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Latest podcast episodes about police chief

3 Cops Talk - Rebuilding Community Trust
61: Dave Smith's Takeaways from the Kimberly Potter Trial

3 Cops Talk - Rebuilding Community Trust

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 58:06


On this week's episode, 3CT is joined by renowned Police Trainer, Dave Smith, to discuss the case involving former Police Officer Kimberly Porter of the Brooklyn Center (MN) Police Department. Porter was recently convicted on two counts of manslaughter, for the unintended killing of Daunte Wright. Based upon the circumstances surrounding this case, it garnered the attention of both media and law enforcement, particularly in the areas of police training and accountability. Dave pulls no punches as we discuss the possible implications of the outcome of this case for both the police and the communities that we serve.We also dedicate this week's show to fallen officers: Sergeant Marlene Rittmanic of the Bradley Police Department, IllinoisEnd of Watch Wednesday, December 29, 2021https://www.odmp.org/officer/25827-sergeant-marlene-rittmanicDeputy Sheriff Sean Riley of the Wayne County Sheriff's Office, IllinoisEnd of Watch Wednesday, December 29, 2021https://www.odmp.org/officer/25816-deputy-sheriff-sean-rileyGuest Bio: Former police lieutenant Dave Smith is an internationally known speaker, writer and law enforcement expert. Dave attended United States Naval Academy and then completed his degree at University of Arizona while fighting forest fires with the “Coconino Hot Shots.” He began his police career with the Tucson Police Department and in 1978 he joined the Arizona Department of Public Safety. As a career police officer, Dave held positions in Patrol, SWAT, Narcotics, Training and Management.In 1980 he developed the popular "Buck Savage" video training series, was the lead instructor for the Calibre Press "Street Survival" seminar from 1983 to 1985, and was instrumental in developing Calibre's timeless "Tactical Edge" officer survival book. Dave holds numerous instructor certifications in firearms, defensive tactics, and human performance and is a proven expert witness and consultant.In 1989, Dave joined the Law Enforcement Television Network (LETN), developing and hosting cutting-edge police, security and public safety training as its Director of Education and was the general manager of Calibre Press until January of 2002. Dave continued to instruct the “Street Survival” seminar through 2012 as its senior instructor and he managed the most comprehensive update to the seminar since 2003. Dave has authored hundreds of articles for publications including Police Chief, Law and Order, The Trainer, Police Marksman, the Calibre Press Newsline, PoliceOne and POLICE magazine.Dave is currently the owner of “Winning Mind Seminars” and is a regular columnist for POLICE magazine and PoliceOne.Com.Dave is also the Director of Video Training for the online Police One Academy. He is available for conferences, training events, and consulting, and is the author of the popular book In My Sights. Dave can be reached via his website at www.jdbucksavage.com or on his Facebook fan page as “JD Buck Savage.”Specialties: Officer survival training, leadership and motivational speaking, legal and law enforcement consulting, conference and event keynotes, media and video expertise.  He is also married to @SgtBetsySmithResources/Links/Websites:https://www.police1.com/columnists/dave-smith/https://t.co/O6j32jLJ2mhttps://www.linkedin.com/in/dave-smith-55308b12

The County 10 Podcast
Coffee Time: Lander’s Mayor, Police Chief chat about Tuesday’s Council meeting, upcoming DUI task force, mountain lions

The County 10 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 14:05


(Lander, WY) - Mountain lions, DUI task forces, and City Council meetings, oh my! Lander Mayor Monte Richardson and Lander Chief of Police Scott Peters stopped by 1330 KOVE AM / 107.7 FM's Coffee Time to chat with host Vince Tropea about last night's Lander City Council meeting, the New Year's Eve DUI Task Force, and the recent confirmation of mountain lion presence in Lander. Check out the full Coffee Time interview with the Mayor and Police Chief below, which also touches on Lander's feral cat issue, ground frost levels, and some upcoming projects for the city of Lander. Be sure to tune in to Coffee Time every morning at 9:30 AM on 1330 KOVE AM / 107.7 FM, or stream it live right here.

Hacks & Wonks
RE-AIR: Investing in Community: Interview with Girmay Zahilay

Hacks & Wonks

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 34:03


On today's rebroadcast, Crystal's interviews King County Councilmember Girmay Zahilay, and they discuss police accountability and what it really means to invest in community. In the conversation they discuss the King County Charter Amendments that were on the November 2020 ballot and have since been approved by the voters, changing how the sheriff is selected, and requiring investigation over all police related deaths. Councilmember Zahilay also goes into the important work he's doing to increase investment in Skyway, without displacing the people who already call it home. A full text transcript of the show is available below, and on the Hacks & Wonks blog at https://www.officialhacksandwonks.com/post/king-county-councilmember-girmay-zahilay-talks-sheriff-reforms-supporting-skyway. Find the host, Crystal Fincher on Twitter at @finchfrii and Councilmember Girmay Zahilay at @girmayzahilay. More info is available at officialhacksandwonks.com.   Articles Referenced: Learn more about the King County Charter Amendments from People Power at https://www.wethepeoplepower.org/kcca.   Transcript: Crystal Fincher: [00:00:00] Welcome to Hacks and Wonks. I'm your host, Crystal Fincher. On this show, we don't just talk politics and policy, but also how they affect our lives and shape our communities. As we dive into the backstories behind what we read in the news, we bring voices to the table that we don't hear from often enough. So today on Hacks and Wonks, we are excited to be joined by Girmay Zahilay, King County Councilmember for District 2, who has been doing a lot of work in the community. You've probably seen and heard from him - he's everywhere, just about, but we are excited to have a conversation today just about what you're working on. So thanks for joining us.  Girmay Zahilay: [00:00:52] My pleasure, Crystal. Thank you for having me.  Crystal Fincher: [00:00:54] So I guess starting out, what are you working on? What's top of the agenda right now? Girmay Zahilay: [00:01:00] We're working on a lot of stuff. I would say the two biggest policy agendas that we have are number one, Skyway, which is a neighborhood just south of Seattle and north of Renton. And that encompasses all things for the wellbeing of that neighborhood. And the second area that's our top priority is our criminal legal systems and imagining the future of public safety and making sure that marginalized communities are uplifted, supported, and feel safe rather than brutalized by a system that is racist and that hasn't seen much of any innovation for a long time. So, I would say those are the two biggest and we can dive into each of those umbrellas, as you like, Crystal, but there's some exciting stuff in each one of those.  Crystal Fincher: [00:01:46] Sure, absolutely. I mean, both of those are related - Skyway has the largest African American population, in the State, per capita. And so we see under-investment, and an under-resourced  area that's been ignored and neglected, despite it's absolutely prime location. And so the conversations that we're having with public safety go hand-in-hand with conversations that we're having there, and that, if Black Lives Matter, as you've said, Skyway has to matter - and the types of considerations that we're talking about in public safety extend to the whole conversation - just about racism and inequalities, and really setting people up for very different outcomes in life from the very beginning, based on the way we're set up systemically. So in terms of public safety, what are you working on? Girmay Zahilay: [00:02:48] Right. Your point, Crystal, about these two issues being intersecting is so spot-on. Right now we're seeing possibly the largest civil rights movement in the history of the United States. The Black Lives Matter movement has brought in millions of people nationally and tens of thousands of people locally. I grew up in South Seattle, so seeing our streets packed with tens of thousands of people like we have, shows me that there is momentum to support Black Lives. The Black Lives Matter movement is not just about ending police brutality. Of course, that's a central message, but it's also about ending all kinds of systemic harm and uplifting Black people because our systems have not done that so far. And like you said, Skyway is the place where we must start. It has the highest proportion of African Americans in the state of Washington and simultaneously, it's also the area that has been disinvested from the most. When you have an area that has the highest proportion of Black people and the area that has been disinvested in the most, that is systemic racism, plain and simple. So it, just to me, it points out this issue where again, our region says one thing and does another. We can drive around South Seattle and Skyway and see Black Lives Matter signs everywhere, but we don't invest in Black people the same way that we should. These issues are intersecting - Skyway, our system of public safety, police brutality - these are all intersecting issues.  Crystal Fincher: [00:04:29] They're absolutely intersecting issues and have been issues for so long, and we're really late in having this conversation. And it's a matter of having a representative in your position continually stress that this is a priority - this is urgent. And someone with lived experience who this is not a theoretical issue for and who has spent many years leading up to this, working on how to change from the root, systemically, the issues that we're dealing with. And one thing that I do want to point out that, from my perspective I appreciate, is, as an elected representative, we want you to take great votes and people are certainly excited about that. But the leadership goes beyond just what you do in the meetings and the votes you take. And you talked about being part of the largest civil rights movement happening right now, that we're in the middle of, and there were nights when we saw horrifying video coming out of the streets of Seattle and surrounding areas and, certainly SPD, behaving questionably. And some just, unambiguously, inappropriately and violently. And there were protesters and people in the community who said, Hey, we need help down here. We need someone down here to witness this, to address this. This is wrong, from being teargassed, to being beaten, to being corralled, and you answered that call. You were there, you were available - one, you were in a position to even see that. I mean, between Twitter and Facebook and Instagram, you are there and present when a lot of other people are not. And you were like, Hey, I'll be there. And you were there. And that just meant a lot to me, it means a lot to community to see - not only as someone willing to take the vote, but this is personal and this is real, and they're willing to stand shoulder-to-shoulder on the front lines and say, You know what, I'm part of this too. And this affects me too. And I'm in a position to use my platform and power to change this, not just when it comes to taking a vote, but just using your voice, shining a light on it all around. So I just want to say - I appreciate that, I saw that, I know a lot of the community sees that. And it matters to have someone who understands and who has felt and experienced, what this really means and the consequences of these actions. And so beyond that, or I guess looking through that lens, what is your approach to turning just the understanding, the pain, and the need into policy - and what is in process? Girmay Zahilay: [00:07:30] Thank you, Crystal, for highlighting that. There were a number of other elected officials who came out that day as well, and just the community members who've been organizing and protesting for the past six months. They've been putting their bodies and their lives on the line every day, to advance justice. And we, as elected officials, need to be out there with them. 2020 is such a special and different year, right? Before 2020 happened, we already had so many crises - it's not like we were in peace times before this and there were a lot of issues to resolve. But then 2020 starts and the issues get bigger and our tools for resolving them diminished greatly - because the usual tools that we have for advocacy engagement, understanding one another, are completely obliterated when we're not allowed to gather or be near each other. So as elected officials, we have to find other opportunities of engaging and learning and listening, because it can't all happen virtually. We cannot believe and be lulled into the false sense of understanding our constituents from a laptop or from a cell phone. We have to be out there. And that's why I try my best to be out as much as I can, in a safe way, every opportunity that I get - whether that's outside delivering masks - I could have my staff or King County officials go out and do that for me, but I want to be out there, I want to see people, I want to talk to them - or that's going out and protesting with people, because I need to experience the police brutality and overreach firsthand if I'm going to shape effective policies. I think it's really important for us to be out there, to be visible, to show people that we're truly listening, and crafting our policies based on what we're seeing and hearing from our constituents. Otherwise, we're susceptible to just believing the spin, and the narrative, and whatever media agenda there is out there of the people who have access to media, telling the story for us. And I think the most perfect example is the evening marchers and the young people who are organizing and marching every night. If I were to just to open up my news apps and read about them, I'm seeing - mobs, destructive mobs. When I went out there and actually sat with them and spoke to them, I was blown away by the level of nuance and informed discussion that I was able to have with these teenagers and young adults. They were pulling up our voting records, they were pulling up things that we have said in the past in various committee meetings. It was just the most intellectual conversation that I've had in my time as a councilmember. And I would have never known that if I hadn't gone out there and spoken to them.  Crystal Fincher: [00:10:28] Well, and what you talked about is very important in needing to be present and experience it yourself 'cause you just mentioned, if we watched the typical evening news, they'll focus on, Hey, if there is some property damage, if there is someone that they can view looking aggressive, or if the police department says, Hey, this is our take on things today, whether or not that story changes later on down the line. That's really been the focus of our local TV coverage that a lot of people catch. A lot of people don't have the time or ability just to do a deep dive into news and the social media and to see what's actually happening. So for you to be able to experience it yourself and be on the ground and understand that this isn't - these aren't people without a plan. These aren't people acting impulsively.  These are people who understand that lives are at stake and who have taken it upon themselves to educate themselves, to arm themselves with knowledge, and to say, You know what? We are going beyond what we've done before and we're demanding better. And I tell you, young people are the best at holding everyone accountable. And out of necessity - because their preceding generations have slipped and didn't do the job they should have. So they're actually coming around and saying, Okay, let's actually show you all how it's done. And we just saw that result in the Seattle City Council recently - overriding Jenny Durkan's veto of the rebalanced budget that significantly defunds SPD and sets the stage for even more defunding in the next budget.  Girmay Zahilay: [00:12:16] Right.  Crystal Fincher: [00:12:16] So, from the County perspective, and talking about the Sheriff's that are within your jurisdiction - are you also looking at defunding and what are the specifics of the plan? Girmay Zahilay: [00:12:29] I would encourage everyone to look into Charter Amendment #6, which will be on your November ballot. When anybody who's listening to this opens up their ballot in November to vote on things like who they want their next president to be, they're also going to see a list of seven King County Charter amendments, and four of these amendments relate to your County system of public safety. If you vote Yes on Charter Amendment #6, it would allow the King County Council to shape the future of public safety. This is not some kind of symbolic, or incremental, or performative change around eliminating police brutality. This would allow the King County Council to move away from a system where we send armed police officers to respond to every single challenge on the streets of our city and county - to assist them - that is a diverse toolkit of public health alternatives. So, if we see a mental health crisis on our streets, we can send trained mental health professionals. If we see somebody in need on our streets, like an encampment, we won't send officers with guns - we send rapid response social workers who can help people in need. If our youth are having conflicts or issues, we can send violence interrupters and mentors to respond. If somebody has routine, everyday things like a noise complaint, or wants to do a wellness check, or a fire code issue, we can send code enforcement officers who aren't armed. Our default response to every single issue does not have to be to send police officers who have guns, because that's how Black and Brown people die unnecessarily. That's what we've seen all around the nation and this charter amendment, if it's passed - and it is something that our office proposed - would remove certain restrictions that would allow, then, the King County Council to transfer public safety functions away from traditional law enforcement and toward community-based and public health alternatives. I think this would be a huge and beneficial change for our county and all it takes is our public approving it through the voting process. Crystal Fincher: [00:14:49] You're listening to Hacks and Wonks with your host Crystal Fincher on KVRU 105.7 FM. So that's going to be on the November ballot.  Girmay Zahilay: [00:15:30] The one I described is just 1 of 7, but there are others - like shifting our Sheriff from an elected position to an appointed position, which would increase accountability to the Council and allow us to give the Sheriff policy instruction, which we can't right now. Crystal Fincher: [00:16:24] You just mentioned the charter amendment to make the Sheriff appointed and not elected. A lot of people feel like, Hey, if we elect people, they're directly accountable to the people - we can hold them accountable, we get a consistent voice. Why is having them report or be appointed and accountable to the council a better system? How does that increase accountability?  Girmay Zahilay: [00:16:56] Well, an independently elected sheriff is exactly that - more independent, and we do not need a more independent police department. We need better checks and balances, we need to be able to oversee them, we need to be able to provide policy instruction to them. And yes, on the surface, it does feel like electing someone feels like accountability to the voters, but once you've elected them for four years, who are they exactly accountable to? The Council right now has budgetary power - we can provide incentives through budgetary sticks and carrots, but we cannot give them policy instruction. We cannot transfer public safety functions elsewhere. And the King County Executive right now - if the Sheriff did something wrong, the King County Executive cannot fire the Sheriff, for example. There would have to be a recall process, which is way more complicated than a King County Executive just saying, Hey, you've done something wrong. You are not being accountable to our constituents. We're going to look for somebody else. And also an appointed position would allow the King County Council and the Executive to do a nationwide search and find the best quality person for the job, whereas an election, you are inherently through that process - you're attracting politicians to that job. People who are going to be accountable to - more accountable to the police unions and to their donors - than to people who want better policy instructions for them.  Crystal Fincher: [00:18:35] It's always interesting to have this conversation with politicians, but it's usually only politicians who hold themselves accountable and allow the public to hold themselves accountable, who want to bring that up. that is a legitimate issue - that there are a lot of politicians who do feel beholden to their donors and to, a lot of times, the special interests that helped provide the funding and resources to get them elected - but that often have competing agendas with the people who they're actually elected to serve. So as we're looking at this overall - one issue that we have recently talked about in Seattle, and especially looking at the Mayor and the control that Jenny Durkan has over the Seattle Police Department, and even the Police Chief for the Seattle Police Department - not really having power or authority to impose appropriate discipline, to make appropriate changes, because of the police guild's contract for Seattle. Is that also an issue with the Sheriff's department in King County? And how do you fix that? How do you begin to change that, so that there is accountability?  Girmay Zahilay: [00:19:49] It's a huge obstacle for justice and accountability. One of the things that we talk about most is the fact that oversight - the process of holding police officers accountable for misconduct, for example, that process is subject to bargaining - meaning that we can only hold police officers accountable in the ways that the police unions agree to. Imagine if any other profession, a high risk profession, say surgeons, or anything like that. Imagine if they told you, Hey, you can only hold us accountable the ways that we agreed to. Is that real accountability? Of course not. That's what we have here - that's the issue that we're facing here - the fact that oversight is subject to negotiation and bargaining. I understand why some things are subject to negotiation - we want workers to be protected - police officers are workers as well - things like benefits and workforce conditions, things like that, of course. But when we're talking about holding you accountable for misconduct, for example, that is not something that we should have to negotiate with you. That should be a completely independent function not subject to negotiation, but it is right now, because of state law. And last month, I actually held a round table discussion with several state-elected officials and community members, especially out in Skyway, and people in the union world, like MLK Labor Council. I had them all on a call and we discussed what can we do to solve this issue without deteriorating workers' rights? Because the last thing we want to do is have anti-union people using this police union issue as a way of deteriorating union rights. That's not what we want to do. Is there a way to carve out this specific, special situation? And that's what we would discuss with the state-elected officials as a state matter - it's not something that King County Council can change, but we did get some commitments from state-level people - that they are going to look into this and address the collective bargaining laws that  allow police unions to be an obstacle to true accountability. Crystal Fincher: [00:22:16] Okay, that makes sense. So, in terms of what is possible in this next legislative session, are there fixes that they're committing to bring forward, or that are currently in discussions? And then how much is an issue of state law preventing that, and how much is an issue of direct negotiation of the contract? Girmay Zahilay: [00:22:41] So it's both for sure. And I, the sense that I got from the state-level people is that they are going to introduce something that allows - that would carve out police unions from this collective bargaining law. Or at least carves out accountability measures from the requirement to bargain and negotiate. Because again, that should be independent. I can follow up with them to hear if a specific bill is going to be proposed, but that's the sense that I got.  