Podcasts about containers

Any receptacle for holding a product used in storage, packaging, and shipping

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The MongoDB Podcast
Ep 130 Serverless with MongoDB and Google Cloud Run

The MongoDB Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 21:43


In this episode, Mike Lynn chats to Abi from Google and Mira from MongoDB to talk about all things serverless and full stack application development in the cloud. They speak about the main reasons to use serverless and why you should use serverless technologies for your development. Topics covered include Docker, Containers, Jib (for building Java Docker images), environment variables, development vs production environments, how to connect to MongoDB, security, and when to consider developing for serverless (hint - when there's significant need for scaling, reducing maintenance and freeing up developers!!) Tune in to listen to what Abi and Mira have to share.

DevOps and Docker Talk
Securing Containers, First Steps in Docker and Kubernetes

DevOps and Docker Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 53:57 Very Popular


Going to KubeCon? Me too! We're planning a meetup on my Discord server #kubecon channel.The Loot Box is Live! Get your DevOps and tech-inspired t-shirts, mugs, and more.Bret goes through his top recommendations for securing container images, Docker containers and Kubernetes pods.This is a tip-packed show where Bret lists much of what's documented in his courses, starting with the first steps you should take, and the bare security necessities that everyone should be doing. Then he covers more advanced security activities you should consider once the basics are covered.Streamed live on YouTube on July 7, 2022.Unedited live recording of this show on YouTube (Ep #177).★Topics★Bret's Container Security AMADocker Security DocsDocker Buys AtomistSlim.ai website: Auto-slimming imagesDocker Slim toolKubescape websiteKubernetes Security ContextSeccomp by defaultLint all files with super-linterDatree K8s file scanKubernetes BenchmarkMy GitHub Actions examples: Automate your builds, CVE scans, and moreVideo on building a more secure base imageSnyk security tools websiteTrivy CVE and K8s scansFalco for watching servers for bad behavior★Join my Community★Best coupons for my Docker and Kubernetes coursesChat with us on our Discord Server Vital DevOpsHomepage bretfisher.com ★ Support this podcast on Patreon ★

Medienbecker
#88: Zukunft im Blick - Daniel Martens von Timbercoast mit der Mobilitätswende auf See

Medienbecker

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 22:01


Daniel Martens von Timbercoast erzählt in dieser Episode von dem Timbercoast uG. Das ist eine Reederei die mit dem Schiff Avontuur verschiedene Waren wie Kaffee, Schokolade und Rum aus Lateinamerika auf dem Seeweg importiert. Dabei handelt es sich um ein Segelschiff, wodurch die Ladung also ohne fossile Energie transportiert wird. Besonders nachhaltig, besonders anders im Vergleich zu den herkömmlichen Containers auf den Tankern. Link: https://timbercoast.com Film auf Youtube über die Entladung: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fm5oeinYDJ4

Getup Kubicast
#100 - Recapitulando o Kubicast

Getup Kubicast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 79:07


O Kubicast completou 100 episódios de vida e para gravar esse marco chamamos a internet toda mais alguns convidados especiais!A ideia era fazer o programa no formato ASK ME ANYTHING, mas acabou que começamos a relembrar os episódios mais marcantes e isso deu pano para manga para entrar em assuntos, como rodar Containers com Windows, arquivo YAML, piadas de Java, como sempre, e etc!Agradecemos as pessoas que participaram desse episódio e todos os demais ouvintes: antigos e novos! É muito gratificante poder tocar esse podcast que começou em 2018, sem muitas habilidades para a coisa, e de lá para cá só foi evoluindo para melhor!Se você chegou aqui agora, seja bem-vindo(a)! O Kubicast é uma produção da Getup, empresa especialista em Kubernetes. Todos os episódios do podcast estão no site da Getup e nas principais plataformas de áudio digital. Alguns deles estão registrados no YT. Os EPISÓDIOS RELEMBRADOS nesse Kubicast:#6 - O que NÃO esperar de Kubernetes#19 - KubeCon Day 1 - Lightning Talks#35 - The day we recorded with Kelsey Hightower#51 - Maratona KubeCon 2020#60 - Windows Containers#69 - Nomad vs Kubernetes#92 - Kubernetes 1.24 is out!#93 - Por dentro do Tsuru#95 - FOMGO - Fear of missing Gomex#97 - Segue o fio com Leandro DamascenaAs RECOMENDAÇÕES dos participantes do programa:Manifesto (série na Netflix)Succession (série na HBO)Dentro da Mente de um Gato (documentário na Netflix)Ruptura (série na Apple TV +)The Sandman (série na Netflix)

Kubernetes Podcast from Google
Ambient Mesh, with Justin Pettit and Ethan Jackson

Kubernetes Podcast from Google

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 55:47 Very Popular


When you think of a service mesh, you probably think of “sidecar containers running with each pod”. The Istio team has come up with a new approach, introduced recently as an experimental preview. Google Cloud software engineers Justin Pettit and Ethan Jackson join Craig to explore ambient mesh. Do you have something cool to share? Some questions? Let us know: web: kubernetespodcast.com mail: kubernetespodcast@google.com twitter: @kubernetespod Chatter of the week Listening immediately and listening on a 1 year delay Death and state funeral of Queen Elizabeth II The Queue What the queue says about our relationship with royalty News of the week Cloud Custodian becomes an incubating project Anthos VM support GKE control plane metrics CVE-2022-3172: Aggregated API server can cause clients to be redirected CVE-2021-25749: runAsNonRoot logic bypass for Windows containers Akuity Platform Episode 172, with Jesse Suen Weave GitOps 2022.09 Coroot Community Edition Constellation, by Edgeless Systems Register for Google Cloud Next Dell and Red Hat expand strategic collaboration Links from the interview Nicira Open vSwitch Introucing Ambient Mesh Service mesh First mention of Ambient in 2018 No first class support for sidecars in Kubernetes Istio working group meeting, August 2021 Remote proxy proposal HBONE: HTTP/2-based overlay network environment mTLS HTTP Connect GIF MASQUE and QUIC Get started with Ambient Mesh Ambient Mesh Security Deep Dive Justin Pettit and Ethan Jackson on Twitter

The Power Teachings
Your Words Are Containers Of Power - By Laurence Torr

The Power Teachings

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 27:30


Your Words Are Containers Of  Power -  By Laurence Torr God word and words are spirit and life and produce great fruit and results in our lives. When we speak forth those heavenly words with faith we see powerful results. Our words are like containers carrying a cargo of life or death, what have you been saying and speaking? begin today and change your words and change your life and receive all those spiritually promises and blessings which are yours into your life today.   Visit Our Website http://www.graceloveandtruth.com/ Visit Our Youtube Channel Here http://www.youtube.com/laurencetorr

Red Hat X Podcast Series
Move to the Cloud. Extend to the Edge. Go Beyond.

Red Hat X Podcast Series

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 39:00


Moving to the cloud and edge comes with big rewards such as new use-cases and business opportunities. But how to efficiently build cloud and edge applications can be a confusing journey, mainly due to the lack of managed platforms that unifies Developer Experience (DX), ZeroOps Experience, and a Reactive Runtime. With Kalix, we set out to create a powerful PaaS that addresses these challenges for the cloud-to-edge continuum. An API PaaS that enables any developer with any language to build high-performance, data-centric applications without the complexity that often slows down engineering teams.

Screaming in the Cloud
Azul and the Current State of the Java Ecosystem with Scott Sellers

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 36:35


About ScottWith more than 28 years of successful leadership in building high technology companies and delivering advanced products to market, Scott provides the overall strategic leadership and visionary direction for Azul Systems.Scott has a consistent proven track record of vision, leadership, and success in enterprise, consumer and scientific markets. Prior to co-founding Azul Systems, Scott founded 3dfx Interactive, a graphics processor company that pioneered the 3D graphics market for personal computers and game consoles. Scott served at 3dfx as Vice President of Engineering, CTO and as a member of the board of directors and delivered 7 award-winning products and developed 14 different graphics processors. After a successful initial public offering, 3dfx was later acquired by NVIDIA Corporation.Prior to 3dfx, Scott was a CPU systems architect at Pellucid, later acquired by MediaVision. Before Pellucid, Scott was a member of the technical staff at Silicon Graphics where he designed high-performance workstations.Scott graduated from Princeton University with a bachelor of science, earning magna cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa honors. Scott has been granted 8 patents in high performance graphics and computing and is a regularly invited keynote speaker at industry conferences.Links Referenced:Azul: https://www.azul.com/ TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: I come bearing ill tidings. Developers are responsible for more than ever these days. Not just the code that they write, but also the containers and the cloud infrastructure that their apps run on. Because serverless means it's still somebody's problem. And a big part of that responsibility is app security from code to cloud. And that's where our friend Snyk comes in. Snyk is a frictionless security platform that meets developers where they are - Finding and fixing vulnerabilities right from the CLI, IDEs, Repos, and Pipelines. Snyk integrates seamlessly with AWS offerings like code pipeline, EKS, ECR, and more! As well as things you're actually likely to be using. Deploy on AWS, secure with Snyk. Learn more at Snyk.co/scream That's S-N-Y-K.co/screamCorey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at AWS AppConfig. Engineers love to solve, and occasionally create, problems. But not when it's an on-call fire-drill at 4 in the morning. Software problems should drive innovation and collaboration, NOT stress, and sleeplessness, and threats of violence. That's why so many developers are realizing the value of AWS AppConfig Feature Flags. Feature Flags let developers push code to production, but hide that that feature from customers so that the developers can release their feature when it's ready. This practice allows for safe, fast, and convenient software development. You can seamlessly incorporate AppConfig Feature Flags into your AWS or cloud environment and ship your Features with excitement, not trepidation and fear. To get started, go to snark.cloud/appconfig. That's snark.cloud/appconfig.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. My guest on this promoted episode today is Scott Sellers, CEO and co-founder of Azul. Scott, thank you for joining me.Scott: Thank you, Corey. I appreciate the opportunity in talking to you today.Corey: So, let's start with what you're doing these days. What is Azul? What do you folks do over there?Scott: Azul is an enterprise software and SaaS company that is focused on delivering more efficient Java solutions for our customers around the globe. We've been around for 20-plus years, and as an entrepreneur, we've really gone through various stages of different growth and different dynamics in the market. But at the end of the day, Azul is all about adding value for Java-based enterprises, Java-based applications, and really endearing ourselves to the Java community.Corey: This feels like the sort of space where there are an awful lot of great business cases to explore. When you look at what's needed in that market, there are a lot of things that pop up. The surprising part to me is that this is the direction that you personally went in. You started your career as a CPU architect, to my understanding. You were then one of the co-founders of 3dfx before it got acquired by Nvidia.You feel like you've spent your career more as a hardware guy than working on the SaaS side of the world. Is that a misunderstanding of your path, or have things changed, or is this just a new direction? Help me understand how you got here from where you were.Scott: I'm not exactly sure what the math would say because I continue to—can't figure out a way to stop time. But you're correct that my academic background, I was an electrical engineer at Princeton and started my career at Silicon Graphics. And that was when I did a lot of fantastic and fascinating work building workstations and high-end graphics systems, you know, back in the day when Silicon Graphics really was the who's who here in Silicon Valley. And so, a lot of my career began in the context of hardware. As you mentioned, I was one of the founders of graphics company called 3dfx that was one of, I think, arguably the pioneer in terms of bringing 3d graphics to the masses, if you will.And we had a great run of that. That was a really fun business to be a part of just because of what was going on in the 3d world. And we took that public and eventually sold that to Nvidia. And at that point, my itch, if you will, was really learning more about the enterprise segment. I'd been involved with professional graphics with SGI, I had been involved with consumer graphics with 3dfx.And I was fascinated just to learn about the enterprise segment. And met a couple people through a mutual friend around the 2001 timeframe, and they started talking about this thing called Java. And you know, I had of course heard about Java, but as a consumer graphics guy, didn't have a lot of knowledge about it or experience with it. And the more I learned about it, recognized that what was going on in the Java world—and credit to Sun for really creating, obviously, not only language, but building a community around Java—and recognized that new evolutions of developer paradigms really only come around once a decade if then, and was convinced and really got excited about the opportunity to ride the wave of Java and build a company around that.Corey: One of the blind spots that I have throughout the entire world of technology—and to be fair, I have many of them, but the one most relevant to this conversation, I suppose, is the Java ecosystem as a whole. I come from a background of being a grumpy Unix sysadmin—because I've never met a happy one of those in my entire career—and as a result, scripting languages is where everything that I worked with started off. And on the rare occasions, I worked in Java shops, it was, “Great. We're going to go—here's a WAR file. Go ahead and deploy this with Tomcat,” or whatever else people are going to use. But basically, “Don't worry your pretty little head about that.”At most, I have to worry about how to configure a heap or whatnot. But it's from the outside looking in, not having to deal with that entire ecosystem as a whole. And what I've seen from that particular perspective is that every time I start as a technologist, or even as a consumer trying to install some random software package in the depths of the internet, and I have to start thinking about Java, it always feels like I'm about to wind up in a confusing world. There are a number of software packages that I installed back in, I want to say the early-2010s or whatnot. “Oh, you need to have a Java runtime installed on your Mac,” for example.And okay, going through Oracle site, do I need the JRE? Do I need the JDK? Oh, there's OpenJDK, which kind of works, kind of doesn't. Amazon got into the space with Corretto, which because that sounds nothing whatsoever, like Java, but strange names coming from Amazon is basically par for the course for those folks. What is the current state of the Java ecosystem, for those of us who have—basically the closest we've ever gotten is JavaScript, which is nothing alike except for the name.Scott: And you know, frankly, given the protection around the name Java—and you know, that is a trademark that's owned by Oracle—it's amazing to me that JavaScript has been allowed to continue to be called JavaScript because as you point out, JavaScript has nothing to do with Java per se.Corey: Well, one thing they do have in common I found out somewhat recently is that Oracle also owns the trademark for JavaScript.Scott: Ah, there you go. Maybe that's why it continues.Corey: They're basically a law firm—three law firms in a trench coat, masquerading as a tech company some days.Scott: Right. But anyway, it is a confusing thing because you know, I think, arguably, JavaScript, by the numbers, probably has more programmers than any other language in the world, just given its popularity as a web language. But to your question about Java specifically, it's had an evolving life, and I think the state where it is today, I think it's in the most exciting place it's ever been. And I'll walk you through kind of why I believe that to be the case.But Java has evolved over time from its inception back in the days when it was called, I think it was Oak when it was originally conceived, and Sun had eventually branded it as Java. And at the time, it truly was owned by Sun, meaning it was proprietary code; it had to be licensed. And even though Sun gave it away, in most cases, it still at the end of the day, it was a commercially licensed product, if you will, and platform. And if you think about today's world, it would not be conceivable to create something that became so popular with programmers that was a commercially licensed product today. It almost would be mandated that it would be open-source to be able to really gain the type of traction that Java has gained.And so, even though Java was really garnering interest, you know, not only within the developer community, but also amongst commercial entities, right, everyone—and the era now I'm talking about is around the 2000 era—all of the major software vendors, whether it was obviously Sun, but then you had Oracle, you had IBM, companies like BEA, were really starting to blossom at that point. It was a—you know, you could almost not find a commercial software entity that was not backing Java. But it was still all controlled by Sun. And all that success ultimately led to a strong outcry from the community saying this has to be open-source; this is too important to be beholden to a single vendor. And that decision was made by Sun prior to the Oracle acquisition, they actually open-sourced the Java runtime code and they created an open-source project called OpenJDK.And to Oracle's credit, when they bought Sun—which I think at the time when you really look back, Oracle really did not have a lot of track record, if you will, of being involved with an open-source community—and I think when Oracle acquired Sun, there was a lot of skepticism as to what's going to happen to Java. Is Oracle going to make this thing, you know, back to the old days, proprietary Oracle, et cetera? And really—Corey: I was too busy being heartbroken over Solaris at that point to pay much attention to the Java stuff, but it felt like it was this—sort of the same pattern, repeated across multiple ecosystems.Scott: Absolutely. And even though Sun had also open-sourced Solaris, with the OpenSolaris project, that was one of the kinds of things that it was still developed very much in a closed environment, and then they would kind of throw some code out into the open world. And no one really ran OpenSolaris because it wasn't fully compatible with Solaris. And so, that was a faint attempt, if you will.But Java was quite different. It was truly all open-sourced, and the big difference that—and again, I give Oracle a lot of credit for this because this was a very important time in the evolution of Java—that Oracle, maintained Sun's commitment to not only continue to open-source Java but most importantly, develop it in the open community. And so, you know, again, back and this is the 2008, ‘09, ‘10 timeframe, the evolution of Java, the decisions, the standards, you know, what goes in the platform, what doesn't, decisions about updates and those types of things, that truly became a community-led world and all done in the open-source. And credit to Oracle for continuing to do that. And that really began the transition away from proprietary implementations of Java to one that, very similar to Linux, has really thrived because of the true open-source nature of what Java is today.And that's enabled more and more companies to get involved with the evolution of Java. If you go to the OpenJDK page, you'll see all of the not only, you know, incredibly talented individuals that are involved with the evolution of Java, but again, a who's who in pretty much every major commercial entities in the enterprise software world is also somehow involved in the OpenJDK community. And so, it really is a very vibrant, evolving standard. And some of the tactical things that have happened along the way in terms of changing how versions of Java are released still also very much in the context of maintaining compatibility and finding that careful balance of evolving the platform, but at the same time, recognizing that there is a lot of Java applications out there, so you can't just take a right-hand turn and forget about the compatibility side of things. But we as a community overall, I think, have addressed that very effectively, and the result has been now I think Java is more popular than ever and continues to—we liken it kind of to the mortar and the brick walls of the enterprise. It's a given that it's going to be used, certainly by most of the enterprises worldwide today.Corey: There's a certain subset of folk who are convinced the Java, “Oh, it's this a legacy programming language, and nothing modern or forward-looking is going to be built in it.” Yeah, those people generally don't know what the internal language stack looks like at places like oh, I don't know, AWS, Google, and a few others, it is very much everywhere. But it also feels, on some level, like, it's a bit below the surface-level of awareness for the modern full-stack developer in some respects, right up until suddenly it's very much not. How is Java evolving in a cloud these days?Scott: Well, what we see happening—you know, this is true for—you know, I'm a techie, so I can talk about other techies. I mean as techies, we all like the new thing, right? I mean, it's not that exciting to talk about a language that's been around for 20-plus years. But that doesn't take away from the fact that we still all use keyboards. I mean, no one really talks about what keyboard they use anymore—unless you're really into keyboards—but at the end of the day, it's still a fundamental tool that you use every single day.And Java is kind of in the same situation. The reason that Java continues to be so fundamental is that it really comes back to kind of reinventing the wheel problem. Are there are other languages that are more efficient to code in? Absolutely. Are there other languages that, you know, have some capabilities that the Java doesn't have? Absolutely.But if you have the ability to reinvent everything from scratch, sure, go for it. And you also don't have to worry about well, can I find enough programmers in this, you know, new hot language, okay, good luck with that. You might be able to find dozens, but when you need to really scale a company into thousands or tens of thousands of developers, good luck finding, you know, everyone that knows, whatever your favorite hot language of the day is.Corey: It requires six years experience in a four-year-old language. Yeah, it's hard to find that, sometimes.Scott: Right. And you know, the reality is, is that really no application ever is developed from scratch, right? Even when an application is, quote, new, immediately, what you're using is frameworks and other things that have written long ago and proven to be very successful.Corey: And disturbing amounts of code copied and pasted from Stack Overflow.Scott: Absolutely.Corey: But that's one of those impolite things we don't say out loud very often.Scott: That's exactly right. So, nothing really is created from scratch anymore. And so, it's all about building blocks. And this is really where this snowball of Java is difficult to stop because there is so much third-party code out there—and by that, I mean, you know, open-source, commercial code, et cetera—that is just so leveraged and so useful to very quickly be able to take advantage of and, you know, allow developers to focus on truly new things, not reinventing the wheel for the hundredth time. And that's what's kind of hard about all these other languages is catching up to Java with all of the things that are immediately available for developers to use freely, right, because most of its open-source. That's a pretty fundamental Catch-22 about when you start talking about the evolution of new languages.Corey: I'm with you so far. The counterpoint though is that so much of what we're talking about in the world of Java is open-source; it is freely available. The OpenJDK, for example, says that right on the tin. You have built a company and you've been in business for 20 years. I have to imagine that this is not one of those stories where, “Oh, all the things we do, we give away for free. But that's okay. We make it up in volume.” Even the venture capitalist mindset tends to run out of patience on those kinds of timescales. What is it you actually do as a business that clearly, obviously delivers value for customers but also results in, you know, being able to meet payroll every week?Scott: Right? Absolutely. And I think what time has shown is that, with one very notable exception and very successful example being Red Hat, there are very, very few pure open-source companies whose business is only selling support services for free software. Most successful businesses that are based on open-source are in one-way shape or form adding value-added elements. And that's our strategy as well.The heart of everything we do is based on free code from OpenJDK, and we have a tremendous amount of business that we are following the Red Hat business model where we are selling support and long-term access and a huge variety of different operating system configurations, older Java versions. Still all free software, though, right, but we're selling support services for that. And that is, in essence, the classic Red Hat business model. And that business for us is incredibly high growth, very fast-moving, a lot of that business is because enterprises are tired of paying the very high price to Oracle for Java support and they're looking for an open-source alternative that is exactly the same thing, but comes in pure open-source form and with a vendor that is as reputable as Oracle. So, a lot of our businesses based on that.However, on top of that, we also have value-added elements. And so, our product that is called Azul Platform Prime is rooted in OpenJDK—it is OpenJDK—but then we've added value-added elements to that. And what those value-added elements create is, in essence, a better Java platform. And better in this context means faster, quicker to warm up, elimination of some of the inconsistencies of the Java runtime in terms of this nasty problem called garbage collection which causes applications to kind of bounce around in terms of performance limitations. And so, creating a better Java is another way that we have monetized our company is value-added elements that are built on top of OpenJDK. And I'd say that part of the business is very typical for the majority of enterprise software companies that are rooted in open-source. They're typically adding value-added components on top of the open-source technology, and that's our similar strategy as well.And then the third evolution for us, which again is very tried-and-true, is evolving the business also to add SaaS offerings. So today, the majority of our customers, even though they deploy in the cloud, they're stuck customer-managed and so they're responsible for where do I want to put my Java runtime on building out my stack and cetera, et cetera. And of course, that could be on-prem, but like I mentioned, the majority are in the cloud. We're evolving our product offerings also to have truly SaaS-based solutions so that customers don't even need to manage those types of stacks on their own anymore.Corey: On some level, it feels like we're talking about two different things when we talk about cloud and when we talk about programming languages, but increasingly, I'm starting to see across almost the entire ecosystem that different languages and different cloud providers are in many ways converging. How do you see Java changing as cloud-native becomes the default rather than the new thing?Scott: Great question. And I think the thing to recognize about, really, most popular programming languages today—I can think of very few exceptions—these languages were created, envisioned, implemented if you will, in a day when cloud was not top-of-mind, and in many cases, certainly in the case of Java, cloud didn't even exist when Java was originally conceived, nor was that the case when you know, other languages, such as Python, or JavaScript, or on and on. So, rethinking how these languages should evolve in very much the context of a cloud-native mentality is a really important initiative that we certainly are doing and I think the Java community is doing overall. And how you architect not only the application, but even the Java runtime itself can be fundamentally different if you know that the application is going to be deployed in the cloud.And I'll give you an example. Specifically, in the world of any type of runtime-based language—and JavaScript is an example of that; Python is an example of that; Java is an example of that—in all of those runtime-based environments, what that basically means is that when the application is run, there's a piece of software that's called the runtime that actually is running that application code. And so, you can think about it as a middleware piece of software that sits between the operating system and the application itself. And so, that runtime layer is common across those languages and those platforms that I mentioned. That runtime layer is evolving, and it's evolving in a way that is becoming more and more cloud-native in it's thinking.The process itself of actually taking the application, compiling it into whatever underlying architecture it may be running on—it could be an x86 instance running on Amazon; it could be, you know, for example, an ARM64, which Amazon has compute instances now that are based on an ARM64 processor that they call Graviton, which is really also kind of altering the price-performance of the compute instances on the AWS platform—that runtime layer magically takes an application that doesn't have to be aware of the underlying hardware and transforms that into a way that can be run. And that's a very expensive process; it's called just-in-time compiling, and that just-in-time compilation, in today's world—which wasn't really based on cloud thinking—every instance, every compute instance that you deploy, that same JIT compilation process is happening over and over again. And even if you deploy 100 instances for scalability, every one of those 100 instances is doing that same work. And so, it's very inefficient and very redundant. Contrast that to a cloud-native thinking: that compilation process should be a service; that service should be done once.The application—you know, one instance of the application is actually run and there are the other ninety-nine should just reuse that compilation process. And that shared compiler service should be scalable and should be able to scale up when applications are launched and you need more compilation resources, and then scaled right back down when you're through the compilation process and the application is more moving into the—you know, to the runtime phase of the application lifecycle. And so, these types of things are areas that we and others are working on in terms of evolving the Java runtime specifically to be more cloud-native.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Sysdig. Sysdig secures your cloud from source to run. They believe, as do I, that DevOps and security are inextricably linked. If you wanna learn more about how they view this, check out their blog, it's definitely worth the read. To learn more about how they are absolutely getting it right from where I sit, visit Sysdig.com and tell them that I sent you. That's S Y S D I G.com. And my thanks to them for their continued support of this ridiculous nonsense.Corey: This feels like it gets even more critical when we're talking about things like serverless functions across basically all the cloud providers these days, where there's the whole setup, everything in the stack, get it running, get it listening, ready to go, to receive a single request and then shut itself down. It feels like there are a lot of operational efficiencies possible once you start optimizing from a starting point of yeah, this is what that environment looks like, rather than us big metal servers sitting in a rack 15 years ago.Scott: Yeah. I think the evolution of serverless appears to be headed more towards serverless containers as opposed to serverless functions. Serverless functions have a bunch of limitations in terms of when you think about it in the context of a complex, you know, microservices-based deployment framework. It's just not very efficient, to spin up and spin down instances of a function if that actually is being—it is any sort of performance or latency-sensitive type of applications. If you're doing something very rarely, sure, it's fine; it's efficient, it's elegant, et cetera.But any sort of thing that has real girth to it—and girth probably means that's what's driving your application infrastructure costs, that's what's driving your Amazon bill every month—those types of things typically are not going to be great for starting and stopping functional instances. And so, serverless is evolving more towards thinking about the container itself not having to worry about the underlying operating system or the instance on Amazon that it's running on. And that's where, you know, we see more and more of the evolution of serverless is thinking about it at a container-level as opposed to a functional level. And that appears to be a really healthy steady state, so it gets the benefits of not having to worry about all the underlying stuff, but at the same time, doesn't have the downside of trying to start and stop functional influences at a given point in time.Corey: It seems to me that there are really two ways of thinking about cloud. The first is what I think a lot of companies do their first outing when they're going into something like AWS. “Okay, we're going to get a bunch of virtual machines that they call instances in AWS, we're going to run things just like it's our data center except now data transfer to the internet is terrifyingly expensive.” The more quote-unquote, “Cloud-native” way of thinking about this is what you're alluding to where there's, “Here's some code that I wrote. I want to throw it to my cloud provider and just don't tell me about any of the infrastructure parts. Execute this code when these conditions are met and leave me alone.”Containers these days seem to be one of our best ways of getting there with a minimum of fuss and friction. What are you seeing in the enterprise space as far as adoption of those patterns go? Or are we seeing cloud repatriation showing up as a real thing and I'm just not in the right place to see it?Scott: Well, I think as a cloud journey evolves, there's no question that—and in fact it's even silly to say that cloud is here to stay because I think that became a reality many, many years ago. So really, the question is, what are the challenges now with cloud deployments? Cloud is absolutely a given. And I think you stated earlier, it's rare that, whether it's a new company or a new application, at least in most businesses that don't have specific regulatory requirements, that application is highly, highly likely to be envisioned to be initially and only deployed in the cloud. That's a great thing because you have so many advantages of not having to purchase infrastructure in advance, being able to tap into all of the various services that are available through the cloud providers. No one builds databases anymore; you're just tapping into the service that's provided by Azure or AWS, or what have you.And, you know, just that specific example is a huge amount of savings in terms of just overhead, and license costs, and those types of stuff, and there's countless examples of that. And so, the services that are available in the cloud are unquestioned. So, there's countless advantages of why you want to be in the cloud. The downside, however, the cloud that is, if at the end of the day, AWS, Microsoft with Azure, Google with GCP, they are making 30% margin on that cloud infrastructure. And in the days of hardware, when companies would actually buy their servers from Dell, or HP, et cetera, those businesses are 5% margin.And so, where's that 25% going? Well, the 25% is being paid for by the users of cloud, and as a result of that, when you look at it purely from an operational cost perspective, it is more expensive to run in the cloud than it is back in the legacy days, right? And that's not to say that the industry has made the wrong choice because there's so many advantages of being in cloud, there's no doubt about it. And there should be—you know, and the cloud providers deserve to take some amount of margin to provide the services that they provide; there's no doubt about that. The question is, how do you do the best of all worlds?And you know, there is a great blog by a couple of the partners in Andreessen Horowitz, they called this the Cloud Paradox. And the Cloud Paradox really talks about the challenges. It's really a Catch-22; how do you get all the benefits of cloud but do that in a way that is not overly taxing from a cost perspective? And a lot of it comes down to good practices and making sure that you have the right monitoring and culture within an enterprise to make sure that cloud cost is a primary thing that is discussed and metric, but then there's also technologies that can help so that you don't have to even think about what you really don't ever want to do: repatriating, which is about the concept of actually moving off the cloud back to the old way of doing things. So certainly, I don't believe repatriation is a practical solution for ongoing and increasing cloud costs. I believe technology is a solution to that.And there are technologies such as our product, Azul Platform Prime, that in essence, allows you to do more with less, right, get all the benefits of cloud, deploy in your Amazon environment, deploy in your Azure environment, et cetera, but imagine if instead of needing a hundred instances to handle your given workload, you could do that with 50 or 60. Tomorrow, that means that you can start savings and being able to do that simply by changing your JVM from a standard OpenJDK or Oracle JVM to something like Platform Prime, you can immediately start to start seeing the benefits from that. And so, a lot of our business now and our growth is coming from companies that are screaming under the ongoing cloud costs and trying to keep them in line, and using technology like Azul Platform Prime to help mitigate those costs.Corey: I think that there is a somewhat foolish approach that I'm seeing taken by a lot of folks where there are some companies that are existentially anti-cloud, if for no other reason than because if the cloud wins, then they don't really have a business anymore. The problem I see with that is that it seems that their solution across the board is to turn back the clock where if I'm going to build a startup, it's time for me to go buy some servers and a rack somewhere and start negotiating with bandwidth providers. I don't see that that is necessarily viable for almost anyone. We aren't living in 1995 anymore, despite how much some people like to pretend we are. It seems like if there are workloads—for which I agree, cloud is not necessarily an economic fit, first, I feel like the market will fix that in the fullness of time, but secondly, on an individual workload belonging in a certain place is radically different than, “Oh, none of our stuff should live on cloud. Everything belongs in a data center.” And I just think that companies lose all credibility when they start pretending that it's any other way.Scott: Right. I'd love to see the reaction of the venture capitalists' face when an entrepreneur walks in and talks about how their strategy for deploying their SaaS service is going to be buying hardware and renting some space in the local data center.Corey: Well, there is a good cost control method, if you think about it. I mean very few engineers are going to accidentally spin up an $8 million cluster in a data center a second time, just because there's no space left for it.Scott: And you're right; it does happen in the cloud as well. It's just, I agree with you completely that as part of the evolution of cloud, in general, is an ever-improving aspect of cost and awareness of cost and building in technologies that help mitigate that cost. So, I think that will continue to evolve. I think, you know, if you really think about the cloud journey, cost, I would say, is still in early phases of really technologies and practices and processes of allowing enterprises to really get their head around cost. I'd still say it's a fairly immature industry that is evolving quickly, just given the importance of it.And so, I think in the coming years, you're going to see a radical improvement in terms of cost awareness and technologies to help with costs, that again allows you to the best of all worlds. Because, you know, if you go back to the Dark Ages and you start thinking about buying servers and infrastructure, then you are really getting back to a mentality of, “I've got to deploy everything. I've got to buy software for my database. I've got to deploy it. What am I going to do about my authentication service? So, I got to buy this vendor's, you know, solution, et cetera.” And so, all that stuff just goes away in the world of cloud, so it's just not practical, in this day and age I think, to think about really building a business that's not cloud-native from the beginning.Corey: I really want to thank you for spending so much time talking to me about how you view the industry, the evolution we've seen in the Java ecosystem, and what you've been up to. If people want to learn more, where's the best place for them to find you?Scott: Well, there's a thing called a website that you may not have heard of, it's really cool.Corey: Can I build it in Java?Scott: W-W-dot—[laugh]. Yeah. Azul website obviously has an awful lot of information about that, Azul is spelled A-Z-U-L, and we sometimes get the question, “How in the world did you name a company—why did you name it Azul?”And it's kind of a funny story because back in the days of Azul when we thought about, hey, we want to be big and successful, and at the time, IBM was the gold standard in terms of success in the enterprise world. And you know, they were Big Blue, so we said, “Hey, we're going to be a little blue. Let's be Azul.” So, that's where we began. So obviously, go check out our site.We're very present, also, in the Java community. We're, you know, many developer conferences and talks. We sponsor and run many of what's called the Java User Groups, which are very popular 10-, 20-person meetups that happen around the globe on a regular basis. And so, you know, come check us out. And I appreciate everyone's time in listening to the podcast today.Corey: No, thank you very much for spending as much time with me as you have. It's appreciated.Scott: Thanks, Corey.Corey: Scott Sellers, CEO and co-founder of Azul. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with an entire copy of the terms and conditions from Oracle's version of the JDK.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Logistics Matters with DC VELOCITY
Guest: Mark Dancer of Network for Business Innovation on how supply chains are being reborn; The rail strike is averted; New efforts to move the backlog of containers at ocean ports

Logistics Matters with DC VELOCITY

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 20:08


Our guest on this week's episode is  Mark Dancer, CEO of the Network for Business Innovation. He is a speaker for two sessions at next week's CSCMP EDGE conference in Nashville. He shares some of his insights and previews his presentations, including his view that supply chains are not really broken, but are being reborn. He also discusses the need for resilient, responsive, and regenerative supply chains and what they will look like in the future.An important labor agreement was tentatively reached this week between America's railroads and labor unions. A threatened strike has been averted. While not yet final, the agreements assure that products continue to ride the rails for now. A strike would have devastated supply chains and further hurt the economy. We will tell you what is involved in the agreement and what it means for the industry to have labor peace.While supply chains are beginning to get back to normal, there are still thousands of containers stranded at our nation's ports. We will tell of some new efforts being made to get those containers moving again, which should soften supply chain disruptions. The problem is that partners are not sharing data properly to meet the new federal regulations in the Ocean Shipping Reform Act, which is designed to avoid the container congestion.DC Velocity's sister publication CSCMP's Supply Chain Quarterly  offers a podcast series called Supply Chain in the Fast Lane.  It is co-produced with the Council of Supply Chain Management Professionals. The second season of eight episodes is fully available and focuses on supply chain digitalization.  Go to your favorite podcast platform to subscribe.Articles and resources mentioned in this episode:Network for Business InnovationTentative agreement averts railroad strikeLooming railroad strike threatens supply chainsPorts need better data sharing to meet OSRA requirements, groups sayVisit DCVelocity.com for the latest news. Visit Supply Chain QuarterlyListen to CSCMP and Supply Chain Quarterly's Supply Chain in the Fast Lane podcastListen to Supply Chain Quarterly's Top 10 Supply Chain Threats podcastSend feedback about this podcast to podcast@dcvelocity.com.Podcast sponsored by:  HysterOther linksAbout DC VELOCITYSubscribe to DC VELOCITYSign up for our FREE newslettersAdvertise with DC VELOCITYTop 10 Supply Chain Management Podcasts

Red Hat X Podcast Series
Securing cloud-native applications in Openshift with Calico

Red Hat X Podcast Series

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 28:03


In this podcast, Dhiraj Sehgal, Director, Product and Solution Marketing for Tigera will talkabout key takeaways shared by Openshift and Calico enterprise users to address the securityand compliance issues with active security initiatives. Tigera  inventor of Calico, one of the most widely deployed Kubernetes CNI in the world with over 2M nodes and 500K clusters. Dhiraj will also touch upon how Calico and OpenShift jointly address the container security, cloud-native network security, and compliance challenges and consequently accelerate your cloud-native application deployments.

30 Minutes to Wealth
S5E14 - Investing in Modular Homes with ROXBOX Containers

30 Minutes to Wealth

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 23:23


Carmen and Jordan meet with Anthony Halsch, founder and CEO of Roxbox Containers, a Denver based manufacturing company that designs, engineers, and builds custom structures out of shipping containers. In this episode, Anthony shares the story of how Roxbox was created and how the company has grown to service clients all over the world in commercial, industrial, residential, office and food & beverage industries.  Anthony talks us through why an investor may gravitate towards the custom shipping container route compared to a traditional build, time efficiencies, the innovative design and build process,  financing structure and more. This is a fascinating episode for those looking to get creative in their real estate and business endeavors.  For more information visit Profunds.ca For more information on real estate investing & 30 Minutes to Wealth: Website: www.30minutestowealth.com Instagram: @30MinutestoWealth Facebook: www.facebook.com/30MinutesToWealth Disclaimer: The views and opinions expressed on the show are those of the individual guests and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of 30 Minutes to Wealth. Some episodes are for mature audiences and include language not suitable for young listeners.

Gus Clemens on Wine explores and explains the world of wine in simple, humorous, fun posts

This is the weekly newspaper column.Wine's glass bottle blues 9-14-2022Winemakers are among the most conscientious stewards of the environment. When vineyards pass down for generations and some of your creations will not be consumed for decades, thinking long term and big picture becomes part of your DNA.Several studies show glass bottles account for the largest percentage of the wine industry's greenhouse-gas emissions. Glass production involves a large amount of heat and energy. Bottles and packing material needed to protect bottles are heavy, driving up transportation costs both in dollars and pollution.Many wine bottles are a one-use item. Then they go to landfills where they will last for thousands of years. There is some recycling, but less than one-third of glass is recycled in the United States. Europe does better with around 75 percent. In many cases, however, recycling does not mean melting to make new glass. Much of “recycled” glass is crushed and used to make paving material.Schemes to buy back bottles and reuse them haven't worked well so far. Even when people return bottles, cleaning the bottles—especially removing labels—is problematic.If you ignore environmental concerns, there remains the problem of cost. Wine bottle costs continue to spiral, increasing 20 percent in the last two years. Bottles from China, a major supplier for the U.S., face a 25 percent tariff. Many of Europe's bottles were made in Ukraine. The Russian invasion virtually eliminated that source.Winemakers respond by exploring options. Cans are easier to recycle, but require significant energy to manufacture and limit aging to about 18 months. Bag-in-a-box wine is environmentally friendly and costs much less to transport, but does not work for aging wine. Plastic bottles and cartons like those used for milk and juice have a similar problem. The alternatives work for wine expected to be consumed young, but not when bottle age is essential. Barolo riserva, for instance, legally cannot be sold until four years of bottle aging and is best after 10 years.Glass wine bottles won't go away. Reusing bottles and recycling more glass must be in the future, along with alternative packaging.Tasting notes:• Bota Box Breeze Dry Rosé, California: Fresh red fruits, low-alcohol, low carbs. $20-23 for 3 liters, equivalent to $5-6 a 750 ml bottle. Also comes in 1.5 ml box, 500 ml carton (similar to a juice carton). Containers are 100% recyclable. Link to my reviewLast round: What do you call a Frenchman in sandals? Phillipe Phloppe. Wine time.Thank you for reading Gus Clemens on Wine. This post is public so feel free to share it.Gus Clemens on Wine is a reader-supported publication. To receive new posts and support my work, consider becoming a free or paid subscriber.Email: wine@cwadv.comNewsletter: gusclemens.substack.comWebsite:  gusclemensonwine.comFacebook:  facebook.com/GusClemensOnWine/posts/Twitter: @gusclemensLinks worth exploringDiary of a Serial Hostess Ins and outs of entertaining; witty anecdotes of life in the stylish lane.As We Eat Multi-platform storytelling explores how food connects, defines, inspires.Balanced Diet Original recipes, curated links about food systems, recipe reviews. This is a public episode. If you'd like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit gusclemens.substack.com/subscribe

52 Weeks of Cloud
52-weeks-aws-certified-developer-containers

52 Weeks of Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 20:21


If you enjoyed this video, here are additional resources to look at:Coursera + Duke Specialization: Building Cloud Computing Solutions at Scale Specialization: https://www.coursera.org/specializations/building-cloud-computing-solutions-at-scalePython, Bash, and SQL Essentials for Data Engineering Specialization: https://www.coursera.org/specializations/python-bash-sql-data-engineering-dukeAWS Certified Solutions Architect - Professional (SAP-C01) Cert Prep: 1 Design for Organizational Complexity:https://www.linkedin.com/learning/aws-certified-solutions-architect-professional-sap-c01-cert-prep-1-design-for-organizational-complexity/design-for-organizational-complexity?autoplay=trueO'Reilly Book: Practical MLOps: https://www.amazon.com/Practical-MLOps-Operationalizing-Machine-Learning/dp/1098103017O'Reilly Book: Python for DevOps: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B082P97LDW/O'Reilly Book: Developing on AWS with C#: A Comprehensive Guide on Using C# to Build Solutions on the AWS Platformhttps://www.amazon.com/Developing-AWS-Comprehensive-Solutions-Platform/dp/1492095877Pragmatic AI: An Introduction to Cloud-based Machine Learning: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07FB8F8QP/Pragmatic AI Labs Book: Python Command-Line Tools: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0855FSFYZPragmatic AI Labs Book: Cloud Computing for Data Analysis: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0992BN7W8Pragmatic AI Book: Minimal Python: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0855NSRR7Pragmatic AI Book: Testing in Python: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0855NSRR7Subscribe to Pragmatic AI Labs YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCNDfiL0D1LUeKWAkRE1xO5QSubscribe to 52 Weeks of AWS Podcast: https://52-weeks-of-cloud.simplecast.comView content on noahgift.com: https://noahgift.com/View content on Pragmatic AI Labs Website: https://paiml.com/

Linux User Space
Episode 3:06: How to Clear

Linux User Space

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 77:11


Coming up in this episode 1. We try to contain ourselves. 2. Clearly, all the history you need 3. Our clear hindsight 4. We plan to install the most popular distro of all time 0:00 Cold Open 1:19 VM's, Containers and Bundles, oh my! 16:09 The Origin Story 18:21 The History: 2015 20:00 2016 22:08 2017 22:59 2018 24:09 2019 25:34 2020 27:05 2021 27:41 2022 29:00 Thoughts on Clear Linux 1:09:26 Next Time: Emacs, Topics (and Alpine) 1:15:45 Stinger Support us on Patreon! (https://www.patreon.com/linuxuserspace) Banter What's a container? What's a virtual machine? What's a Clear Container? What are Bundles? Announcements Give us a sub on YouTube (https://linuxuserspace.show/youtube) You can watch us live on Twitch (https://linuxuserspace.show/twitch) the day after an episode drops. Clear Linux the History 2015 - February 6th Clear Linux was officially released. The only reference we found (https://community.clearlinux.org/t/happy-birthday-to-us/7281) 2015 - February 9 - The first downloadable images, marked 300, 310, 320, 330 and 340, show up at clearlinux.org . Arjan van de Ven penned an article (https://lwn.net/Articles/644675/) 2016 - April 22 - Announcement that the Container-only OS will now start shipping a desktop for developers. (https://clearlinux.org/news-blogs/clarity-desktop) In parallel, Robert Nesius announces (https://clearlinux.org/news-blogs/clear-linux-installer-v20) Enter, Flatpak (https://clearlinux.org/news-blogs/end-user-desktop-applications-clearlinux). The auto-updater is here (https://clearlinux.org/news-blogs/end-user-desktop-applications-clearlinux) XFCE, while still available, is no longer the default desktop. It's Gnome 3.24. (https://www.phoronix.com/review/clear-linux-gnome) The first Issue in Github (https://github.com/clearlinux/distribution/issues/433) about ffmpeg not being included shows up. "How to Clear" (https://github.com/clearlinux/how-to-clear) Wireguard is added (https://github.com/clearlinux/distribution/issues/17#issuecomment-410392156) Snap was and will remain unavailable (https://github.com/clearlinux/distribution/issues/265#issuecomment-436055882) and unsupported. A new installer beta is floating around (https://www.phoronix.com/news/Clear-Linux-Desktop-Live-Beta) The public forum is live (https://community.clearlinux.org/t/welcome-to-the-clear-linux-community-forum/7)! Cups enabled by default. (https://github.com/clearlinux/distribution/issues/563#issuecomment-477317390) version 2.0 of the new installer is released (https://www.phoronix.com/news/Clear-Linux-Desktop-Installer-2) with a full graphical interface! An appeal (https://web.archive.org/web/20190520111801/https://clearlinux.org/news-blogs/linux-os-linux-developers) to Linux developers. Offline installations are now available (https://community.clearlinux.org/t/clear-linux-os-now-supports-offline-installs/1845) exFAT is available (https://github.com/clearlinux/distribution/issues/62#issuecomment-541767114) The distro will focus less on Desktop (https://community.clearlinux.org/t/changes-coming-to-clear-linux-direction-in-2020/4337/42) Clear Linux pulls out a win (https://www.phoronix.com/review/endeavour-salient-ryzen) over EndeavourOS on the Ryzen 9 5900x. Ubuntu 21.04 enjoys plenty of kernel performance improvements, but Clear wins (https://www.phoronix.com/review/ubuntu-2104-clear/4) in all but a handful of benchmarks. Against Windows 11, Windows 10, Ubuntu 21.10, 21.04, and Arch Linux, Clear Linux wins in 68 out of 102 benchmarks. Windows 11 won 1 (https://www.phoronix.com/review/windows11-linux-11900k/8). The first third-party swupd repo (https://clearfraction.cf/) (that we could find)! Clear switches from the -O2 compiler flag for the kernel to -O3 for more SPEED (https://www.phoronix.com/news/Clear-Linux-O3-Kernel) More Announcements Want to have a topic covered or have some feedback? - send us an email, contact@linuxuserspace.show Clear Linux Links Clear Linux Home Page (https://clearlinux.org) Clear Linux Forum (https://community.clearlinux.org/) Clear Linux on GitHub (https://github.com/clearlinux) Clear is part of 01.org, Intel's open source technology (https://01.org) How To Clear (https://github.com/clearlinux/how-to-clear) Documentation (https://docs.01.org/clearlinux/latest/index.html) System Requirements (https://docs.01.org/clearlinux/latest/reference/system-requirements.html) OS Introduction (https://www.slideshare.net/KariFredheim/clear-linux-os-introduction) Architecture Overview (https://www.slideshare.net/KariFredheim/clear-linux-os-architecture-overview) How Clear mounts stuff (https://clearlinux.org/news-blogs/where-etcfstab-clear-linux) Housekeeping Catch these and other great topics as they unfold on our Subreddit or our News channel on Discord. * Linux User Space subreddit (https://linuxuserspace.show/reddit) * Linux User Space Discord Server (https://linuxuserspace.show/discord) * Linux User Space Telegram (https://linuxuserspace.show/telegram) * Linux User Space Matrix (https://linuxuserspace.show/matrix) * Linux User Space Twitch (https://linuxuserspace.show/twitch) * Linux User Space Mastodon (https://linuxuserspace.show/mastodon) * Linux User Space Twitter (https://linuxuserspace.show/twitter) Next Time We will discuss GNU Emacs (https://www.gnu.org/software/emacs/) and the history. We also hope to have a couple of topics and some feedback. Come back in two weeks for more Linux User Space Stay tuned and interact with us on Twitter, Mastodon, Telegram, Matrix, Discord whatever. Give us your suggestions on our subreddit r/LinuxUserSpace Join the conversation. Talk to us, and give us more ideas. All the links in the show notes and on linuxuserspace.show. We would like to acknowledge our top patrons. Thank you for your support! Producer Bruno John Co-Producer Johnny Sravan Tim Contributor Advait CubicleNate Eduardo S. Jill and Steve LiNuXsys666 Nicholas Paul sleepyeyesvince

Kubernetes Podcast from Google
Security, Access and War, with Kateryna Ivashchenko

Kubernetes Podcast from Google

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 39:00 Very Popular


Kateryna Ivashchenko is a Senior Demand Generation Manager at Teleport, an organizer of community events, and a supporter of the developer community in her home country of Ukraine. Do you have something cool to share? Some questions? Let us know: web: kubernetespodcast.com mail: kubernetespodcast@google.com twitter: @kubernetespod News of the week Introducing Ambient Mesh in Istio Istio 1.15 Linkerd 2.12 Linkerd and the Gateway API Symbiosis Cuber nay-tace Reddit discussion VMware Tanzu announcments from VMware Explore Isovalent raises $40m