday message here: https://bit.ly/3srD1CP

Ecomonics
Bob Braham - Famous.co, The Mobile Market Experience

Ecomonics

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 33:26


We don't often make content as brief as today's episode, but we don't often have guests like the amicable Bob Braham with precious little time to spare. We have him on the show today to chat about Famous, a storefront software that focuses on a captivating visual interface for the consumer. Technically, our competition but in the interest of making sure you get the best option out there, we're happy to share the airtime. Going in to this episode, I must inform you that things in ecommerce change pretty rapidly, Bob Braham isn't the CEO any longer and the product itself isn't called famous for much longer either. That said, I'm acutely aware of the rapid nature of business so I always focus on getting in as much evergreen content as I can. Be sure to check our show notes for updates to links and resources. Bob Braham is the former CEO of Famous, the mobile e-commerce experience platform. He has over 25 years of experience in building and growing enterprise SaaS startups and global tech brands, having worked at marquee companies such as HP, Oracle, and Silicon Graphics (SGI).⭐️CREATE. AMAZE. CONNECT.

Up Your Creative Genius
Ram Castillo: How to make lightning-quick decisions towards your best creative future

Up Your Creative Genius

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 53:45


Ram Castillo is a Design Director, two-time Author, Speaker, CreativeLive Instructor, Decision-making Business Coach and Approved Advisor based in Sydney. His focus is to help business owners, entrepreneurs and leaders get unstuck through human centred design methodologies, creative strategy, digital marketing and branding. For 16 years Ram has been working for global agencies including Ogilvy & Mather, DDB, JWT, McCann. He was most recently the Head of Digital Design for Saatchi & Saatchi and has serviced clients including Audi, McDonald's, Qantas, Google, AMEX, Toyota and The Louis Vuitton Group. He's been featured in Apple, GE, Communication Arts, HOW magazine, CreativeLive, Herman Miller, VIVID festival and The American Institute of Design.  For more visit RamCastillo.com https://ramcastillo.com/  Follow Patti Dobrowolski - Instagram https://www.instagram.com/upyourcreativegenius/ Linkedin https://www.linkedin.com/in/patti-dobrowolski-532368/ Up Your Creative Genius https://www.upyourcreativegenius.com/ Timestamps 2:02 Why Ram Castillo is a big deal, and how he came to be this way 4:40 On leveraging a tool like Clubhouse 7:31 The most important step of the design thinking process 8:02 You already have the most important marketing tool: your brand 12:13 Finding your competitive advantage 15:27 Defining your version of success 18:03 The true definition of wealth 20:13 Overcoming obstacles on the way to success 23:28 The value of planting many seeds 25:16 The alchemy of creativity and transformation 33:36 The secret formula to success 37:15 How to design a purpose 38:46 Ram's current fascination with convenience vs. delayed gratification 41:18 The opportunity right in front of us all 43:22 Ram's decision-making framework Patti Dobrowolski 00:03 Hello superstars. Welcome to the Up Your Creative Genius Podcast where you will gain insight and tips just stomp on the accelerator and blast off to transform your business and your life. I'm your host Patti Dobrowolski. And if this is your first time tuning in, then strap in because this is serious rocket fuel. Each week I interview fellow creative geniuses to help you learn how easy it is to up your creative genius in any part of your life. Hey, everybody, it's Patti Dobrowolski with Up Your Creative Genius, oh, god, my head is like exploding because I have RAM Castillo here. You are not going to believe what an amazing Rockstar he is like, this guy is a design director, he's a two-time author. He's a speaker. You know, he teaches an instructor and Creative Live. He's the decision making business coach. And he's worked with some of the biggest brands, some of your favorite brands, let's just say, you know, Louis Vuitton and Herman Miller, and Ogilvy and Mather, and DDB and Toyota and it goes on and on. And not just that, but he has his own podcast, which I am so grateful that you're here because you're up to number 88 in your podcast, and you have interviewed some big names Kelly Slater, right. Naomi Simpson, Kevin O'Leary, these people, and the interviews are spectacular. And what you really do is help designers who are tuning in --this is my understanding of it --tuning in to help them step into the future they desire. So this is where we aligned we met on Clubhouse. Ram. Thank you so much for being here. Ram Castillo 01:51 Patti, what an introduction. I'm deeply honored to be here. Thank you so much. Patti Dobrowolski 01:56 You're just so incredible. So just Whoa. So tell me like, What are you doing right now, first, tell people from your perspective, what you do right now, and then roll me back in time to how you got to where you are right now. So whichever way you want to start, if you want to start in the past, you want to start in the present and go to the past. I'd love it either way, our listeners are going to want to know all they're gonna want to get inside your world right now. Ram Castillo 02:27 Oh, okay. So the short answer is right now I am building my advisory board portfolio. And what that means is I am doing a bit of coaching, a bit of consulting, but advisory it sits in this mix of giving advice to business owners, entrepreneurs, organizations and leaders in the specialty that I've been able to accumulate over that last 16 year career in the world of marketing, communications, creative strategy, and most importantly, human centered design. Yeah. And that's the short answer because I climbed up that world of starting at Ogilvy, which is traditional advertising. That's right my way through other agencies, all the way up to head of digital design at Saatchi and Saatchi servicing AMEX, Qantas, Toyota building teams. And when you go through that path, you're exposed to processes, people, tools, systems, and just the different ways that businesses need to operate in terms of capability in delivering their promise to customers and designing a customer experience that is meaningful, that is actually valuable. So taking all that enterprise learning and helping small to medium sized business owners through advisory sessions and workshops. That's what I'm doing right now. Patti Dobrowolski 03:57 That's fantastic. And I think that entrepreneurs, they don't really have a sense of that, what it requires of you, but what we're talking about are the long hours. And the access to creative ideas which you are famous for. I mean, you've been written up for some of the ideas you came up with or your team came up with. It's just incredible. And I have a feeling that your paths cross with my nephew, Jon Dobowolski, because he worked at Toyota at some of these places. And now he works at Grail, right? And so he's head of design there. So I love that you're doing this in this space, where you're sharing and you're pouring into other people your wisdom. Now I met you on Clubhouse because you were in a room that I was in, and maybe I was in with Pete Cohen and I'm not sure but tell me what are you doing on Clubhouse and are you there running any of your own rooms because you're so incredible. I would be surprised if you weren't. Ram Castillo 04:56 So we did meet on Clubhouse by Pete Cohen. He he and I met on there as well. And then he heard me speak about the importance of personal branding and positioning yourself, hence the duck on his head. And so I have found that clubhouse is just a treasure chest, the ways that I've benefited have blown me away. We're talking right now it's mid November 2021. Buy started day one, mid January 2021. So we're talking 10 months or so ago. Patti Dobrowolski 05:33 Me too, same amount of time. Yes, And right around that time, it was just starting to blow up really, I mean, people would say it had blown up before. But it really at that beginning, people found out about it, Ram Castillo 05:47 I initially went on there just to test. So coming from a design background, it's important to never assume that's one of the key things, it's important to go through an understanding phase. And a lot of that is just testing and absorbing, and gathering information. So for the first three months, I was just gathering information, seeing how the tool works, how it could benefit myself and others. And what I quickly found was that there was the ability to get access number one to people that I would never be able to access. So you know, and you too Patti, right. So that's a stretch, you know, we would probably be able to access them in some way, but the speed of accessing them. The other thing is the relationship building and rapport building is more real in many ways, because you're just not influenced by any other factors such as, you know, seeing their face, you just get to hear their voice. And you get a real sensibility about them straightaway. So I've been able to invest in many deals, that part of the advisory is also looking at how I might be able to invest in companies. Should I wish to do that. So yeah, whatever you're looking for, you will be able to get there. Patti Dobrowolski 07:08 Yeah, I would totally agree. I mean, I just had the most amazing conversations, you know, that I don't think I would have ever probably met Rob Moore or even known who he was really John Lee, people like this, that are in there. And then also badass boss. I mean, I've been in rooms where people have just blown my mind to pieces, and just listening. And you know, what you're talking about is so you were seeking to understand, which is really a design thinking principle. So for listeners that aren't familiar with that whole process, but you really seek to understand what the experience is about and what customers are actually having in that experience. And it really is incredible now. So is that a place where you have been able to get some new clients from there? For example. Ram Castillo 07:58 Absolutely. So I'll swing the needle to this point, Patti, just to contextualize all this, the reality is that every one of us has a brand, we already have a brand that exists and how I define brand. And personal branding in particular is what people attach meaning to. It's your personality, your credibility, your reputation. And the thing that I love about Clubhouse is that you're able to close that gap of saying what you do and doing what you say. And in a world where trust is becoming harder and harder to build and trust is getting harder and harder to come by. Yes, Patti Dobrowolski 08:36 it's being eroded all the time, you know, any belief that there's good out there, you know, you have to really watch out. Right, Ram Castillo 08:43 Right. So like, you know, prior to Clubhouse, which is a social audio app, we've had on an immense amount of Instagram dominance, so to speak, where we're able to get to know this person that we follow that, you know, we might maybe aspire to, or we learn from or just simply are entertained by, but at the heart of it, where we weren't really able to dive deep into like this storytelling one on one and throw questions back at the person so easily. And, you know, having Clubhouse I've found that we're able to get to this important thing, which is the personal branding piece, that space that you occupy in the hearts and minds of people, your audience, relative to your competitors. And so when we're able to understand the space with which we have established some equity, and we can grow that equity, it can really help your business, your career progression, the future you want to design because until you're able to really pinpoint, you know, what is it that you're known for? What is it that you can build a found that to be liked enough to be trusted, then no matter if you're doing business or just building relationships, you don't have a compass. And so it's important to find, in my opinion, yeah, what is the thing that you're able to leverage and build equity with? And then strategically partner and pay the right people to help you get there? Patti Dobrowolski 10:27 Yes, yes, I love this, because it really does start with you. And when you can get a platform of some kind, I mean, that's what I tell people, you know, the only way that I ever became such a well known speaker was because I gave a TED talk. I totally nailed it. And it wasn't even on that platform where it blew up, it was on a bootleg platform, five years later, where somebody said it was the best of whatever, whatever year it was, and then 6 million people, right. And to me, that's the power of Clubhouse in one moment, you can say something that someone will hear, or you can do something. And this reminds me to of clubhouses. It really is about giving away what you know, to people, and then really giving it away. Like I give away sessions to people that I think, you know, if you just did a session with me for two hours, I think it would explode your business. And so I'm willing to do that, because I'm in a place where I've created the client base, such that I can give some things away. And I've also met some amazing clients there. And part of that I think you're talking about so you understand your brand and who you are, that builds then this line of trust, or this bridge of trust to a potential customer or even a person that's going to be your friend, right? And then you get to reap the benefit of meeting them. Ram Castillo 12:03 Yeah. And what we're really talking about here as well. And this is why I love you, Patti, and your podcast title especially, is because if you don't have the overlap, and this is one framework that I have created to find your competitive advantage. It's so simple. But it's two circles on a page overlapping over each other these circles on the left, it has the word appealing question mark. So what's appealing? Yes. And on the right, it's exclusive. Question mark. So what's exclusive, and until you find something appealing and exclusive enough, then you don't have a competitive advantage. Oh, my gosh, to have a competitive advantage. Otherwise, you can't compete in a market that's either being serviced, well, how are you going to compete? And this is why creativity is such an important differentiator. Patti Dobrowolski 12:53 And this creative genius part, right? That's what you're talking about. You're talking about its creativity, but it's also accessing your creative genius. And that is accessible to anybody. And that is, you know, the myth is that some people are creative. Rahm is creative, Patti's creative, but I'm not. And that's a myth. Because we're all born with our imagination. Ram Castillo 13:18 And here's the kicker to all of this, Patti, when I buy you or choose to follow you, wherever you're leading me? Yes, I'm subconsciously asking, What does that make me. So when I buy things, when I buy a Tesla, right, out of all the vehicles that I can buy to move me as a physical human, from A to B to C, I can buy any transportation vehicle, but I choose Tesla, because in the back of my mind, whether you admit it or not the person that has bought it also is pro tech, wants to make a statement that they are a supporter of other energy resource, in this case, something a bit more sustainable, like electricity, and is also wanting to have that title of I'm an innovative person. Yes. So when I buy you, I'm always asking, What does that make me because you're an extension of my worldview? Patti Dobrowolski 14:20 Yes. So when you think about that, like, to me, this is like how the universe works, right? When we think about that, we're a big energy field out there. And you think about all of the little sparks of light that are all of us. The way that you spark your spark and magnetize people who are like you is by being your true and authentic self, and finding what it is that you offer that nobody else offers. And that's really, all it takes for you to build your brand is you have to know that and then you have to help people in some way. Just add the help element Which that for you seems like a big piece of it. Like I watched a bunch of your talks, you know, and you're so generous in how you are onstage. You really are a great speaker. And you're funny, and people just love coming up to you. You can just feel it right. It's great. And it's powerful. But what is it that you feel in your world that you're here to do? What are you here to do? What's your purpose right now? Ram Castillo 15:27 So my why has always been in currently still serves me well as leading with generosity and following with care. And the reason why I say that Patti is because when I asked this definition of what my version of success is, I still arrive at this answer, which is Success to me is how well I go to sleep at night. Because I've had a little, and I've had a lot, and I'll loot this into some tangibility. But I've had a little and I've had a lot, I've had everything in between. You know, granted, I'm Filipino immigrant. My mom is one of five. Her dad wasn't really ever around her mom, my grandmother had to have a little corner store and then have a sewing machine just to raise five kids, my dad's one of 11. Now, his father passed away when he was only three. So he grew up without a father of majority his life. And then his mom passed away when he was at uni. And he graduated marine transportation, mechanical engineering, just to get out as with Filipinos back back in the day, especially get to Australia. And those two degrees at a top university were not recognized, of course. And so he raises three kids, I'm in the middle. And I have this worldview of going hmm, I could have lived that life, a life where they only had a tablespoon of peanut butter and a bit of bread to share. For the day. Often, my mum got so thirsty that she, at six years old job in the cupboard, swallowed a bottle of soy sauce, and now she's traumatized. She didn't know soy sauce, you know. So there are these things here and in place, where we go back now to your original question, you know, about what is my big why, what is my purpose? What is the thing for me? I didn't know it would look like going on two global speaking tours. Yeah, you know, writing two books, starting top ranking podcasts. And connecting with so many people I didn't know would look like that. Because I didn't Patti Dobrowolski 17:24 have well, you didn't have that view of what was possible, really Ram Castillo 17:29 100%. But at the heart of it, I knew that -- and this might not be the intrinsic motivation of most people. I don't know, I can only speak for myself. But deep down, I knew that I felt joy and at peace. And I recently did a talk about two talks, one was called "Don't aim to make a million dollars, aim to help a million people". And that the irony is the money will come. The other talk I did recently, which lands this point around what we're talking about here is that being wealthy doesn't necessarily mean being rich, that being wealthy is about overcoming obstacles, and they're the treasures that you get, you get another coin of resilience, you get another coin of humility, you get another coin of persistence, you get another coin of work ethic and respect and whatever it is that you gain. So Patti Dobrowolski 18:29 and love, and trust Ram Castillo 18:32 Yes. 100%. So for me, it's not it's less about going. I'm all about goals as well, I think, Patti Dobrowolski 18:39 of course, of course, because you're really you're all about making good decisions, good business decisions that are good for your business in the long run. Right. So yeah, so but I love it, you're talking about the journey, and the collection of the coins that you get that the challenges that you face, right or that your parents face, or my parents or grandparents face the you know, my grandmother was an immigrant my father was poor growing up in Chicago, both my mother and father's parents, you know, fathers died when they were seven. That was interesting to experience for them. And then for me to go become a therapist and then have to interview them about that and think about, oh, what was the transmission of Pathology at age seven for me right when they were, but I think that this collection of coins is underrated. It's underrated by most people because they see coin and wealth as how much you have in your bank account or what your capacity is. But it is in the moments where you're truly yourself up against the hardest things and that you pushing through it like you did and that the genetic encoding in your genes your family. They did that I think This forward into a future that we desire more than money, and more than fame, and more than all those things. So I love that you're saying this now, you must have hit some really big challenges in your career and in your life, what kinds of things did you have to come up against in yourself? You came from that kind of a background. So you know, that can make for a very small voice in a room full of very loud people sometimes, right? Ram Castillo 20:32 Absolutely. So few key obstacles that have really shaped how I have gone about life. In primary school, I was bullied quite badly, I had my arm broken three times and got 16 stitches. before the age of 11. I was the shortest kid in school. Never the most athletic, never the most wealthy. As I said, in terms of financial wealth, I was never the most intelligent, I was always. So very, very average. And all below, I was only great at art, funnily enough. And I remember my mum cooking spaghetti in our small apartment. I was about four years old, I would collect empty tissue boxes, toilet paper rolls, and I'd make stuff we obviously didn't have devices back then. And she said, What do you want to be when you grow up? And then I go out, and I'm, I just want to make stuff. Yeah. And then she put her hand on my shoulder, and she's still cooking. She said, Well, remember whatever you want to be, make sure you dream big. Make sure you dream much, much bigger. So although I had these obstacles, she gave me permission to just go for it. You know, there's no, I love that TED Talk by Ken Robinson. And yes, bit in his mother passed away at age 70. Last year, of course. But there was this one bit where he said that there was a girl, she was six years old. She was always very unattentive. She didn't have concentration. One time she did in drawing class and the teacher came up said, Hey, what are you drawing? And she said, I'm drawing a picture of God. And then the teacher said, wow, that's not possible. No one knows what God looks like. And then the child said, well they will in a minute? Yeah, exactly. And the point was that they weren't afraid to try as children, we weren't frightened to try to just give it a go. And so my mum instilled that in me at a young age. So despite the obstacles, and I wasn't a formally trained writer, I was able to write two books, even in my first book, when I went to 20 different publishers, and sponsors, and I tried to get funding for something. And then eventually, I was like, well work another job and self fund it yourself. Yes. Yeah. Get it out. Exactly. I did that. And American Institute of Design in the States were like, wow, you know, you're doing great things. Why don't we host you we've got 72 chapters will host your first speaking tour. In front of crowds before, I'd never done that. I just throw myself to plant many seeds, not knowing which will blossom. But sometimes it's a numbers game to Patti, I get people in finishing university and college. And then they're like, man, it's been four months. I haven't gotten a job. I've finished my degree. And I was like, how many emails have you sent out? How many people have you reached out to how many messages have they like, all like, I sent out like, 15 emails? I'm like 15 emails? I, like I said, 300 emails in the first week. And I was actually in the mailroom. Patti Dobrowolski 23:25 Yeah, exactly. I was thinking, you know, one of my first interviews was Jonathan Javier. And he tells people what he did on LinkedIn, you know, he would send out hundreds of emails and notes to people in LinkedIn every week, until he was able to get the connections that he did. And then he posts these pictures from where, and he just is amazing, right, but it takes this grit and courage and persistence. You know, I think probably I wanted to be a keynote speaker long before I mean, I never dreamed I would be on Broadway, I never dreamed that I would be a keynote speaker for, you know, on a stage of 4000 people that just, you know, the thought that that would be part of my reality. I didn't even know. Future Me was way ahead of me. And I was way back in the past in this limited sphere of can somebody call me right now. And then I'll just go and do it for a couple $100. You know, but this is where you start. And then you learned through doing and working and doing, I don't know about you, but I'm all about 500%. If I can do give you 500% of what you've asked for, then you kind of want to have me back, no doubt, or you're going to say something about that to somebody else. And I think there's something about you know, really and I think this is true for you like when I look at all the big brands that you've worked with. You know, you started out in advertising and we know what a grind that is that is a grind, right? And then you've gotten to this place now where you're ready expert in brand and so many other things. So what other things? Are you fascinated by now? And what are you looking for in your own career and also out there in the horizon to see if you can't tap into it? Ram Castillo 25:14 So here's the thing, everything that we've spoken about here, Patti, has kind of tied back to that theme about creativity, and wealth and designing the future that you want. It is only as successful as how many internal treasures that were looking to acquire, and to turn that into external change. And so we need to Patti Dobrowolski 25:42 say more about that, get that unpack that for people. So you're saying something very deep there. I want everybody who's listening to get this, the internal treasures to impact transforming Ram Castillo 25:53 that. Yeah. And turning that into impact. External change is one of that version, right? Acquiring internal treasures for external change. Because we need to look at back to the coin analogy. Yes, we need to look at that as a point of difference. We need to look at what's creativity, creativity, is putting something that's different and new. And something that requires new means that we need to look at testing, exploring, trying stuff. Yep. And you get this weird, strange, but interesting combination. And that's you. Yeah, that's, you know, one's walked your steps. Yeah, was grown up the same with the same parents mixed with this education mixed with this life experience. ABCD? Yeah, it's a combination that's unique to you. There's already Anthony Robbins, and Oprah Winfrey Brene. Brown and Marie Forleo, or Gary Vaynerchuk. There's already so many Yes, them, but we don't have one of you. Right. And this is what happens. It's not just about believing for belief sake. And so now, I look at it as being very popular to a few, right in whatever you're doing means accepting that we're going to be very unpopular to the other end. And we're going to be very neutral to the majority. And this is why I think people are not pursuing the fullness of their gifts, and then going down the truth. The rabbit hole is because they're trying to please everyone. Yes. Patti Dobrowolski 27:41 Oh, my gosh, this is a best marketing tip you could give to anybody. Right now, this is it. Because there are people that will throw shade, and you can't please them, no matter what you do, it's not going to happen. And then there are people who don't really care. They're living their life, just on this flatline way, no harm, no foul. But then there are a few people who are really expansive, and they're expanding what they're doing into places that they are afraid and maybe scared, and they're not sure what to do. But they know they're excited, and they're passionate about life. And they understand that life is about experience. It's not just about product, but it's about experience. Right? Ram Castillo 28:30 I'm going to give you one really interesting example. Real quick story. We're in the pandemic. Of course, we're still in that. I used to go to the gym a lot. I switched to an outdoor sport that I've never tried called tennis. Okay, I'm in my mid Patti Dobrowolski 28:45 year, I was gonna say you're not gonna say pickleball Are you? That's gonna scare me. Okay, good. tennis. Ram Castillo 28:52 Tennis, right. And so I'm in Sydney and we got lost on a lot of tennis courts, right, a big tennis community here, but I'm new. Definitely. I sign up mid last year. So in June, July 2020. I pick up a racket for the first time in my mid 30s. Okay, so I'm learning tennis. I started documenting videos, I posted some YouTube videos, this and that. This coach here in Sydney that finds these videos. He's got a Spanish accent. He ends up DMing me and he goes, Wow, I saw your test videos. I'd love to learn about entrepreneurship and design and digital media, the whole thing. I go, Well, I'm learning tennis. Why don't we do a value exchange? You teach me I'll teach you : happy days. So we start teaching each other. He's teaching the tennis and then after the tennis lesson and by the way he grew up with Rafael Nadal. The whole thing is just amazing. Yeah. So this is what I said about putting yourself out there. Now I've talked about one crazy seed planting activity. Yeah, I said all this stuff. I'm teaching about business and entrepreneurship, we should apply it to something so that it lands so that it's not just theory. So let's start a little side hustle just as a project. And let's do it because I'm down. I said, his name's Andy, I go, Where is an opportunity in the marketplace? I've got insights, being not in the tennis world that might be valuable. And you have insights, being in tennis world for, you know, over, like 25 years. Yes. And then what we came to arrive at going back to the design thinking, which is about empathy. First, it's about defining the problem that needs to be solved prioritizing that, then it's moving into ideating, prototyping, testing, and then deploying that in the market. So I said to, you know what? To learn tennis as an adult, you've only got two options. One hour private lesson, yes, one hour group, which is only about four people. So, right. There's nothing really like three hours, bootcamp style. Go, there's summer camps, but they're for kids, and they're like, a week or two weeks. Okay, let's try that. Three hour boot camps for beginner adults. We posted it on Eventbrite. Patti Dobrowolski 31:06 I'm sure that you sold out in a second. Ram Castillo 31:10 Sold out 24 hours, but 100 bucks a ticket. 10 people, Max. And so that will uh huh. Let's post another date up and see if that posted another one sold out with another 24 hours. Like, huh. I wonder what else? Let's do a serving specific one posted that that sold out long and the short of it for started, just as an idea is now a fully fledged business. Right? And this is what I'm saying? I'm not even from the tennis world. Exactly. I've not been introduced to tennis as a child. Right? Right. New to this Yes. And yet, I was able, talking about creativity, talking about mixing and matching a combination that is going to be equity in that idea. I love Patti Dobrowolski 31:58 that. And the other piece that you added to this was a value exchange, which I think this is often underrated. People don't realize how easy you know, that's how I met Pete Cohen. value exchange, I came and gave a talk. And then we went and work together, we did all this stuff in Europe, and then you know, just all the time, this value exchange exists out there for you as a possibility. Anytime that you put yourself out there because you did this first. You thought okay, I think I'll document this. Because why not? It seems crazy enough to do right. So you posted it on Instagram or Tiktok? Or whatever you did you like struggling with the racquet and the staff and then getting some stuff down. And then this person sees you because he watched all the videos right of you doing it? Where'd you put it on YouTube? Must have been on Ram Castillo 32:55 my Instagram. Yeah. And so they're documenting my learning journey. That's right. Patti Dobrowolski 33:00 And that's what we're hungry for? Is people learning, being vulnerable, and starting out Because all of us a) we want to learn something new, b) most of us are afraid to try. Because we think oh, I don't know, could I be any good in that, but I've always wanted to. And then somebody comes along and post something where they're doing the thing. And we think, Hey, that guy can do it. And he's really short. I think I could do it too. Right. All right. Yeah. So that's fantastic. I love that and then Ram Castillo 33:33 That's right. Absolutely. And just thought that Patti, what we're really talking about here as well is around, going back to that point about when I buy or follow or am connected to you as a fan, or whatever, customizers, you know, I can see myself in you. And there's a really important piece here, which is, I can trust you enough to go where you're taking me, trust is only possible with safety. Now, if I'm being vulnerable, and I am saying I'm learning and I'm showing you my mistakes, documenting it, I feel safe. And when I feel safe, the only way I can get that is if there's familiarity. And the only way that there's familiarity, is with consistency. And the only way that there's consistency is with repetition. So repetition, showing up, even when you don't see results straightaway, will lead to consistency. So I'll go back the other way. Repetition, consistency, familiarity, safety, trust. Patti Dobrowolski 34:32 That's right. And all of that equals success over time. You know, people they'll say to you, you know, like the person that said, you know, I've spent four months or three months since I graduated and I haven't gotten a job. How many emails did you send out? Well, 10 a week and you're like the Yeah, okay, get real and get into the present moment because we're talking about 7 billion people online right now. So you are just invisible. In that until you make yourself visible, and how do you do that? You do that through repetition and consistency, and then vulnerability, and then over that, that builds trust. And I'm using my own words here, but this is what we're talking about. That's the bridge to someone else. And that bridge becomes friendship, it becomes client relationship, it becomes value exchange, it becomes love, it becomes network expansion, all of that. But part of that is about you risking, you have to take a risk, and put yourself out there, this is how you create change in your life, is what you're talking about, is that you get an idea. And you could shelve that idea. And you could ask people, if you should do that idea, which often will bring shade on your idea, and then you don't want to do it. Or you can go out and you can find people that want to try an idea or want to expand something. And then there you go. Ram Castillo 36:07 And one of the things that I often suggest to people, Patti, because we're talking about not just you know, throwing spaghetti on the wall and seeing what sticks for no Rattray, right. What we're really also talking about is designing the future that you desire, and tapping into your creative genius. And what might that be sure there's a bit of there's there needs to be experimentation to all this. But there's also that bigger question, which is, and full of you listening, I suggest you finish this sentence, and really write it down. Don't let it live in your head. But my vision for a better world is one with more designers, entrepreneurs, and problem solvers. Because that is what the world needs. So now how it lives, I'm not so tied to if I have to go on and explore this speaking thing, or this writing thing, or this podcasting thing, or this YouTube documenting thing? Yeah, it's less about that. I'm willing to try those things. If they meet the vision, the purpose, because if the purpose isn't there, then the product doesn't matter. That's right, Patti Dobrowolski 37:14 if the purpose is for you to make a million dollars, it's not the same as if the purpose is to expand and move women into technology, or to show people all around the world that if you draw a picture of your vision, that you can take action on it, you can increase your chances by 42%. These are the things that will drive you that you can help people with. And the helping other people is the expensive element. It is to me the creative genius equation, right? The equation is around imagination and intuition and desire and drive. But it leads you to outcome to the infinite power, then outcome to the infinite power is I live and I serve the universe. And what I do is to live my biggest self and serve at the highest level, right? And that's what you're doing right now, which to me is so amazing. You're pulling together these people into your podcasts. And also I'm sure that you know, I see the photos of you in design sessions with people to design and develop new ideas and expand them. And I just love that because we are creating a new world every second. And you really are. What is it that fascinate you right now? What are you fascinated with? That's happening out there that you're looking at? And you go, Huh, that's interesting. I kind of like that, or is it this value exchange? What is it? Ram Castillo 38:46 So the first thing that comes to mind that fascinates me right now is how low the bar is for convenience. Let me contextualize this. It's so easy to be inconvenienced now. Yeah. Okay. So, I myself, I had to fill up the petrol my car, and there was one car in front of me, and I rarely drive but I've gone for a long drive the other day, and there was one car in front of me, and then I started to feel impatient. Yes. I also realized that because we were locked down in Sydney for good for Patti Dobrowolski 39:21 oh, yeah, you couldn't even you know, people had to be in a place for a month before you were actually able to go home if you flew in the country. Yes. Ram Castillo 39:28 Yeah. So we had like four months of lockdown we had one hour was the max that you're allowed to go outside and only for specific things. If there's cops all around who get like $5,000 fines, those curfew, the whole thing. So I didn't even have to leave my couch. Technically, I could order my groceries and I actually enjoyed going to the groceries, you know, and now I'm comfortable enough. I don't even need to, like do any kind of like it's convenience. Yes, it's so low now. Yeah, so it's easy to be inconvenient. So I'm fascinated by the lack of voluntary delayed gratification, Patti Dobrowolski 40:05 yes. O.M.G. Wait. The lack of involuntary gratification, right of that waiting. Nobody wants to wait anymore for anything. You don't want to wait for the lack of voluntary, voluntary. Yes, sorry. Ram Castillo 40:24 Like for example, if I'm, you know, uncomfortable, and I'm agitated, it's like, that means there's no consequence Patti. Yeah. You see, it's like, if I can't get this right now, then I'll blow I climate a blow behave this way. Patti Dobrowolski 40:42 Yeah, exactly. I'll just blow up. Hey, I live in Texas. I know all about that. Right? Yes. So you can see that everywhere. But it's everywhere. It's pervasive in, you know, if I can't get what I want right now, I'll just turn on Netflix. And then if I can't get the internet, then I'll find something else. And I'll do this and that. And I'm just filling up all the space that was in waiting in that silence. And that patience in that beautiful quietness, has somehow just evaporated? Ram Castillo 41:14 Well, here's the kicker, all this. It's not just that. I'm fascinated by it. I want listeners to understand that because the bar is so low, it's so easy to be inconvenienced. That's why there's so few great people now in the world, that you can be great. Now is the time. Yeah, my point is, start the thing. Yes. write that book. Finally, you know, launch that podcast, business, meet that person, send that email. Yeah, make that phone call. Now, you might think it's more difficult. Patti Dobrowolski 41:53 But now is the opening. Now's the opening, now's the time, you better step in, now is the time for you to step in. So you have shared so many like jewels, I'm going to go back and listen to this over and over again, for myself. And listeners, I hope you will too. Because we are talking about just really simple processes for you to get out and get your brand solidified, so that you can be known and trusted. And then you can make money doing what it is that you love, which is I know what people want, right? And this piece that Rahm is saying right now, he's saying, Listen, you got to go and do this. Now. Don't wait, because the bar is really low. And so everybody is easily inconvenienced to step on in there. Because you're going to be able to solve somebody's problem right away, right away, because the problems are really simple. Now. They're really simple. So tell me, you know, from your perspective, you gave a lot of tips, but tell me, so let's say somebody's sitting listening, and they're thinking, Oh, I don't know, you know, can I go out and do? What would you say to them about this? You said this about the now but what steps do you think that they might consider as they go out? You mentioned a few buttons, say them again, if you would? Ram Castillo 43:22 Well, I'll give you one framework that I designed for decision making, specifically, because I consider myself a decision making business coach specializing in rapid decision making specifically. And I've created a framework that everyone can use, and they can check out my website, if they want the diagram, or my Instagram. Patti Dobrowolski 43:41 It's all there. And it'll be in the show notes too. So look down there. Absolutely. And Ram Castillo 43:46 take this, you know, this framework, which I which I've coined the lightning bolt method, it's a rapid decision making framework. So it's helped me with both micro and macro decision making from deciding what to cook to dinner for dinner or to business I'd now allow meals today. future transport experiences as well. Right. I actually desired stage one of what the next 10 years of New South Wales trains look like. And so Patti Dobrowolski 44:11 as a three pints house, Okay, I'm ready. Ram Castillo 44:14 Yes. So you start here, interrogate your objectives. Patti Dobrowolski 44:17 Okay, first, interrogate your objectives. Alright, Ram Castillo 44:21 got her got your objectives, and I'll expand in a little bit, but we've got these three main buckets, interrogate your objectives. Number two is curate your criteria. Yes. And number three is dismantle obstacles. Okay. So the interrogate objectives is, you know, we're not in a shortage of having an objective a goal, a dream, we want many things. Patti Dobrowolski 44:49 No, it's not. It's not. Yes. Ram Castillo 44:52 I think the issue is that we don't interrogate it. We identify so many. That that's part The problem first of all, so we need to interrogate which objectives are going to be really meaningful for you. Yes, and interrogate them. I define interrogate objectives as this. What is the minimum viable intention? The minimum viable intention? So I want what to happen. Yes. So start there, like I said to you, my intention was to help, actually about the beginning, it was just to help designers get a job, right. So now I'm not tied to if it turns into a speaking, engagement, or you're Patti Dobrowolski 45:39 teaching online or you're doing whatever, right exactly book Ram Castillo 45:43 audio paperback, what podcast whatever, right, exactly. So interrogate it, interrogate the objective, don't just identify it, interrogate it down to the minimum viable intention, just Yes. The Patti Dobrowolski 45:56 minimum viable intention. So the simplest, simplest, right, simplest, clearest since we're talking about specific and clear, thank you. Ram Castillo 46:07 Correct. That's why the second is curate criteria, which is being brutally honest with your non negotiables. That's it. So with the criteria, the problem that I've often found is that or a sometimes there's not even a criteria, but there's there's so many maybes or I want it to be like this. No, no, non negotiables. You want to take that job? What are your non negotiables? You got a newborn, you need to clock off five, that's a non negotiable. You can't work weekends that are non negotiable, that you've got a certain limitation or comfort around how far you're willing to travel. Specify that. Yeah, that's a non negotiable. Patti Dobrowolski 46:48 Yes, yeah. And you can see on the in the Amazon ads that are on right now, that's what they're appealing to. That's what they're appealing. Absolutely. The non negotiables, right. Ram Castillo 46:58 Absolutely. I'm advising these two founders. They're two dads with three kids each, and they both work full time. And when I said to them, alright, you've got this new startup. It's kind of like Airbnb for backyards. And they're like, we're willing to throw everything into it time, money, energy, you name it, and I go, Whoa, you have to let me just for a second. Yes. Yeah. Didn't have all the time in the world. No, yes. What's the non negotiable? They were like? Well, every night, maybe one hour, maybe max. And then on weekends, maybe like, two hours, three hours, and I go, so you don't have all the time? Money? How much you're willing to spend on it. They said collectively, like 35,000 for the first sort of milestone I go. That's not an unlimited amount of resources. It No. And energy then looked tired. Yeah. And it's like, so curate your criteria. What are your non negotiables be brutally honest. And the third bucket is dismantling obstacles, which basically just comes down to pull it apart? Yeah, here are the things stopping me from getting to that, write them all down, pull it apart and search for the source of it the root cause. Yeah, cuz, Patti, often, it's might be even internal. Patti Dobrowolski 48:13 In my mind, I was thinking like, I was thinking limiting beliefs might be limiting Ram Castillo 48:17 beliefs. But we've got to list all these things down so that we're able to pair a specific Yes, yes. Or tool to just tackle that root cause? Patti Dobrowolski 48:28 Yes. Right. Ram Castillo 48:29 And some people say to me, Ram, I'm not great at Adobe Creative Suite. Now. There's Figma. Now there's all these tools like Miro board and this and I'm like, What do you want it to do? They're like, I just need a bit of animation. Exactly. It will constantly update the technology will constantly go higher and higher. Yes. So you just learned the minimum amount? careers that look like yes, basics, intermediate level, what does that look like? See too many people get caught up, and they don't address and measure? Yes. So this hopefully will help you get unstuck lightning fast. Patti Dobrowolski 49:05 Well, and I would say that is a lightning bolt right there. Kaboom. Really, this is a very simple three step process. You can use it anytime that you're thinking about changing anything in your life in your world, or what you're going to eat for that evil. Ram Castillo 49:21 Even the other day, I was like, a doll, what are we going to eat and then so my minimum viable intention was to just cook a healthy meal, right? And something that wasn't going to take, you know, half an hour. Patti Dobrowolski 49:34 That's a parameters. Ram Castillo 49:36 So it was you know, simple protein and veggies like and you know, what was stopping me was like, okay, all these ingredients. I don't have this as well, you know, got salt and pepper. That'll do. Like, again, it's just when you go through it. The criteria was this. My wife didn't care. She was just tired. She just wanted you know something. Yeah. Patti Dobrowolski 49:56 Can you forgive me, right? I love Yes, yes, I know. My wife was that way last night she goes, can we just have eggs and then you cut some vegetables and put it in, I go, No problem. Got it. Now it's solved. Now we don't have to worry about, we don't have to think about where we're going or ordering or going to the grocery store or anything like that. It's all done. Because it's really the smallest and simplest and specific. And then we just take away the obstacle, whatever perceived obstacle there is, I love that you are so fantastic. I could talk to you all day long. I really could. And I hope I get to again, I hope that you'll come back and you'll tell me everything else that you've learned about the world. And then I can ask you about the other ventures that you started, you know, by just going to the tennis court or maybe going to the test a lot or whatever it was that you were doing your latest thing that you're just experimenting with? Because why not? Now you're not in lockdown in the same way. I don't think are you still walked down there? Not necessarily free, yay, free at last free at last. I love it. Okay, good. Well, thank you so much for everything that you poured into us. Because in this podcast, I mean it I'm serious, I'm going to listen to it over and over again, because there was so much good thinking around you and your brand. And so I thank you for being here. And everybody who's listening, please follow him. His podcast is called the giant thinker. And it's singular, right? The giant thinker and just want to say we want to get him back into number three status. So go in there, follow him. He's on Apple, Spotify, he's probably everywhere with his podcast. So just follow him on Instagram, same handle there. Also in the show notes, you can find him on Clubhouse in this room and that room, mostly around creativity. And I just can't wait to see you again. Thank you so much for being here. Ram Castillo 51:50 Thank you, Patti. Yeah, the podcast is available there for anyone. It's called giant thinkers, my handles the giant thinkers, on that on everywhere. I'd love to hear from you, you know, continue to conversation and it's just about that, you know, planting many seeds. And Patti, I am so grateful to be on your show. You're an absolute rock star, you are a beam of light. And all of us honestly, like Patti Dobrowolski 52:12 one beam to the other there. I'm just saying. So anyone who's listening in, you know, just put all of his great wisdom into your life. Try it and tested. See what parts work for you. Because this is a simple process that will just explode everything that you have thought was hard to do. You'll be able to do it. I just know you will. So to everybody that's tuning in, you know what I'm saying to you is go out there be your best self bring good things to the world because we need you now more than ever don't mess around. Get in, step into your brand. Go out kaboom the world. And until next time, up your creative genius. Thanks again. Thanks for coming on. I love you. Ram Castillo 53:01 Thanks, Patti. Big Love. Thank you so much. Patti Dobrowolski 53:06 Thanks so much for listening today. Be sure to DM me on Instagram your feedback or takeaways from today's episode on Up Your Creative Genius . Then join me next week for more rocket fuel. Remember, you are the superstar of your universe and the world needs what you have to bring. So get busy. Get out and up your creative genius. And no matter where you are in the universe, here's some big love from yours truly Patti Dobrowolski and the Up Your Creative Genius Podcast. That's a wrap.

19 Nocturne Boulevard
19 Nocturne Boulevard - CRUMPING THE DEVIL - Reissue

19 Nocturne Boulevard

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 41:43


[warning - mature situations, foul language and violence] An ornery old woman takes on all comers in defense of her family and her freedom - even the Devil and Death!  Cast List Maggie - Julie Hoverson Nursey - Robyn Keyes  Bertha - Rhys TM Barry - Mr. Synyster Kev - Michael Coleman (Tales of the Extraordinary) Jemma - Gwendolyn-Jensen Woodard (Gypsy Audio) Morte - Russell Gold Devil -Jack Kincaid (Edict Zero) Ted - Russell Gold Spike - Paul Mannering (Brokensea Audio) Other Bikers -  Brandon O'Brien; Bill Hollweg Music:  Kevin MacLeod (Incompetech.com) Editing and Sound:   Julie Hoverson Cover Photo:  Elizabeth Flores       (courtesy of Stock Xchange.com) "What kind of a place is it?  Why it's a recovery ward, can't you tell?" ***************************************** CRUMPING THE DEVIL Cast: [Opening credits - Olivia] Maggie Kev/"the Maniac", grandson Bertha, the manipulative daughter Barry, Bertha's bastard husband Nursey Morte Satan Jemma, the pregnant wimp daughter Ted, Jemma's abusive bastard husband Spike, violent biker OLIVIA     Did you have any trouble finding it?  What do you mean, what kind of a place is it?  Why, it's a recovery ward, can't you tell?  MUSIC AMBIANCE    Hospital, beeps etc. MAGGIE    [talking on phone]  I don't give a flying rat's flaming anus how good a job he does! Shall I roll past your garage and post photos of what he did to his wife?  Perhaps I should leave a nice big bloodstain on your doorstep with the words wifebeater scrawled on the pavemment - don't think I won't! PATIENT    [groan] MAGGIE    [up] Stuff it! [back on phone] Oh, yes!  [evil laugh] You come down here and say that to my face - I'll call the press.  [delighted laugh] I can just see the rags with you beating up a helpless gran in a wheelchair.  Tough guy!  SOUND    DOOR OPENS, FEET COME IN NURSEY    Now, now - phone time's over.  Time to say goodbye to all your friends. MAGGIE    Bugger off, stay-puft. NURSEY    [tsks]  SOUND    PHONE GRABBED AND HUNG UP FORCEFULLY NURSEY    Dear, dear - no need to drive up your blood pressure.  You need to stay calm, ducks, and get your rest. SOUND    CURTAIN PULLED AROUND BED MAGGIE    I'm ordering prunes!  Lots of prunes!  Just so you have to clean up the mess when they come out the other end! NURSEY    My, my - but I'm not here all the time. MAGGIE    [snarled] I have your schedule memorized. MUSIC BERTHA    Mother, you need to be rational about this.  This is your fourth hospitalization this year - you've reached a point where you need someone to look after you.  MAGGIE    Visiting nurse comes by twice a week.  BERTHA     [prompting] Barry! BARRY    What if you... fall? MAGGIE    I have this very special invention.  It allows me to magically contact help when I need it.  BARRY    Oh, what? MAGGIE    It's called a cellphone, you scrofulous prick.  I'll wear it on a lanyard if it'll make you piss off.  Now get your sorry arses out of my sickroom. PATIENT    Go away. MAGGIE    See?  Even that bastard hates you. BERTHA    No mother, we're not leaving until we get this settled. MAGGIE    Nurse! BARRY    There is a button-- MAGGIE    Fuck off - this annoys her more.  Nurse! SOUND    DOOR OPENS, FEET COME IN SLOWLY KEV    H'lo Gran.  [reluctant] Mum.  [distasteful] Barry.    MAGGIE    Who the bloody buggery hell are you supposed to be? BERTHA    Oh, heavens, her memory is going! MAGGIE    Don't get your hopes up, arse-face.  Are you trying to tell me the fruit of your sweaty loins-- BERTHA    [gasp] MAGGIE    --has taken to running about dressed as sir poncy de leon? KEV    I'm Hamlet. MAGGIE    [laughing wickedly] Go on!  You?  You can't memorize the balance of your overdraft!  Come on then, soliloquize us! KEV    [chuckles] It's a sales promotion for a mattress shop.  To sleep or not to sleep, all that bollocks. BERTHA    [muttered] I just don't know where he gets this language from. MAGGIE    Oh, god - if you're truly that fucking dense, I wish I was your father so at least I'd have some slight glimmer of hope that you weren't mine! SOUND    DOOR OPENS, NURSEY FEET ENTER NURSEY    Come, come - let's keep it all nice and civil, there are other people in this hospital, you know. MAGGIE    Well, there must be people somewhere, but there's a couple of wankers in here.  Bugger off, knot-knickers.  BERTHA    [gasp, then affronted noises as she leaves] SOUND    FEET STORM OUT NURSEY    Dear, dear.  Poor old Maggie's being deserted. MAGGIE    Your turn, then isn't it, blancmange?  Shuffle off and fetch something, would you?  ...Like a stick? NURSEY    Tsk Tsk.  You really need to-- MAGGIE    You, hey you in the tights.  You stay.  [beat]  Gotta catflap in those bonbon knickers? KEV    No, gran. NURSEY    [psst, then confidential] Young man, you haven't brought her any alcohol have you? KEV    No - no!  What sort of grandson would that make me?  No bottle on me anywhere, [leering] want to pat me down? NURSEY    [oblivious] No, no!  Five minutes, then visiting hours are over. SOUND    HER FEET LEAVE, DOOR SHUTS MAGGIE    [hushed] You did bring me something, didn't you?  You are aware I think you're the least worthless of all my pathetic offspring? SOUND    PLASTIC BAG OUT OF POCKET KEV    Love you too, gran.  I remember how much you complained last time of not being able to find a place to light one up, so I baked you some brownies. MAGGIE    You?  Baked?  KEV    I'm a sensitive new age type of bloke.  I can make a mix.  SOUND    OPENING PLASTIC BAG MAGGIE    [sniffs] Nice.  You didn't skimp on the "spices." SOUND    TAP ON THE DOOR NURSEY    Time's up! KEV    Stuff em somewhere.  Size of that cow, she probably snaps up everyone's sweeties.   MAGGIE    I think she just eats patients-- SOUND    DOOR OPENS MAGGIE    [louder] --mostly the males. KEV    [wincey noise] Ooh... MUSIC MAGGIE    [into phone, trying to be quiet] --the Maniac left me a mobile. Have you tracked down Python yet, then?  [beat, then getting loud]  Sod it!  I thought you bastards had better legal these days! SOUND     QUIETLY DOOR OPENS, SLOW FOOTSTEPS ENTER MAGGIE    There must be someone there whose tattooes run more than knickers deep!  [beat]  Fine, I'll call the-- SOUND    CURTAIN SWEPT ASIDE SUDDENLY MAGGIE    [gasp] Bugger me! SOUND    MUFFLED VOICE AS SHE HIDES THE PHONE, BEEPING, TRYING TO TURN IT OFF MORTE    Madame?  I believe you are expecting me. MAGGIE    Riiight.  Middle of the night, hospital room.  Must be the stripper.  Where's your music? MORTE    [startled] Um, no, I-- MAGGIE    Well, you can't be a doctor - they've all gone home.  We're in the hands of the sadists and the diapers. MORTE    The what? MAGGIE    Nurses and interns.  Look, It's late and I'm a bit too knackered to abuse you properly, so tell me who you bleeding think you are so you can sod off! MORTE    [trying to get his spooky back on] I'm... death. MAGGIE    Pull the other one - it spits. MORTE    No, really.  I'm... death. MAGGIE    Always thought you'd be Welsh.  So what are you doing swotting around here?  I'm not dead.  The infernal pinging thing says so. MORTE    But you are old [spooky] ...and dying. MAGGIE    [getting mad] So they keep fucking telling me, but I've never been one for following orders.  If you're really the angel of death, why are you wearing such a for-fucks-sake ugly suit?  And where's your bleeding scythe?  Can't be death without a jolly great scythe, can you, now? MORTE    Oh, please - this is the 21st century. MAGGIE    First piece of sense to come out of your festering gob, you git.  Now bugger off - I'm knackered, but I'm not ready for the tip yet. MORTE    You will see me again tomorrow. MAGGIE    Tell you what - you come back during visiting hours and I'll get my bastard son-in-law to drop in.  All I have to do is wave money anywhere within ten kilometers of my Jemma and that bastard appears like bleeding magic. MORTE    But I-- MAGGIE    Him you can take, with all my heartfelts.  If you're not going to make yourself useful, though, you can piss off and stay there. SOUND    FISHES OUT THE PHONE AND DIALS MORTE     [affronted, huffy] You're not supposed to have a mobile in the hospital. MAGGIE    Fuck off. [into phone]  Spike? MORTE    You have a friend named Spike? MAGGIE    [into phone] No, that's not a cop - just some prat trying to sell me life insurance.  Are you Spike? MORTE    You're really going to just ignore me? MAGGIE    Hold on. [hand over phone] Sorry, didn't mean to leave you hanging like that.  You're right, I should finish with you before making my calls.  So if you would kindly FUCK OFF?  Good.  [back to phone]  God, these bleeding salesmen.  They're like some damn pet pekingese - no balls but still won't stop humping once they get a grip on your leg. MORTE    Well, I- I-I- never! MAGGIE     Spike?  Great - what would it take to get some help with a problem? SOUND    MORTE'S FEET STORM OUT, DOOR OPENS AND SHUTS. MAGGIE    Nice!  Hold that thought, and I'll ring you back tomorrow - that twat's just gone to grass on me to the warden. MUSIC AMB     HOSPITAL ROOM - NOT SO URGENT.  NO PINGING THING. SOUND    TAP ON DOOR, THEN DOOR OPENS WITHOUT WAITING SOUND    WHEELCHAIR BEING PUSHED IN JEMMA    [weak, hopeful] Hello?  [down] Mum. MAGGIE    [trying to be calm and quiet] Jemma.  NURSEY    Here we all are then. SOUND    DOOR SWINGS SHUT NURSEY    Ready for a nice litle family chat. MAGGIE    Just ignore her.  [deep breath] They say you're going home soon. JEMMA    I'm all right. [she's not] MAGGIE    I'll see to it, someone drops around and keeps an eye on you. JEMMA    I'll be careful.  [not very convincing] Won't walk into any more... doors. MAGGIE    [getting a bit annoyed] Won't walk into any more fists, more like. JEMMA    [upset, "not in front of the nurse"] Mum!       MAGGIE    She's heard worse.  Haven't you, snowball? NURSEY    [affirming, acerbic] From you alone. MAGGIE    [snort of laughter, then serious]  So, when can I kill him? JEMMA    What? MAGGIE    That cocksucker husband of yours. JEMMA    Mother! MAGGIE    You can't say you don't want him dead.  Bertha keeps pissing on and on about my hospital record - you're leagues ahead of me.  Between the times he's knocked you up and the times he's knocked you down, it's amazing they don't just name a suite for you and give you your own key. JEMMA    [crying]  He doesn't mean to-- MAGGIE    [losing it]  Doesn't mean to!  What, he was cleaning his swotting great fist and it went off!?  Or the other part - dearie, you get preggers every time that arsehole even wanks in your direction.  You'd be much better off without him. JEMMA    He loves me. MAGGIE    Oh, god - we are not having this discussion again.  JEMMA    And we have eight children to look after - nine, soon. MAGGIE    [softer again]  It's all right then? JEMMA    [barely able to talk] Yes.  MAGGIE    Jems, that son of a syphilitic whore punched you - punched a pregnant woman, let alone a pregnant woman he claims to care for - in the bloody stomach.  JEMMA    [breaks into tears] NURSEY    Oh, look at the time.  Come along Maggie, musn't be late on your pills! MAGGIE    [yelling as they leave] Get it through your sodding thick skull - He DID MEAN IT!  MUSIC SOUND    NIGHT, PINGING, ETC. SOUND     MAGGIE MUNCHING ON SOMETHING SOUND     DOOR OPENS, SLOW FOOSTEPS (two sets) SOUND    PLASTIC BAG RATTLES AS IT'S HIDDEN MAGGIE    [sucking stuff out of her teeth]  Who's there? SOUND    CURTAIN PULLED ASIDE MAGGIE    [disgusted noise] Oh, it's just you.  Piss off. MORTE    I told you I would return. MAGGIE    And take my soul blah blah blah.  I have you sussed, you wanker. MORTE    Sussed?  I already told you - I'm death. MAGGIE    Right.  And I have a daughter who would like nothing more than to have her dear old mum babbling on about meeting death in the flesh - all so she can have me declared non compos and shoved away in some shithole of a home while she sends all my odds and sods to auction "on my behalf".  Piss off, and tell her she can piss off too. SATAN    [explosive laugh] MORTE    See?  I told you. MAGGIE    Told me what?  You're not making sense, the curtain is laughing like a drain, and I'm not that stoned. SOUND    CURTAIN OPENS FURTHER WITH A DRAMATIC SWEEP MORTE    She surely is the most frightful woman I've seen in years. SATAN    I like it. MAGGIE    And who are you supposed to be?  Revival of the Rocky Horror show? SATAN    [laughs harder] MORTE    He's the devil. MAGGIE    Well I knew he wasn't a doctor - not dressed like that.  [sigh] SATAN    [laughing subsides] MAGGIE    Are you done?  I wouldn't want to waste a good insult on you when you can't hear it properly. SATAN    [chuckles, but stops himself]  Go on. MAGGIE    Dressed like that, you look like Sir Elton John vomited all over you. SATAN    [chuckles] MAGGIE    And I suspect that'd be rare, since he's probably got a strong gag reflex. SATAN    [a moment, then a gasp as he gets it, then uproarious laughter] MAGGIE    Told you it was a good one. [joins in] MORTE    I don't get it. MAGGIE    Oh, god.  You need to loosen the fuck up.  [evil chuckle]  Here.  Have a brownie. MORTE    A brownie?  Ooh.  Chocolate is my weakness. SOUND    RATTLE OF PLASTIC MAGGIE    Death and chocolate - imagine that.  How about you, Gary Glitter? SATAN    Well, if you're offering. [They munch for a minute] MORTE    Interesting [licks his lips, speculatively] ...aftertaste. MAGGIE    Old family recipe.  The maniac bakes them for me.  Don't tell the nurse - she's already thirteen stone. MORTE    [snorts]  Oh goodness! SATAN    [giggles uncontrollably] SOUND    CELL PHONE RINGS MAGGIE    Scuse me for a minute, will you? [they murmur assent] SOUND    PHONE ACTIVATED MAGGIE    Yeah?  Is this Spike?  Then who the bloody hell--  [pleased] Really? MORTE    [confiding, but loopy] Shouldn't have  mobile in hospital.   SATAN    Might call for help? [they both laugh] MAGGIE    You up for it, then?  More the merrier, I always say.  [beat]  Oh, dead may be overkill, but I wouldn't shed any tears.  Mostly I'd prefer him unable to fuck, or walk for at least a year - no, never again on the first - can you manage that? SATAN    [awed] What?  Did I hear you--? MAGGIE    Shut it.  [on phone]  Candy striper.  You know, one of those new homosexual ones.  [back on topic] So, you can handle it? SATAN    I'll have you know-- MAGGIE    [covers phone] Everyone knows you swing both ways - the devil can fuck with anyone. SATAN    Well [trying not to laugh], if you put it that way [bursts into hilarity again] MAGGIE    Great - when?  [upset] Weekend?  Not sooner?  They'll be sending her home tomorrow! MORTE    I thought you were talking about a man?  Who you don't want to be able to-- MAGGIE    Fine.  [annoyed] I'll try and get out of here too, then shall I?  No I bloody well can't talk them into letting her stay-- MORTE    --to [uncomfortable] "do it"-- SATAN    Just say "fuck." MORTE    [affronted] No. SATAN    Come on, I dare you. MAGGIE    Shut up or piss off.  I'm almost finished.  [into phone]  Saturday night, then?  Call me Thursday, same time, and I'll say where.  Brilliant.  SOUND    PHONE OFF MORTE    So is it? MAGGIE    Is it what, arse-face? MORTE    Is it a man or a woman? SATAN    He means who are you talking on the phone about? MAGGIE    I've got some friends of a-- MORTE    --questionable moral character? MAGGIE    Well, they do call themselves the Bastards of Carnage, so that might be a clue - Anyway, I've arranged will ... have a chat with ... my daughter's oozing sore of a so-called husband. MORTE    And you don't want him to be able to-- MAGGIE    And they won't be as kind as a vetrinarian. SATAN    Well!  [lip smacking noises]  Have you any more of those brownies? MUSIC AMB    MAGGIE'S ROOM KEV    I hear they're letting you go? MAGGIE    They have to get sick of me eventually. KEV    Are you doing all right?  Really? MAGGIE    Healthy as a horse.  [sighs] One of those swayback cartoon nags with glue factory stamped on them.  You know what your evil bitch of a mother is trying to do to me? KEV    Would it be so bad? MAGGIE    Et tu, wanker? KEV    No!  I'm really just curious.  MAGGIE    Well, quite apart from the horrors of loss of control over your life, the fact that they will likely frown on my extensive collection of filthy artwork, and having to obey people whose nappies I might have changed, it's the piss. KEV    Piss? MAGGIE    At your age, piss is still romantic.  Getting yourself well and truly pissed, pissing in the snow, nasty piss-scented alleys where you buy happy little packages - piss hasn't lost its shine. KEV    Oh? MAGGIE    By the time you get old, piss is the thing you fear the most.  