Podcasts about Authorization

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Best podcasts about Authorization

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Latest podcast episodes about Authorization

The Addiction Psychologist
Policy Brief: Dr. Adam Leventhal Discusses the FDA Authorization of the Marketing of Three New E-Cigarette Products

The Addiction Psychologist

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 10:45


On this new Addiction Psychologist segment, we talk to experts about new policy developments to get a better understanding of the implications for our work, our clients, and our personal lives. On this episode, we talk with Dr. Adam Leventhal about the October 12, 2021 announcement that the FDA has authorized the marketing of three new tobacco products, marking the first set of electronic nicotine delivery system (ENDS) products ever to be authorized by the FDA through the Premarket Tobacco Product Application (PMTA) pathway. Dr. Adam Leventhal is a Professor in the Department of Preventive Medicine and Psychology in the Keck School of Medicine at the University of Southern California and a member of the Tobacco Products Scientific Advisory Committee for the Food and Drug Administration. You can read the full FDA press release here. In the days after the recording of this episode, the FDA made a similar announcement authorizing several oral tobacco products, suggesting that authorizations may occur at a rapid pace in the coming weeks.

Coronavirus 4 1 1  podcast
Coronavirus, COVID-19, coronavirus variants, and vaccine updates for 10-21-2021

Coronavirus 4 1 1 podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 4:49


This is Coronavirus 411, the latest COVID-19 info and new hotspots for October 21st, 2021. Sometimes it just doesn't pay to be the leader of a country during a global pandemic. A leaked document suggests a Brazilian congressional panel is ready to recommend mass homicide charges be brought against President Bolsonaro over how he handled the virus. The charge is he deliberately allowed it to spread in hopes of achieving herd immunity. As we reported yesterday, millions of Russians are under strict new restrictions. In Moscow, all unvaccinated residents over 60, and unvaccinated people with chronic diseases have to lock down at home for four months. Non-working days have also been declared from October 30 to November 7 across Russia. The U.S. released its plan to vaccinate children 5 to 11. They'll be able to get it at their pediatrician's office, a local pharmacy, or maybe even their school. Authorization to use Pfizer in kids is expected in a few weeks and those will be low dose shots. Moderna won't give up how to make its vaccine, so the World Health Organization has hired an African startup to hack the formula. Or at least get as close to it as they can. Moderna's patent is public but the way it's written doesn't disclose everything. Moderna has said several times they won't enforce their intellectual property during the pandemic, so it's safe for the startup to move ahead without much fear of getting sued. They don't have a choice in whether or not to get vaccinated, they haven't organized protests against it, and so far, none of them have even said anything about it. 80 animals at the Cincinnati Zoo got two doses of vaccine designed for veterinary use. Handlers worked for weeks to get the animals comfortable with everything they'd see and feel when they got the injections. In the United States cases were down 22%, deaths are down 14%, and hospitalizations are down 19% over 14 days. The 7-day average of new cases has been trending down since September 13. There are 9,540,596 active cases in the United States. With not all states reporting daily numbers, the five states with the greatest increase in hospitalizations per capita: New Hampshire and Michigan 25%, Minnesota 15%, Colorado 14%, and Montana 9%. The top 10 counties with the highest number of recent cases per capita according to The New York Times: Goshen, WY. Stark, ND. Matanuska-Susitna Borough, AK. Lake, MT. Bethel Census Area, AK. Hale, AL. Hill, MT. Inyo, CA. Arenac, MI. And Orleans, VT. There have been at least 729,434 deaths in the U.S. recorded as Covid-related. The top 3 vaccinating states by percentage of population that's been fully vaccinated: Vermont unchanged at 70.6%, and Connecticut and Rhode Island at 70%. The bottom 3 vaccinating states are West Virginia at 40.9%, Idaho at 43%, and Wyoming at 43.2%. The percentage of the U.S. that's been fully vaccinated is 57.1%. The top five countries with a 24-hour increase in the number of fully vaccinated people: Oceana up 3%. Taiwan, South Korea, and Bangladesh 2%. And Australia 1%. Globally, cases were down 9% and deaths were down 11% over 14 days, with the 7-day average trending down since August 26. There are 17,805,130 active cases around the world. The five countries with the most new cases: The United States 71,809. The U.K. 43,540. Russia 33,740. Turkey 30,862. And Romania 18,863. There have been at least 4,918,215 deaths reported as Covid-related worldwide. For the latest updates, subscribe for free to Coronavirus 411 on your podcast app or ask your smart speaker to play the Coronavirus 411 podcast. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Reopening America
Merck Seeks Authorization for Covid-19 Pill, First Oral Antiviral to Treat Coronavirus

Reopening America

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 10:22


Pharmaceutical company Merck is seeking emergency use authorization for its Covid-19 pill. If approved, it would be the first oral antiviral for Covid. Other treatments such as remdesivir and monoclonal antibody treatments both require an intravenous infusion. The pill reduces risk of hospitalization by 50%. Riley Griffin, healthcare reporter at Bloomberg News, joins us for more on this pill that directly targets the virus. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Mac & Gaydos Show Audio
Merck seeks authorization for new COVID treatment pill

Mac & Gaydos Show Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 30:47


Merck is seeking authorization for their new COVID treatment pill. Will people take it? See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Congressional Dish
CD240: BIF The Infrastructure BILL

Congressional Dish

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 64:20


Jen has been all over the internet lately telling the world that the Bipartisan Infrastructure Framework is a dumpster fire of a bill. In this episode, she backs that up by comparing the levels of investment for different kinds of infrastructure and examining the society changing effects the bill would have if it were to become law. Please Support Congressional Dish – Quick Links Contribute monthly or a lump sum via PayPal Support Congressional Dish via Patreon (donations per episode) Send Zelle payments to: Donation@congressionaldish.com Send Venmo payments to: @Jennifer-Briney Send Cash App payments to: $CongressionalDish or Donation@congressionaldish.com Use your bank's online bill pay function to mail contributions to: 5753 Hwy 85 North, Number 4576, Crestview, FL 32536. Please make checks payable to Congressional Dish Thank you for supporting truly independent media! Background Sources Recommended Congressional Dish Episodes CD218: Minerals Are the New Oil CD205: Nuclear Waste Storage Oil CD073: Amtrak Recommended Articles and Documents Benjamin J. Hulac and Joseph Morton. October 7, 2021. “With GOP sidelined, Manchin steps up to defend fossil fuels.” Roll Call. Connor Sheets, Robert J. Lopez, Rosanna Xia, and Adam Elmahrek. October 4, 2021. “Before O.C. oil spill, platform owner faced bankruptcy, history of regulatory problems.” The Los Angeles Times. Donald Shaw. October 4, 2021. “Criticizing Joe Manchin's Coal Conflicts is ‘Outrageous,' Says Heitkamp.” Sludge. Michael Gold. October 1, 2021. “Congestion Pricing Is Coming to New York. Everyone Has an Opinion.” The New York Times. Utilities Middle East Staff. September 13, 2021. “World's largest carbon capture and storage plant launched.” Utilities. Adele Peters. September 8, 2021. “The first commercial carbon removal plant just opened in Iceland.” Fast Company. Hiroko Tabuchi. August 16, 2021. “For Many, Hydrogen Is the Fuel of the Future. New Research Raises Doubts.” The New York Times. Robert W. Haworth and Mark Z. Jacobson. August 12, 2021. “How green is blue hydrogen?.” Energy Science & Engineering. Emily Cochrane. August 10, 2021. “Senate Passes $1 Trillion Infrastructure Bill, Handing Biden a Bipartisan Win.” The New York Times. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. June 3, 2021. “2020 Fatality Data Show Increased Traffic Fatalities During Pandemic.” U.S. Department of Transportation. Nation Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). May 19, 2021. “What We Know—and Do Not Know—About Achieving a National-Scale 100% Renewable Electric Grid .” Michael Barnard. May 3, 2021. “Small Modular Nuclear Reactors Are Mostly Bad Policy.” CleanTechnica. Hiroko Tabuchi. April 24, 2021. “Halting the Vast Release of Methane Is Critical for Climate, U.N. Says.” The New York Times. Grist Creative. April 15, 2021. “How direct air capture works (and why it's important)” Grist. American Society of Civil Engineers. 2021. “Bridges.” 2021 Report Card for America's Infrastructure. Open Secrets. “Sen. Joe Manchin - West Virginia - Top Industries Contributing 2015-2020.” Savannah Keaton. December 30, 2020. “Can Fuel Cell Vehicles Explode Like ‘Hydrogen Bombs on Wheels'?” Motor Biscuit. Dale K. DuPont. August 6, 2020. “First all-electric ferry in U.S. reaches milestone.” WorkBoat. Hannah Ritchie and Max Roser. 2020. “CO2 and Greenhouse Gas Emissions.” Our World in Data. Jeff Butler. January 27, 2019. “Norway leads an electric ferry revolution.” plugboats.com Our World in Data. Annual CO2 Emissions, 2019. Hydrogen Council. 2019. Frequently Asked Questions. Mark Z. Jacobson et al. September 6, 2017. “100% Clean and Renewable Wind, Water, and Sunlight All-Sector Energy Roadmaps for 139 Countries of the World.” Joule. Kendra Pierre-Louis. August 25, 2017. “Almost every country in the world can power itself with renewable energy.” Popular Science. Chuck Squatriglia. May 12, 2008. “Hydrogen Cars Won't Make a Difference for 40 Years.” Wired. Renewable Energy World. April 22, 2004. “Schwarzenegger Unveils ‘Hydrogen Highways' Plan.” United States Department of Energy. February 2002. A National Vision of America's Transition to a Hydrogen Economy -- to 2030 and Beyond. The Bill H.R. 3684: Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act August 10, 2021 Senate Vote Breakdown July 1, 2021 House Vote Breakdown Jen's Highlighted Version Bill Outline DIVISION A: SURFACE TRANSPORTATION TITLE I - FEDERAL-AID HIGHWAYS Subtitle A - Authorizations and Programs Sec. 11101: Authorization of Appropriations Authorizes appropriations for Federal-Aid for highways at between $52 billion and $56 billion per year through fiscal year 2026. Sec. 11117: Toll Roads, Bridges, Tunnels, and Ferries Authorizes the government to pay up to 85% of the costs of replacing or retrofitting a diesel fuel ferry vessel until the end of fiscal year 2025. Sec. 11118: Bridge Investment Program Authorizes between $600 million and $700 million per year through 2026 (from the Highway Trust Fund) for repairs to bridges If a Federal agency wants grant money to repair a Federally owned bridge, it "shall" consider selling off that asset to the State or local government. Sec. 11119: Safe Routes to School Creates a new program to improve the ability of children to walk and ride their bikes to school by funding projects including sidewalk improvements, speed reduction improvements, crosswalk improvements, bike parking, and traffic diversions away from schools. Up to 30% of the money can be used for public awareness campaigns, media relations, education, and staffing. No additional funding is provided. It will be funded with existing funds for "administrative expenses." Sec. 11121: Construction of Ferry Boats and Ferry Terminal Facilities Authorizes between $110 million and $118 million per year through 2026 (from the Highway Trust Fund) to construct ferry boats and ferry terminals. Subtitle D - Climate Change Sec. 11401: Grants for Charging and Fueling Infrastructure Creates a new grant program with $15 million maximum per grant for governments to build public charging infrastructure for vehicles fueled with electricity, hydrogen, propane, and "natural" gas. The construction of the projects can be contracted out to private companies. Sec. 11402: Reduction of Truck Emissions at Port Facilities Establishes a program to study and test projects that would reduce emissions. Sec. 11403: Carbon Reduction Program Allows, but does not require, the Transportation Secretary to use money for projects related to traffic monitoring, public transportation, trails for pedestrians and bicyclists, congestion management technologies, vehicle-to-infrastructure communications technologies, energy efficient street lighting, congestion pricing to shift transportation demand to non-peak hours, electronic toll collection, installing public chargers for electric, hydrogen, propane, and gas powered vehicles. Sec. 11404: Congestion Relief Program Creates a grant program, funded at a minimum of $10 million per grant, for projects aimed at reducing highway congestion. Eligible projects include congestion management systems, fees for entering cities, deployment of toll lanes, parking fees, and congestion pricing, operating commuter buses and vans, and carpool encouragement programs. Buses, transit, and paratransit vehicles "shall" be allowed to use toll lanes "at a discount rate or without charge." Sec. 11405: Promoting Resilient Operations for Transformative, Efficient, and Cost-saving Transportation (PROTECT) Program Establishes the "PROTECT program", which provides grants for projects to protect some current infrastructure from extreme weather events and climate related changes. Types of grants include grants for "at-risk coastal infrastructure" which specifies that only "non-rail infrastructure is eligible" (such as highways, roads, pedestrian walkways, bike lanes, etc.) Sec. 11406: Healthy Streets Program Establishes a grant program to install reflective pavement and to expand tree cover in order to mitigate urban heat islands, improve air quality, and reduce stormwater run-off and flood risks. Caps each grant at $15 million TITLE III: RESEARCH, TECHNOLOGY, AND EDUCATION Sec. 13001: Strategic Innovation for Revenue Collection Provides grants for pilot projects to test our acceptance of user-based fee collections and their effects on different income groups and people from urban and rural areas. They will test the use of private companies to collect the data and fees. Sec. 13002: National Motor Vehicle Per-mile User Fee Pilot Creates a pilot program to test a national motor vehicle per-mile user fee. DIVISION B - SURFACE TRANSPORTATION INVESTMENT ACT OF 2021 TITLE I - MULTIMODAL AND FREIGHT TRANSPORTATION Sec. 21201: National Infrastructure Project Assistance Authorizes $2 billion total per year until 2026 on projects that cost at least $100 million that include highway, bridge, freight rail, passenger rail, and public transportation projects. Authorizes $1.5 billion total per year until 2026 (which will expire after 3 years) for grants in amount between $1 million and $25 million for projects that include highway, bridge, public transportation, passenger and freight rail, port infrastructure, surface transportation at airports, and more. TITLE II - RAIL Subtitle A - Authorization of Appropriations Sec. 22101: Grants to Amtrak Authorizes appropriations for Amtrak in the Northeast Corridor at between $1.1 billion and $1.57 billion per year through 2026. Authorizes appropriations for Amtrak in the National Network at between $2.2 billion and $3 billion per year through 2026. Subtitle B - Amtrak Reforms Sec. 22201: Amtrak Findings, Mission, and Goals Changes the goal of cooperation between Amtrak, governments, & other rail carriers from "to achieve a performance level sufficient to justify expending public money" to "in order to meet the intercity passenger rail needs of the United States" and expands the service areas beyond "urban" locations. Changes the goals of Amtrak to include "improving its contracts with rail carriers over whose tracks Amtrak operates." Sec. 22208: Passenger Experience Enhancement Food and beverage service: Amtrak will establish a working group... Sec. 22212: Enhancing Cross Border Service Amtrak must submit a report... Sec. 22213: Creating Quality Jobs Amtrak will not be allowed to privatize the jobs previously performed by laid off union workers. Sec. 22214: Amtrak Daily Long Distance Study Amtrak would study bringing back long distance rail routes that were discontinued. Subtitle C - Intercity Passenger Rail Policy Sec. 22304: Restoration and Enhancement Grants Extends the amount of time the government will pay the operating costs of Amtrak or "any rail carrier" that provides passenger rail service from 3 years to 6 years, and pays higher percentages of the the costs. Sec. 22305: Railroad Crossing Elimination Program Creates a program to eliminate highway-rail crossings where vehicles are frequently stopped by trains. Authorizes the construction on tunnels and bridges. Sec. 22306: Interstate Rail Compacts Authorizes up to 10 grants per year valued at a maximum of $ million each to plan and promote new Amtrak routes Sec. 22308: Corridor Identification and Development Program The Secretary of Transportation will create a program for public entities to plan for expanded intercity passenger rail corridors, operated by Amtrak or private companies. When developing plans for corridors, the Secretary has to "consult" with "host railroads for the proposed corridor" Subtitle D - Rail Safety Sec. 22404: Blocked Crossing Portal The Administration of the Federal Railroad Administration would establish a "3 year blocked crossing portal" which would collect information about blocked crossing by trains from the public and first responders and provide every person submitting the complaint the contact information of the "relevant railroad" and would "encourage" them to complain to them too. Information collected would NOT be allowed to be used for any regulatory or enforcement purposes. Sec. 22406: Emergency Lighting The Secretary of Transportation will have to issue a rule requiring that all carriers that transport human passengers have an emergency lighting system that turns on when there is a power failure. Sec. 22409: Positive Train Control Study The Comptroller General will conduct a study to determine the annual operation and maintenance costs for positive train control. Sec. 22423: High-Speed Train Noise Emissions Allows, but does not require, the Secretary of Transportation to create regulations governing the noise levels of trains that exceed 160 mph. Sec. 22425: Requirements for Railroad Freight Cars Placed into Service in the United States Effective 3 years after the regulations are complete (maximum 5 years after this becomes law), freight cars will be prohibited from operating within the United States if more than 15% of it is manufactured in "a country of concern" or state-owned facilities. The Secretary of Transportation can assess fines between $100,000 and $250,000 per freight car. A company that has been found in violation 3 times can be kicked out of the United State's transportation system until they are in compliance and have paid all their fines in full. Sec. 22427: Controlled Substances Testing for Mechanical Employees 180 days after this becomes law, all railroad mechanics will be subject to drug testing, which can be conducted at random. DIVISION C - TRANSIT Sec. 30017: Authorizations Authorizes between $13.3 billion and $14.7 billion per year to be appropriated for transit grants. DIVISION D - ENERGY TITLE I - GRID INFRASTRUCTURE AND RESILIENCY Sec. 40101: Preventing Outages and Enhancing The Resilience of the Electric Grid Creates a $5 billion grant distribution program to electric grid operators, electricity storage operations, electricity generators, transmission owners and operators, distribution suppliers, fuels suppliers, and other entities chosen by the Secretary of Energy. The grants need to be used to reduce the risk that power lines will cause wildfires. States have to match 15%. The company receiving the grant has to match it by 100% (small utilities only have to match 1/3 of the grant.) Grant money be used for micro-grids and battery-storage in addition to obvious power line protection measures. Grant money can not be used to construct a new electricity generating facility, a large-scale battery facility that is not used to prevent "disruptive events", or cybersecurity. The companies are allowed to charge customers for parts of their projects that are not paid for with grant money (so they have to match the grant with their customer's money). Sec. 40112: Demonstration of Electric Vehicle Battery Second-Life Applications for Grid Services Creates a demonstration project to show utility companies that electric car batteries can be used to stabilize the grid and reduce peak loads of homes and businesses. The demonstration project must include a facility that "could particularly benefit" such as a multi-family housing building, a senior care facility, or community health center. TITLE II - SUPPLY CHAINS FOR CLEAN ENERGY TECHNOLOGIES Sec. 40201: Earth Mapping Resources Initiative The US Geological Survey will get $320 million and ten years to map "all of the recoverable critical minerals." Sec. 40204: USGS Energy and Minerals Research Facility Authorizes $167 million to construct a new facility for energy and minerals research. The facility can be on land leased to the government for 99 years by "an academic partner." Requires the USGS to retain ownership of the facility. Sec. 40205: Rare Earth Elements Demonstration Facility Authorizes $140 million to build a rare earth element extractions and separation facility and refinery. Does NOT require the government to retain ownership of the facility. TITLE III - FUELS AND TECHNOLOGY INFRASTRUCTURE INVESTMENTS Subtitle A - Carbon Capture, Utilization, Storage, and Transportation Infrastructure Sec. 40304: Carbon Dioxide Transportation Infrastructure Finance and Innovation Authorizes $600 million for 2022 and 2023 and $300 million for each year between 2024 and 2026 for grants and loan guarantees for projects for transporting captured carbon dioxide. Each project has to cost more than $100 million and the government can pay up to 80% of the costs. If the project is financed with a loan, the company will have 35 years to pay it back, with fees and interest. Loans can be issued via private banks with guarantees provided by the government. Sec. 40305: Carbon Storage Validation and Testing Creates a new program for funding new or expanded large-scale carbon sequestration projects. Authorizes $2.5 billion through 2026. Sec. 40308: Carbon Removal Creates a new program for grants or contracts for projects to that will form "4 regional direct air capture hubs" that will each be able to capture 1 million metric tons of carbon dioxide per year. Authorizes $3.5 billion per year through 2026. Subtitle B - Hydrogen Research and Development Sec. 40313: Clean Hydrogen Research and Development Program Changes a goal of an existing research and development plan for hydrogen fuels (created by the Energy Policy Act of 2005) from enhancing sources of renewable fuels and biofuels for hydrogen production to enhancing those sources and fossil fuels with carbon capture and nuclear energy. Expands the activities of this program to include using hydrogen for power generation, industrial processes including steelmaking, cement, chemical feestocks, and heat production. They intend to transition natural gas pipelines to hydrogen pipelines. They intend for hydrogen to be used for all kinds of vehicles, rail transport, aviation, and maritime transportation. Sec. 40314: Additional Clean Hydrogen Programs Creates a new program to create "4 regional clean hydrogen hubs" for production, processing, delivery, storage, and end-use of "clean hydrogen." At least one regional hub is required to demonstrate the production of "clean hydrogen from fossil fuels." At least one regional hub is required to demonstrate the production of "clean hydrogen from renewable energy." At least one regional hub is required to demonstrate the production of "clean hydrogen from nuclear energy." The four hubs will each demonstrate a different use: Electric power generation, industrial sector uses, residential and commercial heating, and transportation. Requires the development of a strategy "to facilitate widespread production, processing, storage, and use of clean hydrogen", which will include a focus on production using coal. The hydrogen hubs should "leverage natural gas to the maximum extent practicable." Creates a new program to commercialize the production of hydrogen by splitting water into hydrogen and oxygen. The overall goal is to identify barriers, pathways, and policy needs to "transition to a clean hydrogen economy." Authorizes $9.5 billion through 2026. Sec. 40315: Clean Hydrogen Production Qualifications Develops a standard for the term "clean hydrogen" which has a carbon intensity equal to or less than 2 kilograms of carbon dioxide-equivalent produced at the site of production per kilogram of hydrogen produced." Subtitle C - Nuclear Energy Infrastructure Sec. 40323: Civil Nuclear Credit Program Creates a program, authorized to be funded with $6 billion per year through 2026, that will provide credit from the government to nuclear reactors that are projected to shut down because they are economically failing. Subtitle D - Hydropower Sec. 40331: Hydroelectric Production Incentives Authorizes a one-time appropriation of $125 million for fiscal year 2022. Sec. 40332: Hydroelectric Efficiency Improvement Incentives Authorizes a one-time appropriation of $75 million for fiscal year 2022. Sec. 40333: Maintaining and Enhancing Hydroelectricity Incentives Authorizes a one-time appropriations of $553 million for repairs and improvements to dams constructed before 1920. The government will pay a maximum of 30% of the project costs, capped at $5 million each. Sec. 40334: Pumped Storage Hydropower Wind and Solar Integration and System Reliability Initiative Authorizes $2 million per year through 2026 to pay 50% or less of the costs of a demonstration project to test the ability of a pumped storage hydropower project to facilitate the long duration storage of at least 1,000 megawatts of intermittent renewable electricity. Subtitle E - Miscellaneous Sec. 40342: Clean Energy Demonstration Program on Current and Former Mine Land Creates a new program, authorized to be funded with $500 million through 2026, to demonstrate the technical and economic viability of putting clean energy projects on former mine land. There will be a maximum of 5 projects and 2 of them have to be solar. Defines a "clean energy project" to include "fossil-fueled electricity generation with carbon capture, utilization, and sequestration." TITLE X - AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS FOR ENERGY ACT OF 2020 Sec. 41001: Energy Storage Demonstration Projects Authorizes $505 million through2025 for energy storage demonstration projects. Sec. 41002: Advanced Reactor Demonstration Program Authorizes between $281 million and $824 million per year through 2027 for advanced nuclear reactor demonstration projects. Sec. 41004: Carbon Capture Demonstration and Pilot Programs Authorizes between $700 million and $1.3 billion through2025 for advanced nuclear reactor demonstration projects. Sec. 41007: Renewable Energy Projects Authorizes $84 million through 2025 for geothermal energy projects. Authorizes $100 million through 2025 for wind energy projects. There is a clarification that this is definitely NOT in addition to amounts wind gets from another fund. Authorizes $80 million through 2025 for solar energy projects. DIVISION E - DRINKING WATER AND WASTEWATER INFRASTRUCTURE DIVISION F - BROADBAND DIVISION G - OTHER AUTHORIZATIONS DIVISION H - REVENUE PROVISIONS DIVISION I - OTHER MATTERS DIVISION J - APPROPRIATIONS DIVISION K - MINORITY BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT Cover Art Design by Only Child Imaginations Music Presented in This Episode Intro & Exit: Tired of Being Lied To by David Ippolito (found on Music Alley by mevio)

