Podcasts about Habitat

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The type of environment in which an organism lives

  • 2,246PODCASTS
  • 5,190EPISODES
  • 41mAVG DURATION
  • 2DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • May 15, 2022LATEST
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Best podcasts about Habitat

Show all podcasts related to habitat

Latest podcast episodes about Habitat

In Defense of Plants Podcast
Ep. 369 - A Historical Perspective on the Coontie

In Defense of Plants Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 39:27


This episode is all about North America's most northerly cycad - the coontie (Zamia integrifolia). A fascinating species both ecologically and culturally, this small cycad once grew from southern Florida up into Georgia. Habitat loss and over-harvesting following European colonization has taken a serious toll on its numbers in the wild, but today it is making a comeback. Join me and my guest Dr. Patrick Griffith of the Montgomery Botanical Center as we discuss the fascinating biogeographic and cultural history of this plant. This episode was produced in part by Peter, Judson, Ella, Alex, Dan, Pamela, Peter, Andrea, Nathan, Karyn, Michelle, Jillian, Chellie, Linda, Laura, Miz Holly, Christie, Carlos, Paleo Fern, Levi, Sylvia, Lanny, Ben, Lily, Craig, Sarah, Lor, Monika, Brandon, Jeremy, Suzanne, Kristina, Christine, Silas, Michael, Aristia, Felicidad, Lauren, Danielle, Allie, Jeffrey, Amanda, Tommy, Marcel, C Leigh, Karma, Shelby, Christopher, Alvin, Arek, Chellie, Dani, Paul, Dani, Tara, Elly, Colleen, Natalie, Nathan, Ario, Laura, Cari, Margaret, Mary, Connor, Nathan, Jan, Jerome, Brian, Azomonas, Ellie, University Greens, Joseph, Melody, Patricia, Matthew, Garrett, John, Ashley, Cathrine, Melvin, OrangeJulian, Porter, Jules, Griff, Joan, Megan, Marabeth, Les, Ali, Southside Plants, Keiko, Robert, Bryce, Wilma, Amanda, Helen, Mikey, Michelle, German, Joerg, Cathy, Tate, Steve, Kae, Carole, Mr. Keith Santner, Lynn, Aaron, Sara, Kenned, Brett, Jocelyn, Ethan, Sheryl, Runaway Goldfish, Ryan, Chris, Alana, Rachel, Joanna, Lori, Paul, Griff, Matthew, Bobby, Vaibhav, Steven, Joseph, Brandon, Liam, Hall, Jared, Brandon, Christina, Carly, Kazys, Stephen, Katherine, Mohsin Kazmi Takes Pictures, Manny, doeg, Daniel, Tim, Philip, Tim, Lisa, Brodie, Bendix, Irene, holly, Sara, and Margie.

Hágase la luz
HABITAT 15: Reutilización de las edificaciones

Hágase la luz

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 20:51


El arquitecto y miembro de la asociaciaón GBC, una asociación que trabaja en la sostebilidad de las edificaciones, Borja Izaola, explica la importancia de reutilizar las edificacions para, de cara a la crisis climática, que los impactos medioambientales no sean tan nocivos....

RNZ: Sunday Morning
What role does our garden play in biodiversity?

RNZ: Sunday Morning

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 13:43


University of Otago urban ecologist Professor Yolanda van Heezik recently led a research team focused on the role private gardens can play in contributing to biodiversity. Professor van Heezik is with us to look at 'Garden Star.' 

Ducks Unlimited Podcast
Ep. 5 - Prairie Habitat Conditions Improved Over 2021

Ducks Unlimited Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 38:52


Dr. Johann Walker and Dr. Scott Stephens join the podcast to provide an armchair view of habitat conditions in the U.S. and Canadian Prairies and openly speculate about what we should expect for the 2022 breeding duck population and production. While winter and early spring storms refilled wetlands in North Dakota, Manitoba, and the Canadian parklands, variable and dry conditions remain across important breeding regions of Montana and southern Saskatchewan and Alberta.  www.ducks.org/DUPodcast

Habitat Podcast
Habitat Podcast #178 - David Gage #2 - Big Bucks & Living Soil, Maximizing Seed & Fertilizer Costs, Nutrient Density & Antler Development & Maximizing Microbiology to Unlock Genetic Potential in a Deer Herd

Habitat Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 65:42


David Gage is back for round #2! This is part 2 of a 2 part podcast. Episode #177 was part #1. We are switching gears into Living Soil and helping listeners get the most for their money! We cover: Personal Farming and Soil Health, Soil health in general Benefits of multi cropping vs mono culture, Living soil and habitat - how they relate, Water retention flood and drought protection. Dollars and Sense, Maximizing synthetics and seed cost. Theories: Nutrient density and palatability. Nutrient density and gestation does/fawn success. Nutrient Density Antler Development. Maximizing microbiology to unlock genetic potential within a deer herd  Food Plot / Soil Builder Diverse Seed Mixes - https://bit.ly/vitalizeseed The Squirrel at Nutplanter.com: https://bit.ly/3kdBp9V 10% off when you talk to Lowell. Morse Nursery Tree Dealer Pricing – info@habitatpodcast.com Property Consultations – HP Land Plans: LAND PLANS YOUTUBE - Habitat Podcast Habitat Hook Giveaway: www.habitatpodcast.com a $250 value! Habitat Hook – HP10 for 10% off - https://bit.ly/33go0Xy Email us: info@habitatpodcast.com Leave us a great review to get FREE DECAL here:  https://apple.co/2uhoqOO Exodus Trail Cameras - https://bit.ly/ExodusHP Afflictor Broadheads - https://bit.ly/AfflictorBH Packer Maxx - http://bit.ly/PACKERMAXX $25 off with code: HPC25 Morse Nursery - http://bit.ly/MorseTrees 10% off w/code: HABITAT10 Michigan Whitetail Pursuit - http://bit.ly/MWpursuit Habitat Podcast AMAZON Store - https://www.amazon.com/shop/habitatpodcast Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Duck Season Somewhere
Waterfowl Habitat Management: Planting Agricultural Hot Crops

Duck Season Somewhere

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 74:37


There's a time and place everything. Kevin Nelms and Ramsey discuss planting agricultural hot crops such as corn, rice, and various millets to provide high-energy food sources for wintering waterfowl, complimenting natural moist-soil habitat to form a waterfowl complex.  What are the pros and cons? How do site limitations affect crop selection, what excellent online resources are available to landowners for determining your property's soil type limitations? What is chiwapa millet and where's it available? What about "grassy corn"?  But wait-there's more! Much more! As USDA NRCS Wildlife Biologist in the Mississippi Delta, Nelms has spent decades designing and developing numerous private-lands waterfowl impoundments. He's worked extensively with private landowners throughout the region, improving desirable waterfowl habitat conditions, enhancing duck utilization, even putting together a handbook that Ramsey considers must-have essential for managing waterfowl habitat (refer to related links in the episode description for your own PDF copy). This is the third episode of a 4-part series that duck habitat nerds both new and old will appreciate.     Related Links: Wetlands Management for Waterfowl Handbook (PDF) Managing Moist-Soil Impoundments (YouTube)     Podcast Sponsors: BOSS Shotshells Benelli Shotguns Tetra Hearing Kanati Waterfowl Taxidermy Mojo Outdoors Tom Beckbe Flash Back Decoys Voormi GetDucks USHuntList   It really is duck season somewhere for 365 days per year. Follow Ramsey Russell's worldwide duck hunting adventures as he chases real duck hunting experiences year-round: Instagram @ramseyrussellgetducks YouTube @GetDucks Facebook @GetDucks.com     Please subscribe, rate and review Duck Season Somewhere podcast. Share your favorite episodes with friends! Business inquiries and comments contact Ramsey Russell ramsey@getducks.com

The Orvis Hunting and Shooting Podcast
Bird Dogs, Conservation, and the Writing Life with Chad Love of Quail Forever

The Orvis Hunting and Shooting Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 99:42


Reid chats with his good friend Chad Love, editor of the Quail Forever Journal. Chad speaks about his native Oklahoma, the hunter·s progress, writing his way through a career, and the QF initiative Bird Dogs for Habitat. A wonderful chat with one of the most thoughtful guys in the game.

On The Wing Podcast
PODCAST EP. 165: Pro Dog Trainer Mike Wieben on Teaching Pointers to Retrieve

On The Wing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 49:50


Host Bob St.Pierre's two-year-old German shorthaired pointer, Gitche, needs a little finishing work this off-season. Consequently, Bob is dropping her off at Dokken's Oak Ridge Kennels for “summer camp” with professional dog trainer Mike Wieben. The guys take Gitche out for a couple of runs on birds, then talk through Gitche's performance and the training plan ahead. Episode Highlights: • Bob talks about his feelings of trepidation and intimidation that come naturally with dropping a beloved pup off with a professional trainer. • Bob details three specific areas he'd like help improving Gitche's performance; 1) strengthening her retrieve, 2) steadying her point, and 3) teaching her “place,” so she can go for a cast & blast canoe trip into the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness this September. Special thanks to SportDOG® Brand for sponsoring this episode of On the Wing podcast and for being a partner in PF & QF's annual Bird Dogs for Habitat campaign. This campaign is a friendly competition that challenges you to cast a vote and donate or become a member on behalf of your favorite bird dog breed. Every dollar donated equals a vote, and every week during the month of May our generous sponsors will be giving away fantastic prizes to those who participate. Vote today at www.BirdDogsforHabitat.org – THANKS!

Natural Habitat Podcast
#635 - Babortion Sandwich

Natural Habitat Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 55:03


Hope you're hungry, because we got a whopper of an episode for you today. Mikey and Ty tackle the alleged upcoming overturning of Roe vs Wade and talk about what that would mean for not only abortion and reproductive rights, but also contraceptive availability, same sex marriage and even interracial marriage!! Don't worry tho, we sandwich the topic between lots of fun and less depressing stuff like Dave Chappelle getting attacked on stage, Michael Winslow on America's Got Talent, comedies that no longer hold up and much much more!!!

Ducks Unlimited Podcast
Ep. 4 - DUTV 25th Anniversary feat. Jared Brown and Marc Pierce (2 of 5)

Ducks Unlimited Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 53:02


Host John Gordon interviews Marc Pierce and Jared Brown. Longtime friends and DU supporters, these former DUTV hosts talk about how they became involved with the show and some of their favorite moments through the years. What snacks did Wade Bourne bring to the blind? Listen in and find out!  DUTV's 25th season kicks off in July on The Sportsman Channel. Watch your favorite episodes on ducks.org/media/du-tv/video, Ducks Unlimited's YouTube page, or MOTV.

NDA's Deer Season 365
You're Managing Deer Sanctuaries All Wrong With Zack Vucurevich of Whetstone Habitat

NDA's Deer Season 365

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 61:08


This week we are talking with wildlife biologist Zack Vucurevich of Whetstone habitat about deer sanctuary areas. We dive into best practices for choosing a location for, creating and maintaining sanctuary areas on your hunting property. Zack discusses some of the ways he often sees sanctuary areas mismanaged and how to avoid those common pitfalls. If you love talking deer habitat, you'll thoroughly enjoy this episode! Important Links: NDA Giving Day! Follow Zack on Instagram Whetstone Habitat website Follow Brian Grossman on Instagram Sign up for NDA's free weekly e-newsletter Subscribe to the Podcast on: Apple Podcasts Google Podcasts Spotify iHeartRadio Stitcher About the National Deer Association The National Deer Association (NDA) is a non-profit deer conservation group that works to ensure the future of wild deer, wildlife habitat and hunting. Thank you for subscribing to our podcast! Support NDA's mission by becoming a member today. NDA has the highest ranking from Charity Navigator, an independent group that monitors non-profits for financial efficiency and effectiveness. Learn more about deer and deer hunting in our weekly, free e-newsletter. Follow us on our other channels: Facebook | Instagram | Twitter | YouTube

The Daily Refresh with John Lee Dumas
1493: The Daily Refresh | Quotes - Gratitude - Guided Breathing

The Daily Refresh with John Lee Dumas

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 3:01


A daily quote to inspire the mind, gratitude to warm the soul, and guided breathing to energize the body. Quote: "You don't think yourself into a new way of acting. You act yourself into a new way of thinking" ~ Millard Fuller - Founder, Habitat for Humanity Gratitude: For the numerous cultures that we can learn about and even have the opportunity to visit all around the world. Guided Breathing: Equal Breathing. Visit TheDailyRefresh.com to share your unique piece of gratitude which will be featured on an upcoming episode, and make sure to watch the tutorial of how to make The Daily Refresh part of your Alexa Flash Briefings! Call to action: If you're interested in launching your very own Podcast, visit FreePodcastCourse.com/ and this completely free training will teach you EVERYTHING you need to know! So visit FreePodcastCourse.com.

Chronique Habitat et Humanisme – Radio Notre Dame
Habitat et Humanisme : « le mépris de l’autre fait le lit de l’entre-soi »

Chronique Habitat et Humanisme – Radio Notre Dame

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022


Le Père Bernard Devert nous explique en quoi le bénévolat est « une école de la fraternité ».

L'heure du monde
L'accueil de réfugiés ukrainiens au Québec, et des espèces sauvages hors de leur habitat naturel

L'heure du monde

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 59:15


Sébastien Desrosiers nous raconte l'histoire de réfugiés ukrainiens fraîchement débarqués au Québec, plus motivés que jamais malgré les temps difficiles; Tiphanie Roquette nous explique que la Cour d'appel de l'Alberta déclare inconstitutionnelle la loi qui permet à Ottawa d'examiner les répercussions de nouveaux projets de développement de ressources naturelles; et la biologiste et chercheuse en écologie marine Lyne Morissette nous parle des animaux sauvages – dont des morses, un ours polaire et un petit rorqual – qui ont été aperçus bien loin de leur habitat naturel dans les dernières semaines.

Pacific Beat
Scientist need more information about plan to dump treated nuclear water into Pacific

Pacific Beat

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 10:02


Starting next year, Japan is planning to dump treated nuclear water from the Fukushima nuclear disaster into the ocean, but many Pacific organisations are not convinced it is safe.

Ducks Unlimited Podcast
Ep. 3 - Science Behind Mallard Body Condition

Ducks Unlimited Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 26:34


While lethal collection and gnarly lab work is the gold standard for measuring body condition of waterfowl, scientists also need non-lethal methods to answer other research questions. Katharine Cody, graduate student from the Univ. of Arkansas at Monticello, explains the importance of winter body condition for ducks and describes her research that sought to identify a reliable, non-lethal way to measure it for Arkansas mallards.  www.ducks.org/DUPodcast

Roe Hunting Resources' Podcast
Ep. 38 – Blown Vocal Chords, Predator Control, Habitat, Turkey Reaping (aka Fanning), and More!

Roe Hunting Resources' Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 151:56


It's Monday morning again, and Chris is behind the microphone late on Sunday night – this time talking about: – How he blew out his vocal chords resulting in this squeaky podcast discussion; – The challenges associated with land management and Mother Nature screwing you (aka Extreme Drought); – CWD in Northwest Kansas and implications on deer management/harvest potential; – Habitat management for ground-nesting birds versus predator management, and the realities of each; – Another brief touch on "Is Hunting Conservation???"; – A teaser regarding Chris' "Sportsmen's Advocacy Burnout"; – Turkey "Reaping" aka "Fanning" and is it the cause/major contributor of turkey population decline?; and – What's ahead for future discussions!

In Defense of Plants Podcast
Ep. 368 - Bumblebees and their Habitat

In Defense of Plants Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 8, 2022 55:42


If we care about organisms like bumblebees, we need to protect and restore their habitats and plants are that habitat. In this episode we hear from Senior Program Officer, Communications Lead,WWF Northern Great Plains Program Clay Bolt about the work being done to restore habitat and bolster bumblebee populations. This episode was produced in part by Judson, Ella, Alex, Dan, Pamela, Peter, Andrea, Nathan, Karyn, Michelle, Jillian, Chellie, Linda, Laura, Miz Holly, Christie, Carlos, Paleo Fern, Levi, Sylvia, Lanny, Ben, Lily, Craig, Sarah, Lor, Monika, Brandon, Jeremy, Suzanne, Kristina, Christine, Silas, Michael, Aristia, Felicidad, Lauren, Danielle, Allie, Jeffrey, Amanda, Tommy, Marcel, C Leigh, Karma, Shelby, Christopher, Alvin, Arek, Chellie, Dani, Paul, Dani, Tara, Elly, Colleen, Natalie, Nathan, Ario, Laura, Cari, Margaret, Mary, Connor, Nathan, Jan, Jerome, Brian, Azomonas, Ellie, University Greens, Joseph, Melody, Patricia, Matthew, Garrett, John, Ashley, Cathrine, Melvin, OrangeJulian, Porter, Jules, Griff, Joan, Megan, Marabeth, Les, Ali, Southside Plants, Keiko, Robert, Bryce, Wilma, Amanda, Helen, Mikey, Michelle, German, Joerg, Cathy, Tate, Steve, Kae, Carole, Mr. Keith Santner, Lynn, Aaron, Sara, Kenned, Brett, Jocelyn, Ethan, Sheryl, Runaway Goldfish, Ryan, Chris, Alana, Rachel, Joanna, Lori, Paul, Griff, Matthew, Bobby, Vaibhav, Steven, Joseph, Brandon, Liam, Hall, Jared, Brandon, Christina, Carly, Kazys, Stephen, Katherine, Mohsin Kazmi Takes Pictures, Manny, doeg, Daniel, Tim, Philip, Tim, Lisa, Brodie, Bendix, Irene, holly, Sara, and Margie.

Ducks Unlimited Podcast
Ep. 2 - DUTV 25th Anniversary feat. Eric Keszler (1 of 5)

Ducks Unlimited Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 30:20


Guest host and DUTV producer, John Gordon, interviews Eric Keszler, executive editor of Ducks Unlimited magazine, about the origin of the longest-running waterfowl hunting show on television, DUTV, in this first installment of a five-part series celebrating DUTV's 25th anniversary. Keszler spent several years producing DUTV and offers a great perspective on the history of the show. DUTV's 25th season kicks off in July on The Sportsman Channel. Watch your favorite episodes on ducks.org/media/du-tv/video, Ducks Unlimited's YouTube page, or MOTV.

Sportsmen's Nation - Whitetail Hunting
Pennsylvania Woodsman - How to Convert Cropland to Wildlife Habitat

Sportsmen's Nation - Whitetail Hunting

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 51:55


What seems to be the norm under private land is that more acres mean better hunting. It cannot be ignored that whitetails (and other wildlife) have a home range much larger than the size of the average Northeast parcel. But often, landowners complain about their inability to hold wildlife on their small property for the wrong reasons - efficiency. On this week's episode of the Pennsylvania Woodsman, Mitch dives into the controversial topic of Agriculture, CREP, and how they often do not correspond with quality wildlife habitat. Many people are in the market to buy a chunk of land to call home and have quality hunting opportunity. Let's make a case you are looking to purchase land in a mixed agricultural area. Now ask yourself which of these scenarios are better: 1) purchase the largest property you can afford but be forced to rent cropland to a local farmer or government CREP program due to financial reasons, or 2) purchase a smaller property that you're able to implement what the property needs in order to be as efficient as possible for your goals? In most cases the latter may be a better solution for a person who wants to have a whitetail and wildlife paradise. You'd be amazed the potential of a small property with the correct practices implemented. There is no one size fits all policy for property improvements, but these practices may be something to consider implementing on your property. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Habitat Podcast
Habitat Podcast #177 - David Gage - Booner Habitat Strategy, Buying More Farms, What is Missing, New Concepts for the Area, Hinge Cut & Opening the Canopy, Dollars & Cents, Great Hunting Stories

Habitat Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 54:13


Habitat Podcast #177 - David Gage joins us from Illinois. A friend of my friend Jordan Hanks, this was a recommended conversation and it was enjoyable.. We cover this podcast in a 2 part episode, and this is part 1. Here we go! Booner Habitat Strategy - David harvests some nice bucks and we talk on how he does it, Buying More Farms - David's story on achieving the dream by buying parcel by parcel, What is Missing? We cover the habitat that is needed to attract big bucks in this area and how David created it, New Habitat Concepts for the Area, Hinge Cut & Opening the Canopy, Dollars & Cents, Great Hunting Stories on Big Illinois Bucks Part 2 coming soon!!! Food Plot / Soil Builder Diverse Seed Mixes - https://bit.ly/vitalizeseed The Squirrel at Nutplanter.com: https://bit.ly/3kdBp9V 10% off when you talk to Lowell. Morse Nursery Tree Dealer Pricing – info@habitatpodcast.com Property Consultations – HP Land Plans: LAND PLANS YOUTUBE - Habitat Podcast Habitat Hook Giveaway: www.habitatpodcast.com a $250 value! Habitat Hook – HP10 for 10% off - https://bit.ly/33go0Xy Email us: info@habitatpodcast.com Leave us a great review to get FREE DECAL here:  https://apple.co/2uhoqOO Exodus Trail Cameras - https://bit.ly/ExodusHP Afflictor Broadheads - https://bit.ly/AfflictorBH Packer Maxx - http://bit.ly/PACKERMAXX $25 off with code: HPC25 Morse Nursery - http://bit.ly/MorseTrees 10% off w/code: HABITAT10 Michigan Whitetail Pursuit - http://bit.ly/MWpursuit Habitat Podcast AMAZON Store - https://www.amazon.com/shop/habitatpodcast Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Natural Habitat Podcast
#634 - Dollar Tree is CANCELED!!!

Natural Habitat Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 50:00


Nobody is safe from cancel culture, especially corporate entities. Mikey and Ty go over some of the nefarious alleged deeds done by Dollar Tree (who we are in no way affiliated with) and try to get to the bottom of things. We also talk about what else is new and much much more!

Mission-Driven
Chris Mann '00

Mission-Driven

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 80:58


Welcome to Season 3!  New episodes will be released througout the spring and summer of 2022. The first episode of season 3 features a conversation with Chris Mann '00.  Chris has built his career around making a difference in the lives of others.  He's joined in conversation with JP Cunningham '23.  They discuss Chris' time at Holy Cross and how he has carried the HC mission to serve others throughout his life and career. Interview originally recorded in November 2021. -- Chris: And so, I think you're seeing companies really say, "This is about our values and being clear on what our values are." Because our most important stakeholders, our people are saying that that's what matters to them and that's what they care about. And so, I think we just think about business differently. Maura: Welcome to Mission-Driven, where we speak with alumni who are leveraging their Holy Cross education to make a meaningful difference in the world around them. I'm your host Maura Sweeney from the class of 2007, Director of Alumni Career Development at Holy Cross. I'm delighted to welcome you to today's show. This episode features Chris Mann from the class of 2000. Maura: Chris's career has spanned roles that have one thing in common, making a positive impact on people and communities. He graduated from Holy Cross with a psychology major and art history minor. With this foundation, he joined the Dana-Farber and Jimmy Fund team, and his career flourished. Skilled at fundraising, event planning, marketing, and communications, Chris flexed his talents and roles at New Balance, Cone Communications, Reebok, and City Year. Maura: At the time this podcast was recorded, Chris worked as the Senior Vice President of Development for City Year. At the time this podcast is aired, Chris will have assumed a new role at Bain Capital as the first Vice President of Community Affairs, leading their philanthropy, employee volunteerism, events, and sponsorship. Chris is joined in conversation by JP Cunningham from the class of 2023. Maura: Their conversation is far-reaching but starts with the transformative years that Chris spent at Holy Cross, his time on the track and field team, and serving as senior class president, as well as his experiences during immersion programs and running summer orientation helped shape who he is today. Better yet, he can count the ways that the Holy Cross Alumni Network has supported him through each step in his career. A proud alumnus, Chris exemplifies the impact that one person can make by committing their talents to mission-driven work. JP: Hello, everyone. Thank you all for listening. I'm JP Cunningham. I'm a junior here at Holy Cross. And I'm joined by Chris Mann. Chris, how are you doing today? Chris: Hey, JP. I'm good. Good to be here with you today. JP: Thank you. So, yeah, I guess with that, we'll get right into it. I wanted to start with a little bit before your time at Holy Cross. So, my first question is, during your college search, what were some of the factors that drew you to the college? And was it your top choice? Yeah, if you can touch on that. Chris: Yeah, absolutely. So, like most high school students, I was looking at a lot of different schools. I didn't quite know what I wanted. I was the first and oldest child in my family, so I hadn't any brothers or sisters go through the college application process before. And at the time, this was in the mid-'90s, there wasn't as much information. It was kind of the glossy books you got in the mail and things like that, and word of mouth. But I knew a couple of things. Chris: I knew living in Andover, Massachusetts and growing up there, I wanted to be close enough to home that I could get back and forth. So, that kind of kept me looking at New England colleges for the most part. And as I started exploring, I knew about Holy Cross's reputation from an academic standpoint, but also had a couple of people at my high school, Andover High School, that I remember really respecting and looking up to in some ways that had gone to Holy Cross a couple of years before me. Chris: So, Chris Sintros, who was a class of '98, and Christine Anderson, class of '99. And I think it just piqued my interest to say, "Hey, those are people that I think I want to be like, and they chose this school." I actually got really fortunate to end up at Holy Cross. It was one of, I think, five schools I applied to, and I was waitlisted. So, I actually didn't know that I was going to get in until right to the end, and was really relieved and excited when I got in off the waitlist. Chris: And it ended up being a great scenario because I came on campus as the only person from my high school going to Holy Cross in that class. And I was matched up with three roommates in a quad in my freshman year. And it really helped me build some relationships and a network right away in a new place, new environment. JP: Awesome. That's really cool. Yeah, I can kind of relate to that, too, because both my dad and my sister went here, and then a lot of just friends and older classmates at my high school went to Holy Cross. And they're all just role models. And I felt the same way like, wow, this seems like a good place to be and that's what drew me there, too. So, it's great. Chris: Yeah. And I would say too, in visiting the school and seeing it, I mean, I certainly fell in love with the classic New England brick college, IV and setting, and it's a beautiful campus, as you know. And so, that, I was really excited about. And I started to get more and more of a field just as I came to visit a couple of different times. Chris: And as you started to read in and hear about the college's mission, and talking about being men and women for and with others, that all started to really resonate for me and felt a little different compared to some of the other schools that I had been visiting, and I loved that. I also really thought that the size was right for me. I was somewhat of a shy kid. I think I was trying to figure out where my place was. Chris: And I liked the idea of being in a school that felt a little smaller and where I wasn't going to get lost in the shuffle. And I think that ended up being a really big thing for me over the course of the four years, too. JP: Yeah, I couldn't agree more. I feel like people might say it's cliche, but I feel like at Holy Cross, the sense of community, just being on campus that first time, at least for me too, visiting that first time, there's something about it that really draws you and makes you feel like, "Hey, this is the place for me." Yes. I guess moving into the next question, after you became a student here, what were some of the things you were involved in during your time on the Hill? And was there one that you were most passionate about? Chris: I got to do a lot of different things, which was to our earlier point, the benefit of going to a smaller school with a lot of opportunities. Off the bat, athletics ended up being a big thing for me, which wasn't something I had planned. I had done sports in high school all three seasons. Really, I was passionate about basketball and track and field, but hadn't expected to be able to do that in college. Chris: And I showed up on campus and I remember, I think it was probably the first week of school, I got a phone call from Larry Napolitano who was the captain of the track team just saying, "Hey, we saw you did track and field in high school. Would you be interested in coming out and joining the team?" And I said, "Yes", and it was one of the great experiences of my time on the Hill being able to be part of that team. Chris: I certainly wasn't a phenomenal athlete or setting any records, but being part of that team environment, getting a chance to get into the daily routine that athletes do I think really benefited me. The structure was really helpful. I think it prepared me for life after college and having a busy schedule of going from weightlifting, to workouts, to classes, to other things. Chris: And just the relationships you build with teammates and coaches and the life lessons of athletics were really valuable and it helps cement a lifelong practice of fitness and health that exists to this day. So, that was foundational. That was a big one. And then, later in my time at Holy Cross, my senior year, I ended up getting encouraged to run for student government. And I ended up being elected president of the senior class of 2000. Chris: And that was a really powerful experience for me, too, so having a broader role in leading fellow students and thinking about our voice on campus. And to be honest, putting myself out there more publicly to run and be elected was not something I was very comfortable with or used to. So, building up that courage and having people believe in me to do that was also really important. And I think it started to show me that maybe I could do some things that I hadn't previously been confident enough to do or thought I could do. Chris: So, that was another big experience. And same thing, balancing those commitments with academics, with athletics really prepared me for life after college and the working world. JP: That's great. Yeah. I feel like balancing all those activities, being a full-time student athlete while being the president of your class can only help you in the long run and having that structure to your schedule and balancing different activities. Because I don't play any sports, but just balancing activities week by week with the schoolwork and all that, it definitely... I feel like it can only help you for after you graduate. JP: So, yeah, going off that, I guess a little more shifting towards the academics. One of the great things about Holy Cross in liberal arts education in general is that you really have the opportunity to major in anything that piques your interest, and then go out and succeed in business or whatever field you choose. So, I know you're a psychology and art history major. Were there any specific skills that you developed from your course of study that have helped you in your professional career? Chris: Yeah, it's interesting. It was another case of I didn't know what I wanted to study. When I came to Holy Cross, I started taking a few different classes in different areas to try and understand what resonated with me and that was what attracted... the liberal arts education attracted me to Holy Cross as well because I didn't know what I wanted to do. Chris: And I found myself really intrigued in the early psychology classes that I took, whether it was Intro to Psychology, or we had some ones later, behavioral psychology and other things, that just fascinated me between the... both the science and the depth of that field, but then also the ways in which humans interact and the way in which our environment influences us just fascinated me. And I really found myself loving that. Chris: And then, on the flip side, I ended up getting a minor in art history, similarly, because I just found myself interested and passionate in the subject matter and human experience behind that. I wouldn't have thought at the time that either of those would translate into a career path or job. I wasn't going to be a psychologist. I certainly wasn't an artist, but I have found over time that I think there are some lessons in the specifics of that. Chris: And in my current job in previous iterations where I'm a fundraiser, and in essence, I sell people on City Year's mission and investing in City Year's mission, some of the experiences and the lessons from psychology come out there, and understanding how you engage and connect with and influence people. So, that is certainly there. Chris: But more broadly, I just think the liberal arts' approach and specifically Holy Cross and the rigor of the academics forced me to really get tight and concise with my thinking, with how to make an argument, with how to take in information, synthesize that and consolidate it and communicate in a really effective, clear way, both verbally, written, visually, et cetera. Those are things I lean on on a daily basis. And I don't think I appreciated it at the time. Chris: But in talking with friends and colleagues and others whose college experiences were very different, either giant lecture halls or other things, the time, the attention, the rigor of the academics was really valuable. And I don't think I realized it until much later. JP: Yeah, I agree. I feel like everyone... and that's also one of the things that drew me to the liberal arts education is the fact that people say, obviously, you study what's interesting to you, but then being able to develop those skills like critical thinking, communication, and just being able to use those skills effectively go a long way in the professional world. So, you touched on some of the activities you were involved in when you are here at Holy Cross. JP: And since you graduated, there have been a number of new programs, activities. For example, the Ciocca Center for Business, Ethics, and Society was established in 2006. Are there any programs or activities happening now that you've become aware of at Holy Cross that stand out to you or you wish were around when you were a student? Chris: I think the Ciocca Center would have been something I would have really enjoyed getting a chance to participate in. I think this idea of business and ethics and where those intersect, and how companies can have an impact on society has been the centerpiece of my career and the different jobs that I've had. So, I think I would have really enjoyed going deeper there in a more formal way, for sure. Chris: I also really appreciate what the college has done in the last few years as we think about diversity at Holy Cross and how is the Holy Cross experience accessible to all. That is, I think, one takeaway from my time. Certainly, we had some level of diversity when I was at Holy Cross, but it was not nearly what it needs to be and what it should be going forward. And I think particularly for fellow classmates that were of color or came from different backgrounds and the majority of students, I think it was a really challenging thing for them and continues to be. Chris: And so, I think the idea of having a college community that does have more representation, does have more diversity across all levels and spectrums of how diversity shows up is valuable because I think, to be honest, it creates a better learning environment, it creates better dialogue, it creates better understanding. And I think that was a challenge, to be honest, during my time at Holy Cross. Many of the students were just like me coming from the same families, communities, et cetera. Chris: And so, that's something that I've been very encouraged to see over the last few years. JP: Yeah, absolutely. I feel like as a student for me and talking to alumni like yourself and just other people I've spoken to, people just say it's awesome to see the way the college is changing for the better, both academically and socially, like you just touched on. Moving a little away from strictly Holy Cross, can you maybe run through your career or professional path starting after you graduated from the college? Chris: Yeah. So, I was really lucky, and this is an area where I talk to current students or students that are considering Holy Cross, and the network of alumni really stepped up and helped me start my career and pursue the opportunities I've had. And I've been really fortunate to come across Holy Cross graduates at every role, every organization that I've been in, which speaks to the power of even the network of a small school overall. Chris: So, I was trying to decide what I wanted to do after graduation. As we mentioned, I had done activities in track and field. I was big into sports, so I was thinking sports marketing and those areas. I also got a chance, while I was on campus, to do a couple of spring break trips via Habitat for Humanity and build some houses down in Tallahassee, Florida for two spring breaks in a row. Chris: That and an internship at the Special Olympics while I was a student started to spark my interest in having a job where I can actually give back and support causes I cared about, and earn beyond a paycheck feel like I was having an impact on a daily basis in my work. So, that was interesting to me. And we had also run and started summer orientations program, the Gateway Summer Orientation Program. Chris: I was fortunate to be part of that first summer orientation program as a leader and then later, one of the co-leads of it. And I found myself really liking and being attracted by events and the planning that would go into preparing for an orientation program or some other event, and then seeing that come together and seeing people have a great time interacting and being part of that event. So, I was looking at sports marketing. I was looking at event management. I was thinking about nonprofits and exploring different things. Chris: And I was talking with John Hayes, who's class of '91. And he was the director of Holy Cross Fund at the time. He was our advisor for our Senior Class Gift. And John said, "Hey, you should really go talk to my friend Cynthia Carton O'Brien now, a class of '93, who was working at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and the Jimmy Fund." And so, he connected me to Cindy via informational interview. I went and learn more about Dana-Farber and the Jimmy Fund, and just loved the idea of it. Chris: It was a cancer hospital, obviously in Boston, doing amazing work for patients and their families, but also had this deep connection in history to the Red Sox. So, as a sports fan, I was excited about that. And I ended up applying for a couple of different jobs there coming out of school. And on the fundraising side, one was potentially to work in plan giving, so helping people think about their giving benefiting those beyond their lifetimes and resourcing the organization for the future. Chris: And then, the other one was going to be a rotational role, which was going to work on different areas of fundraising, the Boston Marathon Jimmy Fund Walk, donor advance and stewardship events, and then also cause marketing, which at the time was a fairly new thing that companies were starting to do. And so, I ended up getting that second job on the rotation. And it was just a phenomenal opportunity experience to get to learn different parts of fundraising and to work with some really, really great team. Chris: So, when I think about advice for people coming out of school and what to think about, I think finding a job where you can learn as much as possible and get exposed to as many different things as you can certainly really worked out for me. And it gave me a chance to understand what parts of fundraising and events that I really liked and what worked well for me. And I was also really lucky to work with just some amazing people. Chris: In particular, my first boss and my first teams on the Jimmy Fund Walk, which later included a couple of Holy Cross grads in the years after me that we hired as well, was just a perfect first start into the working world, for sure. JP: Definitely. So, you may have just answered this next question, but I'll still pose it to you. I know you talked about your experience with the Gateway's orientation. So, would you say that was something that from your time at Holy Cross that greatly influenced your post-grad experience and career? Or were there few other things? Chris: Gateways did influence me mostly in that I realized that I really enjoyed working in a team environment and it was with a lot of students from across different grades that I hadn't met or didn't know before. And I think that idea of working in a team that had some diversity in their experiences, et cetera, is definitely something that's resonated longer term and I've realized leads to a great work environment and a great end product in that Gateway's orientation. Chris: I definitely love the event planning piece of it. And so, I think that steered me towards my first job, for sure. As I got older, I realized I didn't love the always on and the stress of the event planning and so I've since moved to other areas. But I think the idea of that camaraderie and coming together to build something bigger than yourselves was really valuable for me. And I also loved being able to share my experiences with others and with other students. Chris: And so, getting a chance to really talk to people and help share my experience was something that I valued. I think it was probably an early stage mentorship. I don't think I realized it at the time, but I think that's what drew me to it was being able to work with students who were coming into a Holy Cross environment, nervous about it, not sure what to do, and really saying, "Hey, this is going to be a great experience for you. And here's all the reasons why or here are some things to look at." Chris: I realized I think later that that idea of being a mentor and having that mentoring relationship is something that I really value and enjoying doing. But again, I don't think I realized it at the time. But I think it was one of those foundational things, for sure, at least in the early jobs. JP: Absolutely. Yeah, that's awesome. I feel like it's cool to think back on the different ways certain events or activities that you took or spend so much time participating in can go such a long way in your life and the decisions you made, and things like that. Chris: I think so. I think other experiences, too, that I had probably more steered in that direction of what I wanted to do for career, I think having the opportunity to do an internship during my junior year with the Special Olympics of Massachusetts and help to do the marketing and recruitment for a Polar Plunge event that they did sparked an interest in, "Oh, you can do marketing, and you can do these types of business things that I want to do that have an impact for our cause." Chris: And Special Olympics was near and dear to my heart because my mom was a special education teacher. And so, I saw firsthand the power that that can have when you have inclusive opportunities for all young people, and give them a chance to participate in athletics and have those same experiences and lessons that I did from it was really valuable. So, I think the idea and the spark of having a job that can have an impact started there. Chris: And then, I had a summer experience in between my junior and senior years at Holy Cross, where I worked in an educational camp for kids called Super Camp and spent a few weeks on a college campus working with students that were struggling academically. And what we learned in the process when you get to meet these kids and work with them is that, in most cases, it wasn't because they didn't have the ability to learn or to do those that work. Chris: It was because there were other things going on in their lives that were either being a distraction or creating additional challenges that made it hard for them to show up in the education environment or in school in the way that they could or they should. And I think that in hindsight really is why I find myself loving the work that we do at City Year right now. And it's come full circle in that way because we see that talent is absolutely equally distributed and it's everywhere, but access and opportunity are not equally distributed. Chris: So, that's part of what we get to do at City Years is to say, "How can we make sure that every student gets the opportunities that they deserve to really tap into their talent and see success in their futures?" And I think that experience at Super Camp really gave me the first understanding of what education can look like when it works for everyone. JP: Yeah, absolutely. So, while we're looking in hindsight and reflecting on your experience post-Holy Cross, I know there's a lot to say about the strength of Holy Cross's Alumni Network. Could you tell a little bit about how that network has influenced your professional career? Chris: Yeah, it's influenced my professional career because I've been lucky to work with Holy Cross grads in every step of the way in every job almost that I can think of. So, at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and the Jimmy Fund, we hired Joe Robertson, who was a track and field classmate of mine, class of '02, Rebecca Manikian in the year before, '01. So, I got to work with both of them on the Boston Marathon Jimmy Fund Walk and had a community and a shared experience with the two of them. Chris: Worked with Kristina Coppola Timmins at Cone Communications. And Rebecca and Joe also were ended up being Cone alumni at different points. And then, now, a huge number of Holy Cross grads, past and present, that I have worked through, including my current boss, AnnMaura Connolly, class of '86. So, I think at every step, I've seen Holy Cross alumni show up both in the work environment and help in the broader network. Chris: There's not a question that I would have or a connection I'd be trying to make that I couldn't reach out to somebody at Holy Cross and just say, "Hey, we share this background. Can you help?" And there's been countless times where I've had Holy Cross grads that I either know or don't know be willing to offer advice or make a connection, no questions asked and right away all the time. And I think that's fairly rare, at least in my experience. Chris: And it always surprises me how we'll be having a conversation and somebody will say, "Oh, they went to Holy Cross." It's amazing I think how people show up, particularly in the space that I'm in where you're working in the nonprofit field or in other jobs that are trying to have an impact on society. I think that's where the Jesuit teachings I think resonate for folks. And they really internalized that learning and those values, and I think it shows up in their career choices, and it certainly did for me. JP: Definitely. Yeah. Even for me as a student, I feel like something everyone can agree on is the strength of the Holy Cross alumni network. And something I always think about, even before I became a student here, just like walking around, wearing either a Holy Cross hat or that purple shirt, I was surprised and people would be surprised based on how many times you would get stopped, like, "Oh, you went to Holy Cross. I was a grad from this class." And I think that's something really special about that network. Chris: Happens all the time. And you see it in families, too. I mean, you're seeing it in your own with your sister being a grad. And I'm hopeful that my kids will end up being graduates as well. But I think you see that legacy in a lot of ways among families, among communities, where that becomes more than just an individual experience. It's a shared family experience, which is a pretty special thing. JP: Yeah, definitely. And even the fact that, like you mentioned, even just being a student, the fact that any alumni you either reach out to or you meet, they're just so willing to sit down and talk for as long as you need and give you advice or whatever the purpose is for that phone call or that meeting. They really just sit down and are willing to help in any way possible. So, I think that's something that's awesome about the college. JP: So, moving along, I think one of the great things about this podcast is that it highlights and showcases the different ways that Holy Cross mission of men and women for others can play into so many different careers and stories of different alumni. So, I guess just to start, what mission or values fuel your professional work today? Chris: Yeah. It's interesting, I think I've been fortunate to work at this intersection of companies and causes coming together to drive better business and greater good. And it's happened throughout my career and gone full circle starting on the nonprofit side at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and the Jimmy Fund and moving over to the corporate side at New Balance Athletic Shoe and later Reebok, and then now in my current role at City Year. Chris: Seeing how companies can work with nonprofits and advising some of them on how to do that, when I was at Cone Communications and advising clients on those pieces, it's just always fascinated me that you can have a social impact. And it doesn't have to just be about charity, it doesn't have to be just about volunteerism or working in a nonprofit that there's all kinds of ways in which everybody can do that individually and collectively. Chris: Companies have a tremendous opportunity and tremendous power to be able to do that. And so, for me, I realized early on through those internships, experiences that I knew I was motivated by doing something kind of more than earning a paycheck, that I wanted to see that impact. Personally, I want to have a job that at the end of the day, I could feel like we were doing something bigger. And I think that was always a core value. Chris: I think, for me, that came from my parents. I think my example was seeing my mom be a special education teacher and work with students to give them that opportunity and to address some of that inequity and make sure that education was tailored to their needs and their situation, paired with my dad who was an executive in an enterprise rent a car for his whole career, high powered, highly growing business, and getting to see that side of it. Chris: And I think those two sensibilities really steered what I was looking for and seeing it as an example. I wanted to dig into business problems. I love the how do you think deeply about that? How do you try and solve those? How do you get somebody to buy your product or support your company or do something? So, the marketing and advertising and those pieces of it were fascinating to me intellectually, but I wanted to see an impact at the same time. Chris: And so, I think I was searching for that through each role of saying, "How do we combine those two things? And how does that show up?" In my time at the Jimmy Fund, it was really good for two things. I think my first job there was working a lot with families that were participating in the Boston Marathon Jimmy Fund Walk. And what I realized really quickly was, it was such a huge crash course in empathy and in building relationships and in listening. Chris: Because in most cases, I was just helping people that were participating in the event get registered, get their team organized and set up, get the T-shirts for the event, help them with their fundraising, things like that. But in most cases, I was talking with people that were either in the midst of the worst experience of their life because they were having somebody in their family facing cancer, or they were remembering the worst experience of their life and having lost somebody to cancer. Chris: And so, I think what I found is, you'd have a lot of conversations where people would get frustrated or they'd be angry or emotional, all rightfully so because they were dealing with really hard things. And I think I learned to be able to pick up on that and to connect with them and to try and find ways to encourage and support. And I think it was just a hugely valuable early experience in saying, "How do you connect with people and how do you build relationships?" Chris: "And how do you not take for granted both your own health and good fortune, but also how you'd be there when somebody else is struggling and understand what they're dealing with? And can you lift that load in some small way?" And I certainly was not doing anything significant in that regard and in that role, but I could make their day a little bit easier or solve a problem for them, et cetera. I started to really get excited about the ability to do that. And I found that was really motivating for me. Chris: So, the idea of having a purpose and being able to help somebody in a process during that day was, I think, started to become foundational. I think it also gave me a lot of perspective. You could be having a rough day in your job or something else going on. You could walk down the hall to the Jimmy Fund clinic and see the kids there that are coming in for treatment. It puts it in perspective pretty quick on your challenges and what's tough in your life when you're seeing that with a kid. Chris: So, for me, I think it helped build an immense sense of both opportunity to have an impact but then also an immense sense of gratitude for how fortunate I was. And I think those were two foundational pieces of that experience. And then, later, the second big lesson that I learned and this sparked the longer term career path was, I started to work more with the companies that were participating in the Jimmy Fund Walk, either that were sponsoring the event in different ways or they were getting their employees actively walking and fundraising. Chris: And that gave me a different side of it. It gave me exposure to stuff that I hadn't thought of, which was why would businesses do these types of things? Why would businesses want to have some sort of impact socially, which at the time was still relatively, I wouldn't say uncommon, but it wasn't as clear and upfront as it is today. Philanthropy was something that companies did on the side. It was nice to do because they wanted to be good citizens. But it wasn't a business strategy. Chris: It wasn't something that people were asking them about on a daily basis. It wasn't something that they thought about as part of their broader work as an organization and in their community. And so, that just fascinated me was like, why would companies want to do this outside of a classic kind of capitalist structure where they just have to add value for shareholders in the old Adam Smith lessons and things like that? Chris: And what I realized was, there was so much potential and so many resources that companies could bring to bear to help solve social issues. They had incredible skill and knowledge and power behind what they were doing in a lot of cases, really sophisticated ways to do things as businesses. Two, they had amazing people that they can deploy to have an impact in different ways, whether that was volunteering their time or giving access to their customers, things like that. Chris: And then, three, they can really tell a powerful story. Many companies can reach huge numbers of people and customers in a way that nonprofits can't and don't have the dollars or the access to be able to do. So, they could raise awareness and shine a light on different issues and get people to engage and support in a way that no nonprofit could ever hope to do. And I just became fascinated by that, on what a company could potentially do to have an impact in their community. Chris: And so, I think that job gave me two foundational experiences that I think have started to show up in each of the subsequent jobs that I started to have and really got me on that path. So, I think that's where the kind of being men and women for others started to show up for me was it was like a light went on, like, "Oh, this is how I can do that. This is where I can kind of have that be part of my daily life." JP: Yeah, that's amazing. I think what stuck out to me there was the perspective that you gained and you're sharing with us today is going back to at work or at school, you could be having a really bad day and that's that. I mean, obviously, no one enjoys having a bad day and it happens. But being able to just realize that oftentimes it could be way worse, and there's people, there are children and other people struggling, and they may be having a way worse day than you, I think that's a really important perspective for people to develop and take with them day by day. Chris: Yeah, I think so. Now, we have to acknowledge that that's easy for me to do as a white male, heterosexual, affluent, man of privilege in every possible dimension you can probably think of. I've had every advantage I could possibly have. And so, I think it's easy to say, "Have gratitude and appreciate those things when your life is what my life has been." And that doesn't mean we haven't had challenges and I haven't face things that have been tough, but I think it does give you a bit of a perspective. Chris: And I think gratitude and appreciation for those advantages and those experiences I've had is something that's driven a lot of the work for me and the why. But I would say within that, it's not uncommon, people come to try to have a social impact in many ways because of either guilt or a feeling of charity, like, "This is something I should pay it back. I should give back," and I certainly did. I think that was my perspective. I've been given a lot of opportunity. Chris: I owe it to others to give back in that way. I think when you start to do the work and you start to get proximate and really work on different issues, whatever it is, whether it's education or hunger or any way in which racism shows up in all of our systems, you start to realize that you move on the scale from charity to social justice, and really saying, "This isn't about me giving back or appreciating the opportunities I've had. This is about changing a system that is not just." Chris: "And it's my responsibility to play a deeper role there and to do what I can with the resources I have to drive some change there." So, I think you move from charity to social justice as you start to get proximate and more exposed to issues. And I think Holy Cross planted the ideas behind it and the early experiences, whether it was Habitat or other areas where I could start to see and get exposed to that. Chris: But I think later in my career and particularly at City Year, I started to see that more clearly and I think that's why my career has moved more in that direction. JP: Definitely. Yeah. So, I think you also, with those remarks you made, answered the next question I had, but I wanted to just emphasize. Is there something specific that drives you to work hard each and every day? And my takeaway from all you've just said is, I feel like the common theme of impact and purpose. That's what I picked up on, just whether it's you impacting someone or something, or the company you're working for, or just being able to realize the impact that someone else is having or that greater company is having on a specific cause. JP: That was my takeaway. And I think that's awesome just from a professional standpoint, being able to live by those themes of purpose and impact. That's really great. Chris: I think that's right. I think purpose and impact is the right way to frame it. I do think about that, hopefully, every day. Am I having a purpose and am I having an impact? In the day to day, I think you don't probably get up and get out of bed and think about that immediately. But I do think, as I thought about how I want to work and what jobs I want to take and what organizations I want to be at, I think in those times of reflection, certainly grounding back into purpose and impact has absolutely been the question I asked myself. Chris: Where can I feel connected and closest to a purpose? And where can I have the greatest impact in either my experience or in an organization that's working on a really hard problem? So, certainly, when I thought about coming to City Year and in my most recent role, that's absolutely what I was thinking about is, I had missed being close to the impact in a way that I had at Dana-Farber. Chris: And even at New Balance where I was on the corporate side but working closely with a lot of our nonprofit partners, I got to see that impact on a daily basis. When I moved into Cone Communications and advising nonprofit clients and business clients on their programs and their impact, I loved it. It was mentally fascinating and rigorous and an amazing training ground on all kinds of things around strategy and marketing and communications. Chris: Really tremendous skills and experience. But I found myself too far away from the people that we were serving, and I missed that. I wanted to get closer and back to that. And I think that's what drew me back to the nonprofit side at City Year was a chance to really work among people that were having that level of idealism and impact on a daily basis. Chris: And I also felt like it was a chance to take experiences and skills that I gained from other jobs and put them to really good use in helping, so you think about how we work with companies. Yeah. And I think the working hard piece to our earlier conversation, I think the rigor of Holy Cross academically and then all the other things that I got to be involved in really built that work habit in to where you show up and you do the work every day. Chris: And I think good things happen if you consistently spend the time and put in the effort. And again, I would say I had great examples, whether it's my parents or whether it's coaches and others, that really ingrain that work ethic and constantly trying to move forward for something bigger, whether it was a team that you were part of or whether it was the organization and the issue you were trying to support. JP: Definitely. Yeah. So, I guess to shift gears a little bit here, I wanted to talk about the Boston Marathon. Correct me if I'm wrong here, but you ran the Boston Marathon not once, not twice, but three times. Is that- Chris: Four actually. JP: Four, okay. So, the Boston Marathon, four times. At least in my opinion, being able to run the marathon one time is one heck of an achievement. So, could you tell me a little bit about what drove you to do that again and again and again and again? Chris: Yeah, yeah. It was working at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute really was the big thing in our first event. And that I got to work on the Boston Marathon Jimmy Fund Walk. I got exposed to the course because there was a fundraising walk along the route of the Boston Marathon. And we'd have thousands of people walk and fundraise for Dana-Farber along the route. So, I got to know the marathon course, its history. Chris: I got a really good opportunity to work with people like Dave McGillivray, the director of the Boston Marathon, and get to know him and his amazing team and learn from them. And just started to fall in love with that event. I would volunteer at the marathon and see it. And as a former track and field athlete, I wasn't a distance runner by any means, but I started to get it into my head that it would be a really challenging athletic experience. And so, that was interesting. Chris: To be honest, it was my wife that steered me in that direction. She ran the marathon first a couple of times for Dana-Farber and fundraise for them. And so, I got to see her experience doing that. And I'm kind of a competitive guy, so I decided that I wanted to do it myself. And I couldn't just let her have all the fun. So, I did, I signed up and ran for Dana-Farber. I actually got a chance to run that first marathon with my wife who, God bless her, waited for me and dragged me along those last few miles because I was struggling, and she was kind and carried me along. Chris: And then, I had a chance to do it a couple more times, which was great, including when I didn't finish, which was a huge disappointment and a physical struggle. But I got to come back in another year and completed, and it's some of my greatest memories and experiences of participating in that event and being part of fundraising for Dana-Farber, for City Year as part of that. The marathon is a really special event for Boston. Chris: And I think what you learn in that event is that people are always surprised and super like you were complimentary about being able to run that marathon. I fully believe that most people can run a marathon, and I've seen it firsthand on the course. I think what it gets to is our earlier conversation about how do you go pursue your goals and do those things. And anybody that's run a marathon can tell you that the race day is the reward. Chris: It's the thing at the end, it's the countless hours, the 16 weeks before where you're going and you're running three, four, five, six, depending on what your training schedule is, days a week. And putting in countless miles in good weather, bad weather, darkness, snow, rain, cold, your ability to get up and do that each day and keep consistently growing the mileage and keeping the training, that's what leads to the marathon and the success at the end. Chris: So, it's really about, can you do that work on a daily basis? And can you progress over time by sticking with it through the ups and the downs? And then, I was really lucky to train with great groups of people each time. And I think that's another lesson of it is, it's pretty hard thing to go train by yourself and go run a marathon by yourself. Most people that do it have done their training with a group of friends and other people that are running that helped motivate them, support them, and inspire them. Chris: And then, day off, all the people that are out there are cheering you on, supporting you, helping you get to that day. It's truly a team effort. So, I just got to get the rewards of doing it four times. JP: Yeah, that's an awesome achievement. And I have a ton of respect for you and anyone who does that. In fact, one of my buddies here at Holy Cross, Colman Benson, he's a sophomore, and he ran this past marathon. And just seeing him go through that training earlier in the fall, I'd be like, "Oh, what are you doing tomorrow?" He's like, "Oh, I'm running 12 miles in the morning, then I'm going to class." And I just think that's very impressive and definitely an awesome achievement. Chris: Yeah, it's not too late, JP. You can start training, too. JP: Yeah. So, I read in a previous interview that one of your most memorable achievements is your support of Susan G. Komen for the Cure while you're with New Balance. Can you speak a little to that? Chris: Yeah. So, after my first couple jobs at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and the Jimmy Fund, I mentioned I found myself just becoming so fascinated by what companies could do. And I realized that I really wanted to experience it from a company's perspective. I wanted to get over to that side of the work. Around that time, I also decided that I wanted to go deeper into business. I was working with companies. Chris: I was asking them to support us, but I didn't really understand business in a deep way. And so, I ended up going back to graduate school at night to get my MBA while I was working at Dana-Farber. And I ended up making the switch over to New Balance and taking a job there really that was the opposite or the flip side of what I had been doing at the Jimmy Fund. Chris: So, instead of asking companies to support us and asking them to sponsor and have their employees participate in our events, and have an impact in that way, I was helping to guide New Balance's investment in different nonprofits in the community and thinking about how we showed up with our dollars, with our products, with our people to support those efforts. And so, the job was to manage what New Balance called their cause marketing work at the time. Chris: I sat in the marketing department at New Balance. I was measured in the same ways that other marketers were on driving awareness of New Balance's brand, consideration of our product and trying on footwear and apparel and things like that, and then ultimately sales of that product, which was great. And I loved it because I got a chance to really get into the marketing and science of that, which was fascinating, and do it at a brand and in a field of athletic footwear and apparel that I was personally passionate about as a runner and as an athlete. Chris: So, best of both worlds there. And it was just a great opportunity to take what I knew from the nonprofit side and bring that sensibility into the corporate environment into how we showed up and work with our nonprofit partners, whether it was Susan G. Komen for the Cure or Girls on the Run, which was our other major partner. And I just loved it. And I think that really crystallized, this is the career path for me. Chris: I can work with cool products and in areas that I really liked, but I can have an impact in that way. And it just opened my eyes to what was possible for companies. New Balance was such a special place because it was a privately held, family-owned company, had a tremendous number of people that I worked there for years. It really felt like a community of people in ways that the Jimmy Fund and Holy Cross actually felt very similar to me, and that's what I loved about being there at the time. Chris: And we got to do some really cool things, whether it was working on all the different Komen events. I had a chance to meet Joe Biden, President Biden, when he was vice president at the time at an event for Komen and New Balance, which was amazing. We got to do great things, marketing our products, and attending different events, and meeting celebrities. I went on The Ellen Show to give away million dollars for breast cancer research and got to have the big chat out there and hand that to Ellen. Chris: So, amazing, unique experiences that I wouldn't have other ever anticipated getting a chance to do as a result of that job. It's a really special company. And later, I got a chance to really go deep and work with Girls on the Run after my time at New Balance. After I left New Balance, I had a chance to join the board of Girls on the Run and serve on their board and chair their board for a few years. Chris: And to get to work with that amazing nonprofit that focuses on women's leadership development and girls empowerment through a running curriculum and really social-emotional skill building curriculum was just an amazing experience to, again, work for another world-class nonprofit and get a chance to see it grow. So, another really fortunate opportunity for me. JP: Yeah, that's incredible. That seems like such an overall special, I guess, group of things that you got, meeting the president and going on The Ellen Show. That's awesome. So, I guess, it seems like it's hard to top those experiences. But has anything changed in terms of your most memorable milestone since then in your career? Chris: I think you start to look at what are the skills and experiences and most importantly, the relationships you build over your career. And each of those are really cool memories and experiences. But I think what matters is the relationships that you start to have and build over time. So, when I think about those different jobs, it's more about the people that I got a chance to work with and get to learn from. Chris: And I think City Year as my current job and organization now for the last eight years, that's what I start to think about and focus on is how have I gotten the chance to work with and learn from really great people, and continued. I think, even in this kind of midway through my career and later in my career, I feel like I'm still learning and growing on a daily basis, and getting better both at what I do tangibly functionally in my work. Chris: But also as a manager, as a boss, as a co-worker, as a parent, I think you start to pick up those lessons. And I think for City Year in particular, it's by far the most powerful place that I've ever seen as far as helping people really build connection to one another and to help us really explore who we are and how do we show up as our full selves at work on a daily basis. And how do we do that for other people, whether it's our co-workers or whether it's the students we work with in the schools we serve in. Chris: I think that's the amazing lesson and opportunity of City Year. So, I would say I hope I haven't hit the highlights of the careers. I got a lot of work left to do. And I think we've got a lot more to accomplish and learn. So, I'm excited about that. JP: Definitely. The best is yet to come. All right. So, now, to shift over, I know earlier, you talked about the idea of cause marketing and how that plays into your career. And I know that's been around for quite some time now and is becoming increasingly popular and being leveraged by businesses and nonprofits. So, for those who are listening who might not know a lot about it, could you speak a little about cause marketing and what that means to your career, past, present and future? Chris: Yes. It's interesting, you've seen a real change over the decades in how companies think about their responsibility and impact to society. And early on, it was very much about volunteerism and employees coming out doing different things. Or it might be about the company writing a check and the CEO handing it over to an organization. There wasn't really a business strategy. It was, "Hey, we recognize we're part of this community. We want to support our community and we find ways to do that." Chris: And then, what you started to see late into the '90s, early 2000s is companies started to read realize this could actually have a deeper business impact. People want to support companies that are doing good things in their communities. And we can tell that story via our marketing, our public relations efforts, via sponsorships and other things, kind of classic marketing and sales approaches. And so, they started to integrate cause into that. Chris: And so, you start to see opportunities like buy this product, we'll donate XYZ. And then, you started to see buy one, give one like TOMS and other new models of cause marketing come in. But in the early days, it was still very much kind of a business strategy using cause to drive it. So, it was, "We know people care about this cause. And if we talk about being associated with it, it would get them to buy our product or get them to take this action." Chris: And what we've seen over the last decade plus is that's really evolving and going deeper. I think what we started to see, particularly when I was working at Cone Communications and advising clients, we started to say, "What's unique about your company and the work that you do, the industry that you're in, the expertise that you have? And how could you connect your philanthropy to an issue that is aligned with your business?" Chris: "So, if you're in the pharmaceutical industry or other areas, how do you align with health and determinants of health? If you're working in other areas, like cable and telephone and others, how do you think about connectivity and digital connectivity being something that you can provide and connect to?" And so, how do you align the strategy and the impact you can have with your business so that those two things are working in harmony in reinforcing one another? Chris: And so, I think there was an understanding that it can actually drive business. And it's not just a nice thing to do that's over on the side, it's an important strategy to drive business. And so, during my time at New Balance and Cone and later at Reebok, I think we were more in that era of saying, "How do we integrate it into the business? And how do we really see it as a unique business driving strategy?" Chris: Now, I think you're in an even different environment, both with young people like yourselves coming into work and into the environment and being aware of social issues in a way that is deeper and more common than I think it was maybe of my generation and earlier, really wanting to have a purpose at work, and looking at your companies and saying, "How are you helping me do that?" And I only want to be here if I'm having a chance to put my passion and my values front and center in a way that was different than I think previous generations thought about work. Chris: And then, two, I think we're realizing, particularly over the last two years with the pandemic, with the murder of George Floyd, certainly the cracks in our system and how it is not equitable, how racism really shows up across all kinds of dimensions to prevent others from having opportunity that they should, and saying, "That's not okay." And people are saying, "We expect to both individually have an opportunity to affect that." Chris: "And we expect companies to be vocal and to step up and to show what their values are. And if you're not, then that's not going to be a company that I'm going to invest my time in personally as an employee. Or I'm not going to invest my dollars in as a customer." And I think you're seeing a whole new era of companies leading and being vocal in a lot of ways around social issues and taking a stand. Chris: And if they're not, people kind of questioning what's going on and why not. So, I think it's been really impressive and powerful to see. There's a lot that still needs to be done, right? There's a tremendous amount of inequity even within companies. And we see examples every day of bad behavior or other things that companies need to do better and need to do differently. Chris: But I will say, in working with many different Fortune 100 companies on a daily basis, the understanding of issues, the way they talk about social issues, the way they talk about their own diversity, equity, and inclusion and belonging efforts within the company is a huge sea change compared to what I saw even five, 10 years ago, which gives me a lot of hope for where we're going. I think we're realizing that capitalism is an amazing system of value creation. It's done tremendous things to grow and build our company. Chris: And the kind of American dream did a tremendous number of things, certainly for my family and many others, but that that's no longer the case for everyone and it probably never was, to be honest. And so, how do we own that and how do we address that? And I think companies are wrestling with that in a more authentic way. And I hope they continue to do that. It's part of what I think my life's work is, is to try and help companies do that. JP: Yeah, definitely. I feel like that, in my opinion, that idea of cause marketing is something that's... I feel like that's got to be something that's just going to become, I guess, take over in terms of marketing. And just seeing it present today, I guess I've been seeing it firsthand with the new Worcester Red Sox at Polar Park in terms of sports marketing. Their whole thing is... I think the program is like In Debt to a Vet. JP: So, they're marketing that product of going to the game and all. And then, every strike out at home, they donate X amount of money to veterans. And then, they also have just other organizations like fighting food insecurity and things like that. So, I feel like I've just been learning more and more about that. And I feel like that's got to be something like revolutionary in terms of marketing and business today. Chris: Yeah. And do you find yourself deciding who to buy from and who to work with as a result of that? Do you see it show up in the decisions you make? JP: Yeah. Definitely, I feel like these days, I see, even buying clothing and things like that, some... off the top of my head, I can't think of any. And shoes too, especially I've been seeing. They advertise the materials they make their shoes out of and stuff like that. And X percent of the money they take in goes to this cause or that cause. So, yeah, I've definitely been seeing it become more and more present today. Chris: I think it's true. I think as a marketer, and I don't even like the term cause marketing anymore because it feels so transactional, and we're well beyond that. I mean, it is a strategy that is useful and valuable, and company should still do. But I think what you've seen is now that you interact with a company and their products and a brand all the time, whether it's in social media or online or in other places, it used to be such a tightly controlled thing. Chris: You kind of created a marketing message, you put it out there in a campaign. You spent weeks developing it and controlling the advertising message and putting it out there. That's just not how we market and how customers engage anymore. It's year round, minute to minute brand building and engagement. It's a very different thing. And so, what you've seen is companies have to evolve to respond to that and say, "Okay, we need to be talking about not just cause marketing, but it's about what are our values." Chris: "And how do those show up in every action that we do, because it's not just the messaging that we put out from a marketing or an advertising standpoint. It's how somebody experienced us in the store, or an interaction they had with an employee, or something our CEO said, or some way they experienced our product." And it's 24-7-365. And so, I think you're seeing companies really say, "This is about our values, and being clear on what our values are." Chris: Because our most important stakeholders, our people are saying that that's what matters to them and that's what they care about. And so, I think we just think about business differently. JP: Absolutely, yeah. And actually, even aside from just that marketing aspect, the whole idea of impact investing and companies just needing to evolve now based on ESG and sustainability and things like that, it's just becoming more and more just the norm. And I feel like more and more businesses have no choice but to evolve and match what other businesses are doing because that's such a pressing topic in today's time as well. Chris: A hundred percent. And you have to, to compete, to succeed. And all the data tells you that companies that invest and do deep things and are high performing when it comes to the environmental, social, and governance measures outperform other companies and succeed. So, it's not just a nice thing to do, an important thing to do for the planet, a good thing to do. It's an imperative. If you want to continue to build a business and have it thrive, you have to lean in those areas. JP: Definitely. So, could you speak about the back and forth relationship you've seen between business and nonprofits throughout the span of your professional career? Chris: Absolutely. That's a great question. I think to our earlier conversation, early on, I think it was more transactional. It was kind of checkbook philanthropy. And we developed some relationships, and hopefully we get some money. And what we've seen, certainly in my time at City Year and why I was excited to come to City Year and work on it, is that changed. And companies were increasingly looking at a much deeper and holistic way to support issues. Chris: And so, they wanted certainly the branding and the visibility, and being able to talk about themselves as being good citizens, and for nonprofits to help validate and help them have opportunities to do that. They wanted to have employees actively volunteering and spending time, whether that was doing different kind of done-in-a-day volunteer projects or weeks of service, days of service, things like that. Chris: Or deeper ongoing skills-based volunteerism where I can share my expertise in marketing or somebody can share their expertise in web design or other things with the nonprofit and help that nonprofit build its capabilities or its skills. And really being able to set ambitious goals, which is what we're seeing a lot of companies do now, and to say, "This is what we care about from a social impact standpoint. Here's how we're going to try and have some impact. And here's some ways we're going to hold ourselves accountable and measure against it." Chris: And so, now, nonprofits are more partners in that process. And certainly, there's a dynamic of where the dollars come. And we certainly are trying to raise money from companies and have contractual pieces of what we do. But in many ways, we're sitting at the table with our corporate partners, and they view us as experts in the space that help them, at least for City Year, understand education, understand urban education, understand racial issues and how those show up in the education space, and are looking for our help and our guidance on how they can have a deeper impact. Chris: And we often think collaboratively and advise and coach them on some of the things they're thinking about. And in many cases, they can offer tremendous support to help us do different things. We've been fortunate to work with Deloitte Consulting as an example at City Year for decades now, and have benefited from having pro bono case teams and others really come and think about how do we grow City Year as an organization. Chris: So, I would say it's much less of a transactional thing and much more of a collaborative partnership, which has been amazing to see. And I think that's the part that I've been fortunate to have worked on the nonprofit side, the corporate side, the agency side, and seeing that from all angles that I think it hopefully helps me be a better partner to our colleagues. But I think there's such a willingness to say, "These are huge social issues that cannot be solved by any individual nonprofit, any individual organization." Chris: And we have to come together and figure out how we work collectively on them to change them. So, I think the level of expertise sharing, information sharing, and collaboration is greater than it's ever been. So, I'm excited about that. JP: Cool, yeah. Thank yo

On The Wing Podcast
PODCAST EP. 164: Gun Dog Magazine's Editor Kali Parmley on Flushers and Pointers

On The Wing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 39:39


Host Bob St.Pierre chats bird dogs with Kali Parmley, the editor of Gun Dog Magazine and owner of both a Labrador retriever and an English setter. Kali talks about the decision to start with a Lab, then her move to a pointing breed for her second bird dog. Episode Highlights: • Kali and Bob stumble upon the fact they both used llamas last season to get deeper into the backcountry to hunt birds. • Kali also shares a terrific story of her young setter's unexpectedly magnificent chukar retrieve down the side of a mountain last season. This bird dog-oriented episode helps us kick off PF & QF's annual Bird Dogs for Habitat campaign. Do you have a favorite breed of bird dog and love high quality habitat? Join us by becoming a member or making a donation at www.BirdDogsforHabitat.org – THANKS!

My 904 News
It's Teacher Appreciation Day!!

My 904 News

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 33:53


It's Teacher Appreciation Day!! St Johns County Teacher of the Year Finalist Julie Haden sits in the co-host chair to welcome Malinda Everson from Habitat for Humanity St Johns County. Check out the lastest and greatest with affordable housing in our community.

Ducks Unlimited Podcast
Ep. 1 - Western U.S. Remains Gripped by Drought

Ducks Unlimited Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 35:33


Dr. Mark Petrie, DU's director of conservation planning for the Western Region, provides a quick update on drought conditions in the western U.S. for April 2022. With intensifying drought, we should expect limited local duck production, significant declines in planted rice, reduced wetland management, and concerning carry-over effects into fall and winter. Mark also provides insights on what this means for waterfowl and how DU is responding. www.ducks.org/DUPodcast  

The Element Podcast | Hunting, Public Land, Tactics, Whitetail Deer, Wildlife, Travel, Conservation, Politics and more.
E241: Hammering Gobblers (GOBS in Iowa and Missouri w/ Land and Legacy and Dead End, Good Habitat For Turkeys, Roosted Birds in Bad Weather, Hunting Public vs. Private Gobblers, HUGE Surprise!)

The Element Podcast | Hunting, Public Land, Tactics, Whitetail Deer, Wildlife, Travel, Conservation, Politics and more.

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 73:37


What a blessing it was to hunt with our friends in Missouri and Iowa! Y'all be sure and check out the Land and Legacy boys, particularly this podcast episode that we were on: We're Missing The Point! Our Hunt with DEAD END: Stand Up and SHOOT!   3 2 1!!! SPOT and STALK Hogs video!   It just doesn't get any better than these two hunts:   Tyler's KANSAS Giant 18 pt! K.C.'s Dramatic Biggest BUCK EVER!   Be sure and subscribe on YOUTUBE so you can experience all the action on film!     BUY ONE OF OUR NEW SHIRTS and HOODIES! www.theelementwild.com/shop   The MAP SCOUT CHALLENGE powered by OnX  THE MOST COMPREHENSIVE PUBLIC LAND WHITETAIL MAP SCOUTING CONTENT EVER CREATED ON YOUTUBE.  -A ten part video series featuring Tyler Jones and K.C. Smith from The Element map scouting, putting eyes and feet on the deer country, then explaining their findings so that you can learn how to find, hunt, and arrow big bucks!   K.C.'s KANSAS PUBLIC LAND BUCK FILM   Watch the Video from Tyler's Illinois Public Land Giant! BIGGEST 8 POINT EVER!!!   MAKE SURE YOU ARE SUBSCRIBED to our Youtube Channel. **GIANT TEXAS PUBLIC BUCK**     The best map app there is. Find Access to YOUR public lands with OnX Maps. Know where you stand. #onxhunt   Durable Customizable Arrows, Quality Components, Good People, Fast Shipping. Vector Custom Shop Comfort and Mobility Matter. Go With The Best of Both. CRUZR Tree Saddles   Need Some Dependable Trail Cameras That Won't Break The Bank? Moultrie Trail Cameras         To find out more on Texas Public Land opportunities, visit the Texas Parks and Wildlife website. TPWD     Rock out with Tyler and the Tribe!  

PartsVu Xchange Talks Boating
Exploring CCA Florida's Marine Habitat Progress & Initiatives

PartsVu Xchange Talks Boating

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 31:35


PartsVu Xchange Talks Boating had the chance to talk with Frank Gidus, the Director of Habitat and Environmental Restoration for CCA Florida.Frank has had a long career in environmental services and brought that experience and expertise to CCA Florida. Since Frank's hire in 2015, CCA Florida has dramatically increased its habitat restoration work.We discussed:What habit restoration is and the importance of the workHow the marine habitat has become so damaged CCA Florida's marquee habitat restoration initiatives Artificial reef development Broward County Oyster Restoration Study  Support Florida Marine ConservationVisit the Florida CCA website for more information about the organization and learn more about membership benefits.Special Discount from PartsVu for Listeners of This EpisodeFinally, PartsVu is here to support all of your boating cleaning, polishing, and waxing needs.Use coupon code PVTALKSSHINE for free shipping for your next www.partsvu.com order.Follow PartsVu on Facebook and Instagram (@partsvu4u)

My 904 News
Teacher Appreciation Day!! Julie Haden joins Davey with Malinda Everson from Habitat for Humanity

My 904 News

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 47:42


It's Teacher Appreciation Day!! St Johns County Teacher of the Year Finalist Julie Haden sits in the co-host chair to welcome Malinda Everson from Habitat for Humanity St Johns County. Check out the lastest and greatest with affordable housing in our community.

Ducks Unlimited Podcast
SEASON 6 - Beginning Wednesday May 4th!

Ducks Unlimited Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 2:05


We've been gearing up for SEASON 6. We hope you'll join us for more exciting content beginning this Wednesday, May 4th!

Between The Tines Podcast
39 Turkey Hunting, Habitat, And Agriculture With Tre' Smith

Between The Tines Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 115:11


It was a pleasure to have a listener in studio. Thanks Tre' Smith for making the trip to Southeast Louisiana to do an in studio podcast.  Tre is one of the most humble guest that has came to the studio to sit and talk turkey hunting, habitat, and his journey in agriculture. Take a moment and sit a while and dive into his knowledge that he know so well.REK BroadheadsNorth Missouri Land CompamyIti Tashka TaxidermyElimishield HuntOld Indian Tricks LLCOl Hen Turkey CallsTaylor Made Custom Firs PitsCompany 1216 Hat CompanyLil Man Construction LLC

Beasts Of Burden
Ep 72: Hunter Johnson on Nest Predators

Beasts Of Burden

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 106:31


In this episode, we have our awesome guest Hunter Johnson of Arkansas! One topic that is often discussed amongst turkey hunters is: predators. Many fingers point to these furbearers as the culprit for our low turkey numbers. But is it? Hunter and I explore this along with our habitat tools to improve turkey habitat also at the same time advocating for trapping. Trapping is necessary to manage the predators at the end of the day.You can reach Hunter Johnson personally on Facebook or if you would like to learn more:Hunters: Breaking the Ceiling https://www.facebook.com/groups/613577862568335Turkey Hunters: Reversing the Decline https://www.facebook.com/groups/477669256900330Southern Habitat Managers: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1297985527013375

Roe Hunting Resources' Podcast
Ep. 37 – Updates, Habitat Work, and Teasing The Question: "Is Hunting Conservation?"

Roe Hunting Resources' Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 95:13


Chris drags himself into the studio absolutely WOOPED after two long days of hard labor simply because he didn't listen to the "little voice" in his head last summer when he put up the steel buildings at the horse property, and so in this episode, he cautions you to NOT do the same, and: – Shares updates on what's been going on; – Talks about the challenges/status of habitat projects; – Shares his observations regarding "social media hunters" and their perceived "conservation" focus; and then – Finishes by teasing the question, "IS hunting conservation???"

Hitting the Streets
Laurie Mealy - Habitat For Humanity of Grayson County

Hitting the Streets

Play Episode Listen Later May 1, 2022 17:24


It's Podcast Sunday! Today on the show I have the lovely Laurie Mealy, executive director of Habitat for Humanity of Grayson County. Laurie share her story, how she became a part of this amazing non profit organization and how they help our community. Please tune in!! Follow Habitat for Humanity of Grayson County on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Graysonhabitat

Beasts Of Burden
Ep 71: The Habitat Business pt 1

Beasts Of Burden

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 30, 2022 70:06


In this episode, we start with a brand new series I am conductiong focused making a living in the Habitat Business. This episode we talk about some basic information: getting an incoorpration started, focusing on timber work, starting with an atv, chainsaw, backpack sprayer, ect Also we talk about customers, having other or more primary income streams i your business is slow.

CBIA BizCast
Habitat Aims to Grow More Homeowners

CBIA BizCast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 16:20


CBIA BizCast host Ali Warshavsky speaks with Karraine Moody, CEO of Habitat for Humanity of North Central Connecticut. The organization recently changed its name and now serves families east of the Connecticut River. Moody says Habitat does more than build homes, teaching people how to become homeowners while investing sweat equity and learning financial literacy. The organization's goal is to create generational wealth through homeownership. “It sets the standard that homeownership is possible,” said Moody. “It sets the standard that economic stability is a critical need. “ Moody said Habitat works with the city of Hartford and the Hartford Landbank to identify neighborhoods where they can fix up blighted properties. Please rate, review, and subscribe to the BizCast wherever you get your podcasts—we appreciate your support! If you have a story to tell, contact Ali Warshavsky.

Habitat Podcast
Habitat Podcast #176 - Clint McCoy - Veterinarian Hunter, How Vet Views Impact Hunting & Habitat, Decrease in Habitat, Invasives, Big Buck Clint is After & Clint's Favorite Habitat Buck Trap Setup

Habitat Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 71:37


Habitat Podcast #176 - Clint McCoy joins Jared Van Hees and Brian for a great chat on chasing big bucks and improving habitat in Illinois. Clint is a serious hunter who has done habitat work as well. He is a Vet by trade, so I thought it would be interesting to get his views on hunting and habitat. We cover: Veterinarian Hunter, How Vet Views Impact Hunting & Habitat, Decrease in Habitat, Invasives, Big Buck Clint is After & Clint's Favorite Habitat Buck Trap Setup Clint's intro and background and how he got into hunting and habitat work, Current property details, layout, and size. Clint tells us about the buck he is after this Fall, and how he is going to set up on him! Most impactful deer hunting setup (with a story) that Clint has created on his place. His buck trap! Best habitat implement & Favorite Tree. Food Plot / Soil Builder Diverse Seed Mixes - https://bit.ly/vitalizeseed The Squirrel at Nutplanter.com: https://bit.ly/3kdBp9V 10% off when you talk to Lowell. Morse Nursery Tree Dealer Pricing – info@habitatpodcast.com Property Consultations – HP Land Plans: LAND PLANS YOUTUBE - Habitat Podcast Habitat Hook Giveaway: www.habitatpodcast.com a $250 value! Habitat Hook – HP10 for 10% off - https://bit.ly/33go0Xy Email us: info@habitatpodcast.com Leave us a great review to get FREE DECAL here:  https://apple.co/2uhoqOO Exodus Trail Cameras - https://bit.ly/ExodusHP Afflictor Broadheads - https://bit.ly/AfflictorBH Packer Maxx - http://bit.ly/PACKERMAXX $25 off with code: HPC25 Morse Nursery - http://bit.ly/MorseTrees 10% off w/code: HABITAT10 Michigan Whitetail Pursuit - http://bit.ly/MWpursuit Habitat Podcast AMAZON Store - https://www.amazon.com/shop/habitatpodcast Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Natural Habitat Podcast
#633 - The Trial of Johnny Depp

Natural Habitat Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 41:40


Mikey and Ty are here to talk about the biggest court case in recent history. Johnny Depp vs Amber Heard has come to a close and we have all the details on that, as well as our own cease and desist letter we received from a business and much much more!

Habitat University
S2E4 - 50 Solutions to the Private Lands Challenge: (Round 1) National coordination and Colorado ft. Ray Aberle

Habitat University

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 68:24


State wildlife resource agencies are often on the front lines of wildlife habitat management and conservation on private lands by providing technical expertise and custom-tailored programs to help wildlife and people. But each state has its own unique approach. To learn more about these approaches, we're going to be taking a tour of state-led private land programs around the country in the next few episodes! To get us started, Adam visited with Ray Aberle, the private lands program manager with the Colorado Division of Wildlife and the director of the Private Lands Working Group of the Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies. Ray shared some really interesting insights about the approaches states use across the country for private lands work and then discussed the specific programs he oversees in Colorado.   Help us improve the podcast by taking this Habitat University Listener Feedback Survey: https://purdue.ca1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_5oteinFuEzFCDmm    Resources and references mentioned in the episode:  Learn more about AFWA and the Private lands working group here: https://www.fishwildlife.org/afwa-acts/afwa-committees/private-lands-working-group   Learn more about the variety of private lands programs in Colorado that Ray mentioned here:  https://cpw.state.co.us/aboutus/Pages/PrivateLandProgramsResources.aspx  Ray mentioned Rick Knight at Colorado State University—find his work here: https://sites.warnercnr.colostate.edu/richardknight/wp-content/uploads/sites/31/2019/02/CV.pdf     Ray mentioned the Meadowlark Initiative in North Dakota. Learn more here: https://gf.nd.gov/meadowlark-initiative  

Cumberland Road
Mark Davis - The Church Showing Unconditional Love & Acceptance

Cumberland Road

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 65:56


Mark Davis writes, "I'm a fifth-generation Cumberland Presbyterian, originally from Memphis, Tennessee, though I don't count generational heritage as a quality setting one Cumberland Presbyterian apart from any other Cumberland Presbyterian. My parents, Rev. Dr. Harold Davis (deceased) and Willene Davis, were very active in the denomination, and fortunately, saw to it that I was too. My faith's formative years were spent in the Park Avenue and Whitehaven Churches in Memphis under the guidance of pastors such as Arleigh Matlock and Tom Campbell. My father served the denomination as Director of Youth Work, and later as the Executive Secretary of the Board of Christian Education, while my mother was active in CPW, Church Women United, and other similar service-related organizations. I am an ordained Elder out of West Tennessee Presbytery, and served on the Board of Trustees at Memphis Theological Seminary before taking a position with the Ministry Council as Team Leader for the Communications Ministry Team. I worship remotely with and support the ministries of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church of Germantown.My years in higher education were spent at what was then Memphis State University (now the University of Memphis), and Vanderbilt University. I'm married to Susan, and we have three children of our own (Jesse, Philip, and Sarah) and one by marriage (Ashley, Jesse's spouse). Stella, a lovable Staffordshire terrier who never met a human she wouldn't go home with in a heartbeat, depends on Susan and me for belly-scratches and leisurely strolls in the mountain forests where we live.Upon retirement from the Ministry Council in 2018, we built a home on a mountain about 30 miles south of Asheville, North Carolina, just outside Brevard, and within sight of the Blue Ridge Parkway, and moved here in 2019. Pretty well settled in now, I work regularly with Habitat for Humanity of Transylvania County. I also work with Pisgah Legal Services, providing support services for underserved communities (e.g., victims of spousal abuse, undocumented immigrants, and low-income renters) in Western North Carolina. In my spare time, I enjoy bicycling, writing, hiking, reading, playing my fiddle, and woodworking--though not necessarily in that order. I also dabble in web development through a new website: https://undoitall.org. I've not been very good at keeping it up, but look for that to change over the coming months."Music is provided by Pierce Murphy, Caldera Blue. Source:  https://www.freemusicarchive.org/music/Pierce_Murphy/through-the-olive-branches/caldera-blueComments: http://freemusicarchive.org/Additional comments:  modifications made to shorten and loop song for introduction and closing of podcast.Copyright Attribution and License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Sportsmen's Nation - Whitetail Hunting
Whitetail Landscapes - Attacking Client Properties for Better Deer Habitat

Sportsmen's Nation - Whitetail Hunting

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 38:47


In this episode, Jon Teater (Whitetail Landscapes) and Jake Ehlinger (Habitat Solutions 360) discuss the latest strategies and ideas surrounding the effort required to enhance a deer hunting property for success. Jake's strategies include planning, and promoting detailed, focused movements across the landscape to ensure deer use and bed on a property at a high rate. Jake utilizes a chainsaw, backpack blower and walk behind brush cutter to ensure his detailed plans are implemented and result led to success.  Jake and Jon discuss the most overlooked details that create failures when setting up a hunting property. On the properties Jake supports he explains how he setups travel corridors and how dealing with mother nature can be the most difficult impediment, limiting success of any work and improvements. Jake gets into the details on specific trail sizes, the shape and how layouts should look to enhance a hunting property. Jake explains some of the key differences he experiences on his clients' properties and Jon details some tricks he uses to help individuals work on portions of their property at a faster pace. Jake gives his secrets to figuring out bedding areas and exactly how he lays them out for the best utilization. Jon gets into some of the rules of thumb he employs with clients when setting up bedding areas. Jake details layouts on steep slope terrain, exact dimensions and trees that should be left for balancing timber and wildlife needs.  Jake ends the podcast with his number one tactic that has led to his success as a land manager and consultant.   Social Links http://habitatsolutions360.com/ https://www.facebook.com/HabitatSolutions360 https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCetSptPTK0gmg0BE5oRnTTA   https://whitetaillandscapes.com/ https://www.facebook.com/whitetaillandscapes/ https://www.instagram.com/whitetail_landscapes/?hl=en Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Native Plants, Healthy Planet presented by Pinelands Nursery

Hosts Fran Chismar and Tom Knezick reconnect with Kyle Lybarger (Native Habitat Project) to talk about his new podcast The Native Habitat Podcast.  Topics include how life has changed in the last year, what to expect from The Native Habitat Podcast, and what the future holds for The Native Habitat Project.  Bonus Content - Fran plays the Lightning Round!  Music by Egocentric Plastic Men. Have a question or a comment?  Call (215) 346-6189. Want links from this podcast?  Visit www.nativeplantshealthyplanet.com Buy a T-shirt, spread the message, and do some good.  Visit https://native-plants-healthy-planet-2.creator-spring.com/    

The Daily Sun-Up
Habitat for Humanity helps build affordable housing for Colorado teachers; Denver's US Mint

The Daily Sun-Up

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2022 15:39


Today - The Eagle County School District and Habitat for Humanity are working together to build homes for educators amidst the affordable housing crisis. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Habitat Podcast
Habitat Podcast #175 - Brad Thomas - Tree & Shrub Planting Wins, 190" Buck, Vitalize Seed Partner, Property Buying & 1031 Exchange, Cool Season Grasses now Native Forbs, Bush Hogging Oak Trees for Better Growth & Great Whitetail Buck Stories

Habitat Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2022 90:10


Habitat Podcast #175 - Brad Thomas from South Central Iowa joins Jared Van Hees & Brian Halbleib on a great habitat discussion. Brad is a great guy and has learned much like the rest of us, by doing the work. I again, learned more things on habitat for whitetails during this chat. We cover: Tree & Shrub Planting Wins - What worked great and what was learned, Vitalize Seed Partner - Brand new dealer with seed in stock in Iowa close to Missouri, Property Buying & 1031 Exchange - Brad's history and story with 2 farms in a year, Cool Season Grasses now Native Forbs - outperforming soy beans! Bush Hogging Oak Trees for Better Growth - Cool tactic on how Brad turned a heavily browsed oak shrub planting back into healthy trees, 190" Whitetail Buck Story  * * * * * * * * * * Brad Thomas 1650 240th Avenue, Osceola, IA, USA (515) 208-5970 . tcsservices@windstream.net Food Plot / Soil Builder Diverse Seed Mixes - https://bit.ly/vitalizeseed The Squirrel at Nutplanter.com: https://bit.ly/3kdBp9V 10% off when you talk to Lowell. Morse Nursery Tree Dealer Pricing – info@habitatpodcast.com Property Consultations – HP Land Plans: LAND PLANS YOUTUBE - Habitat Podcast Habitat Hook Giveaway: www.habitatpodcast.com a $250 value! Habitat Hook – HP10 for 10% off - https://bit.ly/33go0Xy Email us: info@habitatpodcast.com Leave us a great review to get FREE DECAL here:  https://apple.co/2uhoqOO Exodus Trail Cameras - https://bit.ly/ExodusHP Afflictor Broadheads - https://bit.ly/AfflictorBH Packer Maxx - http://bit.ly/PACKERMAXX $25 off with code: HPC25 Morse Nursery - http://bit.ly/MorseTrees 10% off w/code: HABITAT10 Michigan Whitetail Pursuit - http://bit.ly/MWpursuit Habitat Podcast AMAZON Store - https://www.amazon.com/shop/habitatpodcast Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Natural Habitat Podcast
#632 - Dollar Tree Presents: The 420 Special

Natural Habitat Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 52:36


It's time to celebrate!!! This year is a DIY Special with Ty and Mikey teaching you how to turn any item from Dollar Tree into a more "festive" piece. We got pool noodles, bottles, jars and contraptions galore so take a trip to your local Dollar Tree and stock up with the essentials for this year's festivities!

Truth From The Stand Deer Hunting Podcast
EP. 280: Micro Habitat Scrapes & Rubs

Truth From The Stand Deer Hunting Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 68:41


Today on the podcast we're coming to you live from the DIY hunting trailer! After a lot of inconvenient weather, I finally made it back to the big woods piece I started breaking down last year. My buddy Aaron and I logged quite a few miles, checked some cameras, and found some promising set up. Our good buddy Tom joined us in camp for beers and deers - thanks for listening! To listen to the podcast click the purple play button at the top of the page. You can also download the podcast via iTunes, Stitcher Radio and Google Play—don't forget to share with your friends! If you like the podcast, please leave us a 5 star iTunes rating…we'd really appreciate it. Click here to listen/subscribe on iTunes (best for iOS devices) Click here to listen/subscribe on Stitcher (best for Android devices) WHAT TO EXPECT FROM PODCAST 280 Tom with beers to the rescue Stream set up A buch of rubs Micro habitat scrapes And much more! SHOW NOTES AND LINKS: —Exodus Upgrade Program —Truth From The Stand Merch —Support our partners: Exodus Outdoor Gear, Spartan Forge & Tethrd —Check out Maven optics —Waypoint TV Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Wired To Hunt
How to Improve Pine Stand Habitat for Whitetails

Wired To Hunt

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2022


Tree farms get a bad rap by hunters and are too often viewed as “wildlife wastelands.” But proper planning and management with timber stand improvement (TSI) can make pines a wildlife paradise. They offer safety, food, and hunting opportunities. From the sweltering velvet season to the shortened days of the post-rut, the needs of deer don't change much. Whitetails need three main habitat features within their home range: variety of food, water...

GameKeeper Podcast
EP:87 | Hen Nesting Habitat with Dr. Marcus Lashley

GameKeeper Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2022 95:07


This week we have Dr. Marcus Lashley (aka @drdisturbance), from the University of Florida, sitting between the turkeys and talking about hen nesting habitat. Everybody wonders what they can do to help improve turkey numbers, and this podcast shines a light on exactly how we can all help. It's a fascinating discussion about what prime nesting habitat looks like and how we can help create more of it.  Marcus had actually harvested a gobbler the morning we recorded, and we had some good discussion around his strategy including what the turkey was eating. Marcus is obsessed with turkeys and is a wealth of information.  Listen, Learn, Enjoy, and share this one with some kindred spirits!Stay connected with GameKeepers: Instagram: @mossyoakgamekeepers Facebook: @GameKeepers Twitter: @MOGameKeepers YouTube: MossyOakGameKeepers Website: Mossy Oak GameKeeperSupport the show (https://mossyoakgamekeeper.com/)

Driftwood Outdoors
Ep. 138: Talking Turkey with Reina Tyl

Driftwood Outdoors

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2022 68:41


Brandon Butler and Nathan “Shags” McLeod sit down with Reina Tyl, Missouri Dept. of Conservation's Wild Turkey and Ruffed Grouse Biologist to discuss turkey populations and much more. This is a must listen for anyone who loves turkey hunting in Missouri, across the Midwest and beyond. Fore more info: https://mdc.mo.gov/Special Thanks To CZ-USA:https://cz-usa.com/Special Thanks To Living The Dream Properties:https://livingthedreamland.com/Special Thanks To Hunting Works For Missouri:https://huntingworksformo.com/Special Thanks To Mongo Attachments:https://www.mongoattachments.com/Special Thanks To Scenic Rivers Taxidermy:http://www.scenicriverstaxidermy.com/Connect with Driftwood Outdoors:https://www.facebook.com/DriftwoodOutdoors/https://www.instagram.com/driftwoodoutdoors/Email:info@driftwoodoutdoors.com

Habitat Podcast
Habitat Podcast #174 - Steve Sherk - Woodsmanship, PA Mountain Hunting & Scouting, Habitat to Look For, Traits of a Good Woodsman, How Tech Changed the Game & Steve's Approach

Habitat Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 14, 2022 87:29


Habitat Podcast #174 - Steve Sherk from Sherk's Guiding Service is on talking Woodsmanship with Brian Halbleib and Jared Van Hees. This episode is the beginning of our brand new series, titled; Woodmanship Series. We cover: How Steve got into the outdoor space, hunting, etc. Describe the whitetail deer habitat Steve spends most of your time in. What is unique about the habitat there? Challenges? Advantages? Has Steve struggled outside those comfortable areas? Why and how did he adapt? Steve's approach to scouting for whitetail deer. Late season/Pre Season/In Season/All of the above.? Does he focus on beds/food/scrapes/rubs/all of the above? How has technology changed since Steve started deer hunting. Does he take advantage of that technology? How much of a role does it play in Steve's scouting and hunting? We discuss what he likes and doesnt like about technology in hunting. Top traits of a good woodsman,  * * * * * * * * * * Food Plot Seed - https://bit.ly/vitalizeseed The Squirrel at Nutplanter.com: https://bit.ly/3kdBp9V 10% off when you talk to Lowell. Morse Nursery Tree Dealer Pricing – info@habitatpodcast.com Property Consultations – HP Land Plans: LAND PLANS YOUTUBE - Habitat Podcast Habitat Hook Giveaway: www.habitatpodcast.com a $250 value! Habitat Hook – HP10 for 10% off - https://bit.ly/33go0Xy Email us: info@habitatpodcast.com Leave us a great review to get FREE DECAL here:  https://apple.co/2uhoqOO Exodus Trail Cameras - https://bit.ly/ExodusHP Afflictor Broadheads - https://bit.ly/AfflictorBH Packer Maxx - http://bit.ly/PACKERMAXX $25 off with code: HPC25 Morse Nursery - http://bit.ly/MorseTrees 10% off w/code: HABITAT10 Michigan Whitetail Pursuit - http://bit.ly/MWpursuit Habitat Podcast AMAZON Store - https://www.amazon.com/shop/habitatpodcast Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices