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Panther Point of View
113022 Panther Claw Calls of the Game at Bradley

Panther Point of View

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 1:42


Know what you call a group of Panthers? A claw. Know what we call our group of calls of the game for Panther basketball? Claw Calls of course. A tough road loss for the Panthers to open MVC play, 68-53. The Panthers got a 2nd straight game of 20+ from Bowen Born to lead all scorers in the game. Panthers are now 2-4, 0-1 MVC and come home Saturday to take on Evansville at 1 PM. This is the Panther Point of View, your source for all things Panthers. Listen on:Apple PodcastsSpotifyAnd MORE! Follow UNI Athletics onTwitterFacebookInstagramYouTube Follow the Voice of the Panthers JW Cox on:TwitterInstagram See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Racer Nation Podcast
37. MVCee the Racers Make History

The Racer Nation Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 88:57


MVC conference play is here for the Racers for the first time ever. Before we talk Illinois State and Valpo, we break down the disappointing loss at Chattanoga. A fun episode as always as we look to start 2-0 in the MVC. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/racer-nation-pod/message

Unstoppable Mindset
Episode 79 – Unstoppable Seagrams Special with Lynn Teatro

Unstoppable Mindset

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 62:07


Why Seagrams Special? Listen to a remarkable story about Lynn Teatro where she will tell you about not one, but two times she went to high school. During her second stint, she was given the name.   While Lynn was raised to be a farmer's wife she always wanted more. After her marriage breakup, she chose to try school again as you will discover.   In college, Lynn studied Psychology. She completed a three-year program in 23 months even though her professors said not only that it couldn't be done and that it was against the rules to get her degree in such a short time. Unstoppable or what?   Among other endeavors, today Lynn is a member of an organization that serves persons with disabilities. Her attitude is very refreshing and quite positive not only about those she serves but about life in general.   Today Lynn is developing a program to help encourage dropout students. As you will see, she is teaching others to be unstoppable.     About the Guest:   Lynn Teatro was raised to be a farmer's wife and a mother. Rural Ontario, north of Hwy #7 expectation. She was married 2 weeks out of high school. Lynn wasn't able to graduate because she failed physics and was getting married, so it really didn't matter. Or so she believed back then. 12 years later she was a single parent of two kids, back in class with the teens and completing her Grade 13 (Yes, she's that old). This time I got to hang out with the cool kids. My nickname was the Seagrams Special. She applied to Trent University as a high school graduate and completed her 3- year undergrad in Psychology in 2 years. Lynn's academic advisor told her that she couldn't do that. It was against regulations or something. Too late, Professor Earnest, she had already finished the work for her last credit. Lynn had a varied career as a front-line social service worker. She worked in shelters for abused women and their children, with seniors, with sex offenders in prison, helping the homeless…She had a two-year stint pissing off landlords and pulling miracles out of her ass. Her daughter, Megan's words, not the actual job description. But it's close.   Now as a quasi-retiree, she has made it her mission to help dropouts and other struggling students find their zone of genius. She helps them boost their confidence with workshops, 1:1 counselling, and group coaching. She is also building a professional roster of like-minded people to help her help struggling students fly the nest and on to success.  It's a mighty task and Lynn has learned to ask for help the hard way.  She is proud of her rural roots. Lynn knows for sure that you can take a girl out of the country, but you can't take the country out of the girl. And she also knows that sometimes our personal trail takes us where we weren't expected to go. She challenges all of us to enter that huge unknown world of possibility.  So, take her advice no matter who you are and where you are at in life.  Surprise yourself.    How to connect with Lynn:   Website: www.MyVoiceCounts2.com LinkedIn: http://linkedin.com/in/lynnteatro Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MyVoiceCounts2 I broadcast my Facebook Live My Voice Counts, too: the parents' edition from this page  Calendar link for promotion: https://calendly.com/lynn-teatro/20       About the Host: Michael Hingson is a New York Times best-selling author, international lecturer, and Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe. Michael, blind since birth, survived the 9/11 attacks with the help of his guide dog Roselle. This story is the subject of his best-selling book, Thunder Dog.   Michael gives over 100 presentations around the world each year speaking to influential groups such as Exxon Mobile, AT&T, Federal Express, Scripps College, Rutgers University, Children's Hospital, and the American Red Cross just to name a few. He is Ambassador for the National Braille Literacy Campaign for the National Federation of the Blind and also serves as Ambassador for the American Humane Association's 2012 Hero Dog Awards.   https://michaelhingson.com https://www.facebook.com/michael.hingson.author.speaker/ https://twitter.com/mhingson https://www.youtube.com/user/mhingson https://www.linkedin.com/in/michaelhingson/   accessiBe Links https://accessibe.com/ https://www.youtube.com/c/accessiBe https://www.linkedin.com/company/accessibe/mycompany/ https://www.facebook.com/accessibe/       Thanks for listening! Thanks so much for listening to our podcast! If you enjoyed this episode and think that others could benefit from listening, please share it using the social media buttons on this page. Do you have some feedback or questions about this episode? Leave a comment in the section below!   Subscribe to the podcast If you would like to get automatic updates of new podcast episodes, you can subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher. You can also subscribe in your favorite podcast app.   Leave us an Apple Podcasts review Ratings and reviews from our listeners are extremely valuable to us and greatly appreciated. They help our podcast rank higher on Apple Podcasts, which exposes our show to more awesome listeners like you. If you have a minute, please leave an honest review on Apple Podcasts.     Transcription Notes Michael Hingson  00:00 Access Cast and accessiBe Initiative presents Unstoppable Mindset. The podcast where inclusion, diversity and the unexpected meet. Hi, I'm Michael Hingson, Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe and the author of the number one New York Times bestselling book, Thunder dog, the story of a blind man, his guide dog and the triumph of trust. Thanks for joining me on my podcast as we explore our own blinding fears of inclusion unacceptance and our resistance to change. We will discover the idea that no matter the situation, or the people we encounter, our own fears, and prejudices often are our strongest barriers to moving forward. The unstoppable mindset podcast is sponsored by accessiBe, that's a c c e s s i  capital B e. Visit www.accessibe.com to learn how you can make your website accessible for persons with disabilities. And to help make the internet fully inclusive by the year 2025. Glad you dropped by we're happy to meet you and to have you here with us.   Michael Hingson  01:20 Well, Hi, and welcome once again to unstoppable mindset. Today we get to interview Lynn Teatro. And I'm not going to tell you a lot about her. She's got an incredible story. We'll have to ask her about her nickname when she was in high school the second time around, but she has had a wide variety of experiences. And I think that we're going to find just how unstoppable she is. We'll see. Anyway, Lynn, welcome to unstoppable mindset. How are you? I'm great, Michael, how are you? Doing? Well. Good. Well tell me. Well, you're welcome one. Thank you very much for being here. Lynn is another one of our victims who came from podapalooza. You all have heard about that before. We had another pot of Palooza event last month in June. And by the way, if anyone is interested, there will be another one coming up on October 19. And if you want information about that, please reach out to me at Michaelhi at accessibe.com. And I'll get you all the information as soon as I have links. We'll put those up as well. But anyway, here we are with Lynn and you'll have to tell us all about why you were involved in podapalooza as we go through this, so let's not forget to ask you that. But I'd like to start by you telling us just a little bit about you growing up and all that sort of stuff.   Lynn Teatro  02:40 Well, I was born in Peterborough, which is the place I'm living right now. And my dad was worked in a grocery store and my great ANP company and my mom was a homemaker and I had a brother born right after me and then another brother born the year later, and that was the time that my dad became ill with heart problems. And he was nursed at home and he died just before his 20/25 birthday. 25 seems to be a rough year for the men in my family. My older brother Dale had a diving accident just before his 24th birthday and broke his neck and he was a fully disabled quadriplegic for 19 years. And my other brother kept attractor over on himself and the throttle went up into his leg and barely missed the femoral artery. So he was luckier than what Dale was, and I had a sister that was okay, go ahead.   Michael Hingson  03:35 I was just gonna say, now tell us about the women in the family.   Lynn Teatro  03:39 Yes. My mom found it very difficult to cope and mental health issues run in my family. So she had a long period of depression after my father died. And my teenage uncle came and looked after us for a while. And after we moved to Cannington, about four or five months, it's just a small village where my grandparents were close to. And we lived in a small town and I asked my mom for pink car when I was five. And she actually brought home a pink car. It was called buckskin Brown, but I was actually pinks. I was very, very pleased and the people in town got to know us because I have red hair and my brothers have been bright orange hair actually. We had a blonde German Shepherd shepherd that rode around in the trunk of the car with the lid up. And then it was a pink car. So when we drove down the street, people got to know us very quickly. They knew who you were. Yeah. So my mum ended up marrying about four years after my dad died and they had an incident and she was born with hydrocephalus. And for anybody who doesn't know what Hydrocephalus is, it's water on the brain. And we all have water on our brains. It goes around the brain to push up against the skull and it also goes down to up and down the spinal cord to keep it lubricated. And there was a blockage somewhere in that system that caused the fluid to build up around her brain before she was even born. So yeah, she was born prematurely. But it wasn't soon enough to help her from becoming profoundly developmentally, developmentally delayed. And, yeah, I looked it up in the in YouTube or not YouTube on the internet the other day, my sister required $100 worth of medication to control her seizures. And that's worth almost $800 Canadian, which is a lot of money, and my parents were paying for the farm. And they ended up having to my mom ended up having to go to work. And when she was at work, I was 12 years old, and I was responsible for profoundly, you know, high risk kids for two and a half years of my life when I was home on weekends and holidays, and that kind of thing. So I learned a lot about parenting, but not real parenting because Carrie was very much like a, an infant. She, like our like a doll. She was a living doll. She needed to be fed, she needed to be changed. But she never got that second reflex. She never cried, never laughed. The only real human response we got from her was when we were around. Like if it was just family, she would be awake more times than if we had strangers in the house with the exception of my aunt and uncle and their six kids. She seemed to have accepted them as family to and was quite used to them. So yeah, and yeah, and then yeah, so that that is where the women, women kind of lost it.   Michael Hingson  06:41 So everyone in the family definitely had some challenges. How long did Carrie live? I know that she no longer does.   Lynn Teatro  06:49 Yeah, she was two and a half years old. Two and a half. Yeah, yeah.   Michael Hingson  06:54 Well, you're still here.   Lynn Teatro  06:55 I'm still here.   Michael Hingson  06:57 That's a good thing. It is. It is. So tell me about as you were growing up you in school and so on?   Lynn Teatro  07:04 Well, in school, I did. Okay. I was one of those that was able to get marks without working very hard for them. And but as I got older, my marks started slipping, I started losing my confidence and developed anxiety around public speaking. And I was raised to be a farmer's wife and the mother of farm children. So I went to grade 13, which was popular, you know, was in in place in Ontario at that time.   Michael Hingson  07:36 Now, what is grade 13? Grade 13   Lynn Teatro  07:38 was the final program for going into university. So if you were on the university track, you took grade 13. Well, I just decided to take group three team because otherwise I wouldn't have anything to do. And then I got engaged in the middle of my grade 13 and was married two weeks out of high school. And technically I didn't graduate from grade 13 Because I failed physics.   Michael Hingson  08:05 Physics isn't that hard? Having my master's in physics, I had to say that anyway, go yeah, yes. I'm just defending the honor of science anyway, going well,   Lynn Teatro  08:17 and you know, I'm very interested in science. It's just that that was the one that I had, I had to work out a little bit. And, you know, I had a boyfriend. I was working at the house for doing chores and things. So you know, doing homework was just not one of my priorities.   Michael Hingson  08:32 So you got married two weeks out of high school,   Lynn Teatro  08:35 two weeks I've taught in school. And then two years later, I had my first daughter. And two years after that, I had the second my second daughter. And even though I was living the life that my parents wanted me to have, my husband wasn't a farmer, he was a mechanic. So still working with his hands within got dirty. So that was an honorable profession as far as my family was concerned. But I wasn't happy. I was not happy and my marriage deteriorated. Actually, I had applied to college and was accepted. And the day I was supposed to go down and register. Alright, the night before I was supposed to be down on a register. My husband and I had we argued all night because I was adamant that I was going and he said that we didn't have the money even though I had worked hard to to claim that money. But it was it was irrelevant, because my stepfather came up and said that my brothers had an accident and had broken his neck. So the family made a pledge that they would there would be somebody with my brother every day that he was in the hospital in Toronto. So every day one person, at least one person would drive down and spend the day with him. And I don't regret that at all. It was it was a rough time for him. But once he got moved back to our community and he ended up living in the hospital for most of those 19 years, but after he got back to the community I figured that, you know, that wasn't required. It was just you know back to, to being brother sister. And that's when I applied to university. And my marriage had broken up by that time too. And actually, before I applied to university, I decided I was going back to high school, I just on a whim, drove into the laneway of the high school that I went to earlier, and asked how I got into university. And they sent me to the guidance counselor, and he said, Oh, we're doing this semester system now. You can start, you can start high school tomorrow, upgrade your third grade 13 and apply as a graduate. So I did that. And that's where I got the nickname The secret was special. And it was really funny. Funny, because that was one of the outside ones the first time in high school. But I was one of the cool chicks in the in the second time around.   Michael Hingson  10:49 Well, how did you get this name Seagram special?   Lynn Teatro  10:52 Pierre Burton, one of our here's a host historian and an announcer with CBC had written about a book called The Bronfman dynasty dynasty. And when America had the prohibition against alcohol on the Bronfman, were doing Run, run, running down to the states, and making a small fortune and they are millionaires and the Bronfman dynasty continues, and they continue to make alcohol. And their alcohol is called Seagrams. And there's a special one that's always put in a crown, and it's called the Seagram special. So that's where I got my nickname.   Michael Hingson  11:27 There you are. Yeah. And cgroups is very visible down here in the United States today. Yes. So you finish grade 13, I got   Lynn Teatro  11:36 to finish grade 13. And then went to move to Peterborough and went to university. And I did a few things, right. I selected my courses. So that I was, I would be out the door when my daughters went to just go grab the bus for school, and I would be at home when they got back from school. I   Michael Hingson  11:59 before we go further. So you passed physics in grade 13?   Lynn Teatro  12:02 I didn't take physics. I did a math course. Okay. And I did well, the teacher said afterwards, when she heard that I was coming into the class that she thought that she would have to spend a lot of time with me, because textbooks had changed in that 12 years. Yeah. When I was in grade 13, the first time around calculators, calculators had just become affordable. And we weren't allowed to use them in doing our homework and doing exams and things. When I came back, the textbooks were written to be used with calculators. So there was a bit of an adjustment to make. But I did fairly well, I got 73 wasn't as good as the young woman behind me. She happened to be the, the daughter of the teacher that taught me the first time around in math. And she got 100 She graduated with 105%.   Michael Hingson  12:52 How did textbooks change? To accommodate calculators and so on? So what was different?   Lynn Teatro  12:59 I think that they, it wasn't that you it was the process that they wanted you to go through to go through the process and get the right answer. So rather than doing the, you know, the adding and subtracting and the multiplying, they acknowledged that calculators existed and they could be a good tool.   Michael Hingson  13:16 So what did they make you do instead of doing a lot of calculations to show that you knew what you were doing? Well,   Lynn Teatro  13:23 we still had to do the calculations, we still had to break it down. But it wasn't we didn't, we didn't have to do the math. Mentally. We didn't do figure them out each thought it was, you know, complicated formulas.   Michael Hingson  13:34 And was. Yeah, and what I'm really getting to is, of course, what it's really all about, is it isn't just enough to get the right numbers. But if you're dealing with units and other things, you have to prove that the units and the other aspects of the exercise all come out as well. So it becomes more than just numbers. And that's of course the real issue. And that's true in physics as well, to the unit's come out, it isn't just getting a number.   Lynn Teatro  14:04 No, it's the process. It's the process and the results   Michael Hingson  14:08 and showing that you know that process Exactly. Let's say you passed and you went into college and what did you study as major or did you   Lynn Teatro  14:16 have my major was was psychology, and I took all the requisites so that I get couldn't get my degree as a science, in science rather than arts. My backups were sociology and English. Always loved to read. So that was a good course for me. But at the end of the first year, I decided that I'm on a roll and applied to go to summer school. So I took two courses in the summer. And then I kind of looked at my year again and took six courses are the equivalent of six courses in the winter, two more in the summer and I ended up completing my undergrad degree in two years instead of the three year program. Wow. Which was really lucky. Like it was it was instinct that I did it. It wasn't thought out thoroughly. It was instinct. And that summer or that fall, my son was born because I was kind of a fiancee at that time. And the day my son was born, my beloved grandma Teatro had a stroke. And she didn't even know that the first redhead in the Family Grant great grandchild had in the family had been born. Because when my daughters are born, and I phoned her, I said, she she'd always tell them what it was a girl and healthy. She does actually have red hair, because my grandmother had red hair, and my other grandmother had had red hair. So yeah, she missed it on that. And it was, it was a really tough year, and I got married out here to fall.   Michael Hingson  15:48 How old were your daughters? At that time? My daughters were 10 and 12. Okay, so you did graduate at least high school before they?   Lynn Teatro  15:56 Yeah. Yeah. and got my degree and got my Honours Degree in the next two years, and spent most of my working life in the social services.   Michael Hingson  16:09 So did you did you get a master's degree or just?   Lynn Teatro  16:12 No, I didn't get anxious. Just a bachelor's honours, but it's just a bachelor's. In retrospect, I should have gone on. But   Michael Hingson  16:23 yeah, only so many hours in the day.   Lynn Teatro  16:26 Well, and I was the first person in my mom's family, my father's family and my stepfather's family to graduate from high school, let alone go on to post secondary school education. So that was that was huge.   Michael Hingson  16:40 Well, given the background from what your family or your family's expectations were, how did they take you go into college? And how were they when you graduated?   Lynn Teatro  16:51 Oh, when I was in high school, my sister in law had a tubal pregnancy. And she had one daughter at home, and my mom phoned up to insist that I participate in helping with my sister in law, and I said, I'm in school. And her immediate response is, Oh, you want to be you want to have a career, and it was really dripping with sarcasm. So that was pretty much sums up the support that I was getting from my family about later, still not, you know, it's still not the acceptance that I would have liked. And they did attend my graduation. But they were more impressed with Peters AUSkey, who was a well known radio announcer here in Canada, that he was the getting the honorary degree and doing the keynote speech at my graduation then, than the fact that you know, I was the first person in the family to graduate high school,   Michael Hingson  17:47 let alone University. Now how old are your daughters? Now?   Lynn Teatro  17:50 My daughters are 48 and   Michael Hingson  17:54 And they went to college, or did they? My   Lynn Teatro  17:59 younger daughter just finished. She just graduated from university this year. She got married fairly young. She tried college and ended up dropping out and got married and no, got had two kids. And then she got married, and ended up leaving that marriage and moving to Peterborough, and going to university. And she's studying psychology, too. And I'm urging her to go on to get her Master's.   Michael Hingson  18:23 Good for her and good for you. It usually will help some,   Lynn Teatro  18:27 huh? Well, I think that's a degree now is the same thing as what a diploma was when we were young. That's the starting out that says if you don't have a degree, we're just going to put your resume aside because there's other people that may be more qualified. So it's easy weeding, weeding them out. My other daughter didn't do that route. She's, she's was on she's on the edge of genius like her. Her IQ is around 129. And she chose to go someplace where she could learn and, and earn at the same time. So she got really good at helping computer companies make educational systems and then translating them into French because my children were all bilingual. So they came out of high school fully fluent in French.   Michael Hingson  19:23 You're close enough to Quebec. That makes sense. Well,   Lynn Teatro  19:27 French is our our other official or other official language, right. And when my daughter was young, one of her best friends had decided to go to to French immersion because French immersion had just been developed them. And since her dad worked in the town that the French immersion was being offered. We agreed to let her go and she was she missed the kindergarten portion. So her and Lindsay her her good friends had to sort of start a little bit behind there. peers in that class, but they very quickly caught up. And then my younger daughter just went along with them.   Michael Hingson  20:06 So you graduated from college? And then what did you start to do?   Lynn Teatro  20:11 I went into I started with an outreach center in the middle of low income housing project. And we served two projects, we did, and I was in part of the health care team. So I worked with the children around health and food and exercise and that kind of thing. And then in conjunction with a woman who taught mothers mostly about health and food, we would you charge a small fee and and teach them how to use fires for shopping so that they could get the best value for their dollar and try to avoid buying at the end of the month when everybody got their money, because that's when the flyers had less nutritious food. And then once once they decided to close the shelter, or the the Outreach Center, I started working in women's shelters, and did that for many years. But I also got a contract at a medium security prison here in Ontario, and work with sex, sex offenders. I did a stint with the CAS the Children's Aid Society and in schools. So my my career was very, very varied. And but like my daughter, I would get, yeah, I needed to to learn. It wasn't just about getting the money I had to learn. That was one of my the way I operate in the world. That's not learning. It's not enough fun. For me.   Michael Hingson  21:33 That's pretty obvious from the way you, you tend to behave. And from all the things that I'm hearing. And going back to your college experience, as I recall, you finishing in two years was something that cause some angst with your advisor. And so   Lynn Teatro  21:51 yes, yes, I had my final meeting with my, my professor who was my teacher's advisor. And she said, you know, where are you going from here? And I says, Well, I graduate, and she says, Well, how can you do that? And I told her how? And she says, Well, you're not allowed to do that. And I said, Well, I just had my last class last week, it's a little late to tell me now.   Michael Hingson  22:15 Did she ever decided that was really okay?   Lynn Teatro  22:18 I never had contact with her after that.   Michael Hingson  22:22 Don't you love it when people have these rules, fixed or otherwise are real or otherwise, and they have to go by them. And when you come along and you do something different? They just tell you, it can't be done? Well, it's too late. It's already done.   Lynn Teatro  22:37 Yes, I think that people filter experiences to their own abilities, rather than looking at the abilities of the person sitting in front of them. And sometimes, yeah, not nobody, nobody fits those little cubes that they want to push through students through. Some of them need to take time. Some of them aren't on the fast track. Some of them are great in the sciences, some of them are great, they're great in the humanities, what you do, and how they tackle that is very different. There's been a lot of research on cognitive learning, or cognitive intelligence, which is the way you choose to operate in the world, how you choose to solve problems. And then we've got the IQ. And then there's the emotional quotient. And then there's the personality theory. And so when you start looking at all those pieces, and although none of them are absolutely perfect bang on, they do give us a place to start and looking at those aspects. And when you look at these, like 716 different personalities, and there's 1212 pairs or modus operandi is in the Colby system. They haven't really defined for emotional intelligence. And then of course, for general intelligence, we've got the good old IQ. So when you know that people don't fit into that, there's so many options and you start figuring out in probability theory, you get to appreciate that people are really unique, and how they look at the world and how they act in the world can be very different from yours. So they're going to do differently.   Michael Hingson  24:17 How do we get people to start to understand that each of us has gifts, we don't all have the same gifts, and that's okay. Yeah. How do we get people to start to think more about that that's a reasonable premise to have. Well, certainly   Lynn Teatro  24:34 advocating within the the Council for persons with disabilities, I'm on the board of directors there and helping people understand that people can live rich full lives, and have a disability, and also comparing and being. I'm very vocal about how I act in the world now that I know how I act in the world. And I'm one of those that you know, I make a decision and it's zoom. Let's get into it. And so I'm an instigator. I think I take initiative fairly quickly. But I'm also a researcher. The follow through part, the follow through part, completing things is not my forte. Since grade one, my report card said, Lin does not complete her homework. And even in university, I was sliding, resurrect projects and essays under the professor's door date, the next morning, rather than on the day it was, it was expected. I'm getting better at that challenging kid, a challenging kid. And I think that's another thing too, is that a lot of parents want their kids to behave. But don't realize that the things that drive the parents crazy are the things that do them in most they're going to need as adults. I mean, I'm, I'm was stubborn. My mom tried to teach me with the hairbrush, the flyswatter on my there, but with her bare hands to get, you know, I wasn't supposed to be stubborn I was supposed to do as I was told. And she didn't beat that out of me. That's still there, I am still stubborn. I choose my battles now. But when I get my toes dug in, I'm there. I'm not budging. Unless you give me a really good reason to. I wasn't one of those kids that that took, because I said so as a reason. I'd like to know why.   Michael Hingson  26:34 We you have obviously pushed the envelope in a lot of ways. And there isn't anything wrong with that. There's nothing wrong with exploring and doing things differently. If it works, and if it makes sense. At the same time, obviously, you need to sort of analyze what's happening and decide whether you really made the right choice, I would assume. And then that's what sort of leads you to continue on whatever path you're on.   Lynn Teatro  27:02 So I want to pause right now, working with CPD. And one of the things that we're doing it come fall is talk to people with disabilities, about their lives that are rich and fulfilling. Despite their disability. I worked with a young woman a couple of years ago, in, in teaching her public speaking. And she went on to university and because she was visually impaired, she got so many people telling Well, it's going to take take longer, don't be hard on yourself. And she just graduated this year, she and she got Miss personality and couple of other distinguished awards. So she she went through with flying colors, like there was just no holding her back. And I was just upset with people who try to you know, they thought they were doing or good by saying you know, don't, don't set your expectations too high. But mi. And they you know, if you only make it to the seventh rung on the ladder, you aim for the fifth one, you're still up there. They're still up there. It's a success.   Michael Hingson  28:23 And then you can decide if you want to try to go for the eighth run more than that's run. Yep. Well, how did you get back into being comfortable with public speaking, you said earlier that you were not very comfortable speaking publicly. How did you fix that?   Lynn Teatro  28:36 Oh, when I left my sexist at my second husband, he was very abusive and controlling. And when he threatened to punch my daughter, my 13 year old daughter, shoved up against the kitchen counter and had his fist raised and was, you know, the angry red face? And I said, Nope, that's enough. So I made plans for them to move out. And so when I left him, I joined Toastmasters shortly after we moved and the first speech I did with Toastmasters was I was hiding behind the lectern. And I had it all written out and I read it word for word. And two years later, I was doing impromptu speaking contests and there's a trophy in Toronto with my name on it for impromptu speaking. So I went up the four levels for for table topics. And I'm quite proud of that   Michael Hingson  29:24 reaction. What kind of reaction did you get to that first speech since you were reading it all? What? What sorts of things did they say to you?   Lynn Teatro  29:31 Well, Toastmasters is a very supportive environment. Yeah, they that first speech is just tell us about yourself. And you know, with my colorful past, I didn't want to do a dump on you know, my life's been rough. So it took me a long time to figure out exactly what I would talk about. And but they were very supportive and talked about the things that were good and I'm a good writer, so I had had good language in my speech. And they pointed out a few other things that I did. But at least, you know, they got me out there and trying. And so the next speech was a little errand easier. And the next one after that was easier and and now I have to go back and learn how to prepare a speech properly rather than winging it. Most of the time,   Michael Hingson  30:17 I have found that I do a lot better at speaking, when I'm not reading a prepared speech, as such, oh, notes are one thing, having an outline is one thing. But reading a prepared speech. When I first started, people told me, that's what I needed to do. And I did it once. And one of the things that I always have done is to record my speeches, because I want to listen to how I sound. And I do that with these podcasts as well, because I want to look for habits that I need to break and so on. I think that I analyze myself pretty well, as well as listening to what others say. But I think that I have enough experience that I do get to do great analysis, I don't want to say I'm my own worst critic, because I don't think that that's really accurate. you're analyzing and looking for what's good and what's not. And it doesn't need to be a criticism. But anyway, I listened to that speech that I read, and I went, Oh, my gosh, this guy sounds horrible. And it was, it's, it doesn't sound the same. So I have learned to give speeches without reading it and writing everything down. And there have been times that that's actually been extremely invaluable, as you say, doing extemporaneous or impromptu speeches or prepared speeches, where you're still delivering something where you're talking with the audience, if you well, as opposed to reading it, so that you're making eye contact and communicating because that way, you are much more directly connected with your audience.   Lynn Teatro  31:59 And I hope you get to use your hands. I'm a person who uses my hands a lot when I'm talking. So if I'm holding a paper, I don't get the same. I don't deliver the same energy.   Michael Hingson  32:09 Yeah, I don't use my hands a lot. I recognize that I work on it some. But I do tend to want to make sure that I am communicating. And oftentimes will say things to get audience reactions. And I know when I'm connecting to an audience based on how they react to different things that I might say, and that's good, because I really want the audience to be engaged. I'm I'm a firm believer, and you don't talk to an audience. You talk with an audience.   Lynn Teatro  32:40 Yes, it's a it's a conversation. And even though there's not a lot of words coming from the audience, you still can get responses from them by asking questions and making them laugh. Get your responses that way,   Michael Hingson  32:55 among other things. Yeah, absolutely. So you went off and you learn to speak publicly, which is really cool. And I'm sure that that helped in raising your children. Yeah. Because you became more confident?   Lynn Teatro  33:10 Yes. Public speaking ability is certainly, certainly connected to confidence. And when you have confidence, you're gonna be able to public speak without a lot of prompting. And if you have, if you're not comfortable public speaking, then you're not always confident either. So there's a direct relationship between the two of them.   Michael Hingson  33:32 Right. Now, again, what's the organization that you're working with now that deals with disabilities?   Lynn Teatro  33:38 It's called the Council for persons with disabilities. I'm on the board of directors. We did actually, I was on a on a little cruise today on our little lake here in Peterborough. And we went up part of the Trent Severn waterway, and we'd have lunch before and we had about six people in wheelchairs and about seven people who are visually impaired, and we had friends and we had a blast.   Michael Hingson  34:03 Yeah, and I liked and I gotta say, I liked the way you say vision impaired because visually, it doesn't really matter whether you're blind or sighted, you're you're not visually different, but visually impaired or low vision is a lot more accurate. I think that low vision is probably even a more accurate thing. When you talk to people who are deaf. They like deaf or hard of hearing, they don't really like even hearing impaired. So blind and low vision. And the reality is it's all part of the same thing. And it gets back to what we talked about before, which is recognizing that everyone has gifts. Mm hmm. How did you get connected with CPD at the   Lynn Teatro  34:42 Chamber of Commerce? Oh, actually, yeah, actually. Yeah, it was the Chamber of Commerce because Jason who is the heart and soul of CPD, came to business meetings that I attended. And he invited me to participate. The only people who can participate in CPD has to have lived experience with disability. So if you're completely able bodied, then you can't join. Unless, unless you would like me, you've had somebody in your family that's been disabled.   Michael Hingson  35:13 And I love to have fun saying the reality is whether people like it or not every sighted person has a disability because you're light dependent. You don't do well on the dark. But we cover that with technology. It doesn't change the reality, though, that you still have the disability. But that's okay.   Lynn Teatro  35:29 Yeah, yeah, we're just we're just people, people with different skills and abilities, different weaknesses, and superpowers were just made different. And I love differences. I think the world doesn't want to have me in it. I think they're very happy that there's just one of me.   Michael Hingson  35:49 Yeah. And there's one of each of us. And it's important that we look at that and recognize that. So are you still working in, in a job somewhere or what?   Lynn Teatro  36:00 Actually, my mom passed away last year at the age of 88. And given that our family doesn't tend to live long. I think, well, I thought this is this is this is something to aspire to, my mum was going to be 88 or was 88 when she died? And I decided, Okay, I've got 22 years, what am I going to do with those 22 years. So I'm developing a program for dropout students, I was appalled when I was University. I, I knew what it was like for me to get there. So when I heard that there was a 30% dropout rate. for first year students, I was appalled. So I decided that I'm going to do something about that. So I've developed a program to help build confidence. It's got some public speaking elements, but it's also about getting to know yourself better to find those superpowers. We all know our weaknesses, because we've been told what our weaknesses are, yeah, whether they're real or not, whether they're real or not. And some sometimes the weaknesses aren't really weaknesses, it's just people present our superpowers because it doesn't fit for them, like my stubbornness. So yeah, to help them learn to understand themselves better. So that's what I'm doing right now. And I'm also doing a program called My voice counts to for focusing on adults. And I have people who come in, and the nine broad areas that I've identified as where students can become, become, start to struggle, the nine different reasons. So I've inviting people who have experienced in those nine different reasons and doing interviews with them, and they're sort of semi educational. And if somebody comes to me with a problem, I want to be able to send them to it, because I know that I'm working on the confidentiality and or confidence, confidence and and class engagement part.   Michael Hingson  37:50 How do you? How did you transition to that from what you were doing before?   Lynn Teatro  37:55 Um, well, my background in public speaking certainly helps. But again, I like to learn so taking my learning and putting it to practical use on my own. My own way, is is mine Urbana. I like to I like to be independent. So yeah, it was it was an easy transition is, well, not an easy one. It's doing it is easy, but making it profitable. And getting the word out there is a bit of a challenge.   Michael Hingson  38:26 Is it basically now your own business as opposed to working then for someone else?   Lynn Teatro  38:32 Exactly.   Michael Hingson  38:35 So when did you leave working for other people to do this full time?   Lynn Teatro  38:39 Actually, the partner, my last partner, yes, I've been married three times. My last partner had Crohn's disease. And he wasn't very good at cooking. And so it ended up that I stayed at home and did the domestic stuff. And we renovated the house too. So I helped with that. And I did the meal portion and supported him so that and he was making the better money. So that's how it worked out. For him to retire early because of his illness wasn't the best financial thing and he needed to be out of the house. Anyway. He's a very, very much an extrovert. Uh huh. So yeah, I quit working for social services at that time.   Michael Hingson  39:18 How long ago was that?   Lynn Teatro  39:20 That was about 15 years ago.   Michael Hingson  39:22 Okay. So you left working and stayed at home? When did you when are you still with that partners? He   Lynn Teatro  39:32 No, I'm not. No. Unfortunately, see, became a very angry man as his illness progressed, and he was becoming very, very abusive verbally. So I left and moved to Peterborough and what did some contract work I've with Toastmasters. I've helped develop conferences. So I took those skills and did some, some contract work for a couple of agencies here and social services agencies here in town.   Michael Hingson  39:59 How long To go to start the business then   40:01 was certainly after I moved into Peterborough. So 10 years ago.   40:06 Okay. All right. So you've been doing it for a while and becoming successful? Have you written any books or created? I gather, you've created some courses and so on around it. Have you written any books or done anything that's been published yet?   Lynn Teatro  40:21 I have been doing a lot of writing. You got a taste of that when you asked for those eight questions. Your vote Yeah,   Michael Hingson  40:31 the bio you sent me definitely does sound like three chapters of your autobiography.   Lynn Teatro  40:38 So yeah, I'm keeping on to everything I write, sometimes I just need to get it down and let it go. So that I can focus on what really needs to happen. So I'm not throwing that stuff away. I'm keeping it. And it will go into probably two books, one a, an autobiography, and another one about college confidence and what students need to succeed and why we need to support the current generation because our world is in turmoil. We, most of us, who are educated, recognizing is recognized that there is climate change, and it's causing devastating problems around the world. We've got, we've got we've still got war happening, why do we have wars, and then we've got poverty, we've got poverty here. In first world countries, it's the minority, but there's still there are conceptions around mental health, it's still you know, give them a pill and send them home. Yeah, people haven't learned to adopt. So we need well educated, passionate people taking over this world. And the only way we do can do that is for them to know who they are, that they are confident in what they're doing, and that they learn as much as they possibly can so that they can bring their skills and knowledge and superpowers into the next generation.   Michael Hingson  41:59 So how does what you do? Work? Exactly? Do you have an office? And do you bring people in? Is it online?   Lynn Teatro  42:09 I do I do. I do small group coaching, six to eight participants, because we're dealing with people who are not confidence. And so I want to I want to keep it to small groups, I will I also do one on one coaching. I'm developing some webinars for parents so that they will have some insights as to how to prepare their children for later for, for leaving the nest. And doing and I'm going to be doing my My voice counts too, for students so that I can bring in people who can help them directly. If they feel they need it. Do you   Michael Hingson  42:50 do it online or in person online? Do you just work mainly with people near where you are? Or do you have people all over?   Lynn Teatro  43:00 I am calling people from all over the place. One of the people that I like to refer people to people to lives in the state, but actually two of them live in the States. The one that I that I send to for parenting advice into how to communicate with your child is a speech language pathologist. And then I've got someone who does the Colby the cognitive assessments to help children under them understand themselves and to help parents understand their students. And she also works within the schools to help teachers understand their students so that they can recognize that no, just because children don't do something, the way that they think it should be done. It doesn't mean it's the wrong way. The important thing is getting it done.   Michael Hingson  43:45 Do some of the measuring technologies and systems that we use today, like IQ, for example, do those get in the way,   Lynn Teatro  43:54 I wish I'd had my data, I knew what my IQ was. Because, you know, my marks didn't reflect my intelligence. And my intelligence certainly wasn't cultivated. I mean, I think we had about 12 books in our home library, and black and white TV. I remember, when I was five, my grandmother took me through zip cellars in the toy department. And there was all these white dolls. And then there was one black one and I was that shocked me. Because I had never seen a person of color in my whole life didn't know they existed. So that was my first experience with you know, racism, because I was shocked. So I didn't have any experience i The the role models I had in my life for teachers and nurses and farmer's wives and was taught to bake and cook and do all those sorts of things. And that's what I was praised on not my intellect and my ability to write write reports. And so yeah, I wish I'd known They asked,   Michael Hingson  45:01 I asked the question, because I've heard from some people, I think we've interviewed a couple people here on the podcast that have said, The problem is that IQ isn't necessarily the best way, or the way we measure intelligence is necessarily the best way to really determine how intelligent a person is, I think   Lynn Teatro  45:21 one of the problems with being identified as intelligent is that those who are relying more on their strengths, and don't it's they don't recognize that process. It's not just the intellect, but you have to do the process, you have to start doing the research, you have to compile your papers, and you have to, to be able to spew that you have learned the knowledge and why it's important. So IQ, knowing that you've got good intelligence can get in the way. And there is some research being done that suggests that intelligence is fluid that we can actually build our, on our intelligence, and I'm going to be incorporating that those notions into my group work from now on. So that, yeah, starting to look at that part. And it's keep in the college confidence part. So it's, it's going to be, yeah, get to know yourself, be aware of your weaknesses and fight through them. And you will succeed.   Michael Hingson  46:19 Definitely learn what your perceived weaknesses are, and and see what you can do to change them. Yeah, we all have perceived liabilities. And I put it that way, because I think that is really the case, we often talk about what it is we can't do. The question is, how real is it or how much of a perception is it the whole concept of, as I say, in sales turn perceived liabilities into assets, I learned that from the Dale Carnegie sales course, when I first learned to sell back in 1979. The kind of idea of turning those perceived liabilities into assets, whether it's in selling, or just in our mindset, is extremely important. Because most of the time, the things that we think we can't do our our perceptions, and there may very well be things that we can't do a person who happens to be who lives in a wheelchair. And if they're a quadriplegic, they're not going to be able to walk upstairs. Now technology is changing some of that by introducing some mechanisms that can help do that. And that is perfectly okay. But that's still why it's a perceived liability, turn it into an asset, well, I don't want to walk up the stairs, I've got this great technology. And look, it just brings me up the stairs in a very effective way. Isn't that what you want is someone who's open to looking at alternatives to help you in terms of what it is that is going on in your company, or a blind person who applies for a sales job. And it's kind of one of my favorite examples of saying, well, you're blind, you can't really sell. What do you mean, I sell all the time just to be able to get things done and to live in the world? So do you really want to hire somebody who just sells a little bit every day? Or do you want to hire somebody who truly understands that we sell all the time just as a way of life, turning perceived liabilities into assets is something that we really ought to do a lot more of than we do collectively. And individually?   Lynn Teatro  48:24 I like to say, I try not to use the word can't I choose to or use the word I choose not to? For because for me that change changes perception. It's like okay, why do I choose not to? Is it just because I don't want to? Or is it because I'd have to work harder to do it. You know, what's, what's my reasoning for choosing not to?   Michael Hingson  48:45 I'm a Star Wars and Yoda fan? There is no try do or do not do not? Do or do not? There is no try. And I think that's extremely important to take to heart actually. So it is always a matter of choice. The the can't only is maybe we haven't invented something yet. Or maybe we don't know of what's already been invented. But that's not so much a can't as we don't have what we need yet. But that doesn't mean we can't go create it.   Lynn Teatro  49:21 Exactly. And it turns out, you know, rather than immutable facts, it's just we haven't we haven't found a solution yet. It turns it into a problem. Right problems have have solutions.   Michael Hingson  49:37 Problems always have solutions. We have to find them. What are some of your biggest successes you feel from what you've been doing then with with your teachings and so on for the past several years.   Lynn Teatro  49:52 My biggest success was the young woman who went on to university despite and did well, too. didn't let other people hold her back. She she went through my program,   Michael Hingson  50:05 what is she doing today?   50:06 She just graduated and it's in a childcare. That's when she got her degree. And so she's now working, working. She's looking for a job right now, just like everybody else. But hopefully now that COVID have over and done with your almost over and done with that. Child care facilities, they'll be open up, and she'll find something that's makes her happy.   50:31 It's still exciting that she has progressed so far, and won't hopefully lose any of that spirit will be able to take it to the job.   50:40 Well, she won't lose that spirit, as long as I'm in is connected with her   50:45 good for you? Well, it is important to get that support system and there's nothing wrong with having a good support system to help one, especially when one gets to feel a little frustrated.   51:00 Yeah, and support systems encourage and suggest they don't take over.   51:06 Right. It is called support for a reason. And, and having discussions working together. You never know what you're going to create to   51:17 Oh, yes, yes. I'm a good brainstorm. But if I've got other people in the room talking again, it's like I can take one other ideas and find offshoots from that and other people can do that too. So, the more people you have involved the the ideas and solutions exponentially rise.   51:39 What brought you to attend podapalooza, this last time,   Lynn Teatro  51:42 I'm doing my facebook live program. And I thought that a lot of the application ideas, a lot of the things that we would learn for that I can apply to Facebook as easily as I can for PATA Palooza, and also, I'm going to be taking my Facebook Lives and editing them and and probably making a broadcast out of them.   Michael Hingson  52:01 Tell us about tell us about the Facebook Live program.   Lynn Teatro  52:05 It's it's being rekindled, I've moved three times in the last seven months. So it kind of got lost in the shuffle there. But it's being rekindled. And I'm inviting people off on who have experience in and helping students thrive. In the end the various areas that I that the nine areas. You know, life skills is huge. Being independent and surviving is huge financing. Money control is huge, good stuff. Exercise, one of the things that I did right was get into the swimming pool once a day and do 100 likes. So I went into the campus during the day spent the whole day there did my work. But my noon hour was spent in the pool doing 100 lengths, and I totally avoided the freshman 15 pound gain and and exercise is so good for the for the body and mind. And it's also an opportunity for my mind to shut down and sort of do a meditation, a swimming, counting meditation, right? And swimming isn't everybody's, but you've got to have something that just gets you out of that. That homework studying overwhelms mode.   Michael Hingson  53:22 I enjoy even doing just home chores around here, whether it's doing the washing, which is easier for me to do doing a lot of the cooking, which has become easier for me to do and harder for Karen to do and so on. Because I can do those without having to concentrate and apply a lot of mental pressure. So I can, as you say, relax and meditate or listen to a book or read a book and do other things to take my mind off what normally goes on during the day. And that is so helpful to do. We don't spend enough time just cutting back our mental activity and thinking about what's going on, or at the end of the day doing self analysis to really let ourselves think about what happened that day. And how did it all go? And what can I learn from it really is something that we need to do more of,   Lynn Teatro  54:15 and count our successes for the day. Yeah, we all say most of us look at what what didn't get done, or instead of what did I get done. Because sometimes the reasons why you didn't get something done was because something else came up and you did a really good job of supporting a friend or, or taking out a client that really needed you or however it worked. So you have to count those successes.   Michael Hingson  54:38 The other part about it is though, that even if you have something that you didn't do well that day, going back and looking at it and saying what could I have done better about this? Because we focus so much on the failure that we don't look about what we don't look at what we did learn or what we could learn until we analyze it and that's why I am a major proponent of analyze at the end of the day, and do self analysis of all aspects of your day. Because it really does make a big difference. Well, anyway. So does your Facebook Live program have a name?   55:16 It's called My voice counts to the parents edition. And it's on my Facebook page page called My voice counts too   Michael Hingson  55:23 too as in too?   Lynn Teatro  55:26 the page is called to Oh, yeah, my hashtag is hashtag MVC. And the number two,   Michael Hingson  55:33 the number two. Well, that's, that leads me to my next question, which is if people would like to reach out to you and learn more about you and all that, how do they do that?   Lynn Teatro  55:44 Well, they can find me on Facebook. I think there's about five of us. But if I'm the one with red hair, probably not too many Lynne teatros with red hair, and I'm based in Peterborough. And yeah, I think can find me on Facebook. You can also email me at Lynn.teatro@gmail.com.   Michael Hingson  56:04 Can you spell that please?   Lynn Teatro  56:05 It's l y n n dot? T isn't Tom? E an echo A is an alpha T is and Tom, R and Romeo. O, as an Oscar at@gmail.com gmail.com again.   Michael Hingson  56:19 Okay. So if people are interested in your question, other ways, or other things that you want people to be able to have in the way of accessing you.   Lynn Teatro  56:28 My website isn't up yet. I'm having glitches with glitches with the male. So otherwise, I'd be talking about that. But when it is up, it's my voice.counts two with the number two.com. And Lynn at, My voice counts to the number two.com. But give me a,   Michael Hingson  56:46 we, if we can help you make it accessible, we'd love to explore that. And you probably have some familiarity with that. But with accessibe, we can probably make that a lot easier and a lot less expensive to   Lynn Teatro  56:57 that's certainly something that I want it to be is accessible. My I'm pretty good with technology. But I'm finding that I'm getting bogged down in it right now. And and I'm sort of setting it aside for pursuits that that come a little bit easier to me.   Michael Hingson  57:13 There are still only so many hours in the day. Yep, I want to thank you again for being here. I want to definitely, in the future, hear more about how things are going as you get everything up and running your website and so on. And if there is any way that we can be supportive that I'd like to do that. I know you asked me about being on the Facebook Live program, and I am looking forward to that when you're ready to do that.   Lynn Teatro  57:40 Well, I talked you up today at the CPD adventure and people know you few of them have read your book and are quite excited to know that you're going to be on   Michael Hingson  57:51 well in a way that we can help them be supportive, whether it's through that program or whatever, let me know. And I hope that you'll tell them all about unstoppable mindset, they can listen to it. And of course, when yours comes up, that'll motivate them more but if they'd like to go listen to it now, as most people here know, you can find it wherever you can find podcasts and they can also visit Michael hingson.com/podcast Michael Hanson has m i c h a e l h i n g s o n.com/podcast. But it's available wherever podcasts are, which is really cool. So they can binge listen. As of today. Actually, no tomorrow, it'll be 43 episodes that are up. So we're really excited and we really appreciate you being on today. And again, just if people would like to reach out to me, I'd love to hear from you. We want to know what you think. Please feel free to email me Michaelhi, m i c h a e l h i  at accessibe a c c e s s i b e.com. Let us know your thoughts and please give us a five star rating give Lynn a five star rating for being on the podcast and being very unstoppable. And her stubbornness and everything else. But we really do want to thank you for being here again.   Lynn Teatro  59:12 Well, thank you so much, Michael.   Lynn Teatro  59:14 It's an honor. deines.   Michael Hingson  59:15 Great.   Michael Hingson  59:17 It's been fun. Well, we'll have to do some more of it. Right. That sounds like an excellent plan. Yeah. And I'm sure you have other people that maybe we should be talking with as well. Don't hesitate to have them reach out. We'd love to chat with other people. So I've   Lynn Teatro  59:30 got a couple of in mind. I've a friend of mine as a blind artist, blind visual artist. And then there's there's Jason King who's just Yeah, love them to bits. He's just the Miracle Worker fruit and the heart and soul of CPD. He just knows I love to   Michael Hingson  59:48 meet him. Yeah. Well, we'd love to meet him and have a chance to chat as well. Well, thank you again. And we hope that you and everyone else will join us again next week for another episode of unstoppable mindset. Again thanks very much,   Lynn Teatro  1:00:03 Thanks Michael.   Michael Hingson  1:00:09 You have been listening to the Unstoppable Mindset podcast. Thanks for dropping by. I hope that you'll join us again next week, and in future weeks for upcoming episodes. To subscribe to our podcast and to learn about upcoming episodes, please visit www dot Michael hingson.com slash podcast. Michael Hingson is spelled m i c h a e l h i n g s o n. While you're on the site., please use the form there to recommend people who we ought to interview in upcoming editions of the show. And also, we ask you and urge you to invite your friends to join us in the future. If you know of any one or any organization needing a speaker for an event, please email me at speaker at Michael hingson.com. I appreciate it very much. To learn more about the concept of blinded by fear, please visit www dot Michael hingson.com forward slash blinded by fear and while you're there, feel free to pick up a copy of my free eBook entitled blinded by fear. The unstoppable mindset podcast is provided by access cast an initiative of accessiBe and is sponsored by accessiBe. Please visit www.accessibe.com. accessiBe is spelled a c c e s s i b e. There you can learn all about how you can make your website inclusive for all persons with disabilities and how you can help make the internet fully inclusive by 2025. Thanks again for listening. Please come back and visit us again next week.

Bonita Radio
Domingo Emanuelli pierde caso contra Ex Fiscal Parra

Bonita Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 75:27


119 watching now Premiere in progress. Started 57 minutes ago Los cañones del Departamento de Justicia son enfilados en medios tradicionales contra Janet Parra por sus acusaciones en torno a la debacle en funcionamiento de la agencia. Conversamos con la ex directora de la División de Crimen Organizado y traemos información de cómo trabajan hoy los fiscales de Justicia. ¿Que hace Domingo Emanuelli para evitar que el pueblo siga desconfiando de la agencia que se supone que imparta justicia? En medio de esto, los ex candidatos de MVC y PIP, Manuel Natal Albelo y Adrian González Costa, respectivamente, cuestionan el no referido de políticos del #PNP para investigarse por actividad con asfalto en campaña electoral 2020. #periodismodigital #periodismoindependiente

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60. Taking a Walk on the Wild Side with Dr. Angela Lennox | MVC Preview Series

Fully Vetted

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 22:44


2023 MIDWEST VETERINARY CONFERENCE PREVIEW SERIES Admit it: You always dreamed about caring for exotic animals, even if you didn't end up working at your local zoo or wildlife center. On today's episode, get a glimpse into life as an exotic animal veterinarian—and a sneak peek at the 2023 Midwest Veterinary Conference! Dr. Angela Lennox joins us on this episode to preview her MVC sessions in the Pet Animal Exotics track, which will focus on exotic companion mammal medicine. But that's not all she works with! Listen in to hear her stories about treating everything from hamsters to tigers. =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= For show notes, a transcript, and to learn more about today's guests, please visit www.fullyvettedpodcast.com. =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= ✱ Never miss an episode! Subscribe to email alerts » --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/fully-vetted/message

El Resaltador de la Realidad
Ep. 111 La coalición los tiene nerviosos

El Resaltador de la Realidad

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 71:32


En este episodio hablamos sobre el notorio caso del asesinato del trapero #KevinFret en enero de 2019 donde la exgobernadora Wanda Vázquez (en aquel momento Secretaria de Justicia0 ordenó alegadamente detener el caso. El rapero #Ozuna fue señalado por la madre de Kevin Fret como el responsable de la muerte de su hijo. Además hablamos sobre la posible coalicón entre el PIP y el MVC, ¿llegará esa #AlianzaDePaís que tanto necesitamos? - - - ¿T e gusta nuestro contenido? Apóyanos convirtiéndote en un Patreon y tendrás acceso a contenido EXCLUSIVO para ti y otros beneficios. Accede a www.patreon.com/elresaltadordelarealidad o en la app como El Resaltador de la Realidad #podcast #podcastenespañol #podcastpuertorico #podcastpuertorriqueño #contenidopr #cienciaspolíticas #política #sátirapolítica #cómics #historia #blog #blogenespañol #podcastdepolítica #historiadepuertorico #puertorico #películas #series #tvseries #streaming #gaming #geek #movies --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/elresaltadordelarealidad/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/elresaltadordelarealidad/support

Palabra Libre
Episodio 107 - Medio millón sin contar los fotutos

Palabra Libre

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2022 114:51


Continúa la campaña “Adopta un fotuto”, el medio millón de descargas de Palabra Libre, la corrupción de la justicia en Puerto Rico, las declaraciones de la fiscal Betzaida Quiñones sobre los casos de asesinato del artista urbano Kevin Fret y del abogado Carlos Cotto Cartagena, la manipulación del Departamento de Justicia a través de la exjefa de fiscales Olga Castellón y de la exsecretaria de justicia, y luego exgobernadora, Wanda Vázquez, “La Comay” como fuente de información del secretario de Justicia Domingo Emanuelli, los señalamientos de corrupción realizados por los abogados Mayra López Mulero y Leo Aldridge, la asamblea del Partido Popular Democrático en el sector La Muda de Caguas, la conferencia de prensa de Juan Dalmau y Manuel Natal para una coalición entre el PIP y MVC, la historia de las alianzas políticas en Puerto Rico, las elecciones de mitad de término en EEUU y el triunfo de Lula Da Silva en Brasil. Conducido por Néstor Duprey Salgado y Eduardo Lalo. Síguenos en las redes: Twitter: @PalabraLibrePR, Facebook: Palabra Libre PR Página web: Palabra Libre – Más allá del bipartidismo (palabralibrepr.com) -- Colaboradores: Librería El Candil (www.libreriaelcandil.com), Música: Cafêzz (www.cafezzmusic.com) y Bambola Juguetes (bambolajuguetes.com)

The College Football Experience
FCS College Football Week 10 Preview & Picks (Ep. 1188)

The College Football Experience

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 62:07


The College Football Experience (@TCEonSGPN) on the Sports Gambling Podcast Network previews the upcoming Week 10 college football slate for the FCS. Pick Dundee aka (@TheColbyD) breaks down each and every game on the FCS College Football slate and keys in on his top plays and biggest games of the weekend. Will the Richmond Spiders and Reece Udinski get a huge CAA win over the conference leading New Hampshire Wildcats?  Can Asher O'Hara and the Sacramento State Hornets pick up a huge road win in the elements against Bronson Barron and the Weber State Wildcats? Will Mitch Davidson and the Youngstown State Penguins take down the Illinois State Redbirds and Zack Annexstad in a big MVC game? Can Bubba McDowell and the Prairie View A&M Panthers cover the spread on Friday night against Aaron Allen and the Alcorn State Braves?  Will Matthew Sluka and the Holy Cross Crusaders stay undefeated as they host Gaige Garcia and the Lehigh Mountain Hawks? Will Bronson Yoder and William & Mary stay at the top of the CAA after a road test against Malcolm Mayes and the Hampton Pirates? Can Xavier Shepherd and the Kennesaw State Owls win a critical road game against Dresser Winn and the UT Martin Skyhawks?  Is St. Thomas and Cade Sexauer on the verge of going 8-1 after taking on Aaron Dawson and the Valparaiso Crusaders? Could Gunner Talkington and the Eastern Washington Eagles be a live dog against Gevani McCoy and the Idaho Vandals? Can Tommy Mellott and the Montana State Bobcats stay undefeated in FCS play when they head to Flagstaff, Arizona to take on RJ Martinez and the Northern Arizona Lumberjacks? Will Jaxon Janke and the South Dakota State Jackrabbits avoid a road loss against Theo Day and the Northern Iowa Panthers? Will Deion Sanders and Jackson State stay undefeated Derek Morton and the Texas Southern Tigers? We talk it all and more on this Week 10 FCS edition of The College Football Experience.  SGPN Merch Store - https://sg.pn/store Download The Free SGPN App - https://sgpn.app WynnBET - Bet $100 and get a $100 FREE bet! - https://sg.pn/WynnBET Follow The College Experience & SGPN On Social Media Twitter - https://twitter.com/TCEonSGPN Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/gamblingpodcast Instagram - http://www.instagram.com/sportsgamblingpodcast TikTok - https://www.tiktok.com/@gamblingpodcast Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/sportsgamblingpodcast   Follow The Hosts On Social Media Colby Dant - http://www.twitter.com/thecolbyd Patty C - https://twitter.com/PattyC831 NC Nick - https://twitter.com/NC__NicK   Watch the Sports Gambling Podcast YouTube - https://www.sg.pn/YouTube Twitch - https://www.sg.pn/Twitch   Read & Discuss - Join the conversation Website - https://www.sportsgamblingpodcast.com Discord - https://sg.pn/discord Reddit - https://www.sg.pn/reddit   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Sports Gambling Podcast Network
FCS College Football Week 10 Preview & Picks | The College Football Experience (Ep. 1188)

Sports Gambling Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 62:07


The College Football Experience (@TCEonSGPN) on the Sports Gambling Podcast Network previews the upcoming Week 10 college football slate for the FCS. Pick Dundee aka (@TheColbyD) breaks down each and every game on the FCS College Football slate and keys in on his top plays and biggest games of the weekend. Will the Richmond Spiders and Reece Udinski get a huge CAA win over the conference leading New Hampshire Wildcats?  Can Asher O'Hara and the Sacramento State Hornets pick up a huge road win in the elements against Bronson Barron and the Weber State Wildcats? Will Mitch Davidson and the Youngstown State Penguins take down the Illinois State Redbirds and Zack Annexstad in a big MVC game? Can Bubba McDowell and the Prairie View A&M Panthers cover the spread on Friday night against Aaron Allen and the Alcorn State Braves?  Will Matthew Sluka and the Holy Cross Crusaders stay undefeated as they host Gaige Garcia and the Lehigh Mountain Hawks? Will Bronson Yoder and William & Mary stay at the top of the CAA after a road test against Malcolm Mayes and the Hampton Pirates? Can Xavier Shepherd and the Kennesaw State Owls win a critical road game against Dresser Winn and the UT Martin Skyhawks?  Is St. Thomas and Cade Sexauer on the verge of going 8-1 after taking on Aaron Dawson and the Valparaiso Crusaders? Could Gunner Talkington and the Eastern Washington Eagles be a live dog against Gevani McCoy and the Idaho Vandals? Can Tommy Mellott and the Montana State Bobcats stay undefeated in FCS play when they head to Flagstaff, Arizona to take on RJ Martinez and the Northern Arizona Lumberjacks? Will Jaxon Janke and the South Dakota State Jackrabbits avoid a road loss against Theo Day and the Northern Iowa Panthers? Will Deion Sanders and Jackson State stay undefeated Derek Morton and the Texas Southern Tigers? We talk it all and more on this Week 10 FCS edition of The College Football Experience.  SGPN Merch Store - https://sg.pn/store Download The Free SGPN App - https://sgpn.app WynnBET - Bet $100 and get a $100 FREE bet! - https://sg.pn/WynnBET Follow The College Experience & SGPN On Social Media Twitter - https://twitter.com/TCEonSGPN Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/gamblingpodcast Instagram - http://www.instagram.com/sportsgamblingpodcast TikTok - https://www.tiktok.com/@gamblingpodcast Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/sportsgamblingpodcast   Follow The Hosts On Social Media Colby Dant - http://www.twitter.com/thecolbyd Patty C - https://twitter.com/PattyC831 NC Nick - https://twitter.com/NC__NicK   Watch the Sports Gambling Podcast YouTube - https://www.sg.pn/YouTube Twitch - https://www.sg.pn/Twitch   Read & Discuss - Join the conversation Website - https://www.sportsgamblingpodcast.com Discord - https://sg.pn/discord Reddit - https://www.sg.pn/reddit   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

En Diario
Miércoles, 2 de noviembre de 2022

En Diario

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 15:48


Las noticias para hoy: LUMA Energy insiste en una mayor cantidad de apagones al año debido al impacto de Fiona en el sistema de energía eléctrica. Además, Gobernador asegura que Justicia tomará cartas en el asunto en la alegada intervención de Wanda Vázquez en caso de Kevin Fret. Y el PIP y el MVC hacen frente común contra la prohibición de alianzas en el Código Electoral.

Puestos pa'l Problema
PPP Extra: Midterm Extravaganza

Puestos pa'l Problema

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 73:45


Presentado por nuestros patroncitos y patroncitas PYME: – Los jabones Don Gato son hechos a mano, sin químicos dañinos ni detergentes. Elaborados con los mejores aceites naturales, esenciales y aromáticos, seguros para la piel. Pruébalos y siente la diferencia. Visítalos ahora en jaboneradongato.com  y al utilizar el código "ppp"  obtienes un 10% de descuento en tu compra. Síguelos en sus redes facebook, instagram y twitter como jaboneradongato para mantenerte informado — Roy Chévere, agente de seguros e inversiones. Activo desde el 2009, Roy se especializa en planificar estrategias de retiro y ahorro. Si ya estás pensando en tu futuro, en tu retiro o en proteger a tu familia, Roy te puede ayudar con un plan financiero personalizado para tus necesidades. Ya sea para abrir un plan KEOH, invertir en anualidades o para asegurarte por incapacidad, cáncer u otro escenario catastrófico, Roy tiene lo que necesitas. Comunícate con tu asesor financiero patroncito al 787-209-8441, 787-209-8441. También lo puedes buscar en instagram como Cheverefinancial. Mira qué chévere! - Que se escocote el gobierno, pero jamás tu vida sexual. Capela.love, una tienda de productos para adultos que te ofrece unos juguetitos bien entretenidos que te ayudarán a bajar la presión de las noticias del día. Con empaques discretos y mucho amor y fuete. capela.love Código de 15% de descuento en tu primera compra: PORTATEMAL - Psicóloga Clínica Dra. Gladiminet Lopez , profesora de la universidad Carlos Albizu , oficinas en Levitown y Humacao , terapia Grupal, Individual y de Parejas , Pérdidas (muertes) , adolescentes , niños y adultos (Todo certificada ) Instagram dra.gladiminet.lopez  / 939 272 1231 - A una semana de las elecciones de medio término en EE.UU., nos sentamos con dos amigos del podcast Eliot Tricotti y Francisco Proskauer, para hablar del escenario político; pero antes, analizamos la primera acción concertada de la "Alianza Patria" entre el PIP y MVC. Con Jonathan Lebrón (@SrLebron) y Luis S. Herrero (@lherrero). Sigue a PPP en Twitter, Facebook e Instagram. ¿Te gusta el podcast? ¡Déjanos 5 estrellas! Nuestro logo y camisetas fueron diseñadas por Gabriel René. Síguelo en @gabrielrodz | https://gabrielrene.com Nuestra música fue compuesta por CPR EFFE. Descarga su disco "Treinta y Ocho". ¡Riega la voz! Dile a tus amigos que se pongan al día escuchando PPP.Suscríbete a nuestro Patreon y recibe contenido exclusivo, artículos: https://patreon.com/puestospalproblemaSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The March to the Arch Podcast
22-23 Valley Hoops Preview - Rankings & Awards with Harry Schroeder

The March to the Arch Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 97:20


Baker and Vance conclude their MVC preview with their pre-season rankings and individual awards. Harry Schroeder from ValleyHoopsInsider joins to talk the conference and upcoming season. Banter 0:27 Pre-season Rankings (4:47) Individual Awards (40:15) KenPom View of the Valley (59:06) Harry Schroeder (1:09:30)

The Marketing Remix
Kentico MVC: Making the Switch with a Dual-Site Approach

The Marketing Remix

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 21:22


As a marketer, you know the importance of creating customized content on your website. But it sure takes a lot of time and effort. Here's a shortcut: Kentico 13 MVC. Equal parts powerful CMS and development framework, MVC delivers segmented content personalization, flexible page templates, and SEO improvements. Plus, it's easy to support and scale. Hello, better ROI. In this episode, our own Sr. Director of Web & Platform Solutions, Candice Wyatt, and SEO Strategist, David Lewallen, will guide you through upgrading to Kentico 13 and MVC technology with our innovative dual-site approach. 

In The Circle
Back To The Big 4

In The Circle

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 63:06


It's a new month and a new episode of In The Circle. Today's episode is our look at the upcoming Big 4 Classic, which will take place this weekend in Iowa City. First, we chat with Northern Iowa Head Coach Ryan Jacobs, who has UNI near the top of the MVC for the past three seasons. Coach Jacobs talks with Eric Lopez about the Panthers' outlook in 2023, the ever-changing look of The Valley, and the current outlook of softball within the state of Iowa. He also shares what players to watch for and a strong 2022 that saw UNI make it to the MVC Championship Game.  We then have our conversation with long-time Drake Head Coach Rich Calvert, who has become one of the most tenured coaches in the MVC. He talks about an improving Bulldog program that picked up several Power 5 wins in 2022, his thoughts on the Big 4 Classic, and the Missouri Valley Conference getting even stronger with the additions of Murray State and Belmont.

In The Circle
New Valley, New Horizons

In The Circle

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 65:56


We continue our journey into the Missouri Valley Conference on our latest edition of In The Circle   First, Eric Lopez chats with Murray State Head Coach Kara Amundson. Fresh off an historic 2022 season where they won 40 games, Coach talks with In the Circle about Murray State making the move from the Ohio Valley to the Missouri Valley Conference, She also reflects back on the history making 2022 season, her outlook heading into this upcoming season as well as her playing career at DePaul.   Afterwards, we talk to a coach who was also on pace for an historic season herself. We chat with Belmont's Laura Matthews who also will make the move to the MVC in 2023. Coach Matthews talks about the move from the OVC to the MVC in 2023 as well as a pretty good 2022 season which saw the Bruins win 33 games. She discusses turning the program around as well as being a very diverse sports fan as she roots for the Cubs,Bears, Nashville Predators and Tennessee Titans.

Locked on Women's Basketball
NCAA season is near! Which games are you most looking forward to?

Locked on Women's Basketball

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 36:20


The NCAA women's college basketball season is fast approaching! Host Missy Heidrick takes a look at some changes coming from the NCAA on transfers and the portal while also looking at the conference schedules that have been released for big games in the Big Ten, Big 12, ACC an MVC. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

In The Circle
As We Walk In The Missouri Valley

In The Circle

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 70:02


We are approaching the peak of Fall Ball, and In The Circle will make its way into The Valley; the Missouri Valley Conference, that is.  We begin in Carbondale, Illinois, as we speak with new Southern Illinois Head Coach Jen Sewell. After serving as a longtime assistant under legendary coach Kerri Blaylock, Coach Sewell reflects on her opportunity to lead the Saluki program. She talks about SIU, the outlook for her team in 2023, an always competitive MVC, and much more.  Afterward, we chat with longtime Missouri State Head Coach Holly Hesse. The defending MVC Tournament Champions leader talks to In The Circle about being at Missouri State for 35 years. She also shares her thoughts on the new look of MVC, the 2023 Season outlook, and more.

Sports Open Line
MVC Hoops Preview ft. Commisioner Jeff Jackson

Sports Open Line

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2022 9:51


This a segment from the first hour of Friday night's Sports Open Line. Missouri Valley Conference commissioner Jeff Jackson joins Matt Pauley to preview the upcoming basketball season.

Secure Ventures with Kyle McNulty
FleetDM: Mike McNeill on the BEST Way to Monetize a Product (Open Core)

Secure Ventures with Kyle McNulty

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 41:53


Mike: Founder at FleetDM, helping organizations manage and optimize their OSquery deployments Previously founded Sails.js, the most popular MVC framework for node.js, with over 50 million downloads per year A strong believer in Open Source and Open Core software products Check out the episode for our conversation on open source security software, pivoting from an open source contributor to a full-time founder, and more! Links: https://fleetdm.com/ GitLab article about Open Core: https://about.gitlab.com/company/pricing/

Screaming in the Cloud
The Future of Serverless with Allen Helton

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 39:06


About AllenAllen is a cloud architect at Tyler Technologies. He helps modernize government software by creating secure, highly scalable, and fault-tolerant serverless applications.Allen publishes content regularly about serverless concepts and design on his blog - Ready, Set Cloud!Links Referenced: Ready, Set, Cloud blog: https://readysetcloud.io Tyler Technologies: https://www.tylertech.com/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/allenheltondev Linked: https://www.linkedin.com/in/allenheltondev/ TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at AWS AppConfig. Engineers love to solve, and occasionally create, problems. But not when it's an on-call fire-drill at 4 in the morning. Software problems should drive innovation and collaboration, NOT stress, and sleeplessness, and threats of violence. That's why so many developers are realizing the value of AWS AppConfig Feature Flags. Feature Flags let developers push code to production, but hide that that feature from customers so that the developers can release their feature when it's ready. This practice allows for safe, fast, and convenient software development. You can seamlessly incorporate AppConfig Feature Flags into your AWS or cloud environment and ship your Features with excitement, not trepidation and fear. To get started, go to snark.cloud/appconfig. That's snark.cloud/appconfig.Corey: I come bearing ill tidings. Developers are responsible for more than ever these days. Not just the code that they write, but also the containers and the cloud infrastructure that their apps run on. Because serverless means it's still somebody's problem. And a big part of that responsibility is app security from code to cloud. And that's where our friend Snyk comes in. Snyk is a frictionless security platform that meets developers where they are - Finding and fixing vulnerabilities right from the CLI, IDEs, Repos, and Pipelines. Snyk integrates seamlessly with AWS offerings like code pipeline, EKS, ECR, and more! As well as things you're actually likely to be using. Deploy on AWS, secure with Snyk. Learn more at Snyk.co/scream That's S-N-Y-K.co/screamCorey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. Every once in a while I wind up stumbling into corners of the internet that I previously had not traveled. Somewhat recently, I wound up having that delightful experience again by discovering readysetcloud.io, which has a whole series of, I guess some people might call it thought leadership, I'm going to call it instead how I view it, which is just amazing opinion pieces on the context of serverless, mixed with APIs, mixed with some prognostications about the future.Allen Helton by day is a cloud architect at Tyler Technologies, but that's not how I encountered you. First off, Allen, thank you for joining me.Allen: Thank you, Corey. Happy to be here.Corey: I was originally pointed towards your work by folks in the AWS Community Builder program, of which we both participate from time to time, and it's one of those, “Oh, wow, this is amazing. I really wish I'd discovered some of this sooner.” And every time I look through your back catalog, and I click on a new post, I see things that are either I've really agree with this or I can't stand this opinion, I want to fight about it, but more often than not, it's one of those recurring moments that I love: “Damn, I wish I had written something like this.” So first, you're absolutely killing it on the content front.Allen: Thank you, Corey, I appreciate that. The content that I make is really about the stuff that I'm doing at work. It's stuff that I'm passionate about, stuff that I'd spend a decent amount of time on, and really the most important thing about it for me, is it's stuff that I'm learning and forming opinions on and wants to share with others.Corey: I have to say, when I saw that you were—oh, your Tyler Technologies, which sounds for all the world like, oh, it's a relatively small consultancy run by some guy presumably named Tyler, and you know, it's a petite team of maybe 20, 30 people on the outside. Yeah, then I realized, wait a minute, that's not entirely true. For example, for starters, you're publicly traded. And okay, that does change things a little bit. First off, who are you people? Secondly, what do you do? And third, why have I never heard of you folks, until now?Allen: Tyler is the largest company that focuses completely on the public sector. We have divisions and products for pretty much everything that you can imagine that's in the public sector. We have software for schools, software for tax and appraisal, we have software for police officers, for courts, everything you can think of that runs the government can and a lot of times is run on Tyler software. We've been around for decades building our expertise in the domain, and the reason you probably haven't heard about us is because you might not have ever been in trouble with the law before. If you [laugh] if you have been—Corey: No, no, I learned very early on in the course of my life—which will come as a surprise to absolutely no one who spent more than 30 seconds with me—that I have remarkably little filter and if ten kids were the ones doing something wrong, I'm the one that gets caught. So, I spent a lot of time in the principal's office, so this taught me to keep my nose clean. I'm one of those squeaky-clean types, just because I was always terrified of getting punished because I knew I would get caught. I'm not saying this is the right way to go through life necessarily, but it did have the side benefit of, no, I don't really engage with law enforcement going throughout the course of my life.Allen: That's good. That's good. But one exposure that a lot of people get to Tyler is if you look at the bottom of your next traffic ticket, it'll probably say Tyler Technologies on the bottom there.Corey: Oh, so you're really popular in certain circles, I'd imagine?Allen: Super popular. Yes, yes. And of course, you get all the benefits of writing that code that says ‘if defendant equals Allen Helton then return.'Corey: I like that. You get to have the exception cases built in that no one's ever going to wind up looking into.Allen: That's right. Yes.Corey: The idea of what you're doing makes an awful lot of sense. There's a tremendous need for a wide variety of technical assistance in the public sector. What surprises me, although I guess it probably shouldn't, is how much of your content is aimed at serverless technologies and API design, which to my way of thinking, isn't really something that public sector has done a lot with. Clearly I'm wrong.Allen: Historically, you're not wrong. There's an old saying that government tends to run about ten years behind on technology. Not just technology, but all over the board and runs about ten years behind. And until recently, that's really been true. There was a case last year, a situation last year where one of the state governments—I don't remember which one it was—but they were having a crisis because they couldn't find any COBOL developers to come in and maintain their software that runs the state.And it's COBOL; you're not going to find a whole lot of people that have that skill. A lot of those people are retiring out. And what's happening is that we're getting new people sitting in positions of power and government that want innovation. They know about the cloud and they want to be able to integrate with systems quickly and easily, have little to no onboarding time. You know, there are people in power that have grown up with technology and understand that, well, with everything else, I can be up and running in five or ten minutes. I cannot do this with the software I'm consuming now.Corey: My opinion on it is admittedly conflicted because on the one hand, yeah, I don't think that governments should be running on COBOL software that runs on mainframes that haven't been supported in 25 years. Conversely, I also don't necessarily want them being run like a seed series startup, where, “Well, I wrote this code last night, and it's awesome, so off I go to production with it.” Because I can decide not to do business anymore with Twitter for Pets, and I could go on to something else, like PetFlicks, or whatever it is I choose to use. I can't easily opt out of my government. The decisions that they make stick and that is going to have a meaningful impact on my life and everyone else's life who is subject to their jurisdiction. So, I guess I don't really know where I believe the proper, I guess, pace of technological adoption should be for governments. Curious to get your thoughts on this.Allen: Well, you certainly don't want anything that's bleeding edge. That's one of the things that we kind of draw fine lines around. Because when we're dealing with government software, we're dealing with, usually, critically sensitive information. It's not medical records, but it's your criminal record, and it's things like your social security number, it's things that you can't have leaking out under any circumstances. So, the things that we're building on are things that have proven out to be secure and have best practices around security, uptime, reliability, and in a lot of cases as well, and maintainability. You know, if there are issues, then let's try to get those turned around as quickly as we can because we don't want to have any sort of downtime from the software side versus the software vendor side.Corey: I want to pivot a little bit to some of the content you've put out because an awful lot of it seems to be, I think I'll call it variations on a theme. For example, I just read some recent titles, and to illustrate my point, “Going API First: Your First 30 Days,” “Solutions Architect Tips how to Design Applications for Growth,” “3 Things to Know Before Building A Multi-Tenant Serverless App.” And the common thread that I see running through all of these things are these are things that you tend to have extraordinarily strong and vocal opinions about only after dismissing all of them the first time and slapping something together, and then sort of being forced to live with the consequences of the choices that you've made, in some cases you didn't realize you were making at the time. Are you one of those folks that has the wisdom to see what's coming down the road, or did you do what the rest of us do and basically learn all this stuff by getting it hilariously wrong and having to careen into rebound situations as a result?Allen: [laugh]. I love that question. I would like to say now, I feel like I have the vision to see something like that coming. Historically, no, not at all. Let me talk a little bit about how I got to where I am because that will shed a lot of context on that question.A few years ago, I was put into a position at Tyler that said, “Hey, go figure out this cloud thing.” Let's figure out what we need to do to move into the cloud safely, securely, quickly, all that rigmarole. And so, I did. I got to hand-select team of engineers from people that I worked with at Tyler over the past few years, and we were basically given free rein to learn. We were an R&D team, a hundred percent R&D, for about a year's worth of time, where we were learning about cloud concepts and theory and building little proof of concepts.CI/CD, serverless, APIs, multi-tenancy, a whole bunch of different stuff. NoSQL was another one of the things that we had to learn. And after that year of R&D, we were told, “Okay, now go do something with that. Go build this application.” And we did, building on our theory our cursory theory knowledge. And we get pretty close to go live, and then the business says, “What do you do in this scenario? What do you do in that scenario? What do you do here?”Corey: “I update my resume and go work somewhere else. Where's the hard part here?”Allen: [laugh].Corey: Turns out, that's not a convincing answer.Allen: Right. So, we moved quickly. And then I wouldn't say we backpedaled, but we hardened for a long time before the—prior to the go-live, with the lessons that we've learned with the eyes of Tyler, the mature enterprise company, saying, “These are the things that you have to make sure that you take into consideration in an actual production application.” One of the things that I always pushed—I was a manager for a few years of all these cloud teams—I always push do it; do it right; do it better. Right?It's kind of like crawl, walk, run. And if you follow my writing from the beginning, just looking at the titles and reading them, kind of like what you were doing, Corey, you'll see that very much. You'll see how I talk about CI/CD, you'll see me how I talk about authorization, you'll see me how I talk about multi-tenancy. And I kind of go in waves where maybe a year passes and you see my content revisit some of the topics that I've done in the past. And they're like, “No, no, no, don't do what I said before. It's not right.”Corey: The problem when I'm writing all of these things that I do, for example, my entire newsletter publication pipeline is built on a giant morass of Lambda functions and API Gateways. It's microservices-driven—kind of—and each microservice is built, almost always, with a different framework. Lately, all the new stuff is CDK. I started off with the serverless framework. There are a few other things here and there.And it's like going architecting, back in time as I have to make updates to these things from time to time. And it's the problem with having done all that myself is that I already know the answer to, “What fool designed this?” It's, well, you're basically watching me learn what I was, doing bit by bit. I'm starting to believe that the right answer on some level, is to build an inherent shelf-life into some of these things. Great, in five years, you're going to come back and re-architect it now that you know how this stuff actually works rather than patching together 15 blog posts by different authors, not all of whom are talking about the same thing and hoping for the best.Allen: Yep. That's one of the things that I really like about serverless, I view that as a giant pro of doing Serverless is that when we revisit with the lessons learned, we don't have to refactor everything at once like if it was just a big, you know, MVC controller out there in the sky. We can refactor one Lambda function at a time if now we're using a new version of the AWS SDK, or we've learned about a new best practice that needs to go in place. It's a, “While you're in there, tidy up, please,” kind of deal.Corey: I know that the DynamoDB fanatics will absolutely murder me over this one, but one of the reasons that I have multiple Dynamo tables that contain, effectively, variations on the exact same data, is because I want to have the dependency between the two different microservices be the API, not, “Oh, and under the hood, it's expecting this exact same data structure all the time.” But it just felt like that was the wrong direction to go in. That is the justification I use for myself why I run multiple DynamoDB tables that [laugh] have the same content. Where do you fall on the idea of data store separation?Allen: I'm a big single table design person myself, I really like the idea of being able to store everything in the same table and being able to create queries that can return me multiple different types of entity with one lookup. Now, that being said, one of the issues that we ran into, or one of the ambiguous areas when we were getting started with serverless was, what does single table design mean when you're talking about microservices? We were wondering does single table mean one DynamoDB table for an entire application that's composed of 15 microservices? Or is it one table per microservice? And that was ultimately what we ended up going with is a table per microservice. Even if multiple microservices are pushed into the same AWS account, we're still building that logical construct of a microservice and one table that houses similar entities in the same domain.Corey: So, something I wish that every service team at AWS would do as a part of their design is draw the architecture of an application that you're planning to build. Great, now assume that every single resource on that architecture diagram lives in its own distinct AWS account because somewhere in some customer, there's going to be an account boundary at every interconnection point along the way. And so, many services don't do that where it's, “Oh, that thing and the other thing has to be in the same account.” So, people have to write their own integration shims, and it makes doing the right thing of putting different services into distinct bounded AWS accounts for security or compliance reasons way harder than I feel like it needs to be.Allen: [laugh]. Totally agree with you on that one. That's one of the things that I feel like I'm still learning about is the account-level isolation. I'm still kind of early on, personally, with my opinions in how we're structuring things right now, but I'm very much of a like opinion that deploying multiple things into the same account is going to make it too easy to do something that you shouldn't. And I just try not to inherently trust people, in the sense that, “Oh, this is easy. I'm just going to cross that boundary real quick.”Corey: For me, it's also come down to security risk exposure. Like my lasttweetinaws.com Twitter shitposting thread client lives in a distinct AWS account that is separate from the AWS account that has all of our client billing data that lives within it. The idea being that if you find a way to compromise my public-facing Twitter client, great, the blast radius should be constrained to, “Yay, now you can, I don't know, spin up some cryptocurrency mining in my AWS account and I get to look like a fool when I beg AWS for forgiveness.”But that should be the end of it. It shouldn't be a security incident because I should not have the credit card numbers living right next to the funny internet web thing. That sort of flies in the face of the original guidance that AWS gave at launch. And right around 2008-era, best practices were one customer, one AWS account. And then by 2012, they had changed their perspective, but once you've made a decision to build multiple services in a single account, unwinding and unpacking that becomes an incredibly burdensome thing. It's about the equivalent of doing a cloud migration, in some ways.Allen: We went through that. We started off building one application with the intent that it was going to be a siloed application, a one-off, essentially. And about a year into it, it's one of those moments of, “Oh, no. What we're building is not actually a one-off. It's a piece to a much larger puzzle.”And we had a whole bunch of—unfortunately—tightly coupled things that were in there that we're assuming that resources were going to be in the same AWS account. So, we ended up—how long—I think we took probably two months, which in the grand scheme of things isn't that long, but two months, kind of unwinding the pieces and decoupling what was possible at the time into multiple AWS accounts, kind of, segmented by domain, essentially. But that's hard. AWS puts it, you know, it's those one-way door decisions. I think this one was a two-way door, but it locked and you could kind of jimmy the lock on the way back out.Corey: And you could buzz someone from the lobby to let you back in. Yeah, the biggest problem is not necessarily the one-way door decisions. It's the one-way door decisions that you don't realize you're passing through at the time that you do them. Which, of course, brings us to a topic near and dear to your heart—and I only recently started have opinions on this myself—and that is the proper design of APIs, which I'm sure will incense absolutely no one who's listening to this. Like, my opinions on APIs start with well, probably REST is the right answer in this day and age. I had people, like, “Well, I don't know, GraphQL is pretty awesome.” Like, “Oh, I'm thinking SOAP,” and people look at me like I'm a monster from the Black Lagoon of centuries past in XML-land. So, my particular brand of strangeness side, what do you see that people are doing in the world of API design that is the, I guess, most common or easy to make mistakes that you really wish they would stop doing?Allen: If I could boil it down to one word, fundamentalism. Let me unpack that for you.Corey: Oh, please, absolutely want to get a definition on that one.Allen: [laugh]. I approach API design from a developer experience point of view: how easy is it for both internal and external integrators to consume and satisfy the business processes that they want to accomplish? And a lot of times, REST guidelines, you know, it's all about entity basis, you know, drill into the appropriate entities and name your endpoints with nouns, not verbs. I'm actually very much onto that one.But something that you could easily do, let's say you have a business process that given a fundamentally correct RESTful API design takes ten API calls to satisfy. You could, in theory, boil that down to maybe three well-designed endpoints that aren't, quote-unquote, “RESTful,” that make that developer experience significantly easier. And if you were a fundamentalist, that option is not even on the table, but thinking about it pragmatically from a developer experience point of view, that might be the better call. So, that's one of the things that, I know feels like a hot take. Every time I say it, I get a little bit of flack for it, but don't be a fundamentalist when it comes to your API designs. Do something that makes it easier while staying in the guidelines to do what you want.Corey: For me the problem that I've kept smacking into with API design, and it honestly—let me be very clear on this—my first real exposure to API design rather than API consumer—which of course, I complain about constantly, especially in the context of the AWS inconsistent APIs between services—was when I'm building something out, and I'm reading the documentation for API Gateway, and oh, this is how you wind up having this stage linked to this thing, and here's the endpoint. And okay, great, so I would just populate—build out a structure or a schema that has the positional parameters I want to use as variables in my function. And that's awesome. And then I realized, “Oh, I might want to call this a different way. Aw, crap.” And sometimes it's easy; you just add a different endpoint. Other times, I have to significantly rethink things. And I can't shake the feeling that this is an entire discipline that exists that I just haven't had a whole lot of exposure to previously.Allen: Yeah, I believe that. One of the things that you could tie a metaphor to for what I'm saying and kind of what you're saying, is AWS SAM, the Serverless Application Model, all it does is basically macros CloudFormation resources. It's just a transform from a template into CloudFormation. CDK does same thing. But what the developers of SAM have done is they've recognized these business processes that people do regularly, and they've made these incredibly easy ways to satisfy those business processes and tie them all together, right?If I want to have a Lambda function that is backed behind a endpoint, an API endpoint, I just have to add four or five lines of YAML or JSON that says, “This is the event trigger, here's the route, here's the API.” And then it goes and does four, five, six different things. Now, there's some engineers that don't like that because sometimes that feels like magic. Sometimes a little bit magic is okay.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Sysdig. Sysdig secures your cloud from source to run. They believe, as do I, that DevOps and security are inextricably linked. If you wanna learn more about how they view this, check out their blog, it's definitely worth the read. To learn more about how they are absolutely getting it right from where I sit, visit Sysdig.com and tell them that I sent you. That's S Y S D I G.com. And my thanks to them for their continued support of this ridiculous nonsense.Corey: I feel like one of the benefits I've had with the vast majority of APIs that I've built is that because this is all relatively small-scale stuff for what amounts to basically shitposting for the sake of entertainment, I'm really the only consumer of an awful lot of these things. So, I get frustrated when I have to backtrack and make changes and teach other microservices to talk to this thing that has now changed. And it's frustrating, but I have the capacity to do that. It's just work for a period of time. I feel like that equation completely shifts when you have published this and it is now out in the world, and it's not just users, but in many cases paying customers where you can't really make those changes without significant notice, and every time you do you're creating work for those customers, so you have to be a lot more judicious about it.Allen: Oh, yeah. There is a whole lot of governance and practice that goes into production-level APIs that people integrate with. You know, they say once you push something out the door into production that you're going to support it forever. I don't disagree with that. That seems like something that a lot of people don't understand.And that's one of the reasons why I push API-first development so hard in all the content that I write is because you need to be intentional about what you're letting out the door. You need to go in and work, not just with the developers, but your product people and your analysts to say, what does this absolutely need to do, and what does it need to do in the future? And you take those things, and you work with analysts who want specifics, you work with the engineers to actually build it out. And you're very intentional about what goes out the door that first time because once it goes out with a mistake, you're either going to version it immediately or you're going to make some people very unhappy when you make a breaking change to something that they immediately started consuming.Corey: It absolutely feels like that's one of those things that AWS gets astonishingly right. I mean, I had the privilege of interviewing, at the time, Jeff Barr and then Ariel Kelman, who was their head of marketing, to basically debunk a bunch of old myths. And one thing that they started talking about extensively was the idea that an API is fundamentally a promise to your customers. And when you make a promise, you'd better damn well intend on keeping it. It's why API deprecations from AWS are effectively unique whenever something happens.It's the, this is a singular moment in time when they turn off a service or degrade old functionality in favor of new. They can add to it, they can launch a V2 of something and then start to wean people off by calling the old one classic or whatnot, but if I built something on AWS in 2008 and I wound up sleeping until today, and go and try and do the exact same thing and deploy it now, it will almost certainly work exactly as it did back then. Sure, reliability is going to be a lot better and there's a crap ton of features and whatnot that I'm not taking advantage of, but that fundamental ability to do that is awesome. Conversely, it feels like Google Cloud likes to change around a lot of their API stories almost constantly. And it's unplanned work that frustrates the heck out of me when I'm trying to build something stable and lasting on top of it.Allen: I think it goes to show the maturity of these companies as API companies versus just vendors. It's one of the things that I think AWS does [laugh]—Corey: You see the similar dichotomy with Microsoft and Apple. Microsoft's new versions of Windows generally still have functionalities in them to support stuff that was written in the '90s for a few use cases, whereas Apple's like, “Oh, your computer's more than 18-months old? Have you tried throwing it away and buying a new one? And oh, it's a new version of Mac OS, so yeah, maybe the last one would get security updates for a year and then get with the times.” And I can't shake the feeling that the correct answer is in some way, both of those, depending upon who your customer is and what it is you're trying to achieve.If Microsoft adopted the Apple approach, their customers would mutiny, and rightfully so; the expectation has been set for decades that isn't what happens. Conversely, if Apple decided now we're going to support this version of Mac OS in perpetuity, I don't think a lot of their application developers wouldn't quite know what to make of that.Allen: Yeah. I think it also comes from a standpoint of you better make it worth their while if you're going to move their cheese. I'm not a Mac user myself, but from what I hear for Mac users—and this could be rose-colored glasses—but is that their stuff works phenomenally well. You know, when a new thing comes out—Corey: Until it doesn't, absolutely. It's—whenever I say things like that on this show, I get letters. And it's, “Oh, yeah, really? They'll come up with something that is a colossal pain in the ass on Mac.” Like, yeah, “Try building a system-wide mute key.”It's yeah, that's just a hotkey away on windows and here in Mac land. It's, “But it makes such beautiful sounds. Why would you want them to be quiet?” And it's, yeah, it becomes this back-and-forth dichotomy there. And you can even explain it to iPhones as well and the Android ecosystem where it's, oh, you're going to support the last couple of versions of iOS.Well, as a developer, I don't want to do that. And Apple's position is, “Okay, great.” Almost half of the mobile users on the planet will be upgrading because they're in the ecosystem. Do you want us to be able to sell things those people are not? And they're at a point of scale where they get to dictate those terms.On some level, there are benefits to it and others, it is intensely frustrating. I don't know what the right answer is on the level of permanence on that level of platform. I only have slightly better ideas around the position of APIs. I will say that when AWS deprecates something, they reach out individually to affected customers, on some level, and invariably, when they say, “This is going to be deprecated as of August 31,” or whenever it is, yeah, it is going to slip at least twice in almost every case, just because they're not going to turn off a service that is revenue-bearing or critical-load-bearing for customers without massive amounts of notice and outreach, and in some cases according to rumor, having engineers reach out to help restructure things so it's not as big of a burden on customers. That's a level of customer focus that I don't think most other companies are capable of matching.Allen: I think that comes with the size and the history of Amazon. And one of the things that they're doing right now, we've used Amazon Cloud Cams for years, in my house. We use them as baby monitors. And they—Corey: Yea, I saw this I did something very similar with Nest. They didn't have the Cloud Cam at the right time that I was looking at it. And they just announced that they're going to be deprecating. They're withdrawing them for sale. They're not going to support them anymore. Which, oh at Amazon—we're not offering this anymore. But you tell the story; what are they offering existing customers?Allen: Yeah, so slightly upset about it because I like my Cloud Cams and I don't want to have to take them off the wall or wherever they are to replace them with something else. But what they're doing is, you know, they gave me—or they gave all the customers about eight months head start. I think they're going to be taking them offline around Thanksgiving this year, just mid-November. And what they said is as compensation for you, we're going to send you a Blink Cam—a Blink Mini—for every Cloud Cam that you have in use, and then we are going to gift you a year subscription to the Pro for Blink.Corey: That's very reasonable for things that were bought years ago. Meanwhile, I feel like not to be unkind or uncharitable here, but I use Nest Cams. And that's a Google product. I half expected if they ever get deprecated, I'll find out because Google just turns it off in the middle of the night—Allen: [laugh].Corey: —and I wake up and have to read a blog post somewhere that they put an update on Nest Cams, the same way they killed Google Reader once upon a time. That's slightly unfair, but the fact that joke even lands does say a lot about Google's reputation in this space.Allen: For sure.Corey: One last topic I want to talk with you about before we call it a show is that at the time of this recording, you recently had a blog post titled, “What does the Future Hold for Serverless?” Summarize that for me. Where do you see this serverless movement—if you'll forgive the term—going?Allen: So, I'm going to start at the end. I'm going to work back a little bit on what needs to happen for us to get there. I have a feeling that in the future—I'm going to be vague about how far in the future this is—that we'll finally have a satisfied promise of all you're going to write in the future is business logic. And what does that mean? I think what can end up happening, given the right focus, the right companies, the right feedback, at the right time, is we can write code as developers and have that get pushed up into the cloud.And a phrase that I know Jeremy Daly likes to say ‘infrastructure from code,' where it provisions resources in the cloud for you based on your use case. I've developed an application and it gets pushed up in the cloud at the time of deploying it, optimized resource allocation. Over time, what will happen—with my future vision—is when you get production traffic going through, maybe it's spiky, maybe it's consistently at a scale that outperforms the resources that it originally provisioned. We can have monitoring tools that analyze that and pick that out, find the anomalies, find the standard patterns, and adjust that infrastructure that it deployed for you automatically, where it's based on your production traffic for what it created, optimizes it for you. Which is something that you can't do on an initial deployment right now. You can put what looks best on paper, but once you actually get traffic through your application, you realize that, you know, what was on paper might not be correct.Corey: You ever noticed that whiteboard diagrams never show the reality, and they're always aspirational, and they miss certain parts? And I used to think that this was the symptom I had from working at small, scrappy companies because you know what, those big tech companies, everything they build is amazing and awesome. I know it because I've seen their conference talks. But I've been a consultant long enough now, and for a number of those companies, to realize that nope, everyone's infrastructure is basically a trash fire at any given point in time. And it works almost in spite of itself, rather than because of it.There is no golden path where everything is shiny, new and beautiful. And that, honestly, I got to say, it was really [laugh] depressing when I first discovered it. Like, oh, God, even these really smart people who are so intelligent they have to have extra brain packs bolted to their chests don't have the magic answer to all of this. The rest of us are just screwed, then. But we find ways to make it work.Allen: Yep. There's a quote, I wish I remembered who said it, but it was a military quote where, “No battle plan survives impact with the enemy—first contact with the enemy.” It's kind of that way with infrastructure diagrams. We can draw it out however we want and then you turn it on in production. It's like, “Oh, no. That's not right.”Corey: I want to mix the metaphors there and say, yeah, no architecture survives your first fight with a customer. Like, “Great, I don't think that's quite what they're trying to say.” It's like, “What, you don't attack your customers? Pfft, what's your customer service line look like?” Yeah, it's… I think you're onto something.I think that inherently everything beyond the V1 design of almost anything is an emergent property where this is what we learned about it by running it and putting traffic through it and finding these problems, and here's how it wound up evolving to account for that.Allen: I agree. I don't have anything to add on that.Corey: [laugh]. Fair enough. I really want to thank you for taking so much time out of your day to talk about how you view these things. If people want to learn more, where is the best place to find you?Allen: Twitter is probably the best place to find me: @AllenHeltonDev. I have that username on all the major social platforms, so if you want to find me on LinkedIn, same thing: AllenHeltonDev. My blog is always open as well, if you have any feedback you'd like to give there: readysetcloud.io.Corey: And we will, of course, put links to that in the show notes. Thanks again for spending so much time talking to me. I really appreciate it.Allen: Yeah, this was fun. This was a lot of fun. I love talking shop.Corey: It shows. And it's nice to talk about things I don't spend enough time thinking about. Allen Helton, cloud architect at Tyler Technologies. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with an angry comment that I will reject because it was not written in valid XML.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Cars on Call
6 month US sales analysis, Audi coming to F1 and the how quattro changed the company. Why are highway related deaths going up and we're in the bottom 25% of developed nations.

Cars on Call

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 48:10


Steve-0 spots a 90s era Grand Cherokee. 2Docs discuss sky rocketing sales of Tesla and Genesis. Audi is coming to F1 and 2Docs talk about the how the Quattro revolutionized Audi bringing them to the levels of Mercedes and BMW. Stephan dives into the numbers of rising MVC related fatalities and discusses why the US numbers are deplorably low as compared to developed nations. 2 d

NK Merrimack Valley Radio
From a Tent down by the River

NK Merrimack Valley Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 56:28


The MVC crew traveled out to attend the Southern tier chapter's Summer Bash again in East Branch, New York, We set up our mobile studio and talked to our Southern Tier brothers about what goes into hosting this great annual event. Brothers Bulldog, Rancher, Contempt, and Shiner all sat down and gave us a few minutes of their time. Cameo's by Brothers Canine and Maddog add some color to the podcast.  Maker tries to herd the cats so to speak in the studio, alone and once again unsupervised. This episode is the result..appropriately entilted.. from a Tent down by the River.. 

Moraine Valley Church
Under the Sun / Week 9

Moraine Valley Church

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 39:13


Remember God During the Prime of Life Ecclesiastes 11:7-12:1 August 28, 2022 Introduction: I.Today's passage has a special word for everyone: 1. Young people, those in prime of life and those who are old 2. He defines the prime of life as whose body is still functioning free from the effects of aging. 3. He defines old as anyone whose body is waning away and severely limiting their ability to engage in life! • Let's start with those who are young and those still in the prime of life II. Remember the Lord during the prime of life. I.This passage really turns around three key words that all start with the letter “r”. 1. Rejoice v7-9 2. Remove v10 – the obstacles that keep us from rejoicing 3. Remember 12:1–center which life should revolve around II.As I read this section I want you to watch for two things: 1. 3 “r's” 2. Idea to do all of this “before” it is too late 3. Read 11:7-12:1 III.Rejoice - v7-9 – rejoice in the days of your youth 1. Note three times in v9 he refers to youth (young man, childhood, young manhood) Reread v9a-b 2. In this verse, he tells us specifically how a young person can rejoice in their youth. 3. Read 9c. – by following/pursuing your dreams a. The things your heart desires and the things you see that you want 4. However, he tempers the pursuing of those dreams by saying - read 9d. . This is not an encouragement to go out and do whatever you want and follow every lust of your heart but rather follow your dreams but do it with a sense of accountability to God, do it in a godly way a. Read Ecclesiastes 12:14 - God is going to judge every deed, the things others see and the things that no one sees but you and God. God's judgment is: 1. Without partiality (in other words God has no favorites, he does not care about the color of your skin, your economic status whether rich or poor or what position you hold) 2. All-inclusive as every human being will stand before God in one way or another. 3. Fair in it where the punishment or reward will be equal to the act. 4. Do it justly – that means everyone will be judged by the same standard –God's perfect standard revealed in his word! 5. That awareness that he will hold us accountable for every deed and every word in our lives should change the way we live and cause us to trust him, obey him and live holy lives IV.Then in v10, he tells them what they need to remove in order to enjoy life in a godly way. 1. Note the word “so” Read 10a – . Vexation – it is a word in Hebrew that can be translated as either grief or anger or vexation. Basically some kind of irritation in heart a. He is focusing upon the heart here and is saying get rid of the things that are irritating your heart and keeping you from enjoying life. Get rid of depression, anger, and bitterness. b. How are you doing? – Anything of this in your heart? If so, address it immediately with God and the help of others. 2. The second obstacle we need to remove are the sins of the body. Read 10b . Pain in Hebrew is literally translated as evil. a. The sins of the body are the various different ways we can use our bodies to sin – overeat, substance abuse, laziness, sexual, etc. 3. So get rid of the things in your heart that are stinking it up and the sins of your body so you can enjoy this life now because this youth thing, the prime of life, flies by quickly. V.Remember – 12:1 – read – remember God, put him at the center of everything while you are young, in the prime of life and you can enjoy life to its fullest! VI.Remember your creator - 1. One of the great gifts of still having a body in the prime of life is that you can use your life for God in a big way, without the limitations that poor health can bring. • Now there is a shift in the emphasis of this passage from remembering the Lord during the prime of life to III. Remember the Lord before you die I.With getting older comes declining capabilities of the body. II.This passage is built around two key words – “remember” and “before.” 1. We are to remember him before three things set in! a. v1 before – your youth passes away b. v2-5 before – old age sets in c. V6-7 before – you die. III.In v2-5 the image of a deteriorating house is used to picture for us the impact of old age upon us. There is a lot of debate over the meaning of the “specific” images used in this passage, but they all agree that “image as a whole” is describing the deterioration of the body and human vigor that comes with aging that ultimately culminates in death. Read 2-5 IV.Then in v 6-7 he tells us to remember God before we die as he gives us four images that picture death for us, read v6-7 V.Remembering God before it is too late is the main idea that drives this whole section, whether young, prime of life or old! 1. When he says “remember” he is not just talking about bringing God back to mind so we do not forget God 2. The Hebrew dictionary defines it as remembering him in such a way that causes us to respond to him in a way that is worthy of who he is. 3. So to remember God means to live moment by moment with God at the center of your life, seeking him, serving him, loving him, trusting him, and obeying him and on and on and on. • So what does all this mean for you and me today? IV. Application I.A number of years ago I gave one of my doctors the tape I did on living to the fullest because we are going to die! (I did that again just two weeks ago). Next time I saw him he said, “You am in deep ----; I am upset with you, you have ruined my life.” I said, “You must of listened to my cd” 1. Day after listened to tapes, first person he was supposed to see, that man's wife died that weekend. It hit the doc like a hammer 2. He said, “I have realized that all these plans I have made for the future may never happen – my wife or I may not be there for them. All my savings and all my planning may never happen.” 3. I need to do something now! I was planning to make some minor changes – now I have to make major changes and I do not know what to do. II.So are you living moment by moment with Jesus at the center of your life, seeking him, serving him, loving him, trusting him, and obeying him and on and on and on? III.You are not too young 1. Mary mother of Jesus – was in her early teens when God chose her to be the mother of Jesus 2. Most if not all of the disciples, the ones whom Jesus deeply invested in for three years then entrusted with the world-wide great commission were also in their teens 3. I know of kids here at MVC in 3rd grade who have invited friends to clubs, prayed for them and talked to them about Jesus. 4. We have kids in fifth and sixth grade working as helpers in the Sunday kid's classes and even the cameras on Sunday morning. 5. High school kids working in the junior high department and club impacting junior highs 6. College kids and young singles investing deeply in high school students 7. High school, college and young singles who have been involved in leading us in worship! 8. MVC itself has seen young people all the way back to Ron Hutchcraft to recently Sydney Lach and Ted Aguilar make a deep impact for Jesus both within and beyond these walls. IV.You are not too old to seek the Lord, serve him and be fruitful. God's desire and ability to use you even in your old age is not done – remember Caleb? 1. Caleb was a man who had a different spirit than the others. He was a man who when everyone else saw obstacles, Caleb saw an opportunity for God to do his thing. 2. At the age of 85 Caleb still walking with, serving and trusting God, took a hill from a group of people who were very big and strong and who lived in fortified cities 3. Be a Caleb as you age – there are plenty of others around to complain and see problems, but what MVC needs, what the kingdom of God needs, what your family and friends need. They need a Caleb or a Calebette who see God as bigger than any problem they face and serve him until the end! 4. Too many seniors have checked out at MVC and there are too many needs that they could meet here at MVC. A great place to start is working on Sunday mornings in the children's ministry so you can impact young people and relieve some overworked brothers and sisters who often need to miss church themselves! 5. Let me encourage you with a life giving passage – a. Turn to Psalm 92:12-15 – still yield fruit in old age – full of sap b. Do not waste this opportunity to pour out on others what should be the most abundant and best fruit you should have if you have walked with Jesus even into your old age

Moraine Valley Church
Under the Sun / Week 7

Moraine Valley Church

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 47:41


Death – A Powerful Teacher Ecclesiastes 7, 9, 12    August 7, 2022   Introduction:Let me ask you a question – it's New Year's Eve 2022 and you have two engagements, one in the morning to go to a funeral of someone you deeply loved and the second in the evening to go to a party with some of the most fun people you know!Which would you rather go to? Which would be more beneficial for you to go to? Turn to Ecclesiastes 7 and read v2-4Read v2 again note - it is better …. because/for that is the end of every one of us and it has an impact upon our heart.  Simply stated when you go to a funeral one of God's purposes of this is to remind us that someday it will be our turn to be in that box.  Read v3. Give the literal translation of v3Hebrew lit – the heart “becometh” better NLT – sadness has a refining influence on us. Bottom line - the sorrow, pain, and grief that the death of a loved one brings to us has the potential to make us better, to refine us, and transform us! Death, both in the book of Ecclesiastes and in life, is a powerful transformational teacher.  Let's see some basic   Truths about death  Ecclesiastes uses death to impress four things upon our heartsThat our life is temporary, short and is fleeting - Ecclesiastes 6:12a; Psalm 39:4-5 That no one escapes death – everyone will experience it - Ecclesiastes 9:2-3a When we die, we will take nothing with us! - Ecclesiastes 2:18-19 –  Nobody knows when they will die and it is out of our control, it is in God's hands –   read 9:12 and Ecclesiastes 3:2 – a time to give birth and a time to die! James 4:15 “if the Lord wills, we shall live”  We live life as if it is going to go on forever and make plans as if we are in control of what and when things are going to happen.  The wise man recognizes that being alive today is a gift of God and he does not even have a guarantee to make it to the end of the day.  And yes, someday he will die We also see in Ecclesiastes the nature of death. Remember as I read the next few verses the focus of Ecclesiastes is upon life here on earth and what people will be missing out on in life here on earth. It is not meant to be a statement of what after life will be like.  Read v4-6 Reread v4a – “there is hope” there is still the hope for future dreams; there is still the opportunity to partake in life on earth.  You still can have knowledge of things, you still can experience the rewards that God gives you in life, you still can know and be known personally by people, you still can have the passions of your heart and you still can have the opportunity to participate in all that is going on here on earth. What he is saying is that while you are alive you still have opportunities to engage in life here on earth.  But once you die that ends! So he is using the truths that we are going to die someday at an unexpected time to “motivate” us not to miss the opportunities that lay before us today! In verses 7-10 he lays out for us …  Four wise ways to live in light of the fact we will dieNote that he starts off in v7 with “go then,” in other words here is what you should do in light of what has been said.    Read v7 - enjoy life! We have seen this many times in the book before; actually, it forms the heart of the repeated refrains in the first half of the book.   One of the good things we are told to do is enjoy life, the simple things in life like eating and drinking and the task/work that we do! Read v8 – make every day a special day!In their culture, they could not afford to wear white clothes, cologne, and perfume every day.  So they brought them out for special occasions, like weddings and special holy day celebrations But note in this verse he says to do it “at all times.”  In other words, live every day as a special day. Turn the simple things of life into special occasions and pleasures.   Here in North America we are busy people driven either by a written or internal to do list that never seems to have an end.  To follow this instruction it will simply take a matter of cutting down the list for today and giving some intentional thought how to make the day special and not just another day of getting things done.  Read v9- enjoy life with your mate If you are single, you can apply this truth to your special friend! The reason for this is that this life is flying by us.    Yes, there will not only be an end to your life but an end to your marriage relationship so enjoy that gift while you have it.    I went to visit a man from MVC six months after his wife died. I just wanted to check in with him and see how he was doing.  I will never forget what he told me that day as it has lodged deep within my heart.He said, “Pat, retirement is not what it is cracked up to be. My wife and I had dreams for years what we would do when we got here, but for most part either one of you does not have the health at that time to pull off what you dreamed of doing, or one of you dies and all those dreams go into the ground with them!”    If you are not enjoying the ride with your mate, do something about it!    There is help here at MVC, there is help with personal marriage mentors – (look around and go ask) and there is help with professional counselors.    Do not waste this special gift God has given you for a limited time!  Read v10 – live life to the fullest  The reason again is that when you die that opportunity is all gone. Here is a principle that I use - do everything you can to live your life fully, limiting yourself only to the things you can do with joy and passion.We may need to prune some things to do this!  In other words, are you burning yourself, your joy and strength out by doing too much?    To keep our passion, joy and energy up we need to take enough time to enjoy the simple things God has given to us, make every day special and enjoy the mate or special friends that God has given to us  Regarding these four ways to live you could be feeling: I could have gotten this same info in a secular speech or article, maybe even the local atheist club.  But he adds a fifth one near the end of the book that puts all these into perspective. He adds a fifth  Read Ecclesiastes 12: 6-7 – remember himThe emphasis is remember him before you die! In other words everything we have heard so far must be put in the broader context of remember God That means for us believers today that we should remember Jesus when we enjoy life, make every day special, enjoy our mates and live life to the fullest!  When it comes to enjoying life Read Ecclesiastes 2:24-25   Joy is a gift of God, a fruit of the Spirit, either we can get all bent out of shape, angry and anxious about all the enigmas, uncertainties of life and the fact we are going to die, or we can enjoy gifts God has given to us in this broken world! When it comes to make every day a special day!Read Colossians 3:17   Everything we should do we should do it with the Lord Jesus Christ in mind and for his glory! When it comes to enjoy life with your mateWe learned in Ephesians 5, when we studied marriage that marriage is ultimately a picture of Jesus' relationship to the church and husbands and wives should emulate that in their relationship to those around them.   How Jesus lays down his life for his bride the church and how his bride, the church submissively responded to him in a submission that responds to his loving leadership! Are you using your marriage to model for other believers what Jesus can do for them in their marriage and for the lost world in what a relationship with Jesus can look like for them? When it comes to live life to the fullestJohn 10:10 teaches us that the fullest life possible is only through Jesus Colossians 3:23 teaches us that everything we do we should do with all our hearts for the sake of the Lord!   Are you living for Jesus?  Is he the purpose and driver of your life?While these four ways of living are wise in light of the fact we are going to die, they are meant to be carried out in the context of Jesus at the center of all of them!                                          

Wash Talk: The Carwash Podcast
Episode 124: Meet Iona Kearney

Wash Talk: The Carwash Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 12:50


In this interview with the 2022 Most Valuable Carwasher, Iona Kearney, the operations manager with Speedy Sparkle Car Wash, discusses the importance of employee evaluations and gives advice to other carwash managers.

Wash Talk: The Carwash Podcast
Episode 123: Appreciating Carwash Employees

Wash Talk: The Carwash Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 4:24


An audio reading of the article titled "Appreciating carwash employees," this episode discusses the unique skillset of your carwash team and calls for you to share what inspires you about your employees.

Moraine Valley Church
Under the Sun / Week 5

Moraine Valley Church

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 48:45


 The Test of Pleasure Passage July 31, 2022    Introduction:How many of you have ever seen an illusionist – they are skilled at presenting something real in front of our eyes which leads us to an incorrect perception or false impression about the object .I have always been amazed and entertained by them as they admit it is not magic but an illusion.  Satan is also an illusionist as he is skilled at putting the real things of this world before the eyes of our heart with the intent to mislead or deceive us into thinking this is just what I need! One of the greatest illusions that Satan presents to both to the lost and believer is that what the world has to offer will bring you the fulfillment and joy you are looking for. Turn to 1 John 2:15-17 and readNote:Loving God and loving the things of this world are polar opposites What God offers lasts forever and what the world offers passes away We also see the heart of what the things of the world are:  Reread v16.Lust of the flesh – the pleasures that please our senses and body Lust of the eyes – the possessions we see Boastful pride of life – the high positions within a group or organization that could make you prideful So all the world has to offer are pleasures, possessions and position. Satan is very skilled as presenting those to us as what will bring meaning and joy to our lives. In Ecclesiastes 2, we see that Solomon takes all the world has to offer to see if that answers the question of what brings lasting meaning, significance and value to life.  Turn and read v1-2   Review briefly what we saw is going on in this book.  Question and the test  The major sections at the top Conclusion  Key backdrop – vanity – meaninglessness Eric Bihl made a suggestion to me regarding the role of vanity in this book and I think he said it better than I have been saying.  He said that the idea of vanity that shows up 30 times in this book is suggesting that our works and activities in and of themselves are not useless but they are useless to provide the answer to what bring lasting meaning, significance and value, to life!      That only can come from fearing God and keeping His commandments!  We will see an example of that again here in Ecclesiastes 2 when he tested all that the world has to offer:  pleasures, possessions and positions  Ecclesiastes 2Structure of the passageV1-2 – states he is testing pleasure to see if that will bring this lasting meaning and value he is looking for. V3-8 – he tests pleasures and possessions V9 he experienced high position  V10-11 – he gives his conclusion to this test Watch for all of this as I read and comment along the way Conclusion – the outcome of this pleasure hunt, where he tested the best the world has to offer – was that there was some temporary pleasure but ultimately all of this was vanity and striving after wind when it comes to answer our question what can provide lasting meaning, significance, value or joy.  Reread v10-11As we have seen before the answer to that question comes from fearing God and keeping His commandments! So following Jesus and impacting others is not only the mission God gave us; it really is the pathway to lasting meaning, significance, value or joy!  Following Jesus, impacting othersI think Solomon's test is so important for us in North America today.  As we learned there are things we can enjoy but they do not provide the ultimate things in our heart and life that we need.Satan uses the illusion of the world satisfying as one of his most powerful distractions for Christians today from following Jesus.    Following Jesus is much like a marriage relationship where we leave and cleave.  Read Matthew 4:18-22 V19 – definition of a disciple at MVC – follow and impact V20 – they left their livelihood V22 – they left their possessions, boat and family  Listen further to these verses about being a disciple of JesusMatthew 16:24–26 – note speaking to His disciples – If you want to hang onto your life the way it is and what you have, you will lose out on experiencing life indeed.  Even if you gained the whole world, you will come up empty!  Listen to what Peter said in Mark 10:28 to Jesus.   Read v28 Read v29-30    Testimony I want to introduce you to some friends of mine and missionaries of MVC who left everything to follow Jesus down to the boarder of Mexico to minister to the poor and orphans: Bruce – tell us what your life was like before God called you to the mission field. Bruce – you left some great opportunities up here and followed Jesus down to Mexico to minister to the poor.  Tell us about how God worked in your hearts and brought that about Peter said to Jesus – we left everything … and Jesus told him about the great blessings he would get in return in this world and in eternity.   How has God blessed this leaving the security of the North American dream and cleaving to Jesus as you minister to the poor and orphans in Mexico. Next hour in the Chapel people will have an opportunity to meet you two and hear more about the ministry that you have.   In one minute, tell us what they can expect if they come to that time. Let me ask you and myself today this question – is there anything, anyone or pursuit that we need to leave in order to better cleave to Jesus so we can experience a life that has lasting meaning, significance, value and joy?

Shooters Touch
Roman Penn: Drake Bulldogs

Shooters Touch

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 72:38


On this episode Roman Penn(@romanpenn20) floor general for @DrakeBulldogsMB joins us to talk pizza, Des Moines, hoops and growing up in the Region! It was a fun to catch up and hear more about his climb to being an all-MVC player! #shootersshoot #hoopsiowa  Connect with us! @ShootersTouchIA  --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/theshooterstouch/support

Boys Club
No Conflict, No Interest

Boys Club

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 60:52


Musician and curator Anna Bulbrook joins Natasha and Deana to talk about Metalabels, the creator economy in web3 and why releasing work in 'multiplayer mode' is more fun. Then, Natasha and Deana talked through DAO entity design and Minimum Viable Communities. Preventative Botox and LARPing closed out the ep.  Links: Anna Bulbrook on Twitter: https://twitter.com/annabulbrook Boys Club DAO v1, The MVC: https://boysclub.medium.com/boys-club-dao-v1-launching-our-mvc-4dd4a7f3abe5

The Markley & Van Camp Show
Markley, van Camp and Robbins | June 16, 2022

The Markley & Van Camp Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 110:11


MVC&R are hoping gas prices will start to decline very soon, while the White House is calling on oil companies to be more “patriotic”. Dr. Anthony Fauci has tested positive for COVID-19, and President Joe Biden gets tongue tied with LGBTQ. President Biden's open borders are a welcome mat for MS-13 gang members, and Elon Musk will address Twitter employees for the first time. Another police department is cutting patrols because of gas prices, and top democrats are calling for gender-neutral bathrooms in the Capitol. Van Jones talked about the potential of President Biden not running again, and twenty-five people were hurt walking on hot coals for a team-building exercise.

Markley, van Camp and Robbins
Markley, van Camp and Robbins | June 16, 2022

Markley, van Camp and Robbins

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 110:11


MVC&R are hoping gas prices will start to decline very soon, while the White House is calling on oil companies to be more “patriotic”. Dr. Anthony Fauci has tested positive for COVID-19, and President Joe Biden gets tongue tied with LGBTQ. President Biden's open borders are a welcome mat for MS-13 gang members, and Elon Musk will address Twitter employees for the first time. Another police department is cutting patrols because of gas prices, and top democrats are calling for gender-neutral bathrooms in the Capitol. Van Jones talked about the potential of President Biden not running again, and twenty-five people were hurt walking on hot coals for a team-building exercise.

The Markley & Van Camp Show
Markley, van Camp and Robbins | June 8, 2022

The Markley & Van Camp Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 110:13


MVC&R could have predicted it would happen eventually, and sure enough, a man with a gun was arrested near Justice Brett Kavanaugh's house. There are plenty of examples of democrats and the media demonizing Justice Kavanaugh, and the communist district attorney was fired by San Francisco voters. California leads the nation in active shooters, and a former burglar has the best way to prevent break-ins. A Kansas woman confessed to leading an all female ISIS battalion, and Mark Middleton's family has blocked the release of files relating to his suicide. House republicans call on Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas to slow the border crisis, and Mexico is about to make the border crisis a whole lot worse.

Markley, van Camp and Robbins
Markley, van Camp and Robbins | June 8, 2022

Markley, van Camp and Robbins

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 110:13


MVC&R could have predicted it would happen eventually, and sure enough, a man with a gun was arrested near Justice Brett Kavanaugh's house. There are plenty of examples of democrats and the media demonizing Justice Kavanaugh, and the communist district attorney was fired by San Francisco voters. California leads the nation in active shooters, and a former burglar has the best way to prevent break-ins. A Kansas woman confessed to leading an all female ISIS battalion, and Mark Middleton's family has blocked the release of files relating to his suicide. House republicans call on Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas to slow the border crisis, and Mexico is about to make the border crisis a whole lot worse.

The Markley & Van Camp Show
Markley, van Camp and Robbins | June 6, 2022

The Markley & Van Camp Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 110:13


MVC&R prefer to use the proper tool for each job, and Energy Secretary Jennifer Granholm claims every tool in the toolbox is being used to bring down gas prices. A mother in Uvalde describes running into Robb Elementary to save her children, and terrorists massacre 50+ Christians in a “vile and satanic” attack on a Nigerian church. Vice President Kamala Harris is handing out mayorships, and Elon Musk threatens to walk away from the Twitter deal. Los Angeles district attorney Gascón helped to get a light sentence for a teen who ran over a mother and her baby, and a new ABC poll is showing bad news for President Biden. Transportation Secretary Buttigieg says gas prices are not set by a dial in the White House, and Al-Qaeda now has a “safe haven” in Afghanistan under Taliban.

Markley, van Camp and Robbins
Markley, van Camp and Robbins | June 6, 2022

Markley, van Camp and Robbins

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 110:13


MVC&R prefer to use the proper tool for each job, and Energy Secretary Jennifer Granholm claims every tool in the toolbox is being used to bring down gas prices. A mother in Uvalde describes running into Robb Elementary to save her children, and terrorists massacre 50+ Christians in a “vile and satanic” attack on a Nigerian church. Vice President Kamala Harris is handing out mayorships, and Elon Musk threatens to walk away from the Twitter deal. Los Angeles district attorney Gascón helped to get a light sentence for a teen who ran over a mother and her baby, and a new ABC poll is showing bad news for President Biden. Transportation Secretary Buttigieg says gas prices are not set by a dial in the White House, and Al-Qaeda now has a “safe haven” in Afghanistan under Taliban.

The Markley & Van Camp Show
Markley, van Camp and Robbins | June 2, 2022

The Markley & Van Camp Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2022 110:12


MVC&R have the latest information from the latest shooting at a Tulsa medical facility, with multiple casualties reported. A bank executive warns of an impending “economic hurricane”, while the White House explains President Joe Biden's understanding of the baby formula crisis. Formula manufacturers explain how they saw the shortage coming, while MSNBC's Andrea Mitchell can empathize with Biden's pain due to the “cascade of crises”. Both Johnny Depp and Amber Heard won in their defamation trial, but Johnny won just a little bit more than Amber. Former NFL star running back Marion Barber was found dead by police, and the Brooklyn Nets posted every LGBTQIA+ flag they could.

Markley, van Camp and Robbins
Markley, van Camp and Robbins | June 2, 2022

Markley, van Camp and Robbins

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2022 110:12


MVC&R have the latest information from the latest shooting at a Tulsa medical facility, with multiple casualties reported. A bank executive warns of an impending “economic hurricane”, while the White House explains President Joe Biden's understanding of the baby formula crisis. Formula manufacturers explain how they saw the shortage coming, while MSNBC's Andrea Mitchell can empathize with Biden's pain due to the “cascade of crises”. Both Johnny Depp and Amber Heard won in their defamation trial, but Johnny won just a little bit more than Amber. Former NFL star running back Marion Barber was found dead by police, and the Brooklyn Nets posted every LGBTQIA+ flag they could.

The Markley & Van Camp Show
Markley, van Camp and Robbins | May 31, 2022

The Markley & Van Camp Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022 110:09


MVC&R hope everyone enjoyed their Memorial Day weekend, as we remembered those who made the ultimate sacrifice for our country. Operators were telling officers that there were children still alive in the school, and Canadian President Justin Trudeau says Canada is going to start banning guns. The border agent is speaking out about the Uvalde elementary school shooting, and President Joe Biden claims a 9mm bullet can blow the lungs out of the body. President Biden feels like he just can't catch a break, while the new “Top Gun” set records for the Memorial Day weekend release. Adam Kinzinger believes it is time to start banning guns, and Lia Thomas says the important thing is that Lia is happy.

Markley, van Camp and Robbins
Markley, van Camp and Robbins | May 31, 2022

Markley, van Camp and Robbins

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022 110:09


MVC&R hope everyone enjoyed their Memorial Day weekend, as we remembered those who made the ultimate sacrifice for our country. Operators were telling officers that there were children still alive in the school, and Canadian President Justin Trudeau says Canada is going to start banning guns. The border agent is speaking out about the Uvalde elementary school shooting, and President Joe Biden claims a 9mm bullet can blow the lungs out of the body. President Biden feels like he just can't catch a break, while the new “Top Gun” set records for the Memorial Day weekend release. Adam Kinzinger believes it is time to start banning guns, and Lia Thomas says the important thing is that Lia is happy.

The Markley & Van Camp Show
Markley, van Camp and Robbins | May 26, 2022

The Markley & Van Camp Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2022 109:21


MVC&R have the latest on the situation in Uvalde, Texas, and Robert Francis “Beto” O'Rourke interrupted a press conference on the shooting, in order to do some stumping for his campaign. Video from during the rampage at the elementary school has come out, and it shows frantic parents trying to get past the police barricade to help their children. The woman who wrote “How to Murder Your Husband” was convicted for murdering her husband, and Barack Obama wanted to be sure everyone remembered the anniversary of George Floyd's death, as the country was still coming to grips with the tragedy in Texas. The Russia hoax player billed the Clinton campaign the same day he spoke with the FBI, and San Francisco schools are dropping “chief” from their job titles.

Markley, van Camp and Robbins
Markley, van Camp and Robbins | May 26, 2022

Markley, van Camp and Robbins

Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2022 109:21


MVC&R have the latest on the situation in Uvalde, Texas, and Robert Francis “Beto” O'Rourke interrupted a press conference on the shooting, in order to do some stumping for his campaign. Video from during the rampage at the elementary school has come out, and it shows frantic parents trying to get past the police barricade to help their children. The woman who wrote “How to Murder Your Husband” was convicted for murdering her husband, and Barack Obama wanted to be sure everyone remembered the anniversary of George Floyd's death, as the country was still coming to grips with the tragedy in Texas. The Russia hoax player billed the Clinton campaign the same day he spoke with the FBI, and San Francisco schools are dropping “chief” from their job titles.

Markley, van Camp and Robbins
Markley, van Camp and Robbins | May 24, 2022

Markley, van Camp and Robbins

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 110:13


MVC&R have been transitioning more and more of their money out of savings, due to the soaring gas prices, while President Joe Biden says we are in a fossil fuel transition. Ready or not, the “carbon footprint monitor” may be on the way, and Vice President Kamala Harris serves up another word salad when talking about kids of the community. State Farm seems to be backtracking from their plans to distribute transgender books to five-year-old kids, and U.S. Air Force cadets who are unvaccinated will not receive commissions. Apple spent millions to help homeless people, but it wasn't enough, and Will Smith felt like a “coward” not defending his mother against an abusive father. Halsey called out her record label for refusing to release her new song, and Jake Tapper was caught impersonating a journalist, for a very brief moment.

The Markley & Van Camp Show
Markley, van Camp and Robbins | May 24, 2022

The Markley & Van Camp Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 110:13


MVC&R have been transitioning more and more of their money out of savings, due to the soaring gas prices, while President Joe Biden says we are in a fossil fuel transition. Ready or not, the “carbon footprint monitor” may be on the way, and Vice President Kamala Harris serves up another word salad when talking about kids of the community. State Farm seems to be backtracking from their plans to distribute transgender books to five-year-old kids, and U.S. Air Force cadets who are unvaccinated will not receive commissions. Apple spent millions to help homeless people, but it wasn't enough, and Will Smith felt like a “coward” not defending his mother against an abusive father. Halsey called out her record label for refusing to release her new song, and Jake Tapper was caught impersonating a journalist, for a very brief moment.

The Markley & Van Camp Show
Markley, van Camp and Robbins | May 20, 2022

The Markley & Van Camp Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 110:11


MVC&R are not economists, and a Biden administration official talking about domestic oil production also is not an economist. President Biden jumped aboard the struggle bus when talking about NATO, and the latest “Man-on-the-Street” from Essential Fleccas should terrify you. An MSNBC host suggests letting citizens take guns away from people, and police in Texas are investigating a senior prank at a high school. Elon Musk is now facing a “me too” accusation, and NPR has set up a “snitch hotline” for people who don't wear masks. Charles Barkley had some colorful language for a heckler, and a fake Costco tweet about hotdogs may have tanked their stock price. This Sunday is National Buy a Musical Instrument Day, so the Friday Five celebrates – Best Songs with Musical Instruments in the Title.

Markley, van Camp and Robbins
Markley, van Camp and Robbins | May 20, 2022

Markley, van Camp and Robbins

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 110:11


MVC&R are not economists, and a Biden administration official talking about domestic oil production also is not an economist. President Biden jumped aboard the struggle bus when talking about NATO, and the latest “Man-on-the-Street” from Essential Fleccas should terrify you. An MSNBC host suggests letting citizens take guns away from people, and police in Texas are investigating a senior prank at a high school. Elon Musk is now facing a “me too” accusation, and NPR has set up a “snitch hotline” for people who don't wear masks. Charles Barkley had some colorful language for a heckler, and a fake Costco tweet about hotdogs may have tanked their stock price. This Sunday is National Buy a Musical Instrument Day, so the Friday Five celebrates – Best Songs with Musical Instruments in the Title.

The Markley & Van Camp Show
Markley, van Camp and Robbins | May 18, 2022

The Markley & Van Camp Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 110:14


MVC&R are trying very hard to contain their laughter, but President Joe Biden's “Disinformation Board” is gone, for now, and the FBI debunked a key part of the Trump/Russia conspiracy. It's no secret democrats use illegal immigration to get more power, and it's no surprise there is a montage of their confirmation. Hillary Clinton was handed yet another embarrassing defeat, after Netflix decided to pass on the “Rodham” project after two years in development. It seems Dr. Oz is not going to just Waltz into the Senate, and Cori Bush's primary opponent dropped a hilarious ad. The head of the NIH admitted that trans children are being used as science experiments, while Californians are moving to Portugal in droves, but the Portuguese are not happy about it.

Markley, van Camp and Robbins
Markley, van Camp and Robbins | May 18, 2022

Markley, van Camp and Robbins

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 110:14


MVC&R are trying very hard to contain their laughter, but President Joe Biden's “Disinformation Board” is gone, for now, and the FBI debunked a key part of the Trump/Russia conspiracy. It's no secret democrats use illegal immigration to get more power, and it's no surprise there is a montage of their confirmation. Hillary Clinton was handed yet another embarrassing defeat, after Netflix decided to pass on the “Rodham” project after two years in development. It seems Dr. Oz is not going to just Waltz into the Senate, and Cori Bush's primary opponent dropped a hilarious ad. The head of the NIH admitted that trans children are being used as science experiments, while Californians are moving to Portugal in droves, but the Portuguese are not happy about it.

Markley, van Camp and Robbins
Markley, van Camp and Robbins | May 16, 2022

Markley, van Camp and Robbins

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 110:11


MVC&R have what is known about the Buffalo shooting, and the shooter, as the media wastes no time in blaming Tucker Carlson for the whole thing. President Joe Biden believes telepathy would have helped with the baby formula shortage, and Dr. Anthony Fauci says he would not work under a second Trump administration. A fentanyl awareness group is asking the Biden administration to track overdose deaths the same way they did COVID deaths, and Speaker Nancy Pelosi believes free speech should be balanced. In the wake of the Roe decision leak, Yale law students are calling for the ostracizing of conservative classmates, as well as tossing out the Constitution, and a priest called out NPR's abortion coverage for leaving out pro-life voices. The Cincinnati Reds threw a no-hitter against the Pittsburgh Pirates, yet still lost the game, and the most male- and female-dominated careers today.

The Markley & Van Camp Show
Markley, van Camp and Robbins | May 16, 2022

The Markley & Van Camp Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 110:11


MVC&R have what is known about the Buffalo shooting, and the shooter, as the media wastes no time in blaming Tucker Carlson for the whole thing. President Joe Biden believes telepathy would have helped with the baby formula shortage, and Dr. Anthony Fauci says he would not work under a second Trump administration. A fentanyl awareness group is asking the Biden administration to track overdose deaths the same way they did COVID deaths, and Speaker Nancy Pelosi believes free speech should be balanced. In the wake of the Roe decision leak, Yale law students are calling for the ostracizing of conservative classmates, as well as tossing out the Constitution, and a priest called out NPR's abortion coverage for leaving out pro-life voices. The Cincinnati Reds threw a no-hitter against the Pittsburgh Pirates, yet still lost the game, and the most male- and female-dominated careers today.

Three Man Weave: College Basketball Podcast
#259: Report Card Day (for Coaching Hires)

Three Man Weave: College Basketball Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 82:59


On this offseason episode, the Weavers hand out grades to the power conference and high-major coaching hires. We discussed the improved situations across the landscape while also *trying* to mix in some negativity where applicable. We know grade inflation is a scourge on society, but hey, there weren't many dumpster fires on which to throw timber! We did not hit all 57 hires (plus two remaining openings), but we ended with some winners in the mid-major landscape, as well.  The Rundown:(0:08) - Intro and Reviews (8:45) - Root's Roundup (News, Recruiting, Transfer) (30:55) - Coaching Hires (31:22) - SEC (39:59) - Big East (48:42) - ACC (53:21) - Big 12 (55:30) - Big Ten (59:00) - American (1:03:38) - WCC (1:07:18) - Atlantic 10 (1:13:28) - MVC (1:16:42) - Mid-Major Favorites (no coaching changes in the Pac-12 or Mountain West)