Your own, someone else's - fuck death, fuck the devil, if there was a sodding god of piss we'd all be sacrificing virgin sheep to him just to make him stay the fuck away.  That's what those places are, Kev.  [solemn] They are where piss goes to die.  The smell, the damp, the feel in the air.  As long as I can still hold my water and get myself in and out of the bogatory, it's my bleeding right to look after myself.  KEV    [serious] All right. MAGGIE    [fierce again] Next time you feel yourself getting curious, darling beast, just swot on down to the crystal lights retirement complex - you don't even have to go inside, just stand downwind and have a good long whiff.  MUSIC AMB    NIGHTTIME AGAIN MAGGIE    [anxious sigh, then fretting] What is the bloody holdup?  I said-- SOUND    PHONE BUZZES, TURNED ON MAGGIE    Finally!  Took your goddamn time, didn't you?  [beat]  So Jemma phoned you - God, how I spewed forth such a spineless cow, I've no idea.  [beat, then disgusted]  Oh, right, the bloody money - that's the only thing you give a shit about, isn't it? MAGGIE    Don't bother, you mealy mouthed two faced prick!  I know just how much you care for your wife - I've seen the sodding medical charts.  [beat]  Blah Blah Blah.  Blah Blah Blah.  Course you have a problem - you're still fucking breathing.  I am planning on fixing that, you know.  [beat]  [chuckles nastily]  Wouldn't you like to know?  I'll tell you when, though - give you something to stew about, you arsehole - Saturday night.  You'd best watch your step, cause you may not realize it, but I have friends in low, low places, and they just love an excuse to beat some bastard to holy fuck and back!  [beat]  What do you mean, how are they going to find you?  They're probably already watching you.  Run if you want, but unless you find some way to get me first, they will get you.  SOUND    PHONE SHUT OFF SATAN    Was that really a good idea? SOUND    QUIET FOOTSTEPS APPROACH MAGGIE    What, impressed? SATAN    Yes and no.  I like your intensity, but you shouldn't have warned him. MAGGIE    Betcha I know what I'm doing. SATAN     [seriously] Let me think about it. MAGGIE    So, what's the pitch tonight?  And where's the undertaker? SATAN    He's a very busy entity.  He's already wasted rather a lot of time trying to impress you. MAGGIE    Why impress me - isn't he fucking all-powerful death?  Doesn't he just whisk people off and bobs your uncle, you're hip deep in the bleeding river styx? SATAN    Styx?  Well, I'm impressed-- MAGGIE    [dismissively] Beer mat trivia.  So it's just you and me tonight, is it?  Pity - I haven't had a really good threesome since 1968. SATAN    [chortle] MAGGIE    Right, laughing boy.  Either you dropped in for more of the maniac's brownies, or you want something from me, and I don't fancy myself so fucking entertaining that I'd drag you away from the torture telly. SATAN    Torture? MAGGIE    Bleeding heart chat shows and those so-called game shows where people swallow foul things that haven't even taken them to dinner and a picture first. SATAN    [sigh] Bloody hell - it's getting so hard to frighten people these days.  You say you'll stick a red-hot poker up the bum and half say "been there, done that". MAGGIE    Well, I've been and done around in my time.  Are you planning to try and scare the crap out of me? SATAN    Really, I just follow Morty around, since once he lets on he's coming for someone, it's usually a piece of piss to get them to agree to sell their soul... MAGGIE    [bark of laughter] A bit like when a bloody great hurricane hits and all the bastard insurance salesmen clean up selling storm coverage? SATAN    A bit.  So.  You selling? MAGGIE    Blunt, aren't you? SATAN    I feel we've gone a bit beyond a sales pitch here. MAGGIE    So?  I sell my soul and you - what?  Give me my greatest wish?  I assume immortality is only on the high shelf - the one you can't ever knock down enough sodding bottles to win. SATAN    What do you want? MAGGIE    [thinks, then]  No.  Two reasons.  First, I still believe you're some starving artist Bertha paid to come round and chat me up.  Second, I might have a mouth like a public urinal, but I still read my classics.  Monkey's Paw?  Nothing good ever comes from a bad deal.  SATAN    It's not my fault if people don't take time to read the small print.   MAGGIE    You ponder enough, there's always a way to bugger the customer.  If nothing else - just send the damn thing round unassembled, with instructions in fucking Parsi. SATAN    [laughing again] I do like you. MAGGIE    Can't say you're the worst bastard I've had to deal with in my whole sodding life. SATAN    Tell you what - just to prove that I am what I claim to be, how about a freebie? MAGGIE    I draw the line at giving up my favors for anything less than a fiver. SATAN    [chuckling] No, I mean I'll do something for you.  No strings.  Cross my heart. MAGGIE    You're not planning to bugger me on this? SATAN    What would it get me, until I get a signature on the dotted line?  It can't be anything huge - I'll not cure cancer or feed the world's hungry-- MAGGIE    Sod the hungry.  Too many bloody people clogging up the sewer we call the world anyway. SATAN    --or make you healthy. MAGGIE    [grim] Yeah, right. SATAN    Something short term and simple. MAGGIE    I got it.  And if you do it, I promise to take under consideration that you might actually be the bleeding king of the underworld.  Right? SATAN    Ask and it shall be done. MAGGIE    Right.  Now you have to wait until I say "done" before you go swotting off and do this - I want every bloody condition met.  SATAN    [very serious] Very well. MAGGIE    With no harm to either of them, in the immediate or long term, I want something to happen that will keep Jemma in hospital until Sunday.  Can you do me that?  Suspicious skin condition, something - and this is the part that if you fuck me I will find a way to rip your bollocks off - it has to be something that won't hurt the baby.  Right, uh... [thinking, then] Fuck.  Done. SATAN    [dead serious]  I see.  Agreed.  [beat, then a bit hesitant]  You wouldn't happen to have any of those brownies, would you? MUSIC SOUND    WHEELING DOWN A HOSPITAL HALL NURSEY    Doctor says you're just about well enough to leave.  MAGGIE    [snarl] Lovely.  NURSEY    Probably tomorrow - just in time for the weekend. MAGGIE    [snarl] Can't think of anything that would brighten my day more. SOUND    DOOR OPENS BERTHA    Oh!  Here she is. MAGGIE    Oh, bollocks, who decided to shit all over my parade? BERTHA    Mother! MAGGIE    Technically.  Can you at least keep your festering gob shut until this pelican gets me settled?  It's humiliating enough to be jumbled around like someone's sodding laundry, but to have an audience is just the bloody capper. BERTHA     Mother, this is too important to wait. MAGGIE    Fine.  Talk. BERTHA    I brought you the brochures-- MAGGIE    [somewhat muffled] Talk over.  Fuck off. BERTHA    Mother!  You must admit you need care.  You can't-- MAGGIE    I can!  You'll never get an agreement from me to being stuck in your fucking P-O-W camp, and if you even think about trying to  prove me incompetent, I will change my will and put Jemma in charge. BERTHA    [indignant] Jemma!  She doesn't --- She has too many... children... to look after! MAGGIE    [smug] And a bastard husband who will go through the bulk of my money in a week or two, slick as snot.  BERTHA    Besides, Jemma's going to be a bit longer here herself.  Some weird rash has cropped up that they want to keep for observation. MAGGIE    [at a loss]  Really?  [swallows, then her beligerance returns]  Devil only knows how that happened.  Right.  Now, I'm tired and you need to PISS OFF. BERTHA    This is not over! SOUND    FEET STORM OUT, DOOR SLAMS NURSEY    And what's wrong with a little care? MAGGIE    You. MUSIC SOUND    NIGHTTIME MAGGIE    All right, you pouffy bastard - come out. SATAN    [tsks]  Names? MAGGIE    Endearments, darling beast.  So what did you do to my idiot daughter? SATAN    You asked for a skin disease - I gave you one.  Shouldn't even be much scarring. MAGGIE    Scars she's used to.  I'll send her a bloody great tub of aloe vera.  Or will it to her.  I meant to ask, when can I expect another visit from lord stick up his bum? SATAN    Death?  About a week.  Maybe less.  MAGGIE    And then--? SATAN    [final, agreeing] And then.  You ready to sign on? MAGGIE    I'll read the bloody fine print first. SATAN    [chuckling, evilly] You may not have time - there's a helluva lot of fine print. MAGGIE    [chukles evilly back]  Hand it over. SOUND    HUGE SHEAF OF PAPER HITS THE TABLE WITH A THUD MAGGIE    Bugger me! SATAN    There may be an easier way. MAGGIE    Than buggering me?  What's that, then? SATAN    A bet.  MAGGIE    A bet? SATAN    You suggested it yourself last night.  I asked if you know what you're doing, and you-- MAGGIE    [considering, then quietly] I spoke very loosely. SATAN    The devil is in the details.  [laughs] MAGGIE    How do I prove I won, and what do I get? SATAN    What you get - hmm - I'll get Morty off your back, for, say, ten years?    MAGGIE    Is that all? SATAN    Who do you think I am, bloody Oprah? MAGGIE    That has to come with two things-- SATAN    I said-- MAGGIE    I have to be in at least as good health as I am now the entire time - no fucking coma for ten years - and abso-fucking-lutely no bloody nursing home.  I'll live on the kerb before I'll-- SATAN    Done. MAGGIE    And if I lose? SATAN    I get your soul - immediately. MAGGIE    So the bet is I know what I'm doing - how do I prove I won?  SATAN    What are you trying to accomplish? MAGGIE    Oh, no - I'm not giving you any chance to play silly beggars with my plans.  Suffice to say that after Saturday night I will still be the one smiling? SATAN    Hmm - give me a few more of those brownies and you have a deal. MUSIC SOUND    DOOR OPENS, WHEELCHAIR ENTERS MAGGIE    Jems? JEMMA    [weak, but better than before] Yes?  MAGGIE    They say you're to stay here a few more days. JEMMA    It's this bloody rash.  [itching noise] NURSEY    Now now, you know you're not supposed to-- MAGGIE    [weary] Bugger off Moby Dick.  Jems, I'm going home now, they say, and - uh - this weekend should be bloody interesting. JEMMA    [dull] Of course, mum.  You have someone to look in on you?  Bertha? MAGGIE    Only if I want to sign my away my soul.  [laughs uncomfortably]  Nah, I've talked Kev into roughing it with me for the weekend. JEMMA    [a bit disbelieving] Oh.  Yeah.  Good. MUSIC KEV    [muffled, nervous, on the phone]  Of course this is her bloody mobile!  She's asleep.  [beat]  Fuck no, I won't!  You can haul your own bleeding carcass in here and do your own dirty work.  [beat, sarcastic]  Ri-i-ight.  No, you don't understand - I'm rather fond of the old bag-- [beat]  Well, yeah, there is a toady element to it, but we get on, gran and me.  I'd just as soon have her around a while longer.  [beat]  Ain't impossible, innit?  She is meeting her solicitor next-- [beat] Oh, you didn't know that yet, did you?  [beat, then cowed]  Y‑yeah, I know--  No!  No, don't go to the cops.  I'll--  [beaten] I'll leave latch up, then, shall I? MUSIC [very ominous] SOUND     DOOR OPENS VERY CAREFULLY.  SOUND OF GENTLE WHEEZY BREATHING.  SLOW CREAKING FOOTFALLS.  TED    [muttering]  Stupid bloody old cow.  Have my guts for garters will she?  Hah!  SOUND     CREEPING GETS CLOSER TO THE BREATHING. TED    Once we've got your fucking money, you old bitch, Jemma'n me'll be just bloody fine.   SOUND    LIGHT SWITCH TURNED ON MAGGIE    [casual, off in a corner] Oh, right.  Tickety-bloody-boo. TED    [whirling]  You insane bitch!  [unsure] Wait!  If you're over there in the shadows, then who's in the sodding bed? SOUND     BEDCLOTHES FLUNG BACK KEV    [flamey] 'elo, luv! TED    What kind of bloody game are you playing? MAGGIE     Hmm.  Red Rover.  Red Rover, red rover, send the donkey's scrotum over. TED     Two to one?  The mummy and the weasel.  I can take the both of you!  [yells and runs at her] SOUND     RUNNING FEET, BROUGHT TO A SUDDEN HALT TED    [urk] SOUND     BODY DROP SPIKE    [chuckles nastily] No, me old son, I think you've got that ass-backwards.  Hasn't he, lads? SOUND     DOORS OPEN, SEVERAL SETS OF HEAVY FEET ENTER BIKERS     [agreeing noises, laughs.] SOUND    SLAP OF FIST INTO HAND, CHAIN RATTLES KEV    You mind, gran?  Not my thing. MAGGIE    [kindly] Nah, go ahead, you ponce.  I'll be right here.  Better than a jolly great football riot. KEV    [off] Yeah, but guess who gets to hose out your kip? SOUND     FEET SCUTTLE OUT OF ROOM TED    [panicking] Someone'll hear! MAGGIE    Not bloody likely.  I made dead cert of that.  Amazing what free dinner coupons will do to get people to vacate for the night.  Course, police'll chalk them up to the same burglars who broke in here - luckily Kev and I stopped in for dinner with Bertha. KEV    [yelling from off] We had a sodding flat on the way. MAGGIE    [threatening] Doesn't that just take the biscuit?  Now Ted.  If you take this like a good little mountain of elephant dung, quietly and repentant-like, they might leave you alive.  SOUND    PUNCHING COMMENCES, associated noises from the bikers TED    [grunts]  Hey!  Why--? MAGGIE    [incensed]  Why?  Hold up.  [starting low, and mounting] Three broken wrists - that's why.  A cracked fucking pelvis - that's why.  A broken collarbone - that's why!  Thirty-bloody-seven sodding black eyes, and that's only the ones I counted myself - that's why!  Punching your fucking pregnant wife in her stomach [ragged breath, then almost a whisper]  That.  Is why. SOUND    PUNCHING COMMENCES AGAIN, associated noises from the bikers MUSIC SOUND    HOSPITAL HALLWAY, ANNOUNCEMENTS, WHEELCHAIR APPROACHES NURSEY    [distasteful, but trying to hide it] Oh, goodness, are you back? MAGGIE    No fear, yeti.  We're just visiting, aren't we?  KEV    Right.  We're family. NURSEY    That's lovely.  Well, just a minute then.  He's not really up to much.  Poor fellow. SOUND    DOOR OPENS, PINGING MACHINES INSIDE MAGGIE    I know.  [pouring on the melodrama]  Apparently he was coming by to bring some flowers - since I'd just got out of hospital - and surprised some burglars or something.  [sounding almost teary]  But for the grace of the almighty, that could have been us - couldn't it, Kev? KEV    Worth every bite of mum's pork au poivre. MAGGIE    [sharp] Shh.  [teary] Tragic. NURSEY    [softening] See, I knew you had it in you. SOUND    DOOR SHUTS MAGGIE    If only she had it in her more often, she wouldn't be such a tight-ass knicker-twisting sodding git. TED    [muffled by tubes and such]  uh? MAGGIE    Good night.  What a mess. TED    [alarmed] uh! MAGGIE    Don't call reinforcemants just yet - we're merely here to deliver a message. TED    [shuddering] um? MAGGIE    It boils down to this, my evil bastard sonofabitch in law.  Quite apart from being ready to kill you should anything untoward happen to either of us here, my friends plan to visit anything you do to Jemma upon you.  And I do mean anything.  If you get anywhere near her, even with a freindly weapon, you better be ready to take every single bleeding stroke you give.  SOUND    WHEELCHAIR ROLLS AWAY MAGGIE    I'll send round some vaseline. SOUND    DOOR OPENS MUSIC SOUND    TELLY ON LOW, MAGGIE TAPPING FURIOUSLY AWAY ON COMPUTER MAGGIE    Bastards!  Fucking evil empire bastards!  They just wait until I'm in hospital, and change the rates on me again! SATAN    [clears throat] MAGGIE    One minute - I have to update my sodding bid structure.  Again. SATAN    What? MAGGIE    Business.  And... there.  Good for now. SATAN    Well, um.  [a bit cowed]  The bet. MAGGIE    You have to admit, I got my bloody way. SATAN    Yes.  Very well too.  MAGGIE    So I win, do I? SATAN    Oh... yes.  You're very impressive.  I'd almost offer you a job myself. MAGGIE    Come back in ten years, [fondly] you ponce.  So what, do we shake on it or somesuch? SATAN    Frankly, I'm rather fond of my fingers. MAGGIE    [laughs]  You have my oath I won't bite...  This time. SATAN    Right, then. SOUND    HESITATE, THEN A HANDSHAKE MAGGIE    Go on then.  I'm far too bloody busy to be swotting around all day with the likes of you.  SOUND    TAPS A FEW KEYS MAGGIE    [to computer]  What does that wanker bloody mean he forgot to pay me?  [aside]  There's some brownies there.  Drop round any time.  [back to computer, then fading out] Dammit!  Dammit it all to bloody buggery arse-face fucking donkey scrotum hell!!! CLOSER OLIVIA    Now that you know how to find us, you'll have to come back.  Maybe next week?  Don't be a stranger - we have enough of those already...  

We Have Fun: The Podcast
The Gingerbread House

We Have Fun: The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 68:01


Technically the Christmas episode! The Fellas go a little avantgarde with this one as they attempt to build a gingerbread house. It gets extremely sexual. They're sorry, or they're not. Depends on how much you like/hate it.

Stuff You Should Know
Palm Trees: Technically, Giant Plants

Stuff You Should Know

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 60:03


Palm trees. You see them all over the world and for good reason. There are more than 2,500 varieties. Learn all about these giant plants today.  Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

The Dental Hacks Podcast
Group Function: Digital Dentistry for the Technically Challenged with CAD-Ray

The Dental Hacks Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 31:19


Alan was joined by some friends from CAD-Ray! Jon Acker, Damien Bonner and Rich LaFergola work at CAD-Ray, a full service distributor of technology products focusing on CAD-CAM, CT's and 3D printing! Alan has been using the Medit i500 that he purchased from CAD-Ray back in 2018! But there is SO MUCH MORE that they have to offer! The conversation is wide ranging about technology and how CAD-Ray is making it more accessible to dentists! Who you buy from is important for training and support CAD Ray has a bunch of online videos for training but also does a lot of in person training in Vegas and all over the country. Medit's software is constantly updated with a LOT of tools that many don't even use with no fees ever! "Patient excitement applications" Ortho simulator (included in Medit software) Smile design (included in Medit software) Whitening app (included in Medit software) CAD-Ray private user group Medit user group Model builder (included in Medit software) Clinux software (browser based) by CAD-Ray! Medit Temporary designing software (included in Medit software) How quickly will we be printing final restorations? Medit i500 vs. i700 Create your own cart/computer with Medit! Workflow examples with Medit-->printing CAD-Ray *may* have found a mill they will be selling soon! (chairside crowns anyone?) If you would you like support the Very Dental Podcast Network you should support our sponsors! They help us create content that is, for lack of a better word...Very Dental! Why should you care about single patient use burs? I can think of a lot of reasons, but the one your patients are thinking about is this one. What's that sound? That's the sound of a rotary instrument that's never been used on another patient. That's the sound of no cross contamination. That's the sound of your patient knowing that you are looking out for them. Sure you get a super sharp, never been used bur each and every time you open a Microcopy bur, but mostly your patients know that you take cross contamination seriously. Go check out the wide variety of single patient use products at verydentalpodcast.com/microcopy. A new (and sterile) bur…every time. Microcopy Dental. Ideal preps. That's what we aim for. One excellent way to get there is to use a core material to build the tooth back up to ideal contour. Cosmecore from Cosmedent is my choice for building up a broken down tooth. It's dual cure, comes in a variety of colors and cuts just like a tooth. You'll get a super smooth finish with no gouging. Right now I've got the 50 gram dispenser that fits in a small impression gun, but when I need to refill I think I'll go with the 8 gram syringe. Both work great, but those syringes are handy and don't take much room on a set up. Check it out at verydentalpodcast.com/cosmecore! It's funny, but you never really know how your branding effects people until you see it in your own life. So Jacob, my youngest 11 started Invisalign with a local orthodontist. He's following all the instructions, including taking them out to eat. So I'm CONSTANTLY seeing a case for his aligners with our orthodontist's brand. Like every single day. I'm realizing that cases for aligners, splits and removable offer a brilliant way for people to remember your office and your brand! And then I thought of our friends at Zirc who offer aligner sized and denture sized boxes in tons of colors that you can customize with YOUR logo! They're offering a buy one, get one deal on retainer or denture boxes with your logo and 4 lines of custom print! Go check it out at verydentalpodcast.com/imprint and use code: verydentalimprint for your Very Dental deal! Our friends at Enova Illumination have your magnification and lighting needs all figured out. Whether you're looking at new loupes, a surgical headlight like no other or the amazing line of Zumax microscopes, Enova Illumination has you covered! Go check them out at verydentalpodcast.com/Enova and take advantage of the discounts they have for Very Dental Podcast Network listeners! Do you need help with a logo or website design? Our friends at Wonderist can definitely help! Keep your eyes open for updated logos of all your favorite Very Dental Podcast Network shows this month...they've been designed by the pros at the Wonderist Agency! Want more information? Go check them out at verydentalpodcast.com/wonderist! Do you want an easy way to support the Very Dental Podcast network? Go check out the monthly deals from our friends at Crazy Dental! Each month Crazy Dental will be offering all kinds of different coupons on the product you're using most! Head over to verydentalpodcast.com/crazy to see the monthly deals they have in store for you!  

Ranger Things Have Happened
Episode 23: More Monologues

Ranger Things Have Happened

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 30:56


Technically, you CAN win them all...but no team ever has, and likely never will! Listen back as we (Ricky) discuss the week that was in Rangers hockey. Also, another special guest makes a triumphant return!Original Airdate: 12/09/2021Cast of Characters:Ricky Special Guest: Rachel Nones

Don't Expect Anything
199 - Water On The Knee (feat. Laura Costa And Keegan Mew)

Don't Expect Anything

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 63:19


Technically this episode is a mess. It begins during the pre-episode tech run-through so forgive its crudeness as Keegan tries to win the episode ten seconds in and Laura makes a startling discovery about how microphones work. When the episode finally gets underway, Laura introduces some spy themed Mad Libs to prove no one understands the English language and Dame Doody Stench quickly drops by. Also, stick around for everyone's review of Jeremy Renner's Main Attraction. These Talkie Boiyz are crying and begging for positive feedback, so if you would like to help these sad, sad podcasters out, you can find them here: Facebook: @deapodcast https://www.facebook.com/deapodcast/ Instagram: @deapodcast https://www.instagram.com/deapodcast/ Jeremy: @slippin_on_peels Josh: @j__sh._ Huw: @huwperfluous Liv: @livlikesmovies Keegan: @kega_saur YouTube: SuperBoop Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/dont-expect-anything YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCIlEVJAU7gIirt6xgaG3g4g

Every Album Ever with Mike Mansour & Alex Volz
Episode 115: Porcupine Tree

Every Album Ever with Mike Mansour & Alex Volz

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 126:50


This week we're discussing every album by Porcupine Tree. Led by mastermind Steven Wilson, Porcupine Tree has tackled a ton of styles over their prolific career. Psychedelia, prog rock, metal, alternative, pop. Technically, we should love this band. But we don't. We hate them and we talk about it for two hours. Settle in and leave your angry comments, this is a hot one, folks!Closing track: “Sleep Together” from Fear of a Blank Planet (2007)Spotify playlist on Porcupine Treehttps://open.spotify.com/user/motherpuncherincJoin the Patreon!https://www.patreon.com/everyalbumeverMerch!https://pandermonkey.creator-spring.com/Instagram:Follow Mike @pandermonkeyFollow Alex @motherpuncherMike's Picks:Nil Recurring EP (2007) — Best RecordThe Sky Moves Sideways (1995) — Personal FavoriteStupid Dream (1999) — Worst AlbumDeadwing (2005) — Least FavoriteAlex's Picks:Fear of a Blank Planet (2007) — Best Album, Personal FavoriteThe Sky Moves Sideways (1995) — Worst AlbumThe Incident (2009) — Least FavoriteAlbums we discussed this episode…On the Sunday of Life… (1992)Up the Downstair (1993)The Sky Moves Sideways (1995)Signify (1996)Stupid Dream (1999)Lightbulb Sun (2000)In Absentia (2002)Deadwing (2005)Fear of a Blank Planet (2007)Nil Recurring EP (2007)The Incident (2009)

Charlottesville Community Engagement
December 7, 2021: Charlottesville’s $5.5 million FY21 surplus slated for employee bonuses, salary increase; Southwood presents next phase of development

Charlottesville Community Engagement

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 25:52


In today’s first Patreon-fueled shout-out, WTJU 91.1 FM invites you to tune in next week for the annual Classical Marathon. It’s a round-the-clock celebration of classical music, specially programmed for your listening pleasure. Throughout the week there will be special guests, including Oratorio Society director Michael Slon; UVA professor I-Jen Fang; Charlottesville Symphony conductor Ben Rous; early music scholar David McCormick; and more. Visit wtju.net to learn more and to make a contribution. On today’s program: Virginia receives over $85 million in the latest carbon credit auction A community group gets a look at the next phase of Habitat for Humanity’s development at Southwood Council gets a budget update and decides to donate the Lee Statue for future artistic purposesCharlottesville Community Engagement is a reader-supported publication. To receive new posts and support my work, consider becoming a free or paid subscriber.Lee statue voteCharlottesville City Council had a full meeting last night that will take a few newsletters to get through. We begin at the end with a vote to remove one of three statues removed in July. Here’s City Councilor Heather Hill reading the motion. “Be it resolved by the Council of the City of Charlottesville that the statue of Robert E. Lee is hereby donated and ownership transferred to the Jefferson School African American Heritage Center, a charitable institution organization in accordance with the provisions of Virginia Code 15.2-953,” Hill said. “This disposition is final.” Vice Mayor Sena Magill was not present at the virtual meeting, citing a family emergency. To read more on the statue and the Center’s desire to melt it down to create new public works of art, check out Ginny Bixby’s article in today’s Daily Progress. The further disposition of the Stonewall Jackson and Lewis, Clark, and Sacagewea statues will wait for another day. Possibly on December 20. The vote took place after midnight. Council had begun their day at a work session that began at 4 p.m. at which they discussed reform of the Housing Advisory Committee and the way projects are selected for to be funded through the Charlottesville Affordable Housing Fund. I’ll get to that in a future installment of the show. FY21 year-end balanceAlso in the work session, Council learned how the city fared as the books for fiscal year 2021 closed. Readers and listeners may recall there had been a concern the city would have a shortfall. Chris Cullinan is the city’s director of finance. “I’m pleased to report that we finished fiscal year 2021 in the general fund at surplus revenues of $5.5 million,” Cullinan said. Cullinan reminded Council that the pandemic hit just as the budget for fiscal year 2021 was being finalized. At the time, there was uncertainty about the long-term financial impact but the shutdowns immediately affected the city’s meals and lodging tax collection. Property and sales tax collection performed a bit better than expected. The city also didn’t spend as much as expected.“Several of our larger departments had vacancy savings over the course of the year as well as reduced levels of service or closed facilities during COVID and that resulted in expenditures being less than expected,” Cullinan said. Cullinan said the $5.5 million does not include any federal funding through the CARES Act or the American Rescue Plan. Those funds are accounted for separately. “But what it did allow us to do was instead of utilizing our general fund projects or eligible activities, we were able to use the CARES money instead so that CARES money stepped in the place of the city’s own revenues,” Cullinan said. Staff will return to Council on December 20 with a suggested year-end appropriation. Cullinan said they will make two recommendations that will affect the next year’s budget preparation. One involves a $6.7 million economic downturn fund that was set aside for a reserve fund at the beginning of the pandemic. “We didn’t have to tap into that money through the course of the fiscal year, and so that $6.7 million is outside of the $5.5 million,” Cullinan said. Cullinan said the $6.7 million had been taken by withholding cash funds to the capital improvement program. Now staff is recommending returning that money back to the capital budget. “Obviously as we all know there are several large capital needs both in the upcoming year but also in the five-year plan,” Cullinan said. Outgoing Charlottesville Mayor Nikuyah Walker said she wanted would prefer the money be used in some other way, especially if there is the possibility of funding coming from the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act as well as future federal legislation. “And I don’t know if CIP is where we should be considering allocating that with the fact that there may be funding coming in the future,” Walker said. Outgoing City Council Heather Hill said Council has agreed to proceed with a $75 million investment in upgrading Buford Middle School and would support Cullinan’s recommendation. “I think that any contributions we can put into the CIP right now are going to be needed if we’re going to do any of our other priorities,” Hill said. “And again, this is where those funds were intended to be when this fiscal year began.”For the second recommendation, said staff proposes that the $5.5 million be used for employee compensation adjustments including a one-time bonus related to the pandemic, as well as a six-percent mid-year salary increase to try to retain employees in a tight job market. Deputy City Manager Sam Sanders said the bonuses will cost $3 million and the salary increase will cost $2.5 million. “The plan is to make it effective in January so this would be immediate relief to folks seeing an increase in pay beginning January of 22 and we are already looking forward to how we sustain this going forward and feel comfortable that the projections for revenues are such that we can sustain this as a permanent increase,” Sanders said. Before the meeting, Walker had directed staff to see if they could find a way to vote to approve this before January 6, 2022 when a potential second reading would be held. Walker will not be on Council at that time. Sanders said did not know yet but staff would be looking on whether they could do so under Virginia law. “It’s based on the size of the appropriation that dictates how many days we’re required so we’ll be able to take a look at that in the morning as I did get that later today and we need to dig into that to figure out if we can move faster,” Sanders said. Under state code, localities that make a budget amendment in excess of one percent of the total budget must hold a public hearing, which must be advertised seven days in advance. Take a look at § 15.2-2507 yourself and let me know your interpretation.  The FY21 budget was $192.2 million. RGGI auctionThe latest auction of carbon emission credits held by the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI) will result in Virginia receiving another $85.6 million to help fund programs to mitigate the impact of climate change. Virginia joined the program in the summer of 2020 and became the first state in the southeast to join the compact. Through 54 auctions, RGGI has brought in $4.7 billion from power companies.“RGGI is the first market-based, cap-and-invest regional initiative in the United States,” reads the website. “Within the RGGI states, fossil-fuel-fired electric power generators with a capacity of 25 megawatts or greater (‘regulated sources’) are required to hold allowances equal to their CO2 emissions over a three-year control period.”Virginia has now brought in $227.6 million from the program across four auctions. Around half of the funding goes to pay for flood control and mitigation. In October, Governor Ralph Northam announced Charlottesville would receive $153,000 in RGGI-funded grants to create a model of the city’s portion of the Moores Creek watershed to assist with flood prevention. (October 6, 2021 story) You’re listening to Charlottesville Community Engagement and it is time now for another subscriber-supported shout-out. Filmmaker Lorenzo Dickerson has traced the 100 year history of the libraries in the Charlottesville area, including a time when Black patrons were restricted from full privileges. The film Free and Open to the Public explores the history of library service from the Jim Crow-era until now. If you missed the premiere in November, there’s an online screening followed by a Q&A with Dickerson this Thursday at 7 p.m. Register at the Jefferson Madison Regional Library site to participate in this free event that’s being run with coordination from the Albemarle Charlottesville Historical Society. Visit jmrl.org now to sign up! Southwood updateHabitat for Humanity of Greater Charlottesville has filed an application to extend an existing rezoning application to cover all of the Southwood Mobile Home Park. The 5th and Avon Community Advisory Committee got a look at the details in a community meeting on November 18. (watch the meeting)Rebecca Ragsdale is now the county planner overseeing the implementation of the initial rezoning and the preparation for the next one, taking over from Megan Nedostup who now works as a planner for the firm Williams Mullen. “It does include 93.32 acres and is the remainder and is the existing mobile home community along with a couple of smaller parcels,” Ragsdale said. “There’s three parcels in total. And the code of development proposes a minimum of 531 units or up to a maximum of 1,000 units.” There’s also a request to allow up to 60,000 square feet of non-residential uses in this second phase. Speaking nearly three weeks ago, Ragsdale said the review was just getting underway. Lori Schweller is an attorney with Williams Mullen and she provided additional details. Technically, this application is to amend the existing zoning approval granted by the Board of Supervisors in August 2019. “The current trailer park is located in the largest parcel right in the center and the first development is happening outside that area to minimize disruption from development and construction in phase 1 as much as possible,” Schweller said. Habitat purchased the 341-trailer Southwood Mobile Home Park in 2007 with the intent toward preserving affordable living spaces. The rezoning approved in phase 1 is to the county’s Neighborhood Model District, intended to create walkable communities. “As a neighborhood model development, the plan for phase 1 incorporated included a block plan logically organizing the areas of the development in accordance with the uses, forms, and density set out in the code of development. Density will range from green space at the lowest level of density upward through neighborhood, urban residential, neighborhood mixed-use, urban density mixed-use, to neighborhood center special area in that area designated for a center by the Comprehensive Plan.” Phase two extends the code of development across the whole property. Dan Rosensweig, Habitat’s CEO, said the plan has crafted with input from residents of Southwood. “Not trying to get buy-in but to elevate them to be the engineers and architects of their future,” Rosensweig said. “As such, they created a form-based code that regulated the basic formal characteristics of particular blocks in synch with the land itself, with the contours of the land and with a general pattern of development for the neighborhood.” Rosenseig said Habitat hopes to exceed the county’s affordable housing requirements as it seeks to not displace existing residents.“They all live in dramatically substandard housing on infrastructure that has failed,” Rosensweig said. “And so, to non-displace we have to at least replace the amount of housing that’s there but that’s not enough. We want to overperform that because there’s such an acute shortage in the region.” Rosenweig said 50 units were proffered to be affordable in phase one, but that phase will now include 207 affordable units. That’s in part because the Piedmont Housing Alliance is using low-income housing tax credits to subsidize rents in an apartment complex for households witj between 30 and 80 percent of the area median income. There are 128 market rate units in the first phase. “So 62 percent of the units in phase one are affordable,” Rosenweig said. Rosensweig said residents have led the charge to make sure the neighborhood is mixed-income. “They really wanted to make sure that every block had a mixture of Habitat homes and market rate homes so you can’t tell the difference between the two,” Rosensweig said. The number of units that will be built in the second phase is not yet know. Melissa Symmes is the residential planning and design manager with Habitat.“Based on the concept plan, we can build a minimum of 531 units as Rebecca mentioned, but we hope to build closer to a thousand units,” Symmes said. “If we were able to build a thousand units in phase two, this would result in a gross density of 10.71 dwelling units per acre and then a net density of 13.5 dwelling units per acre.”Symmes said the total for the entire Southwood redevelopment would be a range of between a minimum of 681 units and a maximum of 1,450 units.  “One thing to note is that we are not building the maximum permitted units allowed in phase one,” Symmes said. “We’re building about 100 units less than what the phase one code of development would actually permit.” The first phase allowed up to 50,000 square feet of non-residential space, but Symmes said only up to 10,000 square feet will be built. “So with that in mind there will likely be about 70,000 square feet of non-residential space in Southwood phases one and two total,” Symmes said. Symmes said Habitat will guarantee that 231 of the housing units in the second phase will be affordable and that will be enough to replace the existing trailers. Rosensweig said it may take up to a decade to fully develop the park. Guaranteeing affordability?After the discussion, CAC Chair James Cathro asked several questions including this one.Cathro: “What happens after a family is sold an affordable rate home and they pay it off, can they immediately sell it at market value? Is it their asset to use as they like or are there conditions or restrictions?”Rosensweig:“Great question. The latter. There are 30 to 40 years of deed restrictions on all Habitat homes. In the affordable housing space, there are programs where all of the equity is invested in, it’s really about the unit. On the other side of the spectrum, it’s all about the family. Habitat kind of splits the difference.”That means Habitat has the right of first refusal on purchasing units for a period of 40 years. “They put it on the market, they get a bona fide offer, we have a week to match that offer,” Rosensweig said. “Additionally there are significant incentives in the deed restrictions that incentivize families for staying for an extended period of time.” Rosensweig said Habitat for Humanity of Greater Charlottesville has sold about 300 homes and all but a handful have remained either under original ownership, were passed on to other family members, or were repurchased by Habitat. In the first village under construction, Rosenseigh said Habitat is building 49 units and 40 families are in line to purchase them. The rest are being reserved for Southwood families who want to rent rather than purchase. “Village 2 immediately adjacent to that will have another 25 Habitat homes and then Block 10 will have another 16 so there will be another 41 Habitat homes,” Rosensweig said.Impact on traffic and schools5th and Avon CAC members had questions about what Habitat might contribute to address potential traffic congestion. Steve Schmidt is a traffic engineer with the Timmons Group who is working with Habitat on the project. “You’re absolutely right, there’s a significant amount of traffic out there today, and there’s more coming,” Schmidt said. “There was a reason study done by VDOT to look at the whole corridor to kind of identify improvements that are coming. One of the improvements that we know is coming online is the roundabout at Old Lynchburg and the county complex there. That’s a funded improvement that will be in place in the coming years.” Schmidt was referring to a funded $7.26 million Smart Scale project in which Albemarle put up $2 million from the capital improvement program to help make this submission more attractive under the funding criteria. The Commonwealth Transportation Board approved the project in June. Construction is not anticipated to begin until at least October 2025, according to the application. Schmidt said VDOT and the county are both reviewing the traffic study. Another issue is the amount of additional children that will need spaces in the county school system. Schweller addressed those concerns and said the county is working to identify capital solutions in addition to the $6.25 million expansion of Mountain View elementary that was added to the current capital budget earlier this year. “What the schools are doing now is doing a new master plan analysis and we’ll have more recommendations coming up,” Schweller said. “Those capacity solutions could include a new school, redistricting, grade level reconfigurations. So we’ll wait and see what study reveals.”Schweller also said it is difficult to come up with an estimate of how many students would be generated by a mixed-use development with many types of housing.“It’s very difficult to estimate the number of students,” Schweller said. “If you have a thousand units, for example, in phase 2 that could yield from 40 and 470 students given the wide range of multipliers.” Schweller said there had been initial talk about providing land at Southwood for a new school, but that didn’t pan out. “Dan had discussions with the schools early on to offer a location for an elementary school and the schools at that time decided that was not what they wanted,” Schweller said. “At this point design and planning have moved on so there simply isn’t room in phase two for a school site and still accommodate all the homes that need to be built there.” Another attendee asked if Habitat would sell some of the land for the school, especially if the development does generate more need for elementary school seats. Rosensweig explained further why he would not proffer giving land over for a school. “You have to think about the purpose of a mixed-income community,” Rosensweig said. “There are really two purposes of a mixed-income community. One is to deconcentrate both wealth and poverty and create a neighborhood where people of all walks of life can live together. That’s very different from the last 150 years in our country which has become more segregated and intentionally so. So that’s one purpose. So if we take lots off line for market rate sales then we don’t concentrate wealth or poverty quite as much.”Rosensweig said the sale of market rate units subsidized the affordable units, and a balance has been worked out. He also said the architecture used for schools currently might not be compatible with the urban form of Southwood.“It would take a little bit of a frame shift in the way schools are planned to create the form of a school that would fit the context and character of this neighborhood,” Rosensweig said. “Something like a traditional Albemarle County ten-acre that has ballfields next to it that’s sprawling and on one level, I can’t in any shape or way or form seeing that fit this neighborhood but if the county were looking at something creative like a three-level school with minimal parking.”As an example, Rosenweig pointed to Rosa Parks Elementary School in Portland Oregon, which was built in the mid-2000’s as part of a public housing redevelopment project. The building is shared with the Boys and Girls Club and also functions as a community center.“So something like that if people were interested in thinking outside the box and you could pull some partners together, I think it would be a huge addition,” Rosensweig said. One community member who served on the Planning Commission from 2016 to 2019 noted that there appeared to be a lot of loose ends in the process about what would actually be built in the second phase.“I’m trying to figure out what level of certainty that the community, not just the legacy residents but the overall community, what level of certainty can be provided that the descriptions in the code of development by block are going to be built out in a way that those permitted uses and locations and appearance and everything, that there is some certainty about what’s going to be built,” Riley said. Symmes listed in the Code of Development said the blocks will clearly lay out what can be built where, but said she would follow up with Riley to get on the same page. There’s nothing new to report since November 18, but this item will eventually go to the Planning Commission for a public hearing. I’ll be there when it happens. Eventually! Special announcement of a continuing promo with Ting! Are you interested in fast internet? Visit this site and enter your address to see if you can get service through Ting. If you decide to proceed to make the switch, you’ll get:Free installationSecond month of Ting service for freeA $75 gift card to the Downtown MallAdditionally, Ting will match your Substack subscription to support Town Crier Productions, the company that produces this newsletter and other community offerings. So, your $5 a month subscription yields $5 for TCP. Your $50 a year subscription yields $50 for TCP! The same goes for a $200 a year subscription! All goes to cover the costs of getting this newsletter out as often as possible. Learn more here! This is a public episode. Get access to private episodes at communityengagement.substack.com/subscribe

Better Read than Dead: Literature from a Left Perspective

This week we are bringing you what the people want, and have always wanted, Herman Melville's Pierre (1852)! Wait, you don't want to read a book about a guy who breaks up with his mom for his sister? But you haven't even heard about his dad yet! Technically it's more of a painting of his dad, but the painting has a mischievous stare that lets you know it's very into French ladies. And that's how Pierre got a secret sister. He likes her more than a friend. She likes hiding in her hair and playing guitar more than a friend. This makes Pierre's mom so mad she throws a fork into a painting of herself. We didn't make this up. Herman Melville did. Come take a ride with us. We discuss why Melville is so cool, the mom/dad/sister triad, artistic mediation, and the nation. This is a two-parter, so come back next week to find out how it ends! We read the Norton Critical Edition edited by Robert S. Levine and Cindy Weinstein. For more on this totally regular book, check out Gillian Brown's “Anti-sentimentalism and Authorship in Pierre” in Domestic Individualism: Imagining Self in Nineteenth-Century America. Find us on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook @betterreadpod, and email us nice things at betterreadpodcast@gmail.com. Find Tristan on Twitter @tjschweiger, Katie @katiekrywo, and Megan @tuslersaurus.

KUOW Newsroom
Sawant Recall Election in Seattle is about more than those 3 charges

KUOW Newsroom

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 4:53


The November elections are over, but there's still a political battle brewing in one district, where the only socialist Seattle City Council member, Kshama Sawant, is the target of a December 7 Recall Election. Technically it's a contest over three formal charges that Sawant broke the law, but for many voters in District 3, which includes Capitol Hill and the Central Area, it's a referendum on Sawant's politics and her political style.

REZD.tv Network
You Like the Worst Stuff #428 – Live TGA Voting 2021

REZD.tv Network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 37:28


Vote along with your Worst Pals in this year's The Game Awards! (Technically, late-November 2020 to early-November 2021, plus also any game released by CD Projekt Red in September 2020's Game Awards.) Tony, Kat and Joe make their picks LIVE during the show, often using […]

You Like the Worst Stuff
You Like the Worst Stuff #428 – Live TGA Voting 2021

You Like the Worst Stuff

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 37:28


Vote along with your Worst Pals in this year’s The Game Awards! (Technically, late-November 2020 to early-November 2021, plus also any game released by CD Projekt Red in September 2020’s Game Awards.) Tony, Kat and Joe make their picks LIVE during the show, often using […]

They're Terrified & Tipsy
66. Addams Family Values (1993)

They're Terrified & Tipsy

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 82:56


Hi Friends! Today we talked about Addams Family Values! Technically this was our Thanksgiving episode (since, you know, Pugsley dresses like a turkey at one point), but close enough! Tell us what you thought. Cheers!To listen to ad-free episodes, a day early, plus get awesome exclusive content AND choose a movie for us to watch each month, check out our Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/tipsypodVisit http://www.tispypod.com for all things Tipsy Pod!--https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0106220/Directed by Barry Sonnenfeld (Men in Black 1997)The Addams Family try to rescue their beloved Uncle Fester from his gold-digging new love, a black widow named Debbie.--To listen to ad-free episodes, a day early, plus get awesome exclusive content AND choose a movie for us to watch each month, check out our Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/tipsypodPart of the Slash 'N Cast Podcast Network: https://www.slashncast.network/Voice over work by Dustin Kind: https://www.dustinkind.comAll podcast links: https://www.bio.link/tipsypod

Scaling Up Business Podcast
288: John Swanson — How to Develop a Strong Mindset

Scaling Up Business Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 30:13


This week's topic covers how to have a more resilient mindset when you're focused on building your own company. Headspace is almost everything when you're dealing with a lot of moving pieces, unforeseen stressors, and disruption. Today's guest has some answers on how you can handle the unknown and certainty with ease. John Swanson is the CEO of Wendell, a coaching company that focuses on the areas of Mindset and Health. He was the former CEO of Granite Games, Fast Factory Fitness, and Factory Forge. He is also an avid professional athlete who is passionate about shortening business leaders' to-do lists and turning them into clear action steps that move the needle. When you fail, that's when you really learn. As a professional athlete, John has had his fair share of failures and when he retired, he found a new path that led him to help other athletes with their nutrition, sports performance, and mindset. A lot of times, life will not meet your expectations. How do you manage the disappointment in your life? Do you sit and wallow, do you start to dig yourself out of it, or do you give up completely? Sports are even more ruthless when it comes to winners and losers. Technically, there can only be one. Everyone else is seen as a failure otherwise. When you're on a “losing team,” you have to be extremely proactive in finding the small victories that help you keep going. If you can't find these small wins in the bigger picture of life, it becomes incredibly hard to push through.   Interview Links: Sponsored by: Bit.ly/clariontech Wendellco.com John on LinkedIn   Resources: Scaling Up Summits (Select Bill Gallagher as your coach during registration for a discount.) Bill on YouTube   Did you enjoy today's episode? If so, then head over to iTunes and leave a review. Help other business leaders discover the Scaling Up Business Podcast so they, too, can benefit from the ideas shared in these podcasts.   Scaling Up is the best-selling book by Verne Harnish and our team for Gazelles Coaching, on how the fastest-growing companies succeed where so many others fail. My name is Bill Gallagher, host of the Scaling Up Business Podcast and a leading Gazelles Coach. Gazelles is the term we use for fast-growing companies. We help leadership teams with 4 Decisions around People, Strategy, Execution, and Cash so that they can Scale Up successfully and beat the odds of business growth success. Scaling Up for Gazelles companies is based on the Rockefeller Habits 2.0 (from Verne's original best-selling business book, Mastering the Rockefeller Habits).  

RCR Wireless News
Well, technically… cybersecurity needs diversity (Ep. 59)

RCR Wireless News

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 10:15


Shannon Rosales Mirani, senior human resources business partner for Global Sales at Tanium, comes on the podcast to discuss how prioritizing diversity and equity helps the company to grow and innovate.

Talkin' Tigs Podcast
Ep. 120: Technically Victorious! LSU Beats ULM + A&M Game Preview

Talkin' Tigs Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 40:15


This week on Talking Tigs:LSU beats ULM, but looks ugly doing itA&M game preview - Can the Tigers scrape out 6-6?Basketball continues hot start!Thanks for listening! Subscribe, Share, and Geaux Tigers!

Cool Story - A Wheel of Time Podcast
Technically True, Intensely Misleading (SIDE QUEST: Prime E02-03)

Cool Story - A Wheel of Time Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 64:43


In this episode, Matt and Enn discuss the Wheel of Time Amazon Series Episodes 02-03!  Forgive Matt's Audio for the first 6 minutes; I promise it improves lol. We get our first views of Ba'alzamon...meh. The Whitecloaks are in full effect and the gang enters Shadar Logoth which gives us Chernobyl vibes.  Our group is seperated and we find out what Nynaeve has been up to; Also Thom joins the party, just as each of group encounters some unexpected threats...E02: Shadow's WaitingE03: A Place of Safety

Seeking the Gospel Truth
211.25: Isaiah 40: Good News in the Old Testament. Judgment Ceases and Comfort is Here!

Seeking the Gospel Truth

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 18:12


Several times, years ago, I had the pleasure and honor of singing Handel's Messiah in a mass choir. That's a choir of 30-40 people, along with a local symphony orchestra and professional soloists. What an experience! Technically, I'm a 2nd soprano singing between alto and soprano. Sometimes, I could manage the soprano part if it didn't go too high. I would have loved to sing the soprano part of Messiah, but it was way too high. I had to settle for alto. Still, the altos had a significant part as did all the voices. I've embedded videos of the songs of Handel's Messiah at the bottom. Why bring this up? Well, Handel, got his inspiration for the start of his Messiah oratorio from Isaiah chapter 40. When you listen to the performances, you'll see that it's just about word-for-word in the King James version. See, in the prior chapters, as well as in 2 Kings, God was warning the people of both kingdoms, Israel and Judah, of the coming wrath. All they had to do to avoid it was turn away from worshiping the false gods of their neighboring pagan nations and follow the One True God. Yet, they didn't. Israel was attacked and carted away by the Assyrians and Judah was attacked 3 times and carried away to exile in Babylon. Chapter 40 of Isaiah is the start of his Gospel prophecies. He's telling the people that though you'll go through hard times, God comforts, God is all-knowing and He's bigger than any other thing in this world. Let's dig in… Keep reading in my blog where there are links to dig deeper and watch the special music videos of Handel's "Messiah" at the bottom…. It's time to GET RIGHT WITH GOD! Are you ready to meet God today? You may just meet God today! If you want to reap all the benefits of salvation including the 1-way, non-stop ticket to Heaven then… Believe. Repent. Be Baptized. Receive the Holy Spirit. Pray this prayer humbly and wholeheartedly… “Dear Lord Jesus, I know I am a sinner. I believe You died for my sins and rose from the dead. Please forgive me. Right now, I turn from my sins and open the door of my heart and my life to you. I confess You as my personal Lord and Savior. I surrender my whole life to you and I will follow you for the rest of my life. Thank You, Jesus, for saving me. In Jesus' name, Amen.” Or visit: https://giselleaguiar.com/how-to-invite-jesus-into-your-heart/ This is a daily podcast, published each evening. Subscribe button so can get to know God. And please share this with your friends. Soli Deo Gloria — To God Alone Be the Glory! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/seek-the-truth/message

We Have Fun: The Podcast

Technically the Thanksgiving episode! We're giving you even more to argue about beyond politics this year. Is NBA even real basketball? How long can a James be a Jimmy? Plus, Jimmy Stewart has held a mid-PA town hostage for decades, and the Fellas try out accents from all over the world. Stay safe, babies, and be sure to tell somebody you love'em.

Kottke Ride Home
Thu. 11/18 - AMC Will Soon Deliver Popcorn to Your Home

Kottke Ride Home

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 15:28


Will we soon have a new Planet Nine? The first human trial for an Alzheimer's nasal vaccine is about to be under way. And Papa John's has changed their name. Technically. And AMC Theaters has said, “movies, who? Never heard of her. We're a popcorn company now.”Sponsors:Tentree, Use code KOTTKE to get 15% off at tentree.comShopify, Get a 14-day free trial at shopify.com/kottkeLinks:Planet 9: Old data could uncover the Solar System's newest world, 38 years late (Inverse)A 1980s Space Telescope May Have Seen Planet Nine (Gizmodo)Mysterious Object Glimpsed Decades Ago Might Have Actually Been Planet Nine (Science Alert)In Depth | Hypothetical Planet X (NASA)First human trial of Alzheimer's disease nasal vaccine to begin at Boston hospital (CBS News)Brigham and Women's Hospital is testing a nasal vaccine for Alzheimer's disease (Boston Globe)Business Insider catches up with disgraced Papa John Schnatter (A/V Club) Papa John's redesigns its logo and stores (CNN)Papa John's drops apostrophe, is now Papa Johns (The Takeout) AMC Theatres Will Start Selling Popcorn Outside of Movie Theaters (Variety)AMC to start delivering popcorn straight to your house (A/V Club) The end of “click to subscribe, call to cancel”? One of the news industry's favorite retention tactics is illegal, FTC says (Nieman Lab)Cancelling Cable (Saturday Night Live, YouTube) Kottke.OrgJackson Bird on TwitterSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Nothing Personal with David Samson
50 million dollars!? Verlander new Astros deal; Fenway Sports Group trying to take over sports world; Where is Peng Shuai? (11/18)

Nothing Personal with David Samson

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 50:36


Today's word of the day is ‘West Palm Beach' as in area of south Florida as in the home of the Houston Astros Spring Training facility as in Justin Verlander has signed a 1-year, $25M deal with the Astros with a $25M player-option. WHAT?! Verlander will be 39 years old; Verlander has not pitched since ONE GAME in July, 2020. Did I miss something? (11:45) The MLB owners meetings in Chicago have been taking place. What goes on at these meetings? Are they just a big snooze fest? The Tampa Bay Rays are still trying. Trying their best to get the two city path finished. Why is the Montreal/Tampa idea still happening? (32:20) Review: Titane. (35:10) The Fenway Sports Group is ready to buy the Pittsburgh Penguins. What is FSG? John Henry, owner of the Boston Red Sox, is a large-market hawk. FSG owns the Red Sox, Liverpool FC, Roush Racing, and NESN. (39:55) NPPOD. (44:10) Chinese Peng Shuai is missing in China. Technically, Chinese authorities say she is not missing, but she hasn't been seen. What is happening here? Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Acme Packing Company: for Green Bay Packers fans
UnPack Pod: technically, someone has to play right guard.

Acme Packing Company: for Green Bay Packers fans

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 31:48


Zach and Justis help Packers fans bridge the gap between last week's Seahawks game and the upcoming Vikings ga,e Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Marketing Agency Leadership Podcast
Franchise: Focus, Scale, and BOOM!

The Marketing Agency Leadership Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 30:31


Adam McChesney, Owner, and Partner at St. Louis, Missouri franchise of Hite Digital, a service digital marketing agency with 15 locations. Adam's agency provides logo design, branding services, website design, search engine optimization, paid advertising, and recently launched Hite CRM, a technology-based software based on GoHighLevel's white-labeled CRM.  The goal? “To create an ecosystem that . . . helps us generate more business for them, . . . turn(s) those leads into customers, and then turn(s) those customers into walking billboards for our clients.” He wants to “turn a client's business into “a scalable model” that helps them reach their goals and helps them get more out of what they put in.” Adam says over 75% of his clients are in a home-service or contracting-type industry. Before Hite, Adam sold medical devices for around five years. When Covid hit, he decided he wanted to get into marketing. His background in prospecting, sales, and growing business gave him the skills he needed to get clients. He studied up on website building, ranking, and paid ad production so he could do the work.  He started his agency in July of 2020 and grew it “from basically nothing up to 30 or 40 clients,” but then came the problems. A lot of issues – fulfillment, account management, and scaling – were breaking the agency and its business. Adam started looking for ways to outsource. After he became “official” with Hite in June of this year, he doubled his agency's monthly revenue in 90 days . . . jumping from $30K to $60k a month. Hite Digital at the corporate level handles processes, systems, fulfillment, and some of the prospecting and administration services, leaving Adam with the time and energy to focus on prospecting, selling, growing, and scaling his business. Daily franchise calls with other franchise owners cover different business topics – each week starts with sales, then progresses through mindset, general operations, product, and on Friday, family-oriented personal sharing – providing a rich source of franchise “lessons learned,” but, more importantly, supportive relationships. The franchise has allowed him to leverage the resources and abilities of about 150 full-time team members and 15 distinct locations, and do work at a scale that a small, independent agency could not. Adam feels the franchise certifications, high-profile sponsorships, and publicity have increased his “validity” . . . he no longer has to sell himself as an individual product. With Hite corporate providing the processes and systems (“Sales are not going to outperform and out-scale bad processes and systems,” Adam warns), he now has the time to be “hyper-focused on what's going to take this agency and continue to grow.” He then concludes, “The things that are happening behind the scenes – strategy, everything like that – have continued to stay the same One key to finding quality clients? Adam is in a number of mastermind groups where he meets with business owners from all over the country on a regular basis. Many of the people in his mastermind groups are his clients or become his clients . . . and those people refer new clients to him, as well. Adam feels personal branding contributes to his ability to get and retain clients, because people know, like, and trust him based on the relationship created before they even consider a partnership. Adam is available on Instagram: @adamlmcchesney or on his agency's website at: hitedigital.com/st-louis Transcript Follows: ROB: Welcome to the Marketing Agency Leadership Podcast. I'm your host, Rob Kischuk, and I'm joined today by Adam McChesney, Owner and Partner at Hite Digital St. Louis, obviously in St. Louis, Missouri. Welcome to the podcast, Adam. ADAM: Yeah, Rob. Thanks for having me on. Super excited to be here today. Appreciate you having me here today. ROB: Excellent to have you on the podcast. Why don't you start off by telling us about Hite Digital St. Louis? Tell us what you all are doing, what's exciting there, what clients seek out. ADAM: Yeah, absolutely. Hite Digital St. Louis is a franchise operation of Hite Digital. Hite Digital has 15 locations as of this recording today, and I'm lucky enough to be the owner/partner here in St. Louis, Missouri. We're a full-service digital marketing agency. We do everything from logo and branding, website design, search engine optimization, paid advertising, and we've recently launched our own CRM as well. We do things a little bit differently over at Hite. Some really cool things that we have in the works. But we are a franchise model, so we leverage the resources and the abilities of about 150 full-time team members and 15 different locations. It has allowed us to do a lot of things at scale that, if you were basically your own little hyper-agency like I was before merging with Hite, you just couldn't do. Some really exciting things we have going on. ROB: It's a really interesting model, and I think it's one we really haven't encountered before on this podcast. How did you become aware of Hite, and how did you get drawn in? I'm sure that's a process; I'm sure there's some aspirations of what you can build on your own, what you can build together. It's probably a journey. ADAM: Absolutely. It's definitely been a journey. I've been an agency owner full-time now since July of 2020. Quick backstory on me: I was in the medical device sales field for about five years. Worked my way up through multiple companies and was pretty successful, but right as COVID was going on, I realized I didn't know if this was necessarily for me. I'd always wanted to take marketing full-time to see what I could do, helping local businesses – especially during such a unique time that we were seeing with the pandemic. So, in July of 2020, I left. My background, my strengths are really in prospecting and sales and growing business, so I never really had any issues finding people that were interested in allowing me to do their marketing and advertising. And then I was taught through courses and programs and a lot of self-teaching how to build a website, rank a website, do all the paid ads. So, I could sell and then I could also do it, which was nice, but it also brought its own set of problems for fulfillment and account management and scaling. As I took my agency from basically nothing up to 30 or 40 clients, I had a lot of issues that were breaking the agency and the business as a whole. I started looking into ways to outsource. Hite Digital was one of those ways that I was looking. Hite Digital in the past had been a white label fulfillment company for agencies that obviously didn't want to do the work internally. So, transitioning over to this franchise model – I had heard about it; never heard anything like it. I thought, “Wow, this is way too good to be true.” They handle the processes and the systems, they handle the fulfillment, they handle some prospecting and admin stuff. For me, it was a perfect storm where I was at in my agency to be able to continue and focus on what I wanted to do, which is prospect and sell and grow a business. ROB: It's really fascinating. It sounds like the whole delivery aspect of the business is something you don't really have to worry about on a day-to-day basis. ADAM: That's correct. ROB: But then with that also comes – you still do have to sell something that is aligned to what Hite can deliver as an organization. How do you think about the alignment between what you're selling and what's being delivered? ADAM: Luckily, I had a taste of what Hite was able to do before I came on as a franchise. I knew a couple other people that were already franchisees of Hite, I had seen it from a white label standpoint, and most of what I'm selling today was also what I had previously sold and also done myself. So, for me, it wasn't much of a transition. The biggest transition for me was to get out of a lot of the mundane tasks of the day to day. So, managing the accounts, managing the projects, building a website myself – all the things that in theory were good for me in the beginning to get access to knowing how to do it and be able to better sell what I was selling, but it got me very focused on the things that weren't going to grow and scale a business. ROB: What kind of territory do you have, then? Is it St. Louis in fact, and someone else might come in and do Kansas City or Nashville? You've got about 100 miles? What's your range? ADAM: Basically, right now I'm the only one in Missouri. I can't remember the specifics on the range. I want to say it's about 120 miles that I can remember. For example, in the state of Texas we have four franchisees down there. We don't really necessarily have a boundary of where we can do business, being digital marketing. There's not any caps on anything like that. But I want to say it's about 120 miles in terms of where another franchise would be opening. ROB: Got it. It reminds me – the NBA operates kind of like that too, and they seem to be doing all right for everyone there. [laughs] When it comes to prospecting, you almost get to go out and prospect a bit more unencumbered with the day to day of the operations, which is fascinating. Quite often in the medical sales field, it's I think a little bit similar. How do you think about which kinds of clients you're working with locally? ADAM: Where I really got my start was online networking. I'm in a variety of different masterminds where likeminded people are coming together. I'm meeting business owners all the time, and whether I'm working with people within those masterminds as clients of mine or they're referring people to me, most of my clients were all over the country. This has now given me an aspect to start doing some cool things locally in terms of networking, getting my name out there from a standpoint that actually means something. When I am the product, the service, and everything, and I'm telling people, “Hey, this is what I've got,” no one really understands that. Now I can send them over to Hite Digital, show them all the team members that we have, all the certifications, all the sponsorships, all the stuff that has been written about Hite Digital throughout the publications. It has a lot more validity. So, I'm more proud to be able to go and show that and do that, and it's given me access and more time to be able to do it. Personal branding is such a big aspect of where I've been able to get clients, keep clients and retain clients, because people know, like, and trust me based on the relationship that we've already created before even coming into a partnership together. ROB: Where does that lead you? Are there particular verticals or sizes of companies? Is there a typical client right now in St. Louis for you? ADAM: Most of the clients I have are in the home service or contracting space. That's really where I got my start and where I'm heavily involved from a client standpoint. But transitioning over to Hite, we've been able to work with clients of all shapes and sizes and a variety of different industries. Even started getting into the ecommerce space, which I had never been into before. There's really not a cap, but if I had to say, majority of my clients, 75% and above right now are all in a home service or contracting type industry. ROB: Got it. That certainly makes sense from a services perspective, whether you're talking about SEO, whether you're talking about paid search. All of those kinds of things, you need a certain kind of website; you need to be distributed certain places. You can definitely see how there's a lot of them, and you're prospecting probably looks a little bit similar on that side too, going to the medical. There's lists of these people. You can find them, you can build trust with them, and keep on going. Does that transfer? ADAM: Exactly. That absolutely does. ROB: You mentioned the CRM product, then. Is that a Hite central offering? What does that look like? ADAM: Yes. We partnered with GoHighLevel to create a technology-based software of their white label CRM. It's called Hite CRM. We launched it probably about two months ago right now. We've started to have some people adopt it. But essentially, we want to create an ecosystem that not only helps us generate more business for them, but able to obviously turn those leads into customers, and then turn those customers into walking billboards for our clients. The strategic part about what we do isn't just getting them more lead flow or more calls; it's how we turn your business into a scalable model that helps you reach your goals and helps you get out more of what you put in. ROB: That part makes sense. I do wonder – and this is always a little bit of a tricky art between that transition from sales to delivery in terms of relationship. You mentioned relationship, you mentioned retention. How do you think about the ownership of the relationship when a client goes from sales in your office to delivery, which is across the world, and certainly has to be at a level of quality – but it seems like the boundary of who owns the account is a little bit trickier than maybe if you had everything in-house. ADAM: Absolutely. Technically, we still obviously have it in-house. My account managers that I have are full-time. They just work with my clients. We have created the relationship and created that on a very high level. People obviously do business with me because they know, like, and trust me, and then I transition to not necessarily completely step away from the account, but “Hey, here is Kevin or Moe that's going to be able to take care of you on a daily basis.” The problem in agencies, as you grow and scale, and the issue I was having, is I was lucky if I was able to hop on a call with a client that was paying me a good amount of money once per month. In that, I wanted to make sure that the customer service was to a tier above where I had it and that we were still getting the results, that we were getting the correct reporting, that we were building efficiencies around how we do things for our clients. The aspect of the touching of each account and to the effectiveness we've been able to do it has completely gone through the roof in the transition. Obviously, that comes with me stepping back and delegating and putting processes and systems in place so I'm not the face of the day-to-day communication. But at the end of the day, the things that are happening behind the scenes – strategy, everything like that – has continued to stay the same. ROB: What does it look like? What's maybe the most extreme example of what it looks like to scale a city as a Hite franchisee? What's the limit? There's almost an unlimited amount of business. ADAM: Yeah, there's unlimited amount of business. Ideally, I think in the future we create physical offices, we have all these different things. Being able to work remote and pretty much anywhere in the world, I think there's a ton of opportunity just with one location. Just to give you an idea, I came into Hite officially June of this year, and by stepping away from the account management, by stepping away from the fulfillment and the admin tasks, I've been able to double my agency in 90 days. We went from about $30k a month to over $60k a month. And really all that is attributed to me being able to step away and not have to worry about “When's this project going to be due?” or “How am I going to figure out how to get all of these reports out to these clients and then hop on calls with them, and then hopefully for 30 minutes to an hour a day focus on my personal brand and also prospecting?” Those things tend to go in the backseat when you have to figure out the projects and the account management. For me, I've been able to be very hyper-focused on what's going to take this agency and continue to grow. ROB: A lot less fires to fight, for sure. A flipside of that, I would think, is maybe having fewer people around you when it comes to having a table of different opinions to help challenge the business, to move it forward, to think of what's next. How do you think about finding peer support and things to drive you forward in that way? ADAM: Luckily, the support system with the franchise model at Hite is absolutely phenomenal. We have a daily franchise call. Each day of the week is a particular sector or topic of the business. Today was sales, getting the week started off right. Tomorrow is mindset. Then we have general operations, product, and then family-oriented personalized stuff. So, we talk together on a consistent basis, even though we are completely on opposite ends of the country or the world or wherever we're talking. I think by having all of this communication and collaboration in the last 90 days, what's also taken me is I'm finding new ways to put different twists on my business based off of what all these agency owners are doing, because we're all in it together. If someone is finding success in a certain area, we're going to share it with the team because we want to grow and scale at its height. If you were to just have a daily call with 15 agency owners, I don't know how many people are going to start sharing their secrets every single day of the week to help you grow. You might get one or two things. But we're able to do this thing at scale and really help a ton of clients, a ton of people, and do it on a consistent basis. So that's been a really cool part. ROB: Right. From a geography perspective, there's no competition. You can be fully transparent. Someone can tell you exactly one account they're having a hard time with, they're weak, they're dying, the client's at risk, and you can't go steal that client. There's nothing you can do. That's their client, and they need the help to succeed, and you can learn from it. ADAM: Yeah, it's been phenomenal. To also give you an idea, we have one of our owner/partners who's in Nashville, and he's a real estate investor himself. He got into the space for being a real estate investor, to try to grow and scale his wholesaling company. He's jumped on calls with me to talk real estate with potential clients that he's never going to see anything from. No one's ever going to take time out of their day to do that if you're not a part of something like we have going on at Hite. ROB: One thing that seems like it would be tricky – and I'm sure they've solved it – how do you handle the question of product offerings and pricing? Because it seems like there's a lot of room for transparency there. There's a lot of room for you to try to mark up a service 10 times the rack rate. There's room for Hite to mark up a service 10% and tell you to just deal with it. How does that balance work from the pricing as it flows through to a client? ADAM: We have our fulfillment costs of what we pay per project or per service offering, what have you, and then we have “Hey, here's what we recommend selling it for.” You can sell it for what you want. If you want to package something together, if you want to offer X, Y, and Z free for 90 days or at a percentage off, you have the complete ability to do that. Clients are never really getting access to what our cost is on anything, so you then can go and say, “Hey, here's what I want to do in my business to be able to get to XYZ goal, and I'm going to reverse-engineer back knowing your costs.” So yeah, we haven't had any issues with it thus far. ROB: It's an interesting thing. It also allows you to be entrepreneurial because you can assess the market conditions locally, the competitive situation. It all makes sense. It still feels like selling, sounds like. ADAM: Yeah, it does. The huge thing for us is we've been able to get access to opportunities that we would've never gotten access to if we were just our little agency here in St. Louis. We were the VIP sponsor out at Traffic & Conversion. We got a ton of exposure there. We're a sponsor on Dave Ramsey's podcast. There's a lot of things you can now do when you have 15 locations that are all pooling things together. We have an opportunity generation department that helps out with our prospecting and even sets appointments for us. There's a lot of really cool things you're able to do when doing it at scale. ROB: Absolutely. That did ring a bell, actually. I have listened on the EntreLeadership Podcast. I have heard Hite Digital. It did ring a bell, and part of me wondered how much that sponsorship cost. I don't expect you to know that, but… [laughs] ADAM: I don't know it. [laughs] ROB: It's probably something you wouldn't do on your own. ADAM: Yes, exactly. ROB: Very good. Adam, you've done your own agency, you've chopped the delivery part off now and freed yourself to focus on some strengths; what are some lessons you've learned on your journey leading the agency that you might go back and tell yourself if you could rewind the clock and try to play Back to the Future and tell yourself what you ought to have known? ADAM: There's a variety of different things. It's only been 15 months of doing this full-time, and I've had a lot of success, but I've made a lot of mistakes, so the list could be very long. But I think the biggest thing for me, being a sales rep in my past, is sales are not going to outperform and out-scale bad processes and systems. When I first started running this full-time, I leave medical device, I leave a very lucrative industry, benefits, security, all those different things, and the shiny object is “Just go get sales. Take whatever product or service you can get in here and start selling it. Get people in the door.” Which was fine to an extent, but then my weakness – and why it's been such a great transition into Hite – is the processes and the systems. It's the organization. It's the fulfillment aspect. Trying to outsell bad processes and systems is never going to be the answer, and I think so many agency owners experience those problems where they're just focused on the shiny object, which is that next deal or that next month's worth of retainers, when not focusing on a process or system could set you back next month, 90 days, 6 months from now, and keep you from scaling to grow your business.  ROB: Sure. A lot of the processes are handled for you. How do you think about the processes that are not handled for you? How do you think about keeping consistency? Is there a playbook you're pulling from Hite? Is there a playbook you're writing yourself? How do you keep those account managers locked and loaded? How do you think about the next zero on the size of the business? ADAM: There's definitely a playbook and framework from Hite, but with how we do our business – to give you an idea, not everyone is going to have an account manager based on where they're at in their franchise. I happen to have two of them due to the size of our franchise. There's different dynamics that are coming in. I'm doing things a little bit differently than someone else is doing them based on our comfortability and based on where we're at with our clients and what projects we have going on. I'm managing it and learning new things each day, because I've really never managed people in a full-time aspect, especially in the account manager role, and I've also never been just an account manager. So, there's a variety of different factors that are going on. The next level in my agency is to bring in an integrator type person with digital marketing experience that really knows how to grow and scale an account management team, eventually a sales team. That way, I can really focus on what I'm doing best, which is at the top, strategizing, growing, and scaling the franchise itself, and not in the day to day still when it comes to managing people and the operations aspect. ROB: That lets you focus also on bringing in a very interesting sort of integrator, because you're not talking about a full-scale ops and delivery integrator. You can think about it as a different sort of organization, probably bring a more specialized integrator into that role. ADAM: A specialized integrator, one that's done SOPs, one that's done the product and the service aspect of what you do, and that likes doing it. Because at the end of the day, I think a lot of people are put in positions or pivoted to be an integrator when really they could be a visionary type of person or someone that doesn't like “I'm going to check the boxes and do all these different things.” My mind races at 1,000 miles per hour, and I need someone to help reel that in, and when we do have a good idea or a new process and system that could take the business to the next level, have someone that can run and put it into place and actually make it work. ROB: Absolutely. You've mentioned there's different scales of these franchises; there's one-man/one-woman shows. You've got a couple people around you. With the visibility that you have, what's the biggest you've seen a franchise get so far, and what does it look like from a work structure? ADAM: The franchise model is actually not even a year old. It's super new. We have people that have come in with agencies of all sizes, and then also people that are brand new to running their own agency, which I think is really cool. I think on the spectrum of where things are at, our average agency – we just saw the numbers today – is doing almost $30,000 a month. That's between all the agencies that are out there. Our agency here in St. Louis is definitely the largest in terms of I have two full-time people. I think everyone else pretty much at least has another full-time person or is working towards that. From a monetary standpoint, those things are going to be on every which end of the spectrum. But the average is right around $30,000, which is pretty healthy for 15 and only being a year old. ROB: Yeah, and you're setting the pace then a little bit, creating what this looks like. I wondered up front what it looked like perhaps from a pride perspective, because you start your own business and then you're merging, you're rebranding. But it almost sounds like a way to think about it is it's a way of making a bet and investing in growth. You're saying, “I think if I take this path instead of another one, I'm going to rebrand, I'm going to gain this halo over me” – and I guess some podcast ads, and this conference, plenty of other lead routes. But sometimes a merger is an ego battle, and it sounds like this is a little bit more of an investment strategy. ADAM: Yeah. It was a concern for me, to be honest. I was a lot more concerned with the way that I thought it was going to go versus how it actually did. For me, it wasn't so much the ego, but it was that I was the product, the service, and the everything. Basically, taking feedback and taking how the customers at the time and eventual customers took it, I took all that stuff personally. Some was good, some was not so good, and there were areas of opportunity. But for me, it was more so we each have our own commitment at Hite, and we're committed to so many different things of helping people, empowering people. I am the commitment to live a more whole, well-rounded life. If I want to do that, the way I do that is by impacting as many people as possible. I can only impact so many people if I'm doing everything, and I don't have the support, I don't have what I have now at Hite. Now, in 90 days, I've already grown the business double to what it was already at before, which was helping a lot of people. It's really cool to see even what we'll have at the end of the year and then this time next year. We're able to fulfill our commitments at a higher level, and in the process of that we're obviously going to lose clients that maybe we wouldn't have lost if I stayed and did my little agency. But we have to look at the bigger picture. I have to look at the bigger picture and what's best for me, my family, my agency, and everything else that's included. ROB: For sure. When you're looking ahead, Adam, at the next year, if we were to catch up a year from now, what's going to be new from the Hite Digital fulfillment mothership, and what will be different in St. Louis? What should we be looking forward to? ADAM: I alluded to earlier, over the next three to six months, I really want to bring in an operations integrator type manager to help take this business and plug up the holes that are here. What I think that allows us to do is to grow our team here in St. Louis – adding that person that would be local here in St. Louis, potentially adding some sales managers, more account managers. But getting very strategic on the partnerships and the things we're doing, investing in relationships, investing in masterminds to make sure that we're impacting not only as many people as we possibly can, but the right people, the right clients to come in here. The more people we're able to work with on a consistent basis, it's really going to help everyone win. I think in terms of Hite, we have ambitions of taking it from 15 franchises – I don't know what the end goal looks like in terms of a specific number of franchisees, but I think the people we're bringing in are all quality. They fit the bill of what makes Hite, Hite. And the best part is we're attracting all of these people. We're bringing in agency owners that we're connected to in our market, we're in other masterminds together. There's just a uniqueness to what we're doing. I think that continues on over the next couple months and throughout the years. ROB: Excellent. Adam, when people want to find and connect with you and Hite Digital St. Louis, where should they go to find you? ADAM: The easiest place is going to be my Instagram account. That's @adamlmcchesney. That's where I'm probably the most active in terms of messaging back and forth with people. You can also go to hitedigital.com/st-louis and find our information there in terms of what we offer and everything we have going on here at Hite Digital St. Louis. ROB: Excellent. Adam, thank you for coming on. This really does uncover a model we haven't talked about a lot on this podcast. It's a different path. It's clear it's working for you, it's exciting, and I think we're going to hear more about it. Thanks for coming on and sharing your experience, sharing your vision and leadership thus far, and we can't wait to see where it all goes. ADAM: Thank you very much. It was a pleasure to be on. Super excited for the future. ROB: Thanks so much, Adam. Take care. Thank you for listening. The Marketing Agency Leadership Podcast is presented by Converge. Converge helps digital marketing agencies and brands automate their reporting so they can be more profitable, accurate, and responsive. To learn more about how Converge can automate your marketing reporting, email info@convergehq.com, or visit us on the web at convergehq.com.

LeftOnRead Podcast
Episode 165: Technically Difficult

LeftOnRead Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 48:07


Episode 165: Technically Difficult by LeftOnReadPodcast

My Business On Purpose
531: How To Have More Time For Yourself

My Business On Purpose

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 7:37


I was sitting on the backside of an eight-person round table in the middle of a high-ceiling, golf club meeting room clearly designed with interiors from the 1980s and yet to be updated. In the middle of a presentation on resource management the presenter said this, “you can always make more money, you can always make more friends, but you will never be able to make more time... time is a non-renewable resource.” Huh. My mind began weaving through all of the available resources that we connect with every day realizing that almost everything that came to mind had the potential to be renewed; except time. The second that just passed is gone and it will not return.   Taking a doomsday approach to the non-renewability of time is not helpful, and yet being aware of time's terminal tick is a wise base for thinking, planning, and preparing. Whether it is a Mom or Dad tired from juggling work, kids, bills, and friendships, or a newly retired person fatigued from a life of that same juggling, all of us would like to find the silver bullet to having more time for ourselves. Similarly, we also wish to know the secret for having more time with those we love, with the things we love, with the causes, we are passionate about, and the hobbies that feed our soul. But, how? Our clients are asking the same question at the time that I am producing this post.  This is a special week that happens in November of each year, it is Business On Purpose PREP WEEK where each of our business owners makes time to work ON their business in preparation for the upcoming year. Most business owners feel a need to “get prepared” in the same way that a dehydrated athlete feels a real need to chug water on a hot, muggy, practice day when after an hour of running drills... they crave it. Unfortunately, most business owners never make it to the cooler to drag a swig of water before heading off to the next drill.  Over time the inevitable happens, they cramp up and are no longer available to the team for their particular skill. Business owners are notorious for never making it to the cooler of refreshment for their business.  They wake up to a fresh and exciting new year, with a tired and fatigued mind. How can business owners make time to work on the business... or just make time for themselves? First, you must come to your own conclusion that time, in fact, is non-renewable and that you wish to take advantage of that finite resource. Look no further than the 2020 pandemic for evidence of the non-renewability and fragility of time.   Care and desire are undervalued realities in the push for personal transformation.  You have to care, and you must have the desire to leverage the resource of time for the mission that you are uniquely built for. Second, you must stop seeing every detour and distraction as an excuse to making good use of your time. Truth is, most important things are not urgent.  Where we get caught up is when others place the burden of their own urgency and lack of planning on us!   This is a sobering statement, “your lack of planning and preparation does not mandate my urgent responsibility.” Sure, if you are a medical or security professional, or run a nuclear power plant, urgent responsibility is in your job description, but for the rest of us, we spend far too much time reacting to the problems and chaos caused by the lack of preparation of others... or because we have not planned ourselves and are simply responding to THE LATEST, LOUDEST VOICE. Third, create appointments in your schedule with yourself or with a project that you are working on. When asked, “hey can you grab coffee tomorrow at 3?”, you simply respond, “I have a meeting I cannot move.”  No need to share that the meeting is with yourself. That time you are spending in reflection, thought, or project building, is time spent serving others. Can you imagine a speaker standing up in front of 100 people with no notes and confessing, “I have been so busy responding to unplanned requests for my time that I have not been able to prepare notes for my talk... but at least I made those other people happy!” She would run out of the room, as frustrated attendees bemoan this colossal waste of the time of 100 people! Instead, when that presenter blocks three hours to work on that talk instead of reacting to the last-minute distraction, it is as if she is holding a meeting with those 100 people. We must reframe how our time alone is spent.  Technically, as I write this, I am not meeting with anyone, yet it is on my calendar as a meeting.  My phone is not in the room with me, my email and other notifications are not even turned on.  The only person I am thinking about right now is you... the reader, the listener.   Life can go on without the buzzing and dinging that we have become addicted.  We don't have to live like Pavlov's dog. Finally, put accountability in place around you regarding your time.  Create an ideal weekly schedule and then share it with a small group and make them ask you about it. The loving encouragement and gentle push of small group who are pulling for you can be just what you need to make the time for what really matters. This week, as business owners prepare for the upcoming year they will tweak their vision story, write an annual letter, populate their culture calendar, assess their team's feedback, review their financials, prepare budgets, and plan their personal budgets and planning.. .all because they have decided to MAKE the time.