Crystal Fincher: [00:23:12] Yeah, that makes sense. And, appreciate you trying, even though that is not in your direct area of control - to make an effort to work in cooperation with your partners at the state, and to say, Hey, we need action. What can we do? And to get that conversation started, and we will certainly be talking more about that here on Hacks and Wonks.  So broadening the conversation - and we started talking about Skyway - and we started talking about the disinvestment and, really, the institutional neglect and hostility, which is certainly harmful and a form of violence. How do we - what are the best ways to address that? What change can meaningfully be made? What policies can be changed, especially right now in the middle of a pandemic, when every local government and state government is saying, We're experiencing a budget crisis at the same time - so what can be done? And looking at the near term, and then in the next six months to a year, what is planned? What is possible? Girmay Zahilay: [00:24:29] For sure, Crystal, and I think the most important thing is to start off understanding what the problem statement is. The problem statement is not - how do we get more investment into Skyway? I actually just got into a Facebook argument with somebody on Facebook - which I tell myself every day, Don't get into Facebook arguments because it's a losing battle - you're not arguing rational people most of the time. But I posted how Skyway needs investments, et cetera, and this guy who, of course, had a vote Trump thing in his profile pictures, somewhere deep in there, was saying that, The easiest way to fix Skyway and to have it catch up with the neighborhoods around it, is to reduce regulations for developers, handout permits as quickly as possible, and private capital can flow in and we can develop it so fast - this is such an exceedingly simple solution. And I have to tell him, Again, you are working with the wrong problem statement. The problem is not where we need to find ways of having private capital flow into Skyway. If that were the only thing we're trying to solve for, the solution is exceedingly simple, right? It's just to eliminate all regulations, hand out permits to developers. And of course, they would take that in a heartbeat. The problem statement is - How do you invest in Skyway without displacing the people who already call it home? And the solution to that is much more nuanced and requires us to be much more thoughtful about how we proceed with development. It requires us to, yes, invite development, but do it in a way that is lockstep with anti-displacement measures, that invests in existing people and existing small businesses that are already there. It requires us to down-zone certain areas so that we can slow the pace of gentrification as much as possible. It requires us to be really thoughtful about what kind of requirements we're putting on developers - we're not just saying, Hey, developers, it's a free-for-all. No, you have to have a certain number of your units be affordable. You have to - right of first return to people that you displace in the process of development. You have to invest a certain amount of money in existing small businesses. You have to create community land trusts and community ownership. Those are all things that we're trying to do right now, because as far as I can tell, I have not been able to identify a single neighborhood or region in Washington State that's gotten it right so far. If it was so simple, I asked this man who argued with me on Facebook, give me the list of neighborhoods in our state where this has worked before. Just - we don't have to argue - just lay out the facts for me, because again, if you're going to point to places like the Central District - no. South Seattle - no. Anywhere you point to me, I'm going to show you that - no, we did not get it right. Yes, private capital flowed in and development happened, but what happened to the people who already live there? And that's what we're trying to solve in Skyway. And I can talk about the things that we've been working on so far, but I know it's always best to give myself some breathing room and not talk endlessly.  Crystal Fincher: [00:27:50] Well, we do have a few more minutes, but it would be good just to get an idea of what the focus is. Girmay Zahilay: [00:27:59] For sure. So the first thing that we did was help get a Skyway Land Use and Zoning Plan pushed across the finish line. This is something that people had been working on before I got here, but we helped push it across the finish line. And that's the first thing - is setting the foundation for investment - and that means we down-zoned certain areas from bigger commercial areas into smaller neighborhood commercial areas. Because again, we don't want speculative developers coming in here and putting in giant high-rises, and Targets, and Walmarts, and all that. Not yet. We also changed the areas that are already zoned for multi-family housing, like apartment complexes - we included some affordability requirements into those, so if you are going to develop areas that are already marked for multi-family, you have to have a certain level of affordability for lower income people to be able to live there. That's just setting the foundation. And then, now what we're working on is bolstering the level of investment that King County is willing to put in - for things like a community center, we just got earmarked for $10 million. For things like participatory budgeting, where the community gets to choose how it wants to spend money - whether that's for housing, or youth services, or roads and infrastructure - $10 million is going to go into that. We're getting $4.6 million - and this is all part of King County Executive Dow Constantine's proposed budget - $4.6 million is going to be redirected, of marijuana revenue, is going to be redirected from law enforcement and go toward community-based alternatives. So you lay the foundation of slowing the rate of gentrification, and then you slowly invest and build up - and at the same time, in lock step, we're going to also be placing, preparing anti-displacement measures, like just cause eviction, which would require that landlords and other big commercial developers - that they have a just reason for kicking out tenants and can't just do it for commercial reasons, or whatever it might be.  Crystal Fincher: [00:30:21] Right. That is helpful, certainly. And excited to hear that you're picking that up - other local jurisdictions have taken that up, and so others are just beginning to follow their lead and I'm glad to see that you're on the leading side of that. So I appreciate you just talking to us about everything today and what's going on and just understanding more of one central point. It isn't simple. It isn't simple, it isn't easy, but that is not an excuse not to do the work. And in fact that means that we really have to double down and dive in to understand the issues and get to work now, because we really can't wait any longer. We can't afford to wait any longer - people's lives are at stake and in the balance - and everything from health to education, just to what someone's neighborhood and school and street looks like, and what their future is set up to be - depends on the work that we're doing today. So I appreciate you spending this time, I appreciate the work that you're doing. Can you give your Twitter handle one more time, so people can get more information about what we've talked about today?  Absolutely. It's @girmayzahilay. Thank you so much, Crystal. I Girmay Zahilay: [00:31:48] really appreciate the opportunity to speak with you. I really love the work that you do, and your whole team does. Thank you for highlighting the voices of our most marginalized communities and some of the solutions that would get us on track to being a region that works for everyone. Crystal Fincher: [00:32:10] Thank you for listening to Hacks and Wonks. Thank you to KVRU 105.7FM in Seattle where we record this show. Our chief audio engineer is Maurice Jones, Jr. And our producer is Lisl Stadler. If you want more Hacks and Wonks content, go to officialhacksandwonks.com, subscribe to Hacks and Wonks on your favorite podcatcher, or follow me on Twitter @finchfrii. Catch you on the other side.

