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Designation for types of settlement as administrative territorial entities

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Street Cop Podcast
Refusing Police Commands

Street Cop Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 25:44


In this archive episode, Dennis answers questions on case laws regarding refusal to follow police commands. Recorded on 04/19/2018. State v Doss 2002 - https://law.justia.com/cases/new-jersey/appellate-division-published/1992/254-n-j-super-122-1.html?fbclid=IwAR3VADQXd2nKrzEPBtRk3MOniOpmwiYw--JK3I7zyqQ43e6qJmT1Y_GRJRs (https://law.justia.com/.../1992/254-n-j-super-122-1.html) In the present case, once the totality of the circumstances observed by the police justifiably aroused an "articulable suspicion" which warranted their stopping and interrogating defendant, he was legally obligated to halt in response to their shouted orders to stop and, subject to his privilege against self-incrimination, he had a duty to answer their inquiries.[4] As the Court stated in State v. Lashinsky, 81 N.J. 1, 11, 404 A.2d 1121 (1979), "where an officer's instructions are obviously reasonable, *130 in furtherance of his duties, an individual toward whom such instructions are directed has a correlative duty to obey them." See also State v. Taylor, 121 N.J. Super. 395, 297 A.2d 216 (Cty.Dist.Ct. 1972). When defendant continued his flight from the pursuing police officers despite their shouted orders to halt, his refusal to obey their orders, together with all of the other circumstances of the case, gave the police reasonable cause to believe that he had committed or was then committing a criminal offense. See Kolender v. Lawson, supra, 461 U.S. at 366 n. 4, 103 S. Ct. at 1863 n. 4, 75 L. Ed. 2d at 915 n. 4 (Brennan, J., concurring) ("[R]eactions [by individuals to a properly limited Terry encounter], such as flight, may often provide the necessary information, in addition to that the officers already possess, to constitute probable cause."); LaFave, supra, § 9.2(d) at 369 (quoting Model Code of Pre-Arraignment Procedure at 284-85 (1975)). Consequently, when Detective Parks and the other policeman caught up with defendant and handcuffed him when he tripped and fell, they had probable cause to effect his arrest. The concurrent seizure and search of the cap which he held crumpled up in his hand, revealing the cocaine which it contained, was lawful because it was incident to a lawful arrest. See State v. McNair, 60 N.J. 8, 285 A.2d 553 (1972). 2C:29-1 condemns "interference"; it states, "A person commits an offense if he purposely ... prevents or attempts to prevent a public servant from lawfully performing an official function by means of ... physical interference or obstacle...." (Emphasis added.) The implication of Lashinsky is that refusing to obey the order of a policeman constitutes "interference" within the meaning of N.J.S.A. 2C:29-1. See also State v. Manning, 146 N.J. Super. 589, 370 A.2d 499 (App.Div. 1977) (An automobile passenger's refusal to comply with a policeman's order to return to his car "interfere[d]" within the meaning of N.J.S.A. 2A:170-29; cf. Township of East Brunswick v. Malfitano, 108 N.J. Super. 244, 260 A.2d 862 (App.Div. 1970); State v. Taylor, 38 N.J. Super. 6, 118 A.2d 36 (App.Div. 1955)). The second sentence of N.J.S.A. 2C:29-1 says, "This section does not apply to flight by a person charged with crime, refusal to submit to arrest, failure to perform a legal duty other than an official duty, or any other means of avoiding compliance with law without affirmative interference with governmental functions." That sentence does not exclude defendant Doss from its purview. He had not been charged with a crime although he was suspected of one. He had not refused to submit to an arrest; he was seeking to evade a stop short of an arrest. See State v. Perlstein, 206 N.J. Super. 246, 502 A.2d 81 (App.Div. 1985), where this court held that a driver who refused to show her driving credentials to a policeman and who moved her car contrary to his directions was guilty of "attempt[ing] to prevent a public servant from lawfully performing an official function by means of... physical interference" in violation of N.J.S.A....

Hammer + Nigel Show Podcast
Pike Township Had E-Learning Today

Hammer + Nigel Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 12:39


Pike Township had E-Learning today. Lots of layers here. Early this morning, The school system announced via social media post that Friday will be a remote learning day. MSD of Pike Township said they are “unable to provide bus service for students today.” See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Trip Records Sets
Techno: Township Rebellion @ Fusion Festival, Germany [2021-09-19][RESHARED]

Trip Records Sets

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 60:56


TRS 3892 -- // Township Rebellion // ------------------------------------------------ All uploads on this channel are for promotional purposes only! The music has been converted before uploading to prevent ripping and to protect the artist(s) and label(s). If you don't want your content here (that goes for audio or images) please contact me immediately via email: set@trip-records.com and I WILL REMOVE THE EPISODE OR ARTWORK IMMEDIATELY! ------------------------------------------------ ► Are You a Dj? Send Your Video or Dj Set: http://www.trip-records.com/Sets/index.html  ► Subscribe to Trip Records Sets: http://www.youtube.com/c/TripRecordsSets  ------------------------------------------------ Send Your Demo, Trip Records is looking for you ! (Send us a private Soundcloud link) ► demo@trip-records.com ----------------------------------------------- Link Podcast ► https://podcasts.apple.com/it/podcast/trip-records-sets/id1176106514  Unique Podcast Without Service Interruptions

ESP Media Podcasts
Columbia Township - Great Things Are Happening with John Servizzi Podcast

ESP Media Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 24:00


Columbia Township - Great Things Are Happening with John Servizzi Podcast

The Remote Real Estate Investor
Here‘s what you need to know about investing in Pittsburgh PA

The Remote Real Estate Investor

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 36:05


Max Feinberg is a Roofstock Certified Agent out in Pittsburgh PA, a fellow investor and a wealth of knowledge about his local market.  In this episode, Max tells us about the homes in Pittsburgh, the vintage, neighborhoods, the rent to purchase-price ratio, common issues that come up on inspection reports, and details that only a local would know. Listen to this episode to learn if Pittsburgh is a good market for your strategy.   --- Transcript Before we jump into the episode, here's a quick disclaimer about our content. The Remote Real Estate Investor podcast is for informational purposes only, and is not intended as investment advice. The views, opinions and strategies of both the hosts and the guests are their own and should not be considered as guidance from Roofstock. Make sure to always run your own numbers, make your own independent decisions and seek investment advice from licensed professionals.   Mark: Welcome to The Remote Real Estate Investor. My name is Mark Woodling. Michael Albaum and I are joined today by Max Feinberg, who's from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. So he's one of our certified agents and is going to give us a quick market breakdown and tips and tricks that we need to know about investing in Pittsburgh. So let's jump into it.   Max: Thanks for having me.   Michael: No, We're really excited to have you on So You are our certified agent out in Pittsburgh, right?   Max: That's correct. Yep. Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.   Michael: And are you born? Are you a born and bred Pittsburghean? Is that is that the proper term?   Max: Pittsburgher, Yeah, I am.   Michael: Much better.   Max: We could go with Pittsburghean. I was born and raised in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. I left when I was 18 years old. I lived in Arizona for about seven years. And I started my real estate career out there. But I'm back home in Pittsburgh and really enjoying working in real estate here.   Michael: Where in Arizona where you?   Max: I wasn in well, I went to Arizona State University. So I was in Tempe, Scottsdale Phoenix. started my career in Scottsdale. Yeah.   Michael: A lot less snow out in Tempe right?   Max: Yeah, yeah, well, weather was a little bit better. But it's not how I'll tell you that much.   Michael: Yeah I totally can appreciate that. So max curious to know, how did you go from Arizona real estate back to Pittsburgh real estate was it just, you know, the home homesickness or you knew that market better, you'd read that market better?   Max: It's a combination of a few things, those those are definitely part of it. Arizona is one of the more competitive real estate markets in the whole country. I'm not going to get the number exactly right. But I remember they had some crazy number of agents in the state of Arizona over 40,000 or something like that. And so just inherently not being from there. And not having that sphere of influence and network made it hard for someone who was just starting in the real estate industry to get you know, some traction.   When you combine that with not really knowing the area, like you just mentioned, and being a little bit homesick. All those things brought me back to Pittsburgh.   Michael: Fantastic. And I'm curious what what's been the biggest change in Pittsburgh, since you grew up there to now what have you seen?   Max: the biggest one has probably been, you know, some of the factors that are making up the economic drivers here in Pittsburgh, the increase in tech jobs, health care, education, all of those things. And then what they've done to the real estate market, some of the crazy amount of appreciation we've seen in certain areas, and now starting to spill over into these other areas. And we're seeing a lot of development. When I when I was younger, we didn't have we didn't have as much of that the Pittsburgh was still coming off that steel town reputation. And that's really changed a lot over the last 2025 years.   Michael: Interesting. So when people say when people hear the word Pittsburgh now, what should they think of?   Max: They should think of technology, healthcare education? I know it doesn't. Well, you know, you still think of the Pittsburgh Steelers, you think of steel mills and things like that. And I think there's only one steel mill left in the whole city, you know, those have been gone for a long, long time now. So you know, the main economic drivers, as I mentioned before, I've totally changed and we've become a really savvy city. That's more cutting edge.   Michael: Interesting. That's really exciting to hear.   Max: Yeah.   Michael: So as someone that's not familiar with Pittsburgh, asking for a friend, talk to me, like I'm a brand new movie, and give us kind of a high level walkthrough, if you will. Okay, if I'm looking at a Google map of Pittsburgh, how should I be thinking about some of the different sections, sub markets areas, if I'm an investor?   Max: Yeah, it's funny you say that, because I always tell clients I'm working with looking at a map of Pittsburgh is really not helpful at all. For a few reasons. One, we have over 90 different cities that comprise of a fairly small, big citiy, you know small major market. So we have a lot of small little neighborhoods, which are all really different.   And you know, outside of the city of Pittsburgh, there's another 150 or so small neighborhood. So when you combine that with really the topography of the area, looking at it to the map, as an investor really doesn't help you too much. You know,   Michael: Great to know   Max: A town that can be right next to another town on a map would be one place would be an A plus type community with great schools. And you look at a map and you say, well, these prices are lower right next door, why can't we invest in this area? Well, you know, it's across a river and there's a mountain there and you know, it looks like it's next to it on a 2d map. It's really not the case. So it's definitely be helpful to be familiar with the area. And that's where I could come in, or I've had a lot of clients come, you know, fly into Pittsburgh and drive around and really learn a lot from just doing that.   Michael: What you just said, I think is so valuable for so many investors, because I think so often, especially remote investors will take our local knowledge and apply it elsewhere. And to your point, I mean, you can't do that. You can't do that ever, and especially not in Pittsburgh. So this is great to know. Okay, so then talk to us about some of the markets, sub markets, neighborhoods that you are seeing, really right for investors, where folks are doing quite well.   Max: Yeah, you know, it's there's a few different types of investments that could work here in Pittsburgh, as I'm sure there are other areas and with there being so many different communities. I would say there's really not one answer to that, right. There's there's communities, such as Lawrenceville, or Shadyside, or East Liberty, where we've seen a lot of these companies like Google or Facebook, or Uber moved from Silicon Valley and open offices here. And so those are more appreciation plays, right? Or maybe Airbnb or a property like that works in these areas. But when we're looking at analyzing them for cap rate, or cash on cash, the prices are a little too high. So where we see a lot of success with investors in Pittsburgh is some of these areas that are a little more obscure, a little lesser known that I would call more B to C plus type areas. And we have a lot of them. There's no shortage of them. Like I said, there's, you know, 100 of them.   Michael: Okay, so awesome. And kind of digging into the numbers a little bit on those more appreciation plays. Can you give us an idea of just a ballpark idea of what a 3-2 would cost and what it would rent for versus some of those more cashflow heavy markets?   Max: Yeah, yeah, I mean, in Lawrenceville, and areas like that. Some areas that are popular with nightlife would be like the South Side Mount Washington, Lawrenceville, these types of places are three twos probably going to be the lower end would be 250, you're probably going to be in the 350 to 400 range for something that doesn't really need any work. And the rents are going to be in the mid 2000s. So on the surface, if we do, you know, napkin math, right back in the napkin math, that doesn't really meet that 1% rule that we look at, to further analyze a property. But right, you know, you are getting appreciation you are in areas where you know, it's probably a better tenant base that, you know, wants to be in those areas for the nightlife and things like that. So…   Michael: Yeah, totally random question. Where do you think the term back of the napkin came from? Is it because there's like, like food on the front of the napkin?   Max: Probably a couple guys sit in like a, you know, a pub in England or something. Maybe just doing some math on the back of a napkin? I'm not sure.   Michael: No one ever says some front of the napkin math, it's always back of the napkin.   Mark: So Max, I got a quick question. What's the sweet spot that you're finding right now between, you know, the cash flow markets and the appreciation markets? Where Where do you feel like the opportunity is that most investors are really gearing towards in it's competitive, but not overly competitive?   Max: Yeah, so for Pittsburgh, there's, there's a few different answers to that, if you're looking for single family homes in those B to C plus type areas, we're going to be looking at prices that are in the low to mid one hundreds, just because that's where the rents are going to match up, and we're going to be near that 1% rule or maybe a little over it. Now, like most cities, if you get a little further away from town, or you go to some areas that are a little less desirable, we may be able to find single family homes where the numbers look a lot better. And there's inherent risk involved with that as well, the buildings are a little rougher, you may have more tenant turnover and issues in that regard. But that's generally where we're going to be for a three bedroom, one or two bath home, duplexes and triplexes are going to be probably in the mid one hundreds to low to hundreds. At this point, which has really gone up, you know, I'm sure like a lot of other cities in the past two years, from, you know, the low to mid one hundreds to high one hundreds, each thing's probably gone up about 30,000. So, you know, probably about 10 to 15% appreciation.   But that's where we're going to see the numbers. I like to steer clients towards duplexes and triplexes if they're looking for cash flow. You know, we know that there's probably more turnover on multi units than there are single family units. But cash flows generally going to be a little bit better around here.   Michael: Max you bring up such a great point. And it's something that I talked to members in the academy all the time about, how do you have the conversation around someone who says, well, Max, here's this $120,000 house that rents for 1200 bucks, let's say, but over here, here's this $180,000 duplex that rents for two grand gross, and you have to explain to them that those tenants might be very different. We have to get beyond the gross numbers. I mean, how do you have that conversation?   Max: Right? Yeah, well, that's tenant turnover is just part of it. I mean, here in Pittsburgh, as I'm sure we'll touch on In a little bit here, some of these buildings are older, and utilities are separated. In some instances, they're not separated. In some instances, the owner may be responsible for paying water and electric, the tenant pays gas. Whereas a single family home generally the tenants responsible for paying all the utilities.   But when you dive into the numbers a little bit more, may actually make those single family homes more attractive than they first appeared. But yeah, no tenant turnovers part of it. Utilities being split as part of it, just property maintenance is part of it. I mean, you've got two kitchens, to bathrooms, if not more, probably bigger buildings. So there's a lot of factors while the cash flow may be a little bit better, your expenses maybe a little bit more as well.   Michael: That's such a good point to keep in mind. So you, you mentioned it, and I would love to come back to it. So the age of the housing stock in Pittsburgh, talk to us about what that looks like. Is it new builds? Is it 200 years old, 100 year old, you know, what, what is the age of some of these properties that are good cash flow investments look like?   Max: Yeah, we don't really have a whole lot that's over 130 years old. And most of the stuff that's going to be that age is going to be really close to the city center. So some of the neighbors like the north side, South Side, you look at the date, those were built in those were in the late 1800s. But oftentimes, that scares people without even really looking into it. I mean, these places were built to last a little bit different than they are nowadays.     And then we have new builds, I was just at a friend's house yesterday, who has a townhome that was built less than a year ago, he's already got plumbing issues. So you know, sometimes sometimes age isn't a bad thing. But there are issues that are associated with having buildings that are 100 years old or so which is where I would say a lot of these properties are going to sit about 100 years old 80 to 100.   Michael: And how do you determine or decipher? I mean, so I would give an example, I have a four Plex that was built in like 1890. But I took it down to the studs, brand new, everything brand new, you know, roof, electrical, plumbing, whatever, and so on the insurance that says your construction 2019. So how do you get how do you? How do you coach people? How do you walk people through? Yeah, I know, it says it was built in 1900. But it's been rehabbed. So for you, as the owner, it's effective your construction is 2020, or whatever.   Max: I tell people that all the time, I say, you know, if this building was built in 1880, there's very few things in this building that are still from 1880, one of them may be the foundation, which I know is a big is a big issue for a lot of people. But again, these foundations oftentimes are 18 to 24 inches thick, and they're not going anywhere. But as you touched on the plumbing, electrical roof, all this stuff's probably within 50 years old. So you know, we go in there, we do inspections, and we figure out the age of some of these mechanicals, and we're better able to figure out what we should be estimating for maintenance capex and things like that.   Michael: I love it. And so you touched on foundations, and there may be some damage to those foundations. What are some other common issues that you see in the Pittsburgh market that maybe are custom to the Pittsburgh market that might scare other investors away? Like for one we had, were chatting with an agent, they have termites everywhere, they have termites. So if you see termites is not a big deal. what's what's kind of unique to Pittsburgh?   Max: Termites is one of them, but it's not crazy. Common around here. termites are prevalent, though, but a lot of the issues that we see here that I've noticed have caused pause for some investors from out of state are related to the foundations, and then kind of our pretty awful weather. So you know, these foundations that are from 1880 1890, they didn't use basements back then the same way we do. And they design these houses, with foundations that are oftentimes fairly porous. And then when you combine that with the amount of rain that we get here, we see issues like mold, we see issues like dampness and basements. And then, you know, some settling and foundation shifting that's associated with age and moisture.   These issues are pretty common around here and definitely can be caused for large concern, but oftentimes are not. And, you know, I talked to Mark about this a few weeks ago, I work with one guy who says mold is gold, because it scares people away. But it's really easy and common. It's an easy thing to fix. And it's so common, but you know, when you deal with people from Arizona, for example, they hear the word mold and they just shut down right?   So that was those would be a couple things. A couple other common issues around here have to do with the age of buildings and cause people to hesitate or odd layouts. We have sometimes these duplexes or triplexes that were single family homes maybe 100 years ago, and they'd be repurposed over the last 100 years. They've got really bizarre layouts and they're not your traditional uptown or side by side duplex. We've got very small bedrooms that really should be closets, attics that are finished, basement bedrooms, things like that, that if you trace the lineage of a property back, you'll find that every 20 or 30 years or so something was done and changed it a little bit so those are a few of the things and that just other issues that are associated with older buildings which we kind of already touched on.   Michael: Yeah, that makes total sense.   MarkL Yeah Max I think one of the important points to the mold aspect is it's so cold up there that you know mold really thrives on heat right and that's where a lot of water just kind of you know, it turns in the mold once the heat gets to it but out there the freeze you know, really takes care of it so you're not going through these vicious mold cycles out there. It's really just maybe more seasonal if anything, right?   Max: Yeah, I would say it's not as common in the winter but these basements again, they a lot of them just let a lot of water in and if you're not running a dehumidifier or you know there's a lot of people that do external French drains and things like that there's ways to combat these once you remediate the actual mold issue.   Michael: That's great.   Mark: Mold is gold well we'll save that only for the more high level investors out there that really can coined that phrase I think that's good for anybody so it doesn't freak them out you know once they see some of those items.   Max: Right.   Michael: So max I come from a long long background in the insurance industry so I'm curious to know in Pittsburgh Do you guys have natural disasters? Do you have tornadoes, floods, hurricanes, that kind of thing?   Max: You know, it's funny you say that I it's another thing I like to talk to out of state clients about while our weather here is not notoriously great, you know, we get a lot of rain and it's fairly overcast, we actually don't have many natural disasters. We really don't have earthquakes. We have tornadoes one tornado me we every, maybe every three to five years. And you know, it touches down and it's gone. And, you know, I guess we do have some floods, because of the topography and the amount of rain. And they're, you know, you coming from insurance, I'm sure you're familiar with, we do have a lot of properties that require flood insurance. So that's something that we dive into, you know, before we commit to a property, because that can be a little pricey and can hurt hurt the numbers if that's another 1200 bucks a year or so. Right?   But the weather here, it doesn't get too hot. It's really not as cold as some places, you know, in New York, or, you know, Minnesota or Wisconsin or places like that. It's not as hot as you know, some places in the south. So it's fairly mild here, in my opinion.   Michael: You're talking to a guy from California. So the fact that snow is a part of the equation, mild is no part of that sentence.     Max: That's right. Yeah. Well, yeah, with no earthquakes here so we'll take that.   Michael: That's a big win. That's a big win. Sign me up.   Max: Right.   Michael: Okay. And so Max, I'm curious to know, or for investors to know, because I think property taxes is one of the biggest misses that investors encounter in investing remotely, they often know how, what their property taxes look like in their county or their state, but going across the country across state lines can often change things. So how do you know how people should be calculating their property taxes?   Max: Totally. That's the biggest one I've seen. Mark and I have talked about this as well. You know, a lot of times we've got buildings here that have been owned in the same family for 70-80 years. And on the surface, you look at the taxes, it's like, wow, $200,000, and it's only $950 a year in taxes. Well, that's what it is now, but it's going to change.   So that's one of the conversations I like to have with people. It varies county by county here. So Pittsburgh's in Allegheny County, and that's where most of the properties that we're going to be talking about or Roofstocks going to be publishing are going to be located in Allegheny County.   Generally, in Allegheny County, the way they reassessed these properties is approximately 80% of the new sales price. And then the millage rate in each Township, which we just discussed, there's a ton of them, varies. So I can't really give a one size fits all answer there other than you can calculate the assessed value based off your purchase price, and then go check out what the millage rate is for whatever neighborhood that property is actually in and go from there.   Once you get outside of Allegheny County, in the neighboring counties, such as Westmoreland, Butler, Beaver County, places like that, they're all calculated differently. So we could go on a one by one basis there but Allegheny County for the most part, that's how it's done.   Michael: Okay, perfect. And that's what I always share with folks too is Hey, just go call the county assessor ask how you calculate your resale property taxes. So this is super helpful. So for anybody listening, who's interested in investing in that market, go look up the millage rate for that specific area and multiply it by 80% of the purchase price.   Max: Approximately varies year over year. Sometimes it's 75. But yeah, that's a safe way of calculating it   Michael: More or less. Okay, cool. Mark, do you have some other questions for Max?   Mark: Yeah, I think it's good to know really what your expectations are because it's a two way street. You know, buyers are putting in offers on Roofstock for MLS properties, we would kick those offers over to you as a referral. And you're going to work with those buyers. But when you have that first conversation with buyers, what is it that you always emphasize or some of the common things that you say hey, before we move forward into and submit this offer. Let's make sure we have these things in a row. What What is it that you go through?   Max: Well, I'll tell you this, Roofstocks done a really good job of making sure buyers are pre qualified and ready to buy. So it's a little different for buyers I work with from Roofstock, that may be someone I've met through another means. But the biggest thing with expectations is I try to let people know that the market still pretty hot, it has slowed down a little bit, especially in the multifamily world. But if we see a property that the numbers look really, really good, a lot of other people are seeing that property, and they're running those same numbers as well. So you just got to be ready to go.   And I know a lot of people a lot of times being from out of state have a lot of questions. And some of which we've just covered, how do I calculate taxes or some of these issues? So I like to just try to have this conversation with them initially, and say, Hey, you know, here's, here's the answer to these questions. By the way, we also have a 10 to 14 day inspection period where we can make sure we're not getting into something that we shouldn't be getting into. So if a property looks really good, I just want people to understand that it's going to be gone still within 24 to 48 hours around here.   Michael: That makes total sense.   Mark: That's great. And when you submit an offer, and you hear back from let's say, a listing agent, you know, what's the typical back and forth that you have with a buyer, because I know some agents give you extra information and give you some ideas about you know, where you need to be, how do you approach that with a buyer to give them as much market Intel, just so they can really either submit that offer, say, Hey, you know what this may not be, you know, the the best offer on the table. So let's go shop for another property.   Max: A lot of times, especially with deals that are really competitive, I just tell people, even if it's not a highest and best situation, sometimes it's best to put your best foot forward and just say, Hey, this is what I'm willing to do. This is my personal, highest and best situation. And if someone else wants to do 10,000 more, or is able to offer cash, then so be it right, and this one wasn't the one that was meant to be. But that way, at least you know, you're not trying to squeeze out two or $3,000.   I try to help people understand that if you're going to look at this as a long term investment, two or $3,000 off of sales price, when you're doing a 30 year mortgage is so small, that if you think this is a property that you really want, it looks like a good deal. Let's go for it, right. And we can do our due diligence on the property and some of these other things during an inspection period, when we can still get out of it, and you can get your deposit back.   Michael: And Max to your point. I mean, even putting your best foot forward, knowing that you might still lose out on the deal allows you to potentially become that backup offer. If the first deal falls through this just happened to me…   Max: Totally,   Michael: You know, the selling agent came back and said, Oh, you know, our other buyer fell out. Are you still interested? And I see Yeah, you know, we can talk? Yeah, let's have that conversation.   Max: Yeah, we can talk about that offer. That offer might go down a little bit right?   Michael: Exactly. You gotta pay for rejecting me.   Max: That's, that's right. Yeah. But you know, that's that's happened a lot around here. And I'm glad you said that, because I think we've had a lot of appraisal issues lately. I'm not sure if this is happening in other markets. But I think appraisers, especially around here, are tasked with the difficult job of trying to cool off a hot market, right? They see these prices going up and going up. And they don't want to be the ones left holding the ball like 13 years ago, or 12 years ago. And so we've had a lot of, you know, appraisals come back low lately. And that's really open things up for what you just mentioned, hey, this person doesn't want to buy it anymore, you know, hey, is your offer still stand? So I'm glad you said that, because we've seen a lot of that here.   Michael: Interesting. And so in terms of the offer prices that you're seeing properties go under contract for, are they and keep in mind everyone listening, we're recording this end of September 2021. But are they at list price? Are they over list price? Are they under list price? Where are you seeing the off the winning offers coming coming in?   Max: With single family homes, we're still seeing them above list price pretty often. With multi families not quite as often. I feel like there's a few reasons for that, you know, obviously the first and foremost being there's less people looking to buy multifamily properties that are single family properties. But multi families are still going to be around list price. I just had a client lose out the other day we went 7000 over on $125,000 duplex, and I think the winning bid was probably about 10 or 11,000 over so that's still common.   We don't really have anything, you know, more than, you know, 10 or 20,000 over for the most part, just because you don't really go 50,000 over, you know, on a $200,000 purchase. I'm sure in places like California, you may see it more often because the initial price is higher, right? But here the percentage is, you know, never really too much more than 10% above list price.   Michael: Okay. And are you seeing people get really aggressive and creative with the terms that they're offering?   Max: Yeah, yeah, I mean a lot of people still waiting inspections and I know that's something that's hard for a lot of Roofstock clients. And I really honestly expect a lot of Roofstock clients to want to waive inspections as they've never seen the properties but sometimes you have to remember you're competing against local investors as well, who have experience and they've walked that property and they're comfortable waiving inspections, because they already know you know what's needed or what's not. So that's obviously still a big part of it.   And we're seeing, you know, lease backs to the owners, because it's hard to find properties for them to move into. So they're letting owners stay, you know, for three months for free. There's a lot of creative things going on right now.   Michael: Interesting.   Max: There's still people covering appraisal differences as well, even if you're doing a purchase with a loan, you know, you can still waive the appraisal contingency, but you're going to be responsible for covering that that gap. I've seen that more often in the last few months than I have in the past as well.   Mark: And so Max, are you when you're getting an offer submitted through Roofstock? How many times are you doing a leaseback? Like what percentage? Or what percentage? Are you waving? You know, the inspection contingencies or any of those like what's what's the common ratios that you're seeing out there?   Max: For Roofstock not as much again, the clients are usually out of state. And so they they feel more comfortable, at least having an inspection done. And so I try to help them understand other ways that we can improve the offer, you know, obviously more money is helpful, but maybe more deposit money, maybe a quicker closing, whatever it may be, there's other ways to make your offer more attractive. Maybe you just tell them, hey, I want to do an inspection. But it's going to be an as is sale, I'm either going to take it or leave it I'm not going to use this inspection to really beat you guys up and negotiate any further. I just had a Roofstck client do that this week. So leasebacks not as often. But you know, other creative strategies are pretty common.   Michael: Awesome. And, Max, when you're putting up properties onto the Roofstock select program in the Pittsburgh market, what criteria are you looking for? What is it that when you see a property screams Oh, perfect investment property candidate?   Max: Yeah, Mark and I have talked about this a lot. And I'm still trying to find, you know, what's best for the Rootstock investors? And I think the answer to that is there's investors that are looking for all different types of things. So I'm trying to get creative, and put all different types of properties on there, I've been doing a lot of properties in these Lawrenceville types areas where the initial return doesn't look great. But I found that there's Roofstock investors who are from California or Washington, and they're still looking at us. And when these are still really good numbers.   So that's I'm doing some of that a lot of the B to C plus properties where we're looking at a 1% rule. That's one of the things I'm looking for. And then I've I've been uploading some properties to Roofstock lately that are in some of the areas where the returns are going to be a little higher. And on the front end, I've really found it's important with those properties to have these conversations about potential issues. So there's there's all sorts of different criteria for what we can find in Pittsburgh.   Michael: That's great and cool to hear that Pittsburgh does really cater to to every investor type or every investor persona with the type of asset that they have that you have in the market.   Max: Absolutely.   Mark: Yeah, I have a few stats I want to throw at max and just see what he if he has any comments around these because I was just studying John Burn's real estate data, which is a great source of information. It shows that rents were up 2.7%, from 2020, basically. So over the last year, it was 2.3% in 2020, and 2019 is 3.6%. So slow and steady, I would say is always good. The existing home prices jumped. This is a median number from 173 to 192 in 2021. So over the last year is jumped up a nice percent was that clip about 20% clip, it's not too bad or 10% clip, excuse me.   Here's the number that stood out. And I would love to hear what Max has to say on this. So I'm looking at the cost of a payment and maintenance to own versus the cost of rent. And it shows that the cost of a payment with maintenance for let's call it an entry level home is $997 a month versus that same entry level home to rent is about $1416. max, are those numbers accurate? What do you see in the market?   Max: That sounds accurate to me, like I said, you know, $1400 a month in rent would be about probably $170,000. Home, depending on the area, but so that average rent sounds just like the average purchase price you just mentioned. So that sounds spot on to me. And I'm glad you brought that up the rent increase to one of the other things that we see around here a lot, which I've had conversations with a lot of Roofstock investors about is the current rents of these properties we're uploading, we have a lot of properties here that are older, have maybe been passed down through families, tired landlords, and the rents are just crazy low.   And so you know, when we initially upload properties, if there's tenants in there, the numbers may not look great on where they are now, and there's a lot of reasons for that. And the most common reason is landlords, just really not raising rents and keeping up with how fast they've appreciated, like you just mentioned, Mark, I think a lot of these older, tired, landlords don't really go and check the real estate stats like that and say, oh, holy cow, I should have raised this, you know, 10% over the last three years, because that's what it's gone up, you know, and people don't realize that, you know, they're still sitting at 650 a month for a one bedroom. And, you know, it should be at 850. Now, and that changes everything. That's really, really common around here.   Michael: Yeah, that's such a good point, Max. And I was just having a conversation with some investors yesterday talking about the difference between buying on pro forma or buying at true value. And so what we're talking about is because of single family is a little bit different than multifamily. But for single families, if the potential is truly there, I think it can totally make sense. But you just want to avoid is a seller saying, Oh, well, the market rents 850, my current rents at 650. But you have to pay the price to buy the home at 850. And really, the market is 700. That's where you get yourself into big trouble. Max: Max: Right? Right. It's like, well, you should have gone and done it then. Right?   Michael: Yeah, why don't you do it? And then I'll pay for it. Right?   Max: Why don't you do it then and keep the house. But you know, what I'm seeing a lot of times is that, in this market, we're kind of purchasing in the middle of the pro forma and true value. You know, people are pricing them at the true value, and the performance, you know, 20,000 below that, or 30,000. Below that. And oftentimes where we're settling is somewhere in the middle. So yeah, I'm glad you said that.   Michael: Okay, that's that's super good to know, as well. And what tools would you recommend investors utilize to get a handle on what are the true market rents?   Max: Well, I this is a conversation I have all the time, I wish there was some sort of rental appraisal software where there was an actual correct answer for that. But really, you know, we have this conversation a lot, there is no such thing as a rent appraisal, right? It is, whatever someone's willing to pay. The tools I use are probably the ones that a lot of other people use. I use Zillow rentals a lot. I use Rentometer a lot. I use Craigslist, I look what's out there, I just try to look at everything that's, you know, really available. And then oftentimes, if it's still available, I'll take 10 or 15% off of what that is, and say that's probably about where we should be otherwise, again, it would be rented at that price. Right?   Michael: Right.   Max: Yeah, it wouldn't be available still, if it was if it was priced correctly, but we use rent ometer I use rent ometer a lot. Zillow rentals a lot.   Michael: Yeah, those are those are both great tools.   Mark: So I have two more quick stats. One of them's vacancy. So we're showing the vacancy rate is actually like 5% going all the way back to 2016. So 95% occupancy, as you guys would say, Do you find that that's true? Or you know, it sounds like it's a very competitive rental market out there. Is that right?   Max: It is a competitive rental market. I've I always go back to two things when I think about how competitive the rental market is and how people don't really realize how competitive it is I purchased a building in December of last year, so it's been about you know, 9-10 months, and the owner was living in the downstairs unit which was a really nice unit and they told me it's probably worth 750-$850 a month. Well I went on Facebook marketplace, listed it for 1100 a month I got all these comments You're crazy. You're crazy second day rented so it is competitive. You know people don't realize what true rents really should be and how many people are actually looking for a nice property if you've got a nice clean property people are willing to pay because there's not a lot of those available.   Michael: Awesome Wow.   Mark: Well the backup statistic to that is 53% of the housing units are tenant occupied. So renters are occupying 53% of the property so that shows you homeownership rate out there is just not as strong and that's in the city as Pittsburgh so that's where the competitive nature is coming from versus ownership rate is 64% nationally right so you flip those numbers around and you see that there's that many more renters than in Pittsburgh.   Max: Yeah you know what it's really I've heard that stat and it's really amazing to think about when you think about the cost of you know purchasing a property here it's it's amazing that it's not flipped around and you can buy a nice house for $170,000.10 minutes away from the city but rental rates are really high here and I'm not really sure why I think maybe it's because we have a lot of out of state investors and you know, I'm not really sure beyond that, but the opportunity is there there's a large rental pool and not a lot of vacant properties as you just mentioned.   Michael: Interesting.   Mark: That's great Well to me that that's what sums it up right there is that it's there's the the slow steady your rental growth, there's a tenant occupancy, there's a there's a demand for tenants that are coming from both your side as well as they're looking for properties. So it sounds like the supply and demand is very healthy on the renter side which is the I really drive investors to the market.   Max: Yeah, and rising rents and rising ARVs as well so it's a good time to get in.   Mark: Max this was great. This is the the comments on just you know what, what the common things are that you're seeing out there. I mean, this is the information that you probably have the conversations every day, maybe 5-10 times a day so glad we could get that out there and share it with a listener. So Michael, this was us, he was probably one of the better interviews I would have to say because it's, it's a demystifying right, all the all the little things that people hear about, but you really need to hear it from the locals.   Michael: And I can say wholeheartedly, Max that   Max: I'm gonna have to go back and watch the other interviews how to make sure. Thanks, guys, I appreciate it.   Michael: This was great.   Mark: Thank you so much.   Alright, thanks again, Max, for joining us. And thanks to all the investors for listening and we'll catch you on the next one. Happy investing.

WBBM Newsradio's 4:30PM News To Go
After two positive COVID tests, Rich Township High School District 227 shifts to remote learning for two weeks

WBBM Newsradio's 4:30PM News To Go

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 7:53


In other news; City of Chicago workers need to get their last COVID shots by today. Otherwise they face getting tested for COVID on a regular basis; Churchill Downs and Rush Street Gaming, owners of the Rivers Casino, have pulled their bid for a new casino license in Waukegan; State police say they're increasing patrols on Chicago expressways in an effort to stem to rash of shootings this year; a man from the Fuller Park neighborhood says his dog saved him from a fire that damaged or destroyed seven homes yesterday; and much more. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

SPOTLIGHT Radio Network
Ryan Berman, State Representative (R) Commerce Township

SPOTLIGHT Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 11:02


SPOTLIGHT Radio Network
Steve Johnson, State Representative (R) Wayland Township, Chairman of the House Oversight Committee

SPOTLIGHT Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 10:52


The Nolecast: Florida State football analysis
Predicted, but painful: FSU loses 31-23 to Louisville

The Nolecast: Florida State football analysis

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2021 31:31


Though both Bud and Ingram predicted Louisville to win over Florida State by multiple scores, the way it went down is still painful, as FSU falls to 0-4 on the season. Florida State made a valiant comeback attempt, but how much of that is for real? Not quitting was real, to be sure, but how much of the rushing game success was legit? How much of the defense's success in the second half was related to Louisville shutting things down? What was not disappointing was the great crowd in attendance at Township for the listener meet up. It was great to see our friends and sponsors including Matt Thompson, Chad Reidlinger of 844-FSU-Loan, Matt Lewis of Congruity, and to sip some beers from our Louisiana Hot Sauce koozies. Thanks for supporting the show. We know this is a rough season, and though we have and will continue to note that this is a long-term rebuild, it is still painful.

30 Minutes with Mike FCADC Podcast
Getting the low down on Antrim Township with Brad Graham, Township Manager.

30 Minutes with Mike FCADC Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 46:11


Mike, David, and Brad Graham recap a windshield tour of Antrim Township with Township Manager, Brad Graham.  The Township is one of the fastest growing areas in south central PA.  Take a listen to all the good stuff going on.  Even with Mike's horrible driving, David held it together in the back seat and did not throw up.   

SPOTLIGHT Radio Network
Gary Peters, U.S. Senator (D) Bloomfield Township

SPOTLIGHT Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2021 10:44


OA BIG BOOK CHERRY HILL NJ
08/22 - Lynne K. - Berkley Township, NJ - "Bill's Story" - Part 7

OA BIG BOOK CHERRY HILL NJ

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2021 21:33


Listen to Lynne K share on “Bill's Story” pages 14 - 16 If you would like to join us live, we meet every Sunday from 10:00 - 11:30 EST Zoom mtg login: 986 618 6769 Zoom password: bigbook164 

The Dom Giordano Program
Wall Township BoE Pres. Speaks Out Against Gov. Murphy's Mask Mandate Executive Order

The Dom Giordano Program

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2021 9:36


Ralph Addonizio, President of the Wall Township, NJ Board of Education, joins the Dom Giordano Program after his school board spoke out against New Jersey Governor Murphy's executive order for a mask mandate centered on schools in New Jersey. In a letter penned to Wall residents, Addonizio explained that the board takes issue with Executive Order 251 as it runs directly counter to a decision made by the district-wide Pandemic Response Team, which suggested that schools remain mask optional for the 2021-2022 school year. Addonizio explains that the new executive order removes decision-making from the school district and local leaders, those who know how to address the situation for their local area the best. Addonizio noted that the board is not coming out against mask mandates, and wants to leave open the possibility of requiring masks in the future, but the overbearing nature of an executive order makes the jobs of local officials even harder. (Photo by Eduardo Munoz Alvarez/Getty Images) See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

SPOTLIGHT Radio Network
Ryan Berman, State Representative (R) Commerce Township

SPOTLIGHT Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2021 12:42


Let's Talk--with Michele Hardman
Marshall Township Volunteer Fire Department

Let's Talk--with Michele Hardman

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2021 27:39


Especially if you live in a more rural area, who are usually the first people to show up when you have any kind of emergency? Your local volunteer fire department crew is always there long before an ambulance or law enforcement arrives. They're there for us in all sorts of sickness, health problems, accidents, fires and more, and we all need to be so thankful for their dedication and sacrifice. Think about that, and how you can help support them, either with cash donations, your time, or maybe donating items for their next fundraiser. Listen to my conversation with Fire Chief Jason Lewis from the Marshall Township Volunteer Fire Department in Judah and you may gain a whole new appreciation for these men and women that we all depend on so much. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/michele-hardman/support

ESP Media Podcasts
Columbia Township - Great Partnership with Hamilton County & Denise Driehaus Podcast

ESP Media Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2021 21:30


Columbia Township - Great Partnership with Hamilton County & Denise Driehaus Podcast

Investec Focus Radio
NOW Ep6: Township economy, flywheel of inclusive economic growth

Investec Focus Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2021 34:17


Episode 6: The so-called “township economy” is a lifeline for many, contributing an estimated 17% of SA's total employment. In the 6th episode of No Ordinary Wednesday, we examine the damage caused by Covid-19 and the recent unrest to this vital sector. We hear from township entrepreneur Refiloe Rantekoa, whose bread making businesses continues to prove despite the challenges. We chat to Investec's Setlogane Manchidi on how Investec is building active economic participants. And finally, we hear former YES CEO, Tashmia Ismail-Saville about the most urgent item needed to grow the entrepreneurship sector, in order to equal our developing nation peers. No Ordinary Wednesday with Jeremy Maggs

Virtual Boys
Episode 31 - A Township Tale, a miss...or just misunderstood?

Virtual Boys

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2021 59:58


Ryan and Chris talk all about A Township Tale and it's game design and why we think it doesn't work wellThe Virtual BoysYouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCpgxwcShn03mIG9c24hZIngTwitter: @virtualboyspodPatreon:  https://www.patreon.com/virtualboyspodcastShugghead GamingYouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/shugghead1981Twitter: @ShuggheadFacebook: ShuggheadGaming Discord: Shugghead Gaming#7032The VR GridYouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCarZs1RTyTxOfAC83QxhQ2wTwitter: https://twitter.com/theVRgridFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/thevrgrid Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thevrgrid

The CopDoc Podcast: Aiming for Excellence in Leadership
The CopDoc Podcast Ep 33 Dr. Beth J. Sanborn, Lower Gwynedd Township Police, School Resource Officer with Jeff Tate commentary

The CopDoc Podcast: Aiming for Excellence in Leadership

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2021 50:53


Beth Sanborn is a Detective, Juvenile Officer, and School Resource Officer in Pennsylvania with the Lower Gwynedd Township, PA Police. A law enforcement officer for nearly 25 years, she is active in the Penn. Association of School Resource Officers and the National Association of School Resource Officers. Dr.  Sanborn enthusiastically and affirmatively supports the inclusion of SROs in American schools.  Having earned a doctorate from West Chester University, she has conducted research in the area of School Resource Officers.  

Impact Christian Church
How Can We Be Sure There Is Life After Death? (Audio)

Impact Christian Church

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2021


What is holding you back from having trusting in God? The answer is the very reason keeping you from believing in God and his promise of eternal life. Join Pastor Bill Balbach as answers this very question.

Point Pleasant Podcast
Episode 30: Gottlieb update, Art Festival Review and Township News with Fallon Schultz

Point Pleasant Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2021 47:05


This episode of the Point Pleasant Podcast was a fun episode with a TON of information. We reviewed the most recent Arts Committee Beach PaARTy Street Fair, we spoke about upcoming events and we got a first hand update from Fallon Schultz on the highly anticipated Gottlieb project. This is definitely an episode to check out! for more info or to suggest a guest contact, Michael Langsner at www.HavensSweetShop.com

Not a Rabbi
S3E2 - Is this a 1st Amendment Case?

Not a Rabbi

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2021 63:11


Episode Notes News and Discussion: New Jewish Superhero in DC Comics Google Parts with Cloud VP Kosher Supervision Company asked to drop Ben & Jerry's Main Topic Special Guest and Not a Rabbi Legal Correspondent - Bret Uhrich Partner at Walkerheye.com Kept From Keeping Shabbos Orthodox Women in Medicine Face Descrimination Town of Jackson. NJ Case Previous Court Decisions We Discussed Hardison Goldman EEOC v. Abercrombie New York Executive Law 296 Price Waterhouse v. Hopkins Employment Division v. Smith Church of Lukumi Fulton v. City of Philadelphia Bostock (Sexual Orientation case) U.S. v. Township of Jackson Complaint U.S. Township of Jackson Answer New Jersey v. Jackson Township Complaint Agudath Israel of America v. Township of Jackson Complaint Shatkin v. UTA Order Denying Summary Judgment (demonically possessed supervisor) Kurlansky v. 1530 Owners Corp (Co-op condo case) Complaint Kurlansky v. Owners Corp Motion for Preliminary Injunction Owner's Corp Memorandum in opposition to the motion for preliminary injunction Kurlansky v. 1530 Owners Corp Docket (Some available, some not) Support Not a Rabbi by contributing to their Tip Jar: https://tips.pinecast.com/jar/not-a-rabbi This podcast is powered by Pinecast.

WWJ's All Local
Mother, daughter found dead in Van Buren Township apartment

WWJ's All Local

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2021 5:01


WWJ's Jason Scott and Roberta Jasina have your Tuesday morning news briefs including a tragic story from Van Buren Township in Wayne County where a mother and daughter have been found dead in an apartment.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Full Dive Gaming: a Virtual Reality Podcast in VR
Episode 51, Township Tale and INSANE 2020 VR growth

Full Dive Gaming: a Virtual Reality Podcast in VR

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2021 48:39


We discuss newly released on Quest Township Tale, all of the hosts got to try it out and we share our experiences. We also discuss INSANE VR growth in 2020, and the Rec Room arms and legs update. Intro: 0:00 Q&A: 1:12 Rec Room arms and legs: 9:31 Insane VR growth: 15:49 Township Tale: 23:13 Kayleighs Music Video! 36:49 Outro: 47:40 This week's podcast was made in partnership with Asterion Products. Get 5% off the Aura headset or any other order $19.99 or more with the code FULLDIVE at https://www.asterionproducts.com Welcome to the Full Dive Gaming podcast, bringing a weekly dive of all the news, discussion, and condensed nerd talk you need for VR gaming! Every Friday we release FULL PODCASTS on all Your Favorite major platforms: Spotify, Apple, Google... etc. We post daily segments here on YouTube for you to enjoy throughout the week and see our interactions inside of VR, where we film and record every podcast! SUPPORT US: -https://www.patreon.com/fulldivegaming Join The Discord Server: -https://discord.gg/VWGcT3G LISTEN TO FULL EPISODES: -SPOTIFY: https://open.spotify.com/show/1BhFGZWRhobzEVsQ9csjhA?si=O_Zo3xtuS7eFJz5jNzbwdw -APPLE: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/full-dive-gaming-podcast/id1513469932 -GOOGLE PODCASTS: https://podcasts.google.com/?feed=aHR0cHM6Ly9mZWVkcy5jYXB0aXZhdGUuZm0vZnVsbGRpdmVnYW1pbmc%3D -OVERCAST: https://overcast.fm/itunes1513469932/full-dive-gaming-podcast -TUNEIN: http://tun.in/pjRQF -PODCHASER: https://www.podchaser.com/podcasts/full-dive-gaming-podcast-1199646 -RADIOPUBLIC: https://radiopublic.com/full-dive-gaming-podcast-8jyN49 ***High Quality Stereo versions of the podcast are for Patreon supporters only, watch them on Patreon, or watch them on your app of choice. More information at https://support.patreon.com/hc/en-us/articles/212055866-Subscribe-to-your-Audio- FOLLOW US: -Twitter: https://twitter.com/FullDiveGaming -Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/fulldivegaming/ EMAIL US: Business Inquiries Only at adam@fulldivepodcast.com Support this podcast

TheNaturalOnes
The Affairs of Dragons and of Townships

TheNaturalOnes

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2021 129:03


musichttps://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLTE3SbXfATN4I8OoKvs1eHC0AfdndrJvShttps://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLTE3SbXfATN4XeY8rhOa3nbtxH7GFKijghttps://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLTE3SbXfATN4qsCNvXNN2bqRIv30fxVUwhttps://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLTE3SbXfATN4NqXLEbtz3u2ejM3S2V5Ldhttps://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLTE3SbXfATN6tv9FYrESihAV90kUl3G9Whttps://tabletopaudio.com/

Impact Christian Church
Friends Through Thick & Thin (Audio)

Impact Christian Church

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2021


Friendships often are spurn out of the blue. Join Duane Eger as he talks to us about what it takes to be a good friend by looking at the story of Jonathan and David.

NCTV45 - The Train - New Castle, PA
Route 376 Shenango Township this is approximately 6:15 PM on Friday, July 23 2021

NCTV45 - The Train - New Castle, PA

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 24, 2021 1:09


The Douglas Coleman Show
The Douglas Coleman Show w_ Thomas Russo Jr. and Kristine Raymond

The Douglas Coleman Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2021 43:23


Mr. Russo is a competent and confident servant leader; a proven visionary and strategic thinker with highly effective communications and organizational skills. Mr. Russo previously served as an elected official in two NJ municipalities. He was a Committeeman in Bernards Township from 2014–2017. He served as a Councilman, Council Vice President, and Council President in Parsippany-Troy Hills Township from 1998–2005, earning the distinction as the youngest-ever elected Governing Body member in the history of the Township. Mr. Russo has also dedicated time to countless political campaigns from 1992–2014 attending several inaugurations and conventions. He was selected as part of the inaugural class of young elected leaders at the 1st National Young Elected Leaders Conference, Eagleton Institute of Politics, Rutgers University. He was also chosen by the NJ Herald in 2009 as one of 40 influential people in Sussex County under the age of 40. He recently published his first book, a memoir of his life experiences and how he gave up New Jersey politics and found faith as a born again Christian. The purpose of his book, There Are No Politics In Heaven, is to help individuals work through their brokenness and improve their lives with spirituality as their cornerstone.Thomas is a very unique guest in that he successfully combines politics, religion, and humor.Take a look with him into the mirror of his life, where he faced childhood challenges, rode political highs and lows, achieved external greatness with internal emptiness, confronted the psychological demons within, experienced a religious transformation, and lived to fight another day. Join him on this rollercoaster ride of newfound faith, hope, perseverance, and the ability to change.He also has over 23 years of experience in municipal and county government as well as the nonprofit sector. Mr. Russo is also an adjunct professor at three colleges in New Jersey: Pillar College, Seton Hall University, and Fairleigh Dickinson University. He is also president of Russo Communications, LLC, a consulting firm in Basking Ridge, NJ.http://nopoliticsinheaven.comIt wasn't until later in life that Kristine Raymond figured out what she wanted to be when she grew up, an epiphany that occurred in 2013 when she sat down and began writing her first novel. Over a dozen books in multiple genres later, there are a multitude of ideas floating around in her head thus assuring she'll never be idle.When a spare moment does present itself, she fills it by navigating the publishing and promotional side of the business. When not doing that, she spends time with her husband and furbabies (not necessarily in that order) at their home in south-central Kentucky, gardens, reads, or binge-watches Netflix.http://kristineraymond.comThe Douglas Coleman Show now offers audio and video promotional packages for music artists as well as video promotional packages for authors. Please see our website for complete details. http://douglascolemanshow.comIf you have a comment about this episode or any other, please click the link below.https://ratethispodcast.com/douglascolemanshow

Chicks on the Right Podcast
Hour 3, 07-19-21: America First rally cancelled, LA County's new mask mandate, and Abdul on Wayne Township

Chicks on the Right Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2021 36:49


See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

ESP Media Podcasts
Columbia Township - Great Things Coming Podcast - July 2021

ESP Media Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2021 19:00


Columbia Township - Great Things Coming Podcast - July 2021 

Haverford Township Podcast
13. Senator Amanda Cappelletti | Haverford Township Podcast

Haverford Township Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2021 17:48


Pennsylvania State Senator Amanda Cappelletti joins the podcast to discuss the state's new budget and how it impacts Haverford Township. Plus, she shares what types of resources are available to our residents.  Senator Cappelletti represents Pennsylvania's 17th district, which includes Haverford and Radnor in Delaware County and 9 other municipalities in Montgomery County.Host: Jeff Hancock (Communications Manager)

Brian Thomas
Mike Robison for Miami Township Trustee

Brian Thomas

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2021 13:53


Farmer's Inside Track
Six tips to thrive as a township farmer in Mzansi!

Farmer's Inside Track

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2021 37:59


In this week's episode of Farmer's Inside Track… Six tips to thrive as a township farmer in Mzansi! We chat to iZindaba Zokudla founder Dr Naudé Malan. Plus, we share the do's and don'ts about cotton farming!  We find out why agriculture, land reform and rural development minister Thoko Didiza declared three KwaZulu-Natal districts as disease management areas.  In our farmer development segment, FarmSol boss Aron Kole tells us what it takes for new farmers to convert productivity into profitability.  Motlatsi Tolo, a chicken farmer from North West, is this week's Soil Sista. Every week, we crown another queen, powered by Food For Mzansi and Corteva Agriscience. Our farmers selected a Simon Sinek blockbuster as their book of the week. And we head all the way to Mpumalanga for our farmer tip of the week by Sizo Tshabalala.

SPOTLIGHT Radio Network
Donna Lasinski, House Democratic Leader (D) Scio Township

SPOTLIGHT Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2021 10:39


Daily Reflection Podcast
#152 A FELLOWSHIP OF FREEDOM (June 18) - Kirsten O (Pilesgrove Township, NJ)

Daily Reflection Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2021 30:50


Kirsten O. shares on the daily reflection entitled "A Fellowship of Freedom".A FELLOWSHIP OF FREEDOM. . . if only men were granted absolute liberty, and were compelled to obey no one, they would then voluntarily associate themselves in the common interestAS BILL SEES IT, p. 50When I no longer live under the dictates of another or of alcohol, I live in a new freedom. When I release the past and all the excess baggage I have carried for so very long, I come to know freedom. I have been introduced into a life and a fellowship of freedom. The Steps are a "recommended" way of finding a new life, there are no commands or dictates in A.A. I am free to serve from desire rather than decree. There is the understanding that I will benefit from the growth of other members and I take what I learn and bring it back to the group. The "common welfare" finds room to grow in the society of personal freedom.Need the Daily Reflection Book?Visit our web siteRead about Recovery on our BlogVisit our Facebook GroupFollow us on TwitterSupport the Podcast:- On Patreon: https://patreon.com/dailyreflection- On PayPal: https://paypal.me/dailyreflectionIf you're struggling with alcohol or addiction, or wondering how to stop drinking it's helpful to know that there's a solution that has worked for millions of people. The Daily Reflection Podcast provides hope, and inspiration through the shared experiences of people that have found a way out. 

Brian Thomas
Lexi Lausten for Anderson Township Trustee

Brian Thomas

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2021 11:11


ESP Media Podcasts
Columbia Township - Great Things Coming to the Central Region - June 14, 2021

ESP Media Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2021 28:45


Columbia Township - Great Things Coming to the Central Region - June 14, 2021

practicing
a peek into the wesley township weekly correspondance diary

practicing

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2021 44:53


today, a special episode in which we hear from thom and the fingers and things that they use to alter reality

Hammer + Nigel Show Podcast
CRT In Warren Township

Hammer + Nigel Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2021 5:27


An email/survey was sent to teachers in Warren Township regarding Critical Race Theory. Hammer reads the email. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Uncut Gems Mixtape
92: Joe Budden Fires Rory & Mal , Death of a Dynasty, How to NOT do business with friends.

The Uncut Gems Mixtape

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2021 60:03


Joe Budden recently fired Rory & Mal from The Joe Budden Podcast. During this installment we discuss the on-air firings. We also discuss pro's and cons of doing business with friends. We welcome special guest, our esteemed producer, Tarik of the Township to join the conversation and provide insight. What does “the show must go on” really mean ? --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Small Town Murder
223 - Disturbing, Depraved & Disgusting - Coventry Township, Ohio

Small Town Murder

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2021 147:04


This week, in Coventry Township, Ohio, someone decides to take a trip to "find themself", only to end up being a lot harder to find than was initially thought. As a matter of fact, they're dead.  Not only dead, but murdered in an unthinkably brutal way, and that's only the start. A horrific discovery leaves everyone involved scratching their heads, and saying "how" & "why"... and "gross"! This one is quite a trip!   Along the way, we find out that Connecticut thinks they have a little Ohio, that you might not want to purchase your murder tools on Amazon, and that a little bleach isn't enough to cover some smells!!   Hosted by James Pietragallo & Jimmie Whisman    New episodes every Thursday!    Donate at: patreon.com/crimeinsports or go to paypal.com & use our email: crimeinsports@gmail.com    Go to shutupandgivememurder.com for all things Small Town Murder & Crime In Sports!    Follow us on...    twitter.com/@murdersmall    facebook.com/smalltownpod    instagram.com/smalltownmurder    Also, check out James & Jimmie's other show, Crime In Sports! On iTunes, Stitcher, or wherever you listen to podcasts# See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Horrible History
Terrible Today - Manchester Township & Westfield, NJ

Horrible History

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2021 18:48


Today's episode features stories from New Jersey!A supplement to our longer Horrible History episodes, this weekly tiny episode will focus on ridiculous, lighter crime stories from the years 1987-present. Each week we'll share Terrible Today stories featuring news articles from the places we visited in the previous week's main episode. Contact Us: Instagram: @horriblehistorypod Twitter: @thehorriblepod Email: [email protected] Support Your Hosts: Buy Us a Coffee - www.buymeacoffee.com/horriblehistory Bonus Content:Patreon - www.patreon.com/horriblehistory For just $5 a month - the cost of one trip to the coffee shop - you can not only help this podcast grow, but also get excellent bonus content! $5 and up Patrons get early access to main episodes, access to Happy Hour with Horrible History and access to our NEW! Where In the World? segment. Happy Hour with Horrible History - a palate cleanser and deeper dive into a featured topic. Where In the World? - a more location-focused segment, where we share personal / listener stories about their travels to the destinations we are visiting.  For $10 and up Patrons, access video content with your hosts, opportunities for live interaction and merch upon signing up!Sources: PatchNew JerseyNorth Jersey Intro Music: “Creeper” - Oliver LyuSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/horriblehistory)

Small Town Murder
#207 - Mr. Hot Tub - Ross Township, Pennsylvania

Small Town Murder

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2021 148:29


This week, in Ross Township, Pennsylvania, a man with a tragic past finds a new life, only to have it taken away, once again? Or is he the one responsible? Things become a bit more clear when we find out that the terrible, and seemingly accidental death has actually happened before. In exactly the same way. Will he get away with it twice??   Along the way, we find out that Pittsburgh loves good food, that it's almost impossible to drown in the tub, without any water, and that you can sometimes get away with murder, once, but don't make it a pattern!   Hosted by James Pietragallo & Jimmie Whisman    New episodes every Thursday!    Donate at: patreon.com/crimeinsports or go to paypal.com & use our email: crimeinsports@gmail.com    Go to shutupandgivememurder.com for all things Small Town Murder & Crime In Sports!    Follow us on...    twitter.com/@murdersmall    facebook.com/smalltownpod    instagram.com/smalltownmurder    Also, check out James & Jimmie's other show, Crime In Sports! On iTunes, Stitcher, or wherever you listen to podcasts See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Small Town Murder
#205 - The Disappearing Cheerleader in Hanover Township, New Jersey

Small Town Murder

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2021 160:44


This week, in Hanover Township, New Jersey, a bright, popular cheerleader disappears from the mall parking lot, leaving her car keys still in the ignition. This causes widespread fear, until another young woman is attacked, then it turns into complete panic. Who would do such horrible things? A very horrible person, of course. And how this person ends up getting caught is one for the ages!   Along the way, we find out that it's very easy to start a UFO hoax, that maybe when someone who kills 2 people, may kill more people, and that when a cheerleader goes missing, people notice!   Hosted by James Pietragallo & Jimmie Whisman    New episodes every Thursday!    Donate at: patreon.com/crimeinsports or go to paypal.com & use our email: crimeinsports@gmail.com    Go to shutupandgivememurder.com for all things Small Town Murder & Crime In Sports!    Follow us on...    twitter.com/@murdersmall    facebook.com/smalltownpod    instagram.com/smalltownmurder    Also, check out James & Jimmie's other show, Crime In Sports! On iTunes, Stitcher, or wherever you listen to podcasting See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.