Woman's Hour

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The programme that offers a female perspective on the world

BBC Radio 4


    • Jul 2, 2022 LATEST EPISODE
    • weekdays NEW EPISODES
    • 49m AVG DURATION
    • 963 EPISODES

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    Latest episodes from Woman's Hour

    Weekend Woman's Hour: The law on abortion, Aparna Sen, Being lesbian in the military

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2022 56:43

    The overturning by the US Supreme Court of the landmark Roe v Wade ruling has prompted many of you to get in touch to share your reactions and experiences. But what does the law in the UK say about a woman's right to an abortion? We hear from Professor Fiona De Londras, the Chair of Global Legal Studies at Birmingham Law School. Aparna Sen is one of India's best loved and most successful film directors. Her career has spanned 40 years and she's explored issues around mental health, sexual abuse and infidelity. Aparna is in England for the London Indian Film Festival. Have you ever noticed the queue for the women's toilets is much longer than the queue for the men's? Two Bristol university graduates have tried to resolve this issue, by inventing female urinals. They joined Emma to explain how it works. How do you heal and get through a break up? Annie Lord is Vogue's dating columnist. She joins Emma Barnett to talk about her debut book, Notes on Heartbreak. A candid exploration of the best and worst of love, she talks about nursing a broken heart and her own attempts to move on in the current dating climate; from disastrous rebound sex to sending ill-advised nudes, stalking your ex's new girlfriend and the sharp indignity of being ghosted. Welsh singer and dancer Marged Siôn is with us. She's in the band, Self Esteem and appears in a new Welsh-language short film called Hunan Hyder which means self-confidence). She talks to us about trauma, healing and appearing on stage with Adele! Dame Kelly Holmes came out as a lesbian last week. The Olympic champion served in the army in the late 1980s, when you could face prison for being gay as a member of the military. Dame Kelly spoke of her worry that she would still face consequences if she were to let her sexuality be known. It wasn't until 2000 that a ban on being gay and serving in the Army, Navy or RAF was lifted. Emma Riley was discharged from the Royal Navy in 1993 for being a lesbian. An American pregnant woman who was on holiday in Malta this month couldn't get an induced medical miscarriage when she needed it because of the country's strict abortion laws. Andrea Prudente ended up going to Mallorca to get treatment, where she's recovering in a hotel.

    Aparna Sen, Midwives, Marged Sion

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 57:43

    Aparna Sen joins us in the studio. She's one of India's best loved and most successful film directors. Her career has spanned 40 years and she's explored issues around mental health, sexual abuse and infidelity. Aparna is in England for the London Indian Film Festival. The number of NHS midwives in England has fallen by over 600 in a year, according to figures by the Royal College of Midwives. We talk to Birte Harlev-lam from the Royal College of Midwives, as well as a midwife in the West Midlands. What's the reason behind this drop? We talk about what it's like to be a plus-sized actor. A new Matilda film is coming out starring Emma Thompson who will play Miss Trunchbull. It means she'll wear a fat suit for the role. Two plus-size actors, Katie Greenall and Samia La Virgne, give their reaction to the casting, and share their experiences of being a bigger actor. Welsh singer and dancer Marged Siôn is with us. She's in the band, Self Esteem and appears in a new Welsh-language short film called Hunan Hyder which means self-confidence). She talks to us about trauma, healing and appearing on stage with Adele! And we catch up with Gina Harris who at 82 has cycled from Lands End to John O'Groats. It took a month and she faced rainy days and tired legs!

    Annie Lord, Menovests, Roe v Wade, The Fellowship

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 66:33

    How do you heal and get through a break up? Annie Lord is Vogue's dating columnist. She joins Emma Barnett to talk about her debut book, Notes on Heartbreak. A candid exploration of the best and worst of love, she talks about nursing a broken heart and her own attempts to move on in the current dating climate; from disastrous rebound sex to sending ill-advised nudes, stalking your ex's new girlfriend and the sharp indignity of being ghosted. The overturning by the US Supreme Court of the landmark Roe v Wade ruling has prompted many of you to get in touch to share your reactions and experiences. One listener, Nicola, wanted to tell us about her mum - who died after having a legal termination that should have been safe, in 1968. Closer to home there's been a high-level summit about buffer zones at abortion clinics. Emma speaks to Scotland's Green MSP, Gillian Mackay, who has drawn up a members bill which aims to introduce protest-free buffer zones around clinics. And what does the law in the UK say about a woman's right to an abortion? We hear from Professor Fiona De Londras, the Chair of Global Legal Studies at Birmingham Law School. The senior backbench Conservative MP Sir Iain Duncan Smith and some of his fellow MPs were given the opportunity this week to find out first hand exactly how uncomfortable a menopausal hot flush can be, especially when you're in the workplace. As part of an event raising awareness around the country's shortage of HRT, Sir Iain and some his colleagues from both sides of the House of Commons, tried out a so-called MenoVest, a special piece of clothing fitted with heat pads, to simulate the extreme discomfort which many menopausal women have to live with. Emma speaks to Sir Iain Duncan Smith and Lesley Salem, who had the idea to create the vest. The Fellowship is a play which looks at the children of the Windrush generation and the relationship between Marcia and Dawn, two black sisters struggling to take care of their dying mother whilst juggling their turbulent personal lives. Emma speaks to Director Paulette Randall and actor Suzette Llewellyn, who plays Marcia.

    Ghislaine Maxwell sentencing, Minister for Justice in Ireland, Dame Deborah James, Trans sport, Music education

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 57:34

    Ghislaine Maxwell has been sentenced to 20 years in prison for helping former financier Jeffrey Epstein abuse young girls. We speak to Equality Lawyer Georgina Calvert Lee about her statement in court where she addressed her victims, saying she empathised with them, and that she hoped her prison sentence would allow them "peace and finality". The tragic killing of Ashling Murphy in Tullamore, County Offaly in Ireland in January of this year sparked a huge public outcry, and has been seen as a watershed moment in how the country tackles violence against women and girls. Ireland has launched its third national Domestic, Sexual and Gender-Based violence strategy. Emma speaks to the Minister for Justice in Ireland, Helen McEntee about what it aims to achieve. Dame Deborah James has died aged 40 from bowel cancer. The cancer campaigner, blogger, broadcaster and former teacher had been receiving end-of-life care at home and raised millions for cancer research. She was given a damehood in May in recognition of her fundraising. Emma speaks to GP Dr Ellie Cannon, and Julia Bradbury who has spoken about her journey with breast cancer. Culture Secretary Nadine Dorries has told UK sporting bodies that "elite and competitive women's sport must be reserved for people born of the female sex". We get the details from our reporter, Jane Dougall. The National Plan for Music Education was published by the UK government last Saturday. Called The Power of Music to Change Lives, their ambition is for every pupil to have at least one hour of high quality music education a week. We speak to Veronica Wadley, Baroness Fleet, the chair of the advisory panel that published the report, and YolanDa Brown who contributed to it as a MOBO award-winning saxophonist and Chair of Youth Music.

    Andrea Prudente, Zara Aleena, Women in Science, Loo queues at festivals

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 57:48

    An American pregnant woman who was on holiday in Malta this month couldn't get an induced medical miscarriage when she needed it because of the country's strict abortion laws. Andrea Prudente ended up going to Mallorca to get treatment, where she's recovering in a hotel. She joined Emma. Zara Aleena, 35, was assaulted as she walked home in East London in the early hours of Sunday. The Met Police believe she was the victim of an "opportunist stranger attack". She died later in hospital. Emma speaks to Andrea Simon, Director of End Violence Against Women Coaltion and Zoe Billingham, former Her Majesty's Inspector of Constabulary about women's safety. Women in science are less likely to have their contributions recognised than their male counterparts - for example on a scientific paper or named on a patent - according to new analysis. A team of economists in the US found that women often have to work twice as hard as men to earn credit. But what's it like for women in science here in the UK? Monica Grady, CBE is a Professor at the Open University. She joins Emma as does co-author of the US study, Professor Julia Lane from the Wagner School of Public Policy at NYU. Have you ever noticed the queue for the women's toilets is much longer than the queue for the men's? Two Bristol university graduates have tried to resolve this issue, by inventing female urinals. They joined Emma to explain how it works. We have an update on Roe v Wade being overturned with the attorney Rebecca Kiessling and Jessica Arons from the American Civil Liberties Union. Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Emma Pearce

    Being lesbian in the military, Roe v Wade overturned, Shireen Abu Aqla

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 57:03

    Dame Kelly Holmes came out as a lesbian last week. The Olympic champion served in the army in the late 1980's, when you could face prison for being gay as a member of the military. Dame Kelly spoke of her worry that she would still face consequences if she were to let her sexuality be known. It wasn't until 2000 that a ban on being gay and serving in the Army, Navy or RAF was lifted. Emma Riley was discharged from the Royal Navy in 1993 for being a lesbian, she joins Emma in the studio alongside Caroline Paige, joint Chief Executive of Fighting with Pride. American women are starting this week with a newly re-drawn map of the United States, in light of the Supreme Court's landmark overturning of Roe vs Wade last Friday, which gave women constitutional right to get an abortion nationwide. Today, abortion is legally banned in at least nine US states - with more to follow as so called trigger laws clear the necessary hurdles. For some this is a time of huge shame, sorrow, bafflement and fear - the clock turned back on women's rights. For others - the supreme court's decision represents a victory - the success of a long fought battle against abortion being a nationwide right in America. But for women who are pregnant now and don't want to be - especially in states where even abortion providers are unclear if they will be prosecuted should they go ahead - what should they do? Emma hears from BBC correspondent in Washington DC Holly Honderich, journalist Hadley Freeman and Dr Jan Halper-Hayes, former Global Vice President for Republican Overseas. A memorial service will be held in London tomorrow for the Palestinian-American journalist Shireen Abu Aqla who was killed while reporting in the occupied West Bank last month. On Friday, the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, said the bullet had been fired by Israeli security forces - something the Israel Defence Force disputes. Emma is joined by the BBC's Middle East Correspondent Yolande Knell to talk about Shireen. It's the first day of Wimbledon, and current world number 11 Emma Raducanu makes her centre court debut this morning, playing against Alison Van Uytvanck. This is her second Wimbledon, but her first since winning the US open last year. Molly McElwee is the women's sport reporter for The Telegraph and gives the lowdown on Emma's form.

    On Weekend Woman's Hour: Kate Bush, Olivia Harrison, Amanda Blanc, Althea Gibson, frozen embryos and women in comedy

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022 56:52

    In a world exclusive, Kate Bush speaks to Emma Barnett about being discovered by a new generation and making it to number 1 in the UK singles charts 44 years after her first chart-topper Wuthering Heights. Running Up That Hill was first released in 1985 and its use in the Netflix hit series Stranger Things has made Kate Bush a social media and streaming sensation. The physical and emotional challenges of in vitro fertilisation, or IVF, never fade from your memory - whatever the outcome. But what happens when you have been lucky enough to have a child or children and you still have frozen embryos in storage you are sure you will not use? You can donate to another couple in need, to science, let them be discarded or continue to preserve them. Alison Murdoch, Professor of Reproductive Medicine at Newcastle University and two women who have faced this join Emma. The comedians Katherine Ryan and Sara Pascoe have been making headlines in recent weeks following comments they made on Katherine's new TV show. Both revealed instances when they've worked with men they believe to be predatory and despite complaining these men have not been reprimanded. Emma is joined by Kathryn Roberts who quit comedy because of her experiences and also by Chloe Petts who will be performing her show Transience at the Edinburgh Fringe this summer. Olivia Harrison has penned a book of poetry called "Came the Lightening" to celebrate her husband, George Harrison's life, more than twenty years after his death.. As lead guitarist of The Beatles, his most famous songs included While My Guitar Gently Weeps, and Here Comes the Sun. What prompted her to share her memories in poetry? She tells Emma. As Wimbledon is set to begin on Monday, we discover the story behind Althea Gibson the first Black woman to win Wimbledon in 1957 and 1958. Writer and performer Kemi-Bo Jacobs was so inspired by her that she has written a one-woman play, 'All White Everything But Me' about her. She joins Anita to tell her more. The Treasury's Women in Finance Charter has published its annual review looking at gender diversity within the financial sector in the UK for 2021. Amanda Blanc is CEO of Aviva, the UK's leading insurer and leads the Women in Finance Charter and speaks to Emma about the review as well as her experiences of sexism as one of a handful of female FTSE 100 bosses.

    Althea Gibson, Bill of Rights, Sexual assault at festivals, Miscarriage & stroke, Viking Festival - Up Helly Aa

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 56:51

    On Wednesday the government announced plans to create a new ‘Bill of Rights' to Parliament, that will replace the current Human Rights Act. It argues that these reforms will ‘reinforce freedom of speech, enable us to deport more foreign offenders and better protect the public from dangerous criminals'. But organisations that work with female victims of crime say this is a direct attack on women's rights. They say the Human Rights Act is an important weapon when it comes to victims and survivors' ability to seek justice. Next Monday is the start of this year's Wimbledon and today we discover the story behind Althea Gibson the first Black woman to win Wimbledon in 1957 and 1958. Despite many obstacles her achievements, now more than 60 years ago, led seven-times Wimbledon winner, Serena Williams, to describe her as the ‘most important pioneer for tennis'. Writer and performer Kemi-Bo Jacobs was so inspired by her that she has written a one-woman play about this trailblazer, now on stage at the Alphabetti Theatre in Newcastle. With festival season well underway, the Association of Independent Festivals has re-launched the Safer Spaces campaign which tackles sexual assault and harassment at festivals. Over 100 festivals have signed up to their charter, and will be rolling out their policies over the summer. Anita Rani is joined by Kate Osler, who is on the non-executive board of the Association of Independent Festivals and is secretary director for the El Dorado festival where she is currently setting up for next weekend, and Bea Bennister, who co-founded Girls Against, a non-profit organisation fighting sexual assault at live music events. Women who have suffered multiple miscarriages and stillbirths are at greater risk of stroke, according to new research published by the British Medical Journal. The data looked at over 600,000 women around the world, and in particular women aged between 32 and 73 who were then followed up for an average of 11 years. Professor Gita Mishra is from the University of Queensland, School of Public Health and the senior author on this project. As far as festivals go, Shetland's famous Up Helly Aa fire festival has to be one of the most spectacular. It takes place in January and remembers the Vikings who used to rule the Shetland islands 1,000 years ago. Warriors parade through the streets by torchlight as visitors from across the world gather to watch the spectacle and the day culminates with the dramatic burning of a replica Viking long ship. But women and girls have never been allowed to take part in Lerwick - which is the capital of Shetland - until now. It was announced earlier this week there will no longer be gender restrictions. Johan Adamson is a campaigner from the group Up Helly Aa for Aa and Amy Gear is codirector of arts organisation Gaada who looked at the equality of Up Helly Aa for of their projects. Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Kirsty Starkey Interviewed Guest: Hannah Couchman Interviewed Guest: Victoria Atkins Interviewed Guest: Kemi-Bo Jacobs Interviewed Guest: Kate Osler Interviewed Guest: Bea Bennister Interviewed Guest: Professor Gita Mishra Interviewed Guest: Johan Adamson Interviewed Guest: Amy Gear

    Decisions about embryos, Female wildlife rangers, Amanda Blanc, Nude images and teens

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 56:54

    The physical and emotional challenges of in vitro fertilisation, or IVF, never fade from your memory - whatever the outcome. But what happens when you have been lucky enough to have a child or children and you still have frozen embryos in storage you are sure you will not use. None of the choices you face are easy – to donate to another couple in need, or to science, to let them be discarded or continue to preserve them. We hear from Alison Murdoch, Professor of Reproductive Medicine at Newcastle University and two women who have come to different conclusions about what they will do. A new study of over 5000 teenagers in 46 schools has found that more than a third of teenage girls who sent nude images of themselves had been pressured into doing so. Researchers found that girls felt “shamed” when their nude images were leaked, while boys said that the leaking could lead them to gain social status. It also revealed that 34% of girls were first asked to send a nude when they were 13 or younger. Emma is joined by Soma Sara, the founder of Everyone's Invited - a safe place for survivors to share their stories anonymously - and Ruby Wootton, associate director from Revealing Reality, one of the authors of the study - which was done in collaboration with PHSE, that's the national body for personal, social, health and economic education. Being a ranger in the wild - protecting animals from poachers, leading conservation efforts and sometimes putting yourself in the line of fire - isn't often a job taken on by women. In fact, less than 11% of the global wildlife ranger workforce is female - something many in the sector want to change. Holly Budge is a British adventurer who's founded World Female Ranger Week following a successful World Female Ranger Day last year. Purnima Devi Barman is a conservationist from the state of Assam in north-eastern India who set up her own 'Stork Army' to save one species of bird. They both join Emma on the programme. The Treasury's Women in Finance Charter has published its annual review looking at gender diversity within the financial sector in the UK for 2021. Amanda Blanc is CEO of Aviva, the UK's leading insurer and leads the Women in Finance Charter and speaks to Emma about the review as well as her experiences of sexism as one of a handful of female FTSE 100 bosses.

    Kate Bush, Lynn Fitch, Cost of living, Electroconvulsive therapy

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 56:59

    In a world exclusive, today Kate Bush gives Emma Barnett her reaction to being discovered by a new generation and making it to number 1 in the UK singles charts 44 years after her first chart-topper Wuthering Heights. Running Up That Hill was first released in 1985 and its use in the Netflix hit series Stranger Things has made Kate Bush a social media and streaming sensation. We also speak to Caitlin Moran about how rare it is to hear from Kate and why she is inspired by her songs. A report out today has found that the number of abortions has increased over the course of the pandemic. The cost of living has been cited as a key factor for this rise at an uncertain time in the economy and with job insecurity. Mary-Ann Stephenson is co-director of the Women's Budget Group, an independent body which analyses the impact of government policy on women. A decision is also expected any day from the US Supreme Court on whether to overturn Roe v Wade – the historic 1973 ruling which has guaranteed women access to abortion nationwide. At the centre of this legal challenge, is a woman who is being hailed by some as the lawyer who could end Roe v Wade. She is the Mississippi Attorney General Lynn Fitch…and the BBC's Holly Honderich joins Emma to explain more. Twice as many women than men are receiving electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) according to researchers at the University of East London. ECT is used to treat a range of mental health issues including severe depression, long-lasting mania, and catatonia. But an FOI request to twenty NHS Trusts has also revealed that older women are also more likely to be receiving treatment. They are concerned it causes memory loss and that patients are not given sufficient information to make informed decisions before they give consent to treatment. Emma is joined by one of the lead researchers, clinical psychologist Dr Chris Harrop and by Dr Trudi Seneviratne, Registrar of the Royal College of Psychiatry. Emma speaks to the writer, DJ and broadcaster, Annie Mac on what has been a big week for music. They discuss Beyonce's new single, Break My Soul, which marks a change of musical genre for her as it's a House track. They talk about the history of house music and it's cultural shifts and about Kate Bush and Glastonbury 2022.

    Celebrating midwinter in sub-Antarctic. Olivia Harrison on celebrating her husband though poetry.

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 57:33

    As we celebrate the summer solstice on the other side of the world it's the shortest day or mid-winter. For the first time the British Antarctic Survey have an all-female team wintering on Bird Island in the sub-Antarctic. Midwinter is a moment of celebration for the teams on sites. The Bird Island Research Station Leader, Imogen Lloyd, joins Emma to tell her about the work they're doing. Olivia Harrison has penned a book of poetry called "Came the Lightening" to celebrate her husband, George Harrison's life, more than twenty years after his death.. As lead guitarist of The Beatles, his most famous songs included While My Guitar Gently Weeps, and Here Comes the Sun. What prompted her to share her memories in poetry? A court support service that helps thousands of people who cannot afford a lawyer could be under threat after having its government funding changed. The Chief Executive of Support Through Court Eileen Pereira explains what any loss of core-funding could have on the women they support. A new story suggests that Boris Johnson may have spoken to Downing Street aides about getting his wife, Mrs Carrie Johnson, two roles while she was living in Number 10 with the Prime Minister as his fiancee. Sources told the Daily Mirror that the Prime Minister raised possible new environmental roles for her in autumn 2020, either on the COP 26 summit or with the Royal Family. His closest advisors are said to have vetoed both suggestions - but what questions does this raise about her being the victim of sexism and the idea of her as a private citizen? We hear from Daily Mirror Political Editor Pippa Crerar Plus a new coming-of-age TV series was released on Amazon Prime – The Summer I Turned Pretty, The characters are supposed to be 15 and 16 year olds, but the majority of the cast are in their early 20's. Why are films and television shows that focus on the teenage experience so often played by older actors? We hear from Alex Hart an English and History Student at Durham University and Tianna Haffenden a young actor. Presenter Emma Barnett Producer Beverley Purcell

    #MeToo in Comedy, Prom Dresses, Crowd Surfing

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 57:30

    The comedians Katherine Ryan and Sara Pascoe have been making headlines in recent weeks following comments they made on Katherine's new TV show. Both revealed instances when they've worked with men they believe to be predatory and despite complaining these men have not been reprimanded. Emma is joined by Kathryn Roberts who quit comedy because of her experiences and also by Chloe Petts who will be performing her show Transience at the Edinburgh Fringe this summer. School proms return this year, but with more and more families feeling the pinch during the cost-of-living crisis, some students are missing out on this milestone event as they can't afford a dress. Across the UK, pop-up shops for preloved dresses are helping relieve the financial burden for disadvantaged teenagers. We speak to two women involved in such intiatives. When Amy Maynard offered to take in a Ukrainian lady called Iryna, she didn't realise the other struggle Iryna had been dealing with – fertility. Her first round of IVF was successful until she had a stillbirth, and she has one embryo left in Kyiv. Amy has now decided to raise money for Iryna and her husband Sergey, so they can have the chance to have a family of their own. Have you ever tried crowd surfing before? One woman decided she would try her hand at it and won a competition. Amanda Mansell from York has been crowned 'Middle-Aged Crowd Surfing Champion'. She had never done it before but now thinks more women should be doing it. Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Emma Pearce

    Weekend Woman's Hour: The Whyte Review into British Gymnastics, Lea Ypi, Rosie Kinchen on horticultural therapy

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 56:41

    Following a two-year investigation into bullying, abuse and discrimination the Whyte Review into British Gymnastics is finally published. We hear from ex-gymnast Claire Heafford, co-founder and campaign director of Gymnasts 4 Change, and Sarah Moore, lawyer and partner at Hausfeld who are acting on behalf of 38 former elite gymnasts against British Gymnastics in relation to allegations of abuse. In her prize-winning memoir, Free: Coming of Age at the End of History, Lea Ypi describes what it was like to grow up in Albania under a strict communist regime. Lea joins us to talk about her extraordinary coming-of-age story in Europe's last Stalinist outpost. Rosie Kinchen explains how horticultural therapy helped her overcome depression after having her second child. She discusses finding solace in a community garden. Her newspaper only launched 14 weeks before the outbreak of war in Ukraine, but the Kyiv Independent now has over two million followers on Twitter, and has been described by Time Magazine as: "The world's primary source for reliable English-language journalism on the war." We speak to the Editor of the newspaper, Olga Rudenko. A new film, Below the Belt, documents the reality of living with endometriosis. We hear from director Shannon Cone. Listener Christian Peake inherited a huge stack of canvasses painted by her grandmother, the artist Maeve Gilmore, whose artistic work had been over-shadowed by her more famous husband Mervyn Peake. As time went on though she became increasingly determined to get Maeve's work the recognition she feels it deserves. Her grandmother's first exhibition is now on at Studio Voltaire in Clapham, London. Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Lucy Wai Editor: Lucinda Montefiore

    The Whyte Review into British Gymnastics, Women's Health Ambassador, the Future of Cars

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 57:31

    Following a two year investigation into bullying, abuse and discrimination the Whyte Review into British Gymnastics is finally published. We hear from ex-gymnast Claire Heafford, co-founder and campaign director of Gymnasts 4 Change, and Sarah Moore, lawyer and partner at Hausfeld who are acting on behalf of 38 former elite gymnasts against British Gymnastics in relation to allegations of abuse. It's has just been announced that Professor Dame Lesley Regan has been appointed as the first ever Women's Health Ambassador for England. She'll support the implementation of the upcoming Government led women's health strategy, which aims to close the gender health gap and ensure services meet the needs of women throughout their life. We hear from her about what she hopes to achieve in this new role. This summer marks two years since the start of Covid-19. We hear from psychologist Ciara Dockery at Gurls Talk, the community-led non-profit organisation, about why they are encouraging young women and girls to write a letter to their pre-pandemic selves. What is the future of cars? Linda Zhang is the Chief Engineer of the Ford F-150 Lightning pick-up truck, the newly-electrified version of the USA's most popular vehicle. She is in the UK to take part in the BBC World Service's Future of Cars event staged at the Science Museum with the Royal Commission for the Exhibition of 1851. She tells us why bringing out an electric version of this monster vehicle is so important and why young people and women want to drive it. A house in Hackney, which in the early 20th century sheltered hundreds of stranded and abandoned South and East Asian Nannies – known as Ayah's, has been commemorated with a blue plaque. Historian Dr Rebecca Preston tells us who these women were and their importance to British and international history. Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Rabeka Nurmahomed

    Women reporting the war in Ukraine, SEND consultation, Red Dress project, former Olympic Athlete, Anyika Onuora

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 57:33

    Her newspaper only launched 14 weeks before the outbreak of war in Ukraine, but the Kyiv Independent now has over two million followers on Twitter, and has been described by Time Magazine as: "The world's primary source for reliable English-language journalism on the war." Emma speaks to the Editor of the newspaper, Olga Rudenko about the challenges female journalists are facing in Ukraine. She also discusses how her and her team, which are mostly women, launched their newspaper just weeks after being fired from their previous newspaper that was owned by an oligarch. In a Woman's hour exclusive, two women whose disabled sons died after failing to get their Special Educational Needs supported in the right schools, have written an open Letter to two Secretaries of State warning that the system must change. Ministers are consulting until July 22 on how to make the SEND system better. Our reporter Carolyn Atkinson tells us more, and Emma speaks with Amanda Batten, chair of the Disabled Children's Partnership and Susie who spent £10,000 battling the system to get her disabled child into an appropriate school. Since 2009, the artist Kirstie Macleod has been working on The Red Dress project. This involves pieces of this red silk dress travelling around the world to be embroidered by mostly female artisans, many of whom have been marginalised and live in poverty. After 13 years, 46 countries and 343 embroiderers, the dress is finally finished. And, former Olympic Athlete Aniyka Onuora may have stepped away from the track, but in her new memoir: "My hidden race" she details her personal experience with professional sports, racism and sexism, mental health, and growing up in a Nigerian household in 1990's Liverpool. She joins Emma in the studio.

    The housing crisis and women with Vicky Spratt, Rising Covid rates, Christian Peake on Maeve Gilmore

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 57:31

    Last week, Prime Minister Boris Johnson unveiled his "benefits to bricks" plan to tackle the UK housing crisis - the chronic shortage of homes to rent and buy and climbing property prices. According to the charity Shelter at present across the UK there are currently 17.5 million adults without safe, secure or stable homes. If you include children in this number – it is 1 in 3. A new book Tenants is about people on the frontline of Britain's housing emergency – and describes particularly how a shortage of homes is affecting women. The author is journalist Vicky Spratt, housing correspondent for the I newspaper, and she joins Emma in the studio. Covid rates appear to be rising again and some experts are predicting a new wave of the virus over the summer. In the week to 2nd June, 1 in 65 people in the UK were testing positive – up from 1 in 70 the previous week. But do we actually need to worry about it – and if so, what should we be should we be doing to protect ourselves? Emma will be getting the thoughts of Professor Devi Sridhar, who's chair of global public health at Edinburgh University, and sits on the Scottish Government Covid-19 Advisory Group. Listener Christian Peake was given a huge stack of canvasses painted by her grandmother the artist Maeve Gilmore who had died when Christian was 11 and whose artistic work had been over-shadowed by her more famous husband Mervyn Peake. A busy teacher and mother, Christian didn't really know what to do with them. As time went on though she became increasingly determined to get Maeve's work the recognition she feels it deserves. She has created an online gallery at maeve_gilmore_archive on Instagram and her grandmother's first exhibition is currently on at Studio Voltaire in Clapham, London. A new report by healthcare charity Doctors of the World reveals that some migrant women have been charged up to £14,000 for NHS maternity services in England. The survey of 257 migrant women - including undocumented, refugee and asylum seeking women - shows that over a third have received a bill for maternity care. The bills range from £296 to £14,000 with half of those receiving a bill being charged more than £7000. To discuss the findings Emma is joined by Anna Miller, Head of Policy and Advocacy at Doctors of the World, and we hear from Kemi, who received a bill for £4900 after having an emergency caesarean section. Apparently, the naked dress is in - catwalk models and celebrities have been wearing dresses with depictions of the female form on them - some have gilded sculpted breasts with prominent nipples. Fashion journalist, Letty Cole gives her thoughts on this eye-catching new fashion trend.

    Menopause in Parliament, Rebel Wilson, Women and Gaming, Sibling Sexual Abuse, Growing up in Albania.

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 57:34

    The House of Commons is going to become a 'menopause-friendly' employer. Speaker of the Commons, Sir Lindsay Hoyle said after he signed a Menopause Workplace Pledge yesterday, that he hopes to "break the taboo" around the menopause. Practical adjustments could be included in Westminster, such as well-ventilated rooms and fans, flexible working and breathable uniforms. But will a pledge in Parliament have any impact of the lives of women across the UK? Journalist and author of Cracking The Menopause, Mariella Frostrup and academic and author Dr Lara Owen join Emma to talk about changing the culture around menopause. The Australian actor Rebel Wilson has revealed she is in a relationship with a woman. Last Friday, she shared a picture with her new partner on Instagram saying she she had found her "Disney princess". But it was revealed the following day, the Sydney Morning Herald wrote they'd known about the relationship before it was public. Their celebrity reporter said he had given Wilson 1.5 days to provide comment for a story. That report sparked widespread criticism on social media, with LGBTQ+ campaigners saying it was unacceptable to put pressure on people to come out. The paper has since removed that gossip column and offered an apology. Emma is joined by the journalist and feminist campaigner Julie Bindel to discuss. Lea Ypi, professor of Political Theory at the London School of Economics, has written a prize-winning memoir, Free: Coming of Age at the End of History. Lea grew up in Albania and for the first eleven years of her life, it was one of the most isolated countries in the world, Europe's last Stalinist outpost. Then, in December 1990, the regime collapsed. Lea joins Emma to talk about her extraordinary coming-of-age story. A new report funded by the Home Office suggests that sexual abuse of a child by their brother or sister – sibling sexual abuse – may be the most common form of sexual abuse within the family. Many experts say it is not given enough attention and resources need to be set aside to support families dealing with this. Emma speaks to reporter Livvy Haydock and Stephen Barry, who is the Lead Clinician at 'Be Safe' Bristol, part of the Avon and Wiltshire Mental Health partnership NHS Trust. Fancy taking your rage at the patriarchy out on a computer game? Well a developer in Plymouth has come up with The Glass Ceiling Games, where you fire slingshots back against catcalls, slice machetes at unsolicited nude photos, and point a ray-gun against mansplaining. So does it make a difference when women write computer games? Emma is joined by Hannah Wood creative director of The Glass Ceiling Games, and Karla Reyes, a game designer and Head of Business Development at Code Coven - an award-winning game development accelerator for underrepresented talent.

    Below the belt, a film about endometriosis, Rosie Kinchen on her memoir The Ballast Seed, Grenfell Tower anniversary

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 57:43

    A new film, Below the Belt, directed by Shannon Cohn features four women with endometriosis. Shannon who previously directed Endo What joins Emma. New research from the Young Women's Trust paints a bleak picture for many young women as they come out of the pandemic and into the cost of living crisis, with young mums experiencing particular disadvantages. We hear from young mums Charlotte and Jyndi, and speak to Claire Reindorp CEO of the Young Woman's Trust. Rosie Kinchen found herself in despair after the birth of her second child. She was deeply depressed and the baby failed to thrive. After rescuing an ailing houseplant and experiencing an unexpected joy at the wilting aloe's recovery she started dragging herself out of the house to look at plants in supermarkets and garden centres. With the redoubtable botanical artist Marianne North as a guide Rosie comes to see her life, her work and her city through new eyes. The Ballast Seed is her memoir. One of the UK's worst modern disasters, it will soon be the fifth anniversary of the Grenfell Tower fire. Seventy-two people died. The artist Tuesday Greenidge is sewing a quilt the size of Grenfell Tower to "symbolise justice" for survivors and the people affected. The singer Sophie DeMasi was involved in a song called West Side Story which came out this year in honour of the anniversary. They join Emma to discuss how art can help in the aftermath of such tragedy.

    Dame Emma Thompson, Binner or Flusher, Spare Rib & Virago at 50, Surgeon Ian Paterson, Dolly Alderton

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 11, 2022 56:52

    Oscar-winner Dame Emma Thompson on women's pleasure and full frontal nudity in her latest acting role in Good Luck To You, Leo Grande. Are you a 'flusher' or a ‘binner'? New research says 2.4 million tampons are flushed down UK toilets every day leading to sewer blockages and pollution. We talk to Martha Silcott who's developed a simple product to encourage you to bin and Daisy Buchanan who says more needs to be done to make a product which flushes without causing environmental harm. In 2017 surgeon Ian Paterson was jailed for 20 years after being found guilty of 17 counts of wounding with intent. Mr Paterson was diagnosing cancer when there wasn't any and cutting his patients open for no reason, performing unnecessary and damaging surgery. He also carried out unregulated "cleavage-sparing" mastectomies, in which breast tissue was left behind, meaning cancer returned in many of his patients. Ahead of a new ITV documentary Emma speaks to the whistleblower who raised concerns about Ian Paterson – Mr Hemant Ingle, and one of Paterson's victims Debbie Douglas, who is still campaigning for a change in the law to prevent anything like this from happening again. 50 years ago this month the first edition of the iconic feminist magazine Spare Rib was published. Also in that year - 1972 – and inspired by its founders, Rosie Boycott and Marsha Rowe, Carmen Callil founded the book publisher Virago which still gives a voice and platform to female writers today. Emma hears from the three trailblazing women. Can platonic love survive romantic love as we grow up? The writer Dolly Alderton on her new BBC TV series, an adaptation of her 2018 memoir ‘Everything I Know About Love'. Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Dianne McGregor

    Binner or Flusher, Ms Marvel, Feral Girl Summer

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2022 57:32

    Are you a 'flusher' or a ‘binner'? We're talking about getting rid of tampons and towels. What makes you decide whether to flip that bin lid, or just drop and flush? New research is out which says 2.4 million tampons are flushed down UK toilets every day leading to sewer blockages and pollution. We talk to Martha Silcott who's developed a simple product to encourage you to bin and Daisy Buchanan who says more needs to be done to make a product which flushes without causing environmental harm. She's finally arrived! Ms Marvel the latest character from the Marvel universe. What's special about her? Marvel's first Muslim superhero. Newcomer Iman Vellani, stars as Kamala Khan aka Ms. Marvel. We speak to Hafsa Lodi, a Pakistani-American journalist and author all about the series. Nellie Bly was the most famous American woman reporter of the 19th century. Her investigation of what was called back then an "insane asylum" sparked outrage, legal action, and improvements in the way that patients were treated. Louisa Treger's new book ‘Madwoman' is a fictional reimagining of Nellie's early life and her time at the asylum. We also have Martine Croxall, BBC news presenter who was chose Nellie Bly as her specialist subject on Celebrity Mastermind. Last year we talked about "Hot Girl Summer". This year we're talking about "Feral Girl Summer". On TikTok, the hashtag alone has already been viewed more than seven million times. But what's this trend all about, and should we celebrate it? Olivia Petter, relationships writer at The Independent and Lydia Venn, Features Editor at The Tab discuss.

    09/06/2022

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 57:00

    Oscar-winner Dame Emma Thompson has graced our screens for four decades. As an actor, she's played all kinds of women, from her role as Elinor Dashwood in Sense and Sensibility to her heart-breaking Karen in Christmas favourite, Love Actually. But now she's taking on a different kind of acting role. Good Luck To You, Leo Grande tells the story of Nancy Stokes, a 55-year-old widow (played by Thompson) who decides to hire a significantly younger male sex worker, played by the Irish actor, Daryl McCormack. She joins Emma to talk about women's pleasure, full frontal nudity and the #MeToo movement. If you're a woman and you have a baby it's going to cost you £70,000 in lost earnings over the next decade. That's according to new research from the Social Market Foundation which is setting up a cross party commission to tackle the spiralling costs of childcare. Emma talks to Director of the Foundation James Kirkup about its findings, and one woman working as a senior mental health nurse who says she takes home just £100 per month after childcare costs. We also get the view of the Early Years Alliance, a charity that represents child minders, nurseries and pre-schools. Since 2009, the artist Kirstie MacLeod has been working on The Red Dress project. Pieces of this burgundy silk dress have travelled around the world to be embroidered by women, many of whom have been marginalised or live in poverty. It's given them a platform and an opportunity to share their story and identity. After 13 years, 46 countries and 343 embroiderers, the dress is finally complete. Kirstie joins Emma to describe the finished dress. Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Alison Carter Photo credit: Nick Wall © GoodLuckLeoLimited

    Sarah Brown, Dr Julia Shaw, Ian Paterson

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 57:37

    This year marks 20 years since Sarah and Gordon Brown lost their daughter Jennifer, who died ten days after being born seven weeks prematurely. In a search for answers, they founded the Jennifer Brown Research Laboratory in 2004, which looks into the causes and consequences of premature birth. Around 1 in 13 babies in the UK are born prematurely –before 37 weeks. Sarah is Chair of the charity Theirworld and tells Emma about the latest research. It's been over a year since Sarah Everard was adbucted, raped and murdered by a serving police officer, Wayne Couzens, who's now in prison for life. The vigil that followed in London followed to remember Sarah, ended up with clashes with the police and arrests. Now it's been reported that some police officers thought the event was an anti-police protest. The Evening Standard newspaper has printed what certain officers have told Westminster magistrates court this week. They say they faced resistance when they tried to break up the crowd, had feared being attacked, and were branded “murderers” by some people in the crowd. At the moment, six people are being prosecuted by Scotland Yard over the vigil. Jamie Klinger is one of the founders of Reclaim These Streets, which tried to organise the vigil. Psychologist and co-host of BBC podcast Bad People Dr Julia Shaw's new book Bi: The Hidden Culture, History and Science of Bisexuality combines her own experiences of being bisexual and her background in the psychological sciences to explore and celebrate a sexual identity she says remains marginalised and forgotten. It's been described as "one of the biggest medical scandals ever to hit this country". In 2017 surgeon Ian Paterson was jailed for 20 years after being found guilty of 17 counts of wounding with intent. Mr Paterson was diagnosing cancer when there wasn't any and cutting his patients open for no reason, performing unnecessary and damaging surgery. He also carried out unregulated "cleavage-sparing" mastectomies, in which breast tissue was left behind, meaning cancer returned in many of his patients. Ahead of a new ITV documentary being broadcast this weekend, Emma speaks to the whistleblower who first raised concerns about Ian Paterson – Mr Hemant Ingle, and one of Paterson's victim's Debbie Douglas, who is still campaigning for a change in the law to prevent anything like this from happening again.

    Joan Armatrading, Spare Rib and Virago at 50, Defra Minister Victoria Prentis MP, Mermaids

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 57:26

    The singer songwriter Joan Armatrading received an Ivor Novello Award for Outstanding Contemporary Song Collection in 1996. Best known for hits such as Love And Affection, Me Myself I and Drop The Pilot, she has released more than 20 studio albums. Later this week Joan will receive The Music Producers Guild Outstanding Contribution Award. She joins Emma to discuss her music and this latest achievement. 50 years ago this month the first edition of the iconic feminist magazine Spare Rib was published. It set out to offer an alternative to existing women's magazines at a time when the women's liberation movement was challenging women's secondary place in society. Also in that year - 1972 – and inspired by its founders, Rosie Boycott and Marsha Rowe, Carmen Callil founded Virago – the book publisher which still gives a voice and platform to female writers today. Tonight a party is being held at the British Library in celebration, and Emma is joined by all three women. Prime Minister Boris Johnson has won the backing of a majority of Tory MPs in a confidence vote despite a significant revolt against his leadership. He won 59% of the vote, meaning he is now immune from a Conservative leadership challenge for a year. In all, 211 Tory MPs voted they had confidence in the PM's leadership while 148 voted against him. We've since heard from a number of male MPs, but where are all the female MPs? Vanishingly few women from the Conservative Party have spoken publicly on this - especially from the rebel side. Emma is joined by Victoria Prentis, Minister of State for the Department for Environment Food and Rural Affairs. Every year HIV, tuberculosis, and malaria kill more than 5 million people. Much has been done to try to eradicate these diseases, and international donor funds are intent on curing them by 2030. The UK has historically been one of the main donors, but due to the covid-19 pandemic, priorities have shifted and some funds have been redirected. The Kenyan campaigner Maurine Murenga, who lives with HIV herself, is asking for the international community to bring their attention back to these deadly diseases. She joins Emma in the studio. If you happened to be strolling along the seafront at Plymouth at the start of the Jubilee weekend you may have looked down and spotted a very large gathering of mermaids sunning themselves. Pauline Barker organised the event to kick off celebrations in the city by the sea, and to try and break a Guiness world record - she tells Emma how it went.

    Writer Dolly Alderton. Sue Biggs CBE on moving on from her role as the RHS's DG.

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 57:26

    Can platonic love survive romantic love as we grow up? Emma Barnett talks to to the writer Dolly Alderton about her new BBC TV series, an adaptation of her 2018 memoir ‘Everything I Know About Love', A round-up of the weekends events for the Queen's platinum jubilee from Roya Nikkah - royal editor of The Sunday Times and Dame Prue Leith on being part of the final part of the final pageant on the Mall. The Royal Horticultural Society is the UK's largest gardening charity For the last 12 years Sue Biggs CBE has been its director general. She's been pivotal in creating and carrying out a huge investment programme. As she prepares to step down later this month, she talks to Emma Barnett about her work over the last decade and her plans for the future. The non-fatal strangulation law comes into effect tomorrow as part of the Domestic Abuse Act, following a successful campaign by groups such as the Centre for Women's Justice and cross-party MPs and peers. We discuss its significance and next steps with Nogah Ofer from the Centre for Women's Justice and forensic physician Dr Catherine White, who is calling for specialist training for groups who work with victims of NFS. Plus as Boris Johnson faces a vote of No Confidence in the Commons this afternoon, we hear from attorney general for England and Wales Suella Braverman and our deputy political editor Vicky Young. Presenter Emma Barnett Producer Beverley Purcell

    Weekend Woman's Hour: Grease stars Olivia Moore & Jocasta Almgill, Female Bouncers & the Power of Silence

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 4, 2022 55:09

    As the nation celebrates the Queen's 70 year reign this jubilee weekend we ask what impact will the changes to primogeniture mean for future British monarchs? We hear from five historians, Alison Weir, Lady Antonia Fraser, Jung Chang, Tracey Borman and Kate Williams. Author Julie Myerson's new book is Nonfiction, a novel about a couple struggling with a daughter who is addicted to heroin. It's partly inspired by the experience of her own son's drug addiction. Julie joins Andrea Catherwood to talk about addiction, maternal love and the ethics of novel writing. Grease IS the word! We meet actors Olivia Moore and Jocasta Almgill, who are taking on the roles of Sandy and Rizzo in a new production of one of the best-loved musicals of all time. The Women's Prize for Fiction has launched a campaign to encourage more men to read novels by women. Research, conducted for Mary Ann Sieghart's The Authority Gap, found that of the top 10 bestselling female fiction authors, including Austen, Atwood and Agatha Christie, only 19% of their readers are men. We hear from Kate Mosse a best-selling novelist, playwright and founder director of the Women's Prize for Fiction. What's it like to be a female bouncer? With the industry saying staff shortages are impacting their ability to keep people safe, they are making plans to hire more women. Michael Kill is CEO of the Night Time Industries Association and Carla Leigh is a Door Supervisor and is setting up her own security business focusing on getting women in to the industry. Tahmima Anam is an anthropologist and a novelist. She's a big fan of silence and believes it can be harnessed to challenge sexism and expose bad behaviour. Presenter: Nuala McGovern Producer: Rabeka Nurmahomed Editor: Karen Dalziel PHOTO CREDIT: Manuel Harlan

    'Our Greatest Queens' with Anita Rani and Lady Antonia Fraser, Alison Weir, Kate Williams, Tracy Borman and Jung Chang

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2022 56:04

    As the nation celebrates the Queen's 70 year reign this jubilee weekend we have our own tribute to Her Majesty with a special programme to champion some of the other great Queens in history. Anita Rani brings five eminent historians together to champion their candidate including Lady Antonia Fraser on Marie Antoinette, Kate Williams on Liliʻuokalani the last Queen of Hawaii, Tracy Borman on Elizabeth I, Jung Chang on Empress Dowager Cixi from China and Alison Weir on Eleanor of Acquitaine. They consider what each brought to their reign and the nature of Queenship. What traits do all queens share including Elizabeth II ? and what impact will the changes to primogeniture mean for future British monarchs? Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Lisa Jenkinson and Flora McWilliam Studio Engineer: Duncan Hannant

    Kate Garner, Carly Perry, Kelly Lindsey, Kate Mosse, Amina Atiq

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2022 53:39

    The songwriter and pianist Kate Garner is the daughter of Chas Hodges of Chas and Dave fame. Chas's mother, Daisy, recorded a special tribute to the Queen for the silver jubilee back in 1977. But to celebrate the Queen's Platinum Jubilee, Kate has decided to continue the family tradition and has penned her own song called Platinum Queen. She performs live and tells Nuala McGovern how her song prompted a response from the Queen herself. For the first time this year the Women's FA Cup Final was played on the same weekend as the men's and matches are seeing record attendance levels. Despite all this success a recent study has found that 86% of players in the Women's Super League and Championship wanted or needed clinical support at some point during their playing years. The Lead author of the report, Carly Perry ,from the University of Central Lancashire found that only 50% of clubs represented by participants offered psychological support. She joins us alongside Kelly Lindsey from Lewes FC which is the only club in the world to pay it's men and women's teams equally. The Women's Prize for Fiction has launched a campaign to encourage more men to read novels by women. Why? Because the stats are currently alarming. The research, conducted for Mary Ann Sieghart's The Authority Gap, found that of the top 10 bestselling female fiction authors, including Austen, Atwood and Agatha Christie, only 19% of their readers are men. In comparison, for the top 10 bestselling male authors the split in readers is much more even at 55% men and 45% women. In other words, women are prepared to pick up novels by men, but men are much more reluctant to read novels written by women, regardless of the genre. We talk to Kate Mosse a best-selling novelist, playwright and founder director of the Women's Prize for Fiction. Amina Atiq is a Yemeni- Scouse poet, performance artist, creative practitioner and award-winning community activist. She was a BBC Words First Finalist in 2019. She joins Nuala McGovern to talk about her most recent project Poet's Gift where she worked with young Muslims to create a group poem which has been published on a bus stop in Toxteth in Liverpool. Presenter: Nuala McGovern Producer: Lisa Jenkinson Studio Engineers: Tim Heffer & Donald McDonald

    Tahmima Anam, Genome Sequencing, Twinnie

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2022 55:40

    Tahmima Anam is an anthropologist and a novelist. She's a big fan of silence and believes it can been harnessed to challenge sexism and expose bad behaviour. We talk about the pros, cons and ethics of genome sequencing for new-borns. A new pilot will be running shortly, so we speak to Vivienne Parry, Head of Engagement at Genomics England and Rebecca Middleton, who has an inherited brain aneurysm disorder and is a member of the panel representing parents and health care professionals. Do you know what "fexting" is? Do you do it? It's in the headlines because the First Lady of the United States, Jill Biden, has admitted that she 'fexts' with her husband. It means fights over text. So we're asking is it a good way to row? Behavioural psychologist and relationship coach, Jo Hemmings helps us out.  In Japan abortion pills are illegal, but that's due to change by the end of the year. However it looks like a woman who's in a relationship will need permission from her male partner before she gets them, plus the cost could be out of reach for many. We speak to women rights campaigner, Kazuko Fukuda, and the BBC's Mariko Oi in Tokyo. And we've got Twinnie, the singer and songwriter from York. She describes her music as country pop, and her new track is called Welcome To The Club.

    Grease stars Olivia Moore and Jocasta Almgill. Author Julie Myerson. Restorative justice.

    Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022 55:47

    Grease IS the word! We meet actors Olivia Moore and Jocasta Almgill, who are taking on the roles of Sandy and Rizzo in a new production of one of the best-loved musicals of all time. Author Julie Myerson's new book is Nonfiction, a novel about a couple struggling with a daughter who is addicted to heroin. It's partly inspired by the experience of her own son's drug addiction. Julie joins Andrea Catherwood to talk about addiction, maternal love and the ethics of novel writing. As we await the verdict in the Heard / Depp libel trial, we look at the ramifications. Some say that neither party comes out of it well, but there are also serious concerns that this televised court case is harmful to victims. New sentencing guidelines regarding child sexual offences come into force today. Child abusers will now face tougher sentences for the act of planning or facilitating sex offences even if sexual activity doesn't occur or the child doesn't exist, for instance, where police pose as children in sting operations. We hear from Gabriel Shaw, Chief Executive of the charity NAY-PAC, National Association for People Abused in Childhood. And for the first time in Scotland, some victims of rape and domestic abuse will be able to formally meet those who harmed them. In a process called restorative justice, victims of crime, such as sexual abuse or assault, can ask for a face-to-face meeting with the perpetrator. Andrea talks to Gemma Fraser, head of Restorative Justice Policy at Community Justice Scotland, and Ashley Scotland, Chief Executive of the charity Thriving Survivors, which will offer a specialist service for cases involving sexual harm. Presenter Andrea Catherwood Producer Beverley Purcell PHOTO CREDIT; Manuel Harlan

    Hannah Fry, Female Bouncers, Ukrainian Refugees

    Play Episode Listen Later May 30, 2022 56:43

    Hannah Fry is a professor in the Mathematics of Cities at UCL, a best selling author, a TV presenter and a podcaster. But in January 2021, her life changed when she found out she had cervical cancer. At just 36 years old, with two young daughters, she was faced with her own mortality. She turned to the statistics to find out what she was facing. But what she found within them shocked her. As a way of coping with the diagnosis, she started filming her treatment and has turned it into a deeply personal documentary: Making Sense of Cancer. What's it like to be a female bouncer? With the industry saying staff shortages are impacting their ability to keep people safe, they are making plans to hire more women. Michael Kill is CEO of the Night Time Industries Association and Carla Leigh is a Door Supervisor and is setting up her own security business focusing on getting women in to the industry. Over 60 thousand Ukrainian refugees have arrived in the UK since the beginning of the war. Most of those are women and children as most men have been banned from leaving Ukraine. Anya Abdulakh is from the charity Families4Peace, which is helping newly arrived Ukrainians in London. She is working with women like Maria and Olena who both came to the UK from Kyiv in recent weeks. Anya, Maria and Olena speak to Paulette. Do you know what a tweenager is? A listener got in touch and told us she was struggling to work out how to support and understand her 11-year-old daughter. In focusing on teenagers have we neglected younger children? Dr Tara Porter is a Clinical Psychologist and she argues that the 'tween' years lay the groundwork for the teens. She joins Paulette Edwards to offer insights and advice. Presenter: Paulette Edwards Producer: Emma Pearce

    Weekend Woman's Hour: Amara Okereke as Eliza Doolittle, Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe, Sean O'Neill on his late daughter's ME

    Play Episode Listen Later May 28, 2022 56:57

    Part of our exclusive Woman's Hour interview with Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe. She reveals the full story of her imprisonment in Iran to Emma Barnett. Nazanin explains how she survived solitary confinement, how the love of her daughter kept her alive. Anita Rani speaks to documentary photographer Joanne Coates about her exhibition and book 'Daughters of the Soil' looking at the role of women in farming; a culmination of a year's research where she explored the role of women in agriculture in Northumberland and the Scottish Borders. We also speak to arable farmer, Christina Willet, who farms with her son in Essex. This month, the health secretary announced a new plan to tackle ME and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome in England. A listen back to our interview with Sean O'Neill, a senior writer for the Times, whose eldest daughter Maeve, passed away last October at the age of 27, after suffering from ME since she was a teenager. A recent landmark report called ‘Broken Ladders' has revealed 75% of women of colour have experienced racism at work, 27% having suffered racial slurs and 61% report changing themselves to fit in. Produced by the Fawcett Society and the Runnymede Trust, ‘Broken Ladders' explores and documents the experiences of 2,000 women of colour in workplaces across the UK, showing the entrenched racism that women of colour endure throughout their careers. Zaimal Azad, senior campaigns officer at the Fawcett Society spoke to Jessica Creighton. We speak to and hear a live performance from Amara Okereke who has taken on the role of a life time as Eliza Dpolittle in My Fair Lady. Amara, who is 25 has been called 'the new face of British theatre' and has been performing at The Coliseum in London. Producer: Surya Elango Editor: Lucinda Montefiore

    The play Lotus Beauty, Women in Agriculture & America's Sterilisation policy

    Play Episode Listen Later May 27, 2022 58:09

    The play Lotus Beauty set in a beauty salon in Southall tells the story of the Punjabi immigrant women it serves where culture meets the desire to fit in. The beauty salon is a backdrop for exploring themes such as domestic abuse, suicide, and a desperation for belonging. We hear from the plays Director Pooja Ghai, and from Kiran Landa, who plays the character Reita. In 1973, two Black girls - Minnie Lee and Mary Alice Relf - were sterilised without their knowledge in Alabama by a government funded organisation. The summer of that year, the Relf girls sued the government agencies and individuals responsible for their sterilisation. By 1979, the US Department of Health, Education and Welfare was ordered to establish new guidelines for the government's sterilisation policy. A new book, Take My Hand, draws inspiration on this landmark case and explores the history of compulsory sterilisation against poor, Black and disabled women and girls in America. We hear from the author - Dolen Perkins-Valdez. We hear from the documentary photographer Joanne Coates who has a new photography exhibition and book Daughters of the Soil looking at the role of women in farming . This work is a culmination of a year's research where she explored the role of women in agriculture in Northumberland and the Scottish Borders. The poet Charly Cox takes us through her latest collection inspired by a piece of research by the dating website Plenty of Fish. It found that 51% of people have secretly brought a friend along on a date with them. Charly tells us about her own experience and some of the stories behind the eight poems she has written about blind dates and dating. Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Rabeka Nurmahomed

    ABBA Voyage, rape disclosure, Katie Hickman, cost of living, women of colour & racism in the workplace

    Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2022 56:44

    Amongst all his other difficulties, Boris Johnson has promised to improve the outcome for rape victims, saying he will fix the system. It was a pledge made after the murder of Sarah Everard. Today, long awaited guidelines on evidence in trials have been published which campaigners say will do just the opposite. They'll deter women from coming forward because police and prosecutors will STILL be allowed to ask for personal records like medical and therapy notes and even school reports. We discussed this last month - when our reporter Melanie Abbott heard that draft guidelines prepared by the Crown Prosecution Service were being overturned. She joins us to tell us the latest. Bravehearted is a new book that explores the extraordinary story of the women of the American ‘Wild West' during the 19th century. Whether they were the hard-drinking hard-living poker players and prostitutes of the new boom towns, 'ordinary' wives and mothers walking two thousand miles across the prairies pulling their handcarts behind them, Chinese slave-brides working in laundries, or the Native American women displaced by the mass migration, all have one trait in common: extreme resilience and courage in the face of the unknown. We speak to author and historian, Katie Hickman about a period of history she believes has never been as well-documented by women as this. The Living Wage Foundation has said that women are being disproportionately impacted by the cost of living crisis as they are more likely to be in low paid work. Today the government is set to announce support, the Financial Times' Clear Barrett joins Jessica on the programme to discuss how this could help you. One of the most successful pop groups in history is back! 40 years since their last concert, ABBA, are once again performing. Well almost… Agnetha, Freida, Benny and Björn spent 5 weeks performing their songs in motion capture suits so that their movements could be captured and turned into ABBA-TARS. The end result? A digital, 360-degree, immersive concert experience which feels like you're watching ABBA, from the 1970s, perform in front of you. Producer Svana Gisla has kept the whole production on track for five years. A recent landmark report revealed 75% of women of colour have experienced racism at work, 27% having suffered racial slurs and 61% report changing themselves to fit in. Produced by gender equality organisation, the Fawcett Society, and the race equality think tank, the Runnymede Trust, ‘Broken Ladders' explores and documents the experiences of 2,000 women of colour in workplaces across the UK, showing the harmful and entrenched racism that women of colour endure at every stage of their career journey. Zaimal Azad, senior campaigns officer at the Fawcett Society joins Jessica Creighton. Presenter: Jessica Creighton Producer: Kirsty Starkey Interviewed Guest: Vera Baird Reporter: Melanie Abbott Interviewed Guest: Katie Hickman Interviewed Guest: Claer Barrett Interviewed Guest: Svana Gisla Photo Credit: Baillie Walsh Interviewed Guest: Zaimal Azad

    Roxanne Tahbaz, Mina Smallman, Amara Okereke on playing Eliza Doolittle

    Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 55:28

    It has been just over two months since Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe and Anoosheh Ashoori returned to the UK from detention in Iran, and were reunited with their families. But for the family of London born businessman and wildlife conservationist Morad Tahbaz it's been a different story. The family said they expected their father to be part of the same deal but he was only released on furlough and swiftly returned to prison. His daughter Roxanne Tahbaz joins Emma. On yesterday's programme Nazanin paid tribute to those who campaigned for her release and in particular the ordinary women who supported her cause. Two of those women are retired primary school teacher Linda Grove and Freya Papworth from the organisation FiLia who organised a 24 hour fasting relay hunger strike. Both join Emma in the studio. Amara Okereke has taken on the role of a life time as Eliza Dolittle in My Fair Lady. Amara, who is 25 has been called 'the new face of British theatre' and has been performing at The Coliseum in London to rave reviews. She joins Emma to talk about the show. Mina Smallman has spoken to Woman's Hour several times to talk about her grief after the murder of her daughters Bibaa Henry and Nicole Smallman. Two weeks ago the two former police officers who took photos of her daughters and shared them with colleagues were back in court to try and get their sentences reduced. Mina was in court to see that happen, she joins Emma. Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Emma Pearce

    Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe talks to Emma Barnett

    Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 53:44

    Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe talks for the first time to Emma Barnett for this special Woman's Hour programme. In this exclusive interview she reveals the full story of her imprisonment in Iran. Nazanin explains how she survived solitary confinement, how the love of her daughter kept her alive and what Prime Minster Boris Johnson told her about the real reason for her imprisonment. Nazanin was arrested in April 2016 after visiting her parents in Iran with her 21 month-old daughter Gabriella, on her way back to Britain. For the next six years the charity project manager was detained by the Iranian regime. She was sentenced to five years for plotting to overthrow the Iranian Government, and then in 2021, sentenced to another year for propaganda against Iran. Nazanin has always refuted those allegations as strongly as she could, stressing that she was in Iran on holiday visiting her family. Her husband Richard Ratcliffe mounted a tireless campaign to free his wife, including twice going on hunger strike. In March 2020, as Covid took hold in Iran, Nazanin was temporarily released to her parents' home under house in Tehran. On 17 March this year, she was finally allowed to come home and be reunited with her husband and daughter. Her release, along with fellow British-Iranian national Anoosheh Ashoori, came after negotiations and diplomatic efforts that had intensified in the preceding months. At the same time the UK Government paid a £400 million debt to Iran dating back to the 1970s although both governments have said the two issues should not be linked. CREDITS Presenter Emma Barnett Producer Woman's Hour Sarah Crawley Producer Director John O'Rourke Executive Producer Tanya Hudson Executive Editor Woman's Hour Karen Dalziel

    Producer Svana Gisla behind the ABBA-tars, Threads

    Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 58:01

    Around three- quarters of the estimated two hundred and fifty thousand people suffering from ME, in the UK are women. This month the Health Secretary, Sajid Javid, announced a new plan to tackle Myalgic Encephalomyelitis and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome in England, with better care and support, more research and a pledge to “trust and listen to those with lived experience” of ME. Woman's Hour is joined by Sean O'Neill, a senior writer for the Times, who described that announcement as “the most bitter of bittersweet moments.” Sean's eldest daughter Maeve, passed away last October at the age of twenty -seven, after suffering from ME since she was a teenager. That news from the Health Secretary made him decide the time was right for him to tell his very personal story about Maeve and her debilitating struggles with both the illness and the NHS. Emma also talks to Dr Charles Shepherd, medical advisor to the ME Association. In the last of our series Threads Listener Jeanie remembers her marvellous Aunty Mary whose Land Girl jacket holds so many happy memories. One of the most successful pop groups in history is back. 40 years since their last concert, ABBA, are once again performing. Well almost… Agnetha, Freida, Benny and Björn spent 5 weeks performing their songs in motion capture suits so that their movements could be captured and turned into ABBA-TARS. The end result? A digital, 360-degree, immersive concert experience which feels like you're watching ABBA, from the 1970s, perform in front of you. Producer Svana Gisla has kept the whole production on track for five years. Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Lucinda Montefiore

    Weekend Woman's Hour: Siobhan McSweeney, Anne-Marie Duff, Mel C

    Play Episode Listen Later May 21, 2022 56:55

    Do you know much about nuns? Many people don't, but some nuns in the US are turning to social media to bring religion into the 21st century. Sister Monica Clare from the Community of St John the Baptist went viral on Tik Tok after followers wanted to know her skin routine - now she answers people's questions about being a nun. She joins Krupa as does Siobhan McSweeney, who plays fictional Sister Michael in Derry Girls to talk all about nuns. Actor Anne-Marie Duff talks to Emma about her new role as Constance, a working class matriarch from the Midlands in a new play that spans five decades of the lives, and deaths, of the Webster family. ‘The House of Shades' by Beth Steel is on at London's Almeida Theater until 18th June. Are you happiest when you're in the office or do you prefer to work from home? Are you contemplating leaving a role because it's no longer flexible? Dr Jane Parry, Associate Professor of work and employment at Southampton Business school and Guardian columnist Gaby Hinsliff speak to Emma about recent work from home data. After Little Mix said goodbye to their fans with their final show on Saturday before going on hiatus, it seems that for the first time in decades, Britain is without a major girl band. Emma is joined by Melanie Chisholm from the Spice Girls and music journalist, Jacqueline Springer. Women attending abortion clinics in the UK can face “regular harassment” according to a report from BBC Newsnight. Anti-abortion groups who gather outside services say they're holding “prayer vigils” and offering help but some patients say they have been so distressed they've had panic attacks or even felt suicidal. Now charities are calling for protected areas outside all services which activists cannot legally enter. BBC Newsnight Correspondent Anna Collinson speaks to Krupa about it. A new exhibition exploring female spiritual beings in world belief and mythological traditions around the globe opens at the British Museum this week. Feminine power: the divine to the demonic is the first exhibition of its kind to bring together ancient sculpture, sacred artifacts and contemporary art from six continents. Belinda Crerar, Exhibition Curator at the British Museum and Dr Janina Ramirez, a British Art Historian and author of Goddess a book for children written to accompany this exhibition join Krupa. Photo Credit: Channel 4

    US singer/songwriter Beth Nielsen Chapman, Laura Bates, Menstrual leave/abortion reform in Spain, Feminine power & goddesses

    Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 54:20

    It's been ten years since the writer and activist Laura Bates founded the Everyday Sexism project, giving a platform to thousands of women to document their everyday experiences of sexism, harassment and assault. In her new book, ‘Fix the System Not the Women' she argues we have wasted decades telling women and girls how to fix things, how to fix themselves, how to stay safe, it hasn't worked because women were never the problem in the first place. She is calling for systematic reform of our key institutions and societal systems that she says are failing to protect women. Spanish women with severe Menstrual symptoms could be entitled to three days of leave a month - extended to five in some circumstances - if a draft bill going through the Spanish parliament is approved. It would make it the first legal entitlement of its kind in Europe. The bill is part of a package of reforms that could also overturn laws passed by the previous government, including 16 and 17 year old girls no longer needing parental consent to have an abortion. Maria Ramirez is a journalist and Deputy Managing Editor from ElDiario an online investigative and political news service based in Madrid. A new exhibition exploring female spiritual beings in world belief and mythological traditions around the globe opens at the British Museum this week. Feminine power: the divine to the demonic is the first exhibition of its kind to bring together ancient sculpture, sacred artifacts and contemporary art from six continents. It will look at how femininity has been perceived across the world, and how feminine power has been used in deities, goddesses, demons, saints and other spiritual beings. Belinda Crerar is Exhibition Curator at the British Museum and Dr Janina Ramirez is a British Art Historian and author of Goddess a book for children written to accompany this exhibition Two-time Grammy nominee Beth Nielsen Chapman has had a career spanning 40 years. Inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame in 2016, Nashville-based Beth, has released more than a dozen albums and written number one hits and songs recorded by the likes of Bonnie Raitt, Willie Nelson, Bette Midler, Elton John and Neil Diamond. Beth joins Krupa to discuss her music and to perform her bluesy new single ‘Hey Girl' (We Can Deal With It) an anthemic reaction to the ‘Me Too' movement, a song Beth calls her “celebratory shout out to our sisters making their way in the world.” Presenter: Krupa Padhy Producer: Kirsty Starkey Interviewed Guest: Laura Bates Interviewed Guest: Maria Ramirez Interviewed Guest: Belinda Crerar Interviewed Guest: Dr Janina Ramirez Interviewed Guest: Beth Nielsen Chapman

    Actor Anne Marie Duff, Chinese feminism, the story of Henrietta Howard

    Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 57:41

    Actor Anne Marie Duff talks to Emma Barnett playing a working class matriarch in a new play that spans five decades of the lives, and deaths, of the Webster family. Last September 19, 2021, Sophia Huang Xueqin, the Chinese journalist who kick-started China's #MeToo movement, disappeared. We find out what has happened to her from BBC Eye journalist Jessie Lau who's been investigating her disappearance,. Plus writer and journalist Lijia Zhang explains what it's like to be a feminist in China. Plus Anna Eavis the Curatorial director at English Heritage tells us the the story of Henrietta Howard, Countess of Suffolk, and mistress of King George II, as Marble Hill, a Palladian villa built in the 1720s for her, prepares to open to the public following its restoration Presenter Emma Barnett Producer Beverley Purcell Photo credit; Helen Murray

    Helen Fitzgerald, Abortion Clinic Harassment, Nuns and Juliet Stevenson on Acting Your Age

    Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 57:48

    Helen Fitzgerald grew up in rural Australia as one of 13 siblings. Her new novel Keep Her Sweet looks at what happens when 'normal' sibling rivalry turns into something else. She joins Krupa to explain why she's so fascinated by the dark corners of family life. When was the last time you saw a nun? It feels like a very old-fashioned vocation – and there are less and less in the public eye now. But some nuns in the US are turning to Tik Tok to bring religion into the 21st century through social media. The Daughters of St Paul are known as the ‘media nuns' on Tik Tok, they do skits and dances, and have millions of followers worldwide. Then Sister Monica Clare from the Community of St John the Baptist went viral because she was on Tik Tok and everyone wanted to know her skin routine…now she answers people's questions about being a nun. And, of course, we've got everyone's favourite - less PC nun – Sister Michael from Derry Girls, played by Siobhan McSweeney. Women attending abortion clinics in the UK can face “regular harassment” according to a report from BBC Newsnight. Anti-abortion groups who gather outside services say they're holding “prayer vigils” and offering help but some patients say they have been so distressed they've had panic attacks or even felt suicidal. Now charities are calling for protected areas outside all services which activists cannot legally enter. More than 100,000 women in the UK attended abortion services targeted by activists in 2019, according to latest data from the British Pregnancy Advisory Service, which is a leading provider of abortions. Anna Collinson is the Newsnight Correspondent who compiled the report. It's four years since journalist and actor Nicky Clark founded the Acting Your Age Campaign. Incensed by the lack of middle-aged women on stage, television and in film, and rarely seeing stories of women like herself portrayed, she has attracted a lot of support from women such as Meera Syal, Tracy-Ann Obermann and MP Jess Phillips. Actor and fellow-supporter, Juliet Stevenson joins Nicky and presenter Krupa Padhy to explain why it appears male actors on screen ‘have a whole life and women have a shelf life' and why this campaign is necessary.

    Kate Rusby, Gay Women and Sport, Motor Racing

    Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 55:37

    Kate Rusby is one of the UK's leading folk singers. She joins Andrea Catherwood to talk about her latest album 30: Happy Returns. She's collaborated with musicians such as Ladysmith Black Mambazo, K. T. Tunstall and Richard Hawley to sing new versions of her old songs and to celebrate thirty years of making music. The footballer Jake Daniels has come out as gay. He's the first current male professional footballer to do so, which shows you how unusual it is. So, is it harder to be yourself in the men's game compared to the women's? With us on Woman's Hour is the footballer Lianne Sanderson who's won 50 international caps for England and was the first professional female player to come out 12 years ago, and Dr Rachael Bullingham, who's a senior lecturer at the University of Gloucestershire and specialises in homophobia in women's sport. We speak to the BBC's Sarah Rainsford who's covering the war in Ukraine about the Wives of Azov. Their husbands are part of the Azov Regiment who are seen as heroes in Ukraine because they've been defending Mariupol, but they've been trapped for more than two months in a steel works. Overnight some of them managed to get out of there. Paula McGowan's autistic son died when because he was given anti-psychotic drugs, despite warnings from him and his family. His death was described as ‘avoidable'. Paula is now on the brink of achieving her goal which is that all health and social care staff must, by law, undergo mandatory training in autism and learning disability awareness. We speak to Paula, as well as Alexis Quinn, who's been involved in piloting the training.

    Girl Bands, Period Tracking Apps, Couples Therapy

    Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 56:49

    After Little Mix said goodbye to their fans with their final show on Saturday before going on hiatus, it seems that for the first time in decades, Britain is without a major girl band. Emma is joined by Melanie Chisholm from The Spice Girls and music journalist, Jacqueline Springer. We discuss recent work from home data with Dr Jane Parry is Associate Professor of work and employment at Southampton Business school and Guardian columnist Gaby Hinsliff. In the wake of the tragic killings of toddlers Star Hobson and Arthur Labinjo Hughes, a government report is expected to be published shortly looking into what went wrong. Social workers had failed to act on warnings from relatives, which meant the children were not removed from their abusive homes. But a BBC ONE Panorama explores a different perspective - what about when children's services intervene too far, too fast – and when they act unethically, even unlawfully towards children and their parents, causing lifelong trauma in the process? One local authority in Herefordshire has been severely and repeatedly criticised by a high court judge for breaching children's human rights through what the judge called “appalling” social work practice. Woman's Hour talks to Panorama Reporter Louise Tickle about her investigation. Women in the US have been raising concerns about period and pregnancy tracking apps on phones. BBC Technology reporter Shiona McCallum and Jillian York from the American digital rights group, the Electronic Frontier Foundation, join Emma to discuss. Relationships for many of us are just downright fascinating. Susanna Abse is a psychoanalytic psychotherapist and joins Emma to discuss her new book. Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Emma Pearce

    Weekend Woman's Hour: Emeli Sandé, Abi Morgan, Sophie Willan

    Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 55:35

    Emeli Sandé is one of Britain's most successful songwriters - with 19 million singles sold; including three number one singles, six million albums and four BRIT awards. Emeli joins Emma to discuss her music and career. How are disabled children being affected by the war in Ukraine? There are claims that thousands have been forgotten and abandoned in institutions unable to look after them. The human rights organisation, Disability Rights International, has carried out an investigation. Their Ukraine Office Director, Halyna Kurylo joins Emma. ‘Alice's Book' by Karina Urbach tells the story of Karina's grandmother Alice Urbach. Before the Second World War Alice wrote a cookbook called Cooking the Viennese Way! - but when books by Jewish authors couldn't be distributed, Alice was taken off it. Karina talks about her family history, intellectual theft by the Nazis and her mission to restore Alice Urbach's name to her cookbook. Abi Morgan is a BAFTA and Emmy-award winning playwright and screenwriter whose credits include The Iron Lady, Suffragette and The Hour. She has now written her first book - This Is Not A Pity Memoir - about an extraordinarily tumultuous period in her and her family's life. Last weekend the Baftas saw Sophie Willan, the actress and creator of Alma's Not Normal, take home an award for best female performance in comedy. The sitcom is based on Sophie's own experience of growing up in care, and focuses on her relationship with the women in her family. Sophie dedicated her win to her grandmother, Denise Willan, who sadly passed away half-way through filming the show. Watching Eurovision tonight? Two hundred million people are expected to watch it, live from Turin. Representing the UK this year is Sam Ryder. He's doing well at the moment and is second favourite to win behind Ukraine. The UK really hasn't done very well over recent years, but twenty-five years ago we won it with Katrina and The Waves and Love Shine a Light. Katrina joins Anita.

    Alice Urbach, Your children's friends, Katrina and The Waves

    Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 57:12

    ‘Alice's Book' by Karina Urbach tells the story of Karina's grandmother Alice Urbach. Before the Second World War Alice wrote a cookbook called Cooking the Viennese Way! but when books by Jewish authors couldn't be distributed, Alice was taken off it. Karina talks about her family history, intellectual theft by the Nazis and her mission to restore Alice Urbach's name to her cookbook. The Taliban have ruled that Afghan women will have to wear the full face veil for the first time in decades. It comes soon after the Taliban reversed their decision to allow girls to go to secondary schools. We catch up with Hasina Safi, who used to be the women's minister in Afghanistan and is now a refugee in the UK, still living in an hotel. She joins Anita to discuss her reaction to this latest news and her hopes for the future of women in Afghanistan. Babies as young as six months recognise differences like skin colour according to research. So what's the best way to talk to young children about race? Does it matter how diverse a child social circle is? And what about their parents' friendship groups? Tineka Smith is the author of Mixed Up: Confessions of an Interracial Couple and has a young son, and Uju Asika is an author, parenting blogger and has two teenage boys. Watching Eurovision tomorrow? Two hundred million people are expected to watch it, live from Turin. Representing the UK this year is Sam Ryder. He's doing well at the moment and is second favourite to win behind Ukraine. The UK really hasn't done very well over recent years, but twenty-five years ago we won it with Katrina and The Waves and Love Shine a Light. Katrina joins us.

    Michelle Kholos Brooks, Monica McWilliams, Mandy Garner, Cecilia Floren, Sophie Willan

    Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 57:20

    H*tler's Tasters is a dark comedy about the young women who have the “honour” of being Adolf Hitler's food tasters. The play explores the way girls navigate sexuality, friendship, patriotism, and poison during the Third Reich. Emma Barnett talks to its award winning playwright, Michelle Kholos Brooks After a record number of women are elected to Stormont we talk to Monica McWilliams an academic, peace activist, human rights defender and former politician who co-founded the Women's Coalition political party in 1996 and was a signatory to the 1998 Good Friday Agreement. A new survey by Working Wise has flagged that many working women are concerned about the gaps in work they've taken and what impact those gaps will have on their pension. The author of the research Mandy Garner tells us about her findings and we hear from Cecilia Floren who is worried about her pension. On Sunday, the Baftas saw Sophie Willan, the actress and creator of Alma's Not Normal, take home an award for best female performance in comedy. The sitcom is based on Sophie's own experience of growing up in care, and focuses on her relationship with the women in her family. Sophie dedicated her win to her grandmother, Denise Willan, who sadly passed away half-way through filming the show. She joins Emma to talk about their relationship and the importance of grandparents. Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Lisa Jenkinson Studio Manager: Giles Aspen Photo Credit: Hunter Canning

    Jules Montague on diagnosis, Abortion in the US, A scratch and sniff T-shirt, Disabled children in Ukraine

    Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 57:40

    In former consultant neurologist Jules Montague's new book, The Imaginary Patient, she looks at how they can be influenced by many external factors. Who gets to choose which conditions are "real" or not, and is that a helpful question to ask? And what implications does that have for women? She joins Emma. Michael Gove, The Levelling Up Secretary, confirmed that there will be no emergency budget to help with the cost of living, even though the Queens Speech yesterday said that the Government would help. New research says that an estimated 1 and a half million households in the UK will struggle to pay food and energy bills over the next year. Sarah Pennells is a Consumer Finance Specialist at the Pensions Provider Royal London and has been gathering data on this. How are disabled children being affected by the war in Ukraine? There are claims that thousands have been forgotten and abandoned in institutions unable to look after them. The human rights organisation, Disability Rights International, has carried out an investigation. Their Ukraine Office Director, Halyna Kurylo joins Emma. It's been just over a week since the the publication of a leaked draft document from the Supreme Court, which suggests Justices are set to overturn the landmark Roe v Wade, ruling, which gave women in American an absolute right to an abortion. To discuss what this means for women in America Emma is joined by Associate Professor Emma Long and State Senate candidate Leslie Danks Burke. There'll be no emergency budget to help with the cost of living, even though the Queens Speech yesterday said that the Government would help. That's been confirmed by Michael Gove, The Levelling Up Secretary, this morning. We've been celebrating the emotional power of old clothes in our series Threads. Zoe, who was known as 'strawberry girl' on her small university campus in Liverpool tells us about her 'scratch-and-sniff' t-shirt.

    Abi Morgan, Toddlers running errands, Suzie Miller

    Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 57:46

    Abi Morgan is a BAFTA and Emmy-award winning playwright and screenwriter whose credits include The Iron Lady, Suffragette, Sex Traffic, The Hour, Brick Lane and Shame. She is the creator and writer of BBC drama, The Split. She has now written her first book. This is not a Pity Memoir about an extraordinarily tumultous period in her and her family's life. Prima Facie starring Jodie Comer, best known for her role as Villanelle in Killing Eve, is making her West End debut. Both star and play have been performing to glowing reviews. It is an incisive investigation into the criminal justice system, how it deals with sexual assault and then fails those seeking justice through it. A one-woman show, it tells the story of a criminal defence barrister who is raped by a colleague. Suzie Miller, who wrote the play, joins Emma Barnett in the Woman's Hour studio. Would you let your 2 year old walk to the shops on their own? The long running Japanese TV show Old Enough!, which has become available to stream on Netflix, follows kids as young as 2 while their parents send them off on their first ever errand away from home. Unknowingly followed by undercover TV camera operators. It has sparked debate about how much freedom we give our toddlers in the UK. Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Lucinda Montefiore

    Emeli Sandé, Depp v Heard, Afghanistan

    Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 52:42

    Emeli Sandé is one of Britain's most successful songwriters. With 19 million singles sold including three number one singles, 6 million albums and four BRIT awards (including Best Female twice!). Emeli joins Emma to discuss her music, and has a specially recorded version of There Isn't Much – a track written with Naughty Boy and Shaq, from her new album Let's Say For Instance. Over the weekend in Afghanistan the Taliban ordered that all women must wear a burqa in public. It's the latest blow to women's rights in the country since the Taliban took power in August last year. Yalda Hakim is an International Correspondent for the BBC and spoke to us about this development. What is it like to run a fashion magazine? We ask Kenya Hunt, who became the first black Editor-in-Chief at Elle UK when she took over the role in March. With print readership in decline, and the fashion industry reeling from the pandemic, how does she plan to keep women reading magazines? Depp v Heard. It's the court case that has gripped not just America but the whole world. The actor Johnny Depp is suing his ex-wife Amber Heard for defamation over an article in which she said she was a victim of abuse. The BBC's Holly Honderich joins Emma to discuss this very public trial. Anna Kent is a humanitarian aid worker, NHS nurse and midwife. She was 26 when she joined Medecins Sans Frontieres (Doctors without Borders) for her first assignment in South Sudan in 2007. She has subsequently worked as a midwife across the world including Ethiopia, Haiti, Bangladesh and the UK. She has now written a book, Frontline Midwife: My Story of Survival and Keeping Others Safe. Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Emma Pearce