The Hopper in the Morning Show
Episode 731 - 12-29-21 - Jake Castellow - Porterville Police Chief

The Hopper in the Morning Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 19:46


On Today's episode, Hopper talks with Porterville Police chief, Jake Castellow about this weekend's New Years celebrations and what the department is looking out for to keep the public safe.

The Pat Thurston Show Podcast
December 28, 2021: Pat Thurston Show: Oakland Police Chief LeRonne Armstrong hopeful that violence in Oakland is trending down

The Pat Thurston Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 16:36


As a regular guest on the Pat Thurston Show, Oakland Police Chief LeRonne Armstrong explained the OPD's strategy to combat crime in Lake Merritt. The city is also looking for a sponsorship for its annual gun by back program. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

ATO: BRIDGING THE DIVIDE
Episode 17 Dallas Police Dept Chief of Police Eddie Garcia

ATO: BRIDGING THE DIVIDE

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 104:11


The story of Chief Garcia is beyond inspiring as he grew up in Puerto Rico….started the San Jose police Department as a 21 year old rookie cop who worked undercover Narcs, Special Operations and as a Homicide Investigator. Chief then climbed the ranks to become the Chief of Police of San Jose. His energetic leadership and innovative ideas in community engagement was infectious as he served the citizens of San Jose and lead his troops with great integrity and respect.  Chief retired from the San Jose after 29 years and shortly after was named the Chief of Police of the Dallas Police Department. Chief Garcia is the Department's 30th Police Chief and first Latino to serve in this position in its 140 year history. Chief hit the ground sprinting in Dallas and quickly elevated morale and introduced policies that will set a leadership template for years to come.  Sit back and enjoy this story of a true cop's cop.

The Tom and Curley Show
Hour 2: Family outraged after Tacoma police chief exonerates 2 of the officers involved in Manuel Ellis' death

The Tom and Curley Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 28:55


Family outraged after Tacoma police chief exonerates 2 of the officers involved in Manuel Ellis' death // With Rachel Belle: $4,000 fee will go ahead for Edmonds' streateries // Jack reacts to the texts from the Manny Ellis segment   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Delaware Valley Journal
Scott Bohn of the PA Police Chief's Association on the 'Smash and Grab' Crime Problem

Delaware Valley Journal

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 12:28


On this edition of the Delaware Valley Journal podcast, Scott Bohn of the PA Police Chief's Association talks about the surge in "smash-and-grab" robberies in recent weeks and how you might (unknowingly) be contributing to the problem. The criminal gangs behind these robberies are trying to connect with you, right now, over the internet.Hosted by Michael Graham.

Steve and Ted in the Morning
City of Wichita to look for new police chief

Steve and Ted in the Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 41:46


Hour 2 - Time for Mondays with the Mayor on Steve and Ted.  Steve and Ted discuss the city's search for a new police chief with Mayor Brandon Whipple.  This after local and national news and sports and ahead of business news from The Wichita Business Journal. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Jeff Caplan's Afternoon News
Former Salt Lake City Police Chief weighs in on recent school threats

Jeff Caplan's Afternoon News

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 18, 2021 11:59


See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Mike Broomhead Show Audio
Scottsdale Police Chief Jeff Walther

The Mike Broomhead Show Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 10:08


Mike talked to Chief Walther about the massive fentanyl bust in Scottsdale. The Chief also delivered a message to parents about why it's so important to be closely involved in your children's lives.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Be My Guest
December 16, 2021- Nick Reimer - City of Manitowoc Police Chief

Be My Guest

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 28:31


December 16, 2021- Nick Reimer - City of Manitowoc Police Chief

Insight with Beth Ruyak
Incoming Sacramento Police Chief Kathy Lester | Central Sierra Snow Lab | Possible link between the Omicron variant & HIV | CapRadio's 40th ‘Jingle Bell Jazz'

Insight with Beth Ruyak

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021


An interview with incoming Sacramento Police Chief Kathy Lester. The UC Berkeley Central Sierra Snow laboratory on Donner Summit. Stanford University's research on the Omicron variant and its possible connection to HIV. Finally, CapRadio Music's “Jingle Bell Jazz.” Today's Guests CapRadio Race and Equity Reporter Sarah Mizes Tan shares her interview with Sacramento Police Deputy Chief Kathy Lester, who will become the first woman selected as police chief in the city following Chief Daniel Hahn's retirement at the end of the year.  Dr. Andrew Schwartz, Station Manager and lead scientist at the UC Berkeley Central Sierra Snow Laboratory on Donner Summit, talks about this week's snowfall and gives his perspective on the future of California's snowpack.  Dr. Seth Hoffman, Infectious Disease Fellow at Stanford Health Care, shares the university's research on the Omicron variant and its possible connection to HIV.  CapRadio Jazz Host Andrew Mills joins us to preview CapRadio's 40th edition of “Jingle Bell Jazz” on Christmas Eve, along with Gary Vercelli, creator of the program. They will share music and stories from years past.

The KYMN Radio Podcast
The Morning Show - Northfield Police Chief Mark Elliott, 12-16-21

The KYMN Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 14:14


Northfield Police Chief Mark Elliott discusses last night's severe weather and encourages residents to sign up for the Everbridge alert system through the City of Northfield website, provides winter driving tips, talks about new positions to be hired, and more.

1080 KYMN Radio - Northfield Minnesota
Police Chief Mark Elliott on Everbridge Alert System, new positions, and more

1080 KYMN Radio - Northfield Minnesota

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021


Northfield Police Chief Mark Elliott discusses last night’s severe weather and encourages residents to sign up for the Everbridge alert system through the City of Northfield website, provides winter driving tips, talks about new positions to be hired, and more.

Tulsa Talks: A TulsaPeople Podcast
Help needed: Police Chief Wendell Franklin and Fire Chief Michael Baker on staffing issues and more

Tulsa Talks: A TulsaPeople Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 57:59


Welcome to Tulsa Talks presented by Tulsa Regional Chamber. I'm your host Tim Landes.For this month's issue of the magazine, I wrote about the staffing issues that are impacting our first responders in policing, fire and EMSA and how they're trying to fill the gaps in protection. I also took part in a ridealong with TPD patrol officer John Shelton, who works in the Mingo Valley Division, which is based in east Tulsa. It's the busiest division in terms of calls, and the November night I was in a car, the calls were nonstop. I wrote about some of that experience to highlight the job they have to do while short staffed. I also shared a photo gallery in the online version story. I talked to both Police Chief Wendell Franklin and Fire Department Chief Michael Baker. Both are in their second year on the job, and both have their own challenges to face to help keep Tulsa safe. Both men shared way more info than I could fit in the story, so I'm doing it here.  Franklin is a repeat guest of the podcast, but this was the first time I sat down with him face-to-face to interview him. We talked in his office on Nov. 16. Something I like about Franklin is he's a history buff and a reader. He filled me in on the Daniel Silva spy series that filled a shelf or two after we talked about his job. And now I have more books to read.In this conversation, you'll hear Franklin talk about the morale of his officers before getting into why they are stretched thin. He talks about how staffing issues are impacting community policing, which he calls collaborative policing. He also discusses the benefits of the pay raise and the pros and cons of the TPD's 4-year degree requirement. One of the most complicated topics of the year is the McGirt decision, which upholds tribal sovereignty and has an impact on policing. Local politicians have shared their opinions. I wanted to hear from Franklin his thoughts on how they are handling the changes and what can be done to make the transition easier for everyone.  He then concludes by talking about the year in crime. Homicides are down and violent crime is up. Franklin shares his thoughts maybe why this is the case.After my conversation with him, hear from TFD Chief Baker on how they've overhauled the application and hiring process to take the department into the 21st century. He also talks about the morale of a department that has seen many fire fighters retire and is currently in arbitration for more funding to pay fire fighters and fix equipment.  ***The guys who make up Jasper Wilderness took advantage of the pandemic to grow together as a band. In November the alt-rockers released their five song EP “Coming Home to Silence.” Coming in our January issue is a story about the release. Lead singer Gabe Philips says: “Coming Home to Silence" was born out of a lot of artistic writing sessions that we wouldn't have been able to have without the lockdown. The band is a small, tight-knit group and were able to meet during the craziness and get good creative energy/get on the same page about how to pursue music. Now the band has a great foundation for stepping out and playing live.”And with that here is the EP track “Alibi.“

The News with Gene Valicenti
12-15-21 Barrington Police Chief Michael Correia

The News with Gene Valicenti

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 10:42


Barrington Police Chief Michael Correia responds to recent threats made at the high school. The chief also discusses a petition circulating amongst students who are worried about safety.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Ross Kaminsky Show
12-14-21 *INTERVIEW* Pueblo Police Chief Chris Noeller

The Ross Kaminsky Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 15:55


The Mike Broomhead Show Audio
Phoenix Police Chief Jeri Williams

The Mike Broomhead Show Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 7:08


An emotional conversation between Mike & Chief Williams about the early morning shooting of Officer Tyler Moldovan and why there's no such thing as a "routine call." See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Dori Monson Show
Hour 1: Lakewood Police Chief Mike Zaro

The Dori Monson Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 34:33


12PM - The Big Lead // Student Walk-out in Monroe // Teacher comes out to her students // GUEST:  Lakewood Police Chief Mike Zaro on their uptick and car theft and a situation where his officers could not pursue a suspect because of the new policing law // Biden uses tornado to push global warming See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Insight with Beth Ruyak
How the storm affects the unhoused | “De-Masking” in schools | Revisiting our conversation with the Sacramento Police Chief | Sacramento Ballet's “Nutcracker”

Insight with Beth Ruyak

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021


An update on how the unhoused community is affected by the storm. The call for public health officials to create guidelines for “de-masking” in schools. Revisiting our conversation with Sacramento Police Chief after his retirement announcement. Ballet's “Nutcracker” returns after nearly two years. Today's Guests CapRadio News Reporter Chris Nichols gives us an update on how the storm affected the unhoused community in Sacramento. Dr. Monica Gandhi, Professor of Medicine of the division of HIV, Infectious Diseases, and Global Medicine at UC San Francisco, joins us to discuss why she's encouraging public health leaders to create guidelines for “de-masking” in schools. Last week, the Sacramento Police Department announced Deputy Chief Kathy Lester will take over as Chief in 2022. Today, we revisit our August 2021 conversation with Sacramento Police Chief Daniel Hahn after announcing his retirement. Anthony Krutzkamp, Artistic/Executive Director of the Sacramento Ballet, discusses hometown Nutcracker performances this season. 

The CopDoc Podcast: Aiming for Excellence in Leadership
Chief Stephanie Price, The CopDoc Podcast Ep 51 - Bluffton, SC Police Department

The CopDoc Podcast: Aiming for Excellence in Leadership

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 46:50


Stephanie Police is the Police Chief with the Bluffton, SC Police Department.  She is a veteran in policing for over 20 years.  A long-term officer and Command Staff member with the Kansas City, MO Police Department.  She left to become Assistant CHiaf with the Savannah, GA Police.  In 2020, Chief Price started as Chief of the Bluffton Police Department.    Stephanie holds a Bachelor's Degree from Park University and an MBA from Benedictine University.  We talked about her experience in three different agencies.  She talks of the importance of community and community outreach in policing. 

Santa Barbara Talks with Josh Molina
Santa Barbara Talks Podcast 88: Police Chief Barney Melekian

Santa Barbara Talks with Josh Molina

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2021 45:29


Santa Barbara Police Chief Barney Melekian is one of the most respected people in law enforcement throughout the nation. He is currently serving as interim police chief, at a time of major transition and turmoil at City Hall. Melekian opens up about his thoughts on the Community Formation Commission and the eventual Civil Review System. Many members of the community pushed for a civilian review board after the murder of George Floyd. He also talks about implicit bias training, diversity of the police force, and the challenges that law enforcement faces in Santa Barbara. Melekian also shares his hopes for new Mayor Randy Rowse and what he hopes the former councilman will bring to the City Council. This is a revealing conversation with Santa Barbara's top cop.

