Podcasts about Starbucks

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American multinational coffee company

  • 8,659PODCASTS
  • 13,275EPISODES
  • 43mAVG DURATION
  • 6DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Oct 15, 2021LATEST
Starbucks

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Best podcasts about Starbucks

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Latest podcast episodes about Starbucks

What's The Play Trivia
Everything You Love About Starbucks- THE Who Cares Podcast Ep 87

What's The Play Trivia

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 89:09


THE Who Cares Podcast is once again featured here its available on ITunes and Spotify and everywhere else you listen to your favorite podcasts or you can listen at its home https://anchor.fm/who-cares-the-podcast Everything You Love About Starbucks- Ep 87 Stephen brings his insight about society at large then buries the ideas under a mattress. Starbucks fandom represented by friend of the show Richard, who speaks for all of the siren themed chain in explaining to Stephen the insanity that is Starbucks sends all goods and bads to - stephen@whocaresthepodcast.com Blog Site- https://whocaresthepodcast80965603.wordpress.com/ twitter- https://twitter.com/WhoCaresPodcas Submit your Dreams, Questions and Dislikes stephen@whocaresthepodcast.com The Single Most Honest Podcast in the Land! help support your cast and look better than you already do https://whatstheplay.store/ Watch Live on https://www.twitch.tv/whatstheplaygames visit and ask any question you need answered and leave a voice note https://www.whatstheplay.net/ or JOIN https://www.facebook.com/groups/whatstheplay sponsored by: Pacific Shore Estates- Moving within Southern California was never so easy visit their website and type in Who Cares for a massive discount https://pseres.com/ Support this podcast

Woody & Wilcox
The Woody and Wilcox Show for 10-15-2021

Woody & Wilcox

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 62:58


Today on the Woody and Wilcox Show: Kevin James is trending; Coldplay's new tour will be green; It Happened in Flori-duh; Fun with Football Audio; Jason Sudeikis' interview with Seth Meyers “leaks” Ted Lasso spoilers; Woman accidentally live streams herself in the shower; Woody receives a handwritten thank-you note; Howie Mandel passes out in a Starbucks; And so much more!

The Goal Digger Girl's Podcast
227: 3 Steps to Launch an Automated Onboarding System

The Goal Digger Girl's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 12:04


I cannot wait to share with everyone the 3 steps to launch an automated onboarding system! Giving your team members a chance to walk through your core processes step by step is one of my favorite things to teach. These easy steps really help you go from just managing your team, to building it and THRIVING. If you are ready to get plugged in and dive into work, stick around and let's do this! Host Bio: Kimberly Olson is a self-made multi-millionaire and the creator of The Goal Digger Girl, where she serves female entrepreneurs by teaching them simple systems and online strategies in sales and marketing. Through the power of social media, they are equipped to explode their online presence and get real results in their business, genuinely and authentically. She has two PhDs in Natural Health and Holistic Nutrition, has recently been recognized as the #2 recruiter in her current network marketing company globally, is the author of four books including best-sellers, The Goal Digger and Balance is B.S., has a top 25 rated podcast in marketing and travels nationally public speaking. She is a business blogger, success coach and in a leadership position within her current network marketing company. She is a mom of two and teaches others how to follow their dreams, crush their goals and create the life they've always wanted. Important Links: Check out Project Broadcast: https://bit.ly/ProjectBroadcastTGDG Website: www.thegoaldiggergirl.com Instagram: www.instagram.com/thegoaldiggergirl Facebook: www.facebook.com/thegoaldiggergirl Youtube: www.youtube.com/c/thegoaldiggergirl Grab The Goal Digger Girl Journal: https://amzn.to/3BeCMMZ Check out my Facebook groups for those that want to build their business online through social media, in a genuine and authentic way: Goal Digging Boss Babes: http://bit.ly/GoalDiggingBossBabes Goal Digger Creatives: http://bit.ly/GoalDiggerCreatives Goal Digger University is where you can access my archive and newly released workshops, masterclasses, bonus training PLUS my Mastermind- with weekly live in-depth training for a monthly subscription: http://bit.ly/GoalDiggerU Connect with me across the social media platforms: https://searchmysocial.media/thegoaldiggergirl If you find value in this podcast, please leave us a review - it means so much! https://ratethispodcast.com/thegoaldiggergirl Grab coffee on Kimberly throughout the month of October! Submit an honest review of the Goal Digger Girl Podcast, take a screenshot, and share it on your FB/IG stories to be entered to win a Starbucks gift card! Be sure to tag @thegoaldiggergirl on social media for your entry to count! We'll be choosing 4 winners. If you haven't already, be sure to text “PODCAST” to 737-240-3136 to get notified when there is a new episode! Thanks for Listening: Thanks so much for listening to my podcast! If you enjoyed this episode and think that others could benefit from listening too, please share using the social media buttons on this page. Read the full transcript here: https://bit.ly/2YRIJ4C --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/thegoaldiggergirl/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/thegoaldiggergirl/support

Your Money. Your Life. With Delano Saporu
Episode 90: Michelin Tires

Your Money. Your Life. With Delano Saporu

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 15:57


On this episode: We have a large news week with Starbucks 50 year anniversary and Coinbase adding an NFT marketplace. In the roundtable, we discuss the John Gruden emails and being a minority in the workforce. As always follow me on IG here: https://www.instagram.com/delano.saporu/?hl=en Connect with me here also: https://newstreetadvisorsgroup.com/social/ Want to support the show? Feel free to do so here! https://anchor.fm/delano-saporu4/support Thank you for listening --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/delano-saporu4/support

kPod - The Kidd Kraddick Morning Show
Kellie's Showbiz Top 5-Howie Mandel Fainted In A Starbucks

kPod - The Kidd Kraddick Morning Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 11:01


Facebook is updating their bullying and harassment policy... Katie Couric releases her memoir soon...Owen Wilson still hasn't met his three year old daughter... Howie Mandel fainted in a Starbucks... Adele finally has a new album!

Business Movers
Howard Schultz: Saving Starbucks | The Third Place | 1

Business Movers

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 39:36


Howard Schultz bought a small Seattle coffee company called Starbucks in 1987. By the time he stepped down as Starbucks' CEO in 2000, Howard had transformed the six-store operation into the largest coffee brand in the world. But in the late 2000s, Starbucks descended into a financial spiral, and Howard came back to save the company he'd built from the brink of disaster.To listen to Business Movers ad-free, join Wondery+ in the Wondery App. Click here to download the app: https://wondery.app.link/businessmovers.Support us by supporting our sponsors! See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Having Funlessness with Jen Kirkman

This week: Jen's talking about how she's podcasting from her hotel in Palm Desert while being away with her parents. She talks about getting a root canal and the dentist not remembering her, being recognized and then un-recognized at a restaurant in NYC, teaching an Instacart shopper about where to find fresh soup in the grocery aisles, a Starbucks barista who didn't know what was going on, listener emails, and Jen's quest to find out who raised the current crop of teens.Get the ad-free video version (with bonus content) of this episode here: https://www.patreon.com/posts/57270742Buy tickets to Jen's five shows in December 2021 (album tapings) in Brooklyn here: https://unionhallny.comTo subscribe to Jen's You Tube Channel, Anxiety Bites podcast, buy merch, albums, books, or coffee for Jen click here: jenkirkman.bio.link“No Fun: the Jen Kirkman Podcast” is part of the Misfit Toys Comedy Network. To find all of the other great podcasts on the network go here: https://art19.com/networks/misfit-toysSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Al & Jerry's Postgame Podcast
Al & Jerry's Postgame Podcast for Thursday 10/14/21

Al & Jerry's Postgame Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 62:43


Al & Jerry Discuss: Man urinates in front of Starbucks, Buying a business and how that works and Curb Your Enthusiasm is back this month Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Super U Podcast
Michael Preysman

Super U Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 11:43


Michael Preysman is the founder and CEO of Everlane, a direct-to-consumer design brand based in San Francisco, California. Preysman shares tips and insights about what makes his company is extremely successful.   5x #1 Bestselling Author and Motivational Speaker Erik Qualman has performed in over 55 countries and reached over 50 million people this past decade. He was voted the 2nd Most Likeable Author in the World behind Harry Potter's J.K. Rowling. Have Erik speak at your conference: eq@equalman.com Learn more at: https://equalman.com Motivational Speaker | Erik Qualman has performed in 55 countries and reached over 50 million people. Qualman inspires his audiences on Digital Leadership-ensuring they are harnessing the power of Innovation, Future Trends, Focus, and Digital Transformation. He has inspired audiences at FedEx, Chase, ADP, Huawei, Starbucks, Godiva, FBI, Google and many more.

Courtney & Company
The Wake Up Full Show with Bret & Julie for 10-13

Courtney & Company

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 60:38


From trying to order Bret's "Fall In A Cup" at Starbucks to wondering if a teen wearing a Harley Quinn costume is too risque, The Wake Up shares those stories and MORE on today's show.  Enjoy! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Author Hour with Rae Williams
Brands Don’t Win: Stan Bernard

Author Hour with Rae Williams

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 33:23


How do leading companies win by changing the game? Established businesses like Amazon, Starbucks, and Tesla, and emerging players like Peloton, Halo Top, and Seedlip have a secret system for winning. These and ... The post Brands Don't Win: Stan Bernard appeared first on Author Hour.

Snacks Daily

The owner of Zales, Kay, and Jared's isn't just selling more jewelry than ever, it's selling pricier jewelry. Is Starbucks 50 years old or 50 years young? And the NHL is kicking off its renaissance season — but it needs Disney's marketing magic. $SIG $SBUX $DIS Got a SnackFact? Tweet it @RobinhoodSnacks @JackKramer @NickOfNewYork Want a shoutout on the pod? Fill out this form: https://forms.gle/KhUAo31xmkSdeynD9 Got a SnackFact for the pod? We got a form for that too: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSe64VKtvMNDPGSncHDRF07W34cPMDO3N8Y4DpmNP_kweC58tw/viewform Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Value Inspiration Podcast
A story about executing bold vision - one about reimagining the way the world works for the benefit of employees

Value Inspiration Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 42:38


This podcast interview focuses on product innovation that has the power to transform our workplace into a fair workplace - starting with fair pay. My guest is Maria Colacurcio, CEO of SyndioMaria is a tech veteran – she previously co-founded Smartsheet, which went public in 2018. She spent three years at Starbucks, one of the first Fortune 50 companies to go public with pay equity results. Having started her career working on congressional campaigns, she has a long history of mission-driven work, and a compassionate and competitive attitude to spur change.She serves on the board of the nonprofit Fair Pay Workplace and has been named by Goldman Sachs Builders + Innovators Summit one of this year's 100 most intriguing entrepreneurs.As a CEO and a mom of 7, Maria is walking the walk on eradicating workplace inequities. Today Maria is the CEO at Syndio, a SaaS startup helping companies around the world create an equitable workplace for all employees, regardless of gender, race, or ethnicity. That inspired me, and hence I invited Maria to my podcast. We explore what's broken in today's workplace when it comes to valuing people for the contribution they bring and paying them fairly independent of who they are. We discuss the pivot and what it took to change course. We discuss the effects the Pandemic introduced, and what was critical to not only bounce back, but actually come out stronger. And last but not least we address the role of the CEO in creating a business that people love talking about. Here are some of her quotes:If we get it right we quite literally transform society. I think the gender and race pay gaps resulted in lifetime wages that are often hundreds of 1000s of dollars less for women and people of color. So I think when you think about the wealth gap, and how we just compound over time, that's where we have a tremendous opportunity to transform society. And for companies, it's just as big because, if we get it right, it means they move away from this cycle of annual one and done remediation. And they actually get to stay on top of this proactively overtime on both sides.We really believe that workplace equity is a combination of two things. We started with pay equity, and now we're moving over to more broad workplace equity to look at promotions and when you can get to both. That's when you have a company that Really has an enduring ability to create value and to measure how they're valuing their employees not just for who they are, but the contributions they bring.During this interview, you will learn four things:That the odds of success and surviving any crisis starts with having a solution that's perceived as mission-critical, and not a nice to have.How to prioritize your roadmap by focusing on the smallest ingredient that driving the biggest impact for your ideal customersThat your ideal customers are not the ones that have the biggest budgets, but the ones where you align on world-views and show the courage to stick to it no matter whatHow to focus your leadership team on looking at a problem and brainstorming a solution collaboratively without blaming and fingerpointingFor more information about the guest from this week:Maria ColacurcioWebsite See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Holy Healthy Mama
84. Pumpkin Spice Latte--how to order at Starbucks to avoid baby weight struggles

Holy Healthy Mama

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 14:24


Pumpkin, spice, and everything nice.  Here you'll find practical tips and considerations for your Starbucks run so you can enjoy your drink AND feel your best in your mom bod!!   Links and Coaching Info

The Goal Digger Girl's Podcast
226: The #1 Mistake I See Entrepreneurs Make on Social Today

The Goal Digger Girl's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 10:33


I take you on the road with me again! We've recently had some unfortunate things happen on social media that should be treated as a wake-up call. Facebook and Instagram were shut down for the majority of the day! It may seem a little on the gloomy side, but these are things you need to know in order to keep running your business successfully WITHOUT social media. If you're ready to crush your business and light your soul on fire, then stay tuned! Host Bio: Kimberly Olson is a self-made multi-millionaire and the creator of The Goal Digger Girl, where she serves female entrepreneurs by teaching them simple systems and online strategies in sales and marketing. Through the power of social media, they are equipped to explode their online presence and get real results in their business, genuinely and authentically. She has two PhDs in Natural Health and Holistic Nutrition, has recently been recognized as the #2 recruiter in her current network marketing company globally, is the author of four books including best-sellers, The Goal Digger and Balance is B.S., has a top 25 rated podcast in marketing and travels nationally public speaking. She is a business blogger, success coach and in a leadership position within her current network marketing company. She is a mom of two and teaches others how to follow their dreams, crush their goals and create the life they've always wanted. Important Links: Website: www.thegoaldiggergirl.com Instagram: www.instagram.com/thegoaldiggergirl Facebook: www.facebook.com/thegoaldiggergirl Youtube: www.youtube.com/c/thegoaldiggergirl Grab The Goal Digger Girl Journal: https://amzn.to/3BeCMMZ Check out Project Broadcast: https://bit.ly/ProjectBroadcastTGDG Check out my Facebook groups for those that want to build their business online through social media, in a genuine and authentic way: Goal Digging Boss Babes: http://bit.ly/GoalDiggingBossBabes Goal Digger Creatives: http://bit.ly/GoalDiggerCreatives Goal Digger University is where you can access my archive and newly released workshops, masterclasses, bonus training PLUS my Mastermind- with weekly live in-depth training for a monthly subscription: http://bit.ly/GoalDiggerU Connect with me across the social media platforms: https://searchmysocial.media/thegoaldiggergirl If you find value in this podcast, please leave us a review - it means so much! https://ratethispodcast.com/thegoaldiggergirl Grab coffee on Kimberly throughout the month of October! Submit an honest review of the Goal Digger Girl Podcast, take a screenshot, and share it on your FB/IG stories to be entered to win a Starbucks gift card! Be sure to tag @thegoaldiggergirl on social media for your entry to count! We'll be choosing 4 winners. If you haven't already, be sure to text “PODCAST” to 737-240-3136 to get notified when there is a new episode! Subscribing to The Podcast: If you would like to get updates of new episodes, you can give me a follow on your favorite podcast app. Read the full transcript here: https://bit.ly/3v3eAei --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/thegoaldiggergirl/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/thegoaldiggergirl/support

Wall Street Unplugged - Your Best Source for Finance, Investing & Economics
The 3 biggest growth trends in crypto… and how to profit

Wall Street Unplugged - Your Best Source for Finance, Investing & Economics

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 34:49


The media sells fear to get clicks... And that makes it difficult to sift through the noise and find the truth. I run through a few recent headlines designed to scare the hell out of you… a potential U.S. debt default, China fears, and inflation. [0:30] But amid the fearmongering and government recklessness… bitcoin is poised to benefit. We're still in the early stages of this incredible industry… I expect other countries to follow in El Salvador's footsteps and recognize bitcoin as a legal tender. And 3 new trends within the digital asset space are particularly disrupting Wall Street... [7:30] I have a fun exercise for you: Next time you're at Starbucks, pay with bitcoin. You'll see how easy and cheap it is and why mass adoption is a matter of “when,” not “if.” [16:45] Cryptocurrencies are the best risk/reward opportunity for individual investors… I explain why you need exposure to this asset class right away. [25:05] Enjoyed this episode? Get Wall Street Unplugged delivered FREE to your inbox every Wednesday: https://www.curzioresearch.com/wall-street-unplugged/     Wall Street Unplugged podcast is available at: --: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/wall-street-unplugged-frank/ -- : https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/curzio-research/wall-street-unplugged-2 -- : https://www.curzioresearch.com/category/podcast/wall-street-unplugged/   : https://twitter.com/frankcurzio :. https://www.facebook.com/CurzioResearch/ : https://www.linkedin.com/in/frank-curzio-690561a7/ : https://www.curzioresearch.com

To Whoever's Listening
Whittier vs Inglewood...

To Whoever's Listening

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 56:47


Welcome to season two of To Whoever's Listening!  We have a lot to talk about, so grab a snack, drink or whatever gives you pleasure and enjoy the show! Follow us on all of our social media to keep up with the guys and be the first to see all of our craziness! We love youInstagram: @towhoeverslisteningTwitter: @TWLpodYoutube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCaJA...Tik Tok: @towhoeverslistening

THE CITY CONFESSIONS
Ep 120: Hilla Narov and Samantha Woolf, Co-Founders of Official Partner- Challenges and Lessons as Female Entrepreneurs During Pandemic- Realities of working with A List Celebrities & Living Dream Job

THE CITY CONFESSIONS

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 46:40


Today we are joined by two entrepreneurial women, Hilla Narov and Samantha Woolf, co-founders of Official Partner, a premiere marketing and entertainment agency that connects brands with A list talent and influencers and New Yorkers. Prior to founding Official Partner, Samantha and Hilla each spent over 20 years at notable entertainment management agencies but then last year decided to pivot by starting their own agency. This was a little over one year ago during an unlikely time – the beginning of the Covid-19 global pandemic. While they faced many challenges, they have come out the other side and are even stronger. Hilla Narov and Samantha Woolf have an instinct for what's next, what's newsworthy and the ability to architect a winning deal that translates to success for their clients. In this episode, we cover the below topics: Lessons from their first year as female founders and their life in NYC Challenges they faced during the Covid-19 pandemic Why they believe mentoring other women is key to their success The fun and challenging experiences working with A list celebrities We also talk a lot about New York and how the city has affected their mindset, the way they approach business and what the city has given them. You can learn more about Samantha and Hila below: About Samantha Prior to starting Official Partner, Samantha was Head of Marketing, NY at United Talent Agency (UTA), one of the leading talent, influencer and entertainment agencies in the world. With over 20 years of experience, Samantha has worked with branding powerhouses Deutsch Inc., Grey Global Group, and PEOPLE magazine, and brands such as Covergirl, Pantene and Head & Shoulders. She has also worked closely with some of the most highly respected and sought-after talent faces across digital media, television, music, and live entertainment including Sofia Vergara, Taylor Swift, Queen Latifah, Ellen DeGeneres, Katy Perry, Selena Gomez, P!NK and James Charles. About Hilla A forward-looking thinker and creative problem-solver, Hilla has built trusted relationships across the entertainment, luxury, fashion, beauty, and lifestyle industries – always with an interest to drive brand visibility and business growth. Hilla brings over 20 years of public relations and brand management experience. She led the relaunch of Jordache's luxury denim collection securing Sarah Jessica Parker, partnered veterans non-for-profit Dog Tag Bakery with Starbucks and secured a multi-year sponsorship for Heidi Klum's Halloween with Party City. Hill has brokered numerous high profile talent deals for brands like Louis Vuitton, Dior, Tiffany, Bulgari, Coach, Maybelline, HSN, QVC and Mattel. Website: https://official-partner.com/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/officialpartneragency/ Feel free to direct any questions, comments or feedback to thecityconfessions@gmail.com. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/thecityconfessions/support

Max Potential Habits
The Top 3 Money Myths that Are Making You Work Too Hard in Your Business

Max Potential Habits

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 23:44


Band of Mothers Podcast
Unbelievable Birth Stories (Well...That Happened)

Band of Mothers Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 74:41


Every mom remembers the moment she became a mother — the beautiful drama AND, very commonly, the deep and often unnecessary trauma. This week, we explore unbelievable birth stories... some crazy, some funny, some heartbreaking… but stories that will always unite us, and hopefully offer you a moment to reflect on this magical adventure, no matter how or when your kid was born.  Follow Tracey and Shayna on IG @bandofmothersofficial.  What we explore:  Tracey and Shayna share some of the more poignant and scary moments from their own births (31:44) Hear a live interview from viral TikTok sensation Meredith Bates as she shares the crazy events from the day her son was born prematurely (Hint: She saved someone having a heart attack at a Starbucks!) (12:46) Writer/director Alex Goldberg shares a birth story from a dad's perspective  Listeners share their unbelievable stories, from C-sections to surrogates to a toilet birth (6:22) Shay sings “TIGHT,” recorded at one of our live Denver #BOMpod shows  Mentions:  Jen McLellan of Plus Mommy and Plus Size Birth  Dr. Marcy Crouch of The Down There Doc   Book: From the Hips: A Comprehensive, Open-Minded, Uncensored, Totally Honest Guide to Pregnancy, Birth, and Becoming a Parent by Rebecca Odes and Ceridwen Morris     To access any products or other endorsed items and brands mentioned in this episode, visit BOM.Market/Shop-The-Podcast.  Do you want to share an inspiring, hilarious, or amazing story that we can air on an upcoming episode? Take a peek at what we're looking for next and leave us a message here: www.bandofmothers.com/shareyourstory  Looking for a great gift, or in the mood to treat yourself? Shop our delightfully curated marketplace of amazing goods selected for moms, by moms at BOM.Market, including our own handcrafted, bespoke line of super-clean wellness products, High Plains Market. Use code BOMPOD for 15 percent off your first order! Join our super high-vibe private Facebook group for moms, #BANDOFMOTHERS.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Band of Mothers
Unbelievable Birth Stories (Well...That Happened)

Band of Mothers

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 74:41


Every mom remembers the moment she became a mother — the beautiful drama AND, very commonly, the deep and often unnecessary trauma. This week, we explore unbelievable birth stories... some crazy, some funny, some heartbreaking… but stories that will always unite us, and hopefully offer you a moment to reflect on this magical adventure, no matter how or when your kid was born.  Follow Tracey and Shayna on IG @bandofmothersofficial.  What we explore:  Tracey and Shayna share some of the more poignant and scary moments from their own births (31:44) Hear a live interview from viral TikTok sensation Meredith Bates as she shares the crazy events from the day her son was born prematurely (Hint: She saved someone having a heart attack at a Starbucks!) (12:46) Writer/director Alex Goldberg shares a birth story from a dad's perspective  Listeners share their unbelievable stories, from C-sections to surrogates to a toilet birth (6:22) Shay sings “TIGHT,” recorded at one of our live Denver #BOMpod shows  Mentions:  Jen McLellan of Plus Mommy and Plus Size Birth  Dr. Marcy Crouch of The Down There Doc   Book: From the Hips: A Comprehensive, Open-Minded, Uncensored, Totally Honest Guide to Pregnancy, Birth, and Becoming a Parent by Rebecca Odes and Ceridwen Morris     To access any products or other endorsed items and brands mentioned in this episode, visit BOM.Market/Shop-The-Podcast.  Do you want to share an inspiring, hilarious, or amazing story that we can air on an upcoming episode? Take a peek at what we're looking for next and leave us a message here: www.bandofmothers.com/shareyourstory  Looking for a great gift, or in the mood to treat yourself? Shop our delightfully curated marketplace of amazing goods selected for moms, by moms at BOM.Market, including our own handcrafted, bespoke line of super-clean wellness products, High Plains Market. Use code BOMPOD for 15 percent off your first order! Join our super high-vibe private Facebook group for moms, #BANDOFMOTHERS.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Savvy Social Podcast
3 Strategic Ways to Repurpose Your Content

Savvy Social Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 15:01


Exhausted from trying to create original content for EVERY. Single. Platform?  Well, stop now.  Because you're about to discover a simpler, easier way: content repurposing. Tony Robbins does it. Starbucks does it. And you'll do it too (the smart way) after listening to this week's episode.  In this episode of the podcast, I talk about:  Your #1 consideration before creating content, so you get the most bang for your buck. 3 strategic ways to slice, dice, and reuse your content. Over. And Over. Again! What evergreen content is and is not (plus, why you should never do this with it). My account managers' secret to not only producing more content with less work but also owning the voice of our clients. The Dos and Don'ts of reusing content. 4 tactics for refreshing content before reusing it on Twitter, so it doesn't get flagged.  …and more!    This Episode Was Made Possible By: Social Media Rockstar Framework Free Course The Social Media Rockstar Framework is your chance to pull back the curtain and get insights on how to build a social media strategy that works for you, learn how to create (and implement) a simple and effective content plan, convert followers into buyers, and much more. Register for this FREE course and gain the confidence you need to use social media as a tool to grow your business: https://onlinedrea.com/free Go to the show notes for all the resources mentioned in this episode: https://onlinedrea.com/171

Interviews
Fabrice Testa on Super Entrepreneurship

Interviews

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021


Entrepreneurship is a method, and it's also a mindset. Fabrice Testa has written a book that brilliantly integrates the two: he calls the integration "Super Entrepreneurship," and his book title is therefore Super Entrepreneurship Decoded (Mises.org/E4B_139_Book). He has the appropriate credentials as a proven super-entrepreneur who has created and nurtured numerous great companies (and successfully sold a couple of them). Fabrice knows the true meaning of the phrase, “The day before something is a breakthrough, it's a crazy idea”. Entrepreneurs are animated by their purpose. Super entrepreneurs embrace a massive transformative purpose. The motivation for entrepreneurs is to help others — to solve problems for others, as we sometimes phrase it. Super entrepreneurs, in Fabrice Testa's language, are those who choose to dedicate their businesses to solving the biggest problems. By setting big goals, they attract many like-minded partners, collaborators, and employees. By targeting transformation, they aim to change the world in a significant way. In making this choice, super entrepreneurs are delving deeply into their own personal story to understand their own drivers and their own passionate commitment. There's a major self-discovery component. Having set their MTP, super entrepreneurs develop a systematic approach to the pursuit of their goal. Fabrice Testa recommends that super entrepreneurs combine what he calls CRAZY thinking with a relentless sense of purpose. CRAZY is an acronym for elements of entrepreneurship that Testa calls the Five Secrets. We agreed not to give them away, but they add up to a five-step method entrepreneurs can follow, and a checklist that they can use to assess the market power of their own concepts and business models. The context for the 5-step method is the exponential rate of growth of available and applicable technologies for entrepreneurship, and the convergence of those technologies that results in a compounding of productivity. When, for example, sensor-based data collection can be combined with A.I. and robotics, whole new fields of automation open up, potentially helping billions of people. A relentless sense of purpose is a major element in the super entrepreneurial mix. Super entrepreneurs are highly motivated. They display high levels of ambition and drive, and they generate strong momentum. They seek change, and aim for breakthroughs. They love to set the bar high. There is a spirit to super entrepreneurship, an intangible spark of super energy and boldness that sets the best entrepreneurs apart and powers them to unusual levels of achievement. There's a plan, but it's not fixed. Fabrice Testa identifies a master plan for the activities of high-achieving entrepreneurs, but it's not the restrictive plan of the business school strategist. One term he used was Roadmap: there's a goal to get from A to B, but it's OK to visit C, D and E along the way, and to learn and double back and embrace recursive procedures to reach the targeted end-results. The key to success is keeping the goal in mind with flexibility on the route to get there. Let the customer be the guide. Testa subscribes to the protocol of involving the customer early and often in the process of designing and building a product or service or a company. Entrepreneurs are always working with assumptions, and, at minimum, must validate them with customers. He introduced us to the “Starbucks method” of customer validation. Park yourself in Starbucks, order a beverage of your choice, then look around for likely-looking people who might be open to a brief conversation about your idea or proposal or even prototype. It's easy to engage people, they're willing to help, and you can offer to buy them a coffee to lubricate the relationship. A few hours investment of your time and a few dollars invested in coffee will result in a deep, broad and rich set of reactions and responses and a meaningful feedback loop. Success is more about fitting in than it is about timing. When writers and historians are trying to analyze the unusual success of a particular business, they often attribute a lot of the cause of the outcome to timing — the product or service or technology came along at just the right time. This is a misinterpretation. The happy correspondence of a new offering with a receptive context is not timing but fitting in. According to Fabrice, to fit in in a big way is to fit in with the zeitgeist of the era. The dictionary definition of zeitgeist is the general intellectual, moral, and cultural climate of an era. What Fabrice is pointing towards is a heightened ability to sense the movement of the time, and the direction of its flow, and to step into that river at the right point. Entrepreneurship is everywhere, and can be achieved at multiple scales. Super entrepreneurship is not limited by the scale of resources, but it can certainly be augmented wherever resources are abundant. That's why we seek to encourage entrepreneurship for individuals, teams, and firms of all size, including the largest corporations. Big companies under-perform at entrepreneurship for two reasons. First, they spawn bureaucracy, which is a form of organization that is counter-entrepreneurial. Second, they have existing businesses to defend and fear the consequences of self-disruption. The solution is to change the purpose of big corporations so that they can become super-entrepreneurial. The purpose would be to create new businesses with no bureaucracy and separated from the defense mechanisms of existing business units or divisions. Additional Resources Super-Entrepreneurship Decoded: 5 Secret Keys to Create Breakthrough Businesses that Change the World by Fabrice Testa: Mises.org/E4B_139_Book "Super Entrepreneurship" (PDF): Mises.org/E4B_139_PDF

Mises Media
Fabrice Testa on Super Entrepreneurship

Mises Media

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021


Entrepreneurship is a method, and it's also a mindset. Fabrice Testa has written a book that brilliantly integrates the two: he calls the integration "Super Entrepreneurship," and his book title is therefore Super Entrepreneurship Decoded (Mises.org/E4B_139_Book). He has the appropriate credentials as a proven super-entrepreneur who has created and nurtured numerous great companies (and successfully sold a couple of them). Fabrice knows the true meaning of the phrase, “The day before something is a breakthrough, it's a crazy idea”. Entrepreneurs are animated by their purpose. Super entrepreneurs embrace a massive transformative purpose. The motivation for entrepreneurs is to help others — to solve problems for others, as we sometimes phrase it. Super entrepreneurs, in Fabrice Testa's language, are those who choose to dedicate their businesses to solving the biggest problems. By setting big goals, they attract many like-minded partners, collaborators, and employees. By targeting transformation, they aim to change the world in a significant way. In making this choice, super entrepreneurs are delving deeply into their own personal story to understand their own drivers and their own passionate commitment. There's a major self-discovery component. Having set their MTP, super entrepreneurs develop a systematic approach to the pursuit of their goal. Fabrice Testa recommends that super entrepreneurs combine what he calls CRAZY thinking with a relentless sense of purpose. CRAZY is an acronym for elements of entrepreneurship that Testa calls the Five Secrets. We agreed not to give them away, but they add up to a five-step method entrepreneurs can follow, and a checklist that they can use to assess the market power of their own concepts and business models. The context for the 5-step method is the exponential rate of growth of available and applicable technologies for entrepreneurship, and the convergence of those technologies that results in a compounding of productivity. When, for example, sensor-based data collection can be combined with A.I. and robotics, whole new fields of automation open up, potentially helping billions of people. A relentless sense of purpose is a major element in the super entrepreneurial mix. Super entrepreneurs are highly motivated. They display high levels of ambition and drive, and they generate strong momentum. They seek change, and aim for breakthroughs. They love to set the bar high. There is a spirit to super entrepreneurship, an intangible spark of super energy and boldness that sets the best entrepreneurs apart and powers them to unusual levels of achievement. There's a plan, but it's not fixed. Fabrice Testa identifies a master plan for the activities of high-achieving entrepreneurs, but it's not the restrictive plan of the business school strategist. One term he used was Roadmap: there's a goal to get from A to B, but it's OK to visit C, D and E along the way, and to learn and double back and embrace recursive procedures to reach the targeted end-results. The key to success is keeping the goal in mind with flexibility on the route to get there. Let the customer be the guide. Testa subscribes to the protocol of involving the customer early and often in the process of designing and building a product or service or a company. Entrepreneurs are always working with assumptions, and, at minimum, must validate them with customers. He introduced us to the “Starbucks method” of customer validation. Park yourself in Starbucks, order a beverage of your choice, then look around for likely-looking people who might be open to a brief conversation about your idea or proposal or even prototype. It's easy to engage people, they're willing to help, and you can offer to buy them a coffee to lubricate the relationship. A few hours investment of your time and a few dollars invested in coffee will result in a deep, broad and rich set of reactions and responses and a meaningful feedback loop. Success is more about fitting in than it is about timing. When writers and historians are trying to analyze the unusual success of a particular business, they often attribute a lot of the cause of the outcome to timing — the product or service or technology came along at just the right time. This is a misinterpretation. The happy correspondence of a new offering with a receptive context is not timing but fitting in. According to Fabrice, to fit in in a big way is to fit in with the zeitgeist of the era. The dictionary definition of zeitgeist is the general intellectual, moral, and cultural climate of an era. What Fabrice is pointing towards is a heightened ability to sense the movement of the time, and the direction of its flow, and to step into that river at the right point. Entrepreneurship is everywhere, and can be achieved at multiple scales. Super entrepreneurship is not limited by the scale of resources, but it can certainly be augmented wherever resources are abundant. That's why we seek to encourage entrepreneurship for individuals, teams, and firms of all size, including the largest corporations. Big companies under-perform at entrepreneurship for two reasons. First, they spawn bureaucracy, which is a form of organization that is counter-entrepreneurial. Second, they have existing businesses to defend and fear the consequences of self-disruption. The solution is to change the purpose of big corporations so that they can become super-entrepreneurial. The purpose would be to create new businesses with no bureaucracy and separated from the defense mechanisms of existing business units or divisions. Additional Resources Super-Entrepreneurship Decoded: 5 Secret Keys to Create Breakthrough Businesses that Change the World by Fabrice Testa: Mises.org/E4B_139_Book "Super Entrepreneurship" (PDF): Mises.org/E4B_139_PDF

Light After Trauma
Episode 64: You'll Be Glad You Kept Fighting: One Woman's Journey From Child Abuse with Christina Vitagliano

Light After Trauma

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 39:50


Christina Vitagliano shares her story from enduring child abuse to going on to start a multimillion-dollar business and publishing her own memoir. She breaks down the ripple effects that child abuse had on her life and why some of the effects of child abuse hit much so much harder in adulthood. Support the Podcast Light After Trauma website   Christina's Website   Transcript:   Alyssa Scolari [00:23]: Hey, warriors. Welcome back to another episode of Light After Trauma. I'm your host, Alyssa Scolari, and we have with us today, Christina Vitagliano. Now, Christina is an author, entrepreneur and the founder of a successful family entertainment concept, Monster Mini Golf. Having spent three decades working on her memoir, Christina hopes to share her story and touch the hearts of readers with her account of childhood abuse, empowering survivors to reclaim their lives and learn to thrive, despite their trauma. Her passion is to provide affordable, fun entertainment that the whole family can enjoy. Monster Mini Golf is a multi-million dollar company with 30 locations across the USA and Canada. Without any further ado, I would love to introduce our guest today. We're going to be talking about childhood trauma with Christina. Welcome, Christina, how are you today? Christina Vitagliano [01:31]: I am good. How are you? Alyssa Scolari [01:33]: I am good. Really happy just to update the listeners. I just learned that while Christina is currently in Vegas, she's originally from the New England area, which I love. As all the listeners know, I'm a Jersey girl through and through, even though I live in PA now. Christina's accent feels like a warm cup of tea for me. Thank you for being here. I'm really happy to have you on the show. Christina Vitagliano [02:02]: Oh, thank you for inviting me. Alyssa Scolari [02:04]: Yeah, of course. You're spreading awareness about, I think, one of the most taboo topics in the field, people really shy away from talking about child abuse. Christina Vitagliano [02:19]: They do. Alyssa Scolari [02:21]: You are doing anything but shying away from that. Christina Vitagliano [02:26]: Took me a while, but yes. Alyssa Scolari [02:28]: I think that's important to point out, right? That it doesn't happen overnight for sure. Christina Vitagliano [02:33]: No. Alyssa Scolari [02:35]: I guess let's start with take me back to how you even became somebody who spreads awareness on childhood abuse. What is your story? Where did you come from? How did you get to where you are today? Christina Vitagliano [02:53]: Well, a quick overview. It started when I was about four years old and it lasted until I left home, which was around 16/17 years old. Actually I didn't move out until I was 18, but it was that whole period. Alyssa Scolari [03:06]: That was the whole period that you ... So you started being abused around the age of four? Christina Vitagliano [03:06]: Yep. Alyssa Scolari [03:06]: Okay. Christina Vitagliano [03:11]: Then I left home around 18 or when I legally could, I was out the door. Then I didn't tell anybody. I didn't talk about it. I didn't do anything. I'm sorry. That's my doorbell. Until I decided to sit down and write about it, which was about 20 something years ago. I sat down and just put it all on paper and then I sat on that for the last 20 years, and then finally published my memoir this year. Alyssa Scolari [03:42]: Wow. Christina Vitagliano [03:43]: Yeah. Yeah. Alyssa Scolari [03:45]: Okay. You escaped your abusive environment. Now, when you were in your abusive environment, did you know at the time that that was abuse? When did you make that connection like, "Oh, this is what's happening here." Christina Vitagliano [03:58]: Well, God, at four years old I try to ... I remember ... I have a very, very good memory on some things, but I couldn't tell you what I had for lunch yesterday, but- Alyssa Scolari [04:06]: Same here. Christina Vitagliano [04:06]: ... I do. I have such vivid ... That's a curse and a blessing at times, but very vivid memories. I remember being that young, knowing that what was happening wasn't right. I didn't know why it wasn't right. I didn't know ... Because you're four. I mean, you only know so much, but whatever it was, was wrong. On the flip side, I didn't want to mess up our family. My mom ... This was my stepdad and they had just gotten married. My big thing was, "Don't make mom unhappy because she was so unhappy before and now this man makes her happy and I don't want to mess things up." You know? That's how it started. I think once you start down that path, and I don't know why, you just continue down that path of, "I am going to handle this myself. I'm not going to mess things up for anybody." I was terrified that I would get taken away from the family and thrown into an orphanage, which to me was worse than what I was dealing with. Kind of short version of that whole story. Alyssa Scolari [05:16]: You're speaking such universal feelings and thoughts that children have, which is children have this concept that the devil you know ... And even adults, right? Christina Vitagliano [05:16]: Yeah. Alyssa Scolari [05:28]: The devil you know is better than the one that you don't. I think so many children endure what they need to endure for the sake of keeping the family together and not risking being pulled away from their family. Christina Vitagliano [05:48]: Yeah. Oh, yeah. I think as a child, it's instinctive that you want to make your mom or your dad, whoever it is you're bonded to, or even if it's both of them, instinctively your job is to make sure that you do what you're supposed to do and make them happy because that makes you happy. I don't know. I mean, it's a vicious circle, but that's not true. You shouldn't do some things just to make other people happy. It took me 30 years to figure that out. Yeah. Alyssa Scolari [06:21]: Yeah. Honestly, it takes some of us so much longer because that's what we think. You're right. It's, "I want to make this person happy. I see how happy my mom is. I don't want to be the bearer of bad news. I don't want to stir the pot." It's so difficult. How did you get ... Was it just that with age you began to change and then when you became a teenager, you were like, "I got to get out of here." Christina Vitagliano [06:49]: No. A couple of things. Like you said, you know it was wrong. I did know it was wrong at a very young age, and as you get older, boy, do you learn it's more wrong. I mean, so now this ridiculous thing of, "Wow, I'm going to protect everybody else." The wrong part gets so hard and as you get older, much harder because you learn more, but you keep dealing with it. Then when I met my now husband, he was the first one that I ever told and he's the first one that ever approached me and said, "Hey, what's wrong with you?" I mean, short version, you know? Alyssa Scolari [07:25]: Right. Christina Vitagliano [07:25]: Hey, what the hell's wrong with you? He just did it in such a blunt way. We were young. We had been dating for maybe, I don't know, weeks. I had been previously married and divorced. Didn't tell him, didn't tell anybody I'd ever dated. Now I was about 30 years old, so I don't know if it was him in my face being so blunt and the only one who said, "What the hell happened to you?" Or if it was a combination of that and at 30 years old, you kind of ... I don't know what it is. You hit these milestones in life. 30 is one of them though. You say, "What am I doing with my life?" You think you're an adult and you're not an adult at 30 because that's bullshit. I don't even know if I'm an adult at my age and I'm in my 50s. It's just, you start to question yourself as to what you think you know and, "Hey, maybe it's time I stand up and stop doing what I've been doing to myself." You're abusing yourself really for so many years. I listened to one of your podcasts where you went through your relationship and I was like, "Dear God, how many of us have been down that same exact path with the same exact reasoning within ourselves?" Then one day you wake up and say, "Holy cow, I'm a dummy." In a good way though, it's a good thing to say because you realize you don't need to be that dummy all the time, you know? Alyssa Scolari [08:50]: Right. It's not like I'm a dummy in a disparaging- Christina Vitagliano [08:55]: No. Alyssa Scolari [08:55]: ... a self-disparaging way. It's almost like you wake up one day and the pieces fall together and you're like, "Oh, God." Christina Vitagliano [09:04]: Where was I, man? I know. Alyssa Scolari [09:07]: Right. I feel so disconnected from the person that I was when I was in it and in those bad relationships. You also realize that the bad relationships that you then continue to have in your teens and 20s are because you didn't really know any better. Christina Vitagliano [09:28]: Yeah. Yeah. Alyssa Scolari [09:29]: [crosstalk 00:09:29]. Christina Vitagliano [09:29]: Or you've conditioned yourself to be who you are and it's instinctive, "Well, I'm going to make this person happy. I don't want to upset the applecart." I do that to this day. I still do that. Yeah. Alyssa Scolari [09:42]: Oh, yes. The chronic people-pleasing and not wanting to upset anybody. There are people ... I say this all the time, especially with, oh, one of my clients in particular where we talk about the red flags and how all the red flags look green. Even the red flags that are so bad, they're on fire we choose to look past. Christina Vitagliano [10:03]: Yep. It's almost you'll do anything to avoid turmoil. I don't even know why that is, but it is a common thing like, "Oh, geez, I don't want to make anything bad." You know? I don't know. Alyssa Scolari [10:14]: Yeah. I think it's because we're taught when we're so young that other people's feelings matter more than our trauma and what happens to us. That's the narrative that we carry around, that it doesn't matter. Yes. I'm unhappy and yes, maybe this person is hurting me, but this person is giving me love, some sort of love. Even if it's not what I really truly need or want, it's something and something is better than nothing. At the end of the day, my partner's feelings matter more than mine so I stay. Christina Vitagliano [10:50]: I remember. I went through a similar relationship that you spoke of in one of your podcasts and I thought to myself, "Oh, you can relate to every single word that you were saying." Then you wake up one day and say, "Hey, I know this sucks. I know I'm in a bad relationship. I know that he's really f'ing with me. You know what I mean? But I'm afraid to live alone. I'm terrified to be on my own. What would I do by myself?" Then one day you wake up and say, "I don't care what I do by myself." I remember saying to myself, "If I sit in a room and I'm stuck watching TV for 12 hours a day because I have nothing else to do, I don't have any friends anymore because he's alienated everybody, then that's okay with me." As soon as you decide that whatever it is, is okay, and is better than what you were dealing with, the door opens. Then you're just like, "Well, this is all good." You realize everything you thought was complete bullshit." Because it's not that bad out there by yourself. You know? Alyssa Scolari [11:52]: Yeah. Eventually you'll get to a point ... Well, I shouldn't say everybody because some people spend their whole lives in- Christina Vitagliano [12:00]: Oh, you're right. Alyssa Scolari [12:01]: ... one toxic relationship to the next, which breaks my heart and is part of the reason why we sit here and talk about this. It's just about awareness. Yeah. I think some people do get to a point where the pain of being in the situation is greater than the pain that it would take to change. That's when change comes. I guess I'm wondering for you, what do you think got you to a point where you were like, "Okay. I'm going to sit down and I'm going to write all of this out." Because you said this was what? Like 20 years ago that you wrote all this down? Christina Vitagliano [12:37]: Yeah. I don't know because once my ... It wasn't my husband then, but once he asked me, "Hey, what happened to you?" When I answered that, you've held that in for that long. Now all of a sudden it's raw and it's in your face and he's the kind of guy that just asked and asked and asked. He won't stop asking. Alyssa Scolari [12:57]: He doesn't let it go. Christina Vitagliano [12:58]: He doesn't let it go, and I'm the person, and on the flip side, I'm still the people-pleaser so I answered all of those questions that I probably didn't want to answer at the time, but I did, which is a good thing I think in the long run because it was ... But once it was all out there, I was like, "Wow." As I'm talking about it, I'm teaching myself, "Wow. There's a lot of things I should have done differently and I don't want anyone else to have to deal with any of this. If you could help anybody at that point, you're like, "Holy cow, nobody should have to deal with some of this." I started to put it down on paper and I said, "I'm going to start from the beginning." And I just kept going. My husband, he teases me. He said, "For six months, all I saw was the back of your head on the computer." Because it's all I was doing, was writing, writing, writing. Then when I got done, I was like, "All right, now I want to publish this." Now, of course knew nothing about publishing, and 20 something years ago, self-publishing didn't really exist like it does now. I learned, "Holy cow, I have to have this professionally edited." Then I learned that cost about $5,000 plus at the time. I didn't have any money. Then that was the next hurdle. How do you get from this raw bunch of words to it being fine-tuned and ready to go to a publisher? Then, will anybody even want to publish it? I sat on that. I didn't have the $5,000. I had left my career when I married my husband because I didn't want to be a workaholic. There's a lot of things I think that when you come out of an abusive relationship, whether it's child abuse or whatever that's happened over a long period of time, you're not just affected with who you are mentally, but I don't know, my vice was working. I didn't drink. I didn't do any drugs, nothing like that, but I worked because work consumed my brain. When this all came out, I learned that I also have to fix that. I can't be working 70 hours a week and married to my job because if you're going to have a relationship, that person deserves some of you too. I wasn't capable of doing both of them. I knew that. I literally quit my career. Said, "I'm going to give this relationship thing a shot because I failed so many other times." I left that and went to work with my husband and started doing some things in odds and ends. Of course, we had no money. We're living on like peanut butter. After I wrote the book, I'm like, "I need $5,000. I don't have $5,000." I created a company called Monster Mini Golf and- Alyssa Scolari [15:34]: That's how you became the accidental entrepreneur. Christina Vitagliano [15:37]: Yes. In my head I was like, "I'm going to raise $5,000. I can do mini golf indoors, me and a friend, and when I raise the five grand, maybe I can get it published and then I'll be able to make enough money to live on too in the meantime. That was almost 20 years ago. Now we have 30 Monster Mini Golf locations. We franchised it. We've got two crazy locations in casinos in Vegas here, one with KISS and one with the Twilight Zone. I got sucked in and I became a workaholic and my husband owns this company with me so I kind of turned him into one now. Now he wants to be the workaholic and I don't want to be so that's its own battle. Yeah. Then when the pandemic hit, I sat down and said, "Oh, okay, we're closed. There's nothing to do. Hey, self-publishing is amazing. Look at all of this." I self-published. Alyssa Scolari [16:38]: Yeah. Yes. Now you have this book out titled Every 9 Minutes. Christina Vitagliano [16:45]: Yep. Yep. Alyssa Scolari [16:46]: Can you tell us a little bit about this book? Is this detailing your life- Christina Vitagliano [16:51]: It is. Alyssa Scolari [16:52]: ... and what you went through? Christina Vitagliano [16:54]: It is. It's titled Every 9 Minutes because every nine minutes there is a reported case of child abuse in the United States. Just in the United States, the rest of the world I can't even imagine, and that's reported. Alyssa Scolari [17:10]: Right. That's what's reported. Christina Vitagliano [17:12]: Child abuse, I think the majority is not ... I never reported mine because it's so taboo and you just condition nobody tells anybody about it and all kinds of very bad things are wrong with the whole subject. Anyway, that's where the title came from. The book is a memoir. I've changed a lot of names. I've changed a lot of places, just because respect for people that I ... Other people, good people. But I kept my name in it. It starts in 1969, which is when I'm four years old and it ends when I met my husband and how the whole thing came to light and I talked it. It spans 30 years, but I think a lot of people ... And I apologize with my dogs upstairs. I think- Alyssa Scolari [17:57]: Oh, is that what that is? Is that your dog? Christina Vitagliano [17:59]: We have two bulldog pups and they're insane. I think a lot of folks will ... And it's getting better. People will talk about child abuse and they'll talk about their experience of abuse. I think when I wrote this book, it spans that long because it's not just about the abuse. It's about the effect that the abuse has on you for that period of time. Alyssa Scolari [18:24]: That is so important that you said that because yes, when we talk about abuse, we cannot just talk about the incidents themselves. Christina Vitagliano [18:36]: No. Alyssa Scolari [18:36]: Because they have ripple effects onto your life for decades and ages to come. I love that you said that. I mean, it's so important not to just talk about, "Oh, this is what happens to me." But then what happened after. Christina Vitagliano [18:50]: This is what happened to me as a result of what happened to me. Alyssa Scolari [18:52]: Yes. Yeah. Christina Vitagliano [18:54]: This is why all these things happen. Yeah. Alyssa Scolari [18:57]: You said it best. You said it best. Christina Vitagliano [19:01]: A lot of people don't talk about that because ... and there's nothing ... I think it's because when somebody hears that subject, it just is like, "Wow." It's so big on its own that people have to get what happened out. To me, and this is a really weird thing, what was happening was the abuse became so routine to me that, yeah, I'm like, "I can handle that crap." It's everything else that's happening to me that I couldn't figure out until I was old enough to say, "Oh, it's all because of that crap." You know? Alyssa Scolari [19:35]: Yeah. Yeah. Exactly. I mean, you're exactly right. I think it's so important and I guess one of the questions that I have for you is, what is your goal with this book? Are you trying to show people that they're not alone? Are you trying to show people that they can survive this? What was the goal for publishing this? Christina Vitagliano [20:02]: Yeah. I think you hit the nail on the head there. A few things. One, we're not alone. Two, I'm okay to talk about it if you guys can't, because there's a lot of people who can't talk about it. It doesn't matter whether we should or shouldn't. They just never will be able to. Sometimes knowing that somebody else is talking about it makes life a little bit better and yes, you can ... You know what's weird? I don't like the word survive it because I hate surviving shit. Surviving, it hurts. I don't want to hurt anymore and it's going to hurt forever and ever that never goes away. I think you have to try to overcome the intensity of it and overcome, you will never overcome it, but you have to outbalance it. You know what I mean? Yes, it's there, but I'm going to stay a step above it and keep it in check. Surviving it is bullshit because you never survive it. That's crap I think. Alyssa Scolari [21:02]: Yeah. Absolutely. I like what you said there, that it's not so much about surviving it as it is about managing the intensity of it. It's about not letting the memories and the flashbacks and the feelings and the urges swallow you whole and take over your entire life. Christina Vitagliano [21:23]: Yep. There are ... And it's weird. I think ... Some of it, I wrote about and some of it I don't because you can't write everything and you don't want to share literally everything. It's a hard subject to actually write about because people have a hard time reading about it too. You had to balance, "Hey, I have to share it and I don't want to share everything." I remember my editor when she went through it and you go through a child abuse scene in the book. She would come back to me and she would say, "Okay. Well, this is good. Change this. You have errors here and whatever." Then once in a while, she'll go, "Hey, detail this scene more." I'm like, "No. I'm not going to detail that scene more. Are you out of your mind? It's amazing that those words are there." But it was- Alyssa Scolari [22:03]: Right. Like, "You're lucky I even got this much. There's no way I can detail this." Christina Vitagliano [22:09]: Man, that was, I think ... You're like, "How was it writing it?" Writing it was one thing, dealing with the editing and having somebody above you or with you on your team say, "This is good but if you really want to share, and you want somebody to understand that you can outbalance this or do whatever, you have to show them what happened." Some of that stuff came back to me four and five times and finally ... It was over Christmas, this past Christmas before I published, right before I published. I sat on that book for about six weeks because of her notes. I was like, "I can't do it. I can't do what she's asking me to do." Another part of me was saying, "If you want this to be published and you want to share it and you want people to see what happened to actually make the point come across, then you have to do what she asked." It took six weeks and one day I got up. Just like I think we always ... Hey, you get up and all the puzzle pieces fell into place or kind of, and I said, "I'm going to give it a shot." I did, and when I got done it was like I had to go shower. I'm like, "I just got to walk away from that. Just don't ask me to read it again." You got the words, but somebody else read it now because I've just lived it too many times. Alyssa Scolari [23:24]: Yeah. That's I think another really important point, is I'm sure as you were writing it, or even going through the editing process, you find yourself right back in it. Christina Vitagliano [23:36]: Oh, it's brutal. The editing process was the worst because when you edit ... My book is about 370 pages. It started at 600 because for me to break from the time I was four, until whenever I thought the end was, I literally had to go through my entire life. Then somebody picks it up and says, "We don't need to know what you had for lunch one day." But I couldn't get from AA to B. We had to get rid of all that crap. Because it took me 20 years to publish, by the time I actually got it published, I had read that thing so many times it's just reliving it and reliving it and reliving it. Yes, it was good, but in some ways now, and I'm going to be honest, I'm very, very angry at things that I ... They just make you angry. It's like, "Why did these people let this happen? Why are these people today still siding with that guy?" Family members that were like "Oh, he's a saint." I'm like, "You're choosing not to see reality." That's a very hard thing to deal with. I have to be the person that says, "Well, that's your problem now." My issue is let's help people who want to be helped and band together. Alyssa Scolari [24:52]: That's the hardest part, is it's the reactions of the other people, right? Christina Vitagliano [24:52]: Oh, it's horrible. Alyssa Scolari [25:03]: You're bearing your soul and then there are people that go, "What are you talking about? He was a great guy. What are you doing this for?" That pure unfiltered rage, rage that you must feel like ... Yet, in this moment, you're in these moments where you are being almost like ... not forced, but you have the pressure on to share more and be a little bit more vulnerable. Then you're met with opposition from people, family members or friends or people who know you that are like, "What are you talking about? This is a good guy." In those moments, what kept you going? How did you stay true to the fact that this was right for you? Christina Vitagliano [25:55]: Anger. Alyssa Scolari [25:57]: Turning that rage into something productive. Christina Vitagliano [25:59]: Yeah. You say persevere, survive, overcome. Yeah, sure. All of that. Anger. I'm like, "No. You're wrong." More that I'm not the only one. I mean, nobody talks about this and in this day and age where we have ... And I will give ... Like well, let's say the millennials, because they want to cancel everything. On the flip side, people are speaking out more than anything in the world, but they won't speak about this. How do you want to do everything in the world and fix it all, ooh, but not that subject? That's too cool. That's too taboo. I don't want to do that. I want to get to the point where screaming about this too. Alyssa Scolari [26:39]: Yes. Christina Vitagliano [26:39]: You know? Alyssa Scolari [26:41]: Yeah. We're going to scream about this too. Christina Vitagliano [26:44]: Yeah. We're at that point where if enough of us are yelling, somebody will, people will say, "Okay. Well, it is about time." Celebrities have definitely been more vocal about it, and I think that's great that they are. I think being a normal person and not that celebrity and everybody protects ... not protects them, but they have the voice. I think that when you see a celebrity come out and say, "I was abused or this is happening in Hollywood." You're like, "Well, that's good. I'm glad somebody is talking about it." But you still feel like, "I'm just a normal person and nobody listened to me." I want to be the normal person that speaks out kind of. You know? Alyssa Scolari [27:24]: Yes. The thing is survivors of childhood abuse, we've all got rage and if we're not taking that rage and if we're not using it to speak up and speak out about this taboo topic and shout it from the rooftops, what child abuse is, how it affects people in the long-term, what this does to us, then that rage is still going to be there. It's still going to go somewhere and nine times out of 10, we're going to take it out on ourselves in ways that are self-destructive. Christina Vitagliano [27:56]: You are a hundred percent correct. Yep. Alyssa Scolari [27:59]: That rage has to go somewhere. There's so much power in using your voice, whether it's through writing, whether it's through speaking, taking that rage that you're talking about, which I'm glad you said it, because honestly that is what keeps us going. Rage. Christina Vitagliano [28:15]: It is. [crosstalk 00:28:15]. Alyssa Scolari [28:15]: Pure rage. Christina Vitagliano [28:17]: Yep. You have to keep it in check because we can't go running around with knives and guns, even though your head says, "Well, I wish I could." But you can't. Alyssa Scolari [28:24]: I wish I could. Christina Vitagliano [28:25]: I wish I could. Alyssa Scolari [28:25]: I wish I could. Christina Vitagliano [28:27]: Yep. Alyssa Scolari [28:27]: I wish I could. Christina Vitagliano [28:28]: Yep, but this isn't the cartoons. Alyssa Scolari [28:29]: Right. You have managed to take all of that anger, all of that grief and turn it into something that this is your voice. Your voice. I have to ask you, when you look back on the years in which you were enduring abuse, were there times where you just wanted to completely give up? Christina Vitagliano [28:59]: Oh, of course. Yes. Just yes. Yeah. I think more as ... That's weird because even after I've talked about it and it was out in the open and I wrote it down before I published, more as I got older. I think there's something about this subject, well abusive of any kind, the older you get, it seems like because you get smarter and wisdom kicks in. I think when you're younger, you don't realize how bad it is or how wrong it is. Then you get more educated on people and then you realize how jaded adults are and they're teaching their children the wrong thing. You get angrier. In some ways it's harder to deal with the older I get, but because you're smarter and because you've learned a lot, you learn to balance it better. It's not easy by any means though. Alyssa Scolari [30:05]: I love that you're saying this because this is what happens. It's fantastic because I think that so many people scratch their heads over why adults tend to be so distraught about abuse that happened to them when they were younger. I think a lot of people ... I've seen a lot of people, even people when talking about themselves, and even me personally, when I started a lot of my memories were repressed. When I started to have all of these memories, I was an adult. There were moments that I've had, and I know a lot of my clients have had, where it's like, "Why am I so upset about this now? Why am I more upset about this today than I was 25 years ago when this happened?" It's because the older you get, the more you know, the more you understand and the more you feel and the more you have language to be able to put to what you feel. It's actually very, very natural. It's actually harder when you're older, so [crosstalk 00:31:16]. Christina Vitagliano [31:15]: Yeah. What makes me anger is as you know all of that and you say to yourself, "Goddammit, that's why these adults are abusing children because they know that." I got angrier and still get angry because I'm like, "Well, this person was a full grown adult and what they were doing was bad, but they were a hundred percent aware of what they were doing too and I think that's what makes you angrier as you get older, is you really, really did something terrible to a child with full knowledge of what you were doing. You know? Alyssa Scolari [31:53]: Yes. There's no excuse. No excuse for it. You knew, you know, you took full advantage. Christina Vitagliano [32:01]: You chose to do that. That's a choice. You know what I mean? It's not a sickness. That's a bunch of bullshit. You've chosen to do that. If it was carried on from your parents, then that's a shame, but this is why we're standing here today talking about it so that maybe it doesn't keep going because nobody seems to care that it is going. Alyssa Scolari [32:21]: Yeah. You know? When you talk about the whole, it's a sickness type thing. You know what? Whether it's a sickness or not, I don't give a fuck because you know what? I have a sickness. I have complex trauma and do I walk around hurting people? No. Christina Vitagliano [32:37]: Exactly. I don't care if it's a sickness. It still shouldn't happen. You know? Alyssa Scolari [32:42]: There's no excuse. It's not an excuse. Christina Vitagliano [32:43]: No. No. Alyssa Scolari [32:44]: Right? Christina Vitagliano [32:45]: Yep. Alyssa Scolari [32:46]: It wouldn't be an excuse for me to get drunk and get in my car because I had a night where I was traumatized. That's not an excuse, so why- Christina Vitagliano [32:57]: Yeah. Why is it okay for these other people? Alyssa Scolari [32:58]: ... why do we make excuses? Why do we excuse child abusers so often? It's infuriating. I could scream about it from the rooftops. Christina Vitagliano [33:09]: It really is. It really is. Alyssa Scolari [33:11]: It really is. This book that you've written, it feels like it's a message, not just for other people, but also for your younger self. Like a message to hang on because look at ... Could you ever have imagined the life that you have for yourself now? Would you ever have pictured it? Christina Vitagliano [33:29]: No. Not in a million years. Not even close. Yeah. Yeah, so weird. Alyssa Scolari [33:36]: I'm going to ask you another pretty candid question. Knowing what you know now about how your life was going to turn out, are you glad you stayed? Are you glad you hung on? Christina Vitagliano [33:52]: Through all of it, you mean? Alyssa Scolari [33:53]: Mm-hmm [affirmative]. Christina Vitagliano [33:55]: Yeah. I mean, not glad that it happened obviously, but yes. Yes. I always ... Part of me, I think survived ... And this is my individual case, I think is because my father was so jealous in some weird way that if I got a better grade in school than his crazy son did, that would piss him off. I learned, "Oh, well, then fuck you. I'm going to piss you off." In a lot of ways, I was like, "Oh, yeah, he's failing and you want me to fail too? I'm not going to fail." There's a lot of things that ... And I think a lot of us do that is, "Oh, you don't like that. There's a way I can piss you off, but not piss you off." You know what I mean? Alyssa Scolari [34:41]: Yeah. Christina Vitagliano [34:41]: I just became this driven, crazy person to not be like the rest of my family. I don't want to say there's good that comes out of bad because nobody wants to go through that bad. Nobody should ever go through that bad, but because of the abuse there are, I don't know, things about me that I'm glad that they're like that, you know? I don't know. It's a hard thing to explain. Not that I'm thankful for him for anything, but you know? Alyssa Scolari [35:17]: No. Right. We're not thankful. It's not like we're glad that it happened because it taught us a lesson. Christina Vitagliano [35:24]: [crosstalk 00:35:24]. Alyssa Scolari [35:23]: None of that. It's just a matter of I think for the people out there who are in this, in the thick of it and just want to give up and want to end their lives, and want to throw in the towel and say, "Fuck it." It's like, I think about you and your story and you've managed to go from being severely abused, to getting out, getting married, starting a multi-million dollar business, writing a book, being a voice for those who don't have a voice. I think to myself like, "If that's not a message for the listeners out there to keep going, I don't know what is." Because look at where you're at now. It's so inspirational and it gives so much hope, even though, you're very real about, listen, some days are bullshit. Some of this sucks. This sucks. It's still infuriating and I'm not over it because we don't get over it. We do not get over it, but we learn how to not let it consume us. Christina Vitagliano [36:43]: Yeah. That's the balance. Alyssa Scolari [36:46]: That's the balance. Christina Vitagliano [36:49]: Yep. It is. Alyssa Scolari [36:52]: Now, if people ... Because I just feel like this book ... First of all, for the listeners out there, this book has like well over a hundred reviews, I think I was looking on Amazon. Christina Vitagliano [36:52]: Yeah. Yeah. Alyssa Scolari [37:06]: Yeah. This book has well over ... almost 120 reviews on Amazon, extremely high-rated book. If people want to find more about you, want to find your book, what's the best place they should go? Should they go right to Amazon? You tell us. Christina Vitagliano [37:29]: Amazon's definitely the easiest so if you're in Amazon and search Every 9 Minutes, it pops up. My social media, I'm always obviously promoting my book, but if you look up Every 9 Minutes on anything, Twitter or anybody, it'll obviously pop up. My website and all my social media handles are 123ChristinaV, so whether you're on Twitter or Instagram or Facebook, or my website is 123christinav.com, you can find me there. You can message me from anything anywhere. I'm very responsive. Alyssa Scolari [38:03]: Fantastic. You said that's 123ChristinaV? Christina Vitagliano [38:08]: Yep. And .com is my website. Yep. Alyssa Scolari [38:13]: Okay. Okay. For the listeners out there, I'm going to link that in the show notes. Head on over to the show notes so you can find that. You'll have access there to everything. Christina is also ... She's a speaker. She does so much. Check out this book. The link will be in there. Thank you so much for coming on the show today. Christina Vitagliano [38:36]: Thank you. Alyssa Scolari [38:37]: It was an honor to talk to you. I think you're shedding light on the ripple effects of childhood abuse and you're screaming it from the rooftops. Christina Vitagliano [38:47]: Thank you for having me. Alyssa Scolari [38:49]: Of course. It was a pleasure. Thanks for listening everyone. For more information, please head over to lightaftertrauma.com or you can also follow us on social media. On Instagram, we are @lightaftertrauma and on Twitter it is @lightafterpod. Lastly, please head over to patreon.com/lightaftertrauma to support our show. We are asking for $5 a month, which is the equivalent to a cup of coffee at Starbucks. Please head on over. Again, that's patreon.com/lightaftertrauma. Thank you. We appreciate your support.

Positive University Podcast
Howard Behar - Former Starbucks President on Putting People First

Positive University Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 41:07


Today Jon Gordon is joined by Howard Behar. Howard was the North American president of Starbucks for 21 years. During his tenure, he helped grow the franchise from 28 stores to more than 15,000 across five continents and served on the Starbucks board of directors for 12 years until his retirement. He'' actually the one who coined the term "We aren't in the coffee business serving people, we're in the people business serving coffee." This entire interview is gold. Howard shares so many great insights on building a great culture and organization by focusing on people. He shares a lot of practical things that Starbucks did and what you can do as well to build something great. If you enjoy this, tell others and encourage them to listen as well. Tag Jon and Howard on social. You can also leave a review on Apple, Spotify or wherever you're listening. Get Howard's book, It's Not About the Coffee. Our featured resource this week is our upcoming Power of Positive Leadership Training. If you want to become a better leader, one who creates positive results, this is for you. It's training that develops resilience, mental toughness, grit and provides strategies to overcome negativity, and lead positive change. You can sign up for our next LIVE training at POPLTraining.com

Topic Lords
103. The 303 Beethoven Used

Topic Lords

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 73:19


Support Topic Lords on Patreon and get episodes a week early! (https://www.patreon.com/topiclords) Lords: * Avery * https://averyburke.bandcamp.com/releases * Jay * https://twitter.com/jaytholen Topics: * Kowloon Walled City * Internet communities gaining a reputation and then changing over time as members mature. * The moral cost of the 303 Devilfish clone * Justified and Ancient * https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XP5oHL3zBDg * Unedited (syncable) commentary: https://youtu.be/Peeo6xZqeVs * Cyber Nexus internet cafe in Lakeland Florida and late 1990s internet cafes in general * https://twitter.com/jaytholen/status/1370002162063990786 Microtopics: * Putting all of Spotify on shuffle. * Spotify rejecting your album because you put lyrics on the album cover. * Immersing yourself in a shitty visual aesthetic until you love it and the guy at the record label rejects your album cover. * Renaming your company to Content Distribution Baby now but the logo is still a baby on a CD. * The Godaddy man and the pets dot com sock puppet. * A demon face in the middle of a circuit board. * The part of the show where we look at image search results together. * Visiting Kowloon Walled City for the cheap dentistry. * Going to a nightmare city to get your teeth worked on: an opportunity to die. * One of several problems with working seven days a week and never taking a break. * Blame! or perhaps Blam! * Trying to live in the dystopian future where the construction nanobots run wild and convert all matter on the planet into endless nonsense staircases and ventilation ducts. * The protagonist having a really cool gun. * When the author doesn't know what's interesting about their own setting. * Having to write a novel because nobody's invented D&D source books yet. * Feeling like an outsider because you don't know which Dale Earnhardt crashed into a wall. * An online pixel art isometric place to hang out. * Being a jerk to people in an organized manner. * Audio production subforums. * How internet communities get radicalized and how they mellow out. * Ironically doing outrageous stuff on the internet. * The strange purity of being ahead of the curve. * Memes as a bannable offense. * Getting a Something Awful forum account for your birthday and never looking at it because you don't like awful things. * A synthesizer for the singer songwriter who doesn't have a bass player. * Discovering the future of techno in the bargain bin. * The history of the TB-303. * The Prophet-5 vs. the Prophet-6. * A drum pad that is the first of its kind. * The thing with the egg breaking against a wall and how you always side with the egg. * Creating reproductions of saught after out of print old stuff. * Having two guitars, one tuned in fifths and one tuned like a ukulele. * Writing music that could never be played. * Making games because you want to get your music in front of people. * Jim Stormdancer and the Frog Fractions Players. * Finally receiving the obscurity you've been craving. * Writing a book about the KLF as a lens into your particular moral philosophy. * Drum or Brown? * Doom Demon Invisible. * 5 times voted CMA female vocalist Tammy Wynette. * Trying to gesture at Discordianism or other forms of alternative mysticism. * Making a new game in character as a character from your last game. * The Burning Man man. * Presented with the Most Coveted Living Legend Award Sponsored By TNN. * Hiring randos to sing and play instruments on your album and hiring entirely different randos to be in your music video. * King Boy D and the other guy. * Burning a million quid and then going around asking people why you burned a million quid. * Good names for internet cafes. * A square of computers. * Not recognizing Stargate decor and assuming it's just sci fi Egypt themed. * Losing at Quake for your birthday while your parents watch a Pink Floyd DVD with the owner of the Internet cafe. * Which one is Cyber and which one is Nexus? * Not remembering why your band was invited to play a set at the Interface of Language and Technology. * That's a level 12 mage, get off of that! * Whether an internet cafe is the same thing as a cyber cafe. * The regular at your coffee shop who scalps tickets for a living. * Whipping out a 61 key MIDI controller to write tracks at Starbucks. * Trying to avoid situations where you'd accidentally give a philosophy lecture. * What is an organism and what organisms do. * Whether Aristotle knows that whales are mammals. * A category of things that have an effect.

Fitness Confidential with Vinnie Tortorich
Supplement Scams, Genuine Sponsors, & More - Episode 1949

Fitness Confidential with Vinnie Tortorich

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 83:00


: Episode 1949 - On this Monday show, Anna Vocino and Vinnie Tortorich talk creating content, genuine sponsors, the PDF, supplement scams, Starbucks craziness, and more. Https://www.vinnietortorich.com/2021/10/supplement-scams-genuine-sponsors-more-episode-1949 PLEASE SUPPORT OUR SPONSORS GENUINE SPONSORS Vinnie and Anna have always wanted to give out good, free information. To keep the show running, they've taken on sponsors. Villa Cappelli has been a sponsor for many years. They've been very picky about sponsors; Vinnie will only take money from people whose products he really believes in. Vinnie will not be filling the Belcampo sponsorship slot. Instead, he'll give ads for products he believes in without sponsorship money. Vinnie's never going to tell you 'you must by X for Y.' Because that would be a lie. This said, we do ask that if you are going to buy a cookbook or buy vitamins or coffee, that you do it from us. That keeps this whole project running. SUPPLEMENT SCAMS Vinnie and Anna play a new iteration of 'real or fake.' These products sound ridiculous because they are. Don't spend money on something that seems to good (or too weird) to be true. It probably is. They're algae and chemicals and the like.  You can't get to anything real in these products. In this sense, they're scamming you! You can't even figure out the truth of them, and they're usually fairly expensive. Take care of your diet, don't go down this road. WATCH THIS EPISODE ON YOUTUBE FAT DOC 2 IS AVAILABLE ON iTUNES and AMAZON Please also share it with family and friends! Buy it and watch it now on iTunes to get it to the top of the charts. We need it to get big for people to see it. Here's the (BLUERAY, DVD, PRIME) (MAY NOT BE AVAILABLE YET ACROSS THE POND). And the And the https://amzn.to/3rxHuB9 [the_ad id="17480"] PLEASE DON'T FORGET TO REVIEW the film AFTER YOU WATCH!   FAT DOC 1 IS ALSO OUT Go watch it now! We need people to buy and review for it to stay at the top of iTunes pages. Available for both rental and purchase. You can also buy hardcopy or watch online at Amazon. YOU CAN NOW STREAM FOR FREE ON AMAZON PRIME IF YOU HAVE IT! RESOURCES Https://www.vinnietortorich.com Https://www.purevitaminclub.com Https://www.purevitaminclub.co.uk Https://www.purecoffeeclub.com Https://www.nsngfoods.com

Shock Your Potential
The Spare Room - Emily Chang

Shock Your Potential

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 28:14


“You're especially designed to do something because no one's here to do nothing.” Emily Chang We are all part of something bigger than ourselves, the larger community. Better and functional communities are not built in a day but rather, it is about consistently performing acts of service that uplift others. Emily Chang has been enthusiastic about supporting and building her community, and says it is not so much about the big things, but rather, it is the small acts that really contribute to a thriving community. Emily Chang is the CEO of McCann Worldgroup, China. Prior to accepting this new role, she took a year off to write a book called The Spare Room, the topic of her first TEDx Talk. Before that, she served as CMO for Starbucks China, where she cared for the teams that helped open the first Starbucks Roastery outside of Seattle and commercialized the brand's digital gifting and delivery programs. Lotus (Chapter five) lived with Emily's family while she worked at Starbucks. A strategic business leader with over 20 years of experience, Emily is known for globalization, cross-cultural team leadership, and innovative brand building. Recognized for her ability to drive change and renew organizations, Emily approaches opportunities with an entrepreneurial mind set to establish a culture, set a vision, and build capability. She is known first and foremost as a people leader and team builder. Prior to Starbucks, Emily was the Chief Commercial Officer for IHG, Greater China, where she looked after 320 hotels and an extended team of 5,200 members. While she was at IHG, Emily's family cared for five kids, including Teo (Chapter four). Moving to Shanghai in 2011, Emily led the marketing organization that established the face of Apple Retail in Asia Pacific. While working at Apple, Emily's family cared for three young people, including Jaesin (Chapter three). She first developed her General Management, Marketing and Brand expertise at Proctor & Gamble. Five young people shared her spare room in the 11 years that Emily worked at P&G. Today, Emily sits on the board of SOS Children's Villages and has spoken at select conferences and events, including the Fortune Most Powerful Women's Summit in Hong Kong, C2 in Montreal, and has delivered three TEDx Talks. In her free time, Emily loves to teach, read, and write. She challenges herself to learn a new “big thing” every year (2019 was all about the book, and she's spent much of 2020 straddling a cajon drum). Most of all, Emily enjoys spending time with family: her husband of 20 years, her 12-year old daughter Laini, Holly Berry their rescued mutt, and Jellybean, their pygmy hedgehog. In today's episode, our guest will talk about how she found her positive thing that contributes towards her community. She will also discuss her book and what it entails. Listen in!  Social Media Handles: Author Website: https://social-legacy.com/   LinkedIn: https://linkedin.com/in/emilychang8621   Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/emily.chang.925602   Instagram: https://instagram.com.thespareroombook The first thing is that for me, it's never been about work life balance but about work life integration. [4:11] As I've gotten older, one of the things I realized was I had an opportunity to better integrate my personal life with my professional. [4:36] We always had these kids in our spare room and it was something that we certainly didn't hide, but also didn't really bring to the forefront either. [4:42] As we identified the spare room as a social offering to our community, we started to realize that talking about it isn't really about ego. [5:14] We embraced the idea of talking about the spare room with a TEDx talk and then took a year to write the boo [5:36] We believe this builds into our community and pays tribute to each of the people that we've had the privilege of sharing our spare room with. [5:43] You don't have to do very big things but something that you are specially designed to do that will actively support and build into your community, however you define it. [5:53] I don't think it's the best use of time to try and convince somebody else of your thing, everybody will come into it on their own. [7:28} If everybody starts identifying their offer and their offense, we can create communities that go after improving their communities. [7:43] I did a talk a few years ago called ‘The power of And,' which was all about the power of paradox and how you can take two ideas that seem in congruent and find the mutuality in the middle of them. [9:26] Sometimes we look at people who look like they've arrived and it looks like they have it all togetherand think that they have these intentions but usually it's not [10:26] It doesn't always have to be intentional or some grandiose gesture, sometimes it's your heart saying, I can do something about this. [11:07] We are capable of so much more than we can possibly imagine but we don't have to go after the grand gesture or the fully designed, well orchestrated, intentional, purpose driven thing. [11:27] We can do what helps us feel like we're doing something positive and when you find that moment, then you've hit on something where you can naturally add value to your community. [11:40] You want to position yourself in a way to maximize the value contribution that you can leave in the place around you without the risk of falling into the ego trap. [14:21] Commercial break. [15:40] When we talk about community service, or CSR, sometimes it feels like something that has to be sacrificial and that is human nature. [17:54] If we take an abundance mindset where we want to contribute more than we consume. We want to leave something more than what we've taken from this world. [18:06] The format of the book is written in very much a self reflection, action-oriented mindset and I don't want this to be a book but a movement. [18:58] If this can become something that's good for the world which helps people articulate how they contribute more than they consume, then that is something that I would feel really good about. [19:34] I do believe people are good and generally want to contribute more than they consume but may not know where to direct that attention or what they can [19:44] The construct of the book is a Venn diagram where in chapter one, you've got your offer and the second chapter talks about offense, then chapter three is the intersection of 1 and 2. [20:00] Chapters four and five talks about the action plan and the last part of the book is about, what I want to look back on that can have people say something about me after I've passed. [21:38] I've always believed that defining the end state helps you become much more intentional, with your time, priorities, and your investment. [21:54] There's positive power in positive words so we want to define the things that we're good at and embrace [23:56] Nobody should do nothing and nobody wants to do nothing, so feel empowered even if you do a small thing. [25:48] People came from very ordinary and said, I think I can go do something about this and they ended up changing the world for somebody. [26:14] …………………..….. TopDog Learning Group, LLC is a leadership, change management, and diversity and inclusion consulting firm based in Orlando, FL, USA but with “TopDoggers” (aka consultants) throughout North America and beyond. They focus on training programs (both virtual and face-to-face), keynotes and “lunch and learns,” group and 1:1 coaching, and off-the-shelf solutions. One such solution is their Masterclass on The Top 3 Strategies to be Resilient in Times of Change. This thoughtful self-paced online training will guide you through three tactics you can immediately use to—not just survive—but thrive when change comes at you. Use the code RESIL50OFF for 50% off the program! Just go to https://bit.ly/3a5mIS6 and enter the code RESIL50OFF, in all capitals, to redeem your 50% off coupon. The link and code will be available in our show notes for easy access.  

Why are people watching this?

Here's the official Netflix synopsis for The Guilty: A troubled police detective assigned to 911 operator duty scrambles to save a distressed caller during a harrowing day of revelations – and reckonings. Dave and Justin both liked Jake Gyllenhaal's excellent acting, vomiting, and held-in man crying. Justin wonders why the Scandinavians are obsessed with dead children. Dave calls 911 and speaks directly with Jake Gyllenhaal about Advil and Starbucks. Justin's synopsis: Would you like to watch Jake Gyllenhaal talk on the phone for one and a half hours? No? What if I told you that you get to watch him cry and then vomit into a public toilet? Still no? What if I told you there was a dead baby involved. Still not sold? Your loss, sucker. Because these are all the ingredients for a compelling-ass movie!

The Jason Rantz Show
Rantz Rewind! May 4, 2018

The Jason Rantz Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 37:53


What's Trending: Union workers protest Seattle City Councilwoman Kshama Sawant over the head tax. // Jason reviews Overboard and Tully. // GUEST: Lawfare.com's Brooke Goldstein explains how Starbucks caved to the anti-Semitic wing of the Women's March movement. // GUEST: NBC News mistakenly reported that the FBI was wiretapping Michael Cohen's phone, Daily Caller reporter Saagar Enjeti explains what really happened See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Delingpod: The James Delingpole Podcast

Support the Delingpod!! https://www.subscribestar.com/jamesdelingpole Gerald Celente is the Founder/Director of the Trends Research Institute and Publisher of the weekly Trends Journal magazine. He is the author of the highly acclaimed and best-selling books “Trend Tracking” and “Trends 2000” (Warner Books). With a 40-year track record of identifying, tracking, and forecasting trends, Celente is world-renowned as today's #1 Trend Forecaster. Celente has earned the reputation as a trusted name in trends for his many accurate forecasts; among them the 1987 Stock Market crash, Dot com bust, “Gold Bull Run,” the “Panic of ‘08,” the rise of organic foods, and the popularity of gourmet coffee long before Starbucks was a household name. Celente, who developed the Globalnomic methodology to identify, track, forecast, and manage trends, is a political atheist. Unencumbered by political dogma, rigid ideology, or conventional wisdom, Celente, whose motto is “Think for Yourself,” observes and analyzes current events forming future trends for what they are – not for how he wants them to be. A true American Patriot, Celente owns three pre-Revolutionary stone buildings on the most historic corner in America, where the seeds of Democracy were sown, Colonial Kingston, New York's first Capitol. Self-described as a “Warrior for the Prince of Peace,” Gerald Celente is also the Founder “Occupy Peace & Freedom,” a not-for-profit movement to honor the Constitution and Bill of Rights and restore Freedoms.

Bobbycast
#319 - Reba McEntire on The Untold Story of “Fancy” + Her New Duet with Dolly Parton + Addressed Her Biggest Urban Legends + The First Time She Realized She Was Famous + Going Grocery Shopping By Herself

Bobbycast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 64:42


Bobby sits down with the legend herself, Reba McEntire. They talk about it all! Reba shares stories behind her new project Revived Remixed Revisited including a new version of “Does He Love You” with Dolly Parton. She talks about the time she made her Opry debut and had her set cut short because of Dolly. She addressed all the biggest Urban Legends about her turning down role in Titanic, and if Faith Hill really didn't get the part as her backup singer. She also talks about where her love of corn dogs came from, how she goes grocery shopping and to Starbucks by herself and the first time she realized she was famous! Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Every Day's A Holiday
October 7 is Frappe Day ☕️

Every Day's A Holiday

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 3:08


When you think of this drink you might think of a complicated and sugary order doused with whipped cream that's only been around since Starbucks has graced the planet - but this actually has origins long before that. It's October 7 and today is National Frappe Day.Follow my new blog @ https://todayaholiday.com/national-frappe-day/Photo by pariwat pannium on Unsplash

UnderDog
From Juvenile Probation to 7 Figure Serial Entrepreneur, Sales Coach & Author, Anthony Eisenman Shares His Transformational Journey of Becoming an Iconic Entrepreneur & How to Dominate Sales in Any Industry to Rise to the Top

UnderDog

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 39:33


As a top 1% sales authority, Anthony is the leading Enterprise Sales Expert, working with major organizations like Sprint, MasterCard, Starbucks, Bed Bath & Beyond, PETCO, BJs Restaurants, California Pizza Kitchen, US Bank, Safeway/Albertsons, Intel, Cisco, and Starwood Hotels. With over 20 years of business development experience, Anthony now helps people succeed by learning the enterprise sales process so they too can sell to big corporations and create generational wealth without having to become an entrepreneur. He's inspiring the next generation of sales professionals, giving them the skills they need in this new business landscape. Anthony is also the Podcast Host of The Anthony Eisenman Show where he brings inspirational stories and revenue-generating hacks for salespeople and entrepreneurs.In this episode, Anthony shares his inspiring journey from being on juvenile probation and turning his life around into becoming one of the most iconic entrepreneurs.To connect with Anthony:Website: https://www.anthonyeisenman.com/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/APEisenman/Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/anthonyeisenman/YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCK6I9tR033nSxs4CffSfDPQPodcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-anthony-eisenman-show/id1474124546Follow and subscribe to The Underdog show to listen to inspiring Underdog success stories to help touch, move and inspire new levels of success and pull back the curtains to reveal how you too can overcome ANY obstacle to succeed beyond your wildest dreams.

The Goal Digger Girl's Podcast
225: The Magic Behind Content Creation

The Goal Digger Girl's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 14:49


Episode Summary: In today's episode of The Goal Digger Girl Podcast, I share the magic formula for content creation! Just a heads up, it starts with being vulnerable. Sharing your genuine experiences, your struggles, and your story can have the most significant and positive impact when it comes to creating content. So if you're ready to crush your business and light your soul on fire, then stay tuned! Host Bio: Kimberly Olson is a self-made multi-millionaire and the creator of The Goal Digger Girl, where she serves female entrepreneurs by teaching them simple systems and online strategies in sales and marketing. Through the power of social media, they are equipped to explode their online presence and get real results in their business, genuinely and authentically. She has two PhDs in Natural Health and Holistic Nutrition, has recently been recognized as the #2 recruiter in her current network marketing company globally, is the author of four books including best-sellers, The Goal Digger and Balance is B.S., has a top 25 rated podcast in marketing and travels nationally public speaking. Most recently she has shared the stage with Rachel Hollis, Chalene Johnson, Marina Simone, Tanya Aliza and is an Ambassador for John Maxwell. She is a business blogger, success coach and in a leadership position within her current network marketing company. She is a mom of two and teaches others how to follow their dreams, crush their goals and create the life they've always wanted. Important Links: Website: www.thegoaldiggergirl.com Instagram: www.instagram.com/thegoaldiggergirl Facebook: www.facebook.com/thegoaldiggergirl Youtube: www.youtube.com/c/thegoaldiggergirl Grab The Goal Digger Girl Journal: https://amzn.to/3BeCMMZ Check out my Facebook groups for those that want to build their business online through social media, in a genuine and authentic way: Goal Digging Boss Babes: http://bit.ly/GoalDiggingBossBabes Goal Digger Creatives: http://bit.ly/GoalDiggerCreatives Goal Digger University is where you can access my archive and newly released workshops, masterclasses, bonus training PLUS my Mastermind- with weekly live in-depth training for a monthly subscription: http://bit.ly/GoalDiggerU Connect with me across the social media platforms: www.searchmysocial.media/thegoaldiggergirl Grab coffee on Kimberly throughout the month of October! Submit an honest review of the Goal Digger Girl Podcast, take a screenshot, and share it on your FB/IG stories to be entered to win a Starbucks gift card! Be sure to tag @thegoaldiggergirl on social media for your entry to count! We'll be choosing 4 winners. If you haven't already, be sure to text “PODCAST” to 737-240-3136 to get notified when there is a new episode! Leave a review here: Write a review for The Goal Digger Girl Podcast. Thanks for Listening: Thanks so much for listening to my podcast! If you enjoyed this episode and think that others could benefit from listening too, please share using the social media buttons on this page. Subscribing to The Podcast: If you would like to get updates of new episodes, you can give me a follow on your favorite podcast app. Read the full transcript here: https://bit.ly/3AhBZK5 --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/thegoaldiggergirl/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/thegoaldiggergirl/support

The Consumer VC: Venture Capital I B2C Startups I Commerce | Early-Stage Investing
Rui Ma (Tech Buzz China) - Chinese Crossover Brands, C2M Supply Chains and Future of Livestreaming

The Consumer VC: Venture Capital I B2C Startups I Commerce | Early-Stage Investing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 44:43


Presented by Ferret: Ferret is the first relationship intelligence tool for all business savvy investors to know, for the first time, who they can trust Head to [ferret.ai](http://ferret.ai/) using promo code: CONSUMERVC to jump to the top of the waitlist. Presented by Gorgias: Gorgias is the #1 helpdesk for Shopify, Magento and BigCommerce stores, and can turn your customer support into a profit center.If you're looking to increase your retention for your business, mention Consumer VC and get 2 months of Gorgias for free. Head [Here](https://www.gorgias.com/?gspk=bWlrZWdlbGI4MTk3&gsxid=h9iBxY4DHuTn) to get started. Our guest today is [Rui Ma](https://twitter.com/ruima), who is the founder of [Tech Buzz China](https://www.techbuzzchina.com/) and helps funds identify tech investments in both the U.S. and China. Tech Buzz China is a podcast and a community for those interested in China tech. I've been a fan of Tech Buzz China for a long time and learned so much about the ecommerce innovation that's happening in the east from Rui. As you might be thinking, we're going to discuss the Chinese cross over brands in this episode and talk about C2M businesses and how supply chains have changed over the past few years. 1. What was your initial attraction to technology? 2. You've worked as an investor for a long time, what propelled you to also found Tech Buzz China? 3. What are some of the differences in consumer behavior in China and the United States? 4. What needs to happen in order to bring livestream to the masses in the west? 5. Do you think the creator economy is going to develop like it has in China with livestreamers considering to IPO? 6. How do ecommerce platforms test new features? 7. What do you make of Chinese brands coming to the west and having success? 1. Do you believe Chinese consumer brands today are facing an opportunity like Japanese brands in the 70s (on the cusp of becoming global) 2. If you are an American brand is it more difficult to gain a presence in China? 8. You mention that now it's a super efficient time to build brands in China. Why is this so? 9. Unlike startups in the US may choose to bootstrap and grow their business slowly, many businesses in China just want to make a quick buck, they usually get involved in raising very early. Do you think CPG startup bootstrapping stands any chance in China? 10. Would love your take on valuations / multiples of a traditional business vs a software business. It seems a much more traditional business (like a Starbucks, which has a sizable digital retail component) than a software / platform / digital business? 11. What do you think Americans most misunderstand about the Chinese consumer tech? 12. What's one book that impacted you professionally and one book that impacted you personally? 13. What's the best piece of advice that you've received?

Economic Update with Richard D. Wolff
How US Workers are Really Treated

Economic Update with Richard D. Wolff

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 28:59


This week on Economic Update, Prof. Wolff pays homage to Mikis Theodorakis, Greek musician and political hero, and discusses Starbucks workers in Buffalo, the economic fallout of Supreme Court's anti-aborton act, what Hurricane Ida fatalities show, and the $8 trillion cost of US wars since 9/11. The second half of the show features an interview Leila Roberts and Tess Fraad-Wolff on the harsh realities of US treatment of workers.

Super U Podcast
Kevin Hart

Super U Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 34:13


Kevin Hart is an American stand-up comedian and actor. He began working as a stand-up comedian shortly after graduating from high school, eventually migrating to bigger clubs in New York and Los Angeles. Since then Hart has gone on to big-time Hollywood success, appearing in comedies like Think Like a Man, About Last Night, Get Hard, Central Intelligence and two Jumanji features. Hart's tough experience would provide inspiring motivation and lift him to his current success. 5x #1 Bestselling Author and Motivational Speaker Erik Qualman has performed in over 55 countries and reached over 50 million people this past decade. He was voted the 2nd Most Likable Author in the World behind Harry Potter's J.K. Rowling. Have Erik speak at your conference: eq@equalman.com Motivational Speaker | Erik Qualman has inspired audiences at FedEx, Chase, ADP, Huawei, Starbucks, Godiva, FBI, Google, and many more on Digital Leadership. Learn more at https://equalman.com

Media Mavens Podcast
Cleaner Innovation for Cleaner World

Media Mavens Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 46:15


This week, the Media Mavens meet up with Michael Kaliski, CEO of Good Planet. Always busy trying to help ensure cleaner innovation, a cleaner planet and more sustainable life, Kaliski spoke with the Mavens about an in-depth look at his current projects working with studios and large events to help contain waste, recycle whats needed and to find more innovative ways to manage keeping massive dumping of trash and waste in the landfills in order to leave cleaner footprint. "Starbucks, for example is all plastic so not compostable so everything ends up in a landfill why I encourage using a reusable cups to avoid extra waste" Stated Kaliski. Tune in this week to learn about “Cleaner Innovation for Cleaner World ” and how important it is to ensure a more sustainable and cleaner future. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Daily Zeitgeist
Starbucks Hype Beasts, Senate Dinosaurs Finally Get it? 10.6.21

The Daily Zeitgeist

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 79:42


In episode 1003, Jack and Miles are joined by host writer and comedian Joey Clift to discuss how hospitals weren't bluffing with their vaccine mandates, does congress finally understanding Facebook? Starbucks Stans and more! FOOTNOTES: Joey's "How to Cope with Your Team Changing Its Native American Mascot" Video Hospitals weren't bluffing, get VAXX'd or GET FUKT Maybe Frances Haugen can convince Congress to do something this time Starbucks Stans LISTEN: AJRadico - "Armore" Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

The Goal Digger Girl's Podcast
224: Work-life Balance and Abundance with Rebecca Whitman

The Goal Digger Girl's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 23:31


Episode Summary: In today's episode of The Goal Digger Girl Podcast, Rebecca Whitman and I will dive into the difference between masculine and feminine energy in business. We also discuss what our versions of work-life balance look like and the strategies behind them. If you're ready to crush your business and light your soul on fire, then stay tuned! Guest Bio: Rebecca Whitman is a Success Mentor, graduate with honors from Princeton University, and author of the highly-rated books “Business, Life, Universe” and “How to Make a Six-Figure Income Working Part-Time.” She hosts the top 5% globally ranked “Balanced, Beautiful, Abundant” podcast. Her philosophy divides life into 7 Pillars of Abundance which include: spiritual, physical, emotional, romantic, mental, social, and financial. She helps people achieve balance within these seven areas so they can experience more fun and freedom in life! In addition to her appearances as an expert on ABC and CBS, she has spoken on multiple podcasts and has shared virtual stages with great thought leaders like Grant Cardone, Jack Canfield, and Les Brown. Guest Links: Facebook: www.facebook.com/balancedbeautifulabundant Instagram: www.instagram.com/rebeccaewhitman LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/rebeccaewhitman How to Make a Six-Figure Income Working Part-Time: https://amzn.to/3a8SOfE Manifest Abundance by Journaling: https://bit.ly/abundancejournalprompts Podcast: https://balancedbeautifulabundant.buzzsprout.com/ To learn where you are in/out of BALANCE, take this FREE quiz: https://newyearnewyousummit.com/quiz Important Links: Website: www.thegoaldiggergirl.com Instagram: www.instagram.com/thegoaldiggergirl Facebook: www.facebook.com/thegoaldiggergirl Youtube: www.youtube.com/c/thegoaldiggergirl Goal Digging Boss Babes: http://bit.ly/GoalDiggingBossBabes Goal Digger Creatives: http://bit.ly/GoalDiggerCreatives Goal Digger University is where you can access my archive and newly released workshops, masterclasses, bonus training PLUS my Mastermind- with weekly live in-depth training for a monthly subscription: http://bit.ly/GoalDiggerU Connect with me across the social media platforms: Search My Social https://searchmysocial.media/thegoaldiggergirl If you find value in this podcast, please leave us a review - it means so much! https://ratethispodcast.com/thegoaldiggergirl Grab a coffee on Kimberly throughout the month of October! Submit an honest review of the Goal Digger Girl podcast, take a screenshot, and share it on your FB/IG stories to be entered to win a Starbucks gift card! Be sure to tag @thegoaldiggergirl on social media for your entry to count! We'll be choosing 4 winners, will you be one of the lucky ones?!:) If you haven't already, be sure to text “PODCAST” to 737-240-3136 to get notified when there is a new episode! Read the full transcript here: https://bit.ly/3AfS9Dr --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/thegoaldiggergirl/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/thegoaldiggergirl/support

To Whoever's Listening
NOZ Tank at Disneyland...

To Whoever's Listening

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 60:43


Welcome to season two of To Whoever's Listening!  We have a lot to talk about, so grab a snack, drink or whatever gives you pleasure and enjoy the show! Follow us on all of our social media to keep up with the guys and be the first to see all of our craziness! We love youInstagram: @towhoeverslisteningTwitter: @TWLpodYoutube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCaJA...Tik Tok: @towhoeverslistening

Max Potential Habits
MPM#2:43 - The Entrepreneur Roller Coaster Ride | What To Do When You Want to Give Up

Max Potential Habits

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 23:45


Almost 30
463. Morning Rituals to Unleash Your Creativity with Morgan Harper Nichols

Almost 30

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 58:06


K + L get the tea on Morgan Harper Nichols morning routine, and what lays the groundwork for birthing all the beautiful gifts she brings to the world. She shares how she creates something every day, and why getting smaller with your artistic expression doesn't mean playing small. Now, thanks to her collaboration with Starbucks, your morning coffee can be an act of self-care.   Before you roll your eyes at yet another "morning routine" chat, know that this convo steers clear from dogmatic formulas (who is really journaling for 30 minutes every day anyway)? Instead, think of it as an open-ended invitation for you to explore the small rituals that fuel your creativity and celebrate your life. So feel free to hit the snooze button, and indulge in donuts in bed. You can still sit with us.    We also talk about: K + L's morning routines Why coffee grounds Morgan for her day The question she asks every morning to stay present Creating art in any environment Sponsors: NutriBullet | Use code “ALMOST30NATION” for 20% off at https://www.nutribullet.com/ (nutribullet.com) Osea Malibu | Use code “ALMOST30” to get $10 off $50 or more at http://www.oseamalibu.com/almost30podcast (oseamalibu.com) BetterHelp | Visit http://betterhelp.com/almost30 (betterhelp.com/almost30) for 10% off your first month. As a BetterHelp affiliate, we may receive compensation from BetterHelp if you purchase products or services through the links provided. This podcast is sponsored by BetterHelp. Flo Living | Use code “ALMOST30” for 15% off all products and programs at https://www.floliving.com/ (floliving.com) SAKARA | Go to http://sakara.com/almostsakara (sakara.com/almostsakara) and use code “ALMOSTSAKARA” for 20% off your first order Dropps | Save 25% off your first purchase using promo code “ALMOST30” at https://www.dropps.com/ (dropps.com)t Resources: Start your day on a high withhttps://www.instagram.com/ar/209164434588894/ ( Morgan's “Morning Mantras” IG Effect) Website: https://morganharpernichols.com (morganharpernichols.com) Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/morganharpernichols/?hl=en (@morganharpernichols) Join our community: http://almost30.com/membership (almost30.com/membership) https://www.facebook.com/Almost30podcast/groups (facebook.com/Almost30podcast/groups) Podcast disclaimer can be found by visiting: https://almost30.com/disclaimer (almost30.com/disclaimer).  Find more to love at http://almost30.com/ (almost30.com)! Almost 30 is edited by http://crate.media (Crate Media).

My Simplified Life
From Privilege to Progress with Michelle Saahene

My Simplified Life

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 54:43


Co-Founder of From Privilege to Progress, Michelle Saahene went to grab a latte and work from a Starbucks in 2018. Two black men walked into the coffee shop and asked to use the restroom. They were denied since they hadn't purchased any coffee. They took a seat waiting for their business meeting to start, but were next greeted by 8 police officers who arrested them….for not buying a cup of coffee. Michelle didn't know she was being filmed when she called out the barista for calling the police for no reason at all and she never expected that video to go viral and later create an entire movement. Michelle's story is all too common in what we see going on in our nation and even though we were all talking about it in 2020, the talk has quieted down. We need to keep having conversations around racism, listening more and educating ourselves.   Michelle Talks About The Starbucks Video That Went Viral Racism & Trauma Physical Reactions To Discomfort From Privilege To Progress Links Mentioned   From Privilege To Progress Michelle Saahene's Website Michelle Saahene's Instagram  

Art Horse
73. Pretty pity parties and making ugly art on purpose

Art Horse

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 94:40


It's always okay to throw yourself a pity party with a nice cakeSometimes it helps to google basic for-dummies shit --- like DO I HAVE ALL THE PIESYou are guaranteed to miss out on almost everything life has to offer, and that is what makes your choices meaningful (thanks a lot Oliver Burkeman)By the time you're 32 you know a little somethin somethin about tomorrow (and the next day)Does striving for things ultimately push them away? Who knows, man Join the art club at patreon.com/arthorsepod. See pics from this episode on our instagram @arthorsepod or on our website at arthorsepod.com/73 We mention:Bellbird Wrap Dress: https://www.commonstitch.com.au/digital-sewing-patterns/wrapdress-digital-pattern Tofino cardigan by Tara Lynn Morrison (@good_night_day on Instagram): https://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/tofino-cardigan  Four Thousand Weeks by that man Oliver BurkemanLaerke Bagger's knitted treasures: https://www.instagram.com/p/CSkIZXWjQE6/ Edensprout's bright improvised sweaters : https://www.instagram.com/edensprout/ Tim Wu: “I prefer to brew my coffee, but Starbucks instant is so convenient I hardly ever do what I ‘prefer.'” His essay on the Tyranny of Convenience: https://www.nytimes.com/2018/02/16/opinion/sunday/tyranny-convenience.html Knitting “fade formula” https://patchworktimes.com/2018/01/15/the-fade-formula/ Hand dyed yarn from the Impossible Knot Yarn Shop: https://impossibleknot.ca/ Make it Mighty Ugly by Kim Piper-WerkerBeam paints watercolours: https://www.beampaints.com/  

Light After Trauma
Episode 63: "I Don't Deserve To Heal" with Alyssa Scolari, LPC

Light After Trauma

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 32:45


Have you ever felt like you just don't deserve to be happy? Or more specifically, have you ever found yourself having self-harm urges or feeling suicidal after someone is genuinely kind to you? If so, you are not alone. Tune in to understand the reasons why this might happen as well as how you can train your brain to start accepting love and kindness. Support the podcast and the movement! Light After Trauma website Transcript:   Alyssa Scolari [00:23]: Hey, Warriors, what's up? And welcome back to another episode of The Light After Trauma podcast. I am your host, Alyssa Scolari ,and I am honored to be here with you. We're doing a solo episode today. So some housekeeping things first. I just wanted to say thank you so so much for 15,000 downloads on the podcast. I am blown away and continue to be blown away. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you. That was a really exciting milestone. Alyssa Scolari [00:56]: The other thing I wanted to say is head on over, if you haven't done so already, to my Instagram page lightaftertrauma is the handle. So it's just the exact same title as the podcast. And check out some of the content and let me know what you think. If there's more you want to see. I have really been boosting the amount of content and really putting it out there. I'm trying to put out content about four days a week and I'm also going to be doing an Instagram live this Thursday, October 7th, at 8:00 PM Eastern time. So that's Eastern standard time. I would love it if you could make it. Even if you can pop in for only 30 seconds to just say hi, I would love to meet you. This is my first official Instagram live. So I'm really excited for it. Alyssa Scolari [01:50]: And yeah, I can't wait to meet the folks who have been listening to the podcast because it feels like I have a bunch of friends out there. And I know I've said this before, but it just feels like I have so many friends out there, but I don't know their names. And I would love to just talk to you. And thank you personally, we're talking about stress management on the Instagram live, so I'm going to share some stress management tips because Lord knows we all need it. Alyssa Scolari [02:14]: So that's this Thursday, October 7th at 8:00 PM. Eastern Standard Time. I will be on Instagram live, feel free to come join. The Instagram handle is lightaftertrauma and thank you always for your support and your love. I love you all so much. And also if you haven't done so already, please leave a rating or review for the podcast. The more ratings we get, the more we grow and the wider audience we reach so that we can give even more free content to people all around the world. Alyssa Scolari [02:49]: So if you are a listener of the podcast and you like what you're hearing, or if you hate what you're hearing and you want things to be different, just go leave an honest review. Let me know your thoughts. I would be honored to hear from you because this podcast really is for you. So yeah. Please leave a review. I would really appreciate it. Alyssa Scolari [03:12]: Okay. So today, so I cannot take credit for the inspiration for the topic of today's episode. This topic came from a podcast listener, so thank you. I will not name their name because they did not give me permission to do so. So you know who you are. I told you I was going to be doing an episode about this topic this week. Thank you so much for reaching out and sending me an email. It was great to connect with you. Alyssa Scolari [03:42]: So today we are talking about feeling like you don't deserve to heal and feeling like you don't deserve nice things or compliments or healthy relationships, or really any kind of genuine relationship. Feeling like you just deserve loneliness and heartbreak because that is the narrative that you grew up believing because that is what you had experienced for of your life. Alyssa Scolari [04:22]: I love this topic because it really resonates with me. When I first started my recovery journey and I was in therapy, my therapist, who was truly not, she's not the greatest at all. And she did a lot of harmful things and this was one of them. When I started this process and started uncovering a lot of repressed memories, I was in a spiral. I was going out of my mind. They were definitely some of the worst years of my life and, dare I say, at many points I often remember saying to my therapist or my husband, "This process is actually harder than experiencing the trauma itself." And that's not a fact. That's just my lived experience is that having to like work through it and having all those memories come to the surface so much harder than the trauma itself. Again, that's just my experience. Alyssa Scolari [05:28]: So when all of this started happening and I started having all these memories flood back, my therapist was really good at showering me with compliments. Which, I think that there's a debate on whether or not therapists should be constantly complimenting their patients. I think it depends on the type of compliment. It depends on the goal of the compliment. But my therapist, wasn't very good at holding space for me being in that spot. She very much wanted me to be healed and happy and she wanted me to immediately see how wonderful I was and be done. And I wasn't there. It was going to me a long time to get there. But in that process, all of her compliments, and when I say compliments I mean things like, "Look at how well you're doing. Look at how you're still functioning in life even though you've been through so much." Alyssa Scolari [06:35]: Let's see, what else did she say? Oh, she was full of them. "Look at what a wonderful family you have. Look at the husband that you have." She used to talk about my husband like, "He's such a wonderful guy and you did all of these things. You have this amazing, wonderful life now." And what I noticed was happening for me is the more she talked about how amazing my life is, right? She would kind of say, "Yes, this trauma happened. These terrible things happened, but your life is so amazing now." And the more she would say that to me, the worse I would get when it came to self harm, any kind of like self-deprecating, the self-deprecation increased. Really all the self-destructive behaviors skyrocketed. And I noticed this pattern early on, but I didn't quite understand it enough. Alyssa Scolari [07:33]: So I wasn't really able to talk to my therapist about it at the time because I didn't understand what was going on. But it wasn't just my therapist. Right? It was anybody in my life. If somebody would say, particularly the words, "I'm proud of you," were really hard for me to hear. And if somebody would say that I would spiral. I can recall a time where, so I have, had a supervisor, I should say. My supervisor has now blossomed into a wonderful friend and mentor, Rebecca Christensen. She's been on the podcast before. She's amazing. She's just, she's an angel on earth is really what I can say about Rebecca. Alyssa Scolari [08:21]: But you know, when I first started meeting with Rebecca and she helped me ultimately open up my private practice and she would often say, "I am so proud of you for doing this. I am so proud of you for doing that." And don't get me wrong. She didn't mean anything about it. She had no idea that I was panicking when I would hear those words and neither did anybody else, so this is not a blame game. My therapist definitely knew. So I do place the appropriate amount of blame on her, but for everybody else, this is not a blame game. Alyssa Scolari [08:56]: So she would say all the time, Rebecca, "I'm really proud of you. Look at all you're doing. You're amazing. You're going to do great things in life." And I would, she might say that in a text message. And I would not be able to look at it. If I were to open up my phone and I could see like the, the first, I don't know, whatever, three to five words of the text. And if I could tell that it was a compliment, I would have to shut my phone off and put it down and I couldn't look at it. Alyssa Scolari [09:25]: And then I would start to panic. And then I would call for David. And then I would usually end up crying or having a panic attack. And then eventually I would read the kind message and I would have another panic attack. And then I would talk to David about it incessantly. And I would be like, "Well, David, what does this mean? Do people actually think that I'm kind? Do people actually think I'm a good person? How can this be?" And then I would say, "Well, David, they just don't know the truth. They just don't know what I'm really like. They just don't know how evil I am, how insane I am." Alyssa Scolari [10:09]: Because I truly thought that I was in every sense of the word, insane. That all of the memories that were coming back were false and that something just broke in my brain. So I said to David all the time, "These people who are showering me with compliments and telling me I'm a good therapist, they just don't know the real me. And if they really knew what I was like, they would hate as much as I hate me." Alyssa Scolari [10:42]: How sad is that? I take a moment to pause and reflect on that because I was fighting for my life and I couldn't even tell how amazing I was doing it. It wasn't until, let me think. Yeah. You know, it, it wasn't really until the last year or so. And I attribute so much of my healing to this podcast. Hasn't really been until the last year that I have been able to sit with compliments. So I'm sure that I'm not alone in this. And I know I'm not because the podcast listener, that I was referring to earlier, emailed me and told me that this is one of the most difficult things for them. And I could not agree more in the beginning when I was first understanding everything I had been through and trying to make sense of it all. I couldn't hear that I was a great person. Alyssa Scolari [11:40]: I couldn't hear how strong I was, because I didn't even know if what I was remembering really happened. Or if what I was remembering was just some figment of my imagination. And I think a lot of trauma survivors feel that way. Whether or not we repressed our abuse or not. Whether or not we have repressed trauma or we have a full memory of it, I think a lot of us feel this way. Well, what if I made something up? Well, what if I could have done something differently when I was traumatized and then nothing bad would've happened to me? Alyssa Scolari [12:15]: We find ways in our head all the time to make the trauma our fault, because that gives us a sense of control. And it makes us feel like we could have done something about it. So I just couldn't handle it. And I know that I would resort to binge eating really before, before I was able to recover from my eating disorder, lots of compliments and lots of praise and lots of attention would often result in binge eating and occasionally cutting. Alyssa Scolari [12:46]: But I would say more so binge eating to try to stuff down any of the feelings that were coming up from me when I was having somebody genuinely love me and care for me. I couldn't tolerate it. And I'm sure a lot of us are wondering, right? Like, "Well, why?" Like, "Yes, I do that too. You know? Yes, I also can't take a compliment. Why is that? I get really uncomfortable when people will praise me or compliment me. Why am I like that?" And let's break it down on the most basic, like a fundamental level. Alyssa Scolari [13:21]: So when we look at your brain structure, when you have complex trauma and you have a history of being invalidated, unheard, unseen, gaslit, made to feel like your voice doesn't matter. If you've been sexually abused, physically abused, emotionally abused, whatever it's been, your brain develops., especially if you experience this as a child, that changes the development of your brain. So without getting too technical, because I am a brain nerd and I could absolutely go off on this, but I won't. So without getting too technical, what happens is your brain develops and gets to this sort of homeostasis where it is so used to the invalidation. Alyssa Scolari [14:18]: It is used to being ignored. We are used to being unheard. So, you know, somebody gas lights us. We're like, "Yep. That's just one more person trying to fuck with my head." Somebody sexually abuses us. We're like, "Yep. That's just one more person who doesn't respect my body." Doesn't mean that it's not traumatizing. Please don't misunderstand me because it is all extremely traumatizing. But when you're in it and you're in the thick of it, we learn to expect the worst things to happen to us. "Well, yeah, of course my mom said that to me." Or, "Of course my dad said that to me. That's what he said his whole life. That's just dad. That's just what he does." Alyssa Scolari [15:06]: So we sort of developed this pattern of accepting the abuse and accepting things that people say that hurt us. Shit, if I could go back now and talk back to all of the people who have ever said horrible things. Whew. I wish I could. I wish I could. And, and sometimes I have, right? Sometimes I have. But I know for so many of us, we can't and back then, I know for me, I was just like, "Yep, this is one more person who has let me down or disappointed me. Or one more person who has crossed a boundary, but I don't feel of comfortable speaking up or I'm not going to say anything because you know what, that's what people do. People don't respect my boundaries. So I'm used to it." Alyssa Scolari [15:58]: So then you have somebody come along, and a lot of times it's your therapist, because we talk about this stuff in therapy all the time. It's a little bit easier to brush off compliments from friends because we're just like, "Ah, yeah. You're my friend. I know you like me. Whatever." A kind of take it for granted type of thing. But when we finally go to therapy and we are getting treatment and our therapist is genuinely proud of us. Or we we can tell that whatever was said, whatever that therapist said, gave us this message that they genuinely care. That they genuinely want us to get better. That they genuinely see the good in us our brains initially are kind of like, "We're not used to this. What is this? Somebody respecting my boundaries? Oh no, I can't handle it." Alyssa Scolari [16:53]: And then what happens? Right? We panic. Oftentimes we feel guilty. Oftentimes we get extremely uncomfortable. We feel shame. And we just kind of want that moment to be over. And we want to brush it under the rug, because we're really uncomfortable. Sometimes it gets even worse where that comment kind of sits in our brain. And then we feel like we have to self destruct because it's like, "Nah, my therapist said that to me. And that can't be true. That can't be true. My therapist just doesn't really understand what a monster I am. So I'm going to show them what a monster I am." And a lot of this is subconscious. I want to point that out. Right? I don't think any of this for most people is like a conscious stream of thought that we sit in. Alyssa Scolari [17:39]: It's like, "Well, how can I show my therapist what a monster I am?" I do think a lot of this is subconscious and for me it certainly was subconscious. So our brains simply can't tolerate it because it is so new. And the brain on trauma is very hypervigilant. It is extra wired for protection. So when we are receiving information that is brand new to us, we automatically label it as a threat, even though it's a compliment, right? Even though it's something like, "Hey, Alyssa, I just really love the way that you are so resilient and you keep going and you keep getting up and you're able to also work through your own shit and be there for other people. I think that's amazing. You're doing great things in this world." Alyssa Scolari [18:26]: Oh, I'm cringing. I'm cringing as I say it. Cringing as I say it, because it is so hard and my brain is like, "No, that can't be right. That can't be right. We're not used to receiving this kind of information." So even though it's good stuff, my brain is hearing that and going, "Ugh, no, no, no, no, no. This must be a threat. This must be a threat." And then what happens when your body perceives a threat, right? You go into fight, flight, freeze, or falling. And we panic or we self destruct or we shut down or we kind of just laugh because we don't know what else to do. Or we kind of mimic the facial expressions of the person next to us because that's what's supposed to keep us the safest. Alyssa Scolari [19:10]: So that is, breaking it down on a fundamental level, that is why this happens. So the good news is this changes. It has certainly changed for me. I had somebody text me, I want to say, what's today? It's Sunday, October 3rd, when I'm recording. So I had somebody text me on Friday, October 1st. And this person was somebody that I used to work with a few years back and she follows me on social media and she texted me only to say, "I am so proud of you. And I hope that one day I can be half the clinician that you are." And man, that was amazing to hear. Alyssa Scolari [20:08]: But I have to say that if this were to two years ago, I would've not been able to tolerate it. I would've started sobbing and I would've showed David and I would've had a panic attack. And I would've said, "She doesn't know the real me. She does not know the real me." But today I open up my phone and I see that and I go, "Oh man, this is awesome." Alyssa Scolari [20:39]: This is somebody who did not have to do that. With as busy as everybody is, people don't have time for compliments. People usually just make time for the complaints. People are so much more likely to complain than compliment someone. So for her to find the time out of her busy day to pick up her phone and compliment me when it's, doesn't really, it's not going to affect her. Right? This was a completely selfless act, as small as it might seem, it actually feels really big to me. And I just smiled and I teared up a little bit, but I teared up because I'm just so grateful and very humbled by the love that I've received, but I can tolerate it now. Alyssa Scolari [21:34]: And the reason I can tolerate it is because of this podcast. So it does get better. What you are doing by trying to sit with people saying kind things to you and trying to accept people saying kind things to you and trying to accept relationships where people respect your boundaries you are rewiring your brain. Alyssa Scolari [22:03]: Your brain is forming new neural pathways all the time through this process called myelination and, I believe I said that correctly, if I didn't someone correct me, but I believe the process is called myelination. Where your brain is forming these new neural pathways. And the more we allow ourselves to be around people who shower us with love and affection, unconditional love, I should say, and kindness, the more our brain is rewiring itself. So that now when it receives that information, when it gets that input, it goes, "Oh, we know what this is. This actually, isn't a threat. This is good stuff. So we're going to file this away as a really good moment and not a moment to freak out and panic." So I really hope that makes sense. And unfortunately the process of rewiring your brain it takes a long time. Alyssa Scolari [23:09]: You know, the great news is that it can be done it. I am living proof that it can be done. The brain is neuroplasticity, right? That means that the brain is constantly changing and evolving. So in the same way that your brain learned that only boundary crossing and abuse and gas lighting was safe, that's the same way in which we can learn that unconditional love and affection and genuine compliments are safe. It takes time and it takes practice. So what does that look like? Right. It's nice to talk about that in theory, right? "Oh yeah. Okay, great. My brain needs to rewire itself, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah." But what are some things we can do to work on that? Because it takes work, right? It's not just something we're going to wake up one day and go, "Oh God, look. I can accept these compliments now and I can accept healing. And I can accept that. I'm getting a little bit better." Alyssa Scolari [24:12]: Could be because it's not just, and I should say this, I should have said this from the beginning, but it's not just compliments, right? It's the healing process. It's anything positive in our lives, right? It's healing when we're getting better. When normally a triggering situation would've made us self destruct or self harm or use our eating disorders. And then in this instance, we didn't, and we overcame this triggering situation without self-harming, all of that, right? Any kind of steps towards healing, healing your brain, healing your nervous system, healing your relationships, and your social life. All of it can be difficult. So what are some things that we can do when we notice that we are starting to have better people in our life, or when we notice that we're starting to not self destruct, when time get tough, what can we do? Alyssa Scolari [25:09]: Here are some things that I did. So one of the things that a lot of DBT skills, which I'm sure many of you may be familiar with, I know that I've talked about them before on the podcast. So DBT stands for Dialectical Behavior Therapy and DBT is really wonderful for like distressed tolerance and has really effective coping skills. And honestly, I hate the word coping skills because I think it's just so hard to use coping skills when you're triggered. And it's so hard to find coping skills that are actually good and effective, but I can say, I promise you, DBT skills are where it's at and go a really long way in helping to sit with this kind of stuff. So DBT skills are meant for like, well, they're not meant just for self harm, but they definitely are used in self harm. Alyssa Scolari [26:08]: And that's really what this process is, is you're having a really great healing experience or a really great interaction with somebody and your brain is perceiving that as a threat and therefore self-destructing. So for me, I find that what helps is sitting with it and trying to talk through what exactly is happening inside of my brain and why I'm perceiving this as such a threat. And sometimes I can't, right? Sometimes that like good interaction is way too much for me. And that's when I have to do other stuff, which is like, "Okay, I'm going to sit with this, but I'm also going to go take a bath." Or, "I'm also going to go take a walk." Or sometimes what we need to do is distract. And that can be key. Alyssa Scolari [27:05]: A lot of times, that's what I need to do. And the thing for me is as much as I want to distract, I don't want to forget about it because it really is special to me when somebody is kind to me. Or when I have a really good interaction with somebody it's very, very special to me. So while my system might not be able to tolerate it in that moment, I very much want to come back to it. So what I have found most helpful is I will write it down. Whether I keep like a note in my phone, or if it's a text message, I'll take a screenshot and then I will immediately distract it with somebody else or with something else or somebody, right? I'll talk to my husband or I'll be playing with the dogs, or I will, a really big fan of Epsom salt baths. Or we'll just go to the gym. Or we'll kind of go read emails if I'm in the middle of a work today. Alyssa Scolari [28:02]: But writing it down really how helps me to be able to like put it someplace and then kind of move on with my day. So it's like, "Okay, my system can't tolerate this right now. So I'm going to distract. I'm going to do something that's going to calm my nervous system." Whatever that might be. Also another big one making a hot cup of tea. Ugh. So soothing to me. So do things to soothe your nervous system, if you can't tolerate it. Alyssa Scolari [28:29]: And I know that that sounds kind of silly, right? Like why should I have to try to calm my nervous system or use coping skills because I received a compliment? But again, it goes back to the way your brain is wired, which as a result of trauma, your brain is wired so that you're used to being shit on. But when somebody is actually respectful, your brain's like, "Uh oh, what is this?" Right? It really should be the opposite in folks without a history of trauma they're used to people respecting them. And then when somebody is disrespectful, then they're nervous system gets dysregulated and their brain is like, "Rut oh, this is a threat." Alyssa Scolari [29:10]: So sitting with those feelings, trying to work them through, going through DBT skills, I won't go through all of them. I think that a lot of sensory stuff is really helpful for me. Whether it's cold water, whether it's, like I said, a hot cup of tea, whether it's a massage, an infrared sauna, I'm a very sensory oriented person. So you can Google DBT coping skills and you can find a list of skills. And again, I know that that might sound like a lot of work, but I am telling you it is so, so worth it. Alyssa Scolari [29:47]: And over time, as you continue to be able to incorporate this new information into your body and into your brain, this new information that tells you, "Oh, hey, maybe I am not a horrible human being after all. Maybe I'm just a person who had terrible things happen to them." It will get easier and easier to accept wonderful interactions. And it will be easier and easier to accept your healing. And you will find yourself craving healing and you will find yourself feeling worthy and deserving of healing. Alyssa Scolari [30:28]: So I hope that that helps spread some awareness and insight as to why it is so hard for people to take a compliment or for people to have a genuinely a good interaction with other people in this world. Why we self sabotage with our healing sometimes because it's really difficult, right? The trauma is hard, but the healing is hard too. So I know that I'm not alone in this, as I said earlier, and you are not alone in it either. It's really difficult, but you can get there and you will get there. Alyssa Scolari [31:07]: So with that said, I hope that everybody has a wonderful week. Remember again, I am going live on Instagram this Thursday at 8:00 PM. Eastern time again, that is this Thursday, October 7th. My Instagram handle is lightaftertrauma. Be sure to go check that out as there is lots of great stuff on that page now. We're really rolling out the content and I am holding you all in the light. My husband has brought home some Rita's water ice. So I am going to go chill out with him, have some Rita's and enjoy my Sunday night. Wishing you all the best. Take great care. Alyssa Scolari [31:47]: Thanks for listening everyone. For more information, please head over to lightaftertrauma.com or you can also follow us on social media. On Instagram. We are @lightaftertrauma and on Twitter. It is @lightafterpod. Lastly, please head over to patreon.com/lightafter trauma to support our show. We are asking for $5 a month, which is the equivalent to a cup of coffee at Starbucks. So please head on over. Again, that's paton.com/lightaftertrauma. Thank you. And we appreciate your support.

Bringing the Human back to Human Resources
To Unionize or Not to Unionize? That is the Question.

Bringing the Human back to Human Resources

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 23:35


This week, Traci talks Unions and Labor Relations - she shares some personal anecdotes and a recent scenario with Starbucks in Buffalo, NY. Starbucks Article: https://www.cnbc.com/2021/09/14/starbucks-tells-nlrb-to-let-all-buffalo-workers-vote-on-union-effort.html Sign-up for Human Times Newsletter: https://industryslice.com/subscribers/dbc8cfad-6689-4447-aeb1-9bd98d0a2b61?rh_ref=f00c86a3 Traci has been selected to be a speaker and panelist at the Hacking HR 2022 Global Online Conference! Register to join for FREE from March 7-11, 2022: https://www.hackinghrlab.io/46 Don't forget to rate, review, and subscribe. Share with a friend! Connect with Traci here: https://linktr.ee/HRTraci Disclaimer: Thoughts, opinions, and statements made on this podcast are not a reflection of the thoughts, opinions, and statements of the Company Traci Rubin is actively employed by. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/traci-rubin/support

The Susan Sly Project
234. Presenter Strategies That Actually Work! - with Shufflrr President, AlexAnndra Ontra

The Susan Sly Project

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 23:27


There are many misconceptions regarding how to give a good presentation. AlexAnndra Ontra outlines three effective presentation tactics and how crucial these components are to getting your message out and compelling people to take action. AlexAnndra is changing the way the enterprise world thinks about its most undervalued asset — the presentation. As President and co-founder of Shufflrr, AlexAnndra is blazing a trail in the new discipline of presentation management. The technology she's created is already powering the presentation strategies of companies like Starbucks, Royal Caribbean, and NASA, helping them save millions by transforming humble PowerPoint slides into invaluable PR assets.