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Form of government

  • 702PODCASTS
  • 1,197EPISODES
  • 31mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Aug 9, 2022LATEST
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Best podcasts about parliamentary

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Latest podcast episodes about parliamentary

Feisty Productions
Crisis. What crisis?

Feisty Productions

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 63:19


As Boris Johnson is posted missing and suddenly discovers a set of Parliamentary rules that conveniently means he can't create an emergency budget the two Tory leadership candidates continue to punt themselves to their narrow constituency. Liz Truss's economic plans being rubbished by left and right both and Rishi Sunak letting slip the reality of "levelling up" in Tunbridge Wells.Both claim to be the inheritors of the Thatcher legacy and both as Prime Minister would fail to tackle the root causes of the current economic crisis within privatised  Brexit Britain.However Truss's policies make even Sunak's appear logical and progressive.Lesley questions whether any of this will have any impact on the 160,000 Tory members who will be deciding our next PM?Great play has been made by both, that any public sector pay rises would fuel inflation.  We look at what Tory economic policies have meant to working people over the last decade and just who the winners and losers are.There's growing momentum behind the "Don't Pay" campaign demanding a reduction of energy bills to an affordable level. With another massive hike on October 1st and predictions of the cap rising to over £4000 in January is this a campaign whose time has come?Meanwhile Angela Rayner in Edinburgh,once again, revealed quite how out of touch Labour is on the issue of indyref2. She ruled out working with the SNP in a hung Parliament, claiming that Scottish independence would lead to "perpetual Conservatism at Westminster". We ask what difference, if any, a Starmer Labour government would make. ★ Support this podcast ★

Polity.org.za Audio Articles
Court rules Mkhwebane violated Ivan Pillay's constitutional rights in latest SARS report

Polity.org.za Audio Articles

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 3:28


Suspended Public Protector Busisiwe Mkhwebane's latest report on former South African Revenue Service (SARS) official Ivan Pillay – who last week lambasted her investigations into SARS – has been invalidated "by agreement" with her office. The Gauteng High Court in Pretoria on Monday ordered that the report, which centred on an 18-year-old IT contract, "is reviewed, declared unlawful and set aside" in each instance where it related to Pillay. More damagingly for Mkhwebane, whose impeachment inquiry continues on Wednesday, the high court also found that the beleaguered Public Protector acted "in breach" of Pillay's constitutional rights by failing to provide him with: "any notice whatsoever of the investigation; "any of the rights to which he is entitled to in terms of section 7(9) of the Public Protector Act, 23 of 1994; and "any right to be heard on the remedial action that the first respondent contemplated granting against him." Given that Mkhwebane has routinely been lambasted by the courts for failing to afford the subjects of her most barbed investigations – including President Cyril Ramaphosa and Public Enterprises Minister Pravin Gordhan - these same rights, the high court's ruling is very likely to be part of the arsenal of evidence that she needs to address when she testifies at her impeachment inquiry. In her now partially invalidated report on the SARS' IT contract, Mkhwebane recommended that the Hawks consider investigating alleged criminal conduct by current and former SARS bosses, including Edward Kieswetter and Gordhan. She released that report on SARS' 2006 contract with software firm Budge, Barone & Dominick (BBD) less than three hours after the State Capture Inquiry found in its latest report that Gordhan was instrumental in resisting the Guptas' takeover of Treasury. The complaint of "maladministration, improper conduct and procurement irregularities" which prompted the probe, had been launched by former government spokesperson, and current Jacob Zuma Foundation frontman, Mzwanele Manyi, in 2016. While SARS had used a specific Treasury regulation, which provides for deviation from normal procurement processes without the need to put it out to tender, Mkhwebane said she "could not find compelling reasons for them to do so". The Public Protector Act also says that the Public Protector should not consider any complaint unless its reported within two years of the incident, barring special circumstances. Mkhwebane, in this case, said she was deviating from the two-year rule because of "special circumstances". While the Office of the Public Protector has yet to comment on the high court's ruling, Pillay's lawyers have released a statement, in which they noted that Mkhwebane's latest SARS report was the third in which she made adverse findings against Pillay. Both of the other two Public Protector reports that made findings against Pillay – including the so-called SARS "Rogue Unit" report and the report on his early retirement – have been overturned by the courts. "Testifying as a witness on Friday, in the proceedings of the Section 194 Parliamentary inquiry into the fitness of advocate Busisiwe Mkhwebane to hold office, Mr. Pillay highlighted a litany of similar abuses of power in these investigations conducted by the Public Protector against him," his lawyers said.

The Steve Gruber Show
Steve Gruber, once again, the Dems hell bent on destroying the Middle Class in America have used a parliamentary trick to ram more inflation fueling legislation down the throats of the American people

The Steve Gruber Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 11:00


Live from the No Panic Zone—I'm Steve Gruber—I am America's Voice—God Bless America—God Bless You and let's do this! This is the Steve Gruber show— here to vaccinate you against rampant ignorance—roll up your sleeve—   Here are three big things you need to know right now—   ONE— President Joe Biden has finally tested negative on his Covid test—no word on whether he tested positive for his cognitive test—we will keep you up to date— but it doesn't look good— TWO— American scientists—using millions—and possibly billions of tax payer dollars discovered the missing link—on the road to permanent green energy—a true American game changer—BUT guess what? We GAVE it to China! THREE— And once again—the Democrats—hell bent on destroying the Middle Class in America— have used a parliamentary trick to ram more inflation fueling legislation down the throats of the American people—   There is no question that the new Inflation Reduction Act of 2022—will almost certainly have the opposite effect as the completely fraudulent name implies—BUT what would you expect?   One of the features of the reckless legislation—is a doubling of IRS agents—by adding 87,000 new revenue agents—and lets be totally up front about this—they are not coming after millionaires and billionaires—they are coming after you—and ordinary folks everywhere—and if you missed the other headlines—they have also been buying up piles of guns and ammunition—now why on earth would they need that?   It seems the acceleration of the transition—can come with a single party—and no bi-partisan support for anything—because the Democrats don't really care about Republican votes—they actually are working as fast as possible to upend election integrity—ban voter ID—make mass mail-in ballots permanent along with weeks of early voting and weeks to count the votes too—all of which makes our elections less safe every time they do these things—   The new legislation however—is the worst yet—claiming that it will help energy companies and consumers—that it will lower inflation and help out ordinary people—and the simple question is how is that going to happen—   I mean consider the fact that more than half of the new taxes in this mess—will fall on families making less than $200,000 a year—which means Dementia Joe—lied about all the nobody making less than $400,000 blah blah blah—not that he remembers any of that—I mean—he cannot remember breakfast—or where to sit—or who to talk to without crib notes anymore—BUT at least he is focused on running for another term at the age of 116—I mean he is a very old 79—if we are going to tell the truth about all of this—  

Afternoon Drive with John Maytham
Public protector parliament inquiry continues

Afternoon Drive with John Maytham

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 7:40


Suspended Public Protector Busisiwe Mkhwebane is facing a parliamentary inquiry into her fitness to hold office. EWN's Parliamentary correspondent Lindsay Dentlinger joins us with an update on the progress of today's inquiry.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

New Books in Christian Studies
John Callow, "The Last Witches of England: A Tragedy of Sorcery and Superstition" (Bloomsbury, 2021)

New Books in Christian Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 56:29


On the morning of Thursday 29 June 1682, a magpie came rasping, rapping and tapping at the window of a prosperous Devon merchant. Frightened by its appearance, his servants and members of his family had, within a matter of hours, convinced themselves that the bird was an emissary of the devil sent by witches to destroy the fabric of their lives. As the result of these allegations, three women of Bideford came to be forever defined as witches. A Secretary of State brushed aside their case and condemned them to the gallows; to hang as the last group of women to be executed in England for the crime. Yet, the hatred of their neighbours endured. For Bideford, it was said, was a place of witches. Though 'pretty much worn away' the belief in witchcraft still lingered on for more than a century after their deaths. In turn, ignored, reviled, and extinguished but never more than half-forgotten, it seems that the memory of these three women - and of their deeds and sufferings, both real and imagined – was transformed from canker to regret, and from regret into celebration in our own age. Indeed, their example was cited during the final Parliamentary debates, in 1951, that saw the last of the witchcraft acts repealed, and their names were chanted, as both inspiration and incantation, by the women beyond the wire at Greenham Common. In The Last Witches of England: A Tragedy of Sorcery and Superstition (Bloomsbury, 2021), Dr. John Callow explores this remarkable reversal of fate, and the remarkable tale of the Bideford Witches. This interview was conducted by Dr. Miranda Melcher whose doctoral work focused on post-conflict military integration, understanding treaty negotiation and implementation in civil war contexts, with qualitative analysis of the Angolan and Mozambican civil wars. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/christian-studies

New Books in Gender Studies
John Callow, "The Last Witches of England: A Tragedy of Sorcery and Superstition" (Bloomsbury, 2021)

New Books in Gender Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 56:29


On the morning of Thursday 29 June 1682, a magpie came rasping, rapping and tapping at the window of a prosperous Devon merchant. Frightened by its appearance, his servants and members of his family had, within a matter of hours, convinced themselves that the bird was an emissary of the devil sent by witches to destroy the fabric of their lives. As the result of these allegations, three women of Bideford came to be forever defined as witches. A Secretary of State brushed aside their case and condemned them to the gallows; to hang as the last group of women to be executed in England for the crime. Yet, the hatred of their neighbours endured. For Bideford, it was said, was a place of witches. Though 'pretty much worn away' the belief in witchcraft still lingered on for more than a century after their deaths. In turn, ignored, reviled, and extinguished but never more than half-forgotten, it seems that the memory of these three women - and of their deeds and sufferings, both real and imagined – was transformed from canker to regret, and from regret into celebration in our own age. Indeed, their example was cited during the final Parliamentary debates, in 1951, that saw the last of the witchcraft acts repealed, and their names were chanted, as both inspiration and incantation, by the women beyond the wire at Greenham Common. In The Last Witches of England: A Tragedy of Sorcery and Superstition (Bloomsbury, 2021), Dr. John Callow explores this remarkable reversal of fate, and the remarkable tale of the Bideford Witches. This interview was conducted by Dr. Miranda Melcher whose doctoral work focused on post-conflict military integration, understanding treaty negotiation and implementation in civil war contexts, with qualitative analysis of the Angolan and Mozambican civil wars. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/gender-studies

New Books in History
John Callow, "The Last Witches of England: A Tragedy of Sorcery and Superstition" (Bloomsbury, 2021)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 56:29


On the morning of Thursday 29 June 1682, a magpie came rasping, rapping and tapping at the window of a prosperous Devon merchant. Frightened by its appearance, his servants and members of his family had, within a matter of hours, convinced themselves that the bird was an emissary of the devil sent by witches to destroy the fabric of their lives. As the result of these allegations, three women of Bideford came to be forever defined as witches. A Secretary of State brushed aside their case and condemned them to the gallows; to hang as the last group of women to be executed in England for the crime. Yet, the hatred of their neighbours endured. For Bideford, it was said, was a place of witches. Though 'pretty much worn away' the belief in witchcraft still lingered on for more than a century after their deaths. In turn, ignored, reviled, and extinguished but never more than half-forgotten, it seems that the memory of these three women - and of their deeds and sufferings, both real and imagined – was transformed from canker to regret, and from regret into celebration in our own age. Indeed, their example was cited during the final Parliamentary debates, in 1951, that saw the last of the witchcraft acts repealed, and their names were chanted, as both inspiration and incantation, by the women beyond the wire at Greenham Common. In The Last Witches of England: A Tragedy of Sorcery and Superstition (Bloomsbury, 2021), Dr. John Callow explores this remarkable reversal of fate, and the remarkable tale of the Bideford Witches. This interview was conducted by Dr. Miranda Melcher whose doctoral work focused on post-conflict military integration, understanding treaty negotiation and implementation in civil war contexts, with qualitative analysis of the Angolan and Mozambican civil wars. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books Network
John Callow, "The Last Witches of England: A Tragedy of Sorcery and Superstition" (Bloomsbury, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 56:29


On the morning of Thursday 29 June 1682, a magpie came rasping, rapping and tapping at the window of a prosperous Devon merchant. Frightened by its appearance, his servants and members of his family had, within a matter of hours, convinced themselves that the bird was an emissary of the devil sent by witches to destroy the fabric of their lives. As the result of these allegations, three women of Bideford came to be forever defined as witches. A Secretary of State brushed aside their case and condemned them to the gallows; to hang as the last group of women to be executed in England for the crime. Yet, the hatred of their neighbours endured. For Bideford, it was said, was a place of witches. Though 'pretty much worn away' the belief in witchcraft still lingered on for more than a century after their deaths. In turn, ignored, reviled, and extinguished but never more than half-forgotten, it seems that the memory of these three women - and of their deeds and sufferings, both real and imagined – was transformed from canker to regret, and from regret into celebration in our own age. Indeed, their example was cited during the final Parliamentary debates, in 1951, that saw the last of the witchcraft acts repealed, and their names were chanted, as both inspiration and incantation, by the women beyond the wire at Greenham Common. In The Last Witches of England: A Tragedy of Sorcery and Superstition (Bloomsbury, 2021), Dr. John Callow explores this remarkable reversal of fate, and the remarkable tale of the Bideford Witches. This interview was conducted by Dr. Miranda Melcher whose doctoral work focused on post-conflict military integration, understanding treaty negotiation and implementation in civil war contexts, with qualitative analysis of the Angolan and Mozambican civil wars. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Religion
John Callow, "The Last Witches of England: A Tragedy of Sorcery and Superstition" (Bloomsbury, 2021)

New Books in Religion

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 56:29


On the morning of Thursday 29 June 1682, a magpie came rasping, rapping and tapping at the window of a prosperous Devon merchant. Frightened by its appearance, his servants and members of his family had, within a matter of hours, convinced themselves that the bird was an emissary of the devil sent by witches to destroy the fabric of their lives. As the result of these allegations, three women of Bideford came to be forever defined as witches. A Secretary of State brushed aside their case and condemned them to the gallows; to hang as the last group of women to be executed in England for the crime. Yet, the hatred of their neighbours endured. For Bideford, it was said, was a place of witches. Though 'pretty much worn away' the belief in witchcraft still lingered on for more than a century after their deaths. In turn, ignored, reviled, and extinguished but never more than half-forgotten, it seems that the memory of these three women - and of their deeds and sufferings, both real and imagined – was transformed from canker to regret, and from regret into celebration in our own age. Indeed, their example was cited during the final Parliamentary debates, in 1951, that saw the last of the witchcraft acts repealed, and their names were chanted, as both inspiration and incantation, by the women beyond the wire at Greenham Common. In The Last Witches of England: A Tragedy of Sorcery and Superstition (Bloomsbury, 2021), Dr. John Callow explores this remarkable reversal of fate, and the remarkable tale of the Bideford Witches. This interview was conducted by Dr. Miranda Melcher whose doctoral work focused on post-conflict military integration, understanding treaty negotiation and implementation in civil war contexts, with qualitative analysis of the Angolan and Mozambican civil wars. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/religion

New Books in British Studies
John Callow, "The Last Witches of England: A Tragedy of Sorcery and Superstition" (Bloomsbury, 2021)

New Books in British Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 56:29


On the morning of Thursday 29 June 1682, a magpie came rasping, rapping and tapping at the window of a prosperous Devon merchant. Frightened by its appearance, his servants and members of his family had, within a matter of hours, convinced themselves that the bird was an emissary of the devil sent by witches to destroy the fabric of their lives. As the result of these allegations, three women of Bideford came to be forever defined as witches. A Secretary of State brushed aside their case and condemned them to the gallows; to hang as the last group of women to be executed in England for the crime. Yet, the hatred of their neighbours endured. For Bideford, it was said, was a place of witches. Though 'pretty much worn away' the belief in witchcraft still lingered on for more than a century after their deaths. In turn, ignored, reviled, and extinguished but never more than half-forgotten, it seems that the memory of these three women - and of their deeds and sufferings, both real and imagined – was transformed from canker to regret, and from regret into celebration in our own age. Indeed, their example was cited during the final Parliamentary debates, in 1951, that saw the last of the witchcraft acts repealed, and their names were chanted, as both inspiration and incantation, by the women beyond the wire at Greenham Common. In The Last Witches of England: A Tragedy of Sorcery and Superstition (Bloomsbury, 2021), Dr. John Callow explores this remarkable reversal of fate, and the remarkable tale of the Bideford Witches. This interview was conducted by Dr. Miranda Melcher whose doctoral work focused on post-conflict military integration, understanding treaty negotiation and implementation in civil war contexts, with qualitative analysis of the Angolan and Mozambican civil wars. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/british-studies

NBN Book of the Day
John Callow, "The Last Witches of England: A Tragedy of Sorcery and Superstition" (Bloomsbury, 2021)

NBN Book of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 56:29


On the morning of Thursday 29 June 1682, a magpie came rasping, rapping and tapping at the window of a prosperous Devon merchant. Frightened by its appearance, his servants and members of his family had, within a matter of hours, convinced themselves that the bird was an emissary of the devil sent by witches to destroy the fabric of their lives. As the result of these allegations, three women of Bideford came to be forever defined as witches. A Secretary of State brushed aside their case and condemned them to the gallows; to hang as the last group of women to be executed in England for the crime. Yet, the hatred of their neighbours endured. For Bideford, it was said, was a place of witches. Though 'pretty much worn away' the belief in witchcraft still lingered on for more than a century after their deaths. In turn, ignored, reviled, and extinguished but never more than half-forgotten, it seems that the memory of these three women - and of their deeds and sufferings, both real and imagined – was transformed from canker to regret, and from regret into celebration in our own age. Indeed, their example was cited during the final Parliamentary debates, in 1951, that saw the last of the witchcraft acts repealed, and their names were chanted, as both inspiration and incantation, by the women beyond the wire at Greenham Common. In The Last Witches of England: A Tragedy of Sorcery and Superstition (Bloomsbury, 2021), Dr. John Callow explores this remarkable reversal of fate, and the remarkable tale of the Bideford Witches. This interview was conducted by Dr. Miranda Melcher whose doctoral work focused on post-conflict military integration, understanding treaty negotiation and implementation in civil war contexts, with qualitative analysis of the Angolan and Mozambican civil wars. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/book-of-the-day

New Books in Law
John Callow, "The Last Witches of England: A Tragedy of Sorcery and Superstition" (Bloomsbury, 2021)

New Books in Law

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 56:29


On the morning of Thursday 29 June 1682, a magpie came rasping, rapping and tapping at the window of a prosperous Devon merchant. Frightened by its appearance, his servants and members of his family had, within a matter of hours, convinced themselves that the bird was an emissary of the devil sent by witches to destroy the fabric of their lives. As the result of these allegations, three women of Bideford came to be forever defined as witches. A Secretary of State brushed aside their case and condemned them to the gallows; to hang as the last group of women to be executed in England for the crime. Yet, the hatred of their neighbours endured. For Bideford, it was said, was a place of witches. Though 'pretty much worn away' the belief in witchcraft still lingered on for more than a century after their deaths. In turn, ignored, reviled, and extinguished but never more than half-forgotten, it seems that the memory of these three women - and of their deeds and sufferings, both real and imagined – was transformed from canker to regret, and from regret into celebration in our own age. Indeed, their example was cited during the final Parliamentary debates, in 1951, that saw the last of the witchcraft acts repealed, and their names were chanted, as both inspiration and incantation, by the women beyond the wire at Greenham Common. In The Last Witches of England: A Tragedy of Sorcery and Superstition (Bloomsbury, 2021), Dr. John Callow explores this remarkable reversal of fate, and the remarkable tale of the Bideford Witches. This interview was conducted by Dr. Miranda Melcher whose doctoral work focused on post-conflict military integration, understanding treaty negotiation and implementation in civil war contexts, with qualitative analysis of the Angolan and Mozambican civil wars. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/law

BFM :: General
All Things Considered, An Encouraging Parliamentary Season

BFM :: General

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 22:04


We look back at this session of parliament, what it achieved, and other notable highlights. Image Source: Jaggat Rashidi, Shutterstock

Breaking Politics Podcast
Breaking Politics - the week in #auspol

Breaking Politics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 44:17


Parliamentary sitting week, migration scheme, gas shortages, al-Qaida leader killed, Homelessness Week.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Drive with Jim Wilson
The latest on today's John Barilaro parliamentary hearing

Drive with Jim Wilson

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 5:25


Clinton Maynard has an update.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Mediawatch
Public media legislation takes another step

Mediawatch

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2022 4:18


The Bill setting out the role and obligations of the new public media entity easily passed its first reading in Parliament this week. Members of the public can finally have their say on the plan formed behind-closed-doors when a Parliamentary committee scrutinises the Aotearoa New Zealand Public Media Bill over the next six months.

RNZ: Mediawatch
Public media legislation takes another step

RNZ: Mediawatch

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2022 4:18


The Bill setting out the role and obligations of the new public media entity easily passed its first reading in Parliament this week. Members of the public can finally have their say on the plan formed behind-closed-doors when a Parliamentary committee scrutinises the Aotearoa New Zealand Public Media Bill over the next six months.

Business Drive
Tunisian President To Order Parliamentary Polls

Business Drive

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 1:09


Tunisian President Kais Saied says draft decrees will be prepared for the holding of an election for a new parliament and a second chamber for regions. The president noted the need to prepare a draft decree related to the election of a new parliament and the Council of Regions and Districts. The president also noted that a draft decree related to the Constitutional Court would be prepared, in accordance with provisions of the new constitution, the statement added. Tunisia's election commission says that preliminary results indicated that a referendum on the constitution delivered a yes vote of 94.6% with a turnout of 30.5%.

Heather du Plessis-Allan Drive
Heather du Plessis-Allan: It's not fair that cops get the blame for road toll increase

Heather du Plessis-Allan Drive

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 2:16


I feel the cops are being lined up to take the blame for the increase in this year's road deaths, and I actually don't think that would be fair at all. It turns out we're heading for a high road toll again this year. According to officials, we're probably going to end up with somewhere between 350 to 360 deaths. If you look across the last decade, that's very much at the high end of things. And it's the very opposite of what should be happening. We've got the Government's Road to Zero plan, so we should be heading in the other direction – we're supposed to be aiming for 0 road deaths by 2050. Set aside how unrealistic that goal is to those of us who think rationally, the transport bureaucrats seem to be extremely serious about this, and they're making it very clear who they blame for the uptick in road deaths: the police. This is not the first time transport officials and politicians have blamed the cops for not doing enough things like breath testing and speed camera work and so on and whatever else they expect from the police. This cop blaming has been going on for a little while now, so I'm going to assume that this is deliberate and that this a strategy from the transport people to take the heat off themselves for their own failures. But it's not fair on the police. Because they've been pulled every which way by Government demands in the last two years. These guys were manning MIQ facilities, manning borders around Auckland every time the city went into lockdown, they were sent up north to babysit Hone Harawira's checkpoints so the local iwi could get its way and not pack a tanty if they were told no, they were called in to deal with the Parliamentary protests for the entire time that went on. And meanwhile, they're also trying to deal with a spike in crime in ram raiding and gang activity. They're only so many police to go around – there's not an infinite supply of these people, they can't be everywhere at once. The transport officials are on a hiding to nothing blaming the police. We've all watched the way the coppers have been pulled hither and thither in the last two years. I suspect public sympathy in this one is going to be with the police. They do not deserve to be apportion blame here, they're actually deserving to just be given a break.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

SBS World News Radio
Robust Question Times signal parliamentary business as usual

SBS World News Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 4:12


Parliament has officially sat for the first time since the election but while the faces in the chambers have changed, much of the combative behaviour, it appears, has not.

TGOR
Mornings July 27, 2022 Hour 2

TGOR

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 33:21


Parliamentary hearings concerning payouts by Hockey Canada for alleged sexual assaults, Sheldon Kennedy wants leadership change within Hockey Canada, Bobby Ryan runs into trouble in Nashville and the Redblacks get back to work.

SBS Sinhala - SBS සිංහල වැඩසටහන
Labor's first parliamentary sitting in nine years began today: Australian News in Sinhala on 26 July - වසර නවයකට පසුව කම්කරු පක්ෂ රජයක පළමු පාර්ලිමේන්තු සැසිය

SBS Sinhala - SBS සිංහල වැඩසටහන

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 12:58


Listen to the latest news from Australia, Sri Lanka, and across the globe, and the latest news from the sports world on SBS Sinhala radio news – Tuesday, 26 July 2022. - ඔස්ට්‍රේලියාවේ සහ ශ්‍රී ලංකාවේ නවතම පුවත් මෙන්ම විදෙස් පුවත් සහ ක්‍රීඩා පුවත් රැගත් SBS සිංහල සේවයේ 2022 ජූලි 26 වන දා අඟහරුවාදා වැඩසටහනේ ප්‍රවෘත්ති ප්‍රකාශයට සවන් දීමට ඉහත ඡායාරූපය මත ඇති speaker සලකුණ මත click කරන්න.

RNZ: Nine To Noon
A digital-only future? Ensuring public services stay accessible

RNZ: Nine To Noon

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 14:05


A petition for more inclusive public services will be the subject of a one-hour special Parliamentary debate tomorrow. The campaign, run by the Citizens Advice Bureau, calls for government services to be accessible to people in the ways they need; whether that's online, in-person, or over-the-phone. The Citizens Advice Bureau says the public service is heading towards a digital-only future, but over-reliance on online platforms and the removal of people from the delivery of government services is marginalising the most vulnerable. Kathryn speaks to Andrew Hubbard, the acting chief executive of Citizens Advice Bureau about the petition and tomorrow's debate.

Heather du Plessis-Allan Drive
Lara Greaves: Political commentator as Swarbrick says she is 'not in the running' to replace James Shaw

Heather du Plessis-Allan Drive

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 2:35


Green MP Chlöe Swarbrick has ruled herself out from running for the party's co-leadership. In a statement posted to Facebook, Swarbrick said there had been a lot of speculation in recent days since co-leader James Shaw was ousted from the position at the Greens' annual conference. "What happened at our AGM was unprecedented and I, like all of our Green MPs, wanted to respect the process and take time to reflect and listen. That reflection will continue in the coming days and weeks. "I am not in the running for the Co-Leadership. Thank you to all of the lovely and kind people who've expressed their confidence in me. I will continue my work as Auckland Central's MP, in my Parliamentary portfolios and on Finance and Expenditure committee." Earlier today Shaw confirmed he would contest the leadership, saying he was quietly confident of being re-elected. "I am in it to win it," Shaw told reporters saying he had spoken to party members and family and had decided to stand again as Green Party co-leader. Shaw made the announcement after failing to get the 75 per cent votes of delegates at the party's online annual meeting at the weekend to be reconfirmed in the role. Co-leader Marama Davidson was reconfirmed by delegates. This opens up the co-leadership role this week to challengers. Pundits have speculated that Swarbrick may have a tilt for the co-leadership given her popularity. "If the media wants to talk leadership, let's talk about it," Swarbrick said today. "We'll find it in the young people putting their futures on the line for the climate movement. We'll find it on union pickets for fair pay and conditions. We find it in our classrooms with our teachers, in our hospitals with the nurses and midwives and health workers who deserve healthy conditions and quality wages. "Those are the leaders who need our backing and that is where our energy is needed to change the politics - and the power dynamics - of this country and this world."See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Farming Today
21/07/2022 No parliamentary scrutiny for the Australia trade deal, Dairy feed

Farming Today

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 13:41


The Government has failed to give MPs the chance to debate the trade deal with Australia in the House of Commons. Australia is the first post-Brexit trade deal to be negotiated from scratch. Farmers have objected to its terms; they say it will let in too much beef and lamb produced at standards below those in the UK. Parliamentary scrutiny was promised many times over the last few years. We ask what happened. As part of our week looking at livestock feed, today we hear from a dairy farmer. The recent uncertainty has pushed up animal feed prices which in turn has trickled down to shoppers. Presented by Anna Hill and produced by Beatrice Fenton.

Major Daughter Live The Podcast
LISTEN | The Parliamentary inquiry into Public Protector Busisiwe Mkhwebane's fitness to hold office begins #MdnTv #MdnNews

Major Daughter Live The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 220:31


Breaking News, Trending News, Making Headlines, Latest News, weather, top local stories, international stories, celebrity news and Russian Invasion Of Ukraine. Send your videos and pictures to media@mdntv.live. Rich, online digital channel bouquet to pick from [www.mdntv.live]. No dull moments here, Monday to Sunday, 24/7. We stoop to satiate your online desire. There is something to entertain, inform, educate, enrich you, your family, and all. Watch directly and LIVE STREAM on https://www.mdntv.live LISTEN ON MDNTV THE PODCAST ️Available on all digital platforms https://link.chtbl.com/3O9k3mdF For Interviews and news email interviews@mdntv.live For Advertising advertising@mdntv.live #Mdntv #MdnNews #thisismedia #media #whatthemediawillnotshowyou #whatthemediawontshow #medias #mediaperson #me #press #reporters #tvhost #tvhostnews #freshnews #tv #television #news #meme #viral #india #new #bhfyp #indonesia #usa #trending #sport #hiphop #video #youtube #business #football #world #sports #news #coronavirus #corona #facts #headlines #todaysnews #newsreporter #updatenews #newstoday #newsoftheday #newsupdate #latestnews #dailynews #sports #nflnews #patrickmahomes #fantasysports #nflnow #trending #nfldraft #espnnews #nflupdates #breakingnews --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/major-daughter/message

British Culture: Albion Never Dies
The Next Prime Minister

British Culture: Albion Never Dies

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 20:01


The Prime Minister is the most visible representation of the UK, after the Queen. Travelling around the world, I have often been asked my views on Thatcher, Blair, and the most recent incumbent of Number 10 Downing Street, Boris Johnson (BoJo).Since Boris Jonson announced his resignation on the 7th July, the Conservative Party has been focused on selecting its next Parliamentary leader. As this is the largest political party in the House of Commons, whoever wins will certainly be the next Prime Minister.In this episode, I give some background to events, both surrounding BoJo, and the office of Prime Minister itself. I outline the selection process and how it works. I also give a brief overview of the main contenders at time of recording. If you enjoy this episode, let me know, and I shall give further updates. Currently, no candidate has personally contacted me. You can find me on Instagram: @FlemingNeverDiesYou can e-mail me: AlbionNeverDies@Gmail.comCheck out my Youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/britishculture   Support the show

Keep Calm And Cauliflower Cheese
Red Heat Warning, Parliamentary Petulance, Pork Markets, Tuna Mayo, Ice yer Pants

Keep Calm And Cauliflower Cheese

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 40:06


  Red Heat Warning, Parliamentary Petulance, Pork Markets, Tuna Mayo, Ice yer Pants

The Midday Report with Mandy Wiener
Day 4 of parliamentary hearing into PP's fitness to hold office- former SARS boss Ivan Pillay testifying today.

The Midday Report with Mandy Wiener

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 3:48


Guest: Kgomotso Modise, EWN reporterSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Conversations with Kunmi
A mini-series: Who will be the next Leader of the Conservative Party/ UK Prime Minister?

Conversations with Kunmi

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 26:49


Hello everyone and I am back! If you have been leaving under a rock, the UK Prime Minister, Boris Johnson has resigned. A new leader is expected on Tuesday 6th September 2022. The UK has a Parliamentary system of Government, which means the Leader of the party with a majority of Members of Parliament forms the government. The Conservative Party is expected to choose a new leader and the battle for who will replace Boris Johnson has already begun. This episode was recorded on Monday 11th of July 2022. It was published on Wednesday 13th July 2022 at 4:40 pm. Currently, voting has officially finished in the Tory leadership first round and there are 8 Candidates on the ballot. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/conversationswithkunmi/support

Afternoon Drive with John Maytham
Suspended Public Protector Busisiwe Mkhwebane's parliamentary impeachment begins

Afternoon Drive with John Maytham

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2022 4:35


Guest: Babalo Ndenze | Parliamentary Correspondent at EWN See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

KBS WORLD Radio News
News(Top News : President Yoon Suk Yeol appoints the country's new top financial regulator without a parliamentary hearing, citing many economic issues to be swiftly addressed.) - 2022.07.11 PM5

KBS WORLD Radio News

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2022


Last updated : 2022.07.11 The latest news from home and abroad, with a close eye on Northeast Asia and the Korean Peninsula in particular

World Today
Gotabaya Rajapaksa confirms resignation. What's next for Sri Lanka?

World Today

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2022 52:29


Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi and US Secretary of State Antony Blinken hold constructive talks in Bali. We discuss if there are positive signals for bilateral relations. (01:00) Also in Bali, Wang Yi meets with his Australian counterpart Penny Wong, as he urges Australia to treat China "as a partner, not a threat." (14:36) Sri Lankan President Gotabaya Rajapaksa confirms resignation. What comes next? (24:35) Japan's ruling coalition scores major victory in Parliamentary election, does that give Fumio Kishida an opportunity to revise the pacifist constitution? (34:28) China's CPI up 2.5% in June (42:53)

The Leader | Evening Standard daily
The Queen's powers and Boris Johnson's succession

The Leader | Evening Standard daily

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2022 11:30


The Queen's had a working relationship with 14 prime ministers during her 70-year reign, beginning with Sir Winston Churchill from 1952 to 1955.Now, this week as the Downing Street psychodrama unfolded, the monarch and her staff will have keenly followed developments.After all, our monarchy remains woven into matters of state happening just down the road from Buckingham Palace in Whitehall and the Palace of Westminster.Could the Queen get dragged into the fallout from the Johnson premiership, and what was her relationship like with the outgoing prime minister? We look at the Queen's role in times of national political flux and has the latest on the race to succeed Boris Johnson after his resignation speech.It comes as Johnson defies calls to leave No.10 immediately as the hunt for his successor hots up, with senior Tories looking to September for getting a new prime minister installed following shortlist selection, voting by party members and Parliamentary summer recess.To give us a glimpse into the protocols and legal practicalities of the Queen's rapport with Boris Johnson, we're joined by the Evening Standard's royal editor Robert Jobson.The Leader also discusses whether there's appetite for constitutional reform under future monarchs Charles and William. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Afternoon Drive with John Maytham
The parliamentary impeachment inquiry against suspended Public Protector Busisiwe Mkhwebane

Afternoon Drive with John Maytham

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 6:17


Guest: Karyn Maughan | journalist  at Business Day and Financial Mail See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Radio Sweden
NATO members sign accession protocols for Sweden, SAS files for bankruptcy protection in US, Liberals clear parliamentary threshold in poll

Radio Sweden

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 2:32


A round-up of the main headlines in Sweden on July 5th, 2022. You can hear more reports on our homepage www.radiosweden.se, or in our app Sveriges Radio Play. Presenter: Michael WalshProducer: Frank Radosevich

Never Mind The Bar Charts
Hope and headaches for the Liberal Democrats?

Never Mind The Bar Charts

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 3, 2022 42:23


How much more of a spring in our step should Liberal Democrats have after the Tiverton and Honiton win, and what are the lessons for the party? After discussing this last week with the Lib Dem Pod team, for the latest episode of Never Mind The Bar Charts I invited back an outside expert, political scientist Paula Surridge. Let's see how much cold water Paula has to pour on Lib Dem hopes... Feedback very welcome, and do share this podcast with others who you think may enjoy it. Show notes One, two, three Liberal Democrat Parliamentary by-election victories. Last year's popular episode with Paula after Chesham & Amersham. Graph from Will Jennings on the predictive power of Parliamentary by-elections.  The similarities between North Shropshire and Tiverton & Honiton: Paula Surridge's two graphs - one and two.  More in Common's polling and focus groups on trans rights. Follow council by-election results. UK in a Changing Europe website. Follow Paula Surridge on Twitter. Theme tune by Hugo Lee. New to listening to podcasts? Here are some tips on how to listen to podcasts. Enjoy the show? Spread the word Follow the show on Twitter. Like the show on Facebook. Share the show's website, www.NeverMindTheBarCharts.com.

Politics with Michelle Grattan
Parliamentary ‘newbies' inspect their workplace, with some complaints

Politics with Michelle Grattan

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 9:39


As well as her interviews with politicians and experts, Politics with Michelle Grattan includes “Word from The Hill”, where she discusses the news with members of The Conversation politics team. Michelle and Peter Browne from the Politics + Society team discuss Anthony Albanese's weighing a Ukraine visit and whether Australia will announce more support for that country and reopen its embassy there. They also canvass the just-released Lowy Institute's poll, which found a narrow majority of Australians support increased defence spending, and Defence Minister Richard Marles' announcement extending the terms of the military's top brass. Meanwhile Parliament House has been like the first week of school, with new MPs being briefed on how the place works. Crossbenchers are in a row with the government over Albanese's plan to cut back the additional staff they will get, above the entitlement of government and opposition backbenchers, from four in the last parliament to just one.

The Clement Manyathela Show
State Capture report part on the president, the ANC and parliamentary oversight.

The Clement Manyathela Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 44:03


Clement is in conversation with political editor at News24, Qaanitah Hunter, Associate Editor at Daily Maverick Marianne Merton, former mineral resource minister Dr Ngoako Ramathlodi, former Chairperson of the Parliament's Eskom Inquiry Zukiswa Rantho and Democratic Alliance Chief Whip Natasha Mazzone, zooming into what the state capture report says about the president, the ANC and parliamentary oversight See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

SBS World News Radio
Crossbench anger as government trims parliamentary staffers

SBS World News Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022 4:26


The move has been labelled by some as "an attack on democracy" that leaves independents and minor parties unable to property scrutinize legislation.

Radio Sweden
Radio Sweden Weekly: Looking back at Parliamentary turbulence as lawmakers go on recess

Radio Sweden

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 20:35


Also, we ask where Sweden's NATO application stands ahead of the summit in Madrid; find out how the Public Health Agency views the risk of monkeypox; and learn about how temperatures can vary within the same city. In this week's program, we speak to Nicholas Aylott, political scientist and associate professor of political science at Södertorn University; Mats Eriksson, political correspondent at Swedish Radio News; Erik Sturegård, medical doctor at the Public Health Agency; and Isabel Ribeiro, who works at SMHI's research department for urban climate.Producer: Brett Ascarelli

The Stand with Eamon Dunphy
Ep 1465: Terminal Setback for Macron as Left and Right Converge to Deny Him Parliamentary Majority

The Stand with Eamon Dunphy

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 30:48


Lara Marlowe talks to Eamon following the French National Assembly elections, Lara is Paris Correspondent for the Irish Times.Recorded on 21st June 2022. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information. Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/the-stand-with-eamon-dunphy.

Democracy in Question?
Current State of Affairs in Putin's Russia

Democracy in Question?

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 38:09


Guests featured in this episode:Masha Gessen,  a distinguished journalist & staff writer for the New Yorker.  Born in Moscow in the Soviet Union, Masha moved to the United States in 1981, only to return to Russia as a journalist a decade later. A strong critic of Putin's regime from the very outset, Masha decided to leave Russia and return to the US due to the politically motivated crackdown on gay parents by Russian authorities.They have authored 11 books, most recently, Surviving Autocracy (2020), an insightful account of the Trump Presidency that also draws on their experience of living in Russia. Two of their other books discussed within the podcast are; The Future Is History: How Totalitarianism Reclaimed Russia, and The Man without a Face: The Unlikely Rise of Vladimir Putin (2012).  GLOSSARYWho was Boris Yeltsin? (00:19:15 or p.5 in the transcript)Boris Yeltsin, Russian politician who became president of Russia in 1991, he was the first popularly elected leader in the country's history, guiding Russia through a stormy decade of political and economic retrenching. During his first presidency Yeltsin publicly supported the right of Soviet republics to greater autonomy within the Soviet Union, took steps to give the Russian republic more autonomy, and declared himself in favour of a market-oriented economy and a multiparty political system.At the same time, Russia's parliament, the Congress of People's Deputies, had grown increasingly hostile toward his free-market reforms. Yeltsin and the Congress were also deeply divided over the question of the balance of powers in Russia's proposed new constitution, which was needed to replace the obsolete 1978 Soviet-era Russian Constitution. On September 21, 1993, Yeltsin unconstitutionally dissolved  the Congress and called for new parliamentary elections. In response, hard-line legislators attempted a coup in early October but were suppressed by army troops loyal to Yeltsin. Parliamentary elections and a referendum on a draft constitution were held in December. Yeltsin's draft constitution, which increased the powers of the presidency, was narrowly approved, but the anti-reform character of Russia's newly elected parliament, the Federal Assembly, compelled Yeltsin to govern primarily by executive decree in the coming years.In another spectacular comeback, however, he won reelection over a communist challenger in the second round of elections held in July 1996. He spent the months after his electoral victory recovering from a heart attack he had suffered that June during the rigours of the campaign. The state of Yeltsin's health was a recurring issue.In the late 1990s political maneuvering dominated much of the country's government as Yeltsin dismissed four premiers and in 1998 fired his entire cabinet, though many were later reappointed. The following year the State Duma initiated an impeachment drive against Yeltsin, charging that he had encouraged the breakup of the Soviet Union in 1991, among other  allegations The Duma, however, was unable to secure the necessary votes to proceed. Ever unpredictable, Yeltsin announced his resignation on December 31, 1999, in favour of what he characterized as a new, energetic leadership. He named Prime Minister  Vladimir Putin acting president, and in turn Putin granted Yeltsin immunity from future prosecution. Source: Who was Vladimir Zhirinovsky? (00:29:53 or p.7 in the transcript) Vladimir Zhirinovsky, Russian politician and leader of the far-right Liberal Democratic Party of Russia (LDPR) from 1991 to 2022. Known for his fiery Russian nationalism and broad anti-Semitic asides, he later acknowledged his Jewish roots.Much of Zhirinovsky's personal history is vague, unknown, or disputed. He left his hometown at age 18 to attend Moscow State University, where he studied Turkish and other languages. After graduating about 1969, he went to work as a translator in Turkey, but he was expelled under murky circumstances eight months later. After returning to Moscow in 1972, he worked in various state committee and union posts. He completed an evening law program at Moscow State University, earning his degree in 1977 and then working in a state-run law firm (from which he was later asked to resign). In 1983 Zhirinovsky landed a position as head of the law department at the Mir publishing company, a post that served as a springboard for his political career.Zhirinovsky cofounded the LDPR in 1989. The following year the party was launched in Moscow, and Zhirinovsky was asked to become its chairman, but by October his views had provoked his expulsion. In the spring of 1991 Zhirinovsky created his own party, giving it his previous and party's name, and in June he first ran for the Russian presidency; he ran several times for presidency during his long political carrier. A figure as colorful as Zhirinovsky was bound to be the object of rumour and speculation. It was widely reported that his career could have been possible only under the auspices of the KGB. Source: Democracy in Question? is brought to you by:• Central European University: CEU• The Albert Hirschman Centre on Democracy in Geneva: AHCD• The Podcast Company: Novel Follow us on social media!• Central European University: @CEU• Albert Hirschman Centre on Democracy in Geneva: @AHDCentreSubscribe to the show. If you enjoyed what you listened to, you can support us by leaving a review and sharing our podcast in your networks!  

Simple Civics: Greenville County
Parliamentary procedure is exciting! - and supports decision making

Simple Civics: Greenville County

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 16:46


Parliamentary procedure is at work when you hear "so moved," "second," and "call the question!" in a meeting. It may sound confusing and Byzantine, but it supports productive conversation, deliberation, and both the majority and minority on a public body like an elected council or board. Greenville County Councilman Dan Tripp, known to be one of the most well-versed on council regarding parliamentary procedure, joins us to discuss what it is and how it's used. _ Produced by The Greenville Podcast Company.

Sekeres & Price Show
June 21 2022 - Patrick Johnston & Farhan Lalji

Sekeres & Price Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 100:08


Patrick Johnston, in his regular Tuesday spot, joined Matt and Jeff. Patrick offered his thoughts on the latest Vancouver Canucks signing. PJ answered our poll question that asks which Canucks Russian forward will have a better productive year. The guys also talked about the Parliamentary committee that Hockey Canada finds itself in front of.    Farhan Lalji of TSN joined Matt and Jeff for a wide ranging chat. Farhan talked about hosting events at BC Place and how the Lions fit into it. Talked a little bit about Kuzmenko and what he will bring to the Canucks.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Economist Morning Briefing
Macron set to lose parliamentary majority in France; Fierce fighting around Severodonetsk, and more

The Economist Morning Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 3:58 Very Popular


France's president, Emmanuel Macron, has lost his parliamentary majority according to near-final results in elections to the 577-seat National Assembly.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Intelligence
Stuck in the middle with few: Macron's parliamentary pasting

The Intelligence

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 23:25 Very Popular


resident Emmanuel Macron has lost his majority in France's National Assembly as voters flooded both to the far right and far left. A second term filled with confrontation and compromise awaits him. The shadowy world of corporate spying is broadening to far more than just cola or fried-chicken recipes. And when scare-tactic road-death statistics lead to more deaths, not fewer. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

SBS World News Radio
President Macron loses parliamentary majority

SBS World News Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 6:21


France's newly elected President Emmanuel Macron has lost control of his reform agenda after he and his allies failed to win a majority in the National Assembly.

Simple English News Daily
Tuesday 21st June 2022. World News. Today: Colombia new president. Brazil suspects. France parliamentary vote. UK PM operation. Ethiopia PM

Simple English News Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 6:41


World News in 7 minutes. Tuesday 21st June 2022.Transcripts at send7.org/transcriptsToday: Colombia new president. Brazil suspects. France parliamentary vote. UK PM operation. Ethiopia PM on attacks. South Africa euthanasia. India protests. Japan same-sex marriage constitution. Ed Sheeran most played artist. Please leave a rating on Apple podcasts or Spotify.With Namitha Ragunath.Contact us at podcast@send7.org or send an audio message at speakpipe.com/send7If you enjoy the podcast please help to support us at send7.org/supportSEND7 (Simple English News Daily in 7 minutes) tells the most important world news stories in intermediate English. Every day, listen to the most important stories from every part of the  world in slow, clear English. Whether you are an intermediate learner trying to improve your advanced, technical and business English, or if you are a native speaker who just wants to hear a summary of world news as fast as possible, join Stephen Devincenzi and Namitha Ragunath every morning. Transcripts can be found at send7.org/transcripts. Simple English News Daily is the perfect way to start your day, by practising your listening skills and understanding complicated stories in a simple way. It is also highly valuable for IELTS and TOEFL students. Students, teachers, and people with English as a second language, tell us that they listen to SEND7 because they can learn English through hard topics, but simple grammar. We believe that the best way to improve your spoken English is to immerse yourself in real-life content, such as what our podcast provides. SEND7 covers all news including politics, business, conflict, natural events, technology and human rights. Whether it is happening in Europe, Africa, Asia, the Americas or Oceania, you will hear it on SEND7, and you will understand it. For more information visit send7.org/contact

Economist Radio
Stuck in the middle with few: Macron's parliamentary pasting

Economist Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 23:25


resident Emmanuel Macron has lost his majority in France's National Assembly as voters flooded both to the far right and far left. A second term filled with confrontation and compromise awaits him. The shadowy world of corporate spying is broadening to far more than just cola or fried-chicken recipes. And when scare-tactic road-death statistics lead to more deaths, not fewer. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.