Podcasts about ethiopian

Country in East Africa

  • 3,049PODCASTS
  • 5,134EPISODES
  • 39mAVG DURATION
  • 2DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Sep 19, 2023LATEST
ethiopian

POPULARITY

20162017201820192020202120222023

Categories



Best podcasts about ethiopian

Show all podcasts related to ethiopian

Latest podcast episodes about ethiopian

The Cottondale Pulpit
Surprising Salvations -- A Sermon on Acts 8:9-40

The Cottondale Pulpit

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2023 41:30


In this account of Acts, we see salvation for Samaritans, salvation for Simon, and salvation for Ethiopian eunuch. What lessons are for us in these surprising salvations? Learn more in this sermon presented to Hillside Baptist Church in Eastman, GA on 9/17/23. www.hillsideeastman.com

Sermons
Divine Destiny

Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2023 41:27


Pastor Andy brings the message, “Divine Destiny” from Acts 8:26-40.  Luke records the meeting between Philip and an Ethiopian.  And the closer we read, we realize, “This cannot be just coincidence!”  This study will help us to better understand God's divine destiny for Philip and for the Ethiopian.  And, for us today.

Eastbrook Church
Seeking Understanding

Eastbrook Church

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2023 30:46


When Philip encounters an Ethiopian eunuch who is seeking to understand the words of the prophet Isaiah. The eunuch actively asks questions and seeks answers, and that becomes an opportunity for transformation. Philip is present with him to ask questions, guide him into understanding about the Messiah, and lead him to a next step of faith. Philip exemplifies how disciples of Jesus can be present and ready to explain to those seeking understanding.

Eastbrook Church
Seeking Understanding

Eastbrook Church

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2023 30:46


When Philip encounters an Ethiopian eunuch who is seeking to understand the words of the prophet Isaiah. The eunuch actively asks questions and seeks answers, and that becomes an opportunity for transformation. Philip is present with him to ask questions, guide him into understanding about the Messiah, and lead him to a next step of faith. Philip exemplifies how disciples of Jesus can be present and ready to explain to those seeking understanding.

Pan-African Journal
Pan-African Journal: Worldwide Radio Broadcast

Pan-African Journal

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2023 194:00


Listen to the Sat. Sept. 16, 2023 edition of the Pan-African Journal: Worldwide Radio Broadcast hosted by Abayomi Azikiwe, editor of the Pan-African News Wire. The program features our regular PANW report with dispatches on the continuing war inside the Republic of Sudan; the Republic of Namibia has issued a report on the rate of inflation inside this Southern African state; Kenya as well is facing an even higher rate of inflation in this East African state; and Ethiopian coffee remains a major export for the country. In the second hour we look at the UAW strike which unfolded on Sept. 15. Finally, we examine the 60th anniversary of the Birmingham 16th Street Baptist Church bombing of 1963 where four African American girls and later two boys were killed by racist violence. 

Ways to Change the World with Krishnan Guru-Murthy
Poet Lemn Sissay on growing up in the care system, racism and finding his Ethiopian family

Ways to Change the World with Krishnan Guru-Murthy

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2023 32:10


At 14, Lemn Sissay inked his initials into his hand with a homemade tattoo. He didn't write LS, but NG, for Norman Greenwood, which he thought was his name. Except that it wasn't. His real identity had been withheld from him since he was born. Born in Wigan to an Ethiopian mother, Lemn Sissay was raised in care; first in a foster family and then, from the age of 12 to 18, in a string of children's homes, including the notorious Wood End assessment centre, where he was physically, emotionally and racially abused. Despite going on to become an award-winning and internationally acclaimed poet, the trauma of his harrowing childhood never left him, and has informed much of his work on and off the page. Today on Ways to Change the World, he talks to Krishnan Guru-Murthy about growing up in the care system, finding his identity as a British and Ethiopian man, and why the care system in the UK is failing children in need. Produced by Silvia Maresca

Conversations
Chadden's planet Earth

Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2023 53:06


Chadden Hunter was in his twenties when he found himself sitting around a campfire in the Ethiopian highlands, talking about his PhD thesis with Sir David Attenborough. The meeting changed his life 

Gugut Podcast
ከጃኒ ጋር የተደረገ ቆይታ

Gugut Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2023 164:04


Welcome back to the Gugut podcast! In today's exciting episode, we have a special guest who is a popular content creator on YouTube. You may be familiar with his vlog videos that provide a glimpse into the daily life of a young Ethiopian living in America. We'll be diving into topics such as his experiences in Los Angeles, his passion for dancing, and the content he produces on YouTube. Stay tuned for an engaging conversation! Gugut is an entertainment/educational podcast focused on discussing different perspectives on technology, philosophy and the day-to-day lives of everyday people. For any inquiries

The John Batchelor Show
#ETHIOPIA: The Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam fills while the civil war carries on. Gregory Copley, Defense & Foreign Affairs.

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2023 13:35


#ETHIOPIA: The Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam fills while the civil war carries on. Gregory Copley, Defense & Foreign Affairs. https://www.cnn.com/2023/09/11/africa/ethiopia-blue-nile-reservoir-climate-intl/index.html 1912 Cairo

Trinity United Presbyterian Church
More Ready Than You Know

Trinity United Presbyterian Church

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2023 29:59


In the story of Philip and the Ethiopian we see the following: 1) Philip was listening to God and open to his promptings; 2) He reacted with instant obedience and took a risk; 3) God was already working in this man's life; 4) Philip was willing to initiate a spiritual conversation; 5) He was relevant in his speech; 6) He invited the man to a lifestyle not just a belief system.

Car Con Carne
LiV Warfield on ‘the Edge' (Episode 876)

Car Con Carne

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2023 37:21


Liv Warfield returns to Car Con Carne just as she's about to release her first new studio album in nine years (“The Edge”).   She recommended we go for Ethiopian food for the chat, and we had amazing food from Ethiopian Diamond in Edgewater (6120 N. Broadway). As we ate (with our hands), we talked about the new album, Liv's frame of mind, influencer culture; and, of course… Prince.   Car Con Carne is presented by Alex Ross Art. Visit Alex Ross on YouTube! Be sure to also visit alexrossart.com to see his work and get your hands on an original piece.   __   Car Con Carne is also sponsored by NINETY DAYS IN THE '90s (www.90daysinthe90s.com), by Andy Frye. Take the “Grey Line” back in time to 90s Chicago and relive all the music, moments and pop culture! Get your copy from Amazon, or wherever awesome books are sold.   __   Car Con Carne is also sponsored by Easy Automation (easy-automation.net).   Are you a home owner? Are you ready for a truly “smart home?” Doesn't the idea of minimizing your energy usage while maximizing your comfort sound good?     Easy Automation will help you find the customized solution that's right for you. Their team has 30 years of collective experience in the industry and will tailor a service package that fits your lifestyle and needs.   Get a quote by visiting Easy-automation.net, or call at 630.730.3728  

amazon chicago broadway ethiopian edgewater andy frye liv warfield grey line car con carne
The Globe Minute
LISTEN: Toxic algae updates, Equity Advocates Group, false imprisonment charges, and Ethiopian cuisine | Sept 8 2023

The Globe Minute

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2023 3:15


The Globe Minute is a product of Forum Communications, brought to you by reporters at The Globe. For more news from throughout the day, check out dglobe.com.

The Tikvah Podcast
Yonatan Jakubowicz on Israel's African Immigrants

The Tikvah Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2023 72:33


Last Saturday, supporters and opponents of Eritrea's president, Isaias Afwerki, confronted one another in violent clashes. Yet rather than in Asmara, Eritrea's capital city, this confrontation took place in the streets of south Tel Aviv. In the second half of the 2000s, east African migration to Israel began to accelerate. Since then, in part due to changes in labor policies and law enforcement and in part to a barrier wall erected along the Egypt-Israel border, the number of new east African migrants has fallen precipitously. Nevertheless, although statistics are hard to come by with great precision, there are probably around 40,000 non-Jewish African migrants living in Israel today. What brings these mainly Ethiopian, Eritrean, and Sudanese immigrants to the cities and towns of Israel? And how does and how should Israel distinguish between those seeking humanitarian asylum and those looking for work opportunities and social benefits? These questions have become major points of debate in Israel. Some argue that the state must act in the world as a corrective to the Jewish experience of statelessness in history—that since Jews have so often been migrants and refugees and dependent on the help of others, Israel must help others in need when it can. Others argue that Israel—the political answer to the problems of Jewish statelessness—has an overriding moral obligation to welcome and to secure the lives and liberties of Jews—that it has a special obligation to pursue the ingathering of the Jewish diaspora and so to make a distinction between Jewish and non-Jewish immigrants. To discuss these issues, Yonatan Jakubowicz, formerly an advisor to Israel's Minister of Interior, and a founder of the Israeli Immigration Policy Center, joins Mosaic editor Jonathan Silver. Musical selections in this podcast are drawn from the Quintet for Clarinet and Strings, op. 31a, composed by Paul Ben-Haim and performed by the ARC Ensemble.

Medicus
Ep118 | Careers in Healthcare: Physical Therapist

Medicus

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2023 18:24


In this mini-series, we explore different health professions to get a better understanding of the variety of team members involved in patient care. In this episode, we spoke with Gauri Pawar, PT about her journey to becoming a physical therapist and how physical therapists are an integral part of the healthcare team. Dr. Pawar hails from Ann Arbor, MI, a university town home to the University of Michigan. She graduated with her BS from U of M in 2013 with a concentration in Biopsychology, Cognition and Neuroscience. With an interest in the connection between the mind and body, and as a chronic pelvic pain survivor herself, she pursued her clinical doctorate in physical therapy at Andrews University, graduating in 2018. Her interests include functional weight training, visceral and osteopathic manual therapies, as well as treatment of chronic abdominopelvic pain, bowel/bladder dysfunction, pelvic organ prolapse, and postpartum rehabilitation. Dr. Pawar is passionate about education and has attended courses through the APTA, Barral Institute, Herman & Wallace, and Great Lakes Seminars. She is working towards being a certified sex educator and sex counselor. She is devoted to patient education and empowering patients on their health journeys and improving their compliance in their medical plans.   When she's not working, Dr. Pawar can be found in the kitchen! She is an avid foodie who enjoys cooking foods from global cuisines and especially enjoys touring cities with her belly. Things that bring Dr. Pawar the most happiness in her day to day life include but are not limited to: listening to NPR, reading Brene Brown and following her on social media, Nina Simone's voice, watching Bollywood dancing, the smell of sandalwood (very calming), walking/hiking, farmer's markets, Ethiopian coffee beans, making a successful meal (efficient and tasty!), and sharing. To learn more about a career in physical therapy, go to www.apta.org  Episode produced by: Rasa Valiauga Episode recording date: 5/24/23 www.medicuspodcast.com | medicuspodcast@gmail.com | Donate: http://bit.ly/MedicusDonate --- Send in a voice message: https://podcasters.spotify.com/pod/show/medicus/message

Christian Saints Podcast
Saint Moses the Ethiopian

Christian Saints Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2023 26:52


St Moses the Ethiopian, also known as Moses the Strong, Moses the Black & Moses of SceteReference materials for this episode:https://www.oca.org/saints/lives/2023/08/28/102414-venerable-moses-the-ethiopian-of-scete“The Sayings of the Desert Fathers” Liturgical Press of Cistercian Publications ISBN 0879079592, 9780879079598“The Philokalia vol 1” Faber & Faber Inc. ISBN 9780571130139http://mosestheblack.orgScripture citations for this episode:Matthew 11: 2-18Psalm 137Ephesians 4: 26-27This episode is a joint production of Paradosis Pavilion & Generative soundsParadosis Pavilion - https://youtube.com/@paradosispavilion9555Generative Sounds - https://generativesoundsjjm.bandcamp.comIconographic images used by kind permission of Nicholas Papas, who controls distribution rights of these imagesPrints of all of Nick's work can be found at Saint Demetrius Press  - http://www.saintdemetriuspress.comDistribution rights of this episode & all music contained in it are controlled by Generative SoundsCopyright 2021 - 2023

Hebrew Nation Online
Holy worship:The Music of the Bible – Nebel

Hebrew Nation Online

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2023 27:46


Continuing our “Stringed Instruments” series we look at two highly debated instruments, the Nebel and Nebel Azor pronounced (Ad-Zor). Like our previous broadcasts we examine its construction and the debate surrounding its origin culturally as well as the number of strings. Scriptural citations and academic debate also take stage allowing for the case of these instruments origin to be made as a native or foreign invention among the Hebrews. Finally we shall listen to one of the earliest harps still used in Ethiopian worship by Coptic Christians, the Nanga.   Video Link: BBC The Harp https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I_ImURf8KUE&t=1208s&app=desktop Podcast Streams Anchor https://anchor.fm/kadosh-shachah Castbox https://castbox.fm/vc/2208477 Apple https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/kadosh-shachah-holy-worship/id1472295079 Google Podcasts https://podcasts.google.com/?feed=aHR0cHM6Ly9hbmNob3IuZm0vcy9jODE0ODg0L3BvZGNhc3QvcnNz Spotify https://open.spotify.com/show/00nCHOB2eR8XberphEmIRi I heart Podcast https://podcasts.google.com/feed/aHR0cHM6Ly9hbmNob3IuZm0vcy9jODE0ODg0L3BvZGNhc3QvcnNz Amazon music https://music.amazon.es/podcasts/b4c3976c-1a00-444d-bd3e-d12e244b5a46/holy-worship-the-music-of-the-bible Pocket Casts https://pca.st/3o49 Breaker https://www.breaker.audio/kadosh-shachah-holy-worship Radio Public https://radiopublic.com/kadosh-shachah-holy-worship-6nVNky

Tomball Bible Church
Ready to Respond

Tomball Bible Church

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2023 50:56


August 6, 2023The Philip cycle in Acts 8 comes to an exciting conclusion with the salvation and baptism of an Ethiopian court official. The passage events take place in the southernmost part of the Holy Land in Gaza. The gospel message will also now be carried into Africa in fulfillment of Christ's word to His apostles that their witness would go to the ends of the earth. The Holy Spirit takes center stage in this text and demonstrates how He moves in the church through promptings and guidance. Our responsibility is, like Philip, to be ready to listen and respondActs 8:26-40

Reboot Republic Podcast
1092. ‘They fired on us like rain’ – Nadia Hardman on the massacres at the Yemen-Saudi Arabian border

Reboot Republic Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2023 25:24


Please join us at patreon.com/tortoiseshack You might have seen the reports on Monday that Saudi Arabian border guards/soldiers had killed hundreds of Ethiopian asylum seekers who were trying to cross the border from Yemen. Read:https://www.hrw.org/news/2023/08/21/saudi-arabia-mass-killings-migrants-yemen-border The lead researcher and author of the report, Nadia Hardman, joined us on the tortoise shack to discuss what the 15 month report uncovered, the trauma inflicted on survivors, the International community's lack of response and the need for at the very least a UN led investigation into what are crimes against international law. Warning: Nadia outlines and describes some subject matter that listeners may find disturbing. The Trumpometer podcast is out now here:https://www.patreon.com/posts/patron-exclusive-88383315

The Echo Chamber Podcast
1092. ‘They fired on us like rain’ – Nadia Hardman on the massacres at the Yemen-Saudi Arabian border

The Echo Chamber Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2023 25:24


Please join us at patreon.com/tortoiseshack You might have seen the reports on Monday that Saudi Arabian border guards/soldiers had killed hundreds of Ethiopian asylum seekers who were trying to cross the border from Yemen. Read:https://www.hrw.org/news/2023/08/21/saudi-arabia-mass-killings-migrants-yemen-border The lead researcher and author of the report, Nadia Hardman, joined us on the tortoise shack to discuss what the 15 month report uncovered, the trauma inflicted on survivors, the International community's lack of response and the need for at the very least a UN led investigation into what are crimes against international law. Warning: Nadia outlines and describes some subject matter that listeners may find disturbing. The Trumpometer podcast is out now here:https://www.patreon.com/posts/patron-exclusive-88383315

Series Podcast: This Way Out
1981-My Gay American Road Trip

Series Podcast: This Way Out

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2023 28:58


The queer cross-country journals of “This Way Out” veteran producer JD Doyle capture a slice of pre-AIDS gay male culture in the U.S. (interviewed by Brian DeShazor). And in NewsWrap: Brazil's Supreme Federal Court rules that purveyors of anti-queer hate speech should face significant jail time, Germany's Cabinet proposes a “Self-Determination Act” to help trans and non-binary people officially change their name and gender on government documents, a Beirut drag show is raided and a popular children's board game is banned in Lebanon, the first four people are arrested under Uganda's “Kill the Gays” law, Ethiopian police raid suspected queer venues in Addis Ababa, anti-transgender laws in Idaho, Alabama and Georgia receive positive and negative action in federal courts, bi sprinter Sha'Carri Richardson breaks records for the 100-meter title at the World Athletics Championships, and more international LGBTQ news reported this week by John Dyer V and Tanya Kane-Parry (produced by Brian DeShazor).  All this on the August 28, 2023 edition of This Way Out! Join our family of listener-donors today at http://thiswayout.org/donate/

KPFA - UpFront
Trump DC Trial Set for March, Saudi Border Guards Massacre of Ethiopian Migrants; Plus, SFUSD Considering School Closures

KPFA - UpFront

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2023 59:58


0:08 — Robert Katzberg, former federal prosecutor, turned defense attorney. Author, most recently of The Vanishing Trial. 0:33 — Bill Frelick, Director of the Refugee and Migrant Rights Division at Human Rights Watch. 0:45 — Cassondra Curiel, teacher at Visitacion Valley Middle School, and president of United Educators of San Francisco. The post Trump DC Trial Set for March, Saudi Border Guards Massacre of Ethiopian Migrants; Plus, SFUSD Considering School Closures appeared first on KPFA.

New Books in Early Modern History
David Waldstreicher, "The Odyssey of Phillis Wheatley: A Poet's Journeys Through American Slavery and Independence" (FSG, 2023)

New Books in Early Modern History

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2023 69:43


Thy Power, O Liberty, make strong the weak, And (wond'rous instinct) Ethiopians speak. At the age of 19, Phillis Wheatley published the first book in English by a person of African descent and the third book of poetry by a North American Woman. She was a poet but also a political actor and celebrity – the most famous African in North America and Europe during the era of the American Revolution. George Washington wrote to her. Thomas Jefferson ridiculed her.  In The Odyssey of Phillis Wheatley: A Poet's Journeys Through American Slavery and Independence (FSG, 2023) – a joint exercise in history and literary criticism, Dr. David Waldstreicher writes that Wheatley is “Homer and Odysseus and the slaves and the women they knew or imagined. She aimed for the universal without forgetting who was suffering most and why.” Reading Wheatley's poetry in historical context reveals the extent to which the American Revolution both strengthened and limited black slavery – and also how Wheatley herself affected the debates about American slavery and independence. Mastering the Bible, Greek and Latin translations, and the works of Pope and Milton, Wheatley composed elegies for local elites, celebrated political events, and praised warriors. Despite her skill, knowledge, and fame, she often had to write indirectly about subjects that mattered deeply to her – race, slavery, and discontent with British rule. During a period in which writing was central to political conversation, she used her verse to lampoon, question, and assert the injustice of her enslaved condition. As Waldstreicher demonstrates, Wheatley wrote about events and people – turning what was available and acceptable for a person in her position into poetry that could be read for its art – but also subversively for its political ideas. He concludes that her work proves that the story of the American revolution and Phillis Wheatley are inextricably joined – and that story is one of “resilience and creativity, of antislavery and antiracist possibilities, and of backlash and loss, dreams dashed and deferred.”  Dr. David Waldstreicher is distinguished professor of history, American Studies, and Africana Studies at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. His research interests include U.S. cultural and political history, colonial and early US, African American history, slaver, and antislavery. He is the author of Slavery's Constitution: From Revolution to Ratification (Hill and Wang) and Runaway American: Benjamin Franklin, Slavery, and the American Revolution (Farrar, Strauss & Giroux). His public facing writing includes contributions to The New York Times Book Review, the Boston Review, and The Atlantic. Susan Liebell is a Professor of Political Science at Saint Joseph's University in Philadelphia. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

New Books in Biography
David Waldstreicher, "The Odyssey of Phillis Wheatley: A Poet's Journeys Through American Slavery and Independence" (FSG, 2023)

New Books in Biography

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2023 69:43


Thy Power, O Liberty, make strong the weak, And (wond'rous instinct) Ethiopians speak. At the age of 19, Phillis Wheatley published the first book in English by a person of African descent and the third book of poetry by a North American Woman. She was a poet but also a political actor and celebrity – the most famous African in North America and Europe during the era of the American Revolution. George Washington wrote to her. Thomas Jefferson ridiculed her.  In The Odyssey of Phillis Wheatley: A Poet's Journeys Through American Slavery and Independence (FSG, 2023) – a joint exercise in history and literary criticism, Dr. David Waldstreicher writes that Wheatley is “Homer and Odysseus and the slaves and the women they knew or imagined. She aimed for the universal without forgetting who was suffering most and why.” Reading Wheatley's poetry in historical context reveals the extent to which the American Revolution both strengthened and limited black slavery – and also how Wheatley herself affected the debates about American slavery and independence. Mastering the Bible, Greek and Latin translations, and the works of Pope and Milton, Wheatley composed elegies for local elites, celebrated political events, and praised warriors. Despite her skill, knowledge, and fame, she often had to write indirectly about subjects that mattered deeply to her – race, slavery, and discontent with British rule. During a period in which writing was central to political conversation, she used her verse to lampoon, question, and assert the injustice of her enslaved condition. As Waldstreicher demonstrates, Wheatley wrote about events and people – turning what was available and acceptable for a person in her position into poetry that could be read for its art – but also subversively for its political ideas. He concludes that her work proves that the story of the American revolution and Phillis Wheatley are inextricably joined – and that story is one of “resilience and creativity, of antislavery and antiracist possibilities, and of backlash and loss, dreams dashed and deferred.”  Dr. David Waldstreicher is distinguished professor of history, American Studies, and Africana Studies at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. His research interests include U.S. cultural and political history, colonial and early US, African American history, slaver, and antislavery. He is the author of Slavery's Constitution: From Revolution to Ratification (Hill and Wang) and Runaway American: Benjamin Franklin, Slavery, and the American Revolution (Farrar, Strauss & Giroux). His public facing writing includes contributions to The New York Times Book Review, the Boston Review, and The Atlantic. Susan Liebell is a Professor of Political Science at Saint Joseph's University in Philadelphia. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/biography

New Books in American Studies
David Waldstreicher, "The Odyssey of Phillis Wheatley: A Poet's Journeys Through American Slavery and Independence" (FSG, 2023)

New Books in American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2023 69:43


Thy Power, O Liberty, make strong the weak, And (wond'rous instinct) Ethiopians speak. At the age of 19, Phillis Wheatley published the first book in English by a person of African descent and the third book of poetry by a North American Woman. She was a poet but also a political actor and celebrity – the most famous African in North America and Europe during the era of the American Revolution. George Washington wrote to her. Thomas Jefferson ridiculed her.  In The Odyssey of Phillis Wheatley: A Poet's Journeys Through American Slavery and Independence (FSG, 2023) – a joint exercise in history and literary criticism, Dr. David Waldstreicher writes that Wheatley is “Homer and Odysseus and the slaves and the women they knew or imagined. She aimed for the universal without forgetting who was suffering most and why.” Reading Wheatley's poetry in historical context reveals the extent to which the American Revolution both strengthened and limited black slavery – and also how Wheatley herself affected the debates about American slavery and independence. Mastering the Bible, Greek and Latin translations, and the works of Pope and Milton, Wheatley composed elegies for local elites, celebrated political events, and praised warriors. Despite her skill, knowledge, and fame, she often had to write indirectly about subjects that mattered deeply to her – race, slavery, and discontent with British rule. During a period in which writing was central to political conversation, she used her verse to lampoon, question, and assert the injustice of her enslaved condition. As Waldstreicher demonstrates, Wheatley wrote about events and people – turning what was available and acceptable for a person in her position into poetry that could be read for its art – but also subversively for its political ideas. He concludes that her work proves that the story of the American revolution and Phillis Wheatley are inextricably joined – and that story is one of “resilience and creativity, of antislavery and antiracist possibilities, and of backlash and loss, dreams dashed and deferred.”  Dr. David Waldstreicher is distinguished professor of history, American Studies, and Africana Studies at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. His research interests include U.S. cultural and political history, colonial and early US, African American history, slaver, and antislavery. He is the author of Slavery's Constitution: From Revolution to Ratification (Hill and Wang) and Runaway American: Benjamin Franklin, Slavery, and the American Revolution (Farrar, Strauss & Giroux). His public facing writing includes contributions to The New York Times Book Review, the Boston Review, and The Atlantic. Susan Liebell is a Professor of Political Science at Saint Joseph's University in Philadelphia. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

New Books Network
David Waldstreicher, "The Odyssey of Phillis Wheatley: A Poet's Journeys Through American Slavery and Independence" (FSG, 2023)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2023 69:43


Thy Power, O Liberty, make strong the weak, And (wond'rous instinct) Ethiopians speak. At the age of 19, Phillis Wheatley published the first book in English by a person of African descent and the third book of poetry by a North American Woman. She was a poet but also a political actor and celebrity – the most famous African in North America and Europe during the era of the American Revolution. George Washington wrote to her. Thomas Jefferson ridiculed her.  In The Odyssey of Phillis Wheatley: A Poet's Journeys Through American Slavery and Independence (FSG, 2023) – a joint exercise in history and literary criticism, Dr. David Waldstreicher writes that Wheatley is “Homer and Odysseus and the slaves and the women they knew or imagined. She aimed for the universal without forgetting who was suffering most and why.” Reading Wheatley's poetry in historical context reveals the extent to which the American Revolution both strengthened and limited black slavery – and also how Wheatley herself affected the debates about American slavery and independence. Mastering the Bible, Greek and Latin translations, and the works of Pope and Milton, Wheatley composed elegies for local elites, celebrated political events, and praised warriors. Despite her skill, knowledge, and fame, she often had to write indirectly about subjects that mattered deeply to her – race, slavery, and discontent with British rule. During a period in which writing was central to political conversation, she used her verse to lampoon, question, and assert the injustice of her enslaved condition. As Waldstreicher demonstrates, Wheatley wrote about events and people – turning what was available and acceptable for a person in her position into poetry that could be read for its art – but also subversively for its political ideas. He concludes that her work proves that the story of the American revolution and Phillis Wheatley are inextricably joined – and that story is one of “resilience and creativity, of antislavery and antiracist possibilities, and of backlash and loss, dreams dashed and deferred.”  Dr. David Waldstreicher is distinguished professor of history, American Studies, and Africana Studies at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. His research interests include U.S. cultural and political history, colonial and early US, African American history, slaver, and antislavery. He is the author of Slavery's Constitution: From Revolution to Ratification (Hill and Wang) and Runaway American: Benjamin Franklin, Slavery, and the American Revolution (Farrar, Strauss & Giroux). His public facing writing includes contributions to The New York Times Book Review, the Boston Review, and The Atlantic. Susan Liebell is a Professor of Political Science at Saint Joseph's University in Philadelphia. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Literary Studies
David Waldstreicher, "The Odyssey of Phillis Wheatley: A Poet's Journeys Through American Slavery and Independence" (FSG, 2023)

New Books in Literary Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2023 69:43


Thy Power, O Liberty, make strong the weak, And (wond'rous instinct) Ethiopians speak. At the age of 19, Phillis Wheatley published the first book in English by a person of African descent and the third book of poetry by a North American Woman. She was a poet but also a political actor and celebrity – the most famous African in North America and Europe during the era of the American Revolution. George Washington wrote to her. Thomas Jefferson ridiculed her.  In The Odyssey of Phillis Wheatley: A Poet's Journeys Through American Slavery and Independence (FSG, 2023) – a joint exercise in history and literary criticism, Dr. David Waldstreicher writes that Wheatley is “Homer and Odysseus and the slaves and the women they knew or imagined. She aimed for the universal without forgetting who was suffering most and why.” Reading Wheatley's poetry in historical context reveals the extent to which the American Revolution both strengthened and limited black slavery – and also how Wheatley herself affected the debates about American slavery and independence. Mastering the Bible, Greek and Latin translations, and the works of Pope and Milton, Wheatley composed elegies for local elites, celebrated political events, and praised warriors. Despite her skill, knowledge, and fame, she often had to write indirectly about subjects that mattered deeply to her – race, slavery, and discontent with British rule. During a period in which writing was central to political conversation, she used her verse to lampoon, question, and assert the injustice of her enslaved condition. As Waldstreicher demonstrates, Wheatley wrote about events and people – turning what was available and acceptable for a person in her position into poetry that could be read for its art – but also subversively for its political ideas. He concludes that her work proves that the story of the American revolution and Phillis Wheatley are inextricably joined – and that story is one of “resilience and creativity, of antislavery and antiracist possibilities, and of backlash and loss, dreams dashed and deferred.”  Dr. David Waldstreicher is distinguished professor of history, American Studies, and Africana Studies at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. His research interests include U.S. cultural and political history, colonial and early US, African American history, slaver, and antislavery. He is the author of Slavery's Constitution: From Revolution to Ratification (Hill and Wang) and Runaway American: Benjamin Franklin, Slavery, and the American Revolution (Farrar, Strauss & Giroux). His public facing writing includes contributions to The New York Times Book Review, the Boston Review, and The Atlantic. Susan Liebell is a Professor of Political Science at Saint Joseph's University in Philadelphia. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/literary-studies

New Books in Political Science
David Waldstreicher, "The Odyssey of Phillis Wheatley: A Poet's Journeys Through American Slavery and Independence" (FSG, 2023)

New Books in Political Science

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2023 69:43


Thy Power, O Liberty, make strong the weak, And (wond'rous instinct) Ethiopians speak. At the age of 19, Phillis Wheatley published the first book in English by a person of African descent and the third book of poetry by a North American Woman. She was a poet but also a political actor and celebrity – the most famous African in North America and Europe during the era of the American Revolution. George Washington wrote to her. Thomas Jefferson ridiculed her.  In The Odyssey of Phillis Wheatley: A Poet's Journeys Through American Slavery and Independence (FSG, 2023) – a joint exercise in history and literary criticism, Dr. David Waldstreicher writes that Wheatley is “Homer and Odysseus and the slaves and the women they knew or imagined. She aimed for the universal without forgetting who was suffering most and why.” Reading Wheatley's poetry in historical context reveals the extent to which the American Revolution both strengthened and limited black slavery – and also how Wheatley herself affected the debates about American slavery and independence. Mastering the Bible, Greek and Latin translations, and the works of Pope and Milton, Wheatley composed elegies for local elites, celebrated political events, and praised warriors. Despite her skill, knowledge, and fame, she often had to write indirectly about subjects that mattered deeply to her – race, slavery, and discontent with British rule. During a period in which writing was central to political conversation, she used her verse to lampoon, question, and assert the injustice of her enslaved condition. As Waldstreicher demonstrates, Wheatley wrote about events and people – turning what was available and acceptable for a person in her position into poetry that could be read for its art – but also subversively for its political ideas. He concludes that her work proves that the story of the American revolution and Phillis Wheatley are inextricably joined – and that story is one of “resilience and creativity, of antislavery and antiracist possibilities, and of backlash and loss, dreams dashed and deferred.”  Dr. David Waldstreicher is distinguished professor of history, American Studies, and Africana Studies at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. His research interests include U.S. cultural and political history, colonial and early US, African American history, slaver, and antislavery. He is the author of Slavery's Constitution: From Revolution to Ratification (Hill and Wang) and Runaway American: Benjamin Franklin, Slavery, and the American Revolution (Farrar, Strauss & Giroux). His public facing writing includes contributions to The New York Times Book Review, the Boston Review, and The Atlantic. Susan Liebell is a Professor of Political Science at Saint Joseph's University in Philadelphia. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/political-science

New Books in History
David Waldstreicher, "The Odyssey of Phillis Wheatley: A Poet's Journeys Through American Slavery and Independence" (FSG, 2023)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2023 69:43


Thy Power, O Liberty, make strong the weak, And (wond'rous instinct) Ethiopians speak. At the age of 19, Phillis Wheatley published the first book in English by a person of African descent and the third book of poetry by a North American Woman. She was a poet but also a political actor and celebrity – the most famous African in North America and Europe during the era of the American Revolution. George Washington wrote to her. Thomas Jefferson ridiculed her.  In The Odyssey of Phillis Wheatley: A Poet's Journeys Through American Slavery and Independence (FSG, 2023) – a joint exercise in history and literary criticism, Dr. David Waldstreicher writes that Wheatley is “Homer and Odysseus and the slaves and the women they knew or imagined. She aimed for the universal without forgetting who was suffering most and why.” Reading Wheatley's poetry in historical context reveals the extent to which the American Revolution both strengthened and limited black slavery – and also how Wheatley herself affected the debates about American slavery and independence. Mastering the Bible, Greek and Latin translations, and the works of Pope and Milton, Wheatley composed elegies for local elites, celebrated political events, and praised warriors. Despite her skill, knowledge, and fame, she often had to write indirectly about subjects that mattered deeply to her – race, slavery, and discontent with British rule. During a period in which writing was central to political conversation, she used her verse to lampoon, question, and assert the injustice of her enslaved condition. As Waldstreicher demonstrates, Wheatley wrote about events and people – turning what was available and acceptable for a person in her position into poetry that could be read for its art – but also subversively for its political ideas. He concludes that her work proves that the story of the American revolution and Phillis Wheatley are inextricably joined – and that story is one of “resilience and creativity, of antislavery and antiracist possibilities, and of backlash and loss, dreams dashed and deferred.”  Dr. David Waldstreicher is distinguished professor of history, American Studies, and Africana Studies at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. His research interests include U.S. cultural and political history, colonial and early US, African American history, slaver, and antislavery. He is the author of Slavery's Constitution: From Revolution to Ratification (Hill and Wang) and Runaway American: Benjamin Franklin, Slavery, and the American Revolution (Farrar, Strauss & Giroux). His public facing writing includes contributions to The New York Times Book Review, the Boston Review, and The Atlantic. Susan Liebell is a Professor of Political Science at Saint Joseph's University in Philadelphia. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in African American Studies
David Waldstreicher, "The Odyssey of Phillis Wheatley: A Poet's Journeys Through American Slavery and Independence" (FSG, 2023)

New Books in African American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2023 69:43


Thy Power, O Liberty, make strong the weak, And (wond'rous instinct) Ethiopians speak. At the age of 19, Phillis Wheatley published the first book in English by a person of African descent and the third book of poetry by a North American Woman. She was a poet but also a political actor and celebrity – the most famous African in North America and Europe during the era of the American Revolution. George Washington wrote to her. Thomas Jefferson ridiculed her.  In The Odyssey of Phillis Wheatley: A Poet's Journeys Through American Slavery and Independence (FSG, 2023) – a joint exercise in history and literary criticism, Dr. David Waldstreicher writes that Wheatley is “Homer and Odysseus and the slaves and the women they knew or imagined. She aimed for the universal without forgetting who was suffering most and why.” Reading Wheatley's poetry in historical context reveals the extent to which the American Revolution both strengthened and limited black slavery – and also how Wheatley herself affected the debates about American slavery and independence. Mastering the Bible, Greek and Latin translations, and the works of Pope and Milton, Wheatley composed elegies for local elites, celebrated political events, and praised warriors. Despite her skill, knowledge, and fame, she often had to write indirectly about subjects that mattered deeply to her – race, slavery, and discontent with British rule. During a period in which writing was central to political conversation, she used her verse to lampoon, question, and assert the injustice of her enslaved condition. As Waldstreicher demonstrates, Wheatley wrote about events and people – turning what was available and acceptable for a person in her position into poetry that could be read for its art – but also subversively for its political ideas. He concludes that her work proves that the story of the American revolution and Phillis Wheatley are inextricably joined – and that story is one of “resilience and creativity, of antislavery and antiracist possibilities, and of backlash and loss, dreams dashed and deferred.”  Dr. David Waldstreicher is distinguished professor of history, American Studies, and Africana Studies at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. His research interests include U.S. cultural and political history, colonial and early US, African American history, slaver, and antislavery. He is the author of Slavery's Constitution: From Revolution to Ratification (Hill and Wang) and Runaway American: Benjamin Franklin, Slavery, and the American Revolution (Farrar, Strauss & Giroux). His public facing writing includes contributions to The New York Times Book Review, the Boston Review, and The Atlantic. Susan Liebell is a Professor of Political Science at Saint Joseph's University in Philadelphia. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/african-american-studies

RNZ: Nine To Noon
Middle East correspondent Sebastian Usher

RNZ: Nine To Noon

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2023 12:52


Sebastian says among the number of issues in Israel at the moment is the controversial judicial overhaul and the intensifying conflict with Palestinians. In Syria, there've been days of anti- government protests in the south of the country, Sebastian backgrounds what's motivating them and assesses the threat they pose to President Bashar al-Assad. And there's been a disturbing report about the hundreds of Ethiopian migrants killed in the past year at the Saudi Arabia border with Yemen. Sebastian Usher is a BBC Middle East analyst, editor and reporter.

CITIUS MAG Podcast with Chris Chavez
WORLD ATHLETICS CHAMPIONSHIPS DAY 8 RECAP

CITIUS MAG Podcast with Chris Chavez

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2023 71:32


From the stadium to the roads of Budapest, we saw a full day of action for the penultimate day at the World Championships! Chris Chavez, Kyle Merber, Jasmine Todd and David McCarthy unpack Day 8's biggest moments. We witnessed U.S. sweeps in both the men's and women's 4x100m relays, dominant performances in the men's pole vault and women's 5000m, inspirational finishes in the women's marathon, and lots more.  Some of the highlights of Day 8 include: – Women's marathon: Amane Bariso became the marathon champion by running 2:24:23 and led a 1-2 Ethiopian finish with Gotytom Gebreslase + Lindsay Flanagan finished inside the top 10 with a 2:27:47 9th place finish for the U.S. – Men's 800m final: Marco Arop made a big move on the final backstretch and came away with the victory in 1:44.24 after placing bronze at last year's championships. – Women's 5000m: With a 14:53.88 finish and a 56.69 last lap, Kipyegon held off Sifan Hassan and Beatrice Chebet to win her 2nd gold medal of the week and first in the 5000m.  – Men's Pole Vault: Mondo Duplantis won his third straight global pole vault title with a 6.10m leap and just barely missed a world record attempt at 6.22m. – Men's 4x100m relay: Team USA took the win in a world-leading 37.38 over Jamaica and Italy + Noah Lyles became a triple gold medalist.  – The U.S. women made it a sprint sweep over Jamaica with a 41.03 championship record + Sha'Carri Richardson picked up her 2nd gold & 3rd medal of the championship.  – Much more! As an official partner of World Athletics, ASICS is proud to support all of CITIUS MAG's content throughout this year's World Athletics Championships Budapest 2023. CITIUS MAG is the premier destination for real-time competition updates, in-depth analysis and interviews with your favorite track and field athletes. CITIUS MAG LIVE AT WORLDS: The show will air on the CITIUS MAG YouTube Channel between the morning and evening sessions of competition (Every day at 8 a.m. EST in the U.S.).  CHAMPS CHATS ON THE CITIUS MAG PODCAST DAILY: The CITIUS MAG team of Chris, Kyle, David McCarthy, Jasmine Todd and Katelyn Hutchison will unpack all of the day's biggest surprises and offer up their insights and analysis from being at the new National Athletics Centre and interviewing athletes each day. The podcast recording will be streamed on YouTube at the end of every day and will be also available on The CITIUS MAG Podcast feed on Apple Podcasts, Spotify or wherever you listen to shows.  DAILY CITIUS MAG NEWSLETTER: David Melly will recap all of the biggest moments, highlighting his must-watch athletes and events for each day while also pulling together some of our best content, photos and social moments that the CITIUS MAG team captures.

Crashing the War Party
Lyle Goldstein: Not feeling great about being right on Ukraine

Crashing the War Party

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2023 40:09


Eighteen months into the war in Ukraine and the picture is grim. After so many US officials — including former military — pumped up the prospects of the Ukraine counteroffensive — it looks like the conflict is headed into a bloody stalemate if not a Russian rout. Lyle Goldstein, Director of the Asia Engagement program at Defense Priorities, has been one of the more sober voices calling for a diplomatic pathway rather than a commitment to endless war, because, as a military historian and strategist he could see that the Russians had the advantage from the beginning of the year. He returns to the show to talk about what went wrong and where things can go from here. In the first segment, Kelley & Dan discuss this week's Human Rights Watch report that charges Saudi Arabia of systematically killing hundreds — perhaps even thousands — of Ethiopian migrants at the Saudi border. If true, how can Biden continue to justify reported plans to deliver goodies for Riyadh  — including a security pact and sophisticated US weaponry — in exchange for Saudi-Israel normalization?More from Lyle Goldstein:China Studies Nuclear Risk in the Context of the Ukraine War, with Nathan Waecher, The Diplomat, 7/21/23Is the Ukraine War moving toward a ‘Korea solution'?, Responsible Statecraft, 1/30/23Seeking Alternatives to Military Escalation in the Ukraine War, Inkstick, 11/16/22 This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit crashingthewarparty.substack.com

Good Morning, RVA!
Good morning, RVA: Harmful policies, progressive precedents, public housing

Good Morning, RVA!

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2023


I'm an old person who doesn't really enjoy live music and spends most of his listening time with strange metal from Europe or old Ethiopian jazz.

African Father in America
The Witness of a Rat is Another Rat | African Proverbs | AFIAPodcast

African Father in America

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2023 33:37


The Witness of a Rat is Another Rat | African Proverbs | AFIAPodcast In this episode of our African Wisdom Series, we dive into the intriguing Ethiopian proverb, "The Witness of a Rat is Another Rat." Join us as we unravel the meaning behind this thought-provoking saying, exploring its cultural significance and relevance in today's world. This proverb offers a unique perspective on trust, reliability, and the complexities of human interactions. Let's journey together through the wisdom of Ethiopia's rich heritage. Don't miss out on this enlightening exploration! Share your thoughts on this proverb in the comments below. SUBSCRIBE to get Daily African Proverbs and their meaning in your life https://rb.gy/jdavpn Madaraka Festival: https://madarakafestival.com/ My New Book: Get your copy of Rooted In Love and dive deep into the world of love, and self-discovery. https://store.bookbaby.com/book/rooted-in-love RESOURCES: 1. Descript: Get the perfect production setup with Descript - the audio and video editing experts that make sure your content looks top-notch. https://www.descript.com/?lmref=877QnQ 2. Hostwinds: Get your web hosting sorted with HostWinds – the Webhosting experts that make sure you don't have to worry about your website. https://www.hostwinds.com/12980.html 3. Ecamm: Get the perfect streaming setup with Ecamm Live - the live streaming experts that make sure your show looks polished and professional. https://www.ecamm.com/mac/ecammlive/?fp_ref=simon80 4, Gusto: Looking for a reliable and user-friendly payroll and HR solution for your business? Look no further than Gusto! https://gusto.com/d/simon6633 ******************************

One Sentence News
OSN / August 23, 2023

One Sentence News

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2023 4:16


Learn more about this podcast or subscribe to the email version at OneSentenceNews.com.In this episode:Judge rejects AI copyright claimEcuador votes to ban oil drilling in part of Amazon and mining outside QuitoSaudi border guards killed 100s of Ethiopian migrants, new report says ★ Support this podcast on Patreon ★ Get full access to One Sentence News at onesentencenews.substack.com/subscribe

ESV: Straight through the Bible
August 23: Jeremiah 38–41

ESV: Straight through the Bible

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2023 13:48


Jeremiah 38–41 Jeremiah 38–41 (Listen) Jeremiah Cast into the Cistern 38 Now Shephatiah the son of Mattan, Gedaliah the son of Pashhur, Jucal the son of Shelemiah, and Pashhur the son of Malchiah heard the words that Jeremiah was saying to all the people: 2 “Thus says the LORD: He who stays in this city shall die by the sword, by famine, and by pestilence, but he who goes out to the Chaldeans shall live. He shall have his life as a prize of war, and live. 3 Thus says the LORD: This city shall surely be given into the hand of the army of the king of Babylon and be taken.” 4 Then the officials said to the king, “Let this man be put to death, for he is weakening the hands of the soldiers who are left in this city, and the hands of all the people, by speaking such words to them. For this man is not seeking the welfare of this people, but their harm.” 5 King Zedekiah said, “Behold, he is in your hands, for the king can do nothing against you.” 6 So they took Jeremiah and cast him into the cistern of Malchiah, the king's son, which was in the court of the guard, letting Jeremiah down by ropes. And there was no water in the cistern, but only mud, and Jeremiah sank in the mud. Jeremiah Rescued from the Cistern 7 When Ebed-melech the Ethiopian, a eunuch who was in the king's house, heard that they had put Jeremiah into the cistern—the king was sitting in the Benjamin Gate—8 Ebed-melech went from the king's house and said to the king, 9 “My lord the king, these men have done evil in all that they did to Jeremiah the prophet by casting him into the cistern, and he will die there of hunger, for there is no bread left in the city.” 10 Then the king commanded Ebed-melech the Ethiopian, “Take thirty men with you from here, and lift Jeremiah the prophet out of the cistern before he dies.” 11 So Ebed-melech took the men with him and went to the house of the king, to a wardrobe in the storehouse, and took from there old rags and worn-out clothes, which he let down to Jeremiah in the cistern by ropes. 12 Then Ebed-melech the Ethiopian said to Jeremiah, “Put the rags and clothes between your armpits and the ropes.” Jeremiah did so. 13 Then they drew Jeremiah up with ropes and lifted him out of the cistern. And Jeremiah remained in the court of the guard. Jeremiah Warns Zedekiah Again 14 King Zedekiah sent for Jeremiah the prophet and received him at the third entrance of the temple of the LORD. The king said to Jeremiah, “I will ask you a question; hide nothing from me.” 15 Jeremiah said to Zedekiah, “If I tell you, will you not surely put me to death? And if I give you counsel, you will not listen to me.” 16 Then King Zedekiah swore secretly to Jeremiah, “As the LORD lives, who made our souls, I will not put you to death or deliver you into the hand of these men who seek your life.” 17 Then Jeremiah said to Zedekiah, “Thus says the LORD, the God of hosts, the God of Israel: If you will surrender to the officials of the king of Babylon, then your life shall be spared, and this city shall not be burned with fire, and you and your house shall live. 18 But if you do not surrender to the officials of the king of Babylon, then this city shall be given into the hand of the Chaldeans, and they shall burn it with fire, and you shall not escape from their hand.” 19 King Zedekiah said to Jeremiah, “I am afraid of the Judeans who have deserted to the Chaldeans, lest I be handed over to them and they deal cruelly with me.” 20 Jeremiah said, “You shall not be given to them. Obey now the voice of the LORD in what I say to you, and it shall be well with you, and your life shall be spared. 21 But if you refuse to surrender, this is the vision which the LORD has shown to me: 22 Behold, all the women left in the house of the king of Judah were being led out to the officials of the king of Babylon and were saying,   “‘Your trusted friends have deceived you    and prevailed against you;  now that your feet are sunk in the mud,    they turn away from you.' 23 All your wives and your sons shall be led out to the Chaldeans, and you yourself shall not escape from their hand, but shall be seized by the king of Babylon, and this city shall be burned with fire.” 24 Then Zedekiah said to Jeremiah, “Let no one know of these words, and you shall not die. 25 If the officials hear that I have spoken with you and come to you and say to you, ‘Tell us what you said to the king and what the king said to you; hide nothing from us and we will not put you to death,' 26 then you shall say to them, ‘I made a humble plea to the king that he would not send me back to the house of Jonathan to die there.'” 27 Then all the officials came to Jeremiah and asked him, and he answered them as the king had instructed him. So they stopped speaking with him, for the conversation had not been overheard. 28 And Jeremiah remained in the court of the guard until the day that Jerusalem was taken. The Fall of Jerusalem 39 In the ninth year of Zedekiah king of Judah, in the tenth month, Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon and all his army came against Jerusalem and besieged it. 2 In the eleventh year of Zedekiah, in the fourth month, on the ninth day of the month, a breach was made in the city. 3 Then all the officials of the king of Babylon came and sat in the middle gate: Nergal-sar-ezer of Samgar, Nebu-sar-sekim the Rab-saris, Nergal-sar-ezer the Rab-mag, with all the rest of the officers of the king of Babylon. 4 When Zedekiah king of Judah and all the soldiers saw them, they fled, going out of the city at night by way of the king's garden through the gate between the two walls; and they went toward the Arabah. 5 But the army of the Chaldeans pursued them and overtook Zedekiah in the plains of Jericho. And when they had taken him, they brought him up to Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon, at Riblah, in the land of Hamath; and he passed sentence on him. 6 The king of Babylon slaughtered the sons of Zedekiah at Riblah before his eyes, and the king of Babylon slaughtered all the nobles of Judah. 7 He put out the eyes of Zedekiah and bound him in chains to take him to Babylon. 8 The Chaldeans burned the king's house and the house of the people, and broke down the walls of Jerusalem. 9 Then Nebuzaradan, the captain of the guard, carried into exile to Babylon the rest of the people who were left in the city, those who had deserted to him, and the people who remained. 10 Nebuzaradan, the captain of the guard, left in the land of Judah some of the poor people who owned nothing, and gave them vineyards and fields at the same time. The Lord Delivers Jeremiah 11 Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon gave command concerning Jeremiah through Nebuzaradan, the captain of the guard, saying, 12 “Take him, look after him well, and do him no harm, but deal with him as he tells you.” 13 So Nebuzaradan the captain of the guard, Nebushazban the Rab-saris, Nergal-sar-ezer the Rab-mag, and all the chief officers of the king of Babylon 14 sent and took Jeremiah from the court of the guard. They entrusted him to Gedaliah the son of Ahikam, son of Shaphan, that he should take him home. So he lived among the people. 15 The word of the LORD came to Jeremiah while he was shut up in the court of the guard: 16 “Go, and say to Ebed-melech the Ethiopian, ‘Thus says the LORD of hosts, the God of Israel: Behold, I will fulfill my words against this city for harm and not for good, and they shall be accomplished before you on that day. 17 But I will deliver you on that day, declares the LORD, and you shall not be given into the hand of the men of whom you are afraid. 18 For I will surely save you, and you shall not fall by the sword, but you shall have your life as a prize of war, because you have put your trust in me, declares the LORD.'” Jeremiah Remains in Judah 40 The word that came to Jeremiah from the LORD after Nebuzaradan the captain of the guard had let him go from Ramah, when he took him bound in chains along with all the captives of Jerusalem and Judah who were being exiled to Babylon. 2 The captain of the guard took Jeremiah and said to him, “The LORD your God pronounced this disaster against this place. 3 The LORD has brought it about, and has done as he said. Because you sinned against the LORD and did not obey his voice, this thing has come upon you. 4 Now, behold, I release you today from the chains on your hands. If it seems good to you to come with me to Babylon, come, and I will look after you well, but if it seems wrong to you to come with me to Babylon, do not come. See, the whole land is before you; go wherever you think it good and right to go. 5 If you remain,1 then return to Gedaliah the son of Ahikam, son of Shaphan, whom the king of Babylon appointed governor of the cities of Judah, and dwell with him among the people. Or go wherever you think it right to go.” So the captain of the guard gave him an allowance of food and a present, and let him go. 6 Then Jeremiah went to Gedaliah the son of Ahikam, at Mizpah, and lived with him among the people who were left in the land. 7 When all the captains of the forces in the open country and their men heard that the king of Babylon had appointed Gedaliah the son of Ahikam governor in the land and had committed to him men, women, and children, those of the poorest of the land who had not been taken into exile to Babylon, 8 they went to Gedaliah at Mizpah—Ishmael the son of Nethaniah, Johanan the son of Kareah, Seraiah the son of Tanhumeth, the sons of Ephai the Netophathite, Jezaniah the son of the Maacathite, they and their men. 9 Gedaliah the son of Ahikam, son of Shaphan, swore to them and their men, saying, “Do not be afraid to serve the Chaldeans. Dwell in the land and serve the king of Babylon, and it shall be well with you. 10 As for me, I will dwell at Mizpah, to represent you before the Chaldeans who will come to us. But as for you, gather wine and summer fruits and oil, and store them in your vessels, and dwell in your cities that you have taken.” 11 Likewise, when all the Judeans who were in Moab and among the Ammonites and in Edom and in other lands heard that the king of Babylon had left a remnant in Judah and had appointed Gedaliah the son of Ahikam, son of Shaphan, as governor over them, 12 then all the Judeans returned from all the places to which they had been driven and came to the land of Judah, to Gedaliah at Mizpah. And they gathered wine and summer fruits in great abundance. 13 Now Johanan the son of Kareah and all the leaders of the forces in the open country came to Gedaliah at Mizpah 14 and said to him, “Do you know that Baalis the king of the Ammonites has sent Ishmael the son of Nethaniah to take your life?” But Gedaliah the son of Ahikam would not believe them. 15 Then Johanan the son of Kareah spoke secretly to Gedaliah at Mizpah, “Please let me go and strike down Ishmael the son of Nethaniah, and no one will know it. Why should he take your life, so that all the Judeans who are gathered about you would be scattered, and the remnant of Judah would perish?” 16 But Gedaliah the son of Ahikam said to Johanan the son of Kareah, “You shall not do this thing, for you are speaking falsely of Ishmael.” Gedaliah Murdered 41 In the seventh month, Ishmael the son of Nethaniah, son of Elishama, of the royal family, one of the chief officers of the king, came with ten men to Gedaliah the son of Ahikam, at Mizpah. As they ate bread together there at Mizpah, 2 Ishmael the son of Nethaniah and the ten men with him rose up and struck down Gedaliah the son of Ahikam, son of Shaphan, with the sword, and killed him, whom the king of Babylon had appointed governor in the land. 3 Ishmael also struck down all the Judeans who were with Gedaliah at Mizpah, and the Chaldean soldiers who happened to be there. 4 On the day after the murder of Gedaliah, before anyone knew of it, 5 eighty men arrived from Shechem and Shiloh and Samaria, with their beards shaved and their clothes torn, and their bodies gashed, bringing grain offerings and incense to present at the temple of the LORD. 6 And Ishmael the son of Nethaniah came out from Mizpah to meet them, weeping as he came. As he met them, he said to them, “Come in to Gedaliah the son of Ahikam.” 7 When they came into the city, Ishmael the son of Nethaniah and the men with him slaughtered them and cast them into a cistern. 8 But there were ten men among them who said to Ishmael, “Do not put us to death, for we have stores of wheat, barley, oil, and honey hidden in the fields.” So he refrained and did not put them to death with their companions. 9 Now the cistern into which Ishmael had thrown all the bodies of the men whom he had struck down along with2 Gedaliah was the large cistern that King Asa had made for defense against Baasha king of Israel; Ishmael the son of Nethaniah filled it with the slain. 10 Then Ishmael took captive all the rest of the people who were in Mizpah, the king's daughters and all the people who were left at Mizpah, whom Nebuzaradan, the captain of the guard, had committed to Gedaliah the son of Ahikam. Ishmael the son of Nethaniah took them captive and set out to cross over to the Ammonites. 11 But when Johanan the son of Kareah and all the leaders of the forces with him heard of all the evil that Ishmael the son of Nethaniah had done, 12 they took all their men and went to fight against Ishmael the son of Nethaniah. They came upon him at the great pool that is in Gibeon. 13 And when all the people who were with Ishmael saw Johanan the son of Kareah and all the leaders of the forces with him, they rejoiced. 14 So all the people whom Ishmael had carried away captive from Mizpah turned around and came back, and went to Johanan the son of Kareah. 15 But Ishmael the son of Nethaniah escaped from Johanan with eight men, and went to the Ammonites. 16 Then Johanan the son of Kareah and all the leaders of the forces with him took from Mizpah all the rest of the people whom he had recovered from Ishmael the son of Nethaniah, after he had struck down Gedaliah the son of Ahikam—soldiers, women, children, and eunuchs, whom Johanan brought back from Gibeon. 17 And they went and stayed at Geruth Chimham near Bethlehem, intending to go to Egypt 18 because of the Chaldeans. For they were afraid of them, because Ishmael the son of Nethaniah had struck down Gedaliah the son of Ahikam, whom the king of Babylon had made governor over the land. Footnotes [1] 40:5 Syriac; the meaning of the Hebrew phrase is uncertain [2] 41:9 Hebrew by the hand of (ESV)

Inside Running Podcast
303: Ellie Pashley | World Athletics Championships, Week 1 | Myrniong Ekiden Relay

Inside Running Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2023 124:55


303: Ellie Pashley | World Athletics Championships, Week 1 | Myrniong Ekiden Relay    This weeks episode of Inside Running Podcast is proudly sponsored by ASICS. Stability has never felt better than with the GEL-KAYANO™ 30 shoe. Updated with a 4D GUIDANCE SYSTEM™ for support right when you need it and PureGEL™ technology for softer landings every time. Visit ASICS.com or your specialty running store to grab your pair today. Ellie Pashley fills in for Brad has his heart procedure, catching us up on her race at Sunshine Coast Half and plans for the future. Julian tries to balance moving house along with marathon workouts. Brady has a tough race at the Myrniong Ekiden Relays The XCR23 Ekiden Relay was held at St Anne's Winery, Myrniong and the Men's Premier Division was won by Bendigo Region ahead of Western Athletics and Glenhuntly. The Women's Premier Division was won by Glenhuntly ahead of St Stephens Harriers and South Melbourne. AthsVic Results Hub https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zR9sOTwHpqU    As of the conclusion of Day 2 of the World Athletics Championships in Budapest, Hungary Jessica Hull has advanced to the 1500m Final. Linden Hall and Abbey Caldwell reached the semi finals with Abbey running a personal best of 3:59.79. Adam Spencer and Matt Ramsden both made it to the Semi Finals, with Matt getting tangled up in his heat while Stewart McSweyn was unable to place out of the Heats stage. Joshua Cheptegei won his third consecutive 10000m World Championship in a time of 27:51.42 to just hold off Daniel Ebenyo of Kenya and Selemon Barega of Ethiopia. Sifan Hassan brought drama to the 10000m final, stumbling in the final straight as Ethiopian swept the podium with Gudaf Tsegay winning in 31:27.18 ahead of teammates Letesenbet Gidey and Ejgayehu Taye. Matt Clarke ran 8:40.92 for 12th place in his heat of the 3000m Steeplechase. World Athletics Championships Timetable & Results The team then give their preview of the National Cross Country Championships next weekend making their predictions to win the title.   Listener Question of the week asks how far out should you practise fueling for your goal marathon race, Moose goes on the Loose on creating anti-hero narratives for yourself. Patreon Link: https://www.patreon.com/insiderunningpodcast Opening and Closing Music is Undercover of my Skin by Benny Walker. www.bennywalkermusic.com Join the conversation at: https://www.facebook.com/insiderunningpodcast/ To donate and show your support for the show: https://www.paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr?cmd=_s-xclick&hosted_button_id=9K9WQCZNA2KAN

Africa Today
Saudi forces accused of killing hundreds of Ethiopian migrants

Africa Today

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2023 25:21


Saudi border guards are accused of the mass killing of migrants along the Yemeni border in a new report by Human Rights Watch. The report says hundreds of people, many of them Ethiopians who cross war-torn Yemen to reach Saudi Arabia, have been shot dead. We delve into the intricacies of coup attempts, as David Otto, Director for Geneva Centre for Africa Security & Strategic Studies shares insight on the crucial factors that determine their success or failure. Plus we speak to Nigerian music producer and artist Eclipse Nkasi about the ethical way of using AI to produce music.

PBS NewsHour - Segments
News Wrap: Firefighters have success holding back wildfire threatening Yellowknife

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 21, 2023 3:40


In our news wrap Monday, firefighters have had some success holding back a wildfire threatening Yellowknife, two people died in wildfires burning in Washington state, former President Trump agreed to a $200,000 bond in the Georgia election interference case and Human Rights Watch claims that Saudi Arabian border guards killed hundreds of Ethiopian migrants trying to enter their country from Yemen. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders