Podcasts about ussr

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Share on LinkedIn
Copy link to clipboard

Communist state in Europe and Asia that lasted from 1922 to 1991

  • 1,786PODCASTS
  • 3,386EPISODES
  • 49mAVG DURATION
  • 3DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • May 21, 2022LATEST
ussr

POPULARITY

20122013201420152016201720182019202020212022


Best podcasts about ussr

Show all podcasts related to ussr

Latest podcast episodes about ussr

Craig Peterson's Tech Talk
Do You Know How Crypto's Nose-dive Will Even Hurt Your 401K?

Craig Peterson's Tech Talk

Play Episode Listen Later May 21, 2022 83:25


Do You Know How Crypto's Nose-dive Will Even Hurt Your 401K? Hey, it looks like if you did not invest in "Crypto," you were making a smart move! Wow. We got a lot to talk about here. Crypto has dived big time. It's incredible. What's happened? We get into that and more. [Following is an automated transcript] Hi everybody. Craig Peterson here. Appreciate your joining me today. Spend a little bit of time with me. It's always a fun thing to do thanks for coming in. And Thanks for sticking around.  [00:00:29] Crypto currencies. It's a term for all kinds of these basically non-government sanctioned currencies. [00:00:39] And the idea behind it was I should be able to trade with you and you should be able to trade with me. We should be able to verify the transactions and it's nobody's business as to what's happening behind the scenes. And yet in reality, Everybody's business because all of those transactions are recorded in a very public way. [00:01:03] So crypto in this case does not mean secret or cryptography. It's actually referring to the way the ledgers work and your wallet. And in fact, the actual coins themselves, a lot of people have bought. I was talking with my friend, Matt earlier this week and Matt was saying, Hey, listen I made a lot of money off a crypto. [00:01:29] He's basically a day trader. He watches it. And is it going up? Is it going down? Which coin is doge coin? The way to go? Because Elon Musk just mentioned it. Is it something else? What should I do? And he buys and sells and has made money off of it. However, a lot of people have. And held on to various cryptocurrencies. [00:01:51] Of course, the most popular one. The one everybody knows about is Bitcoin and Bitcoin is pretty good stuff, bottom line, but 40% right now of Bitcoin investors are underway. Isn't that incredible because of the major drop-off from the November peak. And this was all started by a problem that was over at something called Terra Luna, which is another cryptocurrency now. [00:02:22] Already that there is a ton of vulnerable vol a ton of changes in price in various cryptocurrencies, Bitcoin being of course a real big one where, we've seen 5,000, $10,000 per Bitcoin drops. It really is an amazingly fluid if you will coin. So there's a number of different people that have come out with some plans. [00:02:47] How about if we do like what the us dollar used to do, which is it's tied to a specific amount of gold or tied to a specific amount of silver. And of course, it's been a while since that was the case. President Nixon is the one that got us off of those standards. Having a gold, for instance, back in your currency means that there is going to be far less fluctuation and your currency means something. [00:03:16] See, the whole idea behind currency markets for government is yeah, you do print money and you do continue to increase the amount of money you print every year. Because what you're trying to do is create money for the. Good product services that are created as well. So if we created another million dollars worth of services in the economy, there should be another million dollars in circulation that's the basic theory. [00:03:46] Monetary theory, really boiling. Down now of course, already our government is printed way more than it. Maybe should have. It is certainly causing inflation. There's no doubt about that one. So they're looking at these various cryptocurrencies and say what can we do? How can we have a gold standard where the us dollar was the currency the world used and its value was known. [00:04:10] Having a stable currency is incredibly important for consumers and businesses. The business needs to know, Hey, listen, like we signed a three-year contract with our vendors and with our customers. And so we need a stable price. So we know what's our cost going to be, what can we charge our customer here? [00:04:30] Can the customer bear the price increases, et cetera. The answer to most of those questions of course is no, they really can't is particularly in this day and age. So having a. Fixed currency. We know how much it's worth. I know in two years from now, I'm not going to be completely upside down with this customer because I'm having to eat some major increases in prices. [00:04:55] And as a consumer, you want to look at it and say, wow, I've got a variable rate interest rate on my mortgage. And man, I remember friends of mine back in the eighties, early eighties, late seventies, who just got nailed by those. They had variable rate interest loan on their home because that's all they could get. [00:05:14] That's all they could afford. So the variable rate just kept going up. It was higher than credit cards are nowadays. I remember a friend of mine complaining. They had 25% interest and that's when they lost the house because 25% interest means if you have a hundred thousand dollar loan, you got $25,000 in interest that year, let alone principal payments. [00:05:36] So it, it was a really. I think it was really hard for people to, to deal with. And I can understand that. So the cryptocurrency guys. I said, okay, let's tie it to something else. So the value has a value and part of what they were trying to tie it to is the us dollar. That's some currencies decided to do that. [00:06:00] And there were others that tried to tie it to actual. Assets. So it wasn't just tied to the dollar. It was okay. We have X dollars in this bank account and that's, what's backing the value of our currency, which is quite amazing, to think about that. Some of them are backed by gold or other precious metals. [00:06:24] Nowadays that includes a lot of different metals. This one coin called Terra Luna dropped almost a hundred percent last year. Isn't that amazing. And it had a sister token called Tara USD, which Tara Luna was tied to. Now, this is all called stable coin. The idea is the prices will be staying. [00:06:46] And in the case of Tara and Tara USD, the stability was provided by a computer program. So there's nothing really behind it, other than it can be backed by the community currencies themselves. So th that's something like inter coin, for instance, this is another one of the, there are hundreds of them out there of these cryptocurrencies. [00:07:13] Yeah. The community backs it. So goods and services that you can get in some of these communities is what gives value to inter coin money system. Now that makes sense too, right? Because the dollar is only worth something to you. If it's worth something to someone else, if you were the only person in the world that had us dollars, who would want. [00:07:36] Obviously the economy is working without us dollars. So why would they try and trade with you? If you had something called a us dollar that nobody else had, or you came up with something, you made something up out of thin air and said, okay, this is now worth this much. Or it's backed by that. [00:07:56] Because if again, if he can't spend it, it's not worth anything. Anyhow, this is a very big deal because on top of these various cryptocurrencies losing incredible amounts of money over the last couple of weeks, We have another problem with cryptocurrencies. If you own cryptocurrencies, you have, what's called a wallet and that wallet has a transaction number that's used for you to track and others to track the money that you have in the cryptocurrencies. [00:08:29] And it's pretty good. Function or feature it's hard for a lot of people to do so they have these kinds of crypto banks. So if you have one of these currencies, you can just have your currency on deposit at this bank because there's a whole bunch of reasons, but one of the reasons is that. [00:08:50] There is a run on a bank, or if there's a run on a cryptocurrency, currencies have built into them incredibly expensive penalties. If you try and liquidate that cryptocurrency quickly. And also if there are a lot of people trying to liquidate it. So you had a double whammy and people were paying more than three. [00:09:13] Coin in order to sell Bitcoin. And so think about that and think about much a Bitcoin's worth, which is tens of thousands of dollars. So it's overall, this is a problem. It's been a very big problem. So people put it into a bank. So Coinbase is one of the big one called Coinbase, had its first quarter earnings report. [00:09:37] Now, this is the U S is largest cryptocurrency exchange and they had a quarterly loss for the first quarter of 2022 of $430 million. That's their loss. And they had an almost 20% drop in monthly users of coins. So th that's something right. And they put it in their statement. Their quarterly statement here is to, WhatsApp. [00:10:07] Here's the real scary part Coinbase said in its earnings report. Last Tuesday that it holds. $256 billion in both Fiat currencies and cryptocurrencies on behalf of its customer. So Fiat currencies are things like the federal reserve notes are U S dollar, okay. Quarter of a trillion dollars that it's holding for other people think of it like a bank. [00:10:36] However, they said in the event, Coinbase we ever declare bankruptcy, quote, the crypto assets. We hold in custody on behalf of our customers could be subject to bankruptcy proceedings. Coinbase users would become general unsecured creditors, meaning they have no right to claim any specific property from the exchange in proceedings people's funds would become in accessible. [00:11:06] A very big deal. Very scary for a very good reasons. Hey, when we come back a website, no, you go, you type stuff in my email address, do you know? You don't even have to hit submit. In most cases, they're stealing it. [00:11:23] I'm sure you've heard of JavaScript into your browser. This is a programming language that actually runs programs right there in your web browser, whether you like it or not. And we just had a study on this. A hundred thousand websites are collecting. Information upfront. [00:11:40] Hi, I'm Craig Peterson, your chief information security officer. This is not a surprising thing to me. I have in my web browser, I have JavaScript turned off for most websites that I go to now, Java script is a programming language and then lets them do some pretty cool things on a webpage. [00:12:02] In fact, that's the whole idea behind Java. Just like cookies on a web browser, where they have a great use, which is to help keep track of what you're doing on the website, where you're going, pulling up other information that you care about, right? Part of your navigation can be done with cookies. They go on and on in their usefulness. [00:12:23] Part of the problem is that people are using them to track you online. So like Facebook and many others will go ahead and have their cookies on the other websites. So they know where you're going, what you're doing, even when you're not on Facebook, that's by the way, part of. The Firefox browsers been trying to overcome here. [00:12:48] They have a special fenced in mode that happens automatically when you're using Firefox on Facebook. Pretty good. Pretty cool. The apple iOS device. Use a different mechanism. And in fact, they're already saying that Facebook and some of these others who sell advertiser in from advertisers information about you have really had some major losses in revenue because apple is blocking their access to certain information about you back to Jarvis. [00:13:24] It's a programming language that they can use to do almost anything on your web browser. Bad guys have figured out that if they can get you to go to a website or if they can insert an ad onto a page that you're visiting, they can then use. Your web browser, because it's basically just a computer to do what while to mine, Bitcoin or other cryptocurrencies. [00:13:51] So you're paying for the electricity for them as your computer is sitting there crunching on these algorithms that they need to use to figure out the, how to find the next Bitcoin or whatever. And you are only noticing that your device is slowing down. For instance, our friends over on the Android platform have found before that sometimes their phones are getting extremely hot, even when they're not using them. [00:14:18] And we found that yeah, many times that's just. Bitcoin miner who has taken over partial control of your phone just enough to mind Bitcoin. And they did that through your web browser and JavaScript. So you can now see some of the reasons that I go ahead and disable JavaScript on most websites I go to now, some websites aren't going to work. [00:14:40] I want to warn you up front. If you go into your browser settings and turn off JavaScript, you are going. Break a number of websites, in fact many of the websites that are out there. So you got to figure out which sites do you want it on? Which sites don't you want it on? But there's another problem that we have found just this week. [00:15:00] And it is based on a study that was done as reported in ARS Technica, but they found. A hundred thousand top websites, a hundred thousand top websites. These include signing up for a newsletter or making a hotel reservation, checking out online. You probably take for granted that you nothing happens until you hit submit, right? [00:15:25] That used to be the case in web one dot O day. It isn't anymore. Now I want to point out we, I have thousands of people who are on my email list. So every week they get my insider show notes. So these are the top articles of the week. They are, usually six to 10 articles, usually eight of them that are talking about cybersecurity, things of importance. [00:15:51] The whole radio show and podcasts are based on those insider show notes that I also share with the host of all of the different radio shows and television shows that I appear on. It's pretty, pretty cool. So they get that, but I do not use this type of technology. Yeah. There's some Java script. [00:16:11] That'll make a little signup thing come up at the top of the screen, but I am not using technology that is in your face or doing. What these people are doing, right? So you start filling out a form. You haven't hit cement. And have you noticed all of a sudden you're getting emails from. It's happened to me before. [00:16:31] Your assumption about hitting submit, isn't always the case. Some researchers from KU Leuven university and university of Lu sane, crawled and analyze the top 100,000 websites. So crawling means they have a little robot that goes to visit the web page, downloads all of the code that's on the page. [00:16:55] And then. Analyzed it all so what they found was that a user visiting a site, if the user is in the European union is treated differently than someone who visits the site from the United States. Now there's a good reason for it. We've helped companies with complying with the GDPR, which are these protection rules that are in place in the European union. [00:17:21] And that's why you're seeing so many websites. Mine included that say, Hey, listen, we do collect some information on you. You can click here to find out more and there's some websites let you say no. I don't want you to have any information about me where you collect information, just so that you can navigate the site properly. [00:17:39] Okay. Very basic, but that's why European union users are treated differently than those coming from the United States. So this new research found that over 1800 websites gathered an EU users' email address without their consent. So it's almost 2000 websites out of the top 100,000. If you're in the EU and they found. [00:18:07] About well, 3000 website logged a U S users' email in some form. Now that's, before you hit submit. So you start typing in your email, you type in your name and you don't hit cement. Many of the sites are apparently grabbing that information, putting it into the database and maybe even started using it before you gave them explicit permission to do. [00:18:36] Isn't that a fascinating and the 1800 sites that gathered information on European news union users without their consent are breaking the law. That's why so many us companies decided they had to comply with the GDPR because it's a real big problem. So these guys also crawled websites for password leaks and made 2021, and they found 52 websites where third parties, including Yandex, Yandex is. [00:19:11] Big Russian search engine and more we're collecting password data before submission. So since then the group went ahead and let the websites know what was happening, what they found because it's not necessarily intentional by the website itself. It might be a third party, but third-party piece of software. [00:19:33] That's doing it. They w they informed those sites. Hey, listen, you're collecting user data before there's been explicit consent to collect it. In other words, you, before you hit the submit button and they thought, wow, this is very surprising. They thought they might find a few hundred website. In the course of a year now they've found that there were over 3000 websites really that were doing this stuff. [00:20:01] So they presented their findings that use neck. Oh, actually they haven't presented them yet because it's going to be a useful. In August and these are what the cold leaky forum. So yet another reason to turn off JavaScript when you can. But I also got to add a lot of the forums do not work if JavaScript's not enabled. [00:20:23] So we got to do something about it. Maybe complain, make sure they aren't collecting your. Maybe I should do a little course on that once you can figure out are they doing it before I even give them permission? Anyhow, this is Greg Peterson. Visit me online, Craig Peter, som.com and sign up for that. No obligation insider show notes. [00:20:44] We are shipping all kinds of military equipment over to Ukraine. And right now they're talking about another $30 billion worth of equipment being shipped to what was the world's number one arms dealer. [00:21:00] I'm looking right now at an article that was in the Washington post. And some of their stuff is good. [00:21:07] Some of their stuff is bad, I guess like pretty much any media outlet, but they're raising some really good points here. One of them is that we are shipping some pretty advanced equipment and some not so advanced equipment to you. To help them fight in this war to protect themselves from Russia. [00:21:31] Now, all of that's pretty common. Ultimately looking back in history, there have been a lot of people who've made a lot of money off of wars. Many of the big banks financing, both sides of wars. Going way, way back and coming all the way up through the 20th century. And part of the way people make money in war time is obviously making the equipment and supplies and stuff that the armies need. [00:22:03] The other way that they do it is by trading in arms. So not just the supplies. The bullets all the way through the advanced missile systems. Now there's been some concerns because of what we have been seen online. We've talked about telegram here before, not the safest webs, app to use or to keep in touch. [00:22:28] It's really an app for your phone. And it's being used by. Ukraine to really coordinate some of their hacker activities against Russia. They've also been using it in Russia to have telegram that is in order to communicate with each other. Ukraine has posted pictures of some of the killed soldiers from Russia and people have been reaching out to their mothers in Russia. [00:22:57] They've done a lot of stuff with telegram. It's interesting. And hopefully eventually we'll find out what the real truth is, right? Because all of a sudden hides in the military, he uses a lot of propaganda, right? The first casualty in war is the truth. It always has been. So we're selling to a comm country, Ukraine that has made a lot of money off of selling. [00:23:22] Then systems being an intimate intermediary. So you're not buying the system from Russia? No. You're buying it from Ukraine and it has been of course, just as deadly, but now we are sending. Equipment military grade equipment to Ukraine. We could talk about just that a lot. I mentioned the whole Lend-Lease program many months ago now teams to be in the news. [00:23:50] Now it takes a while for the mainstream media to catch up with us. I'm usually about six to 12 weeks ahead of what they're talking about. And it's so when we're talking about Lynn Lee sent me. We're not giving it to them. We're not selling it to them. We're just lending them the equipment or perhaps leasing it just like we did for the United Kingdom back in world war two, not a bad idea. [00:24:16] If you want to get weapons into the hands of an adversary and not really, or not an adversary, but an ally or potential ally against an adversary that you have, and they have. But part of the problem is we're talking about Ukraine here. Ukraine was not invited in Donato because it was so corrupt. You might remember. [00:24:39] They elected a new president over there that president started investigating, hired a prosecutor to go after the corruption in Ukraine. And then you heard president Joe Biden, vice president at the time bragging about how he got this guy shut down. Yeah, he got the prosecutor shut down the prosecutor that had his sights on, of course hunter Biden as well as other people. [00:25:03] So it's a real problem, but. Let's set that aside for now, we're talking about Ukraine and the weapon systems who we've been sending over there. There have been rumors out there. I haven't seen hard evidence, but I have seen things in various papers worldwide talking about telegram, saying. The Ukrainians have somehow gotten their hands on these weapons and are selling them on telegram. [00:25:32] Imagine that a effectively kind of a dark web thing, so we're saying the byte administration okay. There, that none of this is going to happen. Why? Because we went ahead and we put into the contracts that they could not sell or share or give any of this equipment away without the explicit permission of the United States, governor. [00:25:57] Okay. That kind of sounds like it's not a bad idea. I would certainly put it into any contract like this, no question, but what could, what happened here? If this equipment falls into the hands of our adversaries or our other Western countries, NATO countries, how do you keep track of them? It's very hard to do. [00:26:18] How do you know who's actually using. Very hard to do so in forcing these types of contracts is very difficult, which makes the contract pretty weak, frankly. And then let's look at Washington DC, the United States, according to the Washington post in mid April, gave Ukraine a fleet of M 17 helicopter. Now, these are my 17 helicopters are Russian, originally Soviet designs. [00:26:51] Okay. And they were bought by the United States. About 10 years ago, we bought them for Afghans government, which of course now has been deposed, but we still have our hands on some of these helicopters. And when we bought them from Russia, We signed a contract. The United States signed a contract promising not to transfer the helicopters to any third country quote without the approval of the Russian Federation. [00:27:23] Now that's according to a copy of the certificate that's posted on the website of Russia's federal service on military technical cooperation. Russia has come out and said that our transfer, those helicopters has grossly violated the foundations of international law. And you know what they think it has, right? [00:27:43] Arms experts are saying the Russia's aggression Ukraine more than justifies you. I support, but the violations of the weapons contracts, man, that really hurts our credibility and our we're not honoring these contracts. How can we expect you crane to honor those contracts? That's where the problem really comes in. [00:28:07] And it's ultimately a very big problem. So this emergency spending bill that it, the $30 billion. Makes you crane, the world's single largest recipient of us security assistance ever. They've received more in 2022 than United States ever provided to Afghanistan, Iraq, or Israel in a single. [00:28:33] So they're adding to the stockpiles of weapons that we've already committed. We've got 1400 stinger and the aircraft systems, 5,500 anti-tank missiles, 700 switch blade drones, nine 90. Excuse me, long range Howard. There's that's our Chellora 7,000 small arms. 50 million rounds of ammunition and other minds, explosives and laser guided rocket systems, according to the Washington post. [00:29:03] So it's fascinating to look. It's a real problem. And now that we've got the bad guys who are using the dark web, remember the dark web system that we set up, the onion network. Yeah. That one they can take these, they can sell them, they can move them around. It is a real problem. A very big problem. What are we going to do when all of those weapons systems come back aimed at us this time? [00:29:32] It's one thing to leave billions of dollars worth of helicopters, et cetera, back in Afghanistan is the Biden administration did with her crazy withdrawal tactic. But at least those will wear out the bullets, missile systems, Howard, a different deal. [00:29:51] It seems like the government calls a war on everything, the war against drugs or against poverty. Now we are looking at a war against end-to-end encryption by governments worldwide, including our own. [00:30:07] The European union is following in America's footsteps steps again, only a few years behind this time. [00:30:16] But it's not a good thing. In this case, you might remember a few have been following cybersecurity. Like I have back in the Clinton administration, there was a very heavy push for something called the clipper chip. And I think that your whole clipper chip. Actually started with the Bush administration and it was a bad thing because what they were trying to do is force all businesses to use this encryption chip set that was developed and promoted by the national security agency. [00:30:52] And it was supposed to be an encryption device that is used to secure voice and data messages. And it had a built-in. Back door that allowed federal state, local law enforcement, anybody that had the key, the ability to decode any intercepted voice or data transmissions. It was introduced in 93 and was thank goodness. [00:31:19] Defunct by 1996. So it used something called skipjack, man. I remember that a lot and use it to transfer Dilley or defi, excuse me, Hellman key exchange. I've worked with that maybe for crypto keys that used it. Use the Dez algorithm, the data encryption standard, which is still used today. And the Clinton administration argued that the clipper chip was. [00:31:46] Absolutely essential for law enforcement to keep up with a constantly progressing technology in the United States. And a lot of people believe that using this would act as frankly, an additional way for terrorists to receive information and to break into encrypted information. And the Clinton administration argued that it would increase national security because terrorists would have to use it to communicate with outsiders, bank, suppliers, contacts, and the government could listen in on those calls, are we supposed to in the United States have a right to be secure in our papers and other things, right? That the federal government has no right to come into any of that stuff unless they get a court order. So they were saying we would take this key. We'll make sure that it's in a lock box, just like Al gore social security money. [00:32:41] And no one would be able to get their hands on it, except anyone that wanted to, unless there was a court order and you know how this stuff goes. And it just continues to progress. A lot worse. There was a lot of backlash by it. The electronic privacy information center, electronic frontier foundation boast, both pushed back saying that it would be. [00:33:05] Only have the effect of have not, excuse me, have the effect of, this is a quote, not only subjecting citizens to increased impossibly illegal government surveillance, but that the strength of the clipper Chip's encryption could not be evaluated by the public as it's designed. It was classified secret and that therefore individuals and businesses might be hobbled with an insecure communication system, which is absolutely true. [00:33:33] And the NSA went on to do some things like pollute, random number generators and other things to make it so that it was almost impossible to have end-to-end encrypted data. So we were able to kill. Many years ago. Now what about 30 years ago? When they introduced this thing? It took a few years to get rid of it, but now the EU is out there saying they want to stop and end encryption. [00:34:00] The United States has already said that the new director of Homeland security has, and as well as Trump's again Homeland security people said we need to be able to break the. And we've talked about some of those stories, real world stories of things that have happened because of the encryption. [00:34:20] So the EU is now got our proposal forward. That would force tech companies to scan private messages for child sexual abuse material called CSM and evidence of grooming. Even when those messages are supposed to be protected by indenting. So we know how this goes, right? It starts at something that everybody can agree on, right? [00:34:48] This child, sexual abuse material abductions of children, there's still a lot of slavery going on in the world. All of that stuff needs to be stopped. And so we say, yeah. Okay. That makes a whole lot of sense, but where does it end? Online services that receive detection orders. This is from ARS Technica under the pending European union legislation would have obligations concerning the detection, the reporting, the removal, and blocking of known and. [00:35:20] Child sexual abuse material, as well as the solicitation of children. So what we're starting to see here in the us is some apps, some companies that make smartphones, for instance, looking at pictures that are sent and shared to see if it looks like it might be pornographic in. Because again, we're seeing the younger kids who are sending pictures of each other naked or body parts and they get to others. [00:35:46] If you can believe that. Absolutely incredible. But what happens when you send them using an end-to-end encrypted app? Now, my advice for people who want to keep information private, you're a business person you're working on a deal. You don't go to Twitter like Elon Musk and put it out there for the world. [00:36:08] Although, I'm sure he's got some ulterior motives in doing that. You use an app called signal. That's certainly the best one that's out there right now. It provides a whole lot of encryption and privacy, and even has some stuff built in to break the software. That's often used to break into the end to end encryption systems. [00:36:29] So they're trying to get this in place here. They're calling it an important security tool. But it's ordering companies to break that end to end encryption by whatever technological means necessary. It's going to be hard because it's, frankly, it's going to be impossible for them to enforce this because you can take encrypted data and make it look like. [00:36:53] Anything, and man has that happened for a long time? Think of the microdots way back when, certainly in rural world war two and on, they were very popular there's techniques to encrypt data and embedded in a photograph and make it almost impossible to detect. So again they're not going to get to do what they're hoping to do. [00:37:18] And I think that's an important thing for everybody. Please pay close attention to, so they do want to get rid of end-to-end there's WhatsApp out there, which I don't really trust because it's owned by Facebook, but that's supposedly end to end. There's end to end encryption on apple. I message. Although. [00:37:38] Apparently, there are some ways to get into that. I think apple is now maintaining a secondary key that they can use to decrypt, but the back doors that the us has called for and other people have called for. I have been pushed back by companies like apple CEO, Tim cook, oppose the government mandated back doors. [00:38:01] Of course, apple got a major backlash from security experts when in veiled, a plan to how I phones and other devices, scan user photos for child sexual abuse images. That's what I was referring to earlier. And apple put that plan on hold and promised to make changes. But this is apple all over again. And it's hard to say what's the least privacy intrusive way, because if the ISP can read them all, if the company that's providing new with the app that you're using to send the message. [00:38:34] I can read them all, how much privacy is there and if they can read it, who else can read it and what can be done with it? Blackmail has happened many times in the past because someone got their hands on something. So what happens when a Congressman or the military or someone in the military uses that's another problem. [00:38:54] Because if we don't know the way the encryption is being used or is made just like, was true with a clipper chip. And then we move on to the next step, which is okay. So what do we do now with this data that we're storing? Are they going to keep that data confidential? Can they keep it out of the hands of the criminals. [00:39:17] We've certainly found that they just haven't been able to. And if you're talking about grooming, which is what the European union wants. In other words, someone that's trying to get a child to the point where they're doing something that would be important. You've got two. Look at all of the messages, you have to have them analyze by some sort of an AI artificial intelligence, and then ultimately analyzed by people. [00:39:42] It's just going to get worse and worse. This is the most sophisticated mass surveillance machinery. That has ever been deployed outside of China in the USSR. It's absolutely incredible when you look at it from a crypto graphic standpoint. And again, we understand protecting the children. We all want to do that, but how far will this end up going? [00:40:06] I also want to point out that. Nu insider show notes that I've been sending out over the last few weeks have had some amazing responses from people. I've had people saying that this is what they look for in their mailbox. It's the first piece of email they read that it's the most relevant news. But you can only get it one way and that's by going to Craig peterson.com, you can sign up there. [00:40:33] It's easy enough to do. There's no obligation on your part, right? This is not my paid newsletter. This is absolutely free. And it's incredibly valuable. Plus I'll also be sending you once a week. Ish, a small training, just, it takes you a few minutes to read. I just last week went through the firewall in your windows machine, the firewall. [00:40:56] And gave you step-by-step instructions. Is it turned on? What is it doing? What should it do? How do you turn it on and how do you use it? So you can only get that one way and that's, if you are on my email list, so it's important to be there. And if you have any questions, you can hit reply. Any of those emails where there's a training, or if it's the insider show notes, just hit reply. [00:41:22] And I'll go ahead and answer your question. You might have to wait a few days cause I can get pretty busy sometimes, but always answer. So me M e@craigpeterson.com. Anybody can send me email and you can also text me at 6 1 7 503 2 2 1 6 1 7 5. 3, 2, 2, 1 with any questions? That's it for right now, there is so much more. [00:41:51] Make sure you sign up right now. And of course there's more coming right up. So stick around. . [00:42:04] Jam packed today. We're going to start with non fungible tokens. If you don't know what those are, this is a very big deal because so many people are investing in them right now. Are they really investments? I've got a bit of a blow back here. Most people think that Bitcoin is anonymous. We're going to talk about how it absolutely is not. [00:42:24] We're going to talk about anonymous. In fact, the Russians, Microsoft, what they're doing against the Russians and this little comedic thing about cars. [00:42:32] NFTs or very big deal. [00:42:34] I'm going to pull up here on my screen right now. This is a picture of Mr. Jack Dorsey. We'll go full screen, an article from a website called CoinDesk. CoinDesk is one of these sites that really tries to track what's happening out there in the Bitcoin community. Of course, nowadays it's much more than Bitcoin. [00:42:57] Isn't it? We're talking about all kinds of. Different currencies that have a blockchain backend. They're called cryptocurrencies basically. But the big one was of course, Bitcoin. And there is a whole concept. Now, when we're talking about things like cryptocurrencies and these non fungible tokens. People have been investing them in them. [00:43:23] Like crazy people are making millions of dollars every week. Now, remember, I am not an investment advisor and particularly I'm not your investment advisor. So take all the. To your investment advisor. I'm not telling you to buy them. I am telling you to be cautious here though, because these non fungible tokens are designed to give you the ability to be able to just, own something in the digital world. [00:43:52] What might you own in the digital world? We've had a lot of different stuff. We've seen some just crazy monkey things. Have you seen those, these little pictures of monkeys there? Graphic designed and it's all animated. If you will. It's like cartoons and people pay money for them. One of the things that people paid money for was the rights to the first tweet ever on Twitter. [00:44:20] So that's what you're getting. When we're talking about an NFT on a non fungible transaction, it is now yours. So this particular NFT we're talking about was of our friend here, Jack Dorsey. We'll pull it up again, this article, and he had a tweet that was sold last year for $48 million. That is a lot of money. [00:44:47] So people look at this as an investment, but it's not the same as hanging art on the wall. You've got a Picasso that has some intrinsic value. It's a painting. It has all the oil paint on that, it was designed by and painted by a crazy man years ago. And you can take that Picasso and you can. [00:45:11] Turn it around and sell it. It has some real value. If you own the rights to something, let's say it's one of these monkey pictures. It reminds me of a postage stamp and you paid real money for it. Some of these things are going, as I said, for over a million dollars and this Jack Dorsey first tweet went for $48 million. [00:45:31] So let's say that's what you did, right? You bought this thing for $48 million. Really? What do you have? Because anybody can go online and look at that tweet. Anybody can print it up and stick it on a wall. Anybody can go out and get that picture of the monkeys right there. The guy drew, and you can look at it. [00:45:54] In fact, I can pull it up right now, if you want to do. But people paid real money for that. So they've got what really? What do they have? You can't take it off the wall, like you're Picasso and salad, right? Or Banksy, if you're into the more modern art, it's just not. What is doable? How do you make this work? [00:46:15] Only the NFT only gives you bragging rights in reality. That's what it does. You have bragging rights because you could take that digital picture and make a hundred quadrillion copies. Yeah, you'd still own the NFT you would still have in the blockchain for whatever NFT company you're using the rights to it. [00:46:41] They would say this, you owned it. So let's talk about the blockchain behind it. There are a lot of companies that are trying to give you that. Okay. All right. I get it. Yeah, I get to to own it. But who's running the blockchain behind it. Who's validating that you own it with Bitcoin and many of these other blockchain currencies that are out there. [00:47:08] There are various. Companies and individuals who are registered, who have all of the paperwork, if you will saying who owns, how much of what, and who paid, who and everything. And that by the way, is why it takes so long for some of these Bitcoin and other transactions to occur. But how about the NFT? There are tons of companies out there that say they will certify the NFT. [00:47:38] So it gets to be real problem. And when we get into this Jack Dorsey tweet and this article about it, which are let me pull it up again here for you guys. This guy Sina bought the very first tweet ever from Twitter founder, Jack Dorsey for $2.9 million last year. And he decided that he wanted to sell it. [00:48:07] So he listed it for sale again at $48 million last week. Real. He put it up for open bid and this article and CoinDesk is talking about that. And you can see that if you're watching me on rumble or YouTube, I'm showing you my screen here right now. But this Iranian born crypto entrepreneur named of again. [00:48:32] As TAVI purchased it for $2.9 million in March, 2021. Last Thursday, he announced on Twitter where out, that he wanted to sell this and Ft. And he said, Hey, listen, I'm going to put 50% of the proceeds to charity while the auction closed. This was an open auction. People could go and bid on it and head auction closed. [00:49:00] With a, an offer of basically $288, $277 at current prices when this article was written $277 and the lowest bid was $6. And as I recall, this is not in this article, but there were only. I handful of bids. Like when I say handful, I mean a half a dozen beds. Crazy. This is a real problem because the deadline is over. [00:49:31] He paid how much for it, right? How much did he pay? Pull that up again. $2.9 million last year. And his highest bid was in the neighborhood of $280. Isn't that crazy. So did he get money on this? Did he win money on this? I don't know. I'm looking at those saying is it worth it to buy something like that? [00:49:59] That you might think, oh, the very first apple computer, an apple. While that's going to be worth some serious money. Yeah, it is. It's something, you can grab onto, you can hold onto it, it's something and you can sell it. You can trade it. You can take a picture of it. You can't make digital copies of it. [00:50:20] You, you, it's a physical thing. That's worth something. Same thing with that Picasso on the wall, it's really worth something that has some basic intrinsic. Jack's true tweet. The very first tweet. How much is that thing worth? It basically nothing. So the tweet is showing he'll pull it up on the screen again that he's selling ad Jack 2000 6 0 3 21 at eight 50 14:00 PM. [00:50:50] Just setting up my Twitter. So there you go. There's Jack is very first to. And it's absolutely amazing. Is it worth it? Let me pull up some other stuff here for you guys. I'm going to pull this up here is Coinbase launching an NFT marketplace in hopes of appealing to crypto on mainstream users. So here's some examples from a man and FTEs. [00:51:16] I'm going to zoom in on this for those of you guys watching on rumble or on Twitter. All right. Mean. Yeah actually you can see it on Twitter too, but YouTube, here you go. Here's some NFTs it's artwork and it's a creature. So you can buy creature number 7, 8 0 6 right now for six Eve. So let me see. [00:51:39] Value of six. Ethereum is what ether, M two us dollars. So for 3000. And $84. As of right now, you can get a crappy picture that even I could have draw okay. Of this guy and look at all of the work this artist has put in. There's how many of these up here? 1, 2, 3, 4, or five, 10 of them. And it's the same head. [00:52:08] Each time it looks like this almost the same eyes. He changes colors and he's got different background. It's absolutely not. So that's what they're trying to do right now, trying to sell these NFT. So who's going to buy that. Who's going to pay $3,000 for artwork that hunter Biden could have done with a straw. [00:52:30] Anchored around. Here's another one. This is from ledger insights. NBA's launching dynamic NFTs for fans, baseball cards for the NBA that are basically just worthless. They're NF. Non fungible tokens. It has taken the crypto world by storm and people are losing millions as you look, but it really is changing the e-commerce world. [00:52:58] Stick around. We'll be right back. [00:53:02] Bitcoin blockchain. All of the rage, a lot of people are talking about it, but I got to say most people who are talking. I don't know much about it. And when it comes to anonymity, Bitcoin is probably the worst thing you could possibly do. It's amazing. [00:53:20] There are a lot of misconceptions out there when it comes to technology, you have almost any kind of technology and blockchain and Bitcoin are examples of a very misunderstood technology. [00:53:35] Now I'm not talking about how does it work? How are these ledgers maintained? How does this whole mining thing work? Why has Chan. Bandit. Why are a lot of countries going away from it, one country. Now the dictator said, yeah, we're going to use Bitcoin as our we're official currency. In addition to the U S dollar what's going on. [00:53:57] It is complicated behind the scenes. It's complicated to use. Although there are some entrepreneurs that have made some great strides there. I saw a documentary on what has been happening in that one country. I mentioned. They are able to pay in us dollars using Bitcoin. So they'll go up to a vendor on the street. [00:54:22] Quite literally they'll have their smartphone with them. The vendor has their smartphone. They type in 15 cents for the taco and a hit send. It goes to the other person and they have 15 cents worth of Bitcoin. By the way, these types of micro-transactions with the way Bitcoin is structured behind the scenes, make things even less manageable in the Bitcoin world than they have been in the past. [00:54:50] And that's why in case you didn't know, Bitcoin is making some major changes here fairly soon. They've got to change the way all of this ledger stuff works because it takes too long. To record and authorized transactions. And these ledgers just get way too long when it comes to all of these kinds of microtransaction. [00:55:14] So there's stuff going on, Bitcoin, there, there are many of these types of currencies out there. Theories comes one. You've heard about doge coin because of course that's Elon Musk has been talking about and many others and they're all different somewhat, but the main concepts are the. One of the big concepts, I'm going to pull an article up here on the screen for those watching on YouTube or also on rumble. [00:55:39] But this is an article from our friends at wired magazine. And now you have subscribed to wired for many years. This particular one is about what wired is calling the crypto. Trap now that's a very big deal. It is a trap and it's a trap and a lot of different ways. And that's what we're going to talk about right now. [00:56:05] Crypto is not what its name implies. A lot of people look at it and say, oh, crypto that's cryptography. That's like the German enigma machine in world war two and all of this new, great crypto that we have nowadays. And there are some pretty amazing new cryptographic technologies that we've been using, but no, that's not. [00:56:26] What's really going on. You see the basic premise behind all of these technologies is the concept of having a. And this wallet has a unique identifier. It has a number assigned to it. So if I'm sending money to you, I'm going to have your wallet, ID, your wallet number, and I'm going to now send you some amount of fraction, most likely of a cryptocurrency. [00:56:55] It's certainly if it's Bitcoin, it's almost certainly a fraction. And so I'm going to send you $100 worth of, let's say. What ends up happening now is these ledgers, which are public, are all going to record the Craig's sent you a hundred dollars worth of Bitcoin. Of course, it's going to be in a fraction of a Bitcoin. [00:57:16] So sometimes there's rounding errors is not going to be really exactly a hundred dollars. Plus there's the amazing amount of. Tivoli volatility in the cyber currencies. So even though I meant just hitting a hundred dollars, mine ended up being 110 of it goes up. It might be 90. If it goes down you get that. [00:57:34] You don't understand how that works. So the problem now is I have sent you a hundred dollars. And public ledgers that anyone can gain access to now say wallet number 1, 2, 3, 4 cent, a hundred dollars, two wallet, number 5, 6, 7, 8. Obviously the wallet numbers bruises a lot longer than that. So then it's fine. [00:57:58] And there's a degree of anonymity there it's really called pseudo anonymity because in reality, it's not completely anonymous because people know the transaction occurred and they know the wallet numbers. Correct. It's like a bank account, and if I'm putting money into your bank account, that bank account number knows that the money came from a check that I wrote. [00:58:21] Can you imagine that someone writing a check and that check I had a number on it, a bank account number, right? So it can all be tracked while much. The same thing is true when it comes to cryptocurrencies, these cryptocurrencies are in public ledgers and those public ledgers can be used with a little bit of work to figure out. [00:58:42] Who you are. So this article here from our friends at wired gets really hairy. And it might be of interest to you to read, but this is talking about a take-down that happened, and this is a massive take down. This take down was of a whole group of people who were involved in some really nasty stuff. [00:59:09] In this particular case, what it was kitty. Just a terrible thing and the abuse surrounding it. So this logical goes into not a lot of detail. I'm not going to read it because here on the air, because I don't want to upset too many people. Cause it's some of the details of this evening to think about them are incredible. [00:59:29] But. This the police broke into this middle-class suburb home in the outskirts of Atlanta. And he there was Homeland security. It was a guy from the IRS and they came in, they took all of their electronic devices. They separated the family, putting the father who is an assistant principal at the local high school assistant printers. [00:59:57] And he was the target of this investigation. So they had him in one room, they had his wife and another room and they put the two kids into a third room and they started questioning him. Now, this is part of a takedown of a, as I said, a whole ring of these people, including this assistant. Principal at a school. [01:00:20] Can you believe that? So this IRS guy had flown in from Washington DC to have a look over what was going on, but this agent from the IRS and his partner whose name is let's see, his name was Jenn S Scouts. I probably got that wrong. And Tigran GAM bar Yan, Cambodian, and they had a small group of investigators and they were at a whole bunch of different federal agencies, not just the IRS. [01:00:48] What once seemed to be. Untraceable was no longer traceable. Now I've talked on this show before about a lecture I went to by the secret service about how they had tracked down and shut down the world's largest website that was being used to sell illegal materials online. And it's fascinating what they did. [01:01:12] But frankly, they're calling this particular boss to proof of concept and that's why they are IRS was in on this as well, but it was huge. Here's a quote from the IRS agent in this wired magazine article. He's saying he remembers how the gravity of this whole thing. Let me pull this up on the screen too. [01:01:32] So you can read along here, but this was a high school administrator, a husband, and a father of two, whether he was guilty or innocent. The accusations, this team of law enforcement agents were leveling against him. There are mere presence in the home would almost certainly ruin his life. And he, as well as these other people were counting on anonymity from Bitcoin. [01:01:59] Now, obviously I'm glad they got taken down, but listen, folks, if you think that it's safe, that it's anonymous, it ain't Bitcoin just ain't there. Craig peterson.com stick around. [01:02:15] I've been blamed for really complaining about people not updating their software. And that includes things like firewalls. The FBI has stepped in and they are going ahead and doing updates for you. [01:02:30] So once you get into this, because this is, I think something that should concern all of us, what should we be doing as a country? [01:02:40] People are. Updating their software. They're not updating their hardware. And particularly our hardware take a look at what's been happening with the firewalls and the firewall concerns. Everybody has some sort of firewall will almost everybody, but enough people that we can say, everybody has a firewall, you get your internet from you, name it. [01:03:05] And because of the fact they're using something called Nat network address translation, they've got some sort of firewall in front of you. So for instance, You've got your phone, right? You're using your phone and it's got internet on it. You're going through whoever your carrier is. And that carrier is giving you internet access, right? [01:03:28] They don't have enough IP addresses, particularly IPV four, in order for you to get your very own unique little address out on the. No they do. When it comes to V6 things a little bit different, but your device is not completely exposed on the internet. Windows comes to the fire. And by default, the windows firewall is turned on. [01:03:50] Now this gets more than a little concerning because that firewall that's turned on. Isn't really doing anything because I've got a firewall turned on and yet every service is accessible from outside, which is defeating the purpose of the firewall. Again, it's a complaint I've had about Microsoft now for. [01:04:10] Decades, which is they have features that are just check boxes. Yes. Yes. It's got a firewall. Yeah, it's turned on, but the features don't work. So having a firewall and having everything open defeats the purpose of a firewall max do not have a firewall turned on by default, but they do have their services disabled. [01:04:33] Which is just as effective if not more effective. So one of the things we advise people to do is go into your windows system, into the firewalls and your security settings, and turn off any services that you're not using. If you're not sharing file systems, then turn that off. In other words, You're mounting the G drive or whatever you might call it from another computer, then you don't need it. [01:04:59] If you're not as server for what's called SMB, then you don't need to share it. So turn off everything that you don't need. That's going to happen is one of your programs isn't going to work, right? And the, what you did last year, you're going to turn it back on and you can do a lot of research online to find out what they are. [01:05:18] We have over 200 settings that we change in windows. When we get a customer. Now on the Mac side, you can turn it on. I liked turning it on. I liked turning off the ability to see my machine. So in other words, the ability to be able to. So I turned it on and I enable specific services. And again, you can do some research on that. [01:05:44] I've got an improving windows security course that people have taken, and we should probably do that again, if not just have some free webinars on how to do this. So you guys can learn how to do it, but not that hard to do. Anyhow, bottom line is. People aren't updating their computers, even the Macs and windows. [01:06:06] We have a client that would just started a new client and we're tightening things up and we've been finding Mac computers that are major multiple major revisions behind. And that to me is shocking. Apple Macs are just so easy to update. It is extremely rare that an apple update will make your computer break unlike in the windows world, where it's pretty common. [01:06:32] So windows guys, I can understand, but your even more exposed, your bigger target, you need to keep up to date. So how about all of the other equipment that we. I've had warnings again and again, with you guys about what's happening with our smart devices that are out there, right? Our security cameras we have up in the corner, right? [01:06:56] We have these smart thermostats, people are using the list goes on and on of all of this equipment that we're using that is exposing us because when was the last time you have. How about the firmware in your router or your wifi, right? Some of the devices that I recommend to people, and if you have any questions, just email me M e@craigpeterson.com. [01:07:19] I can give you recommendations, even if you're a home user. Although my business obviously is working with businesses on what kind of wifi to buy, what you should get, what you should do. I don't charge for any of that stuff. Okay. You get it. But you have to ask. Me@craigpeterson.com. So you get this information and you go ahead and you buy whatever it is, but you don't keep it up to date, which is why I tend to only recommend stuff that automatically updates. [01:07:48] But that also means every few years you're going to have to replace it because unless you're using the good Cisco equipment where you can get a seven year life out of it you're not gonna find that in consumer grid. So what's happened here. I'm going to pull this up on my screen for people watching this on YouTube or on rumble. [01:08:07] But here is a thing that came straight out of our friends here from the FBI. This is from CSO. This is a a magazine that I do follow. But they're talking about what they call psych clock. Blink. So the article says for the second time in a year, the FBI has used search and seizure warrant to clean malware from devices owned by private businesses and users without their explicit approval. [01:08:40] The FBI used this approach to disrupt a botnet, believed to be the creation of right. Government hackers. So the calling this SYEP clock cycle clubs, blink malware discovered earlier this year. So here's the problem. What do you do if you're the federal government, how do you try and keep your country safe? [01:09:05] Now we know. We've got these military contractors. They make missiles that take out missiles, right? The provide defensive systems. You've heard of iron dome from years ago, all the way through all of the current stuff. That's what they do, but what do they do? What can they do when there's a botnet? A botnet is where there are multiple computers in this case, probably tens of thousands of computers located in the United States that are acting like sleeper. [01:09:36] They sit there and they wait for commands as to what they should do. Should they try and attack a machine? Should they try and spread more? Malware, what should they be doing? And the, these things are vicious. They are absolutely nasty. And in this case, we're looking at Russian malware. So Russia effectively like the Americans. [01:09:59] You might remember that TV show. It was great show, but that. Computers that are owned by you and me and our businesses and government agencies that are under the control of the Russians. Now you don't even know it. You're using your computer or you're playing games. You're going to Facebook, whatever it is you do on your computer. [01:10:20] Your computer is under command and control of the Russians. So the FBI goes to a court and says, Hey, we've got to go ahead and shut this down. We need a warrant. They get the warrant and the search and seizure warrant lets them now. Get on to these machines that are part of the bot net or the controlling machines for the bot net, and either remove the malware or go ahead and take control of the botnet themselves. [01:10:49] So it can't be used. And by the way, our friends at Microsoft they've gotten involved in this too, which is really frankly, cool in shutting down some of these botnets, Hey, I want to encourage everyone. Take a couple of minutes, go to Craig peterson.com/subscribe. That's Craig Peterson. CREI G P T R S O N. [01:11:12] And subscribe, and I'll be sending you a special report on passwords. Plus two more. I send out the most popular special reports that anybody has ever asked for. [01:11:25] Hey, I've got a little bit more to discuss on what's happening with Russia and Microsoft and more, but I'm also going to talk about QR codes. There is a great explanation. That's in your newsletter from Monday about why you shouldn't trust him. [01:11:41] Let's finish up this Russian thing. And then we're going to get into why you cannot trust QR codes and a brand new way. [01:11:51] The bad guys are using QR codes to really mess with us. Now, if you're watching over on either YouTube or on rumble, you'll see this. Let me pull up my screen for you. But here we go. Okay. This is very interesting. Then the last segment, we talked a little bit about what our friends over at the FBI had been doing, which is they have been removing malware from people's computers because people haven't been keeping their computers up-to-date right. [01:12:26] Part of the botnets. So we explained. At the FBI, isn't the only one out there trying to stop these Russians and the hackers anonymous has been very big at it. In fact, let me pull up this other article. This is from security affairs. And here we go. And it's talking about this whole army of these anonymous hackers. [01:12:50] Now none of us have been a nightmare for many businesses that they didn't like. I had an anonymous we'll go ahead and they'll do usually pretty basic stuff. They'll do denial of service attacks and some other things, so they don't like you because of. The don't say gay bill in Florida, and, without bothering to do any research, they'll just start attacking organizations that support it, or organizations that don't support it depending on how they want to do it. So this is an interesting article here, because it's talking about these various. Websites that they've hacked. Now, some of them are government site and some of them are private industries. Now, one of the cool things, bad things about hacking private industry and releasing the emails is now the competitors to these businesses know what they're doing. [01:13:46] And in some cases there's proprietary technology that's being released. Now, when it comes to Russian proprietary technology. The Western world doesn't care a whole lot about some of it, but here's some examples of what these hacktivists of GoDaddy. This is a company called forest 37,000 emails stolen from the company, Russian logging and wood manufacturing firm. [01:14:09] Again, it would give a little bit of an idea into the whole Russian, what are they doing? In the forest industry. This one, I think is a little more concerning for the Russians Aero gap. This is an engineering company that focuses in the oil and gas industry. Their clients include a whole bunch of Russian companies. [01:14:30] They've leaked approximately 100,000 emails from Aero gas. That is a huge deal because so much of the country's revenue, the number one industry in Russia is oil and gas. Petro Fort one of the largest office space and business centers in St. Petersburg, the hackers have leaked approximately 300,000 emails from Petro fork. [01:14:56] Again, you can use that to find out what's happening in your economy. What. Doing how are businesses doing? Are they going to go under so you can see some tweets here. I've got them up on my screen on YouTube and rumble anonymous. What they're saying that they've done and you can follow anonymous directly on Twitter. [01:15:14] Particularly fond of them. They've done a lot of things that I disagree with. This is really telling us about a whole new approach to warfare, right back in the day, you and I couldn't get involved, we could potentially take up arms and go and fight right there and think about the Spanish American war. [01:15:33] Think about what's happening now in Ukraine, where Americans have just gone over there. Taken up firearms in order to help them defend Ukraine. People who are maybe of Ukrainian descent, maybe not right. We have never seen this type of involvement by average citizens because anonymous is not like some big fancy company or government agency anonymous is a bunch of people who are trying to be anonymous and do something. [01:16:05] So they stole 145 gigabytes. Look at this. It's just crazy. So here. The anonymous Twitter thread itself, right? Talking about what. It's absolutely incredible. Incredible. So that's what anonymous is up to. They are hacking Russia and they're hacking Russia in a big way. Now, next stop. We have our friends at Microsoft. [01:16:30] Microsoft has been seizing Russian domains that they are accusing of having been linked to these Russian hackers that have been going after think tanks and government agencies in the U S and the. He kn

TrueAnon
UNLOCKED! Episode 214: NATO (Part 3)

TrueAnon

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 110:57


After the Cold War, NATO needed to reinvent itself politically for the post-Soviet world. For the final installment of our three-part series, we welcome back Ben Howard to talk through the collapse of the USSR, the rise and fall of the Partnership for Peace, and NATO interventions from Yugoslavia to Afghanistan, and we try to figure out just what Article V really means. Kamala press conference video: twitter.com/tomselliott/status/1501904857749405699

Witness History
The first McDonald's in Moscow

Witness History

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 9:02


Following the closure of McDonald's in Russia, we're going back to January 1990 when the global fast food giant opened its first restaurant in Moscow. In 2015, Mike Lanchin spoke to George Cohon, the man who brought the Big Mac to what was then the communist USSR, and to Sveta Polyakova, one of the first locals to work there. PHOTO: A Soviet police officer outside the first McDonald's (Getty Images)

Fret Not
#1 Irina Kulikova: Childhood Stardom & Life on the Road

Fret Not

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 51:17


Russian guitarist Irina Kulikova and I (Rosie Bennet) discuss her growing up in the USSR as a child star, studying at the Gnessin Academy in Moscow and the Mozarteum in Salzburg and how her move to Europe changed her circumstances. We chatted about Irina's daughter, how she balances being a mother with her busy career, how she overcame challenges of financial hardship and postpartum depression and what her advice is for those going through similar moves and displacements.  A beautiful conversation with a long time hero of mine! Enjoy xxx Music - Ão "Cover" Copyright Rosie Bennet 2022 Listeners of Fret Not get 50% off Augustine Strings with the code FRETNOT50 on www.augustinestrings.com for US listeners and www.ivormairants.co.uk for UK listeners

Learning for Life @ Gustavus
“Farewell to Leningrad”

Learning for Life @ Gustavus

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 68:14


For this special episode, Greg speaks with his extraordinary and much-revered high-school history teacher, Mr. D. Stanley Moore, about Stan's Minneapolis background and education at Beloit College, his study of the Russian language in the US Army and eventually Russian Area Studies at the University of Minnesota and Dostoevsky at Yale, his path to and career at Rich East High School in the postwar town of Park Forest, IL, traveling, teaching, learning, and camping in the USSR and Europe (including in the explosive year 1968), teaching in China during and after Tiananmen Square, Russia's war on Ukraine, and his poetry, from which he reads.

Sean's Russia Blog
Trailer 2: Teddy Goes to the USSR

Sean's Russia Blog

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 2:00


Coming May 30! Teddy Goes to the USSR, a new six-part podcast series follows one such American, Teddy Roe, to shine light on Soviet tourism, police surveillance, consumerism, race, and everyday life through his extraordinary three-month trip to the Soviet Union in 1968. The post Trailer 2: Teddy Goes to the USSR appeared first on SRB Podcast.

Bookstack
Episode 66: Zubok on the USSR's collapse

Bookstack

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 35:36


Was the Soviet Union's demise inevitable, and was Gorbachev the heroic reformer we remember him to have been? Vladislav M. Zubok joins host Richard Aldous to discuss the complicated legacy of the end of the Cold War, as well as his new book Collapse: The Fall of the Soviet Union.

Den of Rich
Vladimir Porus | Владимир Порус

Den of Rich

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 125:12


Vladimir Porus is a Soviet and Russian philosopher, specialist in the theory of knowledge, philosophy and methodology of science. Doctor of Philosophical Sciences, Professor at HSE University. Vladimir was born on September 19, 1943 in the city of Osh, Kirghiz SSR. He graduated from high school in Lugansk. After serving in the Soviet army, he entered Moscow State University. In 1970 he graduated from the Faculty of Philosophy of Lomonosov Moscow State University with a degree in Philosophy. In 1974, he completed postgraduate studies at the Institute of Philosophy of the Academy of Sciences of the USSR and defended his dissertation for the degree of candidate of philosophical sciences on the topic "Gnoseological problems of many-valued logic". From 1974 to 2007 he worked at the Institute of Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences (Junior, Senior and Leading Researcher). In 1997 he was awarded the academic title of Associate Professor. Since 1999 - Head of the Department of Philosophy at the University of the Russian Academy of Education. In 2002 he defended his dissertation for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy on the topic "Scientific Rationality as a Topic of Epistemology". Since 2003 - Professor and Head of the Department of Ontology, Logic and Theory of Knowledge of the School of Philosophy, Faculty of Humanities, National Research University Higher School of Economics. Since 2004, he has been a member of the editorial board of the journal Epistemology and Philosophy of Science. Since 2017, he has been the editor-in-chief of Philosophy. Journal of the HSE School of Philosophy and Cultural Studies. Author of more than 450 scientific publications, including monographs “Rationality. The science. Culture” (2002), “At the Edge of Culture” (2008), “At the Crossroads of Method” (2014), etc. FIND VLADIMIR ON SOCIAL MEDIA LinkedIn | Facebook ================================ SUPPORT & CONNECT: Support on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/denofrich Twitter: https://twitter.com/denofrich Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/denofrich YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/denofrich Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/den_of_rich/ Hashtag: #denofrich © Copyright 2022 Den of Rich. All rights reserved.

The Best Storyteller In Texas Podcast
Opportunity Often Comes Dressed in Overalls and Looking Like Hard Work

The Best Storyteller In Texas Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 17:17


In this episode: With graduation season upon us, Kent talks about what makes a good commencement speech. He discusses how crushing student debt can devastate a graduate's future and advises how to avoid it. Although media coverage of the Ukraine war has waned, it still rages on, and with $40 billion of American-provided weapons in Ukraine's hands, Russians may face an uphill battle. Lastly, Kent laments the decline of American journalism, with accuracy often taking a back seat to breaking a story first.

Ukrainian Roots Radio
Nash Holos Vancouver 2022-0514

Ukrainian Roots Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 59:58


Ukrainian Jewish Heritage: an interview with Canadian author Regina Gershman about her recently released book Rebecca's Journey: Memoir of a Young Girl Fleeing Antisemitism in Russia, her childhood recollections of discrimination in the USSR and emigration to Canada, and her work helping today's refugees from oppression and war in Ukraine (Part 2 of 2) • Ukrainian Proverb of the Week • Other Items of Interest • Great Ukrainian Music!Ukrainian Proverb of the Week:Свобода будується на єдності.Freedom is built on unity. Join Pawlina for the Vancouver edition of Nash Holos Ukrainian Roots Radio—every Saturday at 6pm PST on AM1320 CHMB and streaming at www.am1320.com.Vancouver area listeners can hear the Nanaimo edition of Nash Holos every Wednesday with host Oksana Poberezhnyk from 11am-1pm PST on CHLY 101.7fm and streaming at chly.caIn between broadcasts, please check out our website for audio archives, transcripts, and more. Check out the links there to support the show and several charities providing aid to Ukrainian civilians and defenders being brutalized by Russian military attacks. Support the show on Patreon See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Strange New England
The Bunkers at the End of the World

Strange New England

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 14:44


I've been to the place where the world ends. It's in an out of the way spot, far to the north, near a beaver dam and an abandoned air force base that most people have forgotten even existed. A wildlife refuge surrounds this strange little grotto of man-made hillocks that abides there quietly, a vestige of a time that all too unfortunately has not yet passed from our world. Days go by and no human visits. I walked there with my brother and we moved amid the bunkers, squat tomb-like structures built to withstand a nuclear blast unbothered by anyone or anything but a lonely crow flying over the barest whisper of a breeze. If I didn't know better, I could swear I heard someone say something there, something like a prayer. Perhaps that person was me. I grew up about fifteen miles away from this place and for the entirety of my life in my hometown of Caribou, Maine, I knew that the military had nuclear weapons nearby. After all, it was the middle of the Cold War. Loring Air Force Base was even mentioned in the movie ‘Wargames', a film I watched at the local Caribou Theater. In it, a nervous airman answers the call - if the Russians launched an all-out nuclear attack on the United States, Loring would be the first target. Yes, I knew we had bombs. But walking among the bunkers where the nation's first batch of bombs waited in readiness to destroy life on Earth, it brought all that fear and helplessness back to me. It reminded me that I had grown up on the edge of oblivion. We all did. The former site of the North River Depot is in Limestone, Maine. It was built here before the nearby Loring Air Force Base, which itself is now only a memory. The bunkers we walk among are easily viewed on Google Earth but at one time in the early 1950s, this was one of the most secure and secret sites on the planet. Inside this strange and haunting set of structures half buried in the earth, the United States stored enough nuclear warheads to destroy the earth several times over. These are the depositories of doom and they are as quiet as the grave. They stand today as a testament to a period of time in our history when the words ‘the end of the world' were no longer a metaphor. This was the place where the end of the world could easily have begun. In the aftermath of World War II, for a while, the United States was the sole superpower on the planet. Two nuclear fission bombs had been dropped on the cities of Nagasaki and Hiroshima in Japan, ending the greatest war this planet and humanity had ever known. The United States had only two bombs at the time and both were used, with the threat that we had many more at our disposal if the need arose to bomb the country of Japan into submission. When the Emperor of Japan signed the documents ending the war, the United States had no nuclear weapons left. The tactic worked. The arsenal was actually empty, but not for long. Armed with the recipe, the building of bombs began in earnest and with the true start of the military industrial complex came the need for a place to store these weapons, a place where no one would even think to look. IF you're going to stockpile something above top secret, you'd better find someplace no one would ever think of looking. In 1947, a new joint service military organization called the Armed Forces Special Weapons Project began its task of assessing the readiness of the nuclear weapons possessed by the U.S. government. When they got to Los Alamos, they discovered that there were, in fact, no new nuclear weapons to assess. Since the end of World War II, not a single nuclear bomb had been constructed. By the time the inspectors left Los Alamos, there was one bomb that t thought capable of detonation. The Special Weapons project set up shop in neighboring Sandia Base in New Mexico in that same year, which was also the year that the Truman Doctrine became US policy - a doctrine that offered to ‘support free peoples who are resisting attempted subjugation by armed minorities or by outside pressures.' The Truman Doctrine would usher in a period of political tensions that would result in the Cold War, once the USSR also possessed the power of the atom. The US arsenal grew by jumps and starts and by the end of 1947, there were at least fifty-six functional nuclear bombs ready for deployment with a fleet of thirty-five silver-plated B-29s to deliver them. On August 29, 1949, the USSR detonated its first device. The two forces that helped end the war in Europe were now both in possession of nuclear weapons and they were not on the same team anymore. With the tensions growing, it became clear to the powers that be that what was needed was a place to store these weapons. Caribou, Maine is a small city that calls itself the northeastern most city in the country. It is an agricultural country with long, rolling hills, millions of trees, lakes and rivers, and more deer than humans. That was true in 1947 and it is still true today. There were only a few roads into and out of Aroostook County. In 1950, the entire population of Aroostook County was 96,039. This quiet, nearly forgotten part of the country was chosen as the first site in the history of the world to store a nuclear arsenal. Eventually, four more sites would be chosen, but Caribou Air Force Station, also known as North River Depot and then East Loring, was allegedly the first to be built and manned. When you look at an aerial photo of the North River Depot, it is easy to confuse it with a small housing development, but without houses. Instead, you will see over forty small hillocks, covered with grass, masking something larger underneath. These mounds are concrete bunkers built to withstand a nuclear blast. Inside of these structures were stored the bomb housings that, once the detonators were inserted, would each become a means to an end - each designed for the end of someone's world. Looking closer, you will see a road circling the small facility. There are no fences. Instead of fences, a constant patrol circled the bunkers twenty-four hours a day, always in motion. If someone wanted to infiltrate this place, they would have to get there first and then pass through marsh and forest before encountering armed resistance. There are other structures. There is a huge concrete cube that is designed to look like a building. It is modeled to have false windows, false doors and it might be mistaken for a dormitory or office building. If an enemy viewed the building from above, the idea was that they would not view it as a target because of its drab, nondescript design. In fact, despite its size, it has only a few small chambers inside it which you can peek at if you step onto the landing, though it is still off limits to the public. You can see an open vault door a foot thick, open to the elements. Pictures from the decommissioning show shelving with cubicles. This concrete cube housed the detonators, the highly radioactive elements that, once inserted into the bomb housings, would make the bomb capable of detonation and destruction. It was thought safe to store these away from the housings as a precaution against any accidents that might occur. When required, they could quickly be delivered to the adjacent bunkers and gingerly inserted into the bomb. It is rumored that there were underground tunnels running underneath each of the bunkers and from the cube so that in the event of a heavy winter, nothing could stop the efficiency of the bomb's delivery to the aircraft that would ultimately deliver them to their final destinations. In the end, this cube had to be abandoned because it was so heavy, it was sinking at an angle into the ground. Another facility was built and this one was sealed for decades. In January of 1992 when Loring Air Force Base was being closed, twelve workers cut into the door of the cube of Building A and were contaminated by radiation. The Air Force and Congressional representatives investigated the claims. The Air Force explained to the investigators that the building was unknown to them. They didn't know it existed. Officially, the end cause of the illness of the men who cut into the building was that they suffered a massive dose of radon gas that had accumulated in the thirty years it stood there, sealed against the world. This explanation seems weak given that it was once the single place on planet Earth that housed all the man-made radioactive detonators capable of global devastation. Today, there is no door on the building and the winds whistle through the barred doorway. No radon gas can accumulate. For a few years, this site and four others across the country housed Armageddon. The Russians had their storage facilities, as well. So did other nations as the years passed. The long-range bombers used as delivery systems remained but were largely replaced by newer missile systems to deliver the ultimate payload. In 1988, the Cold War effectively ended and Loring Air Force Base closed. Today, it's a hauntingly silent place, still maintained by the local authorities, with one of the largest arch hangers in the world and one of the longest runways, too. There are a few businesses, a nature preserve, a motel, and a museum on the site, but it is always strangely quiet and one might even venture to say haunted- not with ghosts - but with memories. Ask anyone who served at Loring and you'll hear a fondness for the place in their voice, even though the winters were long and cold and it was situated in the middle of nowhere. You'll hear a fondness for the land, for the people, and for the former mission of the base. Time is having its effect on the buildings that are not maintained and it is only a matter of time before much of it returns to the wild. One day, perhaps thousands of years from now, the concrete bunkers that housed the bombs and the sinking concrete cube that housed the detonators will also crumble, but by that time, who knows what the humans of the distant future will think if they stumble upon these curious ruins and wonder, what was their purpose? Who built them and why? I've been to the place where the world could have ended. That the world still exists over seventy years after it was constructed is a testament to the tenacious nature of Humanity. But how strange it is now to walk among the grassy hillocks and into the cavernous mouths of the bunkers and think of things that might have been. It is a lonely, cold feeling, after all, because those things that might have been? Well, the pity is, they still might be... REFERENCES Garbinski, John C., North River Depot, 2011 Rhodes, Richard, Dark Sun The Making of the Hydrogen Bomb, 1995, Touchstone Loring Remembers the Skies for Us, “The History” https://sites.google.com/site/loringremembers/history-of-loring-afb Declassified U.S. Nuclear Test Film #69

Macro n Cheese
Pakistan's False Dawn and the Beginning of History with Aqdas Afzal

Macro n Cheese

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 54:57


A false dawn is a promising situation which comes to nothing. This is how Aqdas Afzal describes the situation in his native Pakistan and India at the end of the Raj. “The point to remember here, Steve, is that the British were in India not to govern. They were in India to extract surplus and to maintain what they called law and order. And so the British left without giving the local people any taste or mechanism for bringing about accountability or democracy. But they did leave behind these two very, almost draconian institutions for keeping law and order. And because of these two institutions - these two state institutions that the British left behind - in the case of Pakistan, the first 25 years of Pakistan's history was complete chaos.” Aqdas talks to Steve about the chaos of partition – a humanitarian crisis. Remember, Pakistan was not only separated from India, but it was also cleaved from its own Eastern wing, now known as Bangladesh. The generation that sacrificed and struggled to gain independence was hoping for a bright future. That was the false dawn. Pakistan fell into the lap of neoliberal thinking because of the Cold War, as Aqdas explains it. When the Soviets entered Afghanistan, the military government took over in Pakistan, cozying up with the US defense establishment. Pakistani policy makers began to sound like the godparents of the neoliberal project, Thatcher and Reagan. The interview covers the destructive role of the IMF, World Bank, and WTO – what Steve refers to as the evil trinity. No matter how many of our guests talk about them, there is always more outrage to be uncovered in their manipulation of the economies of the global South. Steve and Aqdas discuss Francis Fukuyama's concept of “the end of history.” With the collapse of the USSR, liberal democracy and capitalism were expected to be the final stage of human evolution, leaving no other pathway for developing nations. Aqdas counters with the notion that history is not linear. “Russia is a country that went through shock therapy, that was undertaken by experts coming from the World Bank and the IMF. These experts are basically telling Russia how to open its economy, how to change over from socialism to a market-based economy. The same Russia today is challenging the might of capitalist countries like Britain, United States, Germany.” He calls this the beginning of history. Aqdas Afzal finished his undergraduate and first master's degree in Political Science from Ohio State University, then returned to his native Pakistan. After working there for five years he won the Fulbright scholarship for his second master's and PhD in Economics from UMKC. He teaches at Habib University in Karachi and writes https://www.dawn.com/authors/8439/aqdas-afzal (a monthly op-ed in Dawn), a leading English language newspaper there. @AqdasAfzal on Twitter

50 Years Ago In Hockey
May 7-13, 1972: Boston Takes The Stanley Cup

50 Years Ago In Hockey

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 65:31


In the final show of the 1971-72 NHL season, the Stanley Cup final is decided, lots of rumours of players moving to the new WHA, but no stars are making the jump yet, except for Bernie Parent, who now doesn't even have a team to play for, and we have some developments in the September challenge series between the Canadian professional players and those from the USSR.  Support hockey research and get exclusive BONUS podcast episodes! http://patreon.com/hockey50years Twitter: http://twitter.com/hockey50years Web: http://hockey50yearsago.com ADVERTISING DISCLAIMER If you or someone you know has a gambling problem, crisis counseling and referral services can be accessed by calling 1-800-GAMBLER (1-800-426-2537) (IL/IN/MI/NJ/PA/W/WY), 1-800-NEXT STEP (AZ). 1-800-522-4700 (CO/NH), 888-789-7777/visit http://ccpg.org/chat (CT), 1-800-BETS OFF (IA), 1-877-770-STOP (7867) (LA), 877-8-HOPENY/text HOPENY (467369) (NY), visit OPGR.org (OR), call/text TN REDLINE1-800-889-9789 (TN), or 1-888-532-3500 (VA). 21+ (18+ WY). Physically present in AZ/CO/CT/IL/IN/A/LA/MI/ INJ/NYIPA/TN/VA/WV/WY only. Min. $5 deposit required. Eligibility restrictions apply. See http://draftkings.com/sportsbook for details.

The Delingpod: The James Delingpole Podcast

Support the Delingpod by joining James' Locals: https://jamesdelingpole.locals.com/ Jacques Baud is a former colonel of the General Staff, ex-member of the Swiss strategic intelligence, specialist on Eastern countries. He was trained in the American and British intelligence services. He has served as Policy Chief for United Nations Peace Operations. As a UN expert on rule of law and security institutions, he designed and led the first multidimensional UN intelligence unit in the Sudan. He has worked for the African Union and was for 5 years responsible for the fight, at NATO, against the proliferation of small arms. He was involved in discussions with the highest Russian military and intelligence officials just after the fall of the USSR. Within NATO, he followed the 2014 Ukrainian crisis and later participated in programs to assist the Ukraine. He is the author of several books on intelligence, war and terrorism   Freedom isn't free - James needs your support to continue creating The Delingpod. There are many ways you can show your support to James: Join the James Delingpole Community as a paid supporter at: jamesdelingpole.locals.com Support James monthly at: subscribestar.com/jamesdelingpole Support James' Writing at: substack.com/jamesdelingpole www.delingpoleworld.com Buy James a Coffee at: buymeacoffee.com/jamesdelingpole   Find full episodes of The Delingpod for free (and leave a 5-star rating) on: Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/gb/podcast/the-delingpod-the-james-delingpole-podcast/id1449753062 Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/7bdfnyRzzeQsAZQ6OT9e7G?si=a21dc71c7a144f48 Podbean: delingpole.podbean.com Odysee: https://odysee.com/@JamesDelingpoleChannel:0 Rumble: https://rumble.com/user/JamesDelingpole BitChute: https://www.bitchute.com/channel/Zxu5yMwNWTbs/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TheJamesDelingpoleChannel   Follow James on Social Media: Twitter: twitter.com/jamesdelingpole Instagram: instagram.com/delingpodclips GETTR: gettr.com/jamesdelingpole Telegram: https://t.me/+dAx_7JX7WQlwYzVk  

Bitcoin, Blockchain, and the Technologies of Our Future
EU's TERRIFYING Mass Surveillance Plan - w/ Matthew Green

Bitcoin, Blockchain, and the Technologies of Our Future

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 32:13


A leaked document from the EU, proposing new regulation, describes the most sophisticated mass surveillance machinery ever deployed outside of China and the USSR.The proposal is for a new mass surveillance system that will read private text messages, not to detect CSAM, but to detect “grooming”.It would mandate scanning of encrypted messages for CSAM material.Once you open up “machines reading your text messages” for any purpose, there are no limits.Matthew Green, renowned security expert and cryptography professor, says:"Let me be clear what that means: to detect 'grooming' is not simply searching for known CSAM. It isn't using AI to detect new CSAM, which is also on the table.It's running algorithms reading your actual text messages to figure out what you're saying, at scale."Matthew and I dive into everything you need to know. 0:00 Pre-roll0:53 Intro2:00 The EU SILL SCAN Your Computers2:23 Matthew Green4:12 System will READ text messages between people to try to detect "grooming".7:52 "This is not voluntary."18:47 Targeting dissidents and election disinformation23:40 Apple's CSAM-scanning proposal27:38 Decentralization: "They can't win."30:55 Quiz Winner: Congratulations SpeedRacer111!32:40 Show Out and ThanksEU report:https://ec.europa.eu/home-affairs/system/files/2022-05/Proposal%20for%20a%20Regulation%20laying%20down%20rules%20to%20prevent%20and%20combat%20child%20sexual%20abuse_en_0.pdfBrought to you by NBTV members: Sam Ettaro, Will Sandoval, and Naomi BrockwellTo support NBTV, visit https://www.nbtv.media/support(tax-deductible in the US)Sign up for the free CryptoBeat newsletter here:https://cryptobeat.substack.com/Beware of scammers, I will never give you a phone number or reach out to you with investment advice. I do not give investment advice.Visit the NBTV website:https://nbtv.mediaSupport the show

Fate of Fact
May 12th: The USSR Lifts Its Blockade Of Berlin

Fate of Fact

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 5:14


On May 12, 1949, The Soviet Union lifts its blockade of Berlin. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Target USA Podcast by WTOP
Ep. 331 | Despite Ukraine failure Putin still has "grand vision" to rebuild the USSR

Target USA Podcast by WTOP

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 28:14


Former U.S. Director of National Intelligence James Clapper says Russia is still an "existential threat" to the U.S because of President Vladimir Putin and its nuclear weapons.

Doc G
The Doc G Show May 11th 2022 (Featuring Jeff Hanna of The Nitty Gritty Dirt Band)

Doc G

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 101:20


The Doc invites Jeff Hanna co-founder of the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band on the show! The two talk about starting out in southern California, starting with Jackson Browne, moving to Colorado, recording the Will The Circle Be Unbroken album, playing the USSR, recording the new album, working with his son, working with Larkin Poe and much much more! Monologue (Gator Bait): 0:00:23 Birthday Suit 1: 12:17 Ripped From the Headlines: 16:51 Shoutouts: 34:12 Miscellaneous File (Daryl Hall): 35:45 Leftover Headline: 39:54 Jeff Hanna Interview: 44:30 Birthday Suit 2: 1:31:44 Birthday Suit 3: 1:34:22

Mises Media
1991: When America Tried to Keep Ukraine in the USSR

Mises Media

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022


In the final days of the Soviet Union, the Washington establishment was convinced nationalism was a greater threat than Soviet despotism. Thus, George Bush tried to prop up the USSR and prevent Ukrainian secession. Original Article: "1991: When America Tried to Keep Ukraine in the USSR" This Audio Mises Wire is generously sponsored by Christopher Condon.

Audio Mises Wire
1991: When America Tried to Keep Ukraine in the USSR

Audio Mises Wire

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022


In the final days of the Soviet Union, the Washington establishment was convinced nationalism was a greater threat than Soviet despotism. Thus, George Bush tried to prop up the USSR and prevent Ukrainian secession. Original Article: "1991: When America Tried to Keep Ukraine in the USSR" This Audio Mises Wire is generously sponsored by Christopher Condon.

Rabbi Shmuel Silber - Institute for Jewish Continuity

TALMUD TORAH: Yona & Shushie Ehrenfeld in loving memory and l'zecher nishmas their grandfather, Yosef ben Shmuel Aron z'l. Benjamin and Elys Wohl of Netanya, Israel in honor and loving memory of our dear friend and mentor Moshe Chaim ben Tzvi Hirsch. Dr. Michael Gelfand, who deeply loved and supported torah and Israel, touched the lives of so many and inspired our family's spiritual growth. May his neshama be raised to the highest of heights. DAF YOMI: David & Malke Kramer l'zecher nishmas Larisa Kanayeva, who lived most of her life in the USSR but lived her last years with her husband as a proud Jew in Baltimore. When her husband passed away before her, she would have been eligible for chalitza if it was not for the fact that all of her husbands siblings were killed in Babi Yar. If you would like to sponsor a shiur, please contact our office at office@suburbanorthodox.org.

Mornings with Neil Mitchell
'A lot of lies': Expert analyses Putin's Victory Day speech

Mornings with Neil Mitchell

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 5:05


In the lead up to Russia's Victory Day, observers speculated Vladimir Putin may use his speech to announce a national mobilisation push to boost the ranks of the Russian military. But his speech yesterday, on the anniversary of the USSR's defeat of Nazi Germany in World War II, was far softer than many expected. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Sean's Russia Blog
Trailer: Teddy Goes to the USSR

Sean's Russia Blog

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 1:42


Coming May 30! Teddy Goes to the USSR, a new six-part podcast series follows one such American, Teddy Roe, to shine light on Soviet tourism, police surveillance, consumerism, race, and everyday life through his extraordinary three-month trip to the Soviet Union in 1968. The post Trailer: Teddy Goes to the USSR appeared first on SRB Podcast.

Politik Merkez - Robot Okuyucu Yayını

This special day, which is celebrated as Victory Day by the USSR, which won the Second World War, is celebrated by those who participated in this war (for example, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan…) in the former Soviet countries and regions after the Cold War. The date of May 9 created an expectation in the West. What will Putin say? Putin gave his speech on this issue, which, of course, is of current importance. Now everyone will make their own conclusions. In the first place, I also had my findings.

Ukrainian Roots Radio
Nash Holos Vancouver 2022-0507

Ukrainian Roots Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 8, 2022 59:58


Knyzhka Corner Book Review: Survival as Victory – Ukrainian Women in the Gulag, published by the Ukrainian Research Institute at Harvard University, examines the stories of Ukrainian women who were sentenced to the Soviet Gulag in the 1940's and 1950's • Ukrainian Jewish Heritage: an interview with Canadian author Regina Gershman about her recently released book Rebecca's Journey: Memoir of a Young Girl Fleeing Antisemitism in Russia, her childhood recollections of discrimination in the USSR and emigration to Canada, and her work helping today's refugees from oppression and war in Ukraine (Part 1 of 2) • Ukrainian Proverb of the Week • Other Items of Interest • Great Ukrainian Music!Ukrainian Proverb of the Week:Для правди справедливости колись таки мусять дорогу відчинити.Sooner or later a path must be made for truth and justice. Join Pawlina for the Vancouver edition of Nash Holos Ukrainian Roots Radio—every Saturday at 6pm PST on AM1320 CHMB and streaming at www.am1320.com.Vancouver area listeners can hear the Nanaimo edition of Nash Holos every Wednesday with host Oksana Poberezhnyk from 11am-1pm PST on CHLY 101.7fm and streaming at chly.caIn between broadcasts, please check out our website for audio archives, transcripts, and more. Check out the links there to support the show and several charities providing aid to Ukrainian civilians and defenders being brutalized by Russian military attacks. Support the show on Patreon See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

International report
The escaping Russians finding a better life in Turkey

International report

Play Episode Listen Later May 7, 2022 5:18


Turkey is becoming a prime destination for Russians seeking to escape crackdowns by President Vladimir Putin and the effects of global economic sanctions. Turkey remains one of the few countries where Russian airplanes can fly, and where Russian passport holders can enter without visas. Andre, not his real name, makes a cup of his favorite Russian tea for his Turkish hosts. Sipping the strong black brew offers a "taste of home, he says. Andre fled to Istanbul last month as rumours spread of nationwide conscription.  "When I received the news that there might be conscription, I had just two hours to take my things and go," he explains. "I know people are trying to leave Russia; police started to talk with them; 'why are you going'?" Andre says with Russia becoming a country of fear for those who oppose the war in Ukraine, there is now a growing exodus. "A lot of people left Russia; people who cannot leave are just silenced somehow. I know friends who just wrote something on their social media and police came to their houses. "My friends are careful, and most of them have already left Russia, But I know that there are situations where police stop on them the streets and check their phones. It's just a nervous situation for all of us." Popular city Istanbul is an increasingly popular destination for those escaping Putin's Russia. "I chose Istanbul because it's not so far. I already knew something about this city," Andre explains. "Istanbul has similar prices as in Russia, and I have connections here ... I can hear the Russian language everywhere." Istanbul has historical ties with Russia and a long tradition of hosting Russians escaping their country's turmoil. In the Karakoy district, Russian orthodox churches are a common sight. And one of the city's oldest and most prestigious restaurants was founded by refugees from the Bolshevik revolution. Uncertain fate of Turkish drones, a prominent symbol of Ukrainian resistance Today, Turkey is one of the few remaining countries where Russian planes can fly to. It also offers visa-free travel. That also makes it a popular destination for Russians seeking a way into EU countries. This Russian exile, who also declined to give his name, says he left just in time. "I read the news, and I think that the borders will be closed. I think it's the last chance to move," he said. "You can easily come to Europe from Russia. You just firstly go to Istanbul and then to Europe. I have met many Russians here many friends of mine are in other countries. They just traveled and decided not to go back." Properties Many Russians are now buying properties in Turkey. That allows them to secure their savings and even Turkish citizenship for themselves and their family. "For citizenship, via investment program, you can buy like one or two properties, depending on your budget, but it should be fitting to 250 thousand dollars," explains Alex Cihanoglu, a real estate agent at the Istanbul-based Property Istanbul. Istanbul is witnessing a property boom, says Cihanoglu, given that Turkey is uniquely placed for Russians seeking a way out. "Nowadays, there are only five countries to which Russians can travel, and one of them is Turkey," said Cihanoglu. Ankara earns new friends thanks to efforts to end Ukraine war Even Russia's exclusion from the SWIFT money transfer system is not proving an obstacle to buying property here. "There are a lot of people stuck with transferring money," said Cihanoglu, "But there is always, especially cryptocurrency is one of the best ways to move their money to Turkey. So, of course, it's a big destination where people want to park their money." European dream But Andre has no plans to settle in Istanbul, even if he had the funds to buy a home. Instead, he says he plans to move on to Europe and establish a new life there, but his thoughts are with the family and country he left behind. "I am thinking about them every day and making calls; I am writing them almost every day," he said. "Actually, I want to take them from Russia, but I don't know I will be able to do it or have just hope Russia can change in the next five or ten years. I cannot imagine how long it takes; it already looks like the bad years of the USSR. For me, it's like the death of Russia." But for now, Andre spends his time in Istanbul counting on the support of locals and a growing network of Russians for whom Turkey has become a refuge.

The Narrative Monopoly
#37 - Eugene Volokh, Free Speech

The Narrative Monopoly

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 65:24


A conversation about free speech with UCLA law professor Eugene Volokh Topics Computer engineering vs lawSCOTUS LeakBackground of free speechTwitter and free speechAre platforms utilities?The Ministry of Truth Disinformation BoardAnd more! Bio (from UCLA Law)Eugene Volokh teaches First Amendment law and a First Amendment amicus brief clinic at UCLA School of Law, where he has also often taught copyright law, criminal law, tort law, and a seminar on firearms regulation policy.Before coming to UCLA, he clerked for Justice Sandra Day O'Connor on the U.S. Supreme Court and for Judge Alex Kozinski on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit.Volokh is the author of the textbooks The First Amendment and Related Statutes (6th ed. 2016), and Academic Legal Writing (5th ed. 2013), as well as over 90 law review articles. He is a member of The American Law Institute, a member of the American Heritage Dictionary Usage Panel, and the founder and coauthor of The Volokh Conspiracy, a leading legal blog. His law review articles have been cited by opinions in eight Supreme Court cases and several hundred court opinions in total, as well as several thousand scholarly articles.Volokh worked for 12 years as a computer programmer. He graduated from UCLA with a B.S. in math-computer science at age 15, and has written many articles on computer software. Volokh was born in the USSR; his family emigrated to the U.S. when he was seven years old. LinksThe Volokh Conspiracy,Free speech videosnarrativemonopoly.comtwitter   

Toronto Mike'd Podcast
1972 Summit Series: Toronto Mike'd #1043

Toronto Mike'd Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 93:32


In this 1044th episode of Toronto Mike'd, Mike is joined by Scott Morrison as they dive deep into the 1972 Summit Series between Canada and USSR. Buy Scott's great new book on the subject 1972: The Series That Changed Hockey Forever. Toronto Mike'd is proudly brought to you by Great Lakes Brewery, Palma Pasta, Canna Cabana, StickerYou, Ridley Funeral Home and Patrons like you.

Cross Word
The Dancer and the Devil: Pavlova and Stalin

Cross Word

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 34:52


The most beautiful and famous ballerina of the world may have been poisoned by Stalin, the brutish dictator of the USSR.  There is an eerie line between Stalin's grim poison lab and Covid 19.  Join me in conversation with John E. O'Neill and Sarah C. Wynne coauthors of The Dancer and The Devil; Stalin. Pavlova and the Road to the Great Pandemic   published by Regnery Publishing.  A fascinating true life crime story of communist dictators and the lengths they will go to kill the opposition.  This book is an absolute must read for everyone who wants to understand the true depth of evil perpetuated by communist regimes.  Watch Anna Pavlova dance the dying swan https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LXMmx_8oshU Check out the  website the dancer and the devil here https://www.danceranddevil.com/St Michael the Archangel Pray for us

WorldAffairs
The End of Neutrality? Finland's NATO Bid

WorldAffairs

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 25:41


For the last century, Finland has walked a diplomatic tightrope between East and West. A former Russian imperial holding and Soviet target, the independent nordic nation boasts a free market economy, EU membership, and regional defense partnerships. Yet, Finland has previously stopped short of formally joining NATO, the West's major military alliance–maintaining a pragmatic policy of forced neutrality along its 800-mile border with Russia. That is, until Russia's recent invasion of Ukraine. How does a country survive the threat of Russian aggression? Ray Suarez talks with Henri Vanhanen, advisor to the Finnish National Coalition Party, about his country's recent pivot toward NATO membership–both in parliament and the polls–and what it could mean for the future of international security.  Featuring: Henri Vanhanen, foreign policy and EU advisor for the Finland National Coalition Party Ray Suarez, co-host of WorldAffairs Finland 101, by Ray Suarez Maybe you've noticed how often Finland comes up during the Ukraine coverage, and wondered why? Here's a quick little history…a thousand pages in a few seconds. For centuries, the Finns have had to thread their way, as a people, through the conflicts of other big powers in their part of the world. Ethnically and linguistically distinct…they're not their Swedish neighbors to the west or their Russian neighbors to the east…but they had to fend off both to remain themselves. For centuries Finland was fought for, or fought over, by Russians and Swedes. As the 20thcentury began, Finland was part of Czarist Russia…then the Czar abdicated and the Empire collapsed. The Finns flirted with Communism, and with monarchy, before becoming a republic with a new president in 1919. Josef Stalin wanted Finland back for the USSR. The Soviets invaded, shortly after the Nazis bulldozed Poland in 1939. The Finns fought back ferociously. They inflicted heavy casualties. The Soviets eventually recognized Finland's independence, signed a peace treaty, and permanently seized about a tenth of Finland's territory, incorporating it into the USSR. The Finns would remain independent, somewhat free of Soviet domination after the Second World War, but that freedom came at a cost. Finland gave up more territory, and population, and diplomatic freedom of movement. The country lived in a gray area between east and west during the Cold War. Its status even got a dismissive name…Finlandization, used to describe a forced neutrality, an expensive freedom.  Finland had a market economy, democratically elected governments, freedom of speech, and growing prosperity….all the while staying aloof from the expanding European Union, and certainly NATO, the western military alliance. When the Soviet Union collapsed, much as Czarist Russia did, Finland had an escape hatch… denounced its earlier treaties, joined the EU, adopted the Euro, but remained outside NATO, sharing an eight hundred mile border with the Russian Federation.

Spectator Radio
Chinese Whispers: does China want to change the international rules-based order?

Spectator Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 35:26


China is often accused of breaking international rules and norms. Just last week at Mansion House, Foreign Secretary Liz Truss said: 'Countries must play by the rules. And that includes China'. So what are its transgressions, and what are its goals for the international system? My guests and I try to answer this question in this episode through looking at China's attitude to and involvement in international organisations, past and present. Professor Rana Mitter, a historian at the University of Oxford and author of  China's Good War , points out that there's a fundamental difference in China's approach compared to, say, Russia. 'Russia perceives itself as, essentially, a country that is really at the end of its tether in terms of the international system. Whereas China still sees plenty of opportunities to grow and expand its status'. To that end, China is actually a member of dozens of international organisations, most notably – as we discuss in the episode – sitting on the United Nations Security Council, which gives it veto power on UN resolutions (though, Yu Jie, senior  research fellow at Chatham House, points out that China is most often found abstaining rather than vetoing). It wants a seat at the table,  but it also frequently accuses our existing set of international norms and rules as designed by the West. To begin with, then, China is seeking to rewrite the rules in its own favour – Jie gives the example of China's ongoing campaign to increase its voting share in the IMF, on the basis of its huge economy. 'It's not exactly overthrowing the existing international order wholesale, but choosing very carefully which parts China wants to change.' This multilateral engagement has a historical basis. Nationalist China was keen to be seen as an equal and respected partner in the international community, and Rana points out – something I'd never thought of before – that China after the second world war 'was a very very unusual sort of state… Because it was the only state, pretty much, in Asia, that was essentially sovereign… Don't forget that 1945 meant liberation for lots of European peoples, but for lots of Asian peoples – Indonesia, Vietnam, Malaya, wherever you want to name – they basically went back into European colonialism'. This (together with its then-alliance with the United States)  gave the Republic of China a front row seat in the creation of the United Nations and, before then, the League of Nations. It didn't take long for Communist China to start building links with the rest of the world, either. Mao  'had not spent decades fighting out in the caves and fields of China to simply become a plaything of Stalin', Rana points out, making its multilateral relations outside of the alliance with the USSR vitally important. After it split with Moscow, and before the rapprochement with the US, the Sixties was a time of unwanted isolationism,  ' which is well within living memory of many of the top leaders', says Rana, adding more to its present day desire to have as much sway as possible in the world, which still comes through international organisations. Finally, my guests bust the myth – often propagated by Beijing – that China had no role in the writing of today's international laws, pointing out that Chinese and other non-western thinkers played a major role in the creation of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights . What's more, do western ideas have no place in guiding and governing China? After all, Karl Marx was certainly not Chinese, and that doesn't seem to bother his Chinese Communist believers.

Chinese Whispers
Does China want to change the international rules-based order?

Chinese Whispers

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 35:26


China is often accused of breaking international rules and norms. Just last week at Mansion House, Foreign Secretary Liz Truss said: 'Countries must play by the rules. And that includes China'. So what are its transgressions, and what are its goals for the international system? My guests and I try to answer this question in this episode through looking at China's attitude to and involvement in international organisations, past and present. Professor Rana Mitter, a historian at the University of Oxford and author of  China's Good War , points out that there's a fundamental difference in China's approach compared to, say, Russia. 'Russia perceives itself as, essentially, a country that is really at the end of its tether in terms of the international system. Whereas China still sees plenty of opportunities to grow and expand its status'. To that end, China is actually a member of dozens of international organisations, most notably – as we discuss in the episode – sitting on the United Nations Security Council, which gives it veto power on UN resolutions (though, Yu Jie, senior  research fellow at Chatham House, points out that China is most often found abstaining rather than vetoing). It wants a seat at the table,  but it also frequently accuses our existing set of international norms and rules as designed by the West. To begin with, then, China is seeking to rewrite the rules in its own favour – Jie gives the example of China's ongoing campaign to increase its voting share in the IMF, on the basis of its huge economy. 'It's not exactly overthrowing the existing international order wholesale, but choosing very carefully which parts China wants to change.' This multilateral engagement has a historical basis. Nationalist China was keen to be seen as an equal and respected partner in the international community, and Rana points out – something I'd never thought of before – that China after the second world war 'was a very very unusual sort of state… Because it was the only state, pretty much, in Asia, that was essentially sovereign… Don't forget that 1945 meant liberation for lots of European peoples, but for lots of Asian peoples – Indonesia, Vietnam, Malaya, wherever you want to name – they basically went back into European colonialism'. This (together with its then-alliance with the United States)  gave the Republic of China a front row seat in the creation of the United Nations and, before then, the League of Nations. It didn't take long for Communist China to start building links with the rest of the world, either. Mao  'had not spent decades fighting out in the caves and fields of China to simply become a plaything of Stalin', Rana points out, making its multilateral relations outside of the alliance with the USSR vitally important. After it split with Moscow, and before the rapprochement with the US, the Sixties was a time of unwanted isolationism,  ' which is well within living memory of many of the top leaders', says Rana, adding more to its present day desire to have as much sway as possible in the world, which still comes through international organisations. Finally, my guests bust the myth – often propagated by Beijing – that China had no role in the writing of today's international laws, pointing out that Chinese and other non-western thinkers played a major role in the creation of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights . What's more, do western ideas have no place in guiding and governing China? After all, Karl Marx was certainly not Chinese, and that doesn't seem to bother his Chinese Communist believers.

Warfare
Was WW2 Stalin's War?

Warfare

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 30:47


Stalin, the 'Man of Steel' and supreme ruler of the Soviet Union for a quarter of a century, is readily associated with his ruthless regime inside the USSR, and with his fierce opposition to Western Europe and the United States during the Cold War. Commonly, however, this is set aside for narratives of the Second World War, from which he emerged victorious with his Western Allies. Sean McMeekin has been taking a closer look at this. Was Stalin partially to blame for the beginning of the Second World War? And did the USSR emerge in a better position than both its opposition and its allies?As the author of Stalin's War, historian and author Sean tells James more about Stalin, from his ruthless creation of an empire to the ramifications of his regime during World War 2.For more Warfare content, subscribe to our Warfare newsletter here. If you'd like to learn even more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad-free podcasts, and audiobooks at History Hit - subscribe today! To download, go to Android or Apple store. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Around The Empire
Ep 257 Checkered Relations of U.S. and Russia Through History feat Peter Kuznick

Around The Empire

Play Episode Listen Later May 1, 2022 58:28


Guest: Peter Kuznick. We talk about the checkered history of relations between the United States and Russia (and the USSR). We talk about the book “The Untold History of the United States” including a second edition with some new chapters on more recent history. In a bonus question we talk about possible Russian revanchism and whether the Baltic states and other former USSR states in the region are now in danger if Russia begins to feel threatened by NATO activity in those states and in the context of the current invasion of Ukraine. Peter Kuznick is an author, historian and the Professor of History and Director of the Nuclear Studies Institute at American University. He was active in the Civil Rights and anti-Vietnam War movements and remains active in antiwar and nuclear abolition efforts. He regularly provides commentary for all the major U.S. and international media and has begun his fourth term as Organization of American Historians Distinguished Lecturer. FIND Peter Kuznick on the American University website, look for the updated version his book with Oliver Stone: The Untold History of the United States (new 2019 edition) and watch their documentary series which is available on multiple streaming services.  Around the Empire aroundtheempire.com is listener supported, independent media. SUBSCRIBE/FOLLOW on Rokfin rokfin.com/aroundtheempire, Patreon patreon.com/aroundtheempire, Paypal paypal.me/aroundtheempirepod, YouTube youtube.com/aroundtheempire, Spotify, iTunes, iHeart, Google Podcasts FOLLOW @aroundtheempire and @joanneleon.  Join us on TELEGRAM https://t.me/AroundtheEmpire Find everything on http://aroundtheempire.com  and linktr.ee/aroundtheempire

Awakening
#154 STAN BOGDANOV - "PUTIN'S INFLATION WORLDWIDE" In the Eyes Of a Russian

Awakening

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 30, 2022 77:04


I have already shared an episode about a Ukraine family that were forced to move to Poland. Next week I will be interviewing an American that was on the Polish Ukraine border and also in Ukraine helping. My aim to is to get all sides of the conflict and let you decide what is true. I am also getting Stan back so let me know if you have questions for either guests. I have Russian and Ukraine friends so will not be pushing any propaganda like the main media. Freedom International Livestream On April 21, 2022 Thursday Guest: Stan Bogdanov Topic: "Putin's inflation worldwide" in the eyes of a Russian. Bio: Born in USSR in 1972, educated in strategic management Former translator who worked with quite a few VIP's, IT specialist for over 20 years, Happily married on a lady who lived for over 30 years in Crimea (both in Soviet times and under Ukrainian rule) What we Discussed: - The Story from a Russian side - French Elections - It's a Special Operation and not War - The USSR education system - Soviet Referendum about Ukraine - Singing his favourite song - Ukraine destroying Donesk area - The USA and Sanctions - True Freedom - Mutual Respect and more Interview Panel Grace Asagra, RN MA Podcast: Quantum Nurse: Out of the Rabbit Hole from Stress www.quantumnurse.life https://www.bitchute.com/channel/nDjE6Ciyg0ED/ Hartmut Schumacher Podcast: GO YOUR OWN PATH https://anchor.fm/hartmut-schumacher-path Roy Coughlan Podcast: AWAKENING https://www.awakeningpodcast.org/ ------------------------------------------------------------- More about the Awakening Podcast: All Episodes can be found at www.awakeningpodcast.org All Social Media + Donations link https://bio.link/podcaster Our Facebook Group can be found at https://www.facebook.com/royawakening

RNZ: Saturday Morning
James Birch: bringing the Bacon to Moscow

RNZ: Saturday Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 27:10


English curator and art dealer James Birch is arguably best known for his innovative ways of championing British art - including exhibiting the works of figurative painter Francis Bacon in Moscow in the late 1980s, when Russia was part of the USSR. Birch's new book Bacon In Moscow tells the story of his audacious effort to bring Bacon's raw, unsettling works to more than 400,000 Soviet citizens.

So To Speak w/ Jared Howe
S o T o S p e a k | Ep. 879 | The Great Reset Will Continue Until Morale Improves

So To Speak w/ Jared Howe

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 57:14


One of theorized means by which a "Great Reset" might be accelerated is a global food shortage wrought by supply interruptions in Ukraine and Russia. It is often claimed by Putin's ball fanning sycophants that his "limited military action" / attempted genocide of ethnic Ukrainians is ACKCHUALLY a double middle finger to the globalists and the Great Reset, but it remains unclear how supply interruptions in fuel and food over a tapestry of dead whites and disappearing borders is meaningfully distinct from what the woke left has in mind for the West. A common tactic among such subversives is the appeal to tactical continuity between the USSR and the Russian Federation. In one moment, there is no such continuity and the Russian Federation is a totally independent entity, free of all Judeo-Bolshevik influence. In the next, all former Soviet Republics are the rightful property of the Russian Federation because the USSR never really fell -- Nazis only made you THINK it did. This is EPISODE 879 of So to Speak w/ Jared Howe!

Man Overseas Podcast
Alla Bondarenko—Putin's War from a Russian Gal with Ukrainian Relatives' Perspective

Man Overseas Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 124:22


My guest is Alla Bondarenko. She's an art historian and gemologist from St. Petersburg, Russia. She works remotely for a Russian company in Playa Del Carmen, Mexico. Her two passions are psychology & travel.Lucky for us, I'm not interested in gemology, so we mostly discuss travel & psychology. No applause please—it's my job to ensure each episode is worth listening to. But this one, especially, you'll want to copy the link and share with friend(s).Why?Because Alla is the smart & opinionated friend, who, if you got her in a room to "pick her brain" (like many people say they want with you over coffee sometime—but you never hear from again), you'd be like: "Holy moley—this girl's been holding out on me."She doesn't volunteer what she knows, but with a little prodding, you realize the wealth of information in her noggin. In Texas, we'd say, "Look at the big 'ol brain on Alla."Enter Man O. Perhaps the brightest Christmas light on the tree—at least during the USSR years when Christmas was largely erased from the calendar thanks to anti-religious policies during the Soviet Union years. But we're back! Notice the picture at the bottom of the show notes.For this episode, I reserved a private room in a co-working space. And the two of us dive-deep into:Alla growing up in RussiaRussia-Ukraine conflictmasculinity / femininityfake Covid vaccine cardsthe years following Soviet Union's implosionAlla's opinion of PutinFor those of you with no patience—you're either a bad doctor or lack self-regulation—at around 30:00 minutes in you'll hear a unique opinion of the Russia-Ukraine conflict.Or maybe you have a 27-minute commute tomorrow morning and want to hear a fearless Russian's take on Putin that'll fire you up for the day. If so, you've come to the right place.You can catch the rest of this podcast episode on your way home, on a walk, or at the gym. Aren't podcasts the greatest invention since drip coffee? You can listen anytime, anywhere.When I start asking Alla about the first time she'd heard about "the conflict," she says she didn't believe it at first. When friends told her the news—she thought she was hearing the product of mass-media manipulation. It took several days for her to finally believe it was in fact true.We also talk about her troubles working remotely as a result of the Russia-Ukraine conflict. For example, since Visa, Mastercard, and all other money-transferring services are now blocked for Russians like her, she says she must be paid in a Russian account—but then she immediately turns her rubles into cryptocurrency.Since the war began in February 2022, she says the exchange rate of Russian rubles (RUB) has plummeted. Right now, she's taking a 20% pay cut at work. But for many weeks—immediately following the conflict—she suffered what amounted to a 50% pay cut, almost overnight.We also share our thoughts on topics such as: travel, dating, meditation, and much more.Having Alla on the podcast was my biggest "score" of '22. Suffice it to say, you'll learn something new. You'll also nearly guaranteed to hear an opinion you haven't heard before.She's incredibly bright, well-read and possesses that singular trait I value most in a podcast guest—she speaks candidly & without reservation.

Arthro-Pod
Arthro-Pod EP 112: Meet Dr. Val Korneyev, Ukrainian Entomologist

Arthro-Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022


In this episode, Michael and Jonathan speak with Dr. Val Korneyev, professor of entomology and head of the Entomology Department at the Schmalhausen Institute of Zoology in Kyiv, Ukraine. Topics discussed include his work with tephritoid fruit flies, the 6 million specimen collection at the institute, and evacuating important type specimens from Kyiv to Berlin, Germany during the 2022 Russian invasion of Ukraine. Other anecdotes include coming of age as a scientist in the USSR during the 1980's and dealing with the KGB, the view of Ukrainian science to some in Western Europe and the Americas, as well as the future of Ukrainian entomology after the war. Viktor Baranov (left, guest in Episode 108) and Valery Korneyev (right). Photos courtesy of Viktor Baranov via Twitter. Bags containing boxes of type specimens being evacuated from Kyiv to Berlin during the Russian invasion of Ukraine. Photos courtesy of Viktor Baranov via Twitter.If you want to learn more about Val's scholarly work, here are his Google Scholar profile and Research Gate profile, as well as presentations he's given on Old World Pyrgotidae and “Parasitic Fruit Flies”: Pyrgotidae, Ctenostylidae, Tachiniscidae.Questions? Comments? Follow the show on Twitter @Arthro_PodshowFollow the hosts on Twitter @bugmanjon, @JodyBugsmeUNL, and @MSkvarla36Get the show through Apple Podcast, Stitcher, Spotify, or your favorite podcatching app!If you can spare a moment, we appreciate when you subscribe to the show on those apps or when you take time to leave a review!Subscribe to our feed on Feedburner!  This episode is freely available on archive.org and is licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/Beginning/ending theme: "There It Is" by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 

Keith Knight - Don't Tread on Anyone
The War for Polish Independence That Ended With Poland Under USSR Control. Mark Weber & Keith Knight

Keith Knight - Don't Tread on Anyone

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 72:52


Stalin's War: A New History of World War II by Sean McMeekin: https://www.amazon.com/dp/1541672798/ref=cm_sw_r_tw_dp_YNQJ0P1H2X6N0EVPJWRK Mark Weber is the Director of the Institute for Historical Review. The Institute for Historical Review is an independent educational center and publisher that works to promote peace, understanding and justice through greater public awareness of the past, and especially socially-politically relevant aspects of modern history. We strive in particular to increase understanding of the causes, nature and consequences of war and conflict. We defend freedom of speech and freedom of historical inquiry. Website: https://ihr.org/ ----------------------------------------- If you find value in the content, please consider donating to my PayPal KeithKnight590@gmail.com or Venmo: @Keith-Knight-34 LBRY: https://lbry.tv/@KeithKnightDontTreadOnAnyone:b BitChute: KeithKnightDontTreadOnAnyone https://www.bitchute.com/channel/keithknightdonttreadonanyone/ Minds: https://www.minds.com/KeithKnightDontTreadOnAnyone/ MeWe: mewe.com/i/keithknight25 Flote: https://flote.app/VoluntaryistKeith Gab: https://gab.com/Voluntarykeith Twitter: @an_capitalist The Libertarian Institute: https://libertarianinstitute.org/dont-tread-on-anyone/ One Great Work Network: https://www.onegreatworknetwork.com/keith-knight

Now I've Heard Everything
Sergei Khrushchev

Now I've Heard Everything

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 26:34


At the very height of the Cold War, in the late 1950s and early ‘60s, one of the most vilified man in the world – at least in the U.S. – was Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev, For 11 years the USSR was led by this brash, arrogant, often angry man. You may have heard that he wants. Famously said the Soviet Union would “bury” the United States. That, however, was a mistranslation, and it was not something Khrushchev ever actually said. Khrushchev's second son, Sergei, was in his 20s, watching closely as his father guided the USSR. Sergei eventually became a highly educated, and well-respected, engineer in the Soviet Union. But finally, in 1991 -- the same year the Soviet Union crumbled apart -- Sergei Khrushchev emigrated to the United States, and became a naturalized US citizen in 1999.

Explaining History (explaininghistory) (explaininghistory)

This is the first of many podcasts exploring the writing of historian Sean McMeekin in his revisionist exploration of the role of the USSR in World War Two. In this episode we examine how conventional ideas about Stalin's intentions, preparedness and his outlook regarding the prospects of the allied powers against Germany by 1941 need to be revised. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information. Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/explaininghistory.

Scott Horton Show - Just the Interviews
4/22/22 Ryan McMaken on Capitalism and Peace

Scott Horton Show - Just the Interviews

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 32:13


Scott talks with Ryan McMaken about free markets and free trade. They begin with a discussion about the role of the Mises Institute in the push for sound money. Scott then asks McMaken about the nuances of debating capitalism vs. socialism while living under a mixed economy. They then discuss the changing role of the United States in the world. McMaken does believe a “rules-based international order” existed after the fall of the USSR. But that the U.S. destroyed it by invading Iraq in 2003. McMaken argues that the best path forward is a commitment to the classical liberal ideals of free markets at home and nonintervention abroad.  Discussed on the show: Scott's Kennedy Appearance  Mises.org Creature from Jekyll Island by G. Edward Griffin “The "Rules-Based International Order" Is Dead. Washington Killed It” (Mises Wire) Ryan McMaken is a senior editor at the Mises Institute. He has degrees in economics and political science from the University of Colorado, and was the economist for the Colorado Division of Housing from 2009 to 2014. He is the author of Commie Cowboys: The Bourgeoisie and the Nation-State in the Western Genre. This episode of the Scott Horton Show is sponsored by: The War State and Why The Vietnam War?, by Mike Swanson; Tom Woods' Liberty Classroom; ExpandDesigns.com/Scott; EasyShip; Free Range Feeder; Thc Hemp Spot; Green Mill Supercritical; Bug-A-Salt and Listen and Think Audio. Shop Libertarian Institute merch or donate to the show through Patreon, PayPal or Bitcoin: 1DZBZNJrxUhQhEzgDh7k8JXHXRjYu5tZiG. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Spirit, Purpose & Energy
Ep. 343: Understanding Cellular Integrity with Dr. Sveta Silverman

Spirit, Purpose & Energy

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 46:28


Dr. Silverman, former pediatric surgeon from USSR and Canadian board certified breast pathologist. In 2004, after losing mother to multiple myeloma, Dr. Silverman is on a mission to learn and teach cellular health and dis-ease. She teachers the power of nutrient dense foods, power of thoughts positivity and drive to happiness, power of exercise, essential supplementation and cellular upregulation. The goal of her life is to inspire people to take charge of their lives, health and ultimately happiness.  http://hugswithsveta.com   Her YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCy5XNT83el4qOsTn1aq8SyQ   JJ Flizanes is an Empowerment Strategist and the host of several podcasts including People's Choice Awards nominee Spirit, Purpose & Energy. She is the Director of Invisible Fitness, a best-selling author of Fit 2 Love: How to Get Physically, Emotionally, and Spiritually Fit to Attract the Love of Your Life and The Invisible Fitness Formula: 5 Secrets to Release Weight and End Body Shame. Named Best Personal Trainer in Los Angeles for 2007 by Elite Traveler Magazine, JJ has been featured in many national magazines, including Shape, Fitness, and Women's Health as well as appeared on NBC, CBS, Fox, the CW and KTLA. Grab a free copy of the Invisible Fitness Formula at http://jjflizanes.com/book