/Film Daily
What The IATSE Strike Authorization Could Mean For Hollywood

/Film Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 9:43


On the October 4, 2021 episode of /Film Daily, /Film editorial director Peter Sciretta discusses the IATSE strike authorization vote and what it means for the film and tv industry. In The News: Eric: The Possible IATSE Strike Explained, And Why Movie Fans Should Care Vanessa: IATSE Members Vote To Authorize Strike -- Here's What That Means For The Film Industry   Also mentioned:      All the other stuff you need to know: You can find more about all the stories we mentioned on today's show at slashfilm.com, and linked inside the show notes. /Film Daily is published every weekday, bringing you the most exciting news from the world of movies and television as well as deeper dives into the great features from slashfilm.com.  You can subscribe to /Film Daily on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Overcast, Spotify and all the popular podcast apps (RSS).  Send your feedback, questions, comments and concerns to us at peter@slashfilm.com. Please leave your name and general geographic location in case we mention the e-mail on the air. Please rate and review the podcast on Apple Podcasts, tell your friends and spread the word!  Thanks to Sam Hume for our logo.

Channel Ocho Productions
OSWU S2- October 1, 2021 - Vote Yes! Special Episode!

Channel Ocho Productions

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 4:40


Friday. Authorization to Strike Vote Day. Change the Culture.   IATSE Members, check your emails for TODAY!!!! VOTE YES!!!   In Solidarity.       Podcast also available on Spotify, Google Podcasts and Apple Podcasts. Just search, "Channel Ocho Productions" And be sure to Rate and Subscribe all over and tell your friends.

Optimize Yourself
Ep163: Understanding What's At Stake With the IATSE Strike Authorization Vote | Community Q&A

Optimize Yourself

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 81:55


I created Optimize Yourself so that I could provide the resources to help creative professionals find fulfillment in their work and love what they do...but not at the expense of their health, their relationships, or their sanity. A natural extension of this is that we must be valued & respected for the work that we do. Without respect, no matter how much we love our jobs, our careers won't be sustainable and our passion will eventually become indifference (and sometimes even hatred). We become overworked, disrespected, and burned out. This is unfortunately what's happening right now to tens-of-thousands of below the line workers in the entertainment industry as clearly portrayed by the meteoric rise of the @IA_Stories Instagram account. In part because of the horror stories this account has amplified, The IATSE union and the AMPTP have come to a standstill in contract negotiations and the union is asking its members to vote and authorize a strike. This is a historic moment in the union's history, and it's important that all of us understand what is truly at stake beyond the deal points and the percentages. That's why I decided to have an “All-hands-on-deck” call with my Optimizer coaching & mentorship community to provide an open forum where union and non-union members alike could ask their questions, voice their opinions, and gain a better understanding of the true impact this pending vote (and strike) can have on our industry for decades to come. Whether you are in the union or you work freelance outside the union, this conversation will (hopefully) answer your questions and paint a clear picture of why you need to be paying attention to this issue. If you haven't yet read my latest article, Dear Hollywood: If We Don't Speak Up Now, The Industry As We Know It Will Never Be The Same (It's Gut Check Time), I encourage you to check it out as it provides even more context to this timely and important conversation. Want to Hear More Episodes Like This One? » Click here to subscribe and never miss another episode Here's What You'll Learn: How does the current IATSE contract dispute impact non-union workers? This negotiation outcome will be a sea change in the way we advocate for ourselves. Why we need to band together and present a united front. What does is mean if we vote yes to authorize a strike? What exactly is IATSE and who are the members involved? The red ant- black ant analogy and what we should really be focused on. KEY TAKEAWAY: We need our message to reach the other IATSE locals so they understand what is at stake and can make an informed vote. When we talk about producers in this context, we are talking about the studios and the producers at AMPTP. To support our cause, union and non-union members can sign this petition on Action Network. How do we address the issue that working less hours = less pay? What ‘lifestyle creep' is and how it cripples us. One way to help alleviate fears is to create a fund to help people pay their bills. If such a fund is created, I pledge to personally put $1000 into it. Why it's important to understand the problems of the people above you and the people we are negotiating with. The only thing that will make it change is if we no longer meet those unreasonable expectations. How voting works within the guilds to vote for a strike authorization. Director Sam Lavin weighs in about the situation and gives a director's perspective. Canceling our streaming services is not the way to fight back. It comes down to how willing we are to set boundaries to protect ourselves. Ricardo is seeing younger generation of workers stepping up and setting boundaries for themselves so there is hope for the future. Please vote with your heart and do what you feel is right as long as you have all the information you need. If you can't vote, please spread the word to the right people so they understand what the conversation is about. Useful Resources Mentioned: Dear Hollywood: If We Don't Speak Up Now, The Industry As We Know It Will Never Be The Same (It's Gut Check Time) Tell AMPTP to Give Film and Television Workers a Fair Deal IATSE Stories (@ia_stories) • Instagram photos and videos Continue to Listen & Learn Dear Hollywood: If We Don't Speak Up Now, The Industry As We Know It Will Never Be The Same (It's Gut Check Time) Dear Hollywood: We Create Entertainment For a Living. We're Not Curing Cancer Dear Hollywood: We're Not “Lucky to Be Here,” You're Lucky to Have Us Dear Hollywood: Loving What We Do Makes Us Easy to Exploit. Here's Why. Dear Hollywood: It's Time For An Intervention About the Hours We Work I Was Tired of Putting My Kids to Bed via FaceTime Every Night. Here's What I Did About It. Ep113: The Importance of Setting Boundaries, Advocating For Yourself, and Asking For Help | with Janace Tashjian Ep112: On Signing COVID Waivers, Kit Rental Fees, and Working Humane Hours | with Cathy Repola, MPEG National Executive Director Ep128: How to Have a Successful Career Without Sacrificing Family | with Farrel Levy Ep149: How Modern Society Is Damaging Your Brain (and the Simple Steps to Reverse It) | with Dr. Dave Jenkins Ep82: Real Talk About Mental Health and Depression | with Michael Kammes Ep01: Understanding the Link Between Creativity and Depression with Dr. Edison de Mello Our Generous Sponsor: This episode was brought to you by Ergodriven, the makers of the Topo Mat (my #1 recommendation for anyone who stands at their workstation) and now their latest product. New Standard Whole Protein is a blend of both whey and collagen, sourced from the highest quality ingredients without any of the unnecessary filler or garbage. Not only will you get more energy and focus from this protein powder, you will notice improvements in your skin, hair, nails, joints and muscles. And because they don't spend a lot on excessive marketing and advertising expenses, the savings gets passed on to you. Show Credits: This episode was edited by Curtis Fritsch, and the show notes were prepared by Debby Germino and published by Glen McNiel. The original music in the opening and closing of the show is courtesy of Joe Trapanese (who is quite possibly one of the most talented composers on the face of the planet).

AP Audio Stories
Biden gets COVID-19 booster shot after authorization

AP Audio Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 1:20


The Hollywood Success Podcast
Episode 406: Why You Should Vote YES On A Strike Authorization And How The IATSE Crews Have Been Abused For Years

The Hollywood Success Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 66:51


Every 3 years our (the people who work in the crew for television and features) contracts are re-negotiated with the AMPTP (Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers). This year, we've asked the AMPTP to stop the abuse with the 14-16 hour days, the lack of proper rest periods, the "new media" contracts, no meal breaks, and unlivable wages. AMPTP basically told us to go f*ck ourselves. Please listen to this important and pressing episode, with a very important vote coming up next week!

Broken Law
Episode 16: Legal Legacy of 9/11, Part II

Broken Law

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 33:43


In the wake of 9/11, Congress passed the 2001 Authorization for the Use of Military Force (AUMF). Only one member of Congress voted against it, Congresswoman Barbara Lee. Join Russ Feingold, the only senator to vote against the USA PATRIOT Act, for his interview with Congresswoman Lee about what happened behind the scenes in the lead up to the AUMF and what it is like to be a dissenter in Congress. Together, they discuss the legacy of the AUMF and what Congress should do moving forward to implement the lessons learned from giving the executive branch a "blank check" authorization for military force. ----------------- Join the Progressive Legal Movement Today: ACSLaw.org Today's Host: Russ Feingold, President of ACS Guest: Congresswoman Barbara Lee of the U.S. House of Representatives Link: Russ's article, "It's Time to Tear Up the Executive Branch's Blank Check" Link: Congresswoman Lee's article, "Ending the Post 9/11 Forever Wars" Visit the Podcast Website: Broken Law Podcast Email the Show: Podcast@ACSLaw.org Follow ACS on Social Media: Facebook | Instagram | Twitter | LinkedIn | YouTube ----------------- Production House: Flint Stone Media Copyright of American Constitution Society 2021.

Inside Sources with Boyd Matheson
20 Years of the AUMF in Afghanistan

Inside Sources with Boyd Matheson

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 7:52


It's been 20 years since the Authorization of Use of Military Force in Afghanistan. Anthony Marcum from the R Street Institute called in to talk about what we've learned from it and how it applies to our national security challenges today. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Software Engineering Daily
Authorization with Sam Scott

Software Engineering Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 43:10


Web applications often have some sort of login system, and once a user creates an account, they have access to features anonymous users can't see.  In time, application designers will often add an admin level of access for special users.  This is often a slow trickle of technical debt.  Proper execution of a programmatic authorization The post Authorization with Sam Scott appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Screaming in the Cloud
Security in the New Normal with Ev Kontsevoy

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 44:18


About EvEv Kontsevoy is Co-Founder and CEO of Teleport. An engineer by training, Kontsevoy launched Teleport in 2015 to provide other engineers solutions that allow them to quickly access and run any computing resource anywhere on the planet without having to worry about security and compliance issues. A serial entrepreneur, Ev was CEO and co-founder of Mailgun, which he successfully sold to Rackspace. Prior to Mailgun, Ev has had a variety of engineering roles. He holds a BS degree in Mathematics from Siberian Federal University, and has a passion for trains and vintage-film cameras.Links: Teleport: https://goteleport.com Teleport GitHub: https://github.com/gravitational/teleport Teleport Slack: https://goteleport.slack.com/join/shared_invite/zt-midnn9bn-AQKcq5NNDs9ojELKlgwJUA Previous episode with Ev Kontsevoy: https://www.lastweekinaws.com/podcast/screaming-in-the-cloud/the-gravitational-pull-of-simplicity-with-ev-kontsevoy/ TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at VMware. Let's be honest—the past year has been far from easy. Due to, well, everything. It caused us to rush cloud migrations and digital transformation, which of course means long hours refactoring your apps, surprises on your cloud bill, misconfigurations and headache for everyone trying manage disparate and fractured cloud environments. VMware has an answer for this. With VMware multi-cloud solutions, organizations have the choice, speed, and control to migrate and optimizeapplications seamlessly without recoding, take the fastest path to modern infrastructure, and operate consistently across the data center, the edge, and any cloud. I urge to take a look at vmware.com/go/multicloud. You know my opinions on multi cloud by now, but there's a lot of stuff in here that works on any cloud. But don't take it from me thats: vmware.com/go/multicloud and my thanks to them again for sponsoring my ridiculous nonsense.Corey: You could build you go ahead and build your own coding and mapping notification system, but it takes time, and it sucks! Alternately, consider Courier, who is sponsoring this episode. They make it easy. You can call a single send API for all of your notifications and channels. You can control the complexity around routing, retries, and deliverability and simplify your notification sequences with automation rules. Visit courier.com today and get started for free. If you wind up talking to them, tell them I sent you and watch them wince—because everyone does when you bring up my name. Thats the glorious part of being me. Once again, you could build your own notification system but why on god's flat earth would you do that?Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. Roughly a year ago, I had a promoted guest episode featuring Ev Kontsevoy, the co-founder and CEO of Teleport.A year has passed and what a year it's been. Ev is back to tell us more about what they've been up to for the past year and, ideally, how things may have changed over in the security space. Ev, thank you for coming back to suffer the slings and arrows I will no doubt be hurling your way almost immediately.Ev: Thanks for having me back, Corey.Corey: So, it's been a heck of a year. We were basically settling into the pandemic when last we recorded, and people's security requirements when everyone is remote were dramatically changing. A year later, what's changed? It seems like the frantic, grab a bucket and start bailing philosophy has largely been accepted with something that feels almost like a new normal, ish. What are you seeing?Ev: Yes, we're seeing exact same thing, that it's really hard to tell what is normal. So, at the beginning of the pandemic, our company, Teleport was, so we were about 25 people. And then once we got the vaccines, and the government restrictions started to, kind of, disappear, people started to ask, “So, when are we going to go back to normal?” But the thing is, we're 100 employees now, which means that three-quarters of the company, they joined us during the pandemic, so we have no normal to go back to. So, now we have to redefine—not redefined, we just basically need to get comfortable with this new, fully remote culture with fully remote identity that we have, and become comfortable with it. And that's what we're doing.Corey: Beyond what, I guess, you're seeing, as far as the culture goes, internally as well, it feels like there's been a distinct shift in the past year or so, the entire security industry. I mean, I can sit here and talk about what I've seen, but again, I'm all over the place and I deal with a very select series of conversations. And I try not to confuse anecdotes with data. Anecdata is not the most reliable thing. You're working in this space. That is the entire industry you're in. How has the conversation in the industry around security shifted? What's new? What trends are emerging?Ev: So, there are several things actually happening. So, first of all, I wouldn't call ourselves, like, we do all of security. So, we're experts in access; like, how do you act this everything that you have in your cloud or in your data centers? And that space has been going through one transformation after another. It's been basically under the same scaling stress as the rest of cloud computing industry.And we can talk about historical changes that have been happening, and then we can talk a little bit about, kind of, latest and greatest. And in terms of what challenges companies have with secure access, maybe it helps if I just quickly describe what ‘access' actually means.Corey: Please, by all means. It's one of those words that everyone knows, but if you ask three people to define it, you'll get five definitions—Ev: [laugh]. Exactly.Corey: —and they don't really align. So please, you're the expert on this; I am here to listen because I guarantee you I am guilty of misusing the term at least once so far, today.Ev: Can't blame you. Can't blame you. We are—I was same way until I got into this space. So, access basically means four things. So, if you want to have access done properly into your cloud resources, you need to think about four things.First is connectivity. That's basically a physical ability to deliver an encrypted packet from a client to destination, to a resource whatever that is, could be database, could be, like, SSH machine, or whatever it is you're connecting to. So, connectivity is number one. So, then you need to authenticate. Authentication, that's when the resource decides if you should have access or not, based on who you are, hopefully.So, then authorization, that's the third component. Authorization, the difference—like, sometimes people confuse the two—the difference between authentication and authorization is that authorization is when you already authenticated, but the resource decides what actions you are allowed to perform. The typical example is, like, is it read-only or read-write access? So, that's authorization, deciding on which actions you're allowed to perform. And the final component of having access properly is having audit or visibility which is, again, it could be real-time and historical.So ideally, you need to have both. So, once you have those two solved, then you solved your access problem. And historically, if you look at how access has been done—so we had these giant machines, then we had microcomputers, then we had PCs, and they all have these things. So, you login into your Mac, and then if you try to delete certain file, you might get access denied. So, you see there is connectivity—in this case, it's physical, a keyboard is physically connected to the [laugh] actual machine; so then you have authentication that you log in in the beginning; then authorization, if you can or cannot do certain things in your machine; and finally, your Mac keeps an audit log.But then once the industry, we got the internet, we got all these clouds, so amount of these components that we're now operating on, we have hundreds of thousands of servers, and load-balancers, and databases, and Kubernetes clusters, and dashboards, all of these things, all of them implement these four things: connectivity, authentication, authorization, audit.Corey: Let me drive into that for a minute first, to make sure I'm clear on something. Connectivity makes sense. The network is the computer, et cetera. When you don't have a network to something, it may as well not exist. I get that.And the last one you mentioned, audit of a trail of who done it and who did what, when, that makes sense to me. But authentication and authorization are the two slippery ones in my mind that tend to converge a fair bit. Can you dive a little bit in delineate what the difference is between those two, please?Ev: So authentication, if you try to authenticate into a database, database needs to check if you are on the list of people who should be allowed to access. That's authentication, you need to prove that you are who you claim you are.Corey: Do you have an account and credentials to get into that account?Ev: Correct. And they're good ways to do authentication and bad ways to do authentication. So, bad way to do authentication—and a lot of companies actually guilty of that—if you're using shared credentials. Let's say you have a user called ‘admin' and that user has a password, and those are stored in some kind of stored—in, like 1Password, or something like Vault, some kind of encrypted Vault, and then when someone needs to access a database, they go and borrow this credentials and they go and do that. So, that is an awful way to do authentication.Corey: Now, another way I've seen that's terrible as been also, “Oh, if you're connecting from this network, you must be allowed in,” which is just… yeee.Ev: Oh, yeah. That's a different sin. And that's a perimeter security sin. But a much better way to do authentication is what is called identity-based authentication. Identity means that you always use your identity of who you are within the company.So, you would go in through corporate SSO, something like Okta, or Active Directory, or even Google, or GitHub, and then based on that information, you're given access. So, the resource in this case database, [unintelligible 00:07:39] say, “Oh, it's Corey. And Corey is a member of this group, and also a member of that group.” And based on that it allows you to get in, but that's where authentication ends. And now, if you want to do something, like let's say you want to delete some data, now a database needs to check, ah, can you actually perform that action? That is the authorization process.And to do that, usually, we use some mechanism like role-based access control. It will look into which group are you in. Oh, you are an admin, so admins have more privileges than regular people. So, then that's the process of authorization.And the importance of separating the two, and important to use identity because remember, audit is another important component of implementing access properly. So, if you're sharing credentials, for example, you will see in your audit log, “Admin did this. Admin did that.” It's exact same admin, but you don't know who actually was behind that action. So, by sharing credentials, you're also obscuring your own audit which is why it's not really a good thing.And going back to this industry trends is that because the amount of these resources, like databases and servers and so on, in the cloud has gotten so huge, so we now have this hardware pain, we just have too many things that need access. And all of these things, the software itself is getting more complicated, so now we have a software pain as well, that you have so many different layers in your stack that they need to access. That's another dimension for introducing access pain. And also, we just have more developers, and the development teams are getting bigger and bigger, the software is eating the world, so there is a people-ware pain. So, on the one hand, you have these four problems you need to solve—connectivity, authentication, authorization, access—and on the other hand, you have more hardware, more software, more people, these pain points.And so you need to consolidate, and that's really what we do is that we allow you to have a single place where you can do connectivity, authentication, authorization, and audit, for everything that you have in the cloud. We basically believe that the future is going to be like metaverse, like in those books. So, all of these cloud resources are slowly converging into this one giant planetary-scale computer.Corey: Suddenly, “I live on Twitter,” is no longer going to be quite as much of a metaphor as it is today.Ev: [laugh]. No, no. Yeah, I think we're getting better. If you look into what is actually happening on our computing devices that we buy, the answer is not the lot, so everything is running in data centers, the paradigm of thin client seems to be winning. Let's just embrace that.Corey: Yeah. You're never going to be able to shove data centers worth compute into a phone. By the time you can get there, data centers will have gotten better. It's the constant question of where do you want things to live? How do you want that to interact?I talk periodically about multi-cloud, I talk about lock-in, everyone is concerned about vendor lock-in, but the thing that people tend to mostly ignore is that you're already locked in throught a variety of different ways. And one way is both the networking side of it as well as the identity management piece because every cloud handles that differently and equating those same things between different providers that work different ways is monstrous. Is that the story of what you're approaching from a Teleport perspective? Is that the primary use case, is that an ancillary use case, or are we thinking about this in too small a term?Ev: So, you're absolutely right, being locked in, in and—like, by itself is not a bad thing. It's a trade-off. So, if you lack expertise in something and you outsourcing certain capability to a provider, then you're developing that dependency, you may call it lock-in or not, but that needs to be a conscious decision. Like, well, you didn't know how to do it, then someone else was doing it for you, so you should be okay with the lock-in. However, there is a danger, that, kind of, industry-wide danger about everyone relying on one single provider.So, that is really what we all try to avoid. And with identity specifically, I feel like we're in a really good spot that fairly early, I don't see a single provider emerging as owning everyone's identity. You know, some people use Okta; others totally happy tying everything to Google Apps. So, then you have people that rely on Amazon AWS native credentials, then plenty of smaller companies, they totally happy having all of their engineers authenticate through GitHub, so they use GitHub as a source of identity. And the fact that all of these providers are more or less compatible with each other—so we have protocols like OpenID Connect and SAML, so I'm not that concerned that identity itself is getting captured by a single player.And Teleport is not even playing in that space; we don't keep your identity. We integrate with everybody because, at the end of the day, we want to be the solution of choice for a company, regardless of which identity platform they're using. And some of them using several, like all of the developers might be authenticating via GitHub, but everyone else goes through Google Apps, for example.Corey: And the different product problem. Oh, my stars, I was at a relatively small startup going through an acquisition at one point in my career, and, “All right. Let's list all of the SaaS vendors that we use.” And the answer was something on an average of five per employee by the time you did the numbers out, and—there were hundreds of them—and most of them because it started off small, and great, everyone has their own individual account, we set it up there. I mean, my identity management system here for what most of what I do is LastPass.I have individual accounts there, two-factor auth enabled for anything that supports it, and that is it. Some vendors don't support that: we have to use shared accounts, which is just terrifying. We make sure that we don't use those for anything that's important. But it comes down to, from our perspective, that everyone has their own ridiculous series of approaches, and even if we were to, “All right, it's time to grow up and be a responsible business, and go for a single-sign-on approach.” Which is inevitable as companies scale, and there's nothing wrong with that—but there's still so many of these edge cases and corner case stories that don't integrate.So, it makes the problem smaller, but it's still there rather persistently. And that doesn't even get into the fact that for a lot of these tools, “Oh, you want SAML integration? Smells like enterprise to us.” And suddenly they wind up having an additional surcharge on top of that for accessing it via a federated source of identity, which means there are active incentives early on to not do that. So it's—Ev: It's absolutely insane. Yeah, you're right. You're right. It's almost like you get penalized for being small, like, in the early days. It's not that easy if you have a small project you're working on. Say it's a company of three people and they're just cranking in the garage, and it's just so easy to default to using shared credentials and storing them in LastPass or 1Password. And then the interesting way—like, the longer you wait, the harder it is to go back to use a proper SSO for everything. Yeah.Corey: I do want to call out that Teleport has a free and open-source community edition that supports GitHub SSO, and in order to support enterprise SSO, you have to go to your paid offering. I have no problem with this, to be clear, that you have to at least be our customer before we'll integrate with your SSO solution makes perfect sense, but you don't have a tiering system where, “Oh, you want to add that other SSO thing? And well, then it's going to go from X dollars per employee to Y dollars.” Which is the path that I don't like. I think it's very reasonable to say that their features flat-out you don't get as a free user. And even then you do offer SSO just not the one that some people will want to pick.Ev: Correct. So, the open-source version of Teleport supports SSO that smaller companies use, versus our enterprise offering, we shaped it to be more appealing for companies at certain scale.Corey: Yeah. And you've absolutely nailed it. There are a number of companies in the security space who enraged people about how they wind up doing their differentiation around things like SSO or, God forbid, two-factor auth, or once upon a time, SSL. This is not that problem. I just want to be explicitly clear on that, that is not what I'm talking about. But please, continue.Ev: Look, we see it the same way. We sometimes say that we do not charge for security, like, top-level security you get, is available even in the open-source. And look, it's a common problem for most startups who, when you have an open-source offering, where do you draw the line? And sometimes you can find answers in very unexpected places. For example, let's look into security space.One common reason that companies get compromised is, unfortunately, human factor. You could use the best tool in the world, but if you just by mistake, like, just put a comma in the wrong place and one of your config files just suddenly is out of shape, right, so—Corey: People make mistakes and you can't say, “Never make a mistake.” If you can get your entire company compromised by someone in your office clicking on the wrong link, the solution is not to teach people not to click on links; it's to mitigate the damage and blast radius of someone clicking on a link that they shouldn't. That is resilience that understand their human factors at play.Ev: Yep, exactly. And here's an enterprise feature that was basically given to us by customer requests. So, they would say we want to have FedRAMP compliance because we want to work with federal government, or maybe because we want to work with financial institutions who require us to have that level of compliance. And we tell them, “Yeah, sure. You can configure Teleport to be compliant. Look, here's all the different things that you need to tweak in the config file.”And the answer is, “Well, what if we make a mistake? It's just too costly. Can we have Teleport just automatically works in that mode?” In other words, if you feed it the config file with an error, it will just refuse to work. So basically, you take your product, and you chop off things that are not compliant, which means that it's impossible to feed an incorrect config file into it, and here you got an enterprise edition.It's a version that we call its FIPS mode. So, when it runs FIPS mode, it has different runtime inside, it basically doesn't even have a crypto that is not approved, which you can turn on by mistake. It will just not work.Corey: By the time we're talking about different levels of regulatory compliance, yeah, we are long past the point where I'm going to have any comments in the slightest is about differentiation of pricing tiers and the rest. Yeah, your free tier doesn't support FedRAMP is one of those ludicrous things that—who would say that [laugh] actually be sincere [insane 00:18:28]?Ev: [laugh].Corey: That's just mind-boggling to me.Ev: Hold on a second. I don't want anyone to be misinformed. You can be FedRAMP compliant with the free tier; you just need to configure it properly. Like the enterprise feature, in this case, we give you a thing that only works in this mode; it is impossible to misconfigure it.Corey: It's an attestation and it's a control that you need—Ev: Yep. Yep.Corey: —in order to demonstrate compliance because half the joy of regulatory compliance is not doing the thing, it's proving you do the thing. That is a joy, and those of you who've worked in regulated environments know exactly what I'm talking about. And those of you who have not, are happy but please—Ev: Frankly, I think anyone can do it using some other open-source tools. You can even take, like, OpenSSH, sshd, and then you can probably build a different makefile for just the build pipeline that changes the linking, that it doesn't even have the crypto that is not on the approved list. So, then if someone feeds a config file into it that has, like, a hashing function that is not approved, it will simply refuse to work. So, maybe you can even turn it into something that you could say here's a hardened version of sshd, or whatever. So, same thing.Corey: I see now you're talking about the four aspects of this, the connectivity, the authentication, the authorization, and the audit components of access. How does that map to a software product, if that makes sense? Because it sounds like a series of principles, great, it's good to understand and hold those in your head both, separately and distinct, but also combining to mean access both [technical 00:19:51] and the common parlance. How do you express that in Teleport?Ev: So, Teleport doesn't really add authorization, for example, to something that doesn't have it natively. The problem that we have is just the overall increasing complexity of computing environments. So, when you're deploying something into, let's say, AWS East region, so what is it that you have there? You have some virtual machines, then you have something like Kubernetes on top, then you have Docker registry, so you have these containers running inside, then you have maybe MongoDB, then you might have some web UI to manage MongoDB and Grafana dashboard. So, all of that is software; we're only consuming more and more of it so that our own code that we're deploying, it's icing on a really, really tall cake.And every layer in that layer cake is listening on a socket; it needs encryption; it has a login, so it has authentication; it has its own idea of role-based access control; it has its own config file. So, if you want to do cloud computing properly, so you got to have this expertise on your team, how to configure those four pillars of access for every layer in your stack. That is really the pain. And the Teleport value is that we're letting you do it in one place. We're saying, consolidate all of this four-axis pillars in one location.That's really what we do. It's not like we invented a better way to authorize, or authenticate; no, we natively integrate with the cake, with all of these different layers. But consolidation, that is the key value of Teleport because we simply remove so much pain associated with configuring all of these things. Like, think of someone like—I'm trying not to disclose any names or customers, but let's pick, uh, I don't know, something like Tesla. So, Tesla has compute all over the world.So, how can you implement authentication, authorization, audit log, and connectivity, too, for every vehicle that's on the road? Because all of these things need software updates, they're all components of a giant machine—Corey: They're all intermittent. You can't say, “Oh, at this time of the day, we should absolutely make sure everything in the world is connected to the internet and ready to grab the update.” It doesn't work that way; you've got to be… understand that connectivity is fickle.Ev: So, most—and because computers growing generally, you could expect most companies in the future to be more like Tesla, so companies like that will probably want to look into Teleport technology.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by “you”—gabyte. Distributed technologies like Kubernetes are great, citation very much needed, because they make it easier to have resilient, scalable, systems. SQL databases haven't kept pace though, certainly not like no SQL databases have like Route 53, the world's greatest database. We're still, other than that, using legacy monolithic databases that require ever growing instances of compute. Sometimes we'll try and bolt them together to make them more resilient and scalable, but let's be honest it never works out well. Consider Yugabyte DB, its a distributed SQL database that solves basically all of this. It is 100% open source, and there's not asterisk next to the “open” on that one. And its designed to be resilient and scalable out of the box so you don't have to charge yourself to death. It's compatible with PostgreSQL, or “postgresqueal” as I insist on pronouncing it, so you can use it right away without having to learn a new language and refactor everything. And you can distribute it wherever your applications take you, from across availability zones to other regions or even other cloud providers should one of those happen to exist. Go to yugabyte.com, thats Y-U-G-A-B-Y-T-E dot com and try their free beta of Yugabyte Cloud, where they host and manage it for you. Or see what the open source project looks like—its effortless distributed SQL for global apps. My thanks to Yu—gabyte for sponsoring this episode.Corey: If we take a look at the four tenets that you've identified—connectivity, authentication, authorization, and audit—it makes perfect sense. It is something that goes back to the days when computers were basically glorified pocket calculators as opposed to my pocket calculator now being basically a supercomputer. Does that change as you hit cloud-scale where we have companies that are doing what seem to be relatively pedestrian things, but also having 100,000 EC2 instances hanging out in AWS? Does this add additional levels of complexity on top of those four things?Ev: Yes. So, there is one that I should have mentioned earlier. So, in addition to software, hardware, and people-ware—so those are three things that are exploding, more compute, more software, more engineers needing access—there is one more dimension that is kind of unique, now, at the scale that we're in today, and that's time. So, let's just say that you are a member of really privileged group like you're a DBA, or maybe you are a chief security officer, so you should have access to a certain privileged database. But do you really use that access 24/7, all the time? No, but you have it.So, your laptop has an ability, if you type certain things into it, to actually receive credentials, like, certificates to go and talk to this database all the time. It's an anti-pattern that is now getting noticed. So, the new approach to access is to make a tie to an intent. So, by default, no one in an organization has access to anything. So, if you want to access a database, or a server, or Kubernetes cluster, you need to issue what's called ‘access request.'It's similar to pull request if you're trying to commit code into Git. So, you send an access request—using Teleport for example; you could probably do it some other way—and it will go into something like Slack or PagerDuty, so your team members will see that, “Oh, Corey is trying to access that database, and he listed a ticket number, like, some issue he is trying to troubleshoot with that particular database instance. Yeah, we'll approve access for 30 minutes.” So, then you go and do that, and the access is revoked automatically after 30 minutes. So, that is this new trend that's happening in our space, and it makes you feel nice, too, it means that if someone hacks into your laptop at this very second, right after you finished authenticating and authorization, you're still okay because there is no access; access will be created for you if you request it based on the intent, so it dramatically reduces the attack surface, using time as additional dimension.Corey: The minimum viable permission to do a thing. In principle, least-access is important in these areas. It's like, “Oh, yeah, my user account, you mean root?” “Yeah, I guess that works in a developer environment,” looks like a Docker container that will be done as soon as you're finished, but for most use cases—and probably even that one—that's not the direction to go in. Having things scoped down and—Ev: Exactly.Corey: —not just by what the permission is, but by time.Ev: Exactly.Corey: Yeah.Ev: This system basically allows you to move away from root-type accounts completely, for everything. So, which means that there is no root to attack anymore.Corey: What really strikes me is how, I guess, different aspects of technology that this winds up getting to. And to illustrate that in the form of question, let me go back to my own history because, you know, let's make it about me here. I've mentioned it before on the show, but I started off my technical career as someone who specialized in large-scale email systems. That was a niche I found really interesting, and I got into it. So did you.I worked on running email servers, and you were the CEO and co-founder of Mailgun, which later you sold the Rackspace. You're a slightly bigger scale than I am, but it was clear to me that even then, in the 2006 era when I was doing this, that there was not going to be the same need going forward for an email admin at every company; the cloudification of email had begun, and I realized I could either dig my heels in and fight the tide, or I could find other things to specialize in. And I've told that part of the story, but what I haven't told is that it was challenging at first as I tried to do that because all the jobs I talked to looked at my resume and said, “Ah, you're the email admin. Great. We don't need one of those.”It was a matter of almost being pigeonholed or boxed into the idea of being the email person. I would argue that Teleport is not synonymous with email in any meaningful sense as far as how it is perceived in the industry; you are very clearly no longer the email guy. Does the idea being boxed in, I guess—Ev: [laugh].Corey: —[unintelligible 00:27:05] resonate at all with you? And if so, how did you get past it?Ev: Absolutely. The interesting thing is, before starting the Mailgun, I was not an email person. I would just say that I was just general-purpose technologist, and I always enjoyed building infrastructure frameworks. Basically, I always enjoyed building tools for other engineers. But then gotten into this email space, and even though Mailgun was a software product, which actually had surprisingly huge, kind of, scalability requirements early on because email is much heavier than HTTP traffic; people just send a lot of data via emails.So, we were solving interesting technical challenges, but when I would meet other engineers, I would experience the exact same thing you did. They would put me into this box of, “That's an email guy. He knows email technology, but seemingly doesn't know much about scaling web apps.” Which was totally not true. And it bothered me a little bit.Frankly, it was one of the reasons we decided to get acquired by Rackspace because they effectively said, “Why don't you come join us and we'll continue to operate as independent company, but you can join our cloud team and help us reinvent cloud computing.” It was really appealing. So, I actually moved to Texas after acquisition; I worked on the Rackspace cloud team for a while. So, that's how my transition from this being in the email box happened. So, I went from an email expert to just generally cloud computing expert. And cloud computing expert sounds awesome, and it allows me to work—Corey: I promise, it's not awesome—Ev: [laugh].Corey: —for people listening to this. Also, it's one of those, are you a cloud expert? Everyone says no to that because who in the world would claim that? It's so broad in so many different expressions of it. Because you know the follow-up question to anyone who says, “Yeah,” is going to be some esoteric thing about a system you've never heard of before because there's so many ridiculous services across totally different providers, of course, it's probably a thing. Maybe it's actually a Pokemon, we don't know. But it's hard to consider yourself an expert in this. It's like, “Well, I have some damage from [laugh] getting smacked around by clouds and, yeah, we'll call that expertise; why not?”Ev: Exactly. And also how frequently people mispronounce, like, cloud with clown. And it's like, “Oh, I'm clown computing expert.” [laugh].Corey: People mostly call me a loud computing expert. But that's a separate problem.Ev: But the point is that if you work on a product that's called cloud, so you definitely get to claim expertise of that. And the interesting thing that Mailgun being, effectively, an infrastructure-level product—so it's part of the platform—every company builds their own cloud platform and runs it, and so Teleport is part of that. So, that allowed us to get out of the box. So, if you working on, right now we're in the access space, so we're working closely with Kubernetes community, with Linux kernel community, with databases, so by extension, we have expertise in all of these different areas, and it actually feels much nicer. So, if you are computing security access company, people tend to look at you, it's like, “Yeah, you know, a little bit of everything.” So, that feels pretty nice.Corey: It's of those cross-functional things—Ev: Yeah, yeah.Corey: —whereas on some level, you just assume, well, email isn't either, but let's face it: email is the default API that everything, there's very little that you cannot configure to send email. The hard part is how to get them to stop emailing you. But it started off as far—from my world at least—the idea that all roads lead to email. In fact, we want to talk security, a long time ago the internet collectively decided one day that our email inbox was the entire cornerstone of our online identity. Give me access to your email, I, for all intents and purposes, can become you on the internet without some serious controls around this.So, those conversations, I feel like they were heading in that direction by the time I left email world, but it's very clear to me that what you're doing now at Teleport is a much clearer ability to cross boundaries into other areas where you have to touch an awful lot of different things because security touches everything, and I still maintain it has to be baked-in and an intentional thing, rather than, “Oh yeah, we're going to bolt security on after the fact.” It's, yeah, you hear about companies that do that, usually in headlines about data breaches, or worse. It's a hard problem.Ev: Actually, it's an interesting dilemma you're talking about. Is security built-in into everything or is it an add-on? And logically—talk to anyone, and most people say, “Yeah, it needs to be a core component of whatever it is you're building; making security as an add-on is not possible.” But then reality hits in, and the reality is that we're running on—we're standing on the shoulder of giants.There is so much legacy technologies that we built this cloud monster on top of… no, nothing was built in, so we actually need to be very crafty at adding security on top of what we already have, if we want to take advantage of all this pre-existing things that we've built for decades. So, that's really what's happening, I think, with security and access. So, if you ask me if Teleport is a bolt-on security, I say, “Yes, we are, but it works really well.” And it's extremely pragmatic and reasonable, and it gives you security compliance, but most of all, very, very good user experience out of the box.Corey: It's amazing to me how few security products focus on user experience out of the box, but they have to. You cannot launch or maintain a security product successfully—to my mind—without making it non-adversarial to the user. The [days of security is no 00:32:26] are gone.Ev: Because of that human element insecurity. If you make something complicated, if you make something that's hard to reason about, then it will never be secure.Corey: Yeah.Ev: Don't copy-paste IP table rules without understanding what they do. [laugh].Corey: Yeah, I think we all have been around long enough in data center universes remember those middle of the night drives to the data center for exactly that sort of thing. Yeah, it's one of those hindsight things of, set a cron job to reset the IP table rules for, you know, ten minutes from now in case you get this hilariously wrong. It's the sort of thing that you learn right after you really could have used that knowledge. Same story. But those are the easy, safe examples of I screwed up on a security thing. The worst ones can be company-ending.Ev: Exactly, yeah. So, in this sense, when it comes to security, and access specifically, so this old Python rule that there is only one way to do something, it's the most important thing you can do. So, when it comes to security and access, we basically—it's one of the things that Teleport is designed around, that for all protocols, for all different resources, from SSH to Kubernetes to web apps to databases; we never support passwords. It's not even in the codebase. No, you cannot configure Teleport to use passwords.We never support things like public keys, for example, because it's just another form of a password. It's just extremely long password. So, we have this approach that certificates, it's the best method because it supports both authentication and authorization, and then you have to do it for everything, just one way of doing everything. And then you apply this to connectivity: so there is a single proxy that speaks all protocols and everyone goes to that proxy. Then you apply the same principle to audit: there is one audit where everything goes into.So, that's how this consolidation, that's where the simplicity comes down to. So, one way of doing something; one way of configuring everything. So, that's where you get both ease of use and security at the same time.Corey: One last question that I want to ask you before we wind up calling this an episode is that I've been using Teleport as a reference for a while when I talk to companies, generally in the security space, as an example of what you can do to tell a story about a product that isn't built on fear, uncertainty, and doubt. And for those who are listening who don't know what I'm referring specifically, I'm talking about pick any random security company and pull up their website and see what it is that they talk about and how they talk about themselves. Very often, you'll see stories where, “Data breaches will cost you extraordinary piles of money,” or they'll play into the shame of what will happen to your career if you're named in the New York Times for being the CSO when the data gets breached, and whatnot. But everything that I've seen from Teleport to date has instead not even gone slightly in that direction; it talks again and again, in what I see on your site, about how quickly it is to access things, access that doesn't get in the way, easily implement security and compliance, visibility into access and behavior. It's all about user experience and smoothing the way and not explaining to people what the dire problems that they're going to face are if they don't care about security in general and buy your product specifically. It is such a refreshing way of viewing storytelling around a security product. How did you get there? And how do I make other people do it, too?Ev: I think it just happened organically. Teleport originally—the interesting story of Teleport, it was not built to be sold. Teleport was built as a side project that we started for another system that we were working on at the time. So, there was a autonomous Kubernetes platform called Grá—it doesn't really matter in this context, but we had this problem that we had a lot of remote sites with a lot of infrastructure on them, with extremely strict security and compliance requirements, and we needed to access those sites or build tools to access those sites. So, Teleport was built like, okay, it's way better than just stitching a bunch of open-source components together because it's faster and easier to use, so we're optimizing for that.And as a side effect of that simplification, consolidation, and better user experience is a security compliance. And then the interesting thing that happened is that people who we're trying to sell the big platform to, they started to notice about, “Oh, this access thing you have is actually pretty awesome. Can we just use that separately?” And that's how it turned into a product. So, we built an amazing secure access solution almost by accident because there was only one customer in mind, and that was us, in the early days. So yeah, that's how you do it, [laugh] basically. But it's surprisingly similar to Slack, right? Why is Slack awesome? Because the team behind it was a gaming company in the beginning.Corey: They were trying to build a game. Yeah.Ev: Yeah, they built for themselves. They—[laugh] I guess that's the trick: make yourself happy.Corey: I think the team founded Flickr before that, and they were trying to build a game. And like, the joke I heard is, like, “All right, the year is 2040. Stuart and his team have now raised $8 billion trying to build a game, and yet again it fails upward into another productivity tool company, or something else entirely that”—but it's a recurring pattern. Someday they'll get their game made; I have faith in them. But yeah, building a tool that scratches your own itch is either a great path or a terrible mistake, depending entirely upon whether you first check and see if there's an existing solution that solves the problem for you. The failure mode of this is, “Ah, we're going to build our own database engine,” in almost every case.Ev: Yeah. So just, kind of like, interesting story about the two, people will [unintelligible 00:38:07] surprised that Teleport is a single binary. It's basically a drop-in replacement that you put on a box, and it runs instead of sshd. But it wasn't initially this way. Initially, it was [unintelligible 00:38:16], like, few files in different parts of a file system. But because internally, I really wanted to run it on a bunch of Raspberry Pi's at home, and it would have been a lot easier if it was just a single file because then I just could quickly update them all. So, it just took a little bit of effort to compress it down to a single binary that can run in different modes depending on the key. And now look at that; it's a major benefit that a lot of people who deploy Teleport on hundreds of thousands of pieces of infrastructure, they definitely taking advantage of the fact that it's that simple.Corey: Simplicity is the only thing that scales. As soon as it gets complex, it's more things to break. Ev, thank you so much for taking the time to sit with me, yet again, to talk about Teleport and how you're approaching things. If people want to learn more about you, about the company, about the product in all likelihood, where can they go?Ev: The easiest place to go would be goteleport.com where you can find everything, but we're also on GitHub. If you search for Teleport in GitHub, you'll find this there. So, join our Slack channel, join our community mailing list and most importantly, download Teleport, put it on your Raspberry Pi, play with it and see how awesome it is to have the best industry, best security practice, that don't get in the way.Corey: I love the tagline. Thank you so much, once again. Ev Kontsevoy, co-founder and CEO of Teleport. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with a comment that goes into a deranged rant about how I'm completely wrong, and the only way to sell security products—specifically yours—is by threatening me with the New York Times data breach story.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

GovExec Daily
The Sept. 11 Attacks' Effects on Government Administration

GovExec Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 18:59


The bipartisan 9/11 commission recommended dozens of changes to information sharing and intelligence gathering. The war in Afghanistan initially focused the post-Sept. 11 military, while the Authorization for Use of Military Force kick-started the Global War on Terror. In these and other ways, the American response to the Sept. 11 attacks ushered in a new era of government. The United States continues to reckon with these effects, 20 years after the most devastating attack of its kind on American soil. In the finale of our series marking the attacks' legacy on government, GovExec Daily explores the lasting effects on the administrative state and American political culture. Government Executive editor Tom Shoop, 9/11 commission member and former Rep. Tim Roemer, Dr. Alasdair Roberts, Dr. Lisa Parshall and Dr. Ron Sanders discuss how the attacks instigated major changes in government administration and the public's view of government.

The FOX News Rundown
From Washington: After Afghanistan, Is It Time To Re-Think AUMF?

The FOX News Rundown

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2021 28:20


On September 14th, 2001 Congress passed an Authorization for the Use of Military Force, allowing the Armed Forces to strike back against those responsible for the 9/11 terror attacks and deter and prevent acts of international terrorism against the United States. That AUMF has been used by every President since. But with the War in Afghanistan over and no remaining troops on the ground, it may be time to re-think the broad power given to the commander in chief. Indiana Republican Senator Todd Young discusses the future of these military authorizations twenty years later. The 2021 California Gubernatorial Recall Election takes place Tuesday, September 14th, and President Biden is campaigning with Governor Gavin Newsom in an attempt to keep him from being removed from office. Former President Barack Obama released an advertisement for Newsom urging Democrats to return ballots and veto the recall. However, if the California Governor is recalled, there are more than forty candidates lined up to replace him. FOX News Radio Political Analyst and columnist at National Journal Josh Krausaar predicts the election outcome.

Radiolab
60 Words, 20 Years

Radiolab

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 69:27


It has now been 20 years since September 11th, 2001. So we're bringing you a Peabody Award-winning story from our archives about one sentence, written in the hours after the attacks, that has led to the longest war in U.S. history. We examine how just 60 words of legal language have blurred the line between war and peace. In the hours after the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, a lawyer sat down in front of a computer and started writing a legal justification for taking action against those responsible. The language that he drafted and that President George W. Bush signed into law - called the Authorization for Use of Military Force (AUMF) -  has at its heart one single sentence, 60 words long. Over the last decade, those 60 words have become the legal foundation for the "war on terror." In this collaboration with BuzzFeed, reporter Gregory Johnsen tells us the story of how this has come to be one of the most important, confusing, troubling sentences of the last two decades. We go into the meetings that took place in the chaotic days just after 9/11, speak with Congresswoman Barbara Lee and former Congressman Ron Dellums about the vote on the AUMF. We hear from former White House and State Department lawyers John Bellinger & Harold Koh. We learn how this legal language unleashed Guantanamo, Navy Seal raids and drone strikes. And we speak with journalist Daniel Klaidman, legal expert Benjamin Wittes and Virginia Senator Tim Kaine about how these words came to be interpreted, and what they mean for the future of war and peace. Finally, we check back in with Congresswoman Lee, and talk to Yale law professor and national security expert Oona Hathaway, about how to move on from the original sixty words. Original episode produced by Matt Kielty and Kelsey Padgett with original music by Dylan Keefe. Update reported and produced by Sarah Qari and Soren Wheeler. Special thanks to Brian Finucane. Support Radiolab by becoming a member today at Radiolab.org/donate. 

GovExec Daily
The Military Legacy of Sept. 11

GovExec Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 17:30


Congress passed the Authorization for Use of Military Force as a joint resolution a week after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. The AUMF authorized the use of the military against terrorist organizations and every president since George W. Bush has interpreted that authority to extend operations beyond al Qaeda and the Taliban. The Global War on Terror has spanned the globe over the last two decades and continues to this day under the cover of secrecy, as the full list of targeted groups remains classified.  As part of a series marking the attacks' legacy on government, GovExec Daily explores the military and foreign policy legacy of the American reaction to Sept. 11. Ben Watson and Dr. Tony Brooks, veterans of the war in Afghanistan, discuss their experiences and Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction John Sopko talks about the failures in nation-building.

Parallax Views w/ J.G. Michael
Have Forever Wars Become Forever Policy? w/ Karen J. Greenberg

Parallax Views w/ J.G. Michael

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 40:11


On this edition of Parallax Views, has the post-911 Forever Wars created a slew of forever policies that'll live with us long after American military incursions in Afghanistan and Iraq are decades behind us? That's the case Karen J. Greenberg, of the Center on National Security at Fordham Law, joins us on this edition of Parallax Views to discuss that subject as outline in her recent TomDispatch piece "Will the Forever Wars Become Forever Policy?" and her new book Subtle Tools: The Dismantling of American Democracy from the War on Terror to Donald Trump. Karen argues that although we may be seeing some pivots in terms of policies put in place during the War on Terror, many of the policies of the Forever War years remain "on the table". In this conversation we discuss the Department of Homeland Security, managed counter-terrorism handled multilaterally, the War on Terror and the U.S. as "police men of the world", the Authorization for the Use of Military Force and the problem of its broadness, the opening of a Pandora's Box through AUMFs, the Presidency of George W. Bush and overreach of power, the college generation's relationship to the War on Terror and 9/11, U.S. torture programs and the unprecedented use of police powers in the post-9/11 world, domestic terror threats, whether or not the War on Terror has made us more safe and granted us a sense of security, the Guantanamo Bay pictures and their publication by the Pentagon, violations of norms and Constitutional principles during the War on Terror, militarization at home as well as abroad, climate change and globalization, and much, much more.

Angry Americans with Paul Rieckhoff
131. Rob Serra, FDNY (Ret.). 9/11 SPECIAL. Did America Forget? First-Responder Health Issues. The Great American Betrayal of Afghanistan. Professor Rieckhoff Goes Back to School. The Firefighters Podcast. Hockey Heroes Take Over MSG.

Angry Americans with Paul Rieckhoff

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 67:29


Never forget is the mantra of 9/11. It was on bumper stickers, repeated by Presidents, and hashtagged for two decades now. Twenty years later, has America forgotten?  Have we forgotten the lessons of 9/11? Have we forgotten what happened that day? Have we forgotten all that happened after? Have we forgotten about the public officials who said the air was clear at Ground Zero, the islamophobic attacks that happened across america, the rapid passage of the Patriot Act, the people snatched off streets and sent to GitMo without trail, the push for an invasion without a declaration of war, the rapid passage of the Authorization for Use of Military Force that allowed the unchecked expansion of Presidential power and the authority to conduct a forever war? Have we forgotten the unity? Have we forgotten the humanity? Have we forgotten the lessons?  From the bitter divisions around COVID, to the Capitol attack on January 6th, to the betrayal of Afghanistan, to the thousand of 9/11 first responders and survivors left alone to die from health impacts without help to this day...20 years after 9/11, it often feels like we've forgotten. And many in power, would like to keep it that way.  But as keepers of the 9/11 flame, our First-Responder host, Paul Rieckhoff, and his heroic guest consider it their responsibility to try to make sure America never forgets.  Host Rob Serra (@SerraRob) is a leader who can never forget. For over 10 years, he's been one of America's leading advocates for firefighters and first-responders. Rob was born and raised in Staten Island, NY and his first day in the field was September 11th. Along with thousands of others, he reported to the World Trade Center to help with the aftermath of the attacks. And now he's the host of his own groundbreaking new podcast, powered by Righteous Media, called The Firefighters Podcast with Rob Serra, FDNY (Ret.). It's the hottest podcast in America, literally. The show will feature interviews with firefighters and first responders, celebrities, and the always popular and delicious Firehouse cooking segment. Everybody loves firefighters. Now they have a podcast! And Rob is joining us exclusively to share more.  Our host, national security and political analyst and Army veteran Paul Rieckhoff (@PaulRieckhoff) first hosted Rob on this show way back in Episode #2--over two years ago. And this new conversation with Rob is as moving and as real as it gets. Parts of it are hard to hear, but you shouldn't turn away. These are the hard truths and about holding those in power accountable. It's a bold and blunt perspective you won't find anywhere else on the media landscape. You can support this show and join the community of listeners by joining our IA Patreon community. You'll get access to events, guests, merch discounts, and exclusive content. And you'll help us keep speaking truth to power. Paul Begala called Independent Americans: “What all political pods ought to be: fun, engaging, freewheeling, and respectful - even welcoming- of different points of view.” You can watch the video of this moving conversation with Rob and more than 100 other important, inspiring and iconic leaders touched by 9/11 from Sarah Jessica Parker to Admiral James Starvridis; Stephen Colbert to Pete Buttigieg; Jeffrey Wright to Rachel Maddow on the Righteous YouTube page. Independent Americans connects, informs and inspires--and is powered by Righteous Media. On social media or www.IndependentAmericans.us. And check out the new IA merch to hook up your favorite independent as fall approaches. You can also watch the full conversation with Rob and Paul Rieckhoff here: https://youtu.be/f9VEVyz41mA   Stay vigilant, America. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Stack Overflow Podcast
Authorization is complex. Oso is a library designed to help you structure it.

The Stack Overflow Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 22:53


You can learn more about Sam on his LinkedIn here. You can find him on Twitter here.Learn more about Oso, check out the code, and join their Slack community here.Our lifeboat badge winner of the week is Evgeny Lisin, who answered the question: How to find UIWebView in Project and replace it with WKWebView?

The Stack Overflow Podcast
Authorization is complex. Oso is a library designed to help you structure it.

The Stack Overflow Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 22:53


You can learn more about Sam on his LinkedIn here. You can find him on Twitter here.Learn more about Oso, check out the code, and join their Slack community here.Our lifeboat badge winner of the week is Evgeny Lisin, who answered the question: How to find UIWebView in Project and replace it with WKWebView?

Bedletter
Guest: Imposter Syndrome, Algorithm Bias, & Work Ethic w/ Malik Boykin

Bedletter

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 47:14


Malik and Christian continue their conversation. In part two, Malik details how he's dealt with imposter syndrome, his extensive research on algorithm bias, and the ways his work ethic has helped him overcome an intense workload on a day-to-day basis. There's a slough little wisdom-nuggets nestled all throughout this episode, definitely not one you want to miss. Episode 55.Subscribe and find out more at bedletter.substack.com  Follow Christian on Twitter  Follow Malik on Instagram  Listen to Malik's new song Dancing for Freedom  Keep up to date with Malik on his website Support the show (https://bedletter.substack.com/welcome)

Borderlines
#59 - Authorization to Work Without a Work Permit, with Cristina Guida

Borderlines

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 70:40


Cristina Guida is a senior associate lawyer with Green and Spiegel LLP in Toronto. We discuss authorization to work in Canada without a work permit, including business visitors, students, perfroming artists, maintained status, the global skills strategy and other categories. We also discuss what Canada's immigration department continues to be "work."

The Lawfare Podcast
AUMF Reform After Afghanistan

The Lawfare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 57:03


Since January, talk about reforming the nearly 20-year-old 2001 Authorization for Use of Military Force, or AUMF, that provides the legal basis for most overseas U.S. counterterrorism activities, has once again been on the rise. While past efforts have generally failed to yield results, the combination of growing bi-partisan disenchantment with the status quo and a seemingly supportive Biden administration had led some to believe that this is the moment in which reform might finally happen. But now, the collapse in Afghanistan has some wondering whether the Biden administration will still have an appetite for the type of risk that AUMF reform is likely to entail, especially given that President Biden appears to have doubled down on global counterterrorism efforts in recent public remarks. Scott R. Anderson sat down with two leading experts in war powers: Professor Oona Hathaway of Yale Law School and Professor Matt Waxman of Columbia Law School. They discussed where the impetus for reform comes from, what AUMF reforms may be on the table and what recent events mean for the future of reform efforts.Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/lawfare. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Dark Horde Network
Tucker Carlson UFO Revelations, Intelligence Authorization Act, More Believers in the USA, and PA Governor UFO Connection

The Dark Horde Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2021 67:14


On today's podcast: ‘Tucker Carlson Originals' discovers shocking revelations about UFO activity on Fox Nation https://www.foxnews.com/media/tucker-carlson-originals-shocking-ufo-fox-nation Senators Look to Continue Government-Led Research into Strange UFO Sightings https://www.nextgov.com/emerging-tech/2021/08/senators-look-continue-government-led-research-strange-ufo-sightings/184814/ Larger Minority in U.S. Says Some UFOs Are Alien Spacecraft https://news.gallup.com/poll/353420/larger-minority-says-ufos-alien-spacecraft.aspx Local man named campaign manager for Pa. governor candidate https://www.thecourierexpress.com/news/local-man-named-campaign-manager-for-pa-governor-candidate/article_d494a77c-9530-583c-ac96-3e37e061f7b4.htmlb Podcast Stuff Facebook: The Dark Horde - https://www.facebook.com/thedarkhordellc Facebook: The Tempest Universe - https://www.facebook.com/thetempestuniverse Facebook: Manny's Page - https://www.facebook.com/MannyPodcast Twitter: The Tempest Universe - https://twitter.com/ufobusterradio Twitter: The Dark Horde - https://twitter.com/HordeDark Discord Group - https://discord.com/channels/6ciao peeps!79454064890871869/679454064890871875 Mail can be sent to: The Dark Horde LLC PO BOX 769905 San Antonio TX 78245 Tel: (972) 591-8880

TRUNEWS with Rick Wiles
 BAIT AND SWITCH: Pfizer Vaxx Not Actually FDA Approved

TRUNEWS with Rick Wiles

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 120:25


Today on TruNews, we continue our investigation into the shocking news that the FDA ‘vaccine' approval does nothing to impede the continued use of emergency use authorization jabs, as the military, corporations, and school districts make their mandates on false assumptions. Tom Pappert, Editor in Chief of National File talks to Edward Szall about how the FBI is using Satanism to create a network of informants. In the final segment, how are Christians to live in a dystopian world of forced shots and mask mandates? Rick Wiles, Edward Szall, Raymond Burkhart, Kerry Kinsey. Airdate (8/25/21)

The REAL David Knight Show
Tue 24Aug21 FDA's New Definition: Fraudulent Declaration of Authorization

The REAL David Knight Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2021 181:46


TOPICS by TIMECODE 3:00 There Was NO Testing of TrumpShots.  A “bigger” test with more people run for a short time is NOT a “long” term test.  There's no “control group”.  FDA violated all its own rules.  Like the pandemic, the approval is political 9:00 Fauci has spent his entire life working to enslave humanity to giant corporations — exactly the OPPOSITE of William Wilberforce who worked his entire life to eliminate the slave trade and slavery being run by the most powerful and wealthy institutions of his day 18:36 GREED — #BigPharma has already raised price of TrumpShots.  19:44 BOOSTED! Two Dose Approved But 3rd Booster Required to Make Effective?  Booster approval is necessary says Pfizer & its in the pipeline — so what is the FDA “approval” other than nonsense.  Bill Maher gets it, kinda. Here's what he had to say 36:54 There's NO Delta Variant, NO Testing For It. Deja Flu?  It's the same M.O. as the annual flu vax push and what we saw a yr ago with COVID — The Association of Public Health Laboratories says there's few approved tests and they aren't being used.  Is that why govt WILL NOT TELL YOU if you have a “variant”? 42:51 Scott Gottlieb, Trump's FDA head, joined Pfizer board, congratulates his “colleagues” at Pfizer.  It's a revolving door of corruption and crony capitalism while the “anti-corporate” socialist left idolizes BigPharma 45:40 VAERS was trending yesterday on Twitter as leftists mocked the CDC's data about adverse effects.  Only 50 deaths stopped cold the 1976 Swine Flu vaccine. 53:30 What's going to happen to you and your family? “Jesus Take the Wheel” and the toddler in the grocery cart. 1:13:10  Pentagon War Games Forced Vaccines on Troops.  What will they do to those who refuse? 1:30:08 Fauci's long awaited SURGE of mandates for state employees, corporations & schools begins 1:51:13 How come the smallpox vaccine works for ALL variants & this genetic code injection doesn't? 2:07:36 Australian trucker speaks out about coming slowdown 2:18:41 Report out of Australia trolls the news reporting on Australian “quarantine” signs being like Nazi yellow stars 2:25:44  Sean Brooks, PhD — predicts massive death in 5 yrs 2:29:04  Moderna 2.5x More Heart Issues Than Pfizer. There's NO such thing as “minor” myocarditis.  Expect lifelong issues and diminished life expectancy. 2:48:52 MUST SEE: Father Destroys CRT.  5 lies they teach your kid in college freshman orientation and a father demolishes the lie of CRT — but teachers will teach it anyway. Find out more about the show and where you can watch it at TheDavidKnightShow.com If you would like to support the show and our family please consider subscribing monthly here: SubscribeStar https://www.subscribestar.com/the-david-knight-show Or you can send a donation through Zelle: @DavidKnightShow@protonmail.com Cash App at:  $davidknightshow BTC to:  bc1qkuec29hkuye4xse9unh7nptvu3y9qmv24vanh7 Mail:          David Knight          POB 1323          Elgin, TX 78621

The David Knight Show
Tue 24Aug21 FDA's New Definition: Fraudulent Declaration of Authorization

The David Knight Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2021 181:47


TOPICS by TIMECODE3:00 There Was NO Testing of TrumpShots. A “bigger” test with more people run for a short time is NOT a “long” term test. There's no “control group”. FDA violated all its own rules. Like the pandemic, the approval is political9:00 Fauci has spent his entire life working to enslave humanity to giant corporations — exactly the OPPOSITE of William Wilberforce who worked his entire life to eliminate the slave trade and slavery being run by the most powerful and wealthy institutions of his day18:36 GREED — #BigPharma has already raised price of TrumpShots. 19:44 BOOSTED! Two Dose Approved But 3rd Booster Required to Make Effective? Booster approval is necessary says Pfizer & its in the pipeline — so what is the FDA “approval” other than nonsense. Bill Maher gets it, kinda. Here's what he had to say36:54 There's NO Delta Variant, NO Testing For It. Deja Flu? It's the same M.O. as the annual flu vax push and what we saw a yr ago with COVID — The Association of Public Health Laboratories says there's few approved tests and they aren't being used. Is that why govt WILL NOT TELL YOU if you have a “variant”?42:51 Scott Gottlieb, Trump's FDA head, joined Pfizer board, congratulates his “colleagues” at Pfizer. It's a revolving door of corruption and crony capitalism while the “anti-corporate” socialist left idolizes BigPharma45:40 VAERS was trending yesterday on Twitter as leftists mocked the CDC's data about adverse effects. Only 50 deaths stopped cold the 1976 Swine Flu vaccine.53:30 What's going to happen to you and your family? “Jesus Take the Wheel” and the toddler in the grocery cart.1:13:10 Pentagon War Games Forced Vaccines on Troops. What will they do to those who refuse?1:30:08 Fauci's long awaited SURGE of mandates for state employees, corporations & schools begins1:51:13 How come the smallpox vaccine works for ALL variants & this genetic code injection doesn't?2:07:36 Australian trucker speaks out about coming slowdown2:18:41 Report out of Australia trolls the news reporting on Australian “quarantine” signs being like Nazi yellow stars2:25:44 Sean Brooks, PhD — predicts massive death in 5 yrs2:29:04 Moderna 2.5x More Heart Issues Than Pfizer. There's NO such thing as “minor” myocarditis. Expect lifelong issues and diminished life expectancy.2:48:52 MUST SEE: Father Destroys CRT. 5 lies they teach your kid in college freshman orientation and a father demolishes the lie of CRT — but teachers will teach it anyway.Find out more about the show and where you can watch it at TheDavidKnightShow.comIf you would like to support the show and our family please consider subscribing monthly here: SubscribeStar https://www.subscribestar.com/the-david-knight-showOr you can send a donation throughZelle: @DavidKnightShow@protonmail.comCash App at:  $davidknightshowBTC to:  bc1qkuec29hkuye4xse9unh7nptvu3y9qmv24vanh7Mail: David Knight POB 1323 Elgin, TX 78621

Chad Hartman
Dr. Scott Ratzan on Pfizer receiving full FDA authorization

Chad Hartman

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2021 10:57


Dr. Scott Ratzan from the CUNY School of Public Health joined Adam Carter - in for Chad - to talk about the FDA granting the Pfizer vaccine full authorization. Will more folks get vaccinated now? Will more businesses mandate vaccines? See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Blind Boys Politics
Covid-19 Booster Shots Have Been Given Emergency Use Authorization For The Immune Compromised

Blind Boys Politics

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2021 24:04


Date August 20, 2021topics: Booster shots are now to be given to be vaccinated against Covid-19.Masks to be worn on planes until 2022. Are you missing your child tax credit? when should you expect to get it?SNAP beneficiary to receive an increase in there monthly payments. Afghanistan update. Rapid and good news. Follow Nick on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Blinding_AuraFollow Chris on Twitter: https://twitter.com/c_baker002Follow Blind Boys Politics on Twitter: https://twitter.com/blindboypoliticnews articles: https://blindboyspolitics.medium.com/

All Things Chemical
Compliance Checks and REACH — A Conversation with Karin Baron

All Things Chemical

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2021 45:55


This week I sat down with Karin F. Baron, Senior Regulatory Consultant at B&C and our consulting affiliate, The Acta Group. Karin works extensively with the European Union's (EU) Registration, Evaluation, Authorization, and Restriction of Chemicals, better known as REACH, which is the EU counterpart to the U.S. Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA). We discuss REACH Article 41 “compliance checks,” an innocuous-sounding component of REACH that has the potential to cause considerable business anxiety, delay, and expense if a company's REACH dossier is found to be deficient as a result of a compliance check. Karin walks us through what these checks are for, what could happen if you are caught up in one, and how best to respond if your dossier becomes ensnared in a compliance check. ALL MATERIALS IN THIS PODCAST ARE PROVIDED SOLELY FOR INFORMATIONAL  AND ENTERTAINMENT PURPOSES. THE MATERIALS ARE NOT INTENDED TO CONSTITUTE LEGAL ADVICE OR THE PROVISION OF LEGAL SERVICES. ALL LEGAL QUESTIONS SHOULD BE ANSWERED DIRECTLY BY A LICENSED ATTORNEY PRACTICING IN THE APPLICABLE AREA OF LAW. ©2021 Bergeson & Campbell, P.C.  All Rights Reserved

Peggy Smedley Show
Authentication and Authorization

Peggy Smedley Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2021 16:22


Peggy and Bill Mann, CEO, Styra, talk about how the overall security market is getting more complex. He says as we get more technology, there are more moving parts. They also discuss: Why isn't authentication enough on its own. How authorization can help. The drivers for trying to solve the authorization problem. styra.com (08.17.21 - #733) IoT, Internet of Things, Peggy Smedley, artificial intelligence, machine learning, big data, digital transformation, cybersecurity, blockchain, 5G cloud, sustainability, future of work, podcast, Bill Mann, Styra

The Majority Report with Sam Seder
2654 - The Fall of Kabul And Biden's Response: What's Next?

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2021 68:01


Sam and Emma tackle a major week in news, starting with the fall of Kabul to the Taliban and the Biden administration's lackluster, finger-pointing response. They start by taking a bird's eye view of the fall of Kabul by going back to the beginning, when Congresswoman Barbara Lee (D-CA) was the sole person to vote against the Authorization for Use of Military Force (AUMF) in Afghanistan, and how far, or how little, we've come since then. Afterwards, they turn to Biden's remarks he delivered yesterday regarding what's ensued in Afghanistan in the last few weeks, noting that Biden struck the right tone, but some of the substance, namely in terms of Biden's continued adherence to American empire, was lacking. They continue combing through some of Biden's remarks, where he states firmly that the objective was not to nation build in Afghanistan, but to prevent a terrorist attack like that of 9/11 from happening again and to locate and kill Osama Bin Laden, a contention that does seem to be maximize the supposed successes of the invasion while notably minimizing the severe civilian casualties and atrocities that befell the Afghan people as a result, as well as the notable incursion into the Afghan people's everyday life for over 20 years. Biden then went onto say that he had to adhere in part to the deal that the Trump Administration struck to draw down troops by May 1st 2021 at the earliest, or risk further escalation of the conflict, as well as conceding that, in an effort to supply candor to the American people, Biden and the Administration were startled by how quickly Kabul fell. Sam and Emma, while giving some credit to Biden for his delivery and his marginally less hawkish approach to the war than Obama while he was serving as Vice President, don't buy this excuse from Biden, given that there's seemingly no universe where he didn't know that this was coming, and to completely shift blame onto Prime Minister Ashraf Ghani, who fled the country as a result of the invasion, and the Afghan military, completely excludes the role of the American military in this debacle. They end on observing how some of the members of the media responded to the remarks, with Nicolle Wallace making a shockingly cogent point regarding how people and the members of the press might have disproportionate responses to the remarks, while Tucker Carlson pivots to his favorite thing: blaming the P.C. mob for literally any world event. And in the fun half, the gang is joined as always on Tuesday afternoons by Nomiki Konst. The whole MR crew discuss at length the tragic story of Leslie Laurenson, a 58-year old British man who died of COVID very recently, and who, due to numerous influences online, notably the commentary of Bret Weinstein, refused to get the vaccine and was actively skeptical of them as a result. Sam, Matt, Nomi, and Emma dissect the fraudulence and cowardice of Weinstein's positions, where him and his cohort essentially propagate lies and misinformation but, when push comes to shove in terms of real and tangible outcomes as a result of their rhetoric, they shy away from any semblance of accountability and crow that people should know better than to take them *that* seriously. And finally, the gang would be remiss if they didn't cover Chris Cuomo's return from vacation and his hasty inability to truly own up to his complicity in advising his disgraced brother Andrew while actively covering his tenure as Governor when ostensibly fawning praise was in order, but never when Governor Cuomo actually had to face the music. The gang discuss how CNN botched the handling of this and how they could've initiated a real recusal for Chris with some teeth, as well as Chris's dissembling on air basically amounting to "I NEVER advised my brother, but when I DID advise him, I was SORRY about it. He's my BROTHER after all." They end on the curious phenomenon of the younger Cuomo brother searching his name to lambast other reporters that say mean things about him, as he did to Tori Bedford of GBH in 2018 and to Nomi herself a while back as well. Plus, your IM's! Become a member at JoinTheMajorityReport.com Subscribe to the AMQuickie newsletter here. Join the Majority Report Discord! http://majoritydiscord.com/ Get all your MR merch at our store https://shop.majorityreportradio.com/ (Merch issues and concerns can be addressed here: majorityreportstore@mirrorimage.com) You can now watch the livestream on Twitch. Support the St. Vincent Nurses today as they continue to strike for a fair contract! https://action.massnurses.org/we-stand-with-st-vincents-nurses/ Subscribe to Discourse Blog, a newsletter and website for progressive essays and related fun partly run by AM Quickie writer Jack Crosbie. https://discourseblog.com/ Subscribe to AM Quickie writer Corey Pein's podcast News from Nowhere, at https://www.patreon.com/newsfromnowhere Check out The Letterhack's upcoming Kickstarter project for his new graphic novel! https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/milagrocomic/milagro-heroe-de-las-calles Check out Matt Binder's YouTube channel! Check out The Nomiki Show live at 3 pm ET on YouTube at patreon.com/thenomikishow Check out Matt's podcast, Literary Hangover, at Patreon.com/LiteraryHangover, or on iTunes. Check out Jamie's podcast, The Antifada, at patreon.com/theantifada, on iTunes, or at twitch.tv/theantifada (streaming every Monday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday at 7pm ET!) Follow the Majority Report crew on Twitter: @SamSeder @EmmaVigeland @MattBinder @MattLech @BF1nn @BradKAlsop Help Aamon Hawk Buy A Super Computer! Check out Timbah.On.Toast's "Tim Pool: Chaotic News Analyst" Check out ReichWingWatch's "The Jimmy Dore Deception".

KPFA - The Pacifica Evening News, Weekdays
Resignation calls mount after investigation finds sexual harassment allegations against New York Governor credible; Biden administration imposes new eviction moratorium; Senate debates ending Iraq war authorization; Pro-Choice advocates speak out against

KPFA - The Pacifica Evening News, Weekdays

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2021 59:58


The Trevor Carey Show
CDC's PCR COVID Test Emergency Use Authorization Revoked

The Trevor Carey Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2021 38:55


The Health Ranger Report
Situation Update, July 26th, 2021 - CDC withdraws authorization of fraudulent PCR test that drove "casedemic"

The Health Ranger Report

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2021 50:41


0:00 Intro 6:54 Insane News 21:37 Trump vaccines 26:56 PCR testing For more updates, visit: http://www.brighteon.com/channel/hrreport NaturalNews videos would not be possible without you, as always we remain passionately dedicated to our mission of educating people all over the world on the subject of natural healing remedies and personal liberty (food freedom, medical freedom, the freedom of speech, etc.). Together, we're helping create a better world, with more honest food labeling, reduced chemical contamination, the avoidance of toxic heavy metals and vastly increased scientific transparency. ▶️ Every dollar you spend at the Health Ranger Store goes toward helping us achieve important science and content goals for humanity: https://www.healthrangerstore.com/ ▶️ Sign Up For Our Newsletter: https://www.naturalnews.com/Readerregistration.html ▶️ Brighteon: https://www.brighteon.com/channels/hrreport ▶️ Download our app: https://www.naturalnews.com/App ▶️ Join Our Social Network: https://brighteon.social/@HealthRanger ▶️ Check In Stock Products at: https://PrepWithMike.com

Modernize or Die ® Podcast - CFML News Edition
Modernize or Die® - CFML News for July 20th, 2021 - Episode 112

Modernize or Die ® Podcast - CFML News Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2021 40:03


2021-07-20 Weekly News - Episode 112Watch the video version on YouTube at https://youtu.be/42kYISzFpRI Hosts:  Gavin Pickin - Senior Developer for Ortus Solutions Brad Wood - Senior Developer for Ortus Solutions Thanks to our Sponsor - Ortus SolutionsThe makers of ColdBox, CommandBox, ForgeBox, TestBox and almost every other Box out there. A few ways  to say thanks back to Ortus Solutions: Like and subscribe to our videos on YouTube.  Sign up for a free or paid account on CFCasts, which is releasing new content every week Buy Ortus's new Book - 102 ColdBox HMVC Quick Tips and Tricks on GumRoad (http://gum.co/coldbox-tips) Patreon SupportWe have 38 patreons providing 100% of the funding for our Modernize or Die Podcasts via our Patreon site: https://www.patreon.com/ortussolutions. We are now 41% of the way to our next goal, fully funding the ForgeBox.io site.Now offering Annual Memberships, pay for the year and save 10% - great for businesses.News and EventsAdobe Docker Images UpdateFirst, you can now pull the Adobe CF images from Amazon Elastic Container Registry (ECR), including both the CF2021 image and 2018, as well as the add-on and PMT images for CF2021. Second, soon you will be able to download the Adobe CF images from DockerHub as well (“the way it's supposed to be”, some would say). There's no date set for when those will be posted, but indications are that it will be “very soon”, according to Adobe (see below).Finally, the previous repository that Adobe had used, Bintray, announced its closure, to happen May 1. The CF images there did remain accessible until very recently (indeed, as of the date I wrote this, June 17 2021). But as of a check in early July, the repo is indeed gone and pulls from it fail. (If you have images you had previously pulled, those DO still work. But consider the alternatives above, going forward.)https://coldfusion.adobe.com/2021/06/adobe-will-support-dockerhub-soon-and-supports-aws-ecr-now/ CF2018 and CF2021 PreRelease Charlie just updated his post and some of this has changed Support for macOS Big Sur (in ColdFusion, at least. But there's a new ColdFusion Builder 2018 installer for all OS's, including MacOS. More on that below.) Renewed support for the ColdFusion 2021 Lambda/serverless feature (this feature had been removed shortly after CF2021 was released) Support for Tomcat 9.0.43, embedded in CF2021 (I suspect the same is true in CF2018, though I have not yet installed it to confirm) "Enhancements in Language, Accessibility, PMT, Installation. Security and other areas" Several fixed issues https://www.carehart.org/blog/client/index.cfm/2021/7/19/dont_miss_prerelease_updates_to_CF2021_and_2018 Ortus Webinar for July - Building API Integrations with Hyper - Michael BornWednesday, July 21st Time: 11:00 AM CTLearn how to connect to a public API using Hyper in this webinar by Michael Born, where he'll cover API integrations from storing secrets to writing unit tests, to publishing the finished, reusable library on ForgeBox.Register https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZ0rf-GurjMpE9cX63bZoFA-SqC4OXzDw6wK https://www.ortussolutions.com/events/webinars Adobe Developer Week Videos - Videos releasedAdobe has now published Dev Week videos on their ColdFusion Portal site, on their video page.This includes the 20 sessions (from community members and Adobe engineers) as well as the Adobe keynote.https://coldfusion.adobe.com/videos/ ICYMI ColdBox 6.5.0 ReleasedToday we are excited to release ColdBox v6.5.0 and its standalone companion libraries: CacheBox, LogBox and WireBox. This release has focused on stability and making sure all bugs are addressed especially when using our schedulers and asynchronous processes.https://coldbox.ortusbooks.com/intro/release-history/whats-new-with-6.5.0 https://www.ortussolutions.com/blog/coldbox-650-released Reminder - State of the CF Union SurveyHelp us find out the state of the CF Union – what versions of CFML Engine do people use, what frameworks, tools etc. We will share the summary results with everyone who completes the survey so that you can see how you compare with other CF developers.Spread the news so we can get as many responses as possible.https://teratech.com/state-of-the-cf-union-2021-survey 331 Results: https://teratech.com/state-of-the-cf-union-2021-results CFCasts Content Updateshttps://www.cfcasts.com Just ReleasedUp and Running with Quick Workshop Installation and Setup Getting Started Coming up soon More What's new with ColdBox 6 More What's new in qb 8 More Using DocBox LogBox 101 What's new in Content 5 Send your suggestions at https://cfcasts.com/supportConferences and TrainingInto the Box 2021 - live in Person in Texas.September 23rd and 24th.No workshops this year.Selection Committee Met - Speakers and Schedule coming soon.EARLY BIRD TICKETS STILL AVAILABLEhttps://intothebox.orghttps://itb2021.eventbrite.comITB Latam 2021 - live in personDecember 2nd or 3rd 2021 (confirming dates asap)More conferencesNeed more conferences, this site has a huge list of conferences for almost any language/community.https://confs.tech/Blogs, Tweets and Videos of the WeekBlog - Charlie Arehart - Lots more to the current CF2021, 2018 prerelease than folks may realizeHave you checked out the many things coming in the updates for CF2021 and 2018 in prerelease the past few weeks? Anyone is welcome to join the prerelease, logging in with an Adobe account. It's a lot more substantial than I think most realize.There's more changes to CF in the prerelease than just "Azul Java support", and indeed it's about more than just CF itself (but the various released CF installers and CFBuilder as well). In this post I list those things, both features and resources, both to inform those who may be interested in the various things that are coming and to help motivate some to check out the prerelease before final release (which could be any day now).https://www.carehart.org/blog/client/index.cfm/2021/7/19/dont_miss_prerelease_updates_to_CF2021_and_2018 Blog - Charlie Arehart - Videos now posted from Adobe CF Developer Week 2021Great news: all the session recordings are now posted for CF Dev Week 2021. This includes the 20 sessions (from community members and Adobe engineers) as well as the Adobe keynote.The sessions are posted at the videos page here on the CF Portal, which also has most or all recordings from various (but now all) previous Devweeks and CF Summits. It also offers various Adobe webinar series, like the recent one on the API Manager.https://coldfusion.adobe.com/2021/07/videos-now-posted-adobe-cf-developer-week-2021/ Blog - Ben Nadel - Video Presentation: Feature Flags Change Everything About Product DevelopmentA few weeks ago, I had the honor of participating in the Adobe ColdFusion Developer Week conference. I wanted to share a topic that I am extremely keen on: Feature Flags. My presentation was called, Feature Flags Change Everything About Product Development - a title that is in no way hyperbolic. The presentation covers what feature flags are; how I use them in my day-to-day work; how critical they've become to the product development workflow at InVision; and, how I can't imaging life without them. I hope that this presentation gets you jazzed-up about how feature flags might take your engineering efforts to the next level!https://www.bennadel.com/blog/4079-video-presentation-feature-flags-change-everything-about-product-development.htm Blog - Charlie Arehart - Adobe will support Dockerhub soon and supports AWS ECR now for pulling their imagesHere's some news that may surprise and delight those interested in using the Adobe CF Docker images, which I just learned yesterday and today:First, you can now pull the Adobe CF images from Amazon Elastic Container Registry (ECR), including both the CF2021 image and 2018, as well as the add-on and PMT images for CF2021. Second, soon you will be able to download the Adobe CF images from DockerHub as well (“the way it's supposed to be”, some would say). https://coldfusion.adobe.com/2021/06/adobe-will-support-dockerhub-soon-and-supports-aws-ecr-now/ CFML JobsSeveral positions available on https://www.getcfmljobs.com/Listing over 152 ColdFusion positions from 69 companies across 100 locations in 5 Countries.2 new jobs listed this weekFull-Time - ColdFusion Application Developer at Hyderabad, Telangana - India Posted Jul 18https://www.getcfmljobs.com/jobs/index.cfm/india/ColdFusion-Application-Developer-at-Hyderabad-Telangana/11300 Full-Time - Software Developer - Coldfusion at Overland Park, KS - United States Posted Jul 15https://www.getcfmljobs.com/jobs/index.cfm/united-states/Software-Developer-Coldfusion-at-Overland-Park-KS/11299 Ortus Jobs - https://www.ortussolutions.com/about-us/careers Senior ColdFusion CFML Developer (USA TEAM) Desarollador Web (EL SALVADOR TEAM) ForgeBox Module of the WeekHyper 3.1 by Eric PetersonHyper exists to provide a fluent builder experience for HTTP requests and responses. It also provides a powerful way to create clients, Builder objects with pre-configured defaults like a base URL or certain headers.Hyper was built after coding several API SDK's for various platforms — S3SDK, cbstripe, and cbgithub, to name a few. I noticed that I spent a lot of time setting up the plumbing for the requests and a wrapper around cfhttp. Each implementation was mostly the same but slightly different. It was additionally frustrating because I really only needed to tweak a few values, usually just the Authorization header. It would be nice to create an HTTP client pre-configured for each of these SDK's. It seemed the perfect fit for a module.Install: box install hyper https://www.forgebox.io/view/hyperVS Code Hint Tips and Tricks of the WeekSoft UndoUse the Soft Undo (⌘/⌃ + U) to move the cursor back to its previous location. This is particularly useful when you need to move down in a long file to copy a variable or function name and then go back to your original position.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q4MvnT4TjJcThank you to all of our Patreon SupportersThese individuals are personally supporting our open source initiatives to ensure the great toolings like CommandBox, ForgeBox, ColdBox,  ContentBox, TestBox and all the other boxes keep getting the continuous development they need, and funds the cloud infrastructure at our community relies on like ForgeBox for our Package Management with CommandBox. You can support us on Patreon here https://www.patreon.com/ortussolutionsNow offering Annual Memberships, pay for the year and save 10% - great for businesses. Bronze Packages and up, now get a ForgeBox Pro and CFCasts subscriptions as a perk for their Patreon Subscription. All Patreon supporters have a Profile badge on the Community Website All Patreon supporters have their own Private Forum access on the Community Website Patreons John Wilson - Synaptrix  Don Bellamy Eric Hoffman David Belanger Dean Maunder Gary Knight Giancarlo Gomez Jonathan Perret Mario Rodrigues Jeffry McGee - Sunstar Media Yogesh Mathur Joseph Lamoree Ben Nadel Brett DeLine Carl Von Stetten Charlie Arehart Dan Card Daniel Garcia Didier Lesnicki Edgardo Cabezas Jan Jannek Jason Daiger Jeff McClain Jeremy Adams Jonas Eriksson Jordan Clark Kai Koenig Laksma Tirtohadi Leon Seremelis Matthew Darby Matthew Clemente Mingo Hagen Patrick Flynn Ross Phillips Scott Steinbeck Shawn Oden Stephany Monge Steven Klotz You can see an up to date list of all sponsors on Ortus Solutions' Websitehttps://ortussolutions.com/about-us/sponsors ★ Support this podcast on Patreon ★

All Home Care Matters
What is Medicare?

All Home Care Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2021 16:37


Today on All Home Care Matters, we are going to be discussing Medicare. First, we will be talking about what Medicare is and how it differs from Medicaid and other insurances. Then, we'll look into how you can apply and receive Medicare before moving on to talk about how Medicare can help you and your family.   If you're ready to learn more about Medicare then let's get started.   According to the Kaiser Family Foundation, Medicare is a federal health insurance program created in 1965 for people ages 65 and over, regardless of income, medical history, or health status. It was expanded in 1972 to cover certain people under age 65 who have a long-term disability. There are currently over 60 million people in the United States on Medicare.   In 1945, President Truman called for the creation of a national health insurance plan but was unsuccessful. President Kennedy also tried to create a similar plan, but he was also unsuccessful in his attempt. Finally, nearly twenty years later, President Johnson signed Medicare into existence. Former President Truman got to see his idea come to life and he got to play a major role in it when he and his wife Bess, were the first two Medicare beneficiaries.   During the first year, nineteen million Americans signed up to receive Medicare. Over the years, there have been many changes and additions to Medicare legislation. Just last year, regulations were added due to the Covid-19 pandemic. If you are interested in seeing what regulations were added or changed due to the pandemic, you can find a good overview on the Commonwealth Fund's blog. You can find a link to the blog in our show notes for this episode. You can also visit medicare.gov for more information on the current and up-to-date regulations and stipulations on Medicare.     There are three parts of Medicare, Part A, Part B, and Part D. Medicare Part A covers inpatient hospital stays, care in a skilled nursing facility, hospice care, and some home health care. Medicare Part B covers certain doctor's services, outpatient care, medical supplies, and preventive services. Medicare Part C helps cover the cost of prescription drugs, including many recommended shots and vaccines. For more details on each of the individual parts of Medicare, visit medicare.gov.     Almost everyone over 65 is eligible for Medicare Part A and most do not have to pay a premium either. If you or your spouse are eligible for Social Security payments, you are likely eligible for Medicare Part A, as well. In order to not pay a premium, you must have paid payroll taxes for more than ten years. For those with disabilities that are under 65, generally, if you receive Social Security Disability Insurance, then you are eligible for Medicare. In 2016, 15 percent of Medicare beneficiaries were under 65 years old. There is, however, a two-year waiting period to get Medicare this way. But if you are diagnosed with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, also known as ALS, or end-stage renal disease, which is permanent kidney failure requiring dialysis or a transplant, there is no waiting period for Medicare eligibility.   Earlier, we told you about the three parts of Medicare, and you may have wondered why we didn't include the fourth part for Part C. Part C does exist, but it is actually separate from Medicare… in a way. Medicare Part C is what is known as Medicare Advantage. Medicare Advantage is one of the options you have when deciding how to get your Medicare coverage. With Medicare Advantage, you enroll in a private health plan, such as a health maintenance organization, or you may be more familiar with it by the abbreviation HMO, or preferred provider organization, or also known as a PPO, and receive all Medicare-covered Part A and Part B benefits and typically also Part D benefits. Basically, it is an all-in-one coverage plan that bundles the original Medicare options.   President Clinton signed Medicare plus Choice into law in 1997 and it was updated and changed to Medicare Advantage in 2003. Since then, enrollment in Medicare Advantage has grown. Last year, more than 24 million beneficiaries enrolled in Medicare Advantage, and enrollment is expected to grow to 26 million this year.   If you are interested in pricing and Medicare plan options, please visit medicare.gov for more information.   Medicare and Medicaid often go hand in hand, but people tend to get them confused. Medicare is an insurance program, whereas Medicaid is an assistance program. Medicare is also a federal program, while Medicaid is run by state and local governments. With Medicare beneficiaries you usually have to be over the age of 65 to qualify, but there are no age restrictions with Medicaid. Medicaid provides Americans with free or low-cost health coverage to low-income people, families and children, pregnant women, the elderly, and people with disabilities. To see if you qualify for Medicaid, visit healthcare.gov.   If you are having trouble remembering which one is which, remember that Medicare provides care, or insurance plans, while Medicaid aids needy families. Now, we know that Medicaid is no longer just for people with low-income, but the majority of people using Medicaid do have low-incomes and remembering that is easier than trying to say Medicaid comes to the aid of low-income people, families and children, pregnant women, the elderly, and people with disabilities.   Medicare is a federally funded insurance that is open to almost everyone over the age of 65 and it is often more cost-efficient than private insurances. Private insurances, however, have more options and pay scales to choose from. Private insurances offer things that Medicare doesn't, like dental, vision, and hearing. Oftentimes, you may be able to find a plan that will work with Medicare and use it to cover what Medicare will not.     When choosing a Medicare plan, medicare.gov suggests considering costs, coverage, your other coverage, prescription drugs, doctor and hospital choice, quality of care, and travel when deciding between what sort of coverage you need. You can find more information on what you should consider when choosing coverage at medicare.gov.     Cost is a big determining factor when choosing an insurance plan. If you are paying for insurance completely out-of-pocket Medicare is most likely the option for you. If your employer provides insurance for you, they may pay part or all of your monthly premium, even after retirement, but that all depends on your employer. They all differ, as they all have different private insurance companies and plans.   According to Medical News Today, the average monthly premiums for private insurance in 2019 cost families $20,576 per year, the cost for individuals $7,188 per year, and cost for families $6,015 per year after their employer covered part of the cost. Medicare Part A typically has no monthly premiums and Medicare Part B has a standard monthly premium of $148.50, resulting in $1,782 a year.   Private insurance is open to everyone, so if you do not meet the age requirement or one of the other stipulations for Medicare, private insurance is always an option.   If you are interested in signing up for Medicare, visit medicare.gov to start the process. If you are 65 and receiving Social Security, you may have already been automatically enrolled, so make sure you double-check before you try to sign up. There are also only certain times of the year that you can sign up for Medicare, just like with private insurance. Depending on when you are trying to sign up, you may have to wait for the next enrollment period.   Once you are enrolled in Medicare, there are a few things you should do right away. You can find a Welcome to Medicare checklist on medicare.gov or the links in our show notes if you would like to look at the full list. First, you need to decide what Medicare coverage you would like. You can choose from the Original Medicare or Medicare Advantage. If you choose the original Medicare, you can also choose additional coverage to go along with it. Next, you need to give Medicare permission to talk to someone you trust.   If you are getting Medicare for your loved one, you need to fill out the Authorization to Disclose Personal Health Information form so that Medicare can interact with you directly. Then, go online and create a Medicare account at medicare.gov. From here, you can manage your Medicare information anytime, create a list of your prescriptions, view your Original Medicare claims status, pay your Medicare premiums, and more. You can also print an official copy of your Medicare card if you need it. Make sure you tell your doctor about your new Medicare plan and if you have other insurance, make sure to let Medicare know, as well.   During the first year you have Medicare, you can schedule a free “Welcome to Medicare” preventive visit with your doctor. It includes a review of your medical and social history related to your health and counseling about preventive services that may be right for you. During your first year, you should also find out what your Medicare plan covers. You can find out by visiting medicare.gov/coverage or you can use their free app, What's Covered.   If you are on Medicare and you have a limited income, you may qualify for financial help. Visit medicare.gov to see if you are eligible to get help paying your Medicare health and drug costs. You should also get into the habit of filing and checking on your claims to make sure you are not being charged for services you never received.   If you choose a Medicare Advantage plan and would like to change or add on to your plan, you can do that, but make sure you do it within the first three months. If you would like to add or remove drug coverage or switch to an original Medicare plan, as long as you do it within the first three months of having Medicare, you can do so with no penalties or waiting period. If you decide you want to change your plan after the first three months, you can still do that, but only during certain times. Medicare Advantage's open enrollment is from January 1st through March 31st. During this period, you can switch from one Medicare Advantage plan to another, switch from Medicare Advantage to Original Medicare, or enroll in Medicare Advantage for the first time.   The annual open enrollment period for Medicare is in the fall from October 15th through December 7th. During this period, you can change or add to your Medicare plan or enroll in a new Medicare plan. Any changes you make to your coverage will begin on January 1st. There are a few other times you can add or change your Medicare coverage plan like if you reach the age of 65, you lose your insurance, or you move. For more information on Medicare enrollment, visit medicare.gov.   If you or your loved one have questions about Medicare and cannot or do not have access to the internet or a computer, you can call 1-800-MEDICARE, or 1-800-633-4227 at any time. If you have difficulties with hearing or speech, you can also call their TTY number, 1-877-486-2048.   If you or your loved one are struggling to understand Medicare and everything that comes with it, know that you are not alone. Many people don't understand Medicare, which is one of the reasons we have decided on discussing Medicare today. With your State Health Insurance Assistance Program, otherwise known as SHIP, you can get free and personalized health insurance counseling. A trusted insurance agent or broker can also help you understand Medicare and help you go over the options provided to determine the best plan and coverage for you.   Before Medicare and Medicaid were created in 1965, roughly half of seniors were uninsured. Today, both programs cover nearly one-third of all Americans. Without Medicare and Medicaid, a significant number of Americans would be unable to afford the medical care they needed to stay healthy and productive. These programs have saved countless lives since being established. Without them, many seniors would not have been able to afford a stay in the hospital and most likely would have avoided going, even if meant refusing life-saving treatment.   Many seniors worry that their medical expenses will ultimately fall on their loved ones and end up refusing to seek medical help when they need it, but with Medicare, they can seek the help they need and not worry about the financial burden. According to Medicare.gov, Medicare covers 23 types of preventive services, including flu shots and diabetes screenings. Some of these services are free, and for others, you only have a small copayment or deductible to pay, depending on which plan you have.   Medicare can help you and your loved one by providing them with insurance that allows them to seek medical help, but also allows them, and you, peace of mind. If you haven't already, join the millions of families that use Medicare to help ease some of the financial burdens that come with aging. Combined with private insurance, you can make sure your loved one is covered and never has to worry about their medical expenses. When neither you nor your loved one has to worry about the costs, you can enjoy spending time together and making memories with them.   If you have any questions about Medicare, please visit medicare.gov for more information. You can also talk to your insurance agent or broker. They should be able to help you go over your options and find the best coverage for yourself or your loved one. You can also visit Medicare on Facebook and Twitter. They post content regularly that you may find helpful.   We want to say thank you for joining us here at All Home Care Matters, All Home Care Matters is here for you and to help families as they navigate long-term care issues. Please visit us at allhomecarematters.com there is a private secure fillable form there where you can give us feedback, show ideas, or if you have questions. Every form is read and responded to. If you know someone is who could benefit from this episode and please make sure to share it with them.   Remember, you can listen to the show on any of your favorite podcast streaming platforms and watch the show on our YouTube channel and make sure to hit that subscribe button, so you'll never miss an episode. Next, on All Home Care Matters we are very excited to share with you that we have some very special guests who will be joining us over the next few episodes. Stay tuned you won't want to miss these interviews!     Sources: https://www.medicare.gov/what-medicare-covers/your-medicare-coverage-choices/whats-medicare   https://www.kff.org/medicare/issue-brief/an-overview-of-medicare/   https://assets.aarp.org/rgcenter/health/fs149_medicare.pdf   https://www.medicareresources.org/medicare-benefits/medicare-advantage/   https://www.hhs.gov/answers/medicare-and-medicaid/what-is-the-difference-between-medicare-medicaid/index.html   https://www.healthcare.gov/medicaid-chip/   https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/is-medicare-better-than-private-insurance#what-private-insurers-offer   https://www.medicare.gov/media/9211   https://www.medicare.gov/blog/medicare-and-medicaid-keeping-americans-healthy-for-50-years   https://www.medicareresources.org/basic-medicare-information/brief-history-of-medicare/   https://www.medicare.gov/what-medicare-covers/your-medicare-coverage-choices/consider-these-7-things-when-choosing-coverage              

Paul's Security Weekly
SolarWinds, Kaseya, Cisco, Schneider, & Jason Wood - SWN #133

Paul's Security Weekly

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2021 24:07


This week, Dr. Doug talks Billionaires in Space, Killer Robots, Kaseya, Solarwinds, Charming Kitten, Schneider Electric, and CISA reports! All this and Jason Wood on this edition of the Security Weekly News!   Show Notes: https://securityweekly.com/swn133 Visit https://www.securityweekly.com/swn for all the latest episodes!   Follow us on Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/securityweekly Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/secweekly

The Lawfare Podcast
Lawfare Archive: Al-Shabaab Under the AUMF

The Lawfare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2021 45:45


From December 3, 2016: Earlier this week, the New York Times published a story by Charlie Savage, Eric Schmitt, and Mark Mazzetti informing us that the Obama administration had changed its interpretation of the 2001 Authorization for the Use of Military Force to more broadly cover the use of force against al-Shabaab, expanding its previous reading of the AUMF as only authorizing force against members of al-Shabaab individually linked to al-Qaeda. Bobby noted the story on Lawfare and provided a few comments. While the news has been somewhat drowned out amidst the hubbub of the presidential transition, the significance of this change in legal interpretation shouldn't be lost—so we brought Bobby and Charlie Savage on the podcast to talk with Benjamin Wittes about where this change came from and what it might mean. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Defense & Aerospace Report
Defense & Aerospace Report Podcast [Jul 02, '21 Combined Washington Roundtable and Business Report]

Defense & Aerospace Report

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2021 52:57


On this combined Washington Roundtable and Business Report episode of the Defense & Aerospace Report Podcast, sponsored by Bell, our guests in segment one are Dov Zakheim, PhD, former DoD comptroller, now with the Center for Strategic and International Studies, Michael Herson, President and CEO, Bob Hale, former Pentagon comptroller and Mackenzie Eaglen of the American Enterprise Institute. In segment two we are joined by our normal Sunday business crew, “Rocket Ron” Epstein, PhD, of Bank of America Merrill Lynch, Richard Aboulafia of the Teal Group consultancy and Sash Tusa of Agency Partners. Topics: — Move by House to repeal the 2001 Authorization for Use of Military Force, update defense spending plus-ups and bipartisan infrastructure legislation and Jan. 6 investigation — Look at House Appropriations defense subcommittee markup — Outlook for Biden administration nominations that are on hold including Frank Kendall, Mike Brown, Jen Easterly and Susanna Blume — Implications of Russia's recent test of a new missile and revelation that China is building some 120 new ballistic missile silos in the western desert near Yumen — Legacy of former two-time Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld who passed away this week at age 88 — Switzerland's decision to acquire Lockheed Martin's F-35 Lightning II to replace aging Boeing F/A-18 Hornet and Northrop Grumman F-5 Tiger fighters as well as Raytheon's Patriot air and missile defense system — Germany's move to acquire Boeing's P-8 Poseidon as its next maritime patrol aircraft, jeopardizing plan to cooperate with France on future capability — United Airlines' decision to acquire 200 Boeing 737 Max and 70 Airbus A321neo jetliners — Boeing picks Brian West as new chief financial officer to replace Greg Smith who retired earlier this year

Paul's Security Weekly
Meat Scented Candles - PSW #701

Paul's Security Weekly

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2021 173:31


This week, we kick off the show with an interview featuring Rob Shavelle, Co-Founder and CEO of Abine & DeleteMe, to talk about New Security Threats Stemming from PII Online! Then, Haseeb Awan, CEO of EFANI Inc, joins to discuss the The Rise of Sim Swapping! In the Security News, LinkedIn breach exposes user data, Why MTTR is Bad for SecOps, 3 Things Every CISO Wishes You Understood, USA as a Cyber Power, is ignorance bliss for hackers?, flaws let you hack an ATM by waving your phone, and more!   Show Notes: https://securityweekly.com/psw701 Visit https://www.securityweekly.com/psw for all the latest episodes!   Visit https://securityweekly.com/acm to sign up for a demo or buy our AI Hunter! Follow us on Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/securityweekly Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/secweekly

Paul's Security Weekly
Greased Lightning - SCW #78

Paul's Security Weekly

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2021 77:03


This week, we welcome Steve Lenderman, Director, Strategic Fraud Prevention at ADP, to discuss CARES Act Fraud, Paying People & Fraudsters! We will review how synthetics are being utilized to perpetrate pandemic related frauds in the Payroll Protection Program and Unemployment Insurance. An overview of the government programs will take place with the controls that were in place, how they were compromised, by who and what you can do to remediate risk.   Show Notes: https://securityweekly.com/scw78 Visit https://www.securityweekly.com/scw for all the latest episodes!   Follow us on Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/securityweekly Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/secweekly

The FOX News Rundown
President Biden's Anti-Crime, Afghan Policies Raise Concern

The FOX News Rundown

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2021 30:12


President Biden has unveiled his plan to address the rise in violent crime across the U.S. Some points he discussed Wednesday included arresting rogue firearms dealers, helping  former prisoners reenter society and expand employment opportunities for young people. Former businessman Glenn Youngkin is running for Governor of Virginia as the GOP nominee. Youngkin joins today's "Rundown" to weigh in on crime, why it's not a Republican or Democrat issue but a "community safety issue" and he explains why investing in law enforcement is a requirement. President Biden is set to meet with Afghan President Ashraf Ghani this week amid increased violence in the region following the planned removal of U.S. troops. While the President has already begun removing forces from Afghanistan, there is cause for concern as Taliban fighters continue to take control of key districts in Afghanistan following the U.S. troop removal from the region. Congressman Brian Mast (R-FL) and Afghanistan war veteran joins to discuss the right way the U.S. should be executing its troops removal from Afghanistan, the importance of ensuring the Taliban is not emboldened by the move and he explains why he believes there must be a replacement for the 2002 Authorization of Use of Military Force Against Iraq before repealing it completely. Plus, commentary by FOX Nation host Tammy Bruce.

None Taken
E 72 The Real AUMF

None Taken

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2021 109:51


What does actively gay mean? Did China screw up? Election coverage of NYC... and Iran. We talk in depth about the house repealing the 2002 Authorization for Use of Military Force, and the recent controversial Supreme Court decisions. But first, we'll recap the weekend of listener hangouts and puppy pick ups. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/None_Taken /support

The David Knight Show
Tuesday 22June21 - Biden Spends More to END GAS/DIESEL CARS Than Was Spent on Entire Interstate

The David Knight Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2021 108:31


* INTERVIEW: Eric Peters, EPautos.com, Biden's "Infrastructure" bill dwarfs the spending on Interstate Highway system but his purpose is to end private cars — gas & diesel engines first.  And, cops bring out needles for those they suspect of driving while high* CIA in Hollywood — new FOIA (Freedom of Information Act) information* Young Swiss voters lead rejection of "Climate Lockdown" austerity measures* Pelosi refuses, White House dodges questions on humanity of 15 week old baby — as child born at 16 weeks celebrates his 1st birthday* FBI is simply organized crime* Republicans oppose ending AUMF (Authorization of Use of Military Force) that is a declaration of unending war, foreign AND DOMESTICTOPICS by TIMECODE0:00 Pelosi & White House dodge question about killing 15 week old baby (Mississippi law to be tested) on 1st birthday of child who survived from 16 weeks.  The ruthlessness of those in power, including SCOTUS, who will kill TENS OF MILLIONS to extend their power13:06 Biden Administration DOJ called out for ignoring “Due Process” in MODEL RED FLAG legislation being sent to states.  Here's what's in the proposed laws that the feds want states to enact18:24 Eight year old FOIA request (Freedom of Information Act) sheds new light on CIA & Hollywood — specifically Ben Affleck & his movie “Argo”24:02 Affleck's former wife, Jennifer Garner, CIA ads and what it was like to film in Langley, the true seat of government33:43 FBI sponsors 15 crimes a day as the federal government wreaks havoc domestically, not just abroad44:11 GOP fights against ending Authorization for Use of Military Force (AUMF).  Forever war, everywhere — including in America45:44 Ammon Bundy announces his candidacy for Governor of Idaho.  You should listen to his 5 KEY ISSUES55:21 INTERVIEW: Eric Peters, EPautos.com, Biden's massive “infrastructure” move to get rid of gas/diesel cars (more spending than we had for creation of the interstate system) and more government NEEDLING — blood draws to determine if you've had marijuana in the last month.  Used cars soar in value — new business opportunity for service and parts fabrication1:34:34 “Academic” censors (so-called journalism professors) at Stanford, Harvard, Princeton — are bragging about destroying the reach of yours truly1:39:49  IMPORTANT precedent to fight Employer Vaccine Mandates from EEOC1:42:26 According to EU database (only 27 of 50 European countries) COVID jabs have killed 15,472 and injured 1.5 MILLION (half of them seriously).  The story of the 13 yr old boy who died with heart issues a month after injection Find out more about the show and where you can watch it at TheDavidKnightShow.comIf you would like to support the show and our family please consider subscribing monthly here: SubscribeStar https://www.subscribestar.com/the-david-knight-showOr you can send a donation throughZelle: @DavidKnightShow@protonmail.comCash App at:  $davidknightshowBTC to:  bc1qkuec29hkuye4xse9unh7nptvu3y9qmv24vanh7Mail: David KnightPOB 1323Elgin, TX 78621

The REAL David Knight Show
Tuesday 22June21 - Biden Spends More to END GAS/DIESEL CARS Than Was Spent on Entire Interstate

The REAL David Knight Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2021 108:30


* INTERVIEW: Eric Peters, EPautos.com, Biden's "Infrastructure" bill dwarfs the spending on Interstate Highway system but his purpose is to end private cars — gas & diesel engines first.  And, cops bring out needles for those they suspect of driving while high * CIA in Hollywood — new FOIA (Freedom of Information Act) information * Young Swiss voters lead rejection of "Climate Lockdown" austerity measures * Pelosi refuses, White House dodges questions on humanity of 15 week old baby — as child born at 16 weeks celebrates his 1st birthday * FBI is simply organized crime * Republicans oppose ending AUMF (Authorization of Use of Military Force) that is a declaration of unending war, foreign AND DOMESTIC TOPICS by TIMECODE 0:00 Pelosi & White House dodge question about killing 15 week old baby (Mississippi law to be tested) on 1st birthday of child who survived from 16 weeks.  The ruthlessness of those in power, including SCOTUS, who will kill TENS OF MILLIONS to extend their power 13:06 Biden Administration DOJ called out for ignoring “Due Process” in MODEL RED FLAG legislation being sent to states.  Here's what's in the proposed laws that the feds want states to enact 18:24 Eight year old FOIA request (Freedom of Information Act) sheds new light on CIA & Hollywood — specifically Ben Affleck & his movie “Argo” 24:02 Affleck's former wife, Jennifer Garner, CIA ads and what it was like to film in Langley, the true seat of government 33:43 FBI sponsors 15 crimes a day as the federal government wreaks havoc domestically, not just abroad 44:11 GOP fights against ending Authorization for Use of Military Force (AUMF).  Forever war, everywhere — including in America 45:44 Ammon Bundy announces his candidacy for Governor of Idaho.  You should listen to his 5 KEY ISSUES 55:21 INTERVIEW: Eric Peters, EPautos.com, Biden's massive “infrastructure” move to get rid of gas/diesel cars (more spending than we had for creation of the interstate system) and more government NEEDLING — blood draws to determine if you've had marijuana in the last month.  Used cars soar in value — new business opportunity for service and parts fabrication 1:34:34 “Academic” censors (so-called journalism professors) at Stanford, Harvard, Princeton — are bragging about destroying the reach of yours truly 1:39:49  IMPORTANT precedent to fight Employer Vaccine Mandates from EEOC 1:42:26 According to EU database (only 27 of 50 European countries) COVID jabs have killed 15,472 and injured 1.5 MILLION (half of them seriously).  The story of the 13 yr old boy who died with heart issues a month after injection  Find out more about the show and where you can watch it at TheDavidKnightShow.com If you would like to support the show and our family please consider subscribing monthly here: SubscribeStar https://www.subscribestar.com/the-david-knight-show Or you can send a donation through Zelle: @DavidKnightShow@protonmail.com Cash App at:  $davidknightshow BTC to:  bc1qkuec29hkuye4xse9unh7nptvu3y9qmv24vanh7 Mail: David Knight POB 1323 Elgin, TX 78621

Ron Paul Liberty Report
It's About Time! Congress Votes To Repeal Iraq War Authorization

Ron Paul Liberty Report

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2021 29:36


Last week the US House voted to repeal the 2002 authorization to attack Iraq. After nineteen years and perhaps a million dead Iraqis, nothing was achieved by the war but death and destruction. Has Washington learned its lesson? Also today, WHO says no jab for kids! And Fauci's corrupt partner is shown the door.

The Libertarian Institute - All Podcasts
COI#125: Repealing the 2002 Iraq War Authority Won't End the War on Terror

The Libertarian Institute - All Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2021 36:24


On COI #125, Kyle and Will explain recent efforts in Congress to repeal the 2002 Authorization for the Use of Military Force (AUMF), which gave legal authority for the US invasion of Iraq. Kyle argues that while the 2002 authorization has been invoked a few times since the invasion, it's really the 2001 AUMF that's allowed the War on Terror to continue. Far less attention has been paid to the broader 2001 authorities, however. Israel briefly renewed airstrikes on the Gaza Strip last week, after Palestinians sent incendiary balloons into Israeli cities. The exchange followed clashes that sparked during a controversial 'Flag March' through Jerusalem, arranged by Israeli nationalist groups last week. The two sides are now attempting to deescalate, as a new coalition government in Israel cuts its teeth on its first bout of conflict with the blockaded Palestinian enclave. General Mark Milley, the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, made uncharacteristically reasonable comments about China and Taiwan during a recent congressional hearing. Despite near-constant warnings about an imminent Chinese invasion from lawmakers and military officials, Milley downplayed those concerns, questioning whether Beijing has any intention or interest in taking over the island. Odysee Donate LBRY Credits bTTEiLoteVdMbLS7YqDVSZyjEY1eMgW7CP Donate Bitcoin 36PP4kT28jjUZcL44dXDonFwrVVDHntsrk Donate Bitcoin Cash qp6gznu4xm97cj7j9vqepqxcfuctq2exvvqu7aamz6 Subscribe Star – Conflicts of Interest  YouTube – Conflicts of Interest Facebook – Conflicts of Interest Twitter – Conflicts of Interest Apple Podcast – Conflicts of Interest Support Our Sponsor Visit Paloma Verde and use code PEACE for 25% off our CBD