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Russian politician, communist theorist, and founder of the Soviet Union

  • 983PODCASTS
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  • Dec 2, 2021LATEST
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Latest podcast episodes about lenin

Roast Mortem Cast
210 - V.I. Lenin (pt1): The Armchair Revolutionary with a MASSIVE dome

Roast Mortem Cast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 116:42


Hey dirty, slutty COMMIES! We begin our deep dive into the life of one of the most influential idiots of the 20th Century. V.I. Lenin! This top-heavy opportunist spent his life primarily outside of the oppressive Tsarist Russia arguing with other bourgeoisie nerds about the teachings of Karl Marx. Through perversions of Marxist Theory, Lenin created a system almost undistinguishable from the Communist Manifesto. With help of his fish-eyed wife and paychecks from his wealthy mom, Lenin laid in waiting for the right moment to spark the worlds first socialist revolution.

The Expat Cast
Comedy in Germany - Does It Exist?? with Chelsea from SoundingLustig

The Expat Cast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 38:20


Season 6, Episode 10. Hey so uhhh... Are German people funny? We tackle the age-old question with Chelsea, a US American in Hamburg and a fellow lover of comedy. First, we share our favorite and least favorite German language movies and TV shows in the category "comedy." Then, we explore the stand-up scene in Germany, both via online specials and in-person shows. Finally, we turn the examination inwards as we ask, do German people find us funny?   Donate to Kinderlachen to support education grants for differently abled kids in Germany via ThrEGEPADFO!   OUR RECOMMENDATIONS Movies & TV Shows:  Fack ju Göhte, Stromberg, Tatortreiniger, Good Bye, Lenin!, Türkisch für Anfänger Comedians: Hazel Brugger,  Alicja Heldt, fellow expat Mari in Cologne TikTok accounts: Dominic, Felix, Felix's other account, Nic   FIND CHELSEA Chelseas's blog SoundingLustig Chelsea's Instagram @soundinglustig Chelsea's TikTok @soundinglustig   REVIEW On Apple Podcasts On Podchaser On my website   CONNECT theexpatcast.com Instagram @theexpatcast  Twitter @theexpatcast 

O'Connor & Company
O'Connor & Company Show-7 AM Hour 11.25.2021

O'Connor & Company

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 31:21


THURSDAY 11/25 THANKSGIVING- 7 AM Hour,   With Larry O'Connor and Amber Athey Hillary Clinton says that the American people don't "Appreciate" Biden., Five Senate Democrats tell Biden they won't back Lenin scholarship winner Saule Omarova See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Revolutions
10.76- Liberty or Victory

Revolutions

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 31:37


Can anyone guess which one Lenin and the Bolsheviks will choose? 

Revolushow
133 - Introdução ao Imperialismo Tardio

Revolushow

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 65:58


No episódio de hoje Zamiliano recebe Juliane Furno, Luiz Eduardo Fernandes e Tavinho para apresentar o livro que está em financiamento coletivo O Introdução ao Imperialismo Tardio. Publicado pelas editoras Ruptura Editorial e Lavrapalavra, o livro é organizado pelo historiador e professor Luís Eduardo Fernandes reunindo diversos textos e artigos de jovens pesquisadores e pesquisadoras marxistas apresentando o clássico do debate, bem como adiantando a discussão para nossa conjuntura atual.Apoie o livro em https://www.catarse.me/ImperialismotardioVídeo no canal da Juliane Furno -->https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tTMBHBT_H68 Dicionário Marxista 11 - Imperialismo --> https://revolushow.com/dicionario-marxista-11-imperialismo/Juliane Furno --> https://twitter.com/julianefurnoTavinho --> https://twitter.com/tavinhojamesEste programa é criado e produzido por Revolushow e distribuído pela Half Deaf.Produtor executivo - Gus LanzettaGerente de projeto - Lídia RonconiProdução - Zamiliano, Larissa Coutinho, Diego Miranda, João Carvalho e Jones ManoelEdição de Lucas Gelo e Revisão de ZamilianoOuça nosso podcast na Orelo e nos auxílie financeiramente direto da plataforma e com seu play! Baixe o app ou entre no link https://escute.orelo.audio/revolushowSeja você nosso padrim também em http://padrim.com.br/revolushow e concorra ao sorteio de duas bolsas de estudos pela Classe Esquerda, a partir de R$5,00, e tenha acesso a nossa newsletter a partir de R$10,00; ou através do PicPay em https://www.picpay.me/revolushowCupons de Descontorevolushow - 5% de desconto em toda a loja da Cervejaria Soviet - https://www.lojasoviet.com.br/#REVOLUSHOW - 20% de desconto em todos os livros da editora Boitempo - https://www2.boitempoeditorial.com.br/revolushowREVOLUSHOW20 - 20% de Desconto nos livros da Editora Expressão Popular - https://www.expressaopopular.com.br/loja/revolushow20 - 20% de Desconto nos posteres da Revolustore - https://revolustore.com.br/Revolushow202007 - 10% de desconto nos seguintes títulos da editora Lutas Anticapital: Luiz Carlos Prestes textos resgatados do esquecimento; A cidadania burguesa e os limites da democracia; Elementos de Contraposição à Cidadania Burguesa nas Práticas Pedagógicas do Movimento dos Trabalhadores Rurais Sem Terra (MST); Sob o Fio da Navalha: Relações Estado e sociedade a partir da ação política da Economia Solidária no Brasil; Reforma Nacional Democrática e Contrarreforma no ABC paulista (1956-1964) ; A conspiração contra a escola pública; A Estratégia Democrático Popular um inventário crítico; Do Beco dos Sapos aos canaviais de Catende os ciclos de lutas pelo socialismo autogestionário ; O Fetiche da Tecnologia e a experiência das fábricas recuperadas; Mundo do Trabalho Associado e Embriões de Educação para além do capital; Reatando um fio interrompido a relação universidade-movimentos sociais na América Latina; Empresas recuperadas pelos trabalhadores: ocupações e autogestão na Argentina; Educação Democrática, Trabalho e Organização Produtiva no Movimento dos Trabalhadores Rurais Sem Terra (MST); A Tragédia Educacional Brasileira no Século XX: diálogos com Florestan Fernandes; Trabalho, Sindicalismo e Consciência de Classe.revolushow2019 - 15% de descontos nos livros da Editora BaionetaREVOLUSHOW - 10% de descontos nos livros da editora Ciências RevolucionáriasREVOLUSHOW – 20% de desconto nos livros da NovaCulturaREVOLUSHOW10 – 10% Descontos em todas as camisas da Camisa CríticaREVOLUSHOW10 – 10% Descontos em todas as camisas da Veste EsquerdaClube do Livro1- Novacultura.info2- Expressão PopularTrilha sonora:Enxugando o Gelo by BNegão & Seletores de Freqüência is licensed under a Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 Brazil License. Disponível em: https://bit.ly/30dbBjv

Tipsy Tolstoy: Russian Literature for the Inebriated

Shownotes: If you'd rather not hear references to sexual assault, skip 19:35 - 20:06; mild mention between 45:15 - 45: 20. This week, Matt and Cameron continue building the factory in the second half of Fyodor Gladkov's Cement. Following the assault upon the factory, dark clouds loom on the Soviet horizon as committees interfere, the effects of the NEP become clearer, and a party purge approaches… Grab your shovel, comrade, and get to work! But don't forget to put this podcast on while you dig. Major themes: Practicality vs. Idealism, Sometimes Side-Characters are the Real Main Characters, Ambivalence. 03:22 - The brewer is - drum roll please…Baltika Breweries. Maybe the Baltika is damaging my memory. 07:32 - Love of the Worker Bees by Alexandra Kollontai 08:08 - Okay, there are also a lot of other things that Lenin adds to Marxist thought to differentiate Marxist-Leninism. Notably, I would point to the introduction of the Vanguard and the Dictatorship of the Proletariat as concepts assisting a systematic approach to revolution rather than the much more “spontaneous” collapse of Capitalism that Marxism tends to imply. Please don't come for me, theory people. If you're interested in the “modern” forms of Capital (where it is not just a physical thing, but also a theoretical thing), I would definitely recommend that you read Imperialism, The Highest Stage of Capitalism by Lenin. That's a much better explanation of what I was trying to express here. 14:08 - The soft noise you're hearing in the background is my cat trying to get into my room. 28:38 - “A herd” 32:54 - Specifically for saying that the Bersteinists and Legal Marxists don't matter. To be clear, those groups do matter if we're looking at movements globally, but they don't matter specifically in the post-Russian Civil War context. 46:45 - “The Unmentionable Politics in Gladkov's Cement” by Edward Vavra 49:22 - Left Wing Communism: An Infantile Disorder by Lenin The music used in this episode was “soviet march,” by Toasted Tomatoes. You can find more of their work on Bandcamp and Youtube. Follow us on Instagram, check out our website, if you're so inclined, check out our Patreon!

New Books Network
Vladimir Alexandrov, "To Break Russia's Chains: Boris Savinkov and His Wars Against the Tsar and the Bolsheviks" (Pegasus, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 60:02


The latest book by Vladimir Alexandrov is a brilliant examination of the enigmatic Russian revolutionary, Boris Savinkov. Although now largely forgotten outside Russia, Boris Savinkov was famous, and notorious, both at home and abroad during his lifetime, which spans the end of the Russian Empire and the establishment of the Soviet Union. A complex and conflicted individual, he was a paradoxically moral revolutionary terrorist, a scandalous novelist, a friend of epoch-defining artists like Modigliani and Diego Rivera, a government minister, a tireless fighter against Lenin and the Bolsheviks, and an advisor to Churchill. At the end of his life, Savinkov conspired to be captured by the Soviet secret police, and as the country's most prized political prisoner made headlines around the world when he claimed that he accepted the Bolshevik state. Alexandrov argues that this was Savinkov's final play as a gambler, staking his life on a secret plan to strike one last blow against the tyrannical regime. To Break Russia's Chains: Boris Savinkov and His Wars Against the Tsar and the Bolsheviks (Pegasus, 2021) reads like a spellbinding thriller. Professor Alexandrov's biography of Boris Savinkov not only sheds light on one of the most fascinating figures in Russian history, but also prompts speculation about how the history of Russia may have played out differently if the former terrorist turned government minister had achieved his goals. Interview conducted by Lynne Hartnett, Associate Professor of History at Villanova University. Professor Hartnett is the author of The Defiant Life of Vera Figner: Surviving the Russian Revolution and is currently writing a book about Russian political exiles in Britain at the turn of the twentieth century. She is also the author and narrator of two courses for The Great Courses: Understanding Russia: A Cultural History and The Great Revolutions of Modern History Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Biography
Vladimir Alexandrov, "To Break Russia's Chains: Boris Savinkov and His Wars Against the Tsar and the Bolsheviks" (Pegasus, 2021)

New Books in Biography

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 60:02


The latest book by Vladimir Alexandrov is a brilliant examination of the enigmatic Russian revolutionary, Boris Savinkov. Although now largely forgotten outside Russia, Boris Savinkov was famous, and notorious, both at home and abroad during his lifetime, which spans the end of the Russian Empire and the establishment of the Soviet Union. A complex and conflicted individual, he was a paradoxically moral revolutionary terrorist, a scandalous novelist, a friend of epoch-defining artists like Modigliani and Diego Rivera, a government minister, a tireless fighter against Lenin and the Bolsheviks, and an advisor to Churchill. At the end of his life, Savinkov conspired to be captured by the Soviet secret police, and as the country's most prized political prisoner made headlines around the world when he claimed that he accepted the Bolshevik state. Alexandrov argues that this was Savinkov's final play as a gambler, staking his life on a secret plan to strike one last blow against the tyrannical regime. To Break Russia's Chains: Boris Savinkov and His Wars Against the Tsar and the Bolsheviks (Pegasus, 2021) reads like a spellbinding thriller. Professor Alexandrov's biography of Boris Savinkov not only sheds light on one of the most fascinating figures in Russian history, but also prompts speculation about how the history of Russia may have played out differently if the former terrorist turned government minister had achieved his goals. Interview conducted by Lynne Hartnett, Associate Professor of History at Villanova University. Professor Hartnett is the author of The Defiant Life of Vera Figner: Surviving the Russian Revolution and is currently writing a book about Russian political exiles in Britain at the turn of the twentieth century. She is also the author and narrator of two courses for The Great Courses: Understanding Russia: A Cultural History and The Great Revolutions of Modern History Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/biography

New Books in History
Vladimir Alexandrov, "To Break Russia's Chains: Boris Savinkov and His Wars Against the Tsar and the Bolsheviks" (Pegasus, 2021)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 60:02


The latest book by Vladimir Alexandrov is a brilliant examination of the enigmatic Russian revolutionary, Boris Savinkov. Although now largely forgotten outside Russia, Boris Savinkov was famous, and notorious, both at home and abroad during his lifetime, which spans the end of the Russian Empire and the establishment of the Soviet Union. A complex and conflicted individual, he was a paradoxically moral revolutionary terrorist, a scandalous novelist, a friend of epoch-defining artists like Modigliani and Diego Rivera, a government minister, a tireless fighter against Lenin and the Bolsheviks, and an advisor to Churchill. At the end of his life, Savinkov conspired to be captured by the Soviet secret police, and as the country's most prized political prisoner made headlines around the world when he claimed that he accepted the Bolshevik state. Alexandrov argues that this was Savinkov's final play as a gambler, staking his life on a secret plan to strike one last blow against the tyrannical regime. To Break Russia's Chains: Boris Savinkov and His Wars Against the Tsar and the Bolsheviks (Pegasus, 2021) reads like a spellbinding thriller. Professor Alexandrov's biography of Boris Savinkov not only sheds light on one of the most fascinating figures in Russian history, but also prompts speculation about how the history of Russia may have played out differently if the former terrorist turned government minister had achieved his goals. Interview conducted by Lynne Hartnett, Associate Professor of History at Villanova University. Professor Hartnett is the author of The Defiant Life of Vera Figner: Surviving the Russian Revolution and is currently writing a book about Russian political exiles in Britain at the turn of the twentieth century. She is also the author and narrator of two courses for The Great Courses: Understanding Russia: A Cultural History and The Great Revolutions of Modern History Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

Cold War Conversations History Podcast
Soviet leader Leonid Brezhnev - aspiring actor and poetry fan (209)

Cold War Conversations History Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 56:56


Now, what do you think of when you hear the name Leonid Brezhnev who ruled the Soviet Union for 18 years from the 1960s to the 1980s? An old guy waving weakly from the Lenin mausoleum?Well, think again! We speak with Susanne Schattenberg, the author of a new biography that systematically dismantles the stereotypical and one-dimensional view of Brezhnev as the stagnating Stalinist by drawing on a wealth of archival research and documents not previously studied in English. The Brezhnev that emerges is a complex one, from his early apolitical years, as an aspiring actor and poetry fan, through his swift and surprising rise through the Party ranks. We talk about his hitherto misunderstood role in Khrushchev's ousting and appointment as his successor, to his somewhat pro-Western foreign policy aims, deft consolidation and management of power, and ultimate descent into addiction and untimely death. For Schattenberg, this is the story of a flawed and ineffectual idealist - for the West, this biography makes a convincing case that Brezhnev should be reappraised as one of the most interesting and important political figures of the twentieth century.Buy the book here and support CWC  UK https://amzn.to/3kCUaVn US https://amzn.to/3c9fOvZNow time doesn't come free and I'm asking listeners to support my work recording these incredible stories via a small (or large)l donation. If you become a monthly supporter via Patreon, you will get the sought after CWC coaster as a thank you and bask in the warm glow of knowing you are helping to preserve Cold War history.Just go to https://coldwarconversations.com/donate/If you can't wait for next week's episode do visit our Facebook discussion group where guests and listeners continue the Cold War Conversation. Just search Cold War Conversations in Facebook.I am delighted to welcome Susanne Schattenberg to our Cold War conversation…IB Tauris has kindly provided 3 copies of “Brezhnev: The Making of a Statesman” to give away!To be in with a chance to win a free copy of the book you will need to do at least one of the following before 2300 BST 27th Nov 2021:Twitter – Follow us and retweet our book giveaway tweetFacebook Page – Follow us and share using the hashtag #coldwarconvo Instagram – Follow us on Instagram , like our post and tag at least two friends in the comments. Make sure you use  the hashtags  #coldwarconversationsMailing List – Join our mailing list and email us at ian “at” coldwarconversations.com to let me know you want to be enteredLooking for a Xmas gift for the Cold War aficionado in your life? Do check out loads of gift ideas including our wide range of CW themed mugs at our store. More info here https://rdbl.co/3kv7lYk Have a look at our store and find the ideal gift for the Cold War enthusiast in your life? Just go to https://coldwarconversations.com/store/Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/coldwarpod)

Max LucadoMax Lucado
When a Heart Turns to Christ

Max LucadoMax Lucado

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021


The story of Aleksandr began in 1918 in Russia. By early adulthood he was a disciple of Marx and Lenin. In...

Liberation Audio
The October Revolution: Workers Take Power Part 2

Liberation Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 17:10


On April 3, 1917, Lenin, Zinoviev and other leaders arrived in a sealed car on a train. The German government allowed them to return to Russia across Germany and through German-held territory because it hoped that they would take Russia out of the war and relieve the pressure on Germany – that was explicitly the German government's reason. E. H. Carr, an English historian wrote a tremendous 14-volume history of the Bolshevik Revolution. Here is how Carr describes the scene of Lenin's return: Alexander Kollontai produced a bouquet which Lenin carried awkwardly: and the party proceeded to the former imperial waiting room. Here, Lenin was officially welcomed by Chkheidze, the president of the Petrograd soviet, who, in a few carefully chosen words, expressed his hopes for ‘a closing of the ranks of democracy' in defense of ‘our revolution.' Lenin, turning vaguely away from the official party towards the assembled crowds outside, addressed them as ‘dear comrades, soldiers, sailors and workers,' greeted in their persons ‘the victorious Russian revolution,' declared that the ‘robber imperialist war' was the beginning of civil war all over Europe, and concluded:‘Any day, if not today or tomorrow, the crash of the whole of European imperialism may come. The Russian revolution, made by you, has begun it and opened a new epoch. Hail the worldwide socialist revolution.' As Sukhanov notes, it was not a reply to Chkheidze. It did not even fit ‘the context' of the Russian revolution as understood by all without exception who had witnessed it or taken part in it.' Lenin had spoken; and his first words had been not of the bourgeois, but of the socialist, revolution. Read the full article: https://liberationschool.org/milestones-in-communist-history-the-october-revolution/2/

Liberation Audio
The October Revolution: Workers Take Power Part 1

Liberation Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 20:10


The Russian Revolution is a vast subject. An exhaustive analysis of it is beyond the scope of this writing. But below, some of the key points will be highlighted. The Russian Revolution took place in the background of World War I, a war between imperialist powers over control of territories and colonies. The war caused a split in the international socialist movement. Right up to the outbreak of the war, the parties of the Second International had vowed to fight against the war once it started. Socialist parties had pledged to oppose sending workers of the warring countries to kill each other and die for their respective bourgeoisies, the capitalist class. But when the war started, nearly all of these parties collapsed in the face of the war hysteria in their respective countries and ended up supporting the war. Only the Bolshevik party, one of the socialist parties in Russia, and a small party in Serbia took a strong position against the war. The five Bolshevik members of the Duma, Russia's parliament, were sent into exile in Serbia for their position. The Bolsheviks were forced to go completely underground, and faced a new period of isolation and persecution when the war started. Rather than capitulating to the war hysteria, the Bolsheviks called for “revolutionary defeatism.” Their position was that the workers of every belligerent country should call for the defeat of their own ruling class. They called for socialist agitators in the armies to encourage fraternization between the soldiers of warring sides to discuss their common interest in ending the war and stopping killing each other. Lenin also called for turning the imperialist war into a civil war; in other words to turn this imperialist war between nations into a war between classes and against the capitalists. These positions were considered quite bold, to put it mildly, even by other anti-war socialists, or internationalists as they were known. Lenin was considered to be the extreme of the extreme at the time. Over the following two and a half years, millions of soldiers and civilians died in the bloodiest and most destructive war in history up to that point. The Russian Empire suffered huge casualties. Its army was made up mainly of peasants, as was the population as a whole – nearly 90% peasants. Hundreds of thousands of soldiers died in single battles. Famines and epidemics spread. On Feb. 23, 1917 (on the old calendar still used in Russia), March 8 on the modern calendar, International Women's Day, a strike of woman textile workers in Petrograd was called. Petrograd, later named Leningrad and today called St. Petersburg, was the capital and the center of industry. The strike spread like wildfire. The war years of death, disease and deprivation for the workers and peasants, while the czar, the nobility and the rising bourgeoisie lived in almost indescribable luxury, now brought forth an explosion of revolutionary anger that was unstoppable. It was a spontaneous uprising – no organization or party had planned or organized it. But it was strongly influenced by decades of revolutionary work and experiences, especially the experience of the working class in the 1905-06 revolution. Read the full article: https://liberationschool.org/milestones-in-communist-history-the-october-revolution/

Skip the Noise Podcast
Episode73: Lenin Institute of Polyamorous Twin Jealousy

Skip the Noise Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 104:21


Business Side: Mexican Nostradamus breaks down Zillow moves and the housing market/ Susceptibility to propaganda and targeted/ Ranking Texas cities tangent/ Kavanaugh response to Texas law/ Revisiting the 3rd Amendment/ Gain of function research Obama vs Trump/ Futility of COP26? Party Side: Virginia goes red/ Tokyo train knife attack by the Joker/ Did we finally solve the LAX Jet pack mystery?/ Boyfriends of polyamorous twins get haircuts too

Today In History
Today In History - Stalin's body removed from Lenin's tomb

Today In History

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021


https://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/stalins-body-removed-from-lenins-tombSupport the show on Patreon

Anticipating The Unintended
#145 The Escalation Ladder of Outrage

Anticipating The Unintended

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 22:41


India Policy Watch #1: What Outrage Means Insights on burning policy issues in India— RSJLast week while writing about the Fabindia Diwali ad and the accompanying outrage, I wrote that this ‘arms race of purity’ might become a familiar feature in our cultural landscape. This week we got this:“Homegrown FMCG player Dabur has withdrawn its advertisement on Karva Chauth showing a lesbian couple celebrating the festival in the ad campaign of its Fem Creme bleach and has issued unconditionally apology.After facing backlash on social media platforms and also from a politician from the ruling BJP, the company has withdrawn the ad campaign.In the same week, Bajrang Dal activists vandalised the set and assaulted the director and crew members of the web series Aashram because it ‘defamed the Hindu religion’. There are a few larger questions I have about this phenomenon. Before I come to them, let’s look at this Dabur ad issue a bit more. The ad uses the classic “traditional plot with a twist” approach to make it stand out amidst the clutter. A karwa chauth ad with a lesbian couple must have checked all the boxes in the minds of the marketers at Dabur. It was topical and it celebrated diversity. The recent Cadbury’s Dairy Milk campaign that went viral where it switched the gender roles of its classic ads of the 90s is a good example of this approach. The new ad had the girl hitting a last-ball six while her boyfriend danced onto the pitch. So, here’s a thought experiment: what if Cadbury’s had made the same ad with a same-sex couple? Would that have created the same outrage as the Dabur karwa chauth ad? I suspect there would have been some but nothing of the kind we saw with the Dabur ad. There are more than a few ads and TV shows right now featuring same-sex couples. In fact, the statement of the BJP leader who threatened legal action against the ad is useful to quote here:"In future they will show two men taking 'feras' (marrying each other according to Hindu rituals)." I suspect the issue becomes fraught when Hindu rituals are involved. I have argued in previous editions that the way ideologies are understood in India are different from their original conception. A liberal is used for a left-leaning activist kind instead of someone believing in individual rights and consent. People call themselves conservative that is, those who value order, custom and self-directed change in society, while they champion bigoted views and radical changes that will usher in an ‘ideal society’. They do so without any sense of irony. An absence of ideological clarity is a feature of our democracy. Ideological ConfusionNow, if I were an Indian conservative, how would I look at the Dabur ad? Sure, I would wince a bit at the lesbian angle. After all, to me, marriage is a social institution and it is solemnised between a woman and a man. But then I would also reluctantly acknowledge that same-sex relationship is now accepted in many societies. It has a legal sanction in India. Maybe then as a true conservative, I will look at the ad again. Sure it shows lesbians but they are also following a tradition that I hold dear. The ad upholds my belief that individualism has to be grounded by custom and tradition. That social cohesion will be preserved only if we adhere to our cultural mores. So, I would welcome an ad that co-opts a new generation into this tradition. But that’s not how the so-called conservatives behaved. What explains this? The simple answer is that it’s about outrage, not so much about the tradition. It is about using another incident to strengthen the narrative that there are insidious forces who will destroy sanatan dharma if we aren’t forever vigilant. And you can only trust us to protect you from these forces. Today it is a lesbian couple following the karwa chauth ritual that’s seen as a threat to the faith. Tomorrow it could be a straight woman in the ad but without a bindi. The reason for outrage doesn’t really matter. The narrative that religion is under threat is what is important. So, the far-fetched notion that marketing teams and ad agencies working for Fabindia or Dabur are either anti-Hindu or part of some global conspiracy. Not the obvious reality that almost every lever of power is now controlled by those of your ideological slant. That’s not enough. There are still some mythical powerful people who are brainwashing our young. Not the obvious reality that the young in these companies and their customers are slowly changing and accepting of diversity on their own like a conservative would have preferred. There is no real respect for tradition or for how society is changing itself. It is just another opportunity to play an imaginary victim card and keep the narrative of Hinduism in danger for future electoral gains. Thinking About CultureBeyond these specific instances, there are a few questions that come to my mind as I look at the cultural landscape in India. First, we often use the Breitbart doctrine - politics is the downstream of culture - around here. Like we have written before, there is a long history to this idea before Breitbart. Anyway, there’s an obvious counter to the Breitbart doctrine that comes up after seeing instances like these - isn’t politics influencing culture here? Hasn’t culture now become downstream of politics? The way to think about this is that the Breitbart doctrine is focused on the outcome. The outcome always is about a politics different from what it is today. So, yes, the politician in MP who threatened legal action against the ad was trying to influence culture today. But his goal is to create a kind of politics tomorrow that’s narrower and more bigoted than today. How your culture is changing today is still the best indicator of the kind of politics you will get tomorrow. Going by the spate of fake outrage about ads and TV shows, the future of politics doesn’t look promising.Second, there’s another point that’s made when issues like these come up. No one votes on such issues and these are some fringe elements trying to get into a news cycle. Don’t overread this. I agree, with a caveat. Usually, these are indeed isolated instances of people coercing others to their point of view with limited success except when those doing this hold the levers of power. Then the consequences are both real and long-term. They cannot be likened to an equally stupid outrage by the other side who hold almost no power even if they are vocal. To take the US case, the QAnon and other right-wing crazy ideas can find support on social media but there are hardly people holding power in government, universities or corporates who believe in them. But ‘wokeism’ in universities and workplaces can be a real problem as seen in the dismissals of many alternative voices because those holding power in these places tends to support woke ideas. In India, the shoe is on the other foot. The right-wing ideas have the support of those in power. In edition #120 (A Short History of Breitbart Doctrine), I had written about the Gramscian idea of cultural hegemony which is being followed to the letter in India:Gramsci argued a capitalist state had two overlapping spheres that helped it to thrive. There was the ‘political society’ that ruled through coercion and control of means of production which was visible to all. But there was also the ‘civil society’ that ruled through consent and control of minds. The civil society was the public sphere of ideas and beliefs that were shaped through the church, media or universities. To him, the capitalist state was successful in ‘manufacturing consent’ among people through the ‘cultural hegemony’ it set up through its control of the public sphere. People living in such societies didn’t question their position or their exploitation because they thought this was the ‘natural state’ of existence. The cultural hegemony was so complete and overpowering that there could hardly be any mobilisation of people against the ‘political society’ which ruled through coercion. The minds of the people were brainwashed through propaganda.In short: establishing cultural hegemony is the first step to winning the minds and eventually, the votes of people (we are talking of democracy here). Over time, this hegemony in the public sphere will earn you the long-term consent of the people who will consider it their ‘natural state’. Self-censorship will follow as an outcome of this hegemony. That addresses the second question on why people self-censor themselves.Third, there’s the other question that usually comes up along with the imagined victimhood. Why only choose Hindu rituals? Why not show such ads using rituals of other Abrahamic faiths? Well, if some 82 per cent of the people in India are Hindus, it is natural for an ad or a TV show to focus on this majority for their message; radical or otherwise. Dabur or Fabindia won’t show such ads in another non-Hindu majority country if we were to take the hypothetical case of them being present there. Everyone focuses on the majority. It is for exactly the same reason why more than 80 per cent of films and TV shows have protagonists with Hindu names and faith. Or, a majority of holidays in offices are for Hindu festivals. This is how it works for any overwhelming majority. You get everything in majority. A decade or two back, I remember, there used to be articles and shows debating the relevance of rituals like karwa chauth and their place in modern society. Today, the debate is who can be shown observing the ritual and, maybe, what should they be wearing. That’s enough for you to know who is winning the culture war. p.s: Growing up I had almost no knowledge of karwa chauth. I don’t recollect any film or TV shows that featured it in their plots. Till Shah Rukh Khan (SRK) and Kajol ‘universalised’ it in Dilwale Dulhaniya Le Jayenge. Culture changes, gradually and then suddenly, to misquote Hemingway. SRK would’ve learnt it . A Framework a Week: Rules For Political Survival Tools for thinking public policy— RSJI’m reading The Dictator's Handbook: Why Bad Behavior is Almost Always Good Politics (2011) by Bruce Bueno de Mesquita and Alastair Smith. The Netflix series How To Become A Tyrant is based on this. It is an interesting book with the central premise that politicians, dictators and democrats alike, are all the same. They must follow the same playbook of self-interested behaviour to stay in power. I will write about the book in a more relevant context some other time, perhaps. For now, I will leave you with this excellent set of rules that authors suggest leaders can use to succeed in any system:Rule 1: Keep your winning coalition as small as possible. A small coalition allows a leader to rely on very few people to stay in power. Fewer essentials equals more control and contributes to more discretion over expenditures. Bravo for Kim Jong Il of North Korea. He is a contemporary master at ensuring dependence on a small coalition.Rule 2: Keep your nominal selectorate as large as possible. Maintain a large selectorate of interchangeables and you can easily replace any troublemakers in your coalition, influentials and essentials alike. After all, a large selectorate permits a big supply of substitute supporters to put the essentials on notice that they should be loyal and well behaved or else face being replaced.Bravo to Vladimir Ilyich Lenin for introducing universal adult suffrage in Russia’s old rigged election system. Lenin mastered the art of creating a vast supply of interchangeables.Rule 3: Control the flow of revenue. It’s always better for a ruler to determine who eats than it is to have a larger pie from which the people can feed themselves. The most effective cash flow for leaders is one that makes lots of people poor and redistributes money to keep select people—their supporters—wealthy.Bravo to Pakistan’s president Asif Ali Zardari, estimated to be worth up to $4 billion even as he governed a country near the world’s bottom in per capita income.Rule 4: Pay your key supporters just enough to keep them loyal. Remember, your backers would rather be you than be dependent on you. Your big advantage over them is that you know where the money is and they don’t. Give your coalition just enough so that they don’t shop around for someone to replace you and not a penny more.Bravo to Zimbabwe’s Robert Mugabe who, whenever facing a threat of a military coup, manages finally to pay his army, keeping their loyalty against all odds.Rule 5: Don’t take money out of your supporter’s pockets to make the people’s lives better. The flip side of rule 4 is not to be too cheap toward your coalition of supporters. If you’re good to the people at the expense of your coalition, it won’t be long until your “friends” will be gunning for you. Effective policy for the masses doesn’t necessarily produce loyalty among essentials, and it’s darn expensive to boot. Hungry people are not likely to have the energy to overthrow you, so don’t worry about them. Disappointed coalition members, in contrast, can defect, leaving you in deep trouble.Bravo to Senior General Than Shwe of Myanmar, who made sure following the 2008 Nargis cyclone that food relief was controlled and sold on the black market by his military supporters rather than letting aid go to the people—at least 138,000 and maybe as many as 500,000 of whom died in the disaster.Cynical? Maybe. Illuminating, nevertheless. India Policy Watch #2: Musical Chairs Insights on burning policy issues in India— Pranay KotasthaneIn September, you would have come across many headlines to this effect: "right to sit" becomes a workplace law in Tamil Nadu. Or Tamil Nadu Becomes Second State After Kerala to Establish Right to Sit for Workers. Or Tamil Nadu’s ‘right to sit’ Bill, a long-overdue fundamental right.Of course, the change in law doesn’t mean the ‘right to sit’ is now an enforceable fundamental right. Nevertheless, the news coverage on this issue seems to suggest tha a legal right to sit for all workers in shops and establishments in the state would improve the conditions of workers. As someone skeptical of framing entitlements as rights guaranteed by the state, I was intrigued. How is the government going to enforce such a legal right? What does the right cover? What qualifies as seating? What does adequate seating mean? What’s the market failure here? How will smaller shops provide space for adequate seating?A useful philosophical distinction to consider here is between negative and positive rights. The holder of a negative right is entitled to non-interference. That is, having a negative right to sit implies an employer cannot stop a worker from sitting. A positive right is entitled to the provision of some good or service. That is, having the positive right to sit implies an employer must provide workers with a chair to sit on. The framing of the news reportage seemed to indicate that the government was leaning towards a positive right.So I searched for the exact text of the Kerala and TN amendments to their shops and establishment acts. This is what they say:Tamil Nadu LA Bill 29 of 2021:“22-A. Seating facilities -The premises of every establishment shall have suitable seating arrangements for all employees so that they may take advantage of any opportunity to sit which may occur in the course of their work and thereby avoid ‘on their toes’ situation throughout the working hours."Kerala LA Ordinance 50 of 2018 is almost identical:12B. Seating facilities — In every shop and establishment, suitable arrangements for sitting shall be provided to all workers so as to avoid ‘on the toes’ situation throughout the duty time, so that they may take advantage of any opportunity to sit which may occur in the course of their work.That’s about it. Although there’s no mention of a ‘right to sit’, my friend Ameya Naik educated me that such an obligation on a shop or establishment by definition creates a legal right for workers. So, how effective is this right likely to be? We can anticipate the following unintended consequences:Shops might procure a few chairs and yet prevent workers from sitting. Since the act does not define what ‘any opportunity to sit which may occur in the course of their work’ is, enforcing the right will be quite difficult.Smaller shops and establishments with limited space might find it difficult to comply to this law. Expect chairs to appear miraculously just before the inspector pays a visit.This gives another tool in the hands of the inspectors who are also supposed to check if shops comply with laws on holidays, opening and closing hours of the establishment, cleanliness, ventilation, lighting, prevention against fire etc. — a total of 32 sections under the Shops and Establishments Act. Given the limited capacity, we can expect that the bribe rates to increase.In sum, this ‘right to sit’ is, in reality, a mandate at par with other compliances for shops such as a holiday a week, a maximum work day of eight hours, wage for overtime work etc. In the most optimistic scenario, we can expect its compliance levels to be at par with these other pre-existing mandates. Finally, I am honestly unable to identify the exact market failure that necessitates government intervention on seating facilities in a shop. If I had no choice but to recommend a government intervention, an ethical labour sourcing certification that shops can voluntarily opt for, would be my first solution.India Policy Watch #3: Effecting Policy Change Insights on burning policy issues in India— Pranay KotasthaneThis week I read Himanshu Jha’s Capturing Institutional Change: The Case of the Right to Information Act in India. The ‘Right to X’ in a book title is usually a red flag for me but I am glad I ignored that thought. This book is an excellent read for anyone trying to understand how public policy changes happen in India. On the RTI Act’s promulgation, the first dominant narrative is that a bottom-up social movement with the Mazdoor Kisaan Shakti Sangathan (MKSS) ultimately culminated in the RTI Act 2005. Another dominant narrative highlights the key role played by the UPA-1 government. Jha challenges both these narrative and argues, rather convincingly, that:‘institutional change in the case of RTI in India is an incremental and gradual process of ideas emerging from within the state.’ [page 12]That’s a bold claim. Jha argues that key elements in the Indian political ecosystem were on board with the idea of freedom of information many years before the RTI act came into being. It was an idea whose time had come long before 2005. First the opposition parties and later, the mainstream parties played a major role in overturning the established norm of secrecy. The social movement did have a role to play but it too had a co-dependent relationship with elements in the state; the narrative that it was an outright contest between the society and the state in which the former won is incorrect. As a public policy student, this argument interests me because it again challenges a deep-seated belief in India that only crises drive positive changes in our polity. Many reforms, like the RTI Act, the National Pension System reform have actually come about as a result of a gradual process involving aligning cognitive maps, smart negotiating, and display of political will. That is a sign of hope and a call for rejecting cynicism. Crisis is no guarantee for a policy reform. The well-thought-through reforms take time and perhaps for good reason. HomeWorkReading and listening recommendations on public policy matters[Article] Pratap Bhanu Mehta in The Indian Express on Aryan Khan affair: It's not about establishing that everyone is equal before the law. There are larger ideological connections here.[Podcast] Jordan Peterson podcast: Peterson, Steven Pinker, and Jonathan Haidt sit down to discuss truth, how societies function, utopias, the role of religion, & more. [Book] Successful Public Policy: Lessons from Australia and New Zealand is a rare book that identifies elements of good policy design. The chapter on water markets is particularly relevant to India. Get on the email list at publicpolicy.substack.com

Work Stoppage
Overtime Episode 7 - Lenin on the Trade Union Question PREVIEW

Work Stoppage

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 4:04


If you're not a patron you can get the full episode by visiting patreon.com/workstoppage and support us with $5 a month. As a Labor News show, we talk about unions constantly and how vital they are to building any sort of socialist project. But the labor movement has been around a long time without prompting a revolution, so what should our organizing tactics be if our ultimate goal isn't just slightly better wages and working conditions, but a revolutionary transformation of society? On this patrons-only episode, Dan dives into Lenin's work to dig into the Marxist perspective on union organizing and its relationship to socialist politics. Contrasting the Bolsheviks' orientation on the trade union movement to revolutionary syndicalism and social democratic reformism, Lenin aimed for a dialectical approach to the process of raising working class consciousness both within and without the trade union movement. While acknowledging the different material conditions 100 years later, there's still a lot we can learn as organizers about the difficult balance of agitating within often reformist institutions in order to meet the masses where they are. This review of Lenin's theoretical work on the subject centers on the lessons learned from the long struggle for a unified workers movement and how we can apply them today.

A l'abordage - La 1ere
Parole de globe-trotters: Niels Ackermann, photographe

A l'abordage - La 1ere

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 29:15


Chaque semaine À lʹAbordage suit la trace de voyageurs aux profils variés. Cette semaine: Niels Ackermann, photographe. Photographe documentaire suisse travaillant pour la presse internationale depuis 2007, Niels Ackermann est aussi le membre fondateur de l'agence Lundi13. Son premier projet de longue haleine, "L'Ange blanc", documentant le passage à l'âge adulte dans un quartier de Tchernobyl a été publié aux Éditions Noir sur Blanc en 2016 et a reçu de nombreux prix. Son deuxième projet, "Looking for Lenin", réalisé avec le journaliste français Sébastien Gobert a été publié par Fuel Publishing (Londres) et Les Éditions Noir sur Blanc. Ce projet a été créé aux Rencontres de la Photographie d'Arles en 2017. Niels s'associe également régulièrement avec des institutions sociales, environnementales et culturelles sur des projets documentaires et des ateliers. Il donne également fréquemment des conférences et des ateliers sur la photographie documentaire, le travail indépendant et le financement de projets documentaires. Le troisième "opus" de Niels Ackermann, son second avec Sébastien Gobert sʹintitule "New York, Ukraine - Guide dʹune ville inattendue" et sortira le 4 novembre prochain toujours aux Editions Noir sur Blanc, lʹoccasion de revenir sur les pas du photographe. Une séquence de Pascal Bernheim, avec la collaboration de Nicole Fontannaz et Virginie Daude.

Healthcare Insight
10/28/21 Biden Nominees And Policies That Lenin Would Embrace

Healthcare Insight

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 58:49


People Conversations by Citizens' Media TV
Ep94 [2/2]: Esha, me, Lenin, and MMT

People Conversations by Citizens' Media TV

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 57:44


Welcome to episode 94 of Activist #MMT. Today's part two of my two-part conversation with Esha Krishnaswamy, on her own show, late night with Lenin. Esha has me cold read two pieces by Lenin, written more than 100 years ago, and she describes why they remain important and relevant. (Here's a link to .) Esha is the host of the podcast Historic-ly, Which is realistic history, similar to how a MMT is realistic economics. You can follow Historic-ly on Twitter at @ and . I've hosted eight episodes for her podcast, you can find in the show notes. Although I admittedly struggle through the readings, with its unusual names and concepts, and early twentieth century Russian history. Even so, it results in very interesting conversation throughout, all anchored by Modern Money Theory. And now, let's get right back to my conversation with Esha Krishnaswamy. Enjoy.

Activist #MMT - podcast
Ep94 [2/2]: Esha, me, Lenin, and MMT

Activist #MMT - podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 57:45


Welcome to episode 94 of Activist #MMT. Today's part two of my two-part conversation with Esha Krishnaswamy, as a guest on her own show, late night with Lenin. Esha has me cold read two pieces by Lenin, written more than 100 years ago, and she describes why they remain important and relevant. (Here's a link to part one.) Esha is the host of the podcast Historic-ly, Which is realistic history, similar to how a MMT is realistic economics. You can follow Historic-ly on Twitter at @historic_ly and historicly.substack.com. I've hosted eight episodes for her podcast, links to which you can find in the show notes. Although I admittedly struggle through the readings, with its unusual names and concepts, and early twentieth century Russian history. Even so, it results in very interesting conversation throughout, all anchored by Modern Money Theory. And now, let's get right back to my conversation with Esha Krishnaswamy. Enjoy.

100 Books A Year With Keven Wang

Author Spotlight. I read his “1917: Lenin and Wilson” “Gandhi and Churchill”. Highly recommend Arthur's book

Saturday Extra - Separate stories podcast
Australia's greatest (unknown) explorer

Saturday Extra - Separate stories podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 16:21


Peter FitzSimons joins us to talk about his new book, The Incredible Life of Hubert Wilkins, Australia's Greatest Explorer, a rollicking yarn about the truly remarkable adventures of a bloke at the centre of so many important events last century. From Arctic expeditions to the battlefields of WW1, and meeting Lenin in Russia. Who was this guy and why don't we know more about him? 

CREECA Lecture Series Podcast
Esperanto and Languages of Internationalism in Revolutionary Russia - Brigid O'Keeffe (10.21.21)

CREECA Lecture Series Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 45:19


In 1887, a Jewish eye doctor named L.L. Zamenhof launched his international auxiliary language “Esperanto” from the western borderlands of a tsarist empire in crisis. Brigid O'Keeffe traces the history of Esperanto as a utopian vision rooted in late imperial Russian culture through to its rise as a vibrant global movement that inspired women and men around the world in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Although Esperanto and Esperantists have long been dismissed to the margins and footnotes of history, O'Keeffe proposes that revolutionary Russia's Esperantists were exemplars of their era. Their triumphs, frustrations, and tragedies illuminate how and why the Soviet Union ultimately rejected an international language for the global proletariat and chose instead to elevate Russian – “the language of Lenin” – as the language of socialist internationalism.

The Socialist Program with Brian Becker
Lenin on Imperialism (Part 2): The Era of Global Class War

The Socialist Program with Brian Becker

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 46:50


Today's episode is the second in a multi-part series on Lenin's theory of imperialism and how his ideas apply to the modern day struggle against war and empire. Brian Becker and Walter Smolarek discuss how nearly the entire globe was divided up by the imperialist powers by the end of the 19th century as part of the expand-or-die nature of the capitalist system. The imperialists then turned to catastrophic world war as the only available means to grow their empire. But by the middle of the 20th century, it became clear that this had led to the rise of a bloc of socialist states that threatened the existence of capitalism itself. Inter-imperialist competition took a backseat as a new era of global class war began. These concepts are covered in detail in the book "Imperialism in the 21st Century: Updating Lenin's Theory a Century Later" published by Liberation Media. Please make an urgently-needed contribution to The Socialist Program by joining our Patreon community at patreon.com/thesocialistprogram. We rely on the generous support of our listeners to keep bringing you consistent, high-quality shows. All Patreon donors of $5 a month or more are invited to join the monthly Q&A seminar with Brian.

People Conversations by Citizens' Media TV
Ep93 [1/2]: Esha, me, Lenin, and MMT

People Conversations by Citizens' Media TV

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 63:21


Welcome to episode 93 of Activist #MMT. Today I talk with Esha Krishnaswamy on her own show, Late Night with Lenin. Esha has me cold read two pieces written by Lenin more than 100 years ago, and describes why they remain important and relevant. (Here's a link to __PART_TWO__.) Esha is the host of the podcast Historic-ly, which is realistic history, similar to how MMT is realistic economics. You can follow Historic-ly on Twitter at @ and . I've hosted eight episodes for her podcast, you can find in the show notes. The Lenin readings don't start until part two. In part one, we discuss the basics of MMT and how it illuminates the centuries long battle between rich and poor. MMT reveals that when the rich say, "depriving the poor is unfortunate but necessary", what they really mean is "of course we can provide for the poor – we just don't want to." Importantly, MMT makes this clear to average people, not unlike Martin Luther and his papers nailed to the church door during the reformation. In the same fashion (although with printed paper instead of on social media), Lenin illuminated the same things to average Russian citizens, ultimately leading to a rare successful popular uprising. I admittedly struggle through the readings, with its unusual names and concepts, and early twentieth century Russian history. Even so, it results in very interesting conversation throughout, all anchored by Modern Money Theory. Finally, as a brief aside, both of our incredible theme music was created by Wreck Tech. You can find Wreck Tech on and Spotify. And now, onto my conversation with Esha Krishnaswamy. Enjoy. Resources My 2020 interview with Esha on Historic-ly, Anatomy of a Revolution: Parts and Episode 71 of Activist #MMT with graduate student Jane Ball: , which is part two of a two part episode. This episode was by Historic-ly.

Activist #MMT - podcast
Ep93 [1/2]: Esha, me, Lenin, and MMT

Activist #MMT - podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 63:22


Welcome to episode 93 of Activist #MMT. Today I talk with Esha Krishnaswamy as a guest on her own show, Late Night with Lenin. Esha has me cold read two pieces written by Lenin more than 100 years ago, and describes why they remain important and relevant. (Here's a link to __PART_TWO__.) Esha is the host of the podcast Historic-ly, which is realistic history, similar to how MMT is realistic economics. You can follow Historic-ly on Twitter at @historic_ly and historicly.substack.com. I've hosted eight episodes for her podcast, links to which you can find in the show notes. The Lenin readings don't start until part two. In part one, we discuss the basics of MMT and how it illuminates the centuries long battle between rich and poor. MMT reveals that when the rich say, "depriving the poor is unfortunate but necessary", what they really mean is "of course we can provide for the poor – we just don't want to." Importantly, MMT makes this clear to average people, not unlike Martin Luther and his papers nailed to the church door during the reformation. In the same fashion (although with printed paper instead of on social media), Lenin illuminated the same things to average Russian citizens, ultimately leading to a rare successful popular uprising. I admittedly struggle through the readings, with its unusual names and concepts, and early twentieth century Russian history. Even so, it results in very interesting conversation throughout, all anchored by Modern Money Theory. Finally, as a brief aside, both of our incredible theme music was created by Wreck Tech. You can find Wreck Tech on SoundCloud and Spotify. And now, onto my conversation with Esha Krishnaswamy. Enjoy. Resources My 2020 interview with Esha on Historic-ly, Anatomy of a Revolution: Parts one and two Episode 71 of Activist #MMT with graduate student Jane Ball: Government-designed racist zoning to prevent popular uprising, which is part two of a two part episode. This episode was re-published by Historic-ly.

The Sons Of History
From Liberty to Tyranny: Discussing Revolutions Over the Century with Donald Critchlow

The Sons Of History

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 64:06


Lenin. Mao. Castro. Mugabe. Khomeini. Donald Critchlow joins the podcast to discuss his new book "Revolutionary Monsters: Five Men Who Turned Liberation Into Tyranny." The Sons of History talk about how these five dictators came to power across five different regions, but in very similar ways. Dustin Bass and Alan Wakim discuss with Critchlow how the West (whether journalists, politicians, or academics) continued to be enamored we these ruthless tyrants, how academia was a hotbed for revolution each time, what was the ultimate result, and how America and the West is falling into a trap to put themselves in the same situation. The Sons of History highly recommend this book.

Guerrilla History
Electoral Theory and Strategy of Marx and Lenin w/ August Nimtz

Guerrilla History

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 136:23


In this episode of Guerrilla History, we bring on Professor August Nimtz to talk about his book, The Ballot, The Streets, or Both? From Marx and Engels to Lenin and the October Revolution.  This book takes a look at the theoretical and strategic groundings and evolution of electoralism via the writings of Marx/Engels and Lenin.  A conversation that will add a lot of historical nuance to the debates that we have every election season in the "western democratic" countries! August Nimtz professor of political science and African American and African studies at the University of Minnesota.  His book The Ballot, The Streets, or Both? is available from Haymarket Books: https://www.haymarketbooks.org/books/1385-the-ballot-the-streets-or-both.  His other books include Marx and Engels: Their Contribution to the Democratic Breakthrough (SUNY Press), Marx, Tocqueville, and Race in America: The 'Absolute Democracy' or 'Defiled Republic'  (Lexington Books), and Marxism versus Liberalism: Comparative Real-Time Political Analysis (Palgrave Macmillan).   Guerrilla History is the podcast that acts as a reconnaissance report of global proletarian history, and aims to use the lessons of history to analyze the present.  If you have any questions or guest/topic suggestions, email them to us at guerrillahistorypod@gmail.com. Your hosts are immunobiologist Henry Hakamaki, Professor Adnan Husain, historian and Director of the School of Religion at Queens University, and Revolutionary Left Radio's Breht O'Shea.   Follow us on social media!  Our podcast can be found on twitter @guerrilla_pod, and can be supported on patreon at https://www.patreon.com/guerrillahistory.  Your contributions will make the show possible to continue and succeed! To follow the hosts, Henry can be found on twitter @huck1995, and also has a patreon to help support himself through the pandemic where he breaks down science and public health research and news at https://www.patreon.com/huck1995.  Adnan can be followed on twitter @adnanahusain, and also runs The Majlis Podcast, which can be found at https://anchor.fm/the-majlis, and the Muslim Societies-Global Perspectives group at Queens University, https://www.facebook.com/MSGPQU/.   Breht is the host of Revolutionary Left Radio, which can be followed on twitter @RevLeftRadio and cohost of The Red Menace Podcast, which can be followed on twitter @Red_Menace_Pod.  Follow and support these shows on patreon, and find them at https://www.revolutionaryleftradio.com/.     Thanks to Ryan Hakamaki, who designed and created the podcast's artwork, and Kevin MacLeod, who creates royalty-free music.

Puro Pa’DELante Podcast
Entrevista con Lenin Ramirez

Puro Pa’DELante Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 11:15


Lenin Ramirez nos platica de sus Premios y Exitos bien merecidos. PURO PA'DELANTE, un podcast y videopodcast que por primera vez dará acceso exclusivo a la mente creativa de uno de los ejecutivos más importantes del género regional mexicano. Ángel del Villar, en esta ocasión se une a una de las presentadoras más consolidadas del entretenimiento hispano en los Estados Unidos, Rubí Molina, para conversar sin censura con las figuras más relevantes de la industria Latina, quienes expresarán su puntos de vista sobre diferentes temas en tendencia cada jueves. DEL Records, por 10 años ha sido una empresa líder e innovadora, apostándole al mundo digital desde antes que se convirtiera en un estilo de vida, se posiciona como la empresa independiente con mayor alcance en el mundo digital y se enorgullece en abrir dicho medio para el entretenimiento hispano y ser un medio para el mundo digital

The Slavic Connexion
"Frozen by the Thaw": The Soviet Masculinity Crisis of the Long Sixties with Marko Dumančić

The Slavic Connexion

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 42:32


On this episode, Marko Dumančić joins Lera and Cullan to talk about his recently published monograph entitled Men Out of Focus: The Soviet Masculinity Crisis in the Long Sixties wherein he unpacks the changing conceptions of men in post-Stalinist society by taking a deeper look at Soviet films made at the time. This is a fun conversation, riddled with film talk. We hope you enjoy! ABOUT THE GUEST https://cseees.unc.edu/wp-content/uploads/sites/282/2018/10/fullsizeoutput_d03.jpeg Marko Dumančić is an associate professor at Western Kentucky University's History Department. He works on a range of topics involving gender and sexual identity in the Soviet Union during the Cold War and in former Yugoslavia during the 1980s and 1990s. His first monograph, Men out of Focus: The Soviet Masculinity Crisis in the Long Sixties, examines the causes undergirding changing conceptions of masculinity in post-Stalinist society. His current research looks at the concept of genocidal masculinities in Bosnia during the 1990s and seeks to determine the motivations of soldiers who committed wartime human rights abuses. His work has appeared in Journal of Cold War Studies, Cold War History, Studies in Russian and Soviet Cinema, and The Cambridge History of Communism. You can find Men Out of Focus here (https://www.amazon.com/Dumancic-Men-Focus-Marko-Duman%C4%8Di%C4%87/dp/1487505256/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=men+out+of+focus&qid=1633818233&sr=8-1). https://mail.google.com/mail/u/1?ui=2&ik=7aed11d76b&attid=0.0.1&permmsgid=msg-f:1710259909750369228&th=17bc10539a432bcc&view=fimg&sz=s0-l75-ft&attbid=ANGjdJ9DZ0Rg0n1tFqBOc6RIaSotw-x0zPMJD_cYgVv1_EdhP6GIyvTH_6EN9GPHwC3VfNFXRhLZEpMumZTG-sVmQRg2-DWM7Fj_4fgOb-f4-8epLnCQMaV0ULD7zBw&disp=emb PRODUCER'S NOTE: This episode was recorded on June 15th, 2021 via Zoom. To reach us via email, send a message to slavxradio@utexas.edu if you have questions, suggestions, or would like to be a guest on the show! CREDITS Co-Producer: Lera Toropin (@earlportion) Co-Producer: Cullan Bendig (@cullanwithana) Associate Producer: Zach Johnson Assistant Producer: Sergio Glajar Assistant Producer: Misha Simanovskyy Associate Producer/Administrator: Kathryn Yegorov-Crate Executive Assistant: Katherine Birch Recording, Editing, and Sound Design: Michelle Daniel Music Producer: Charlie Harper (Connect: facebook.com/charlie.harper.1485 Instagram: @charlieharpermusic) www.charlieharpermusic.com (Main Theme by Charlie Harper and additional background music by Charlie Harper, Ketsa, Scott Holmes) Additional sound effects and clips from movies referenced in the episode come from YouTube. Executive Producer & Creator: Michelle Daniel (Connect: facebook.com/mdanielgeraci Instagram: @michelledaniel86) www.msdaniel.com DISCLAIMER: Texas Podcast Network is brought to you by The University of Texas at Austin. Podcasts are produced by faculty members and staffers at UT Austin who work with University Communications to craft content that adheres to journalistic best practices. The University of Texas at Austin offers these podcasts at no charge. Podcasts appearing on the network and this webpage represent the views of the hosts, not of The University of Texas at Austin. https://files.fireside.fm/file/fireside-uploads/images/9/9a59b135-7876-4254-b600-3839b3aa3ab1/P1EKcswq.png Special Guest: Marko Dumančić.

il posto delle parole
Marco D'Eramo "Biennale Democrazia"

il posto delle parole

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 16:40


Marco D'Eramo"Biennale Democrazia"http://biennaledemocrazia.it/Biennale Democrazia, Torinovenerdì 8 ottobre, ore 11:00, Teatro CarignanoL'informazione pubblica ha un futuro?Gad Lerner e Marco d'Eramocoordina Anna Maserain collaborazione con Biennale Tecnologiahttps://www.vivaticket.com/it/biglietto/l-informazione-pubblica-ha-un-futuro/163697L'informazione, come quasi tutte le sfere rilevanti della vita sociale, negli ultimi decenni è andata incontro a un processo di privatizzazione, strutturandosi spesso in forma oligarchica. Privati sono i maggiori broadcast internazionali. Privata è la struttura proprietaria delle grandi piattaforme che distribuiscono notizie. Privato è il rapporto che ciascuno di noi intrattiene con le notizie sui social. La libera formazione delle opinioni si gioverà della concorrenza fra privati in questo ambito così delicato o rischia di essere inquinata alla fonte? Quali nuove opportunità si offrono per ripensare e rilanciare l'informazione intesa come servizio pubblico?Marco D'EramoDominio. La guerra invisibile dei potenti contro i sudditiFeltrinelli Editorehttps://www.feltrinellieditore.it/“Il lavoro da fare,” scrive d'Eramo, “è immenso, titanico, da mettere spavento. Ma ricordiamoci che nel 1947 i fautori del neoliberismo dovevano quasi riunirsi in clandestinità, sembravano predicare nel deserto, proprio come noi ora.”Dai birrifici del Colorado alle facoltà di Harvard, ai premi Nobel di Stoccolma, Marco d'Eramo ci guida nei luoghi dove una guerra è stata pensata, pianificata, finanziata. Di una vera e propria guerra si è trattato, anche se è stata combattuta senza che noi ce ne accorgessimo. Lo ha riconosciuto uno degli uomini più ricchi del mondo, Warren Buffett: “Certo che c'è guerra di classe, e la mia classe l'ha vinta. L'hanno vinta i ricchi”. La vittoria è tale che oggi termini come “capitalisti”, “sfruttamento”, “oppressione” sono diventati parolacce che ci vergogniamo di pronunciare. Oggi “ci è più facile pensare la fine del mondo che la fine del capitalismo”. La rivolta dall'alto contro il basso ha investito tutti i terreni, non solo l'economia, il lavoro, ma anche la giustizia, l'istruzione: ha stravolto l'idea che ci facciamo della società, della famiglia, di noi stessi. Ha sfruttato ogni crisi, tsunami, attentato, recessione, pandemia. Ha usato qualunque arma, dalla rivoluzione informatica alla tecnologia del debito. Ha cambiato la natura del potere, dalla disciplina al controllo. Ha imparato dalle lotte operaie, ha studiato Gramsci e Lenin. Forse è arrivato il momento di fare lo stesso e di imparare dagli avversari.Marco d'Eramo è giornalista, ha lavorato per Paese Sera, Mondoperaio, e il manifesto. Collabora con Micromega, The New Left Review, Die Tageszeitung. Tra le sue pubblicazioni: Il maiale e il grattacielo. Chicago: una storia del nostro futuro (Feltrinelli 1995), Moderato sarà lei (manifestolibri 2008, con M. Bascetta), Il selfie del mondo. Indagine sull'età del turismo (Feltrinelli 2017), Dominio. La guerra invisibile dei potenti contro i sudditi (Feltrinelli 2020).IL POSTO DELLE PAROLEascoltare fa pensarehttps://ilpostodelleparole.it/

Haymarket Books Live
The Second International and Revolutionary Marxism

Haymarket Books Live

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 90:03


Join Mike Taber, Eric Blanc, Lars Lih, and Anne McShane for a book launch celebrating the release of Under the Socialist Banner: Resolutions of the Second International, 1889–1912, edited by Taber. Recent years have seen a massive growth of interest in socialism, particularly among young people. But few are fully aware of socialism's revolutionary history. For this reason, an appreciation of the Second International—often called the “Socialist International”—during its Marxist years is particularly relevant. What is the record of the Second International in its Marxist years? What is its legacy, and what lessons does it offer for today? These and other questions will be discussed. --------------------------------------------------------------------------- Order a Copy of Under the Socialist Banner: https://www.haymarketbooks.org/books/1649-under-the-socialist-banner --------------------------------------------------------------------------- Eric Blanc is the author of Red State Revolt: The Teachers' Strike Wave and Working-Class Politics and Revolutionary Social Democracy: Working-Class Politics Across the Russian Empire, 1882-1917. Lars T. Lih is an independent scholar who lives in Montreal. He is the author of Bread and Authority in Russia, 1914-1921, co-author of Stalin's Letters to Molotov , author of Lenin Rediscovered: What Is to Be Done? In Context , and co-editor, with Ben Lewis, of Zinoviev and Martov: Head to Head in Halle . He has also authored a short biography entitled Lenin . At present, he is working on a study of the 1917 revolution that brings out the overlooked role of consensus and continuity in the Bolshevik outlook. Mike Taber is the editor of Under the Socialist Banner: Resolutions of the Second International, 1889–1912. He has edited and prepared a number of other books related to the history of revolutionary and working-class movements—from collections of documents of the Communist International under Lenin to works by figures such as Leon Trotsky, Malcolm X, and Che Guevara. Anne McShane has been involved in Marxist politics for over 30 years. She has a particular interest in the struggle for women's emancipation within socialist projects and has completed a PhD on the role of the Zhenotdel (Women's Department of the CPSU) in Soviet Central Asia. She works as a human rights lawyer in Ireland. This event is co-sponsored by Haymarket Books and Verso Books. Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/wcdUfdo2C_w Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks

Laborwave Revolution Radio
Lenin Was Wrong: Workplace Struggles Are Political

Laborwave Revolution Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 46:02


Marianne Garneau, publisher of Organizing.Work, joins the show to discuss her article Workplace Struggles Are Political. Garneau's provides a necessary corrective over common views amongst "socialists" that work and politics are two separate spheres in which struggle takes place. Following the wrongheaded opinion of Lenin, who assessed workers as only capable of rising to a level of "trade union consciousness," these socialists, according to Garneau, "take a surprisingly apolitical view of what goes on in the workplace."

Super Saints Podcast
The Life of Saint Francis of Assisi

Super Saints Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 104:29


Saint Francis of Assisi audiobook"Lord make me an instrument of Your Peace!" Saint Francis appeals to every aspect of humanity. He is Gospel"Saint Francis of Assisi is one of the most powerful Saints of our Church. Lenin, one of the founders of the Communist Revolution, said on his deathbed, "If we had had one hundred Francis' of Assisi, the revolution would have been successful."Come with us to Assisi, the land of Saint Francis. No matter where you go there, you can feel Saint Francis and Saint Clare.See many of his Miracles. Visit the Portziuncola, first Franciscan Church, the Convent of San Damiano where the Crucifix spoke to Francis, when he asked, "What do you want of me Lord"  and Jesus replied,"Go and rebuild my Church which you can see, is in ruins."Visit the Hermitage, where Francis went to meditate and hear the Lord's words. Come to his Basilica and visit his tomb.Learn about the Stigmata, how it came about, and what effect it had on the rest of Saint Francis' life. Come with him as he returned to the Convent of San Damiano and Sister Clare, who cared for him. See his life and death as depicted by the many murals in the upper Basilica.Learn about Saint Francis. We need him especially today.More about Saint Francis of AssisiJourneys of Faith Bob and Penny Lord's StoreJourneys of Faith Blog Subscribe to our Free Blog Easy PeasyBob and Penny Lord TV Channel Miracles of the Eucharist, Apparitions of Mary, and lives of the Saints videos on demand.Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/bobandpennylord?fan_landing=true)

The Socialist Program with Brian Becker
Lenin on Imperialism (Part 1): A Policy or a System?

The Socialist Program with Brian Becker

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 44:02


Today's episode is the first in a multi-part series on Lenin's theory of imperialism and how his ideas apply to the modern day struggle against war and empire. Brian Becker and Walter Smolarek discuss Lenin's landmark work "Imperialism: The Highest Stage of Capitalism". Far from being a series of mistaken policy choices, Lenin proves that imperialism is a compulsory system under modern capitalism. These concepts are covered in detail in the book "Imperialism in the 21st Century: Updating Lenin's Theory a Century Later" published by Liberation Media. Please make an urgently-needed contribution to The Socialist Program by joining our Patreon community at patreon.com/thesocialistprogram. We rely on the generous support of our listeners to keep bringing you consistent, high-quality shows. All Patreon donors of $5 a month or more are invited to join the monthly Q&A seminar with Brian.

SBS Portuguese - SBS em Português
Mãe solo imigrante na Austrália: para Fernanda Queiroz, subsídios do governo são bons mas não estimulam mulheres a se desenvolverem no mercado de trabalho

SBS Portuguese - SBS em Português

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 14:52


A assistente social Fernanda Queiroz Santos, de 40 anos, mãe do Lenin, de 9, mora na Austrália há sete anos. Ela afirma que a sociedade ganharia muito sendo mais inclusiva com mães solo e seus filhos. "Precisamos de uma comunidade inteira para criar crianças. É preciso tirar um pouco o fardo das mães"

The Anti Empire Project with Justin Podur
Scramble for Africa 3: Theories of Imperialism

The Anti Empire Project with Justin Podur

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 125:52


Our third instalment before we really dig into the actual scramble for Africa is to give you a flavor for how we're interpreting what we read. Lenin wrote Imperialism, the Highest Stage of Capitalism as an explanation for WWI, but much of what he wrote was about Africa; WEB Du Bois wrote an essay with … Continue reading "Scramble for Africa 3: Theories of Imperialism"

VietnamPlus's Podcast
Tin nong ngay 27/9: Tranh cai chuyen cau be 10 tuoi doc Lenin toan tap

VietnamPlus's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 6:03


Trẻ con thích đọc truyện tranh như Doremon hay Conan vốn là "chuyện thường ngày ở huyện" nhưng trẻ con đam mê đọc sách về lịch sử và xã hội có vẻ như là "chuyện xưa nay hiếm." Chính vì vậy, thông tin về cậu bé 10 tuổi đã đọc hàng trăm cuốn sách lịch sử, đang đọc bộ Lenin toàn tập, khiến nhiều người không khỏi bất ngờ. Rồi từ bất ngờ, họ lại tranh cãi, thậm chí phán xét về cậu bé và gia đình cậu./.

Faith And Capital
82 | Tax the Rich? w/ Chris

Faith And Capital

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2021 49:36


Comrade and chaplain Chris join me to discus the political ideologies that are organizing around "taxing the rich" in the imperial core. We discuss social imperialism, social democracy, democratic socialism, the social gospel, woke imperialism, and maoism (marxism-leninism-maoism).Interested in learning more about imperialism? Pick up a copy (or pdf) of Imperialism, the Highest Stage of Capitalism by V. I. Lenin!Support the show: patreon.com/faithandcapital or leave an iTunes rating and review.Faith and Capital is on instagram, twitter, and facebook.Contact: faithandcapital@gmail.comMusic by D.C.R. PollockSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/faithandcapital)

History Unplugged Podcast
What if Tsarist Russia Hadn't Gone Communist? Revolutionaries Like Boris Savinkov Tried to Accomplish This

History Unplugged Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 52:30


Although now largely forgotten outside Russia, Boris Savinkov was famous, and notorious, both at home and abroad during his lifetime, which spans the end of the Russian Empire and the establishment of the Soviet Union. A complex and conflicted individual, he was a paradoxically moral revolutionary terrorist, a scandalous novelist, a friend of epoch-defining artists like Modigliani and Diego Rivera, a government minister, a tireless fighter against Lenin and the Bolsheviks, and an advisor to Churchill. At the end of his life, Savinkov conspired to be captured by the Soviet secret police, and as the country's most prized political prisoner made headlines around the world when he claimed that he accepted the Bolshevik state. However, some believe that this was Savinkov's final play as a gambler, staking his life on a secret plan to strike one last blow against the tyrannical regime. Todays' guest is Vladimir Alexandrov, author of To Break Russia's Chains: Boris Savinkov and His Wars Against the Tsar and the Bolsheviks. Neither a "Red" nor a "White," Savinkov lived an epic life that challenges many popular myths about the Russian Revolution, which was arguably the most important catalyst of twentieth-century world history. All of Savinkov's efforts were directed at transforming his homeland into a uniquely democratic, humane and enlightened state. There are aspects of his violent legacy that will, and should, remain frozen in the past as part of the historical record. But the support he received from many of his countrymen suggests that the paths Russia took during the twentieth and twenty-first centuries—the tyranny of communism, the authoritarianism of Putin's regime—were not the only ones written in her historical destiny. Savinkov's goals remain a poignant reminder of how things in Russia could have been, and how, perhaps, they may still become someday.

Revolutionary Left Radio
The Spectre Still Haunts: Breaking the Imperialist Chain w/ Hakim

Revolutionary Left Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 106:29


The one and only Hakim joins Breht to discuss the Iraq war from the perspective of Iraqis, the western left, Lenin, Reform AND Revolution, the importance of anti-imperialist struggle, contradictions and crises, the global south, etc. At the end, Hakim fields a bunch of common anti-socialist talking points and dismantles them one by one.  This is a wide ranging and genuinely fun conversation with a great comrade and political educator!  Subscribe to Hakim's YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCPPZoYsfoSekIpLcz9plX1Q Follow Hakim on Twitter: https://twitter.com/yaboihakim Outro Music: "Armed & Dangerous" by King Von ----- Support Rev Left Radio: https://www.patreon.com/RevLeftRadio or make a one time donation: PayPal.me/revleft LEARN MORE ABOUT REV LEFT RADIO: www.revolutionaryleftradio.com

Liberation Audio
Paulo Freire's centennial: Political pedagogy for revolutionary organizations

Liberation Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2021 17:24


All revolutionary processes are educational. From organizing meetings and study groups to writing protest speeches and propaganda before the revolutionary moment to creating new revolutionary educational and cultural institutions and training teachers and specialists after the seizure of power, revolution is educational through and through. Yet exactly what kind of educational operations does revolution entail, and how can we understand and practice them? It is precisely these questions that Paulo Freire addressed in his classic work, Pedagogy of the Oppressed. One hundred years after his birth in the Brazilian state of Pernambuco, Freire's name is widely recognized and, relatively speaking, so too is his canonical text. Yet the book is referenced or discussed more than it is deeply engaged. This is particularly evident when Freire's work is severed from its revolutionary Marxist orientation [1]. While it's often taken as an abstract guide-book for how to teach, Pedagogy of the Oppressed is really a theoretical reflection on his own experiences teaching peasants how to read and write, a theory he extends to revolutionary movements, leadership, and organization. After spending 70 days in prison for “treachery” [teaching poor peasants to read and write], he was exiled from Brazil following the military junta in 1964. He eventually settled in Chile, which is where he wrote Pedagogy of the Oppressed. The book has been targeted by the right wing in the U.S. (it is currently banned from public schools in Arizona). It addresses the educational components of revolutionary movements and, as such, it is littered with references to Marx, Lenin, Fanon, and others. Specifically, the book is concerned with how the revolutionary leadership pushes the struggle forward, or how it teaches and learns from the masses in struggle. Read the full article: https://liberationschool.org/paulo-freire-and-revolutionary-leadership/

New Books Network
Alan Shandro, "Lenin and the Logic of Hegemony: Political Practice and Theory in the Class Struggle" (Haymarket Books, 2015)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 110:22


Few figures stand as prominently in Marxist theory and history as V.I. Lenin. The revolutionary who played a pivotal role in one of the most important events in world history has received reverence, damnation, and everything in between, but much of that response depends on deep misunderstandings of both what he thought and what he did. This misunderstanding was deep enough that even he took notice of it at several points, remarking that readers tended to take his theories out of their context and misunderstanding the underlying points. Understanding Lenin, then, will not just mean rereading his work, but understanding the world Lenin was working in, the what's impossible to understand without considering the where's, when's and why's. To that effect, Alan Shandro has stepped in with a book that seeks to do just that. Lenin and the Logic of Hegemony: Political Practice and Theory in the Class Struggle (Haymarket Books, 2015) is a sustained attempt to reread Lenin in light of Gramsci's oft-ignored remark that Lenin was one of his biggest influences in developing his own theories of hegemony. The book spends the first couple chapters contextualizing Lenin by looking at some of his contemporaries, particularly Kautsky, Bernstein and Plekhanov, before turning to Lenin's own works, and reading through them slowly and meticulously. The result is a study that works its way from Lenin's writings in the 1890's all the way to the end of his life in the 1920's, giving us the ability to see Lenin's development of ontological and epistemological themes that run throughout his life and work. While Shandro is not always easy to read, the book has a number of crucial insights for political organizers, and will repay serious effort. Many books have been written on Lenin over the years, but few have bothered to study his own work so meticulously and thoroughly. Published as part of the Historical Materialism book series. Alan Shandro is a professor of political theory, previously at Laurentian University, and is currently a visiting professor at York. He is on the editorial board for Science & Society. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Sociology
Alan Shandro, "Lenin and the Logic of Hegemony: Political Practice and Theory in the Class Struggle" (Haymarket Books, 2015)

New Books in Sociology

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 110:22


Few figures stand as prominently in Marxist theory and history as V.I. Lenin. The revolutionary who played a pivotal role in one of the most important events in world history has received reverence, damnation, and everything in between, but much of that response depends on deep misunderstandings of both what he thought and what he did. This misunderstanding was deep enough that even he took notice of it at several points, remarking that readers tended to take his theories out of their context and misunderstanding the underlying points. Understanding Lenin, then, will not just mean rereading his work, but understanding the world Lenin was working in, the what's impossible to understand without considering the where's, when's and why's. To that effect, Alan Shandro has stepped in with a book that seeks to do just that. Lenin and the Logic of Hegemony: Political Practice and Theory in the Class Struggle (Haymarket Books, 2015) is a sustained attempt to reread Lenin in light of Gramsci's oft-ignored remark that Lenin was one of his biggest influences in developing his own theories of hegemony. The book spends the first couple chapters contextualizing Lenin by looking at some of his contemporaries, particularly Kautsky, Bernstein and Plekhanov, before turning to Lenin's own works, and reading through them slowly and meticulously. The result is a study that works its way from Lenin's writings in the 1890's all the way to the end of his life in the 1920's, giving us the ability to see Lenin's development of ontological and epistemological themes that run throughout his life and work. While Shandro is not always easy to read, the book has a number of crucial insights for political organizers, and will repay serious effort. Many books have been written on Lenin over the years, but few have bothered to study his own work so meticulously and thoroughly. Published as part of the Historical Materialism book series. Alan Shandro is a professor of political theory, previously at Laurentian University, and is currently a visiting professor at York. He is on the editorial board for Science & Society. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/sociology

New Books in Intellectual History
Alan Shandro, "Lenin and the Logic of Hegemony: Political Practice and Theory in the Class Struggle" (Haymarket Books, 2015)

New Books in Intellectual History

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 110:22


Few figures stand as prominently in Marxist theory and history as V.I. Lenin. The revolutionary who played a pivotal role in one of the most important events in world history has received reverence, damnation, and everything in between, but much of that response depends on deep misunderstandings of both what he thought and what he did. This misunderstanding was deep enough that even he took notice of it at several points, remarking that readers tended to take his theories out of their context and misunderstanding the underlying points. Understanding Lenin, then, will not just mean rereading his work, but understanding the world Lenin was working in, the what's impossible to understand without considering the where's, when's and why's. To that effect, Alan Shandro has stepped in with a book that seeks to do just that. Lenin and the Logic of Hegemony: Political Practice and Theory in the Class Struggle (Haymarket Books, 2015) is a sustained attempt to reread Lenin in light of Gramsci's oft-ignored remark that Lenin was one of his biggest influences in developing his own theories of hegemony. The book spends the first couple chapters contextualizing Lenin by looking at some of his contemporaries, particularly Kautsky, Bernstein and Plekhanov, before turning to Lenin's own works, and reading through them slowly and meticulously. The result is a study that works its way from Lenin's writings in the 1890's all the way to the end of his life in the 1920's, giving us the ability to see Lenin's development of ontological and epistemological themes that run throughout his life and work. While Shandro is not always easy to read, the book has a number of crucial insights for political organizers, and will repay serious effort. Many books have been written on Lenin over the years, but few have bothered to study his own work so meticulously and thoroughly. Published as part of the Historical Materialism book series. Alan Shandro is a professor of political theory, previously at Laurentian University, and is currently a visiting professor at York. He is on the editorial board for Science & Society. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/intellectual-history

The Kim Monson Show
Candidates Looking to Change Colorado for the Better

The Kim Monson Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 56:36


“We have a country to save!”  Candidates for the new Congressional District 8 and Douglas County School Board join Kim in the studio to discuss how Colorado must change direction before it becomes the second “California.”  Jewels Gray is a candidate for the new CD8.  Kaylee Winegar and Mike Peterson are running for Douglas County School Board.  Mike quotes President Reagan, “Freedom is never more than one generation away from extinction.”  LEAP, Learning Enrichment and Academic Progress Program, is a proposition on the November ballot.  Vote no on LEAP.  We need to properly educate our students during the school day.  We do not need a nine member board, appointed by the governor, where the members pick their replacements, the board has taxing authority and the board picks the vendors with no accountability.  Biden will be in Denver today.  An opinion piece by Roger Simon states that we may be fulfilling Lenin's statement that the fastest way to socialism or communism is through the healthcare system.  Miami airport now has dogs that can detect the COVID-19/Wuhan-China virus.  With the vaccine mandate, will the trucking industry halt shipments?  Carry with you SB21-142 where it is Colorado law, Every person has a right to privacy with respect to personal health decisions, free from coercion or interference from the government. Jewels discusses with Kim the reasons for her candidacy.  She will no longer be complacent and will work for the rights of the individuals, not the government.  Jewels, like all of us, sees the government overreach in every aspect of our life and it must stop.  Jewels' attention will be focused on:  education, second amendment rights, freedom of speech, concerns of small businesses, and election integrity.  To learn more about Jewels visit her website, jewelsforColorado.com.  Kimberlee Bell, owner of Kunjani Coffee, encourages listeners to visit her website for daily specials and upcoming events, including this Saturday night, September 18th, for Sip and Paint (https://kunjanicoffee.com/events).  Starting this Wednesday night, September 15th, at 6:30pm Kim will be hosting Prayer Night, a time to gather with others to pray for our state and our nation. The four Douglas County School Board candidates, Kaylee and Mike joined by Kristy Williams and Becky Myers, have common themes:  empower parents, teachers and leaders at the local level and focus policy centered around the students.  Classrooms must teach the basics of reading, writing, math, science, history, civics and critical thinking to prepare students to live the best version of themselves possible.  Adult politics need to stay out of the schools.  Statewide, only 24% of our sixth-grade students are proficient in math.  We must stop this trend.  Curriculum and activities taking place in the schools must be transparent so that parents are informed.  Leadership in Douglas County schools has grown into a toxic environment hindering students.  The combined skill sets of the four candidates will enable the district to regain its past reputation of excellence.  This includes giving the teachers the resources they need to properly educate our children so they all can be successful.  For more information, visit vote4kidsfirst.com.

Annoying Question Boy
What must our goals as Revolutionary Communists be?

Annoying Question Boy

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 36:45


In this episode I go into a discussion about why we as the working and oppressed people of the US Need to begin getting organized. We've discussed this before, but I'm going to a little bit more of a specific analysis based on a few of the Lenin's writings that were suggested to me by a friend. I hope you enjoy, also, go get your vaccine!

The Regrettable Century
The New Moment In Marxism: Introducing The Measures Taken

The Regrettable Century

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 72:31


This week we would like to introduce to you to The Measures Taken. The Measures Taken is a podcast about the intellectual history of  the key debates that occurred in Marxism and it also happens to be one of Jason's side projects. All of the contributors to the podcast come from different corners of the American left and believe that they have all been miseducated. This podcast is an attempt at self education and an encouragement for others to do the same. https://www.themeasurestaken.org/Support the show (http://patreon.com/theregrettablecentury)

This is The Revolution
Firefly and Revolutionary Robbery

This is The Revolution

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 33:01


Explore the world of Firefly, an early 2000s Space Western featuring a crew of smugglers with hearts of gold. The crew pulls off a train heist and helps us understand the concept of Revolutionary Expropriations or Revolutionary Heists/Robberies. We'll be using frameworks established by Lenin, Stalin, and the United States Navy to understand how they work.Special thanks to Mike Duncan's Revolutions Podcast for the inspiration!Support the show (https://ko-fi.com/thisistherevolution)