Cherokee Tribune-Ledger Podcast
Animal Shelter Waives Fees; Woodstock Assistant Police Chief Retiring; A Christmas Carol Performed in Woodstock

Cherokee Tribune-Ledger Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2021 13:49


The Cherokee County Animal Shelter is waiving adoption fees this holiday season; Woodstock's assistant police chief will retire; And Woodstock Arts will perform "A Christmas Carol."  #CherokeeCounty #Georgia #LocalNews    -          -          -          -          -          -          The Cherokee Tribune Ledger Podcast is local news for Woodstock, Canton, and all of Cherokee County. Register Here for your essential digital news.             This podcast was produced and published for the Cherokee Tribune-Ledger and TribuneLedgerNews.com by BG Ad Group on 12-10-2021 For more information be sure to visit https://www.bgpodcastnetwork.com/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Be My Guest
December 10, 2021 - Brian Kohlmeyer, Two Rivers Police Chief

Be My Guest

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 27:41


December 10, 2021 - Brian Kohlmeyer, Two Rivers Police Chief

WTAQ News on Demand
11 am News on Demand - Police chief to talk about spike in shootings

WTAQ News on Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 2:54


Fire crews battled a fire for more than three hours Thursday night at Quincy Recycling in Green Bay. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

KFOR Lincoln Live
Lincoln Police Chief, Teresa Ewins

KFOR Lincoln Live

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 9:00


KFOR's Dale Johnson sits down with Lincoln Police Chief, Teresa Ewins

Mornings with Neil Mitchell
Police chief Shane Patton details the revamped "police in schools" program

Mornings with Neil Mitchell

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 8:51


Police will return to Victorian classrooms as part of a revamped police in schools program next year.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Dom Giordano Program
Germantown Carjacking Keeps Dom Up All Night

The Dom Giordano Program

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 41:12


Today, Dom Giordano led off the Dom Giordano Program by updating the situation on crime in and around Philadelphia, revealing that he's learned there may be a big decision from New York Mayor-Elect Eric Adams concerning his choice for Police Chief, which has implications on Philadelphia since current Commissioner Danielle Outlaw is allegedly one of the finalists for the position. Then, Giordano gives an update on the heightened crime itself, discussing an incident yesterday where a 6-year-old child was kidnapped in a carjacking. The child was safely recovered, but in the reporting, it came out that the parent had left the car running while running into a pizza shop, which led to the crime. Dom argues with Dan whether there is ever an appropriate time to leave a child alone in a car, explaining that he does support leaving kids behind if it's under 5 minutes and the doors are locked. Callers chime in, offering their opinion on the debate, and Dom asks where the line should be drawn. Also, Dom asks listeners for a fictional character they'd hire as a bodyguard, and discusses the Fox News Christmas tree, which was set on fire yesterday. (Photo by Getty Images) See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Steve Scaffidi
12/8/2021 - Wauwatosa Police Chief James MacGillis shares how his department is starting some initiatives to help people with mental health issues

Steve Scaffidi

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 11:16


KNX All Local
L.A. police chief's new promise; Armed robbers strike luxury hotel; Car thefts on the rise.

KNX All Local

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 5:35


The Top Local Stories Of The Day See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

WNHH Community Radio
Dateline Hamden: Police Chief John Sullivan & Erik Johnson

WNHH Community Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 47:59


Dateline Hamden: Police Chief John Sullivan & Erik Johnson by WNHH Community Radio

Anchorage Daily News
12/7/21: The abrupt retirement of Anchorage's first Black police chief...and more news

Anchorage Daily News

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 5:05


The abrupt retirement of Anchorage's first Black police chief; Anchorage is expected to see significant snow accumulation; A new milestone was reached Monday in the creeping militarization of space; A federal judge has ruled against the state of Alaska

WTAQ News on Demand
7am News on Demand - Green Bay Police Chief on spike in gun violence

WTAQ News on Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 2:52


The University of Wisconsin System is preparing a Bachelor degree program for inmates.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Trevor Carey Show
80 House Republicans Vote to Spy on Americans Plus Catching up With Fresno Police Chief Paco Balderrama

The Trevor Carey Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2021 38:42


Inside the Daily Press
Police Chief Ramon Batista

Inside the Daily Press

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 53:57


An in-depth interview with the Santa Monica Police Chief Ramon Batista.

WICC 600
The Lisa Wexler Show - Yale Asst Police Chief Anthony Campbell - 12/02/21

WICC 600

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 14:48


Lisa is joined by Yale Assistant Police Chief Anthony Campbell to discuss the charges leveled against the Oxford High School shooter. Should the parents be charged as well? Photo: iStock / Getty Images Plus goir

The Lisa Wexler Show
12/02/21 - Maria Pereira And Yale Asst Police Chief Anthony Campbell

The Lisa Wexler Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 50:19


12/02/21 - Maria Pereira And Yale Asst Police Chief Anthony Campbell by The Lisa Wexler Show

The Lynda Steele Show
The Full Show: Reaction to the new Surrey Police Service 'poaching' officers - hear from Surrey's Police Chief, a potential Canadian boycott of the Beijing games and how the B.C. floods have impacted supply to local food banks

The Lynda Steele Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 58:06


Concerns that Surrey police transition could impact hiring in other municipalities Linda Annis, Surrey City Councillor, weighs in on what some are calling controversial.  Cross-border day trips are back! Guy Occhiogrosso, President and CEO of the Bellingham Regional Chamber of Commerce, discusses the rise in business Bellingham may see throughout the holiday season as cross-border day trips are once again in full effect.  Surrey's Police Chief responds to claims the police transition will ‘damage' other Lower Mainland forces Hear from Norm Lipinski, Chief Constable of the Surrey Police Service, on the 'poaching' that Surrey is doing to staff its' new police force.  Women's tennis tour suspends China events over Peng Shuai concerns Is there appetite to boycott the Beijing games? We discuss with Jeremy Nuttall, Vancouver-based journalist covering China for the Toronto Star A B.C. survivor of conversion therapy shares his story  Jules Sherred, lives in Duncan and survived conversion therapy as a teenager, weighs in on today's decision from the House of Commons to ban conversion therapy in Canada. B.C. floods: how the supply chain challenges are impacting food banks Hajira Hussain, Executive Director of Richmond Food Bank Society tells us how the B.C. floods have impacted food supply See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Lynda Steele Show
Surrey's Police Chief responds to claims the police transition will ‘damage' other Lower Mainland forces

The Lynda Steele Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 12:04


Hear from Norm Lipinski, Chief Constable of the Surrey Police Service, on the 'poaching' that Surrey is doing to staff its' new police force.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Humboldt Holding Up
Retiring Eureka Police Chief Steve Watson on the Challenges and Successes of His Time With EPD, the Staffing Crisis and the Department's Recent Texting Scandal

Humboldt Holding Up

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 71:09


Join us for a very special exit interview with retiring Eureka Police Chief Steve Watson

AP Audio Stories
Police chief: 3 shot in fight at North Carolina mall

AP Audio Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 0:40


The Dana & Parks Podcast
What is actually going on with the Police Chief? Hour 4 11/23/2021

The Dana & Parks Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 32:32


See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Tell Me What to Google
Jailing Political Opponents: Abraham Lincoln and Habeas Corpus

Tell Me What to Google

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 32:40


Abraham Lincoln is known as "The Great Emancipator." But not many people know that during the Civil War, he jailed as many as 2,000 political opponents without charges or trial. The story in this episode revolves around what happened in Baltimore, Maryland in 1861 and why it led to the Mayor, the Police Chief, the entire City Council and many more being jailed indefinitely in a suspension of the writ of Habeas Corpus. Then we chat with entertainer Brandon Anderson and play the quick quiz! Review this podcast at https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-internet-says-it-s-true/id1530853589 Bonus episodes and content available at http://Patreon.com/MichaelKent For 15% at SCOTTeVEST, visit http://scottevest.cwv7.net/a3VBZ

Arizona's Morning News
Assistant Police Chief Mike Pooley, Tempe PD

Arizona's Morning News

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 4:48


Tempe Assistant Police Chief Mike Pooley joined Arizona's Morning News to discuss new memorial displays for road traffic victims that are going up at intersections this weekend. He urges safety on the road this Thanksgiving holiday.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

You Just Have To Laugh
Police Chief Jan Zimmerman keeps us SAFE

You Just Have To Laugh

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 17:18


Raymore Chief of Police Jan Zimmerman began her career in law enforcement in 1979 as a dispatcher before attending the Police Academy at Kansas City and being sworn in as a Police Officer in 1982. She rose through the ranks and was ultimately promoted to Major, which was her rank when she retired to accept the Chief's position in Raymore in 2012. Chief Zimmerman holds a Bachelor's Degree in Criminal Justice and a Masters Degree in Public Administration from Park University. She is a proud alumnus of both the FBI National Academy in Quantico and the Southern Police Institute at the University of Louisville. Her proudest accomplishment is her family. SAFE The mission of SAFE is to provide immediate financial assistance of $25,000 to the families of Firefighters, Police Officers and EMT's who are killed or suffer career-ending injuries in the line-of-duty protecting their communities. Supported entirely through private donations and fundraising efforts, SAFE covers all first responders in 12 counties in the greater Kansas City area. Chief Zimmerman is proud to serve as the Executive Director of SAFE.

The Marc Cox Morning Show
MCMS: Former Ferguson Police Chief calls Rep. Cori Bush shooting claims a "bald-faced lie"

The Marc Cox Morning Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 5:35


Former Ferguson Police Chief Tom Jackson reacts to Rep. Bush's claims of protesters routinely being shot at in 2014.   © 2021 KFTK (Audacy). | Photo by Greg Nash-PoolGetty Images See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Law Enforcement Today Podcast
S5E84: Shot with a Shotgun, He Survived and Eventually Became The Police Chief.

Law Enforcement Today Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 21:47


Shot with a Shotgun, He Survived and Eventually Became The Police Chief.  He purchased soft body armor at his expense before, and that saved his life. He tells his story & his ascension to Police Chief. Early in his police career before Departments issued soft body armor, he was shot with a shotgun. Fortunately for him, he and his wife made the expensive decision to purchase soft body armor at their expense. The soft body armor is what saved his life. Tom tells us about the life and death incident, his recovery and the decision to return to his police career. He continued to serve in the Riverside Illinois Police Department and eventually was promoted to the position of Police Chief. Retired Riverside Illinois Police Chief Tom Weitzel is our guest on the Law Enforcement Today Show. Never miss out on an episode of the Law Enforcement Today Podcast, AND be automatically entered in all future contests. Simply subscribe for our free email newsletter, never more than 2 issues a week sent out. Click here and scroll down about half way. Follow us on the MeWe social media platform. We are on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook. In the Clubhouse app look for and follow @LetRadioShow. Background song Hurricane is used with permission from the band Dark Horse Flyer. If you enjoy the Law Enforcement Today Radio Show and Podcast, please tell a friend or two, or three about it. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Montrose Fresh
Montrose Police Chief says hiring is down given national climate; An update on gray wolf reintroduction

Montrose Fresh

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 6:52


Police agency hiring is down across the country — and it's said to be a matter of applicant quality. Have national events discouraged people from the profession Montrose is no exception when it comes to hiring woes. Montrose Police Chief Blaine Hall said they're absolutely down. He thinks one of the concerning things they're experiencing right now is they're getting the same numbers of individuals applying, but they've seen a decrease in the quality of applicants. Also, results from public engagement meetings concerning gray wolf reintroduction to Colorado are now in, with the report slated for presentation to the Colorado Wildlife Commission on Nov. 18. The species is being reintroduced on designated lands in the Western Slope, which drew stiff opposition from Montrose County leadership and stakeholders here. The vote broadly failed in Western Slope counties, but voters elsewhere carried Prop 114 to the finish line. montrosepress.com Support the show: https://www.montrosepress.com/site/forms/subscription_services/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Garage Logic
10/27 St Paul police chief Todd Axtell will not seek reappointment. What could possibly be the reason?

Garage Logic

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 87:45


St Paul police chief Todd Axtell will not seek reappointment. What could possibly be the reason? Mn doctor fired from hospital after telling school board members that parents should make health decisions for their children. Johnny Heidt with guitar news. FDA approves Covid vaccines for children 5-11 with the hope that they actually work.