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Living organism that has reached sexual maturity

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Latest podcast episodes about adults

The 11th Hour with Brian Williams
DAY 314: The CDC says all adults should get booster shots

The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 44:19


The President urged vaccinations in the face of the omicron variant, but stressed it was "a cause for concern, not a cause for panic." Meanwhile, the Jan. 6 committee is considering a vote on holding former Justice Dept. official Jeffrey Clark in contempt of Congress. And as lawmakers return to Capitol Hill, deadlines loom on government funding, the debt ceiling and Biden's agenda. Yamiche Alcindor, Philip Rucker, Chuck Rosenberg, Juanita Tolliver, Bill Kristol and Dr. Vin Gupta join.

The Last Word with Lawrence O’Donnell
CDC: All fully vaccinated adults should get booster shots

The Last Word with Lawrence O’Donnell

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 41:32


Tonight on the Last Word: President Biden reiterates the need to vaccinate the world. Also, Biden meets with retailers to discuss holiday shopping supply chain issues. Plus, the Supreme Court considers a legal challenge to Roe v. Wade. TheJanuary 6th Committee moves forward on a possible criminal contempt referral for ex-DOJ official Jeffrey Clark. And the U.S. just survived its first Trump-free Thanksgiving since 2014. Laurie Garrett, Diane Swonk, Neal Katyal, Katie Benner, Molly Jong-Fast and Eugene Robinson join Ali Velshi.

Light After Trauma
Episode 71: How To Help Your Bereaved Child(ren) with Michele Benyo

Light After Trauma

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 41:32


Michele Benyo became a Certified Grief Recovery Specialist after her six-year-old son died from cancer. After witnessing her young daughter's intense grief over the loss of her brother, she knew she had to help other parents whose children are grieving the loss of their sibling. Michelle provides incredible insight on the ways in which children grieve and she shares tips for parents who are trying to support their bereaved kid(s). Check out the Light After Trauma website for transcripts, other episodes, Alyssa's guest appearances, and more at: www.lightaftertrauma.com Support the Podcast Michele Benyo's website: https://goodgriefparenting.com    Transcript Alyssa Scolari [00:00]: Hey, hey, hey, everybody. Welcome back to another episode of the Light After Trauma podcast. I am your host, Alyssa Scolari, and I hope you all had a lovely holiday. I know we are really in the thick of the holiday season. And I also know it has been a while since we have had a guest on the show, and we are changing that up today. I appreciate Michele's grace. She is going to be our guest today, Michele Benyo. And I appreciate her grace because I have had to reschedule our interview quite a few times due to some health issues that I have been having lately. I'm just very grateful that she is here on the show today. We have a great episode lined up for you. Alyssa Scolari [01:08]: So I'm going to tell you a little bit about who Michele is. Michele Benyo is a mom of two. She's a certified grief recovery specialist, an early childhood parent coach, and the founder of Good Grief Parenting. After her six-year-old son died of cancer, her three-year old daughter said, "Mommy, half of me is gone." This heartbreaking statement defined Michele's life purpose. Alyssa Scolari [01:38]: Her mission is twofold. To help parents through the unimaginable challenges of parenting while grieving the death of a child. And to help parents meet the unique needs of a child who has lost a sibling in the early childhood years. The desire of Michele's heart is to see families live forward after loss toward a future bright with possibilities and even joy. Alyssa Scolari [02:07]: So this is going to be, I take a deep breath and I encourage you all to take a deep breath with me because this is going to be a difficult, but hopefully very inspiring and supportive conversation. And I am just very grateful to have Michele here us today. So without further ado, let us introduce our first guest that we have had in quite a while on the show. Hi, Michele. Michele Benyo [02:36]: Hi Alyssa. I'm so happy to be here. Alyssa Scolari [02:40]: I'm so happy to have you. Again, thank you for your grace. It really means a lot to me. I know lots of the listeners are aware that I've had some health issues going on. I know as I mentioned just a few moments ago, I've had to reschedule Michele quite a few times, so thank you. I'm so happy to have you here. Alyssa Scolari [03:02]: We're talking about a tough topic today. To be perfectly transparent, I am a trauma therapist, so death of course is part of what I work with. But every therapist has certain things that they might not necessarily work with because it might be too triggering for them. And for me, I cannot see people who have lost children, because I have a hard time managing my own emotions around that. Alyssa Scolari [03:41]: This conversation is a very new one for me as well, and I'm really looking forward to hearing your story and learning, because in the learning, I'm hoping that it's going to help me to be able to help more people. Thank you for being here. I guess the first question that I'll ask you is, can you just let us know a little bit about your story? Michele Benyo [04:06]: Yes. Of course. Just to say that your reaction to child loss is so natural of course. I mean it's called the worst loss for a reason. And when I experienced child loss, I didn't know what to do with it. My story was that I was an early childhood parent educator. I had the best job in the world. I got to go to work every day and be with families of young children. Michele Benyo [04:33]: And I was myself, a mom of two young children. My son was four and a half. My daughter was 15 months. And then he got cancer. He was diagnosed with cancer at that age. And I didn't know what to do with that. That's not normal natural child development. And we had to go through a two and a half year journey. And my families in my classes went through it with us. Michele Benyo [05:02]: My son was an amazing teacher as well. He was a very tenderhearted boy and I just thought, oh, this child can't go through this. But he really went through it very well, like a trooper. I mean, he fought it, and that was alarming to me sometimes because he was really aggressive at times. But the doctors and nurses said, no, we want them to have some fight. Those are the kids who make it. Michele Benyo [05:29]: But my daughter was 15 months when her brother was diagnosed. They were very close. And when he died, she was three and a half. And she said to me, "Mommy, half of me is gone." The journey was hard enough, but then realizing what this had done to her, my loss was devastating, but hers was more heartbreaking than mine because here I have a three and a half year old daughter who is facing the rest of her life with half of her gone. Michele Benyo [06:08]: And I knew that was a true statement because of what I know about early childhood development and just the formation of identity and just the impact that this kind of emotional trauma can have on a child's development in those formative years. So I was desperate not to let her grow up broken, with half of her gone. And I thought, well, I'm in the right field. I know where the resources are, but I wasn't able to find any. Michele Benyo [06:40]: And I should say this was 20 years ago. My son died in the year 2000, and my daughter's now 25. I raised her up, learned a lot of things. There were no resources then. And I did need to figure it out on my own. There are a few more resources now, but I still find that siblings and anyone, any one of your listeners who is a bereaved sibling, whatever age, knows how overlooked that demographic is when it comes to grief, and especially really young children. Michele Benyo [07:20]: Not many of them articulate what my daughter did. We don't want to upset kids. Like you say, when a child dies and when a child's exposed to loss, we want to stay away from it. We don't want to deal with it. So I had to figure it out. And now what I learned over my 20 years of just getting my hands on everything I could is what I want to bring to families through Good Grief Parenting, which is the work that I do with parents who are raising young children after losing a child. Alyssa Scolari [07:57]: Yes. Before we began recording, I was going through and preparing and reading about what you do. And I thought to myself, this is such an important niche of people who are almost unnoticed in their grief process. It is unheard of. And I think back, the training I've had, and we have never ever shown any kind of spotlight on children who have lost siblings. I mean specifically children, early childhood, and what that looks like. Alyssa Scolari [08:34]: There is rarely ever a safe space for parents who lose a child, but still have one or multiple children to raise. What do we do? So, A, thank you so much for sharing your story. I'm so thankful. Can you talk a little bit about how did you get to beginning this? Like where was that moment that you shifted from, okay, I need to not just ... Okay, I'm helping myself with this, but you know what? I need to do more. Where did that shift happen for you? Michele Benyo [09:21]: Honestly, Alyssa, that shift happened right away, because I was an early childhood parent educator. It was what I do. Even though I had other careers, I was a high school teacher, I was a communications coordinator. Other careers before I did this, I started doing early childhood parent ed when I had my son. Michele Benyo [09:45]: And it was really where my heart was making good things happen for children and the adults who loved them and raised them. And that was in my heart kind of because of my own upbringing, feeling a little bit misunderstood as a child. My parents weren't bad parents by any means, but I learned I wanted to parent differently. Michele Benyo [10:06]: So I always had my eye on that piece. And here came something in my own life that was so huge that I didn't know anything about, even with my training. So I knew then that as I was going, I would need to, especially when I found nothing else out there that I would need to do this. But as I said, that was 20 years ago. Michele Benyo [10:30]: And I founded Good Grief Parenting only within the last five years, because my own grief and my own journey and my own focus on my daughter was so primary for me, I just wasn't able to really ... I knew I wasn't able to step into other people's stories yet. And now I am. Now she's raised. And so it really was very early on that I recognized that whatever I was able to glean, I was going to need to share. So this has been in my mind and has been sharpened and adjusted and learned over the last 20 years. Alyssa Scolari [11:14]: Wow! Now, can you talk a little bit about what's very important for adults and for parents to know about the way that younger children grieve in cases and tragedies like this? Michele Benyo [11:35]: I think I would address that by saying that where I start in working with families is looking at what we believe about grief and how we handle grief as a society. And the way we handle it as a society with adults is that it's something to avoid, something that we don't want to talk about. We don't want to bother the griever. And with children, that is so easy to do because they don't usually look like they're grieving. So what we know about children. Michele Benyo [12:06]: A story that I have about my daughter that gives me, again, just conviction in this statement that even really young children grieve, which not that many years ago, we didn't really believe they did. My daughter, as I mentioned was 15 months old when her brother went to the hospital. For the very first time he had to stay overnight. His dad went with him. We had been through a couple weeks of figuring out what wrong with him and getting this devastating diagnosis. Michele Benyo [12:37]: And that night I was home with her. And she was, as I said, 15 months old. Was wailing. She started wailing and making just an inhuman sound. It was alarming to me. I was scared of how she sounded. She was wandering around the house upstairs and down to the garage door and up to David's bed and just wandering. And as I would try to go to her and comfort her, she'd push me away and throw herself on the floor. Michele Benyo [13:11]: She was distraught with every cell in her little body. And I wasn't a mess. I was pretty composed, but she had been in our home when this disruption was happening. And she had absorbed it and she knew her brother and her dad were gone. And this was, she was grieving. She was grieving the loss of her security. And so that coupled with what she was able to say to me two and a half years later, made me just really, really understand how deeply young children grieve. Michele Benyo [13:48]: And so, they don't show it. Even after she said, mommy, half of me is gone, if you looked at her, she didn't. You wouldn't see in her like you might see in me that she was grieving. And we tend not to talk to them because we don't want to upset them. But I knew enough by the time we went through this, that she had been very involved with the whole journey, because we weren't going to leave her with neighbors and friends while the three of us were together. Not after that first night where she reacted the way she did. Michele Benyo [14:25]: She was with us in the children's hospital, and so she was very exposed to it. And I just knew that we would talk about this. That we were open about it. And I had to educate other adults around her that Deanna will talk about her brother. We talk about her brother. You'll talk about her brother. So the other thing is recognizing that kids need and want to talk about what they've been through. Whatever kind of trauma it is, they really need to be able to give it voice. Alyssa Scolari [15:00]: Yeah. And I think that that's very important to say that children grieve so much differently, and it's just not in the way that adults would grieve because typically for any type of loss, even adults who experience loss, there are simply no words. There are no words that could ever exist that convey what grief feels like. So as adults, we struggle to find the language. Alyssa Scolari [15:28]: So you look at a young child who doesn't even have their full range of vocabulary. Their brains are barely developed, and their grief is simply not going to come out in words, it's going to come out in other ways. Like you said, your daughter was throwing herself on the floor because grief and trauma is stored, first and foremost, in your body, before you even have words. Michele Benyo [15:53]: Yes. It will be in their play. That's why play therapy is so effective with children. That's what we did with Deanna in the beginning. She was three and a half, and we found a play therapist for her, so that that person could just listen to her and watch her play and talk to her about what she was playing because she was playing about bun bun. Her nickname was bunny. Michele Benyo [16:19]: They play about the person who died, and they might play about a funeral or some kind of thing like that, and we can learn so much by just paying attention to what they're doing. Like you say often, their play might be very aggressive and physical. And their behavior may be what we mistake as misbehavior, because they don't know how to get it out any other way. Alyssa Scolari [16:48]: Exactly. Exactly. Absolutely. Now, talking about play therapy, with Good Grief Parenting, can you explain like the general approach in your Good Grief Parenting? As I understand it, and please correct me if I'm wrong, you work with both the children who have lost a sibling as well as parents? Or do you work with the parents to help them to help their children? Michele Benyo [17:12]: I work with the parents. I don't work with the children because parents are going to be with these kids for the rest of their lives. And these kids are going to have needs for the rest of their lives. I came across a quote early on in my building of Good Grief Parenting. And it is so perfect to kind of explain what I do. And it's a quote by an author named Anne Roiphe, who wrote a book after her husband died. And in it, she said, there are two parts to grief. The first part is loss. And the second part is the remaking of life. Michele Benyo [17:49]: So when we have the support groups and the things that are there right after we've had the loss. Deanna went to support groups at the hospital, so did I. But then after our eight weeks, the rest of her life is ahead of her. I as a parent understood, and probably more than a lot of parents, because I was in the field of early childhood development, that this was going to affect so much about her life for the rest of her life. And how did I parent her with that grief-informed approach to parenting, and there was no one out there doing that? Michele Benyo [18:25]: So I really am the longer term look at raising these children, not just getting through the loss, because play therapy helps with that. The support groups and the art activities and the things that help kids process it, help with that. But then what about the rest of their lives when they're encountering all kinds of secondary losses? They go to school and do their little stories on their family and they are ... Deanna's sibling, I coin the term sibling by heart, because she's a sibling, but her brother isn't alive to look at her. She looks like an only. She's not an only. There's a big difference between a child who's born an only, and a child who is an only because their sibling died. Michele Benyo [19:21]: Yeah. So a lot of needs, a lot of behaviors that children are going to express. When a child experiences the loss of a sibling at a young age, they're going to reprocess that over and over again as they get older and have a better understanding of what that means to them and how that affected their life and changed their life, and the void that's there. Michele Benyo [19:46]: So I work with parents for the long haul. I am a certified grief specialist, and we start there, because before the parent can help the child, they need to make sure their needs are being met. And their grief is being held gently because you can't help your child with grief if you can't help yourself with grief. I start with that piece, and get parents stabilized in recognizing how some of the things we think about grief, that we avoid it. We don't talk about it. We don't talk to kids. How to do those things differently and in more healthy ways. And then we move into just, really, what does parenting look like? Alyssa Scolari [20:31]: Yeah. Yeah. So I really appreciate that you help. What I hear you saying is you help people in the, when they are more or less emerging from the immediate crisis and the acute trauma. I think that's very important because that's when so many people and so many supports pull out. Are you familiar with David Kessler? Michele Benyo [20:57]: Yes. Mm-hmm [affirmative]. Mm-hmm [affirmative]. Alyssa Scolari [21:01]: The book, was it The Sixth Stage of Grief book, Finding Meaning? I believe he put out a book a few years ago. I believe it's The Sixth Stage of Grief. I've talked about it on the podcast, so the listeners, I'm sure you've heard me talk about this before, is a phenomenal book. But one of the things that he talks about, and then I think so many people who come into my office who have had any kind of loss struggle with is in the beginning, when a loss first happens, everybody gathers round, and everybody is there and people are bringing food and people are checking in. Alyssa Scolari [21:34]: And then typically after the memorial service or the funeral or whatever kind of service there may be, it dies off. That is when things get so difficult, because of all of the, like you said, secondary losses. So that is where you come in to help support parents when they're sort of like, okay, now what? Now how do I keep breathing? Michele Benyo [22:07]: Yes. Yeah. That is just so difficult. And that is really, I think, where the difference about child loss is so apparent. I mean, that happens with any griever, supports go away later. But when it's a child, it's like it's this triple taboo topic to talk about the fact that a child died. And so people just don't want to entertain it. They don't want to upset the family, the parents, and they don't want to think about it because they've got their own little kids, and they don't want to think about the possibility that they could experience that. Michele Benyo [22:46]: I even remember that for myself. I had some friends who had serious things with their kids before my son was diagnosed. And I remember finding myself feeling bad for those families and thinking sort of statistically or whatever, that that was probably the closest I was going to get to it. Somehow thought that knowing these other families that were experiencing this meant that I wouldn't, in some crazy way. And then there I was. Yeah. Our relationships change so drastically with the people around us. Alyssa Scolari [23:30]: Yeah. They really do. They really do. Now, can you speak a little bit about the stages of grief. I know we were talking a little bit about this before we hit that record button. But for so many people out there, and I know that a quite a few listeners of the podcasts are therapists. And a lot of us, when it comes to grief, we are taught what feels like a very simple formula. Grief, here are the five stages. Now, David Kessler has now, there is a six stage, which is finding meaning. Tell me about your thoughts and your opinions on these stages of grief and how they are used, and if they are accurate to what people truly feel? Michele Benyo [24:24]: I don't think they are accurate. And I don't think they're helpful because so many people lean on it. I remember when I lost my son, I knew nothing about grief. And I had friends, people who were not professional in any way, quoting these stages to me, that I was now going to go through. And I didn't go through them. I didn't in any way, shape or form. And I kept thinking, why aren't I angry? Why aren't I this? Why aren't I that? And I felt like I was doing grief wrong. And I kept looking for these things to happen to me. Michele Benyo [25:12]: And I think the reason that there's so many articles out there and people out there who really misuse those stages, and I think that's the danger about them because Elisabeth Kübler-Ross didn't design these as the stages of grief. She stated these stages as what a person goes through when they themselves have had a terminal diagnosis, which is very different. Because I think if I had been diagnosed myself, those stages would've been a bit more apparent in me. Michele Benyo [25:48]: But I think so many people are not really trained in grief, and they grab a hold of what they've heard, and they want to offer something to the griever, so they offer this. And I have been just so appreciative to see that there are many other ways of viewing grief that are now available. I like to think about how William Worden talks about the different tasks that we have. And I love that we now talk about how significant continuing bonds are as opposed to what Freud used to tell us, which is get over the relationship and move on. Michele Benyo [26:30]: And so I think, as you know, because you work with people who go through trauma and you don't see ... People don't go through it the same. They all go through it in their own way. And you need to really, as you know, look at what they're experiencing, and honor that. And help people through it without them feeling like there's a particular way that they're supposed to do it. Michele Benyo [26:55]: So I stay away from the stages myself because I look at some of the other things that are going to be happening in the families that they're going to need to be dealing with. And the fact that since I look at sibling loss and early childhood sibling loss, that griever that I'm focused on, the sibling is going to change in so many ways as they mature and develop cognitively and experientially. Their grief is going to change drastically. Alyssa Scolari [27:28]: Yes. I'm sure it's continuously changing. Always. Now, I just want to make sure I heard you correctly because this is a fascinating little fact that I don't think many people know. Did you say that the five stages of grief were originally created in response to a person being diagnosed with a terminal illness? Michele Benyo [27:47]: Yes. Yeah. They were not the stages of grief. They were the stages that a person goes through, who's been diagnosed with a terminal illness. So, yeah. Kind of a different take. Alyssa Scolari [27:59]: Okay. So if I learned that in grad school, I apologize to my professors because that is so interesting how we have taken that and sort of just generalized it to all grief. All grief. That is really, really fascinating. So with your approach, what would you say, because I know sometimes you talk about the four keys to helping young children heal from grief. Can you share those with us? Michele Benyo [28:29]: Yes. I have a Good Grief Parenting framework that is sort of four pillars. I call them heartbeats. But then I also just offer these four simple things that I think any adult who works with children because ... So Michele's telling us now that we're supposed to deal with this with our kids, and we're supposed to talk to them. That feels scary, I think, to a lot of adults. Michele Benyo [28:56]: And so, first of all, the first key is, as I said, take care of yourself and make sure that you're meeting your own needs. And that doesn't mean just bubble baths and walks in the woods. It means figuring out what it is that you really need in the midst of this crisis that you're having, and this devastating loss that you've experienced. Michele Benyo [29:21]: And then making sure that you are speaking up for yourself and getting your needs met and taking time to do that and getting the support you need, even though you have young children. Parenting and grieving are the two toughest roles that adults and families have. And when you've got to do them at the same time, how do you do that? So self-care has to come first. As important as your little person is, and they are, they're relying on you totally, you need to take care of yourself first. Michele Benyo [29:58]: And then the other key is recognizing that rather than shying away from the loss and kind of avoiding it and kind of not wanting to bring it up to upset anybody, that continuing bonds piece of building the relationship and continuing it forward in new ways is so important for yourself and for your child because that sibling bond doesn't end. I have met adults who lost a sibling as a young child whose parents never talked about that child again. And they grew up with this void and with this feeling that something was off that they could never quite deal with. Michele Benyo [30:43]: And some of the research that I discovered later as I continue to look at this really showed that people who kept that relationship, bereaved siblings, bereaved as children who kept that relationship felt good about it. Felt good that they had it, even though their sibling wasn't there. So that continuing bonds, finding ways to honor that child in your family or that loved one in your family is a healing thing. So when people tell you, you shouldn't keep your child's things in the house or get rid of their picture or whatever, your gut feeling that, no, I want to keep these here, is correct. You are the one that knows what's best for you. So continuing bonds is a second key. Michele Benyo [31:35]: And the third one is conversation, having conversations with your child around this loss and around other griefs as well. I share the story of all of us experience grief in childhood first, and it's not always the death of a loved one. For me, the first grief that I remember was the loss of a floating toy. I was at the lake, and he got away. Wally the walrus, my riding floating toy that was so fun, got away from me, and he started to float off. And the adults who could swim, tried to get him, but the wind took him out of reach. Michele Benyo [32:19]: And I had to stand on the beach and watch him float. I watched him until he was a dot on the horizon. And I felt, I mean to this day, and that was decades ago, to this day I feel that feeling of, oh, I've lost him. He's gone. I'm never going to get him back. And that's what grief is. Mark Twain has a quote that says, and I'm paraphrasing it, but it's in all matters of grief, a child's loss of a doll and a king's loss of a crown are losses of the same weight. Michele Benyo [32:59]: The fourth key then is to honor grief, to honor childhood grief, so that kids can learn that grief is natural. Yes, it was just a toy, which is what many of us as adults would say, and we can get a new one. Or the dog is hit by a car, we'll get a new puppy. Well, fine, but it won't be that puppy. I mean grief is something that we need to help children recognize is very real and normal and natural. And we experience it, we experience loss, and then this is how we live forward. Those are the four keys. Michele Benyo [33:43]: The first one is that self-care. The second one is maintain continuing bonds. The third one is to invite conversation. And the fourth one is to honor grief, even children's grief. If I lost Wally the walrus today, it wouldn't be a case for grief with me, because I'm an adult, but it was for me as a child. Alyssa Scolari [34:06]: It was. Absolutely. Michele Benyo [34:07]: Yeah. Alyssa Scolari [34:08]: Incredible advice. Absolutely incredible. Thank you for that. I've learned so, so much, and I can only imagine that the listeners have learned so much too. Even phrases like siblings by heart and secondary loss, these are things that are not talked about a lot, but are so, so crucial and vital. We've also talked a lot about the importance of communication. How it is so important to continue this conversation. Now, is that what you would say is one of the biggest mistakes that parents or adults would make regarding children and grief? Michele Benyo [34:50]: Yes. I would put it at the very top. Alyssa Scolari [34:52]: Very top. Michele Benyo [34:55]: Yeah. That idea that we don't want to talk about it. Like my daughter, when she was 15 months old, she was picking up the vibes. I mean, when they're around us and we're experiencing this, they pick up on it. They're very perceptive. They're watching us. They're listening to us. They're feeling us. Michele Benyo [35:19]: And if we don't tell them what's happening, they are going to feel very insecure, very worried, very scared. They're going to see us being upset, and they're going to wonder, is mom going to be able to take care of me? She's not herself. So talking to them is really the most important thing we can do. And we don't need to tell them everything. We just need to tell them enough so that they know what's going on. Of course, be age appropriate. Michele Benyo [35:51]: And one of the things that is so counterintuitive for adults is that we really should use the word dead and died. That's the only word that really tells the child what happened. If we use those other words, they don't quite know what that means. Alyssa Scolari [36:11]: Right. It's very confusing for children to say words or phrases like, your brother or sister gained their wings. Or your brother and sister are in heaven. Like it's very confusing for kids. Michele Benyo [36:22]: Yes. Yes. And it's true that young children, three and a half younger, don't necessarily know what dead means, but they get the vocabulary word, just like they get all the other for vocabulary words that we give them, and they grow into understanding it. And we can tell them, your brother died. He can't talk to you anymore. He can't feel. His body stopped working. And he can't do these things anymore. You can tell him that we bury him or whatever, or just that they're not going to see him again. Michele Benyo [37:03]: And then let their questions guide the information that you give them. And that's why as they get older and they understand it more, then they're going to ask some of the questions they maybe didn't ask earlier. But they still know that what happened is this thing called dead. And so they never have any doubt that they're not going to see this person again. Alyssa Scolari [37:26]: Exactly. Exactly. Thank you. Michele Benyo [37:28]: And they're not afraid of that the way we are. Adults don't want to use those words. I had to learn to say my son died. I had to learn to be able to get that phrase out to anybody, let alone my daughter, because we don't want to describe it that way. But to my daughter, it's just a word. It's what happened. Kids don't shy away from that word the way adults do. Alyssa Scolari [37:55]: Right. Kids do not attach the same level of heaviness or stigma or shame to so many words. That's something children learn as they grow into adults. We learn so much from children. Michele Benyo [38:09]: We do. Alyssa Scolari [38:10]: We really do. We really do. That's a whole another podcast- Michele Benyo [38:14]: That is. Alyssa Scolari [38:17]: Michele, thank you so much for being here today. If people would like to find you, where can people reach you? Michele Benyo [38:24]: They can reach me at my website, goodgriefparenting.com. Right at the top of that page, they can download a copy of my Good Grief Guide. So it's the Good Grief Guide on goodgriefparenting.com. And in the Good Grief Guide, I actually do provide more information about some of these ideas of grief that are misleading for us and how we cope with it. As well as suggestions for actually how to talk to kids, because that's the other thing. Okay, you tell me to talk to my child, how exactly do I do that? Michele Benyo [39:03]: So I would just ask all of your listeners to download this Good Grief Guide, whether or not you know anyone right now, any child right now who's grieving, so that you have it when you need it. Or you have it to share with someone who may need it. And you don't have to go looking for how to do this. And hopefully you never will need it, but you may, and you may be able to support someone else. And then if you want to reach me personally, my website is the place to do that as well. So that's goodgriefparenting.com. Alyssa Scolari [39:39]: Yes. That's even a great resource to keep on hand for the therapist. My therapist listeners, something I definitely will be keeping on hand for myself as well. You all know the drill, the link is in the show notes. So go on over, check that out. Alyssa Scolari [39:58]: Michele, thank you again for joining me and for being so vulnerable, sharing your story. This is a really hard thing to talk about, but I learned so much and I appreciate the work that you are doing, because you are not alone in what you have gone through, and you are speaking so that others can feel supported. Thank you so much for everything that you are doing. Michele Benyo [40:27]: Thank you, Alyssa. I was very happy to have the opportunity to be here. Thank you. Alyssa Scolari [40:33]: Thanks for listening everyone. For more information, please head over to lightaftertrauma.com, or you can also follow us on social media. On Instagram we are @lightaftertrauma. And on Twitter it is @lightafterpod. Lastly, please head over to patreon.com/lightaftertrauma to support our show. We are asking for $5 a month, which is the equivalent to a cup of coffee at Starbucks. So please head on over again, that's patreon.com/lightaftertrauma. Thank you. And we appreciate your support. [singing].

B.O. Boys (Movie Box Office)
Encanto barely beats Ghostbusters: Afterlife to take #1 and House of Gucci brings adults back to the theaters. Plus, Licorice Pizza has a gobsmacking $87K per screen average! Is the arthouse back?

B.O. Boys (Movie Box Office)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 63:34


Yes, Encanto is #1, but its Ghostbusters: Afterlife's 45% drop that is the story of the weekend. Is this IP stronger than we thought?    Also, House of Gucci brought the adults back to the theater. Studios know that the rats need their cheese, but will they get the message that the adults need their brie?   And finally, Paul Thomas Anderson's Licorice Pizza lit up the arthouse this weekend in 4 theaters in NYC and LA. Is this greasing the tracks for Simon Rex's Red Rocket to pop off next weekend? The Boys give their two cents   Subscribe: https://theboboys.substack.com E-mail us: theboboyspodcast@gmail.com

Numbers by Barron's
One in Five Adults Have Gotten a Covid Booster

Numbers by Barron's

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 4:47


New variant concerns spark selloff. Johnson & Johnson isn't benefiting from boosters. And why Uber's investment in a Chinese company may become a liability. Host: Jacob Passy. Producer: Katie Ferguson. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Schrift - Ancient Teachings for Modern Times
Life Tip #9 - Listen Up! - Amos 3

The Schrift - Ancient Teachings for Modern Times

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 20:06


When a baby has a problem, it expresses itself by crying - sometimes very loudly. Adults, however, give off far more subtle clues when they are distressed; nevertheless, the distress is no less real. The prophet Amos and the play Woyzeck implore us to become better listeners.

Voices of Your Village
200 - Emotion processing for adults

Voices of Your Village

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 41:00


Happy 200th episode to all of our listeners out there! We are so glad you're on this journey with us.  In this episode we're chatting about emotion processing for adults. What does it look like for us to do this work? How can we best learn these skills for ourselves so we can support our kiddos in learning them too!    Love this podcast? Scroll down to leave a review! I read every one and they fill my heart with joy.   Connect with us on:   Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/seed.and.sew/   Podcast page: https://voicesofyourvillage.com   Music by: https://www.bensound.com/

Worst of The RIOT by RadioU
Worst of The RIOT for November 23rd, 2021

Worst of The RIOT by RadioU

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 49:31


Isaia fills in for Nikki him and Hudson break down what the best part of hosting Thanksgiving is. They also read over some of the worst reviews they have ever given off fast food restaurants. Adults running, attacking a wrestler, Miss America, and more on this episode of the Worst of The RIOT.

Radio Sweden
Andersson first female PM, Greens leave government, opposition budget approved, Covid boosters coming for adults

Radio Sweden

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 2:17


A round-up of the main headlines on November 23rd 2021. You can hear more reports on our homepage www.radiosweden.se, or in our app Sveriges Radio Play. Producer: Kris Boswell Presenter: Frank Radosevich

The Daily Sun-Up
Colorado attempts to address high numbers of adults 55+ leaving workforce; The Colorado River Compact

The Daily Sun-Up

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 12:59


Check out our sponsors! Gaylord Rockies: https://ad.doubleclick.net/ddm/trackclk/N4406.3781527COLORADOSUN/B26479838.315145984;dc_trk_aid=510089669;dc_trk_cid=160176852;dc_lat=;dc_rdid=;tag_for_child_directed_treatment=;tfua=;ltd= Adults age 55 and older are one of the groups with the biggest number of workers leaving the labor force during the pandemic. The reasons for that are many. But older workers often find it difficult when trying to re-enter the workforce or to change jobs. That's a problem that existed before the pandemic, too. Now, as Colorado Sun reporter Tamara Chuang learned, the state and a number of organizations are working to fix the problem. And employers are beginning to see a benefit to hiring older workers. She spoke with fellow Sun reporter John Ingold about the issue. Read more at ColoradoSun.com See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Yang Daily - Andrew Yang News
Episode 458 – 11/23 – Pfizer for kids, and boosters for adults, as COVID spikes, U.S. democracy downgraded, and More!

Yang Daily - Andrew Yang News

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 6:35


In today's episode: FDA and CDC approve Pfizer for kids and boosters for adults, COVID cases spike across Europe and U.S. as winter season begins, gerrymandering abounds as dozens of states redraw maps, U.S. democracy downgraded by international watchdogs, and More! Links and transcript found here: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1nD0GDFdWF22BCm2uTAYaqZOgc1_dmWtOqZ12inNIM2U/edit?usp=sharing Help make this podcast possible at: https://www.patreon.com/YangDaily Message me @YangDailyCast or YangDailyPodcast@gmail.com! YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCcx_EbiZhhRhvvjFdZryPCQ/videos

biobalancehealth's podcast
Healthcast 575 - Why you absolutely need to take oral Vitamin D3

biobalancehealth's podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 17:02


https://www.biobalancehealth.com/healthcast-blog/ Vitamin D is not just a vitamin, as most people think, it is a HORMONE called Cholecalciferol that is required for general health, thick bones, for making muscle and your immune system, your brain function, and for protecting you from diabetes, heart disease and cancer. Vitamin D also acts to assist your body in absorbing calcium and zinc from your food and supplements.  Without Vitamin D3 these vital minerals go through your body without absorption, and you just excrete them without being able to use them. The vitamin-hormone Vitamin D comes in several forms.  The form D2 comes in natural food sources such as salmon, swordfish, egg yolk and fortified foods such as milk, orange juice and other milk products like yogurt.  However, Vitamin D2 is not a potent form of Vitamin D. Vitamin D is also produced by your skin in the melanin when you go out on a sunny day, however you would have to be out daily for most of the sunny hours, without sunscreen, at a latitude like where Phoenix and Destin Florida is or further south to absorb enough Vitamin D from the sun. Your skin absorption in the 21st century is usually minimal since medical science has promoted the use of sunscreen every day all day long which blocks our absorption of Vitamin D. Your skin tone also alters how much Vitamin D you absorb from the sun.  if you have very light skin and burn easily it takes less time in the sun to absorb the same amount of vitamin D than someone who has dark skin.  It is a given that most people who do not live in the southern US and have dark skin are not getting enough Vitamin D from the sun even if they work outdoors all day long, so they must take a supplement orally or in a shot of VitaminD3. The recommended oral dose is 5,000 MIUs of Vitamin D3 every day to receive enough Vitamin D in their body. For all people with all skin types, you should be out in the sun for an hour before you cover yourself in sunscreen.  The sun gives you vitamin D, but also has other benefits. Remember no matter what skin type you have, the tanner you get the less vitamin D3 you absorb.  It is a protective mechanism to prevent overdosing with D from the sun for those people who have dark skin and live in the sun around the equator. What does it really do? For one thing Vitamin D is essential to your immune system.  If you want to be immune to viruses and bacteria as well as cancer you must have a normal blood level of vitamin D.  The accepted level is 30 from the US government but it is preferable to have a blood level of 40-100 for optimal health. The other jobs of Vitamin D include Building muscle and bone, normalizing blood pressure and Type 2 Diabetes, preventing heart disease, stroke, and dementia. If you want to stay healthy throughout your life you should take oral Vitamin D3 5,000 miu per day.   The Actions of Vitamin D3: We have already listed the important job of supporting your immune system to prevent infection and cancer.  The addition Vitamin D supports Muscle and bone.  Without Vitamin D, children get a disease of soft bones that bow their legs and prevent normal height, called Ricketts. It was common in the early industrial age when children were kept inside factories all day long to work instead of playing outside.  Adults we must have Vitamin D to keep our muscles strong, and our bones thick.  Muscle and bone are in a state of homeostasis which means they are growing and breaking down all of the time.  If breakdown is more rapid than growth the bones become thin and are apt to break.  The other necessary elements to keep bone and muscle strong are Calcium, Magnesium Vitamin C, and Vitamin K2. For optimal skeletal muscle (which includes the heart) you have to have adequate vitamin D levels in your blood. For example, patients in a recent study increased their muscle fiber size by taking 4,000 IUs of Vitamin D3 a day. They also made more Type II muscle fibers which are responsible for rising from a chair or lifting things over your head. Type two muscles are located in your hips, back and shoulders.  Another study showed the just 1,000 IUs of Vitamin D3 increased muscle strength by 25%, without any other changes in diet or activity.  Muscle training and exercise are also important, but you won't get the results from just taking Vitamin D, or exercise alone, that you would if you take Vitamin D3 + Exercise + Testosterone. If you are over 50 and don't exercise while you take Vitamin D and replace Testosterone with pellets. Type 2 Diabetes also affects 50% of our population, primarily from eating too many carbs, without exercising, but low vitamin D contributes to the development of diabetes and obesity as well. All people who are Insulin Resistant, who have Type 2 Diabetes or Prediabetes should be taking 5,000 MIU of vitamin D3 a day.   Summary: The easiest and cheapest way to prevent heart disease, stroke, osteoporosis, cancer, type 2 diabetes, and dementia, among others because it improves your immune system too. If you are Latino, Black, Italian, Israeli, or Greek, in, fact if your genetics are from any country around the Mediterranean, or just have dark skin, you must take Vitamin D3 to stay healthy! It is over the counter and relatively cheap.  You should take Vitamin D3 in oil-capsule form for good absorption. Remember….Taking Vitamin D3 doesn't replace going outside for sun absorption.  It is in addition to being in the sun! Sunscreen prevents Vitamin D3 absorption.   Vitamin D may cut heart disease risk in dark-skinned adults A study to be presented at the Experimental Biology 2021 virtual meeting found that taking vitamin D supplements may help people with dark skin, including African Americans, to reduce their risk for heart disease.”Promoting adequate vitamin D status in young, otherwise healthy adults may improve nitric oxide availability and blood vessel function, and thereby serve as a prophylactic to reduce risk of future development of hypertension or cardiovascular disease," says researcher Tony Wolf.  Full Story: Medical Dialogues (4/27) 

My Amazon Guy
How to Use the Product Opportunities Explorer to Find New Amazon FBA Products to Sell

My Amazon Guy

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 4:47


00:00 Product Opportunity Explorer00:19 Browsing Product Opportunity Explorer01:59 What kind of search terms people are using03:40 Alternative to Blackbox with Helium10Learn about explorer: https://sellercentral.amazon.com/help/hub/reference/NJ4YRTXWLMBY38U?ref=efph_NJ4YRTXWLMBY38U_cont_G2&Opportunity ExplorerOpportunity Explorer is a tool to explore customer demand for new product ideas. To access this tool, go to Opportunity Explorer or navigate in the Menu to Growth Product Opportunity Explorer.Note: Opportunity Explorer is currently in limited release in US and Germany, and will release more broadly in US and Europe through 2021 and 2022. If you do not have access yet and are interested, contact us. Refer to the FAQ on this page to determine if you need to request access or configure User Permissions.Opportunity Explorer allows you to understand Amazon customer search and purchasing behavior to evaluate if there is unmet customer demand and an opportunity for you to meet that demand through new products. You can explore up-to-date and accurate data on customer needs and the current selection on Amazon. Customer needs and selection are bundled together into niches. Each niche has a unique set of characteristics, which determine the economic potential for new products in the niche. To find your new niche, you can enter search terms, or browse the store taxonomy, as a customer would. Summary data is included in the search results to help you compare related niches of different sizes. Each niche has a detail page where you can view additional tabs of data including current products, top search terms, and statistics about the launch potential for new products.What is a niche?A niche is a collection of customer search terms and products representing a customer's need. Customers demonstrate their purchase needs when they enter search terms on the store. Amazon combines these search terms into clusters based on the products that customers view or purchase. Search terms and products can meet more than one customer need and can be in multiple niches.How is niche data constructed?Niches include the top related Amazon customer search terms and the top related clicked or purchased products. The number of search terms displayed is currently capped based on which search terms have the greatest search volume. Likewise, products in a niche are limited to those receiving the majority of the clicks and purchases from the search terms shown.Use the following glossary to better understand the data presented to you in Opportunity Explorer:Search Results page: The resulting page after searching, browsing, or filtering for niches, The results page shows summary metrics for each of the returned niches.Term Definition ExampleCustomer Need Similar products that meet a customer's need are called a "niche". The name of the niche is defined as the top-ranked search term, by the search volume. Shark cordless vacuumTop Search Terms Additional search terms that customers entered for the customer need of this niche. Elderberry Gummies, Elderberry for Adults, Elderberry 1000mgSearch Volume (Past 360 days) The total number of times customers entered any of the search terms in this niche on Amazon in the past 360 days. 3,600Search Volume Growth (Past 360 days) Across all of the search terms shown in this niche, the percentage change in search term volume in the past year (0-360 days), compared to the volume from the previous year (360-720 days). 321.98%Search Volume (Past 90 days) The total number of times customers entered any of the search terms in this niche on Amazon in the past 90 days. 3,600Support the show (https://www.paypal.com/paypalme/myamazonguy)

Montana Public Radio News
COVID-19 booster shots are now available to all adults

Montana Public Radio News

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 1:16


Following the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's endorsement of COVID-19 booster shots for all fully vaccinated adults, state health officials say Montanans wanting a booster should have no trouble finding one.

Haunt Weekly
Haunt Weekly - Episode 312 - October/November News

Haunt Weekly

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 50:47


This week on Haunt Weekly we're doing the news, and it has been another busy news cycle to say the least. Not only do we have the end of the 2021 haunt season to go over, but the aftermath of that season carries with it tons of news of its own. Luckily for us, it's an interesting mix of happy and serious stories this week as we talk about an arson at one haunt, another haunt run by the developmentally disabled and much, much more. This Week's Episode Includes: Intro Question of the Week Conference Reminders Parker Haunted House Destroyed in "Suspicious" Blaze (https://www.9news.com/article/news/local/parker-brush-fire-haunted-house-destroyed/73-53796481-4d81-4710-9268-2a73b279fc92) Incident at KLAQ Haunted House Under Investigation (https://kvia.com/news/el-paso/2021/10/30/incident-at-klaq-haunted-house-under-investigation/) Local Youth Run Haunted House (https://kvia.com/news/el-paso/2021/10/30/incident-at-klaq-haunted-house-under-investigation/) Can a Haunted House Even Scare Us in 2021? (https://www.vox.com/the-highlight/22724451/blood-manor-haunted-houses-covid-19) Adults with Developmental Disabilities Re-Energized with Creation of Haunted House (https://www.abcactionnews.com/news/region-pinellas/adults-with-developmental-disabilities-re-energized-with-creation-of-haunted-house) Chandler Community Comes Together to Repair Haunted House Maze (https://www.azfamily.com/news/chandler-community-comes-together-to-repair-haunted-house-maze/article_cd4b018c-3617-11ec-8006-53122423723b.html) Just in Time for Halloween, Zillow Has Created an Interactive Virtual Haunted House Tour (https://www.housebeautiful.com/lifestyle/a38113624/zillow-interactive-virtual-haunted-house/) Wendy's treats Jacksonville to Haunted “House of Fryght” Pop-up Event (https://www.news4jax.com/news/local/2021/10/25/wendys-treats-jacksonville-to-only-haunted-house-of-fryght-pop-up-event/) Woman turns Comstock Park house into Haunted Fairy Tale Display for Halloween (https://www.wzzm13.com/article/features/woman-turns-comstock-park-house-into-haunted-fairy-tale-display-for-halloween/69-32e8d442-8d67-47fc-ad7b-1756e5ca693f?fbclid=IwAR0obeUxKDNdfeXRPb1a4X90lPtozkhTuhe5eCMg8pA65bL0GYst1xc) A Once Small Hayride, Haunted House Event in Steens Now Draws Visitors From All Over North Mississippi (https://cdispatch.com/news/2021-10-29/a-once-small-hayride-haunted-house-event-in-steens-now-draws-visitors-from-all-over-north-mississippi/) Conclusions All in all, this is one episode you do NOT want to miss!

Not Another Fitness Podcast: For Fitness Geeks Only
Episode 124: 5 Tips To Eliminate Holiday Weight Gain

Not Another Fitness Podcast: For Fitness Geeks Only

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 34:33


Weight gain during the holidaysIs it real?Discussion of the researchEat more protein4x40 or 4x30 approachRelax on the big dayHedonic and homeostatic reasons to eatGo moveWalk or exerciseDaily body weight measurementsResearchMore water and electrolytesRelationship between hunger and thirstGetting salt is mainly done via eatingCraving salty foodsResearchAffiliate link: Drink LMNT | Paleo-Keto Friendly Hydration | Zero Sugar Electrolytes – Drink The Flex Diet Podcast is brought to you by the Flex Diet Certification. Go to https://flexdiet.com/ for 8 interventions on nutrition and recovery. If you're outside the enrollment window, sign up for my free newsletter, and you'll be notified when it opens!ReferencesHoliday Weight Gain?Díaz-Zavala, R. G., Castro-Cantú, M. F., Valencia, M. E., Álvarez-Hernández, G., Haby, M. M., & Esparza-Romero, J. (2017). Effect of the Holiday Season on Weight Gain: A Narrative Review. Journal of obesity, 2017, 2085136. https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/2085136https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5514330/Roberts SB, Mayer J. Holiday weight gain: fact or fiction? Nutr Rev. 2000 Dec;58(12):378-9. doi: 10.1111/j.1753-4887.2000.tb01839.x. PMID: 11206847.https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/11206847/Kaviani S, vanDellen M, Cooper JA. Daily Self-Weighing to Prevent Holiday-Associated Weight Gain in Adults. Obesity (Silver Spring). 2019 Jun;27(6):908-916. doi: 10.1002/oby.22454. PMID: 31119881.https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31119881/Protein EffectsWesterterp-Plantenga MS, Lemmens SG, Westerterp KR. Dietary protein - its role in satiety, energetics, weight loss and health. Br J Nutr. 2012 Aug;108 Suppl 2:S105-12. doi: 10.1017/S0007114512002589. PMID: 23107521.https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/23107521/Cuenca-Sánchez M, Navas-Carrillo D, Orenes-Piñero E. Controversies surrounding high-protein diet intake: satiating effect and kidney and bone health. Adv Nutr. 2015 May 15;6(3):260-6. doi: 10.3945/an.114.007716. PMID: 25979491; PMCID: PMC4424780.https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/25979491/Phillips SM, Chevalier S, Leidy HJ. Protein "requirements" beyond the RDA: implications for optimizing health. Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. 2016 May;41(5):565-72. doi: 10.1139/apnm-2015-0550. Epub 2016 Feb 9. PMID: 26960445.https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/26960445/Non-exercise activity thermogenesisLevine JA. Non-exercise activity thermogenesis (NEAT). Best Pract Res Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2002 Dec;16(4):679-702. doi: 10.1053/beem.2002.0227. PMID: 12468415.https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/30370831/Malaeb S, Perez-Leighton CE, Noble EE, Billington C. A "NEAT" Approach to Obesity Prevention in the Modern Work Environment. Workplace Health Saf. 2019 Mar;67(3):102-110. doi: 10.1177/2165079918790980. Epub 2018 Oct 29. PMID: 30370831.https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/12468415/Hunger and ThirstAugustine V, Lee S, Oka Y. Neural Control and Modulation of Thirst, Sodium Appetite, and Hunger. Cell. 2020 Jan 9;180(1):25-32. doi: 10.1016/j.cell.2019.11.040. PMID: 31923398; PMCID: PMC7406138.https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31923398/Bray N. A taste for hunger and thirst. Nat Rev Neurosci. 2020 Nov;21(11):592-593. doi: 10.1038/s41583-020-00380-1. PMID: 32913320.https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32913320/Mattes RD. Hunger and thirst: issues in measurement and prediction of eating and drinking. Physiol Behav. 2010 Apr 26;100(1):22-32. doi: 10.1016/j.physbeh.2009.12.026. Epub 2010 Jan 11. PMID: 20060847; PMCID: PMC2849909.https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/20060847/McKiernan F, Houchins JA, Mattes RD. Relationships between human thirst, hunger, drinking, and feeding. Physiol Behav. 2008 Aug 6;94(5):700-8. doi: 10.1016/j.physbeh.2008.04.007. Epub 2008 Apr 13. PMID: 18499200; PMCID: PMC2467458.https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/18499200/McKiernan F, Hollis JH, McCabe GP, Mattes RD. Thirst-drinking, hunger-eating; tight coupling? J Am Diet Assoc. 2009 Mar;109(3):486-90. doi: 10.1016/j.jada.2008.11.027. PMID: 19248867; PMCID: PMC2671201.https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/19248867/ 

AP Audio Stories
US opens COVID boosters to all adults, urges them for 50+

AP Audio Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 0:52


AP Audio Stories
US advisers support expanding COVID boosters to all adults

AP Audio Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021


“54 Days of Roses”
Day 32 - Sorrowful Mysteries in Thanksgiving

“54 Days of Roses”

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 29:54


Hello Family! Thank you for joining today's Rosary Prayer. This is day 32 of our 54-day Rosary Novena.On Tuesday, November 16, 2021, we went live on Instagram with Ernesto Vega, Coordinator of the  Hispanic Ministry of Faith Formation for Adults for the Office of Religious Education at the Archdioceses of Los Angeles. I want to invite you to head over to our Instagram page and check out the discussion about Mental Health, Our Lady of Guadalupe, and Faith Formation.  In the next couple of days, I will do my best to extract the audio and publish the discussion on the podcast and YouTube. I also would like to ask for your help as we would like to publish another season of 54 Days Of Roses. Season 6 would start on February 23 and would end on April 17. A great way to prepare our hearts for Easter Sunday. If the Holy Spirit leads you to support our ministry, please help us pay it forward by donating on our website at www.54daysofroses.com. You can also pay it forward on our Venmo account @Novena54daysofroses. Or you can Zelle at prayers@54daysofroses.com You can also help us pay it forward by sharing the podcast with your friends and loved ones and rating and reviewing the podcast wherever you listen to this episode.Day 32 Sorrowful Mysteries in ThanksgivingWith that, let's get started; today, We're praying the Sorrowful Mysteries in Thanksgiving for our petitions. Our Lady of the Most Holy Rosary, we offer you this Rosary Prayer in thanksgiving for your intercession with Jesus Christ our Lord as we pray for Mental Health.Blessed Mother, we pray for all teachers, parents, mentors, and students. Blessed Mother, we pray for the intentions that we hold deep in our hearts. We pray for those listening to this rosary prayer.  We pray for our family on Instagram, Clubhouse. We pray for the intentions of Miranda, Kathleen, Jasmine, Suzanne, Louanne, Windell, Beth, Gabriela Steve and their children, Nilton, Zilmira, Dana, Don Mia, James, Mandee, Cynthia, Thomas, Ricky, Juan, Ken, Sanja, Luka, John, and Cherie. With love, Maritza MendezWebsite:https://www.54daysofroses.com/Support our Ministry:https://www.54daysofroses.com/payitforwardInstagramhttps://www.instagram.com/54daysofroses/Audio Engineerhttps://conceptualpodcasting.com/podcastsThe song "Meditation 2" created by Patrick Buddehttps://www.patrickbudde.com

The Daily Dose: Maryland Confronts COVID-19
All adults now eligible for Pfizer and Moderna boosters

The Daily Dose: Maryland Confronts COVID-19

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 18:32


CDC advisers approved Moderna and Pfizer boosters for all adults today. Baltimore County volunteer fire companies, which have been hit hard during the pandemic, will not see a dime of ARPA money. And the Baltimore faith community tries to heal in the wake of a year of 300 homicides, including the recent death of church worker Evelyn Player.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

StudioTulsa
Discussing statewide efforts to advocate for and actively support children and adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities

StudioTulsa

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 28:58


Our two guests, both based in OKC, are noted experts: Wanda Felty is with OU's Center for Learning and Leadership, and RoseAnn Duplan is with the Oklahoma Disability Law Center.

KHON 2GO
NOV. 19: FDA approves Pfizer and Moderna Boosters for adults 18+; U.S. House approved President Biden's "Build Back Better" plan

KHON 2GO

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 8:39


Listen to your daily news with KHON 2GO podcast from Monday to Friday at 8 a.m.

Pharma Intelligence Podcasts
Pink Sheet Podcast: COVID-19 Boosters For Adults, Aduhelm And Part B, Califf For FDA Commissioner

Pharma Intelligence Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 41:25


Pink Sheet reporters and editors discuss the authorization of COVID-19 vaccine booster shots for all adults, Aduhelm's impact on Medicare Part B and rejection by EMA, and the nomination of ex-FDA commissioner Robert Califf for another term.

WSJ Minute Briefing
FDA Clears Covid-19 Boosters for All Adults

WSJ Minute Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 2:08


Plus: Austria to impose vaccine mandate, return to lockdown. U.S. House passes roughly $2 trillion social spending and climate bill. Trenae Nuri reports. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

AP Audio Stories
US expands COVID boosters to all adults, final hurdle ahead

AP Audio Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 0:47


News 8 Daily
FDA approves boosters for all vaccinated adults (18+)

News 8 Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 9:00


FDA approves boosters for all adults, CDC meets about boosters today, Rittenhouse deliberations postponed to next week, vote on House floor after delay on Build Back Better Act, Colts, a fun night on Mass Ave. and more See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

TODAY
November 19: Breaking — House passes President Biden's “Build Back Better” plan. FDA authorizes Pfizer and Moderna booster shots for all adults. Storms set to slow Thanksgiving travel. Christmas tree shortage.

TODAY

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 31:27


Breaking — the House passes President Biden's nearly $2 trillion “Build Back Better” plan. Plus, the FDA has authorized Pfizer and Moderna booster shots for all adults. Also, extreme weather and supply chain issues are leading to a nationwide Christmas tree shortage. And, two major storms are set to slow the start of a busy Thanksgiving travel week — Al Roker has your latest forecast.

Jeff Caplan's Afternoon News
Does Utah have enough supply for COVID-19 booster shots for all adults?

Jeff Caplan's Afternoon News

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 11:01


See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

All Autism Talk
Enriching Life Experiences for Young Autistic Adults

All Autism Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 31:00


Heather Tarczan, Executive Director of Urban Autism Solutions joins us to talk about how their program is working to build opportunity and community for young adults in Chicago. Every year, thousands of teens with autism age out of high school. For the majority of these young adults, this is the end of their autism-based services and support. Urban Autism Solutions provides a multitude of social and vocational opportunities for individuals through innovative, community-based programs including a Transition Academy and 1.2-acre Growing Solutions Farm.   For more information: https://www.urbanautismsolutions.com/ https://www.facebook.com/UrbanAutismSolutions/ https://www.instagram.com/urbanautismsolutions/ https://www.linkedin.com/company/urban-autism-solutions/   Interested in ABA services for your child? Contact Us: https://lrnbvr.com/contact Interested in a career in the ABA field? Apply Now: https://lrnbvr.com/apply-now All Autism Talk (allautismtalk.com) is sponsored by LEARN Behavioral (learnbehavioral.com).

Hard Factor
11/18/21: Capital Punishment, Adults Attracted to Minors, Revenge Porn Mayors and Pre-Historic Park

Hard Factor

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 79:44


The expected exoneration of two of the three convicted killers of Malcolm X set for today (00:21:20). Julius Jones is set for execution today in OK despite protests and petitions (00:26:30). MAPs or ‘Minor Attracted Persons exist and want people to know for some reason (00:35:30). Wooly mammoths are coming back (101:00:25). A mayor goes hard on revenge porn in Reddit (01:08:55). (00:00:00) - Timestamps Cup of Coffee in the Big Time (00:04:55) - Fun Fact: Back in the early 2000s on Playstation 1, FIFA 2001 and Gran Turismo 2 were scratch and sniff cds (00:07:25) - Holidays: National Princess Day, Great American Smoke Day, Mickey Mouse's Birthday (00:08:12) - This Day in History: 1978 - The Jonestown Massacre (00:09:00) - The Iranian women's team goalie has came out and said she is not a woman and will sue the Jordanian football association for accusing her of being a man (00:11:19) - The Chinese tennis star who accused a CCP member of assault and disappeared allegedly sent an email saying she was fine according to the Chinese state; (00:12:48) - Brass Against singer Sophia Urista apologized for peeing on a fan on stage saying she's all about the music and not a shock performer (00:14:53) - #3 - RIP to rapper and music exec Young Dolph who was shot and killed in Memphis on Wednesday (00:18:10) - #2 - The QAnon Shaman has been sentenced to 41 months in prison (00:21:20) - #1A - Two of the three men who were convicted and sentenced to life in prison for the murder of Malcolm X are set to be exonerated today in Manhattan District Court (00:26:30) - #1B - Julius Jones a man convited of the 2002 murder of Paul Howell is set to be killed by the state of Oklahoma today despite a petition with over 6 million signatures and some new information that has come to light post conviction (00:35:30) - A teacher has been placed on administrative leave for their book titled ‘A Long Dark Shadow: Minor Attracted People and Their Pursuit of Dignity' outlining their stance on adults being attracted to minors as okay if they don't act on it TikTok International Moment (00:54:12) - Argentina - A woman has become the second person ever to contract HIV and naturally cure it (00:58:26) - France/UK - The largest sports distributor 'Decathlon' has stopped the sale of canoes in North France to discourage migrants traveling the English Channel to the UK (101:00:25) - Siberia - A company is trying to resurrect the Wooly Mammoth Jurassic Park style (01:08:55) - The Mayor of Cambridge, Maryland Andrew Bradshaw is facing serious jail time after being charged with 50 counts of posting revenge porn of his ex on Reddit These stories, and much more, brought to you by our incredible sponsors: http://beanbox.com/hardfactorholiday - Give the coffee fanatic in your life an unforgettable coffee-tasting experience with Bean Box and get 15% off purchases of $40 or more. http://lightstream.com/factor - Get a special interest rate discount and save even more on a loan to consolidate your credit card debt http://trycaliper.com/factor - Get 20% off your first order of Caliper CBD when you use promo code FACTOR Predicit: Get up to $40 matched when you deposit at Predictit.org/promo/hardfactor40 and make money betting on politics!

AJNR Podcasts
November 2021 Podcast

AJNR Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 19:29


Dr. Manu Goyal joins Dr. Hiatt to discuss MR Imaging Differences in the Circle of Willis between Healthy Children and Adults, followed by Dr. Raymond Stegeman, sharing insights into his article Uniform Description of Perioperative Brain MRI Findings in Infants with Severe Congenital Heart Disease: Results of a European Collaboration. Both are featured in this month's issue of AJNR. (19:28)

Adults Talking Anime +
Adults Talking Boruto... WHY Boruto WHY?!

Adults Talking Anime +

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 26:01


This week on ATA+ we talk spoilers on Boruto and one very big spoiler but lets be honest it's been almost a month since it happened. Is it even a spoiler anymore? We talk bad parents, and give out some fitness tips but for legal reasons we are not dieticians, or doctors. Do not take our advice for you health or fitness ;) Follow us on the socials!!! ATA+ https://www.instagram.com/adultstalkinganime/ (https://www.instagram.com/adultstalkinganime/) Inga D https://www.instagram.com/ingad_cosplay/ (https://www.instagram.com/ing)ibear/ Thor: https://www.instagram.com/thor_draperjr/ (https://www.instagram.com/thor_draperjr/) Twitter: ATA+: https://twitter.com/AdultsAnime (https://twitter.com/AdultsTAnime) Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/adultstalkinganime?fan_landing=true (https://www.patreon.com/adultstalkinganime) Support this podcast

Duluth News Tribune Minute
All Minnesota adults could be eligible for vaccine booster by end of the week

Duluth News Tribune Minute

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 6:01


Here's a look at the top headlines from around the Northland for Wednesday, Nov. 17, 2021.  The Duluth News Tribune Minute is a product of Forum Communications Company and is brought to you by reporters at the Duluth News Tribune, Superior Telegram and Cloquet Pine Journal. Find more news throughout the day at duluthnewstribune.com.

TODAY
November 17: FDA expected to authorize Pfizer booster for all adults. Jury deliberations in the Kyle Rittenhouse trial go into day two. What to expect if you are traveling for Thanksgiving. New documentary on Janet Jackson's Super Bowl wardrobe malfuncti

TODAY

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 31:50


The FDA is expected to authorize the Pfizer booster shot for all adults — this, as Covid cases are on the rise. Plus, the latest in the Kyle Rittenhouse trial as jury deliberations go into day two. Also, with Thanksgiving just eight days away, millions of Americans are getting ready to travel — what to expect if you are planning on traveling for the holidays. And, we're talking with the director of a new “New York Times” documentary about the infamous wardrobe malfunction involving Janet Jackson and Justin Timberlake at the Super Bowl.

Kolbecast
Episode 73: Through Beauty and Technology

Kolbecast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 41:36


AMDG.  Early in the podcast comeback, we talked with Kolbe drama teacher Dolores Mihaliak about the timeless significance of dramatic arts and timely capabilities of technology.  Dolores rejoins Bonnie today to have a conversation about a new way to experience the Camino de Santiago, a pilgrimage route in Spain which dates back to the days of the apostles.  Homeschool graduate and current Ave Maria University student Leila Castillo tells Bonnie and Dolores more about this cinematic pilgrimage, as well as how she honed her communication and media skills while homeschooling and how she chose to rise to opportunities in her path.  Learn more about the movie and Ahava Productions via these links:   "Santiago: THE CAMINO WITHIN" -- watch the trailer and rent the film (English & Spanish)!  ECHO series (2016) on the US Catholic Catechism for Adults that Leila assisted with (English & Spanish)  Music that Moves the Soul  Consider hosting a Pilgrim Party to enjoy the film with friends, relatives, and parishioners!    Follow Ahava Productions on Instagram @ahava_productions   Follow Ahava Productions on Facebook @AhavaProductions    Videos Leila produced with her siblings in 2020:  "The Five First Saturdays Devotion" and "Visiting Jesus!" Documentary (Scroll to the bottom, under "Castillo Kids CK101 Channel)  "Visiting Jesus!" Documentary also found here (first video on this page)    Other relevant links:  Kolbecast Episode 3 with Dolores Mihaliak   Camino pilgrimage page on Google Arts & Culture  Interested in Kolbe Academy's offerings? Visit kolbe.org.     Look for the Kolbecast in your favorite podcast app and subscribe for effortless episode delivery.  Have a suggestion or question for the Kolbecast team? Write to us at podcast@kolbe.org. 

My Biz Bestie
104. Clutter and Organization Strategies For Adults and Kids with Laurie Palau

My Biz Bestie

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 46:04


Getting organized can be especially challenging for neurodiverse people. Sometimes it seems as if our environments fall in either one of two extremes—everything neatly in place or everything in total chaos. It's like a battle of the OCD versus the ADD.  But one woman's clutter might be another woman's “I'm okay with this!” We all have a unique pain point when it comes to organization and time management. Can't we slide along the spectrum instead of living in the extremes? How do we create a functional environment for ourselves within all of our stuff—one that reduces stress and overwhelm, and fosters productivity? And can we teach our kids to do the same? This week on the podcast, my guest is a fellow podcaster, author, and clutter expert Laurie Palau. With neurodiversity in her own family, Laurie has figured out a way to meet adults and kids where they are, by giving them strategies to tackle their unique issues with all types of clutter—both tangible and intangible.  Clutter is really a symptom of something bigger, Laurie says. If we determine “the why of clutter,” we can take actionable steps to make our lives simpler and easier. Warning: You may have to dive deep into some emotions, like guilt and fear. But I know you can do it. If just the idea of getting organized freaks you out, listen in to our conversation for practical, tactical advice on where to get started. And for ways to communicate with your kids to help them manage their clutter too. (You'll never tell your kid to “go clean your room” the same way again!)   About Laurie Palau: Laurie Palau is the author of the book HOT MESS: A PRACTICAL GUIDE TO GETTING ORGANIZED; host of the popular weekly podcast This ORGANIZED Life; and founder of Simply B Organized, a lifestyle company helping people live simply and work smarter. Her advice has been featured in national publications including Real Simple and The New York Times. Laurie speaks on the topics of clutter, parenting, and entrepreneurship. Her CLUTTER CLINIC™ is a nationwide workshop providing strategies to help your team, group, or organization feel more empowered to tackle the areas where they feel most overwhelmed. Her latest work connects the dots between personality type and clutter, through the lens of the Enneagram. A self-described homebody and coffee lover, Laurie lives in Bucks County, Pennsylvania with her husband Josh, two (almost grown) daughters, and dog, Jeter. Visit her website and follow her on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter.   Links and Resources: simplyborganized.com Time Stamps: [2:30] - Neurodiverse kids and adults need extra strategy and support to get organized [3:21] - Organization takes Amber to her calm place [5:58] - The why of clutter [6:46] - Sustainable and lasting change is better than Instagram-worthy  [10:35] - Clutter is a symptom of something bigger [13:08] - Organization is a learned skill [14:36] - Modeling behaviors that you want your kids to adopt [18:36] - Being intentional and specific about what “clean” means [20:35] - Amber's husband's body doubling strategy and distraction with music to help the kids clean their room [25:01] - Laurie's three main types of clutter [24:59] - Emotional clutter stems from guilt or fear and causes decision fatigue [26:46] - People with ADHD struggle with calendar clutter  [29:54] - Resistance to wasting and the sunk cost fallacy  [33:01] - How Laurie empowered a boy to let go of his stuffed animals [36:27] - The last 10% of the project is the real feeling of accomplishment [39:47] - Which room to declutter first if you're overwhelmed [44:31] - Put time on your calendar to deal with clutter

What Fresh Hell: Laughing in the Face of Motherhood
Taking Care Of Our Parents (And Our Kids)

What Fresh Hell: Laughing in the Face of Motherhood

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 47:52


If you're part of the “sandwich generation”– taking care of your parents and your children at the same time– you've got a lot of company. The demographic trends of later parenting and increasing life expectancies mean this double-caretaking will become a reality for a lot more of us. And it seems that this responsibility is falling more often on women: two-thirds of people doing the double caretaking are female.  In this episode, we discuss how caring for parents can be particularly fraught, whether you're giving them daily insulin shots, or just trying to make sense of their finances every April.  We also discuss the importance of prioritizing our own mental and physical health, even (especially) when there seems to be little time to do so.  Finally, we talk about operating from a place of maximum vulnerability. Realize that you really are doing more than any one person can handle. Get specific about the help you need, and be honest when you're hitting your limits.  Here are links to some of the writing on the topic that we discuss in this episode: Dorothy A. Miller: The 'sandwich' generation: adult children of the aging Jessica Grose for NYT: ‘It's Pretty Brutal': The Sandwich Generation Pays a Price Katica Roy for Fast Company: I'm a breadwinner mom and this is why helping women in the sandwich generation is good for the U.S. economy Michelle Konstantinovsky for One Medical: The Sandwich Generation: Managing Stress While Caring For Others Alia E. Dastagir for the Chicago Sun Times: ‘Sandwich generation' stress: Adults caring for aging parents face stress, frustration Special thanks to our sponsors for this month: Once Upon a Farm fruit and vegetable blends are made with whole, organic, farm-fresh ingredients and packaged in grab-and-go pouches. Go to onceuponafarmorganics.com and use the code FRESH25 for 25% off your first order. Betterhelp Start taking charge of your mental health– no matter where you live. Go to betterhelp.com/fresh to get 10% off your first month of counseling.  Brooklinen's luxurious, high-quality sheets are the ultimate bedding upgrade! Go to brooklinen.com and use the promo code FRESH for $20 off your minimum purchase of $100. Dermafacs cream rejuvenates your skin's texture and fades the appearance of damage or scars in just a few weeks. Go to dermafacs.com/whatfreshhell and use the code whatfreshhell for 15% off. Green Chef's expert chefs design flavorful recipes that go way beyond the ordinary. Go to greenchef.com/laughing125 and use code laughing125 to get $125 off including free shipping. Jane.com is a boutique marketplace featuring the latest in women's fashion, accessories, home decor, children's clothing, and more. By shopping at jane.com, you support small businesses, 1500 of which are women-owned. And you will not believe the prices! Visit jane.com/laughing. KiwiCo projects make science, technology, engineering, art, and math super fun– and best of all, kids of all ages can work on them independently! Get 50% off your first month at kiwico.com with the code MOTHERHOOD. MamaZen is an app that provides a revolutionary solution for motherhood burnout, anxiety, impatience, and more. Download MamaZen today from your app store, and use the code "FRESH" to unlock a free trial. Prose now makes supplements personally tailored to address your specific cause of hair shedding. Get your free in-depth consultation and 15% off your custom hair supplements at prose.com/laughing.  Somfy powered motorized window coverings are a great way to keep your home cool- and they connect to your smart home systems! Get a customized quote for your home by visiting http://somfysystems.com/podcast.  SuperBeets heart chews are a tasty treat that give you caffeine-free, heart-healthy energy. Get a free 30-day supply and free shipping and returns with your first purchase at superbeets.com/fresh. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Unfiltered Gentlemen
Batch278: Hangovers for Adults and Fast Food Booze

The Unfiltered Gentlemen

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 39:22


Ever have one of those hangovers that remind you how old you are? Coley joins Flex and Greg to talk about taking full advantage of Sunday Funday, going to breweries to drink for a cause, the importance of lunch beers, fast food flavored booze, and some breaking news that's shaking up the craft beer scene.Coley and Greg are reviewing Birthday Month: Flowers And Fruit, a double IPA from Wild Leap Brewing in LaGrange, GA. Flex drinks Poetic Hustler, a double dry-hopped double IPA from Mikerphone Brewing in Elk Grove, IL. Greg talks about guesting on the I Like to Like Things podcast to give some homebrewing tips. Coley, Greg, and their spouses went to a wine event and ended up stumbling to a brewery to keep the party going; it's those Sundays that lead to rough Mondays. Flex talks about his lunchtime research at Eagle Park Brewing. In huge, breaking craft beer news, New Belgium buys Bell's Brewing. The United States and European Union reached a deal to make booze cheaper. Have you ever thought about fast food flavored hooch? Arby's definitely has. Our friend Vanessa shares a Ludicrous Libation Law from Florida, adding more evidence that Florida is “unique.”Coley: www.instagram.com/ice_cole_beer_ Boozecast Flex: www.instagram.com/flex_me_a_beer Craft Beer Republic: www.CraftBeerRepublic.com www.instagram.com/CraftBeerRepublic www.facebook.com/CraftBeerRepublicPod www.twitter.com/CraftBeerRepub (805) 538-2337 Use promo code UNFILTERED on Tavour.

The Better Behavior Show with Dr. Nicole Beurkens
Episode 173: Holistic Solutions for Autoimmunity in Adults and Children

The Better Behavior Show with Dr. Nicole Beurkens

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 51:26


My guest this week is Dr. Madiha Saeed In this episode, Dr. Madiha Saeed and I discuss why there has been an explosion of autoimmune diseases not only in adults but also in children. These diseases have a huge impact on the quality of life far beyond just the physical aspects that conventional medicine hasn't been able to effectively address. There is hope!   We discuss how families can overcome and thrive with autoimmune diseases. Dr. Madiha, a mom of four, is living proof that declining health doesn't have to be part of our life span. She shares incredibly helpful tips and effective strategies that any family can implement regardless of where they are in their health journey.  Episode Timestamps Episode Intro … 00:00:30 Dr. Madiha Saeed Introduction … 00:01:45 What is Autoimmunity? … 00:09:00 Why is Autoimmunity on the Rise? … 00:16:30 What is Holistic Parenting? … 00:22:45 A Holistic Approach to Restoring Balance … 00:27:38 Positivity is Powerful Medicine … 00:30:50 Food, Nutrition, and Autoimmunity … 00:32:45 Make Changes Fun, Not Overwhelming … 42:45 Resources for the Family … 00:47:15 Episode Wrap up … 00:49:18   Connect with Dr. Nicole Beurkens on... Instagram Facebook Drbeurkens.com

Make it Mentionable with Alyssa Patmos
How Do We Cultivate Community As Adults? With Mindy Jones

Make it Mentionable with Alyssa Patmos

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 66:25


How do we cultivate community as adults? This is the question Mindy Jones joins me to talk about in this week's episode. During our conversation, Mindy and I talk about belonging, how to lead community with intention, some of the reasons we're left feeling disconnected in today's day and age, and how to be intentional about finding friends you want to hang around. ABOUT MINDY: A native of Arizona, Mindy is the owner of the Amy Jones Group, a residential real estate team serving the Valley. On a mission to thrive, Mindy has created a platform for gritty, busy, hard working women who want to live their best lives personally and professionally by serving through real estate and community. Founded on the core principals of doing things better, Mindy's team is focused on educating and empowering consumers to make the best decisions for their families.Show notes and transcript and can be found here: https://alyssapatmos.com/how-do-we-cultivate-community-as-adults-with-mindy-jones/EXTRA RESOURCESSign up for my free newsletter, The Peel, and get my tips for navigating whatever life dishes: https://alyssapatmos.com/thepeelJoin my free community, The Convey Collective, to master authentic communication: https://alyssapatmos.com/communityI'd love to hear from you and continue the conversation! Message me on instagram (@alyssapatmos).

Honeybee Kids - Bedtime Stories
Honeybee "Shout Outs" Story #2

Honeybee Kids - Bedtime Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 37:05


Hear your name featured in the next episode --->https://www.HoneybeeLibrary.com/neighborhood This is Honeybee SHOUT OUT Story #2!! Featuring the names of my little honeybees!

The Blacksmith Chronicles Podcast
136. Worldview Among US Adults Continues with Growth of Marxist Ideas, including Critical Theory (w/Dr. George Barna)

The Blacksmith Chronicles Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 47:12


George Barna is a professor at Arizona Christian University and the Director of Research at the Cultural Research Center at ACU. He also founded the Barna Group, a research company that for years set the standard for understanding trends in American culture. Dr. Barna has written more than 50 books, including numerous award-winners and New York Times bestsellers. He is also a Fellow at the Townsend Institute, has taught at the undergraduate and graduate level, and has pastored two churches. To learn more about Dr. George Barna, please visit: georgebarna.com LISTEN NOW AT: Apple: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-blacksmith-chronicles-podcast/id1485445641 Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/4OmhF96FBZ7wz6umnfiMnT Destiny Image:  https://destinyimagepodcastnetwork.squarespace.com/#/the-blacksmith-chronicles/   Ryan Johnson — www.ryanjohnson.us RJM YouTube Channel — https://bit.ly/34Vxbgl Ryan Johnson Ministries Facebook — https://www.facebook.com/officialryanjohnsonministries The Blacksmith Chronicles Podcast Facebook — https://www.facebook.com/RJMinistries Twitter — https://twitter.com/ryanbjohnson278 Instagram — ryanjohnsonministries EMAIL — info@ryanjohnson.us

Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes
Ask the D-Moms Holiday Edition - More Fun, Less Stress (we promise!)

Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 40:15


With Thanksgiving almost here and the winter holidays around the corner, we know that diabetes stress is about to ratchet way up. The D-Moms are here to help! Moira McCarthy joins Stacey to talk about everything from holiday travel, long car rides, well meaning relatives and holiday gifts centered on T1D. And of course, FOOD! Get advice to keep your children with T1D safe and happy so you can make terrific memories without freaking out about "perfect" blood sugars. Previous D-Mom Holiday advice here Adults with T1D give their take on the holidays:  This podcast is not intended as medical advice. If you have those kinds of questions, please contact your health care provider. Check out Stacey's book: The World's Worst Diabetes Mom! Join the Diabetes Connections Facebook Group! Sign up for our newsletter here ----- Use this link to get one free download and one free month of Audible, available to Diabetes Connections listeners! ----- Get the App and listen to Diabetes Connections wherever you go! Click here for iPhone      Click here for Android Episode Transcription below:  Stacey Simms  0:00 Diabetes Connections is brought to you by Dario health. Manage your blood glucose levels increase your possibilities by Gvoke Hypopen the first pre mixed auto injector for very low blood sugar, and by Dexcom, take control of your diabetes and live life to the fullest with Dexcom.   Announcer  0:20 This is Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms.   Stacey Simms  0:26 This week, Thanksgiving is almost here and many holidays just around the corner. Ask the D moms is here to help more McCarthy and I answer your questions and share our own stories to help you make more wonderful memories with less stress, even if that means doing things differently for a special occasion.   Moira McCarthy  0:44 And the reality is in this long, long, long, long, long lifetime marathon diabetes, you need to just chill a mile here and there. And by doing this and saying to your children, we're going to turn this off. This is okay. Don't worry about it. You're fine. You're modeling that for them and you're giving them the confidence and the courage to know that they can be okay. Yeah,   Stacey Simms  1:06 she said turn this off. She's talking about something I dare to say and do about Benny's CGM. We also talk about long car rides well-meaning relatives and holiday gifts centered on diabetes. This podcast is not intended as medical advice. If you have those kinds of questions, please contact your health care provider. Welcome to another week of the show. I'm your host Stacey Simms always so glad to have you here. You know, we aim to educate and inspire about diabetes with a focus on people who use insulin. And yes, this time of year. I mean, it's the holidays are stressful without diabetes, right. But I'm already seeing in my local group, the stress ratcheting up, somebody said to me the other day that they feel like even though they're not necessarily doing more than they did before the pandemic as more people are venturing out and traveling. They feel like they're really busy. And I think a lot of it has to do with the fact that we haven't been very busy for the last year and a half, really. So there's gonna be more pressure on this holiday season. There's going to be more travel, there's going to be I don't know, it'll feel like higher stakes and especially if you are new to type one, that first year those first holidays, those first milestones are incredibly stressful. So Moira and I are here to help you out you probably already know. But just in case Moira McCarthy is a dear friend of mine. She is the author of many books about raising kids with diabetes, including the amazing raising teens with diabetes, which has that fabulous photo of a teen rolling her eyes right on the cover. I love that cover. You'll hear how long her daughter Lauren has lived with type one. She's a very successful adult now living on her own. And if you are brand new, my son Ben, he was diagnosed almost 15 years ago. He is almost 17, which is really hard to believe so most of my stories have to do with the early years. We're not out of the teens yet, and Moira will help kind of pick it up from there. And I always look to her for guidance as well. One funny thing about Thanksgiving this year, we have a set menu, right? We have our traditions. My husband is the cook in the family and we've always hosted Thanksgiving. He does something a little different every year, but it's really up to him. But Benny has been working in a grocery store for the past six or seven months now. And he is really jonesing for a sweet potato casserole with marshmallows, which we don't usually do nothing do with diabetes. It's just not our style. We generally save the marshmallows for dessert. But my mom who makes our sweet potato casserole every year has valiantly stepped up and says she will make one for him. Because at the grocery store. He has been seeing the display and he's like Mom, it's just sweet potatoes, brown sugar, sweet potatoes, marshmallows, sweet potatoes, brown sugar, like they have this. And he took a picture that I saw the last time I was there. I mean, it's one whole side of a produce display. So this poor kid, he is really dying for that that marketing worked on him. He wants those marshmallows. My daughter is the canned cranberry sauce person, right. You know you make that beautiful, homemade cranberry sauce with the whole cranberries. Are you you boil it down? No, we have to have it in the can with the jelly lines on it. I prefer that as well. I have to admit. Alright, Moira and I talking about real stuff just a moment. But first Diabetes Connections is brought to you by Gvoke Hypopen. Our endo always told us that if you use insulin, you need to have emergency glucagon on hand as well. Low blood sugars are one thing – we're usually able to treat those with fact acting glucose tabs or juice. But a very low blood sugar can be very frightening – which is why I'm so glad there's a different option for emergency glucagon. It's Gvoke Hypopen. Gvoke HypoPen is premixed and ready to go, with no visible needle. You pull off the red cap and push the yellow end onto bare skin – and hold it for 5 seconds. That's it. Find out more – go to diabetes dash connections dot com and click on the Gvoke logo. Gvoke shouldn't be used in patients with pheochromocytoma or insulinoma – visit gvoke glucagon dot com slash risk.   Moira, welcome back. I am so excited to talk to you What a week. I didn't even think about this when we planned. This is a big week for you and Lauren,   Moira McCarthy  5:04 it is yesterday, October 28. At 2:35pm was exactly her 24th diaversary. My daughter has had type 1 diabetes for 24 years. I can't even believe it. It's crazy.   Stacey Simms  5:22 But I have to ask you the time had you know the time.   Moira McCarthy  5:25 So I don't know why I know the time. We were at a doctor's appointment, and I know what time the appointment was. And I know what happened when I got there. So I don't know. It's just drilled into my head. And then there's people I meet that are like, I can't even tell you what day my kid was diagnosed. But for some reason, it just stuck with me. And as a little kid Lauren, like celebrating every year, so I sent her flowers yesterday. No, I don't care. 24 hours or so give us Do you   Stacey Simms  5:51 mind, maybe just a little bit of how she's doing maybe a little update. If this is someone's first time joining us for Deimos.   Moira McCarthy  5:57 I'd be happy to so my daughter Lauren was diagnosed. Well, I just said the date. So basically the beginning of kindergarten when she was six years old, right after her sixth birthday. I can remember feeling like the world was gonna end. But we had a really great medical team from the beginning who were saying to us, you are going to live the life you lived before. We're just going to add steps to it. And Lauren at six years old was saying I'm gonna lead you're not gonna, you know, let this hold me down. Now has it been all rainbows and butterflies? Absolutely not. We have had challenging days. We've had challenging weeks, we've had challenging years in her teen years. But right now, I think, well, first of all, what everybody cares about most is her physical health. She is 100% healthy. She has the labs that a person without diabetes would have if you checked, you know, her kidney and her eyes and everything else. Emotionally, she's really doing great. She has a long struggle with burnout. But I think she really has figured out a way to deal with that when she recognizes it coming up. And the most important lab of all I always say is she's incredibly happy. She has an amazing career and lives in the middle of Washington, DC all by herself, and I don't follow her on share. And I never worry about her. She has 8 million friends and I couldn't be prouder of her and the life that she is building as a young adult. So that's where she's at pretty good. Right? Despite diabetes, that's fine.   Stacey Simms  7:28 I love hearing that, as you know. And as you listen, you may know, I have followed Moira and Lauren story for many, many, many years since before more and I knew each other. So I always kind of look ahead. It's like my time machine of what could happen with us. Where could he go? And of course, he's never leaving our hometown, going to a scary place far away like DC he's gonna He's going to live here. And   Moira McCarthy  7:51 Sunday dinner every week   Stacey Simms  7:53 is nice. That's so nice. So I'm glad she's doing so well. Like you're doing so well. And you know, gosh, I heard something recently about diversity that made me smile. Instead of the diversity you're you're on the new level. So Lauren has reached level 24.   Moira McCarthy  8:08 I like that. That's really funny. And her boyfriend is a big video gamer so he'll like that.   Stacey Simms  8:13 Oh, that's good. Yeah, Benny's approaching level 15. And I am one of those people who I always have to look up the date. I just know it's the first weekend of December, but I never. Yeah. Alright, so we are in that time of year where it's not just our kids diver series. It is holiday time. And after I rewound the Halloween episode that we did a couple of years ago and I got a lot of questions and people asked us to do a follow up for Thanksgiving and looking ahead to the winter holidays. And I got some great questions. So I was wondering more if you wouldn't mind sharing though, you know, the first holiday season that you and Laura and your whole family had to address this you guys want a very different routine? Yeah, we can be a little more difficult but would you mind sharing what that was like that first year?   Moira McCarthy  8:59 I will and and I think it's good to hear because it can help people see how far we have come daily care for this disease. We may not have a cure yet, but what it looks like on a day to day basis is completely different. So Lauren was diagnosed in October so Thanksgiving was our first big holiday and I remember we were going to my in laws and back then you took a moderate acting or we called it long acting, but it was really middle acting insulin called NPH that peaked a bunch of times during the day and then you took regular which you had to take it wait 30 minutes and then eat exactly what you had dose for it exactly 30 minutes which was super fun with a six year old child I will tell you and no waiting in between. So I had reached out to my in laws ahead of time and asked them if they could work the meal around the time that it would work best for her to eat and they said yes and I I move some things around with A doctor to kind of compromise with them, you know, so we changed what time we gave everything starting, like two days before to be ready for Thanksgiving. And then we showed up and they were like, oh, yeah, we decided on a different time. Oh my gosh, the world is ending. But the world didn't end. You know, we figured it out. We got through it. What I will say for these holidays, for people who are new to it, it's not always going to feel this scary and confusing and daunting. I think the first 12 months, you go through every holiday, every special event, every family tradition for first time. And then the second year, you're like, Oh, I remember this from last year, and it gets a little better. And then the third year, you're, you're sailing. That's my theory, and I'm sticking to it.   Stacey Simms  10:43 I would absolutely agree with that. I also kind of suffered and I'll say suffered from this feeling out of the box, that it had to be perfect. Because I remember one just show everybody that we were okay. Especially my mom, I wanted her to not worry. And know that we were we were just fine. And for some reason that got tangled up in my brain by thinking this has to go perfectly and I can't make a mistake. And of course that lasted about three   Moira McCarthy  11:06 seconds. Yeah, we're really with a toddler with type one, and you want to put together a perfect Thanksgiving. Why don't we do that to ourselves, though, you know, but feelings of control at a time when you feel like you've lost control?   Stacey Simms  11:21 Night? Exactly. Alright, so let's get to some of the questions that came in. I got one in my local group. And this was about travel. And the question was, we're driving along distance. And I guess we could talk a little bit about flying or other modes of transportation. But this particular case, we're driving along distance, you know, six or seven hours to a relative's house. Any ideas or tips for helping me and the question here was about stable blood sugars. But I'm also going to kind of throw in there. How do I make this trip? easier on the whole family? Yeah, I'm I have a lot of ideas that maybe you do too.   Moira McCarthy  11:56 Well. So I guess my first idea would be for special occasions and events, stable blood sugars aren't the most important thing ever. I don't think there's anything wrong with trying, of course, we want to try but the first thing I'd say is if it doesn't go perfectly, that's perfectly fine. I am quite sure if you ask your medical team to help you with the plan. That is one of the things they will say to you. That's the first thing. So I mean, what did you do on long car rides? For us it I don't remember it impacting her blood sugar that much, you definitely have to have snacks in the car and like more than you ever think you're going to need in your life, because you never know when you're going to get stuck in a traffic jam from a car accident or something like that. You know what it is be prepared, and then you don't need it. We tend as a family, not just for the person with diabetes, but for everyone to try to stop every 60 minutes and get out of the car and stretch and move around and breathe fresh air and then get back in. I think that helps   Stacey Simms  12:56 us How about depressive we don't my husband would have fit? No. So in my   Moira McCarthy  13:01 father, he would never do that. That's probably why I do it. I grew up driving from Minnesota to Massachusetts and like never being allowed to get out of the car. So   Stacey Simms  13:10 I would say for us we actually did struggle a lot with long car rides, because we did a lot of trips, especially to my parents in Florida, which is like a nine or 10 hour road trip. And we found that Benny's blood sugar would go very high. Just you know, an hour or two in the car and looking back, it's probably because toddlers never stopped moving. So his insulin dosage was all based on constant activity. So when he was sitting still, just looking back that's my assumption. Also, as you mentioned, you know everybody's eating in the car   Right back to our conversation, but first Diabetes Connections is brought to you by Dario health. And, you know, we first noticed Dario, a couple of years ago, we were at a diabetes conference, and many thought being able to turn your smartphone into a meter. It's pretty amazing. I'm excited to tell you that Dario offers even more now, the Dario diabetes success plan gets you all the supplies and support you need to succeed, you'll get a glucometer that fits in your pocket unlimited test strips and lancets delivered to your door and a mobile app with a complete view of your data. The plan is tailored for you with coaching when and how you need it. And personalized reports based on your activity. Find out more go to my dario.com forward slash diabetes dash connections. Now back to the D mom's and I'm talking about what we did when we realized Benny's blood sugar would always go pretty high in the car. What we did was talk to our endocrinologist about adjusting doses giving more insulin when he was in the car, giving more insulin for food when he was in the car. And that was a real trial and error for us because, you know we have to be really conservative about that you're not going to be changing basal rates by enormous amounts and so it may not quote unquote work the first time you do it, but I think you know we're doing Talking about stable blood sugars, I hope that this person means is like maybe kind of sort of in range. You know, when I see somebody talking about stable blood sugars, I usually think like, it's not going to be a steady line at 95, right? We're just trying to keep them from skyrocketing and staying there. And even if that happens, which happened to us a ton, it's fine, and you fix it. When the baby was younger, and the kids were younger, I was much more mindful about healthy eating. You know, they're 19 and 16. And it's like, they buy half their own food. Now anyway, I don't know what they're eating. But we used to get coolers the big cooler, and fill it with, you know, healthy fruits and veggies and hard boiled eggs and carrot sticks. And you know, and then of course, everybody would want to stop for fast food and ruin everything. Right?   Moira McCarthy  15:39 So I made the assumption, and perhaps I shouldn't have that by stable, she meant within that range. If this mom is suggesting that her child should have a straight line across my answers quite different. I have no idea going on the assumption that what she means is within their range. And my answer was based on that what I meant was, if you go above your range, or below your range, I think it's okay. I don't think that if you're going to celebrate with a family, the most important thing is, is staying in your blood sugar range, I think the most important thing is enjoying the time and loving your cousin's and running around and having fun and staying within a an area that is safe. And by safe. I mean, you're not you don't need to get in an ambulance, I guess. And maybe my advice would be talk to your medical team, take some ideas that we have on your idea, I think that's a great idea. My only caveat would be the doctors probably going to want you to err on the side of your child being hired. The first time you do this, as you mentioned, you did it after some trial and error, I'm not sure a new parent to diabetes should just, you know dial way up on their kids insulin because they're going to be in the car for nine hours, I think you should take it slowly and go a time or two or three and see what happens. And then make decisions like that after that. But for now talk to your team. They're they're going to say what I said, and they're going to support you and say, Don't worry about going out of range. You know how to do corrections, here's when and here's why to do a correction and then take it from there.   Stacey Simms  17:12 And like you said, some kids sit in the car and nothing happens. Right? They don't go super high. That's why can't do   Moira McCarthy  17:17 assumption, right. That's why you have to wait and see what happens. One quick   Stacey Simms  17:22 thing about the car that I learned the hard way you mentioned about you know, be prepared for traffic be prepared for you know, delays, if you have and we all do I think have a you know a diabetes kit. Make sure it's where you can reach it, especially if your child is very young, right? I mean, there's a lot of kids, they're older, they can have it the backseat with them. I'll never forget packing everything we needed and leaving it in the trunk or like the way back of the minivan. And then we were delayed. And I'm like I need a new inset like says it was leaking, or we'd like crawl through the car.   Moira McCarthy  17:54 That's a really good tip. So put it   Stacey Simms  17:57 up to the front seat with your pack, even if you just pack a couple of things. And we had so many car adventures. Okay, the next question, I loved this one, because this just I could picture this one I know you can do more. So Deborah said we are in the first year of diagnosis, I just realized I don't know what to do about our Christmas cookie tradition. We make a bunch and give them to relatives we usually eat as we go. Can we still do this with diabetes child is eight and is on multiple daily injections, so no insulin pump yet.   Moira McCarthy  18:26 So my answer is eat all the cookies, bake all the cookies, visit all the friends have all the fun, click your fingers if you want to. But then wash your hands, have all the fun and check in with your child's doctor. And what they're going to say is go do all that check at the end of all the fun. If you need a correction, here's what we'd like you to correct. And here's what we'd like you not to correct for they may not want you to correct because sometimes these things involve a little adrenaline high. And again, first times you have to see what's going on. But just have all the fun. Fix it later. If your child gets high during it, it's no big deal. If they get low, you've got cookies. There's an old saying it started with Kelly crewneck, who's a very well known person on the diabetes world on the internet. And she said people with diabetes can't have cookies, dot dot dot with poison in them. Right? The only cookies you can't have.   Stacey Simms  19:26 I think that's fantastic. And it took me back listening to that about we know we don't have a Christmas cookie tradition. But we certainly you know, I think most people with little kids love to bake. And it's just such a fun activity to do with them. And in the first couple of weeks with shots, it was so difficult. You know, Binney ran away from us. He didn't want anything to do with it. But after a little while, he didn't really care as long as we didn't make a big deal and make him stop what he was doing. So and we bought after, which I know is like bananas that people admit to bolusing after these days, but I think it's so much less   Moira McCarthy  20:00 Streisand gets really super smart, particularly with a small child.   Stacey Simms  20:04 And so for something like this, like we would bake, and then I would kind of try to estimate like, what did he licked the spoon? Did he eat the crumbs? You know, when you do a guess? And in my case, I would always get a little less because he was teeny tiny. And then we would eat the cookie, and a couple hours later, we would correct and move on. Now. I don't know, I feel like the fun as you said, the memories of that time, you know, outweighed the quote, unquote, out of range blood sugar, I'm sure his blood sugar went out of range. And he might have been low, because they sometimes they just get really excited. And you know, he might have been high, but he's, they're healthy.   Moira McCarthy  20:39 You know what, I think this, this mom, and anyone who's considering these kind of questions over the holidays should think about too, when I look back on Lauren's life, these 24 years with type one included, I don't remember that her blood sugar went higher low. I don't remember what her diabetes did one day, I remember that the cookie swap was fun. And so that's why I think it's important to focus on the fun, within reason with a kid with diabetes, you know,   Stacey Simms  21:12 oh, yeah, that's a great way to put it. And I'm realizing as he gets older, I have a lot of those same feelings. I'm so glad it didn't stop us. I'm sure at the time. My heart was pounding, right, especially at first, I'm sure I was worried. I'm sure I was thinking, Am I doing this the right way. But look, you know, you have those fabulous pictures and those great memories. So that's a great way to put it. Alright, so let's talk about well meaning relatives. More Hi, Moira. And Stacy. My aunt thinks she knows everything about diabetes. She has type two and is always lecturing me about not letting my second grader eat, quote, bad foods. Holidays are the worst. I'm sorry to laugh, because she wants us to have sugar free desserts. There's so much going on. In that question.   Moira McCarthy  21:59 Bless her heart, right. You know, I mean, what do you do? It would depend on what kind of person she is. And if they have, if they have a relationship that she could, I would call her ahead of time and say, Look, we're working on adjusting Stevie's life, whatever the child is, and, and there's a lot of things he's dealing with right now. So I'm just asking you, if you have anything you want to say about it? Could you say it to me now over the phone before we go, and let's just avoid talking about diabetes other than Hey, how you feeling? I'm really glad you're doing well at the holiday because I don't want him to feel sad when he has all this on his mind. That's a great way to put it. Who knows what she'll do. Right, right.   Stacey Simms  22:45 I mean, you have you have well meaning relatives who want to help you have nosy relatives who think they're helping, it all depends on my mother for the first year or two she wants to make she makes one of those sweet potato casseroles, not always with marshmallows, but it's got a ton of sugar in it. And so she made it sugar free. And I didn't really notice but it's not something Vinnie was going to eat much of anyway. Yeah, when he was he was three at his first Thanksgiving with diabetes. But she meant well, but what I found worked over the years, and I still use this, even though he's his own advocate. Now, I really found that saying, Our doctor says, which I made up, but our doctor says helped everything. So I would say to somebody like this. Oh, you know, thank you so much for thinking about my son. I really appreciate it. I gotta tell you things with diabetes have changed so much now. And our doctor says that he can eat these foods and as long as we can dose with insulin, you know, we know what we're doing. He's helping us or our doctor says that Thanksgiving should be a date, like every other day or whatever it is. But people would never listen to me. Listen to what my doctor   Moira McCarthy  23:46 says my my words for that was always her medical team. Yeah. sound very official, our medical team is me. But they don't need to know that. The one thing I'll say, though, is it's also okay, if it's not super aggressive, and really out of line. I think it's also okay to teach our children to show some people a little grace. And sometimes and all this even when people are wrong, maybe at the family thanksgiving, or Hanukkah, or whatever party isn't the time to say, Do you know what I mean? Great. And so if someone makes a sugar free thing, and your kid hates sugar free, you say to your kid, please just put a tiny slice of that on your plate and then push a couple pieces around under something. And it'll be fine. They met Well, yeah, you know, yeah, say and then afterwards, you can say hey, he really liked that. But FYI, next time, you don't even need to do that make the same delicious pie, but you don't need to make it sugar free. Right   Stacey Simms  24:41 on everything. And that's a good point. Because we're so in our society today, we're so ready to fight. We're so ready to be on the defensive. And so I think that that's a great point just to be able to say we really appreciate it. We know how you meant it, you know, just thanks and then have the discussion later on. Yeah,   Moira McCarthy  24:57 but if they're over the top aggressive about about telling your child what they do wrong with their diabetes, then you need to have a conversation ahead of time. That's right.   Stacey Simms  25:04 Or you know, even in the moment if this sometimes you see, you know, I made this for these kids who don't have diabetes and look at this wonderful vegetable plate I made for your child like they're having cupcakes, but you could have the carrot that it's okay.   Moira McCarthy  25:17 It just jello Jaguars. My daughter was locked up. I always have to bring a tray of jello jugglers This is before acting. And   Stacey Simms  25:25 that is so funny. I'm so sorry for sugary jello. jigglers Woohoo. Oh, my gosh. Okay, another question. How do I dose for all of the grazing that goes on during Thanksgiving and holiday gatherings? This is kind of similar to the Christmas cookies, or I would think our answer is going to be but in some homes, right? It's not just one set meal. It's we showed up and we're starting to eat and we don't stop for seven hours. Oh, yeah.   Moira McCarthy  25:51 My house isn't that yours?   Stacey Simms  25:53 Isn't? No, no, no.   Moira McCarthy  25:57 Not every house was like that on a holiday. Seriously, this is interesting. All right, well, I guess I'll answer this first, then talk to your medical team. Ask them about planning different times during the day for check ins. And then just let your child have what they're going to have. And at the check in times that you agree with your doctor, it may be every two hours, it may be every three hours, it may be twice I don't know. They'll they'll help you decide. You see where they're at. You look at what's going on what they're going to be doing next. And then you do a correction of corrections needed. That's it.   Stacey Simms  26:31 Go, I'm going to add a layer to that. Yes, please do. For those who are addicted. I don't know anyone like this. I certainly have never been like this anyone who's addicted to their Dexcom. So if you're listening to more thinking, how am I supposed to check every two hours when the Dexcom or wherever three hours, whatever the most no more thinking how am I gonna check at those intervals, when my Dexcom is blaring every five minutes, okay, stay with me, people consider turning your Dexcom high alarm off, and then look at your child's Dexcom High Alert off, and then only looking at it as recommended by your care team. It will take away an enormous amount of stress. Even if your child goes high. And you bolus it's not going to happen right away. You know this, it takes a long time for insulin to work, right. So you're not really doing yourself any favors by checking it every five minutes. I know it's hard. Ask your doctor. But that has helped me more than the years when I was glued to it listening for this a lot.   Moira McCarthy  27:34 And you know, I think that's really wonderful advice. Because there's nothing wrong with freeing up the family to enjoy a good time. If it's so important to you that you keep them in a certain range and you want to watch it all day, then go ahead. But I think what you suggested and what you just said you do is such a good model for your child, because as you care for your child, you're modeling how they should care for themselves later. And the reality is in this long, long, long, long, long lifetime marathon diabetes, you need to just chill a mile here and there. And by doing this and saying to your children, we're going to turn this off, this is okay. Don't worry about it, you're fine. You're modeling that for them. And you're giving them the confidence and the courage to know that they can be okay. If they're not doing, you know, 150%. So I love that answer. Stacy, you get a gold star. Yeah,   Stacey Simms  28:34 it's funny to think about, but that's actually how we use Dexcom. And how everyone use Dexcom intil. Gosh, I'll probably get the year wrong. But until, let's say 2015 Because Dexcom share did not exist, right? So at school, our child would like many others basically used his Dexcom receiver as a no finger stick monitor. Right. So at the time of day were Benny would normally have done a finger stick, he just looked at the receiver showed it to his teacher. And that was it. We started using it like that. So I think it makes it a little easier if you come home from the hospital, like a lot of families do attuned to every alarm. These things may seem like an astronomical ask, but you really can do it. And I would also add with the grazing, we you know, we were grazing experts, because I had a two year old with type one who was diagnosed. I mean, a few years after Lauren, so you know, was not on that very regimented timing. So Benny could pretty much eat all day, like a normal two year old. I mean, obviously not all day, but you know what I mean? Several times a day, and we just had to give them fast acting. So it makes it it does make it a little more difficult, right? It's not but it's not something you do every single day, either. So I think that you know, you've got to kind of let go a little bit, but it's not harmful and it can make these ladies have these wonderful memories. Alright, and finally, this question, I'm a little stymied by this one. What's the Christmas present for a child with die? beedis   Moira McCarthy  30:01 Okay, a good Christmas present for a child with diabetes is what they put on their Christmas list. If you want to give diabetes related gifts for Christmas, that's all good and fine. I knew someone who gave their child quote unquote, their insulin pump for Christmas and like, their heart was in the right place, and the child felt great, but it just made me a little sad. I guess if your child puts insulin pump on their Christmas list, though, that's different. But even then I think I'd say no, Santa doesn't need to bring you medical stuff, we can just get that went whenever you need it. There are toys and animals and things like that. If someone's interested in actually, diabetesMine is having me do a list of them that's going to run in late November, early December. We can link that on this after Oh, that would be great. Like   Stacey Simms  30:54 the American Girl doll stuff and road kid kits. Fabulous.   Moira McCarthy  30:59 And then I don't mean that there's anything wrong with that stuff. I just think that you should give your child gifts that they want as a child, not as a child with diabetes. Yeah,   Stacey Simms  31:09 I think a lot of that depends on how your family celebrates and what gifts you're giving. We are We joked in our family for Hanukkah, when I was growing up, you would get everything from the toy that you really, really wanted to the dictionary that you did not ask for to the socks that you need it right so if your gift giving is like that mixed up, and it's you know, if your family expectation is that kids will get super useful stuff in all the kids not just the kid with diabetes, then I guess I could see it. But I'm with you, I think unless it's something really fun like one of those add on what your list is going to be made up but like, what are those stuffed pancreas like? silly things like that. And yeah, accessories for dolls and fun stuff. It's just like a useful medical thing. I think you've got to be very careful and know, the child like especially a parent to a kid is one thing but if you're like the fun and or you're the family friend thinking this will be a big hit. I just be a little careful. One of the things I saw in another group was you know, there's a newly diagnosed child which they get the family and the most popular response was don't get them anything quote diabetes related, get them fuzzy slippers, and a gift certificate for babysitting or you know a trip to the movies and get them something fun and engaging.   Moira McCarthy  32:22 Get them something normal and and pushing back on what you said I still even if my family did that stuff, I still wouldn't give my child like a box of syringes. So core. I like if you're giving your kids toothpaste for Christmas, because that's what you do, then give your kid with diabetes toothpaste for Christmas treats the same way you treat your other kids when it comes to gifts.   Stacey Simms  32:42 That's a good point. I think if anybody ever gave Benny any diabetes related gifts, and no one would ever mind my family would have ever done that. But   Moira McCarthy  32:49 one time in our family Yankee swap, I used a syringe box, like for the gift and whoever opened it thought it was syringes and we're like, I don't get it. And I'm like, Oh, for goodness sake. It's just a box.   Stacey Simms  33:03 Open it up. Is a Yankee swap like a Secret Santa.   Moira McCarthy  33:07 Yeah, kind of but you you could take gifts away from like a one white elephant. I don't know. I'm sorry. That's a white Jewish lady. It's like we're from different worlds, Stacy.   Stacey Simms  33:21 Oh, you New Englanders.   Moira McCarthy  33:24 Bless my heart.   Stacey Simms  33:26 We do have one funny story. So on Christmas day in Gosh, I'm looking back already. This was this is eight years ago. So on Christmas Day, we started the Dexcom. The very first time we ever used the G four platinum. Vinnie was nine. Oh no, the g4 Platinum pediatric. So Vinnie was nine years old. And we were sitting around a Christmas day at my mom's house like you do. And we said, let's start the Dexcom. Why don't we will put it on we had been instructed on how to do it. Of course, again, I don't know if I can emphasize this enough. We do not celebrate Christmas. I don't think I would do this. Christmas. So but we put it on and I will never forget because that was you know, Christmas Day. Gosh, so yeah. Merry Christmas kid. That was the big horrible insert or two.   Moira McCarthy  34:14 But then it could have Chinese food before the movie, right?   Stacey Simms  34:18 Really my house.   Moira McCarthy  34:21 I know you.   Stacey Simms  34:23 That's great. So normally at the end here, we talk about where we're going in the diabetes community. Of course, you know, there's no diabetes events going on now. And I'm really, really hoping they come back next year. But I mean, I'm doing some virtual events. I'm reaching out, but I cannot wait to be in person again more.   Moira McCarthy  34:39 I feel you. I can't believe I was just thinking about this the other day because my Facebook memory was, I guess right before the pandemic I was in Buffalo, New York speaking at a big diabetes event at this time and they were all these pictures and people posting about interesting things they learned and how happy they were going to be and I was like, oh, I want to go back somewhere. I think we're We're gonna see things start bubbling up I do believe friends for life is going on this summer I'm hoping I'll be there I haven't heard yet but um I know that's probably happening and I think JDRF is going to start doing some smaller half day programs in the near future knock on wood so I hope we're in the same place to Stacey that's what I hope not only we get out and speak but you and I are in the same place.   Stacey Simms  35:22 Yeah. Oh my god,   Moira McCarthy  35:23 it's all about us.   Stacey Simms  35:26 Why not? I was kind of pausing because I don't remember when we saw each other live to look that up. At the end of the show.   Moira McCarthy  35:33 I think it's been at least two years Stacy that's really weird.   Stacey Simms  35:37 It has to be it has to ah, I miss you.   Moira McCarthy  35:40 Me too. We talk every day practically. I miss you as a as a human life form.   Stacey Simms  35:50 Well, the next time we get together we can we can do a Yankee swap.   Moira McCarthy  35:52 Yeah. And and a white elephant, white elephant.   Stacey Simms  35:57 Well, if I don't speak to you have a wonderful Thanksgiving, enjoy your family and your adorable grandchildren. And give Lauren my best and tell everybody we said hi. Same here   Moira McCarthy  36:07 and make sure those kids yours know that I still think they're awesome.   Announcer  36:16 You're listening to Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms.   Stacey Simms  36:21 I will link up some information, including to an episode we did with adults with type one and their take on Thanksgiving. I'll put that in the show notes along with the transcription for this episode, you can always go to diabetes connections.com. Every episode starting in January of 2020 has a transcription. And there's lots more information there. I got to tell you more. And I make it sound pretty easy now, right? But those first couple of years, it's so stressful because you're trying to have a nice holiday. You're trying to project confidence, you know, we're doing great. Diabetes won't stop us. And then you're freaking out, you know, what did you eat? Should we pre bolus what's gonna happen now? Am I gonna be up all night? You know, it's, well, you know, who's got the carb count? Is it accurate? Spoiler, the carb count is never accurate. It's never accurate. I hope you know that. We're estimating everything, even packaged foods. Even somebody who weighs in measures, everything is a total guess, on carbohydrates. So just do the best you can. And it's you got to get through that I think you've just got to get through that experience. There is no other teacher like experience and diabetes, you've got to make mistakes, you've got to kind of be upset, you gotta be worried you got to get through it. But if you let yourself I think as a parent, you really can get to a place where you're like sure marshmallows on sweet potatoes, we can figure that out and go from there. And if you hated my advice to turn the Dexcom off, let me know I would love to hear from you. You can yell at me all you want. Let me know if you try it though. And if it works for you, I don't want to cause more stress. I promise. Diabetes Connections is brought to you by Dexcom. And hey, listen, I'm all about using the technology in a way that helps you thrive with diabetes. So when I say turn it off, it's not a knock on Dexcom. It's sharing how we use it to help us make great choices. Live well and be happy. I stand by that you know we have been using the Dexcom system since he was nine years old. We started back in December of 2013. And the system just keeps getting better. The Dexcom G six is FDA permitted for no finger sticks for calibration and diabetes treatment decisions, you can share with up to 10 people from your smart device. The G six has 10 Day sensor where the applicator is so easy. I have not done one insertion since we got it but he does them all himself, which is a huge change from the previous iteration. He's a busy kid, knowing that he can just take a quick glance at his blood glucose to make better treatment decisions is reassuring. Of course we still love the alerts and alarms and that we can set them and turn them off how we want. If your glucose alerts and readings for the G six do not match symptoms or expectations use a blood glucose meter to make diabetes treatment decisions. To learn more, go to diabetes connections.com and click on the Dexcom logo. A couple of quick housekeeping notes we will have a regular episode next week. Our regular episodes are on Tuesdays. So we will have one for you next week. We will not have an in the news edition of Diabetes Connections. Thanksgiving week though. I will not be doing that live on Wednesday and there will not be an episode Friday the 26th I will say if anything really big happens if we get an FDA approval, you know something like that. I'll probably pop on and give you an update. I you know, I know we're all waiting for something so I can't promise I won't do it. It's not it's like the news person in me I was in you know, I've been doing this since I was 19. So if something breaks, I'm gonna have to jump on. Even if Slade is like, you know, making turkey behind me. We'll figure it out. But right now again this week, the week of the 16th. We will have the regular in the news on Wednesday, which will become an audio only podcast on Friday. The following week. We will have a regular episode, but there will be no in the News episode Thanksgiving week. All right. With that thank you to my editor John Bukenas from audio editing solutions. Thank you so much for listening I'm Stacey Simms I will see you back here for in the news this week until then be kind to yourself Diabetes. Benny  40:10 Connections is a production of Stacey Simms media All rights reserved. All wrongs avenged

The goop Podcast
How Do We Play as Adults?

The goop Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 33:15


Intimacy coach Amina Peterson (one of the featured experts on our Netflix show Sex, Love & goop) wants us to acknowledge that sex is how we play as adults. And she wants us to expand what we think of as sex and play. Peterson shares practices that combine lightness and playfulness with admiration and adoration. These acts remind us that sacred is not synonymous with serious and somber. One example is mirror work, the practice of looking in the mirror and really seeing yourself. If that sounds intimidating, keep listening. And if you're looking for more pleasure tools, see our new intimacy toolkit. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Ignition Tucson
Genesis 41 Part 2

Ignition Tucson

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021


God had been preparing Joseph since he was a young boy to stand before Pharaoh with a plan that will save the world.

Ignition Tucson
Genesis 41 Part 1

Ignition Tucson

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021


Joseph finally begins to see things turn around as the Lord sets him up to be the most powerful man in the land.

Unrestricted with Ben Leber
Jason Matheson. 2X Emmy Award Winning Entertainer. Radio & TV star.

Unrestricted with Ben Leber

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 78:26


Special Thanks:www.wellscare.net  World's only hands-free at-home cold laser therapy devicewww.wexford-harbour.com/unrestricted Optimized family/business insuranceJason Matheson:- 2X Emmy Award Winner- 2016 Marconi Award nominee- Columbia College alumni- Co-host of the Jason and Alex Show on MyTalk 107.1 in the Twin Cities- Creator and Host of the The Jason Show on Fox9 in the Twin Cities- Host of podcast Two Fairy Godfathers- Disney World for Adults                     https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/two-fairy-godfathers/id1451209537- Owner of Betty & Earls Biscuit Kitchen: https://bettyandearls.com/

Friends Next Door
S2E31. Things We Hated as Kids, But Love as Adults

Friends Next Door

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 50:30


What's changed with age? If you think about it, a lot of things can change with age, but what about things that you just COULD NOT STAND as a kid but you are now so on board with as an adult? Did your taste...mature and now you look at broccoli with hearts in your eyes? (Hey health is wealth.) Did you used to hate the rain, but find yourself not minding it at all and even think it's...romantic (lol)? Funny how these things change with passage of time. Come join our convo and reminisce :) As always, if you have a burning question, find us here: Email: frndsnextdoor@gmail.com IG: @frndsnextdoor Dan: @therealdanchen Mia: @msmiaaa Thomas: @mundane_photos

Show Me The Meaning! – A Wisecrack Movie Podcast
Bottle Rocket (directed by Wes Anderson) - Kids Being Adults, Adults Being Kids ft Thomas Flight

Show Me The Meaning! – A Wisecrack Movie Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 65:20


Join the Wisecrack crew and special guest Thomas Flight as they discuss Wes Anderson's feature film debut BOTTLE ROCKET (1996)! In this chat, we talk auteur theory in filmmaking, breaking down what makes Wes Anderson's movie so "Wes Anderson-y," gunfights in his style, this film as a debut, and more! Enjoy! Thanks to Storyblocks for sponsoring this episode. Check out all of Storyblocks' subscription plans today! Go to https://storyblocks.com/wisecrack Want ad-free episodes plus BONUS CONTENT? Become a patron today! patreon.com/wisecrack Have thoughts? Let us know - we may play it on air! Leave us a voicemail: +1 (213) 534-8807 Leave us an email: movies@wisecrack.co Hearing the hosts talk about comments from 'the chat'? Join the livestream discussion on our YouTube channel every Tuesday at 6pm PST! https://wscrk.com/3xBI3vu Follow us on Twitter for more deep dives on discussions from the show! @SMTM_pod @austin_hayden (Austin) @ryansgameshow (Ryan) @creamatoria (Raymond) @thomasflight (Thomas) https://www.thomasflight.com/ (for more Thomas content!) SUBSCRIBE TO SHOW ME THE MEANING!: Apple Podcasts ► https://wscrk.com/3jCDFbJ Amazon Music ► https://wscrk.com/3l12tv1 Spotify ► https://wscrk.com/3AXla8h Stitcher ► https://wscrk.com/39NI3zk YouTube ► https://wscrk.com/3meO1yF Other Wisecrack Podcasts! Culture Binge: https://wscrk.com/culturebinge Respect Our Authoritah!: https://wscrk.com/respect The Squanch: https://wscrk.com/squanch Thanks to RODE for decking out our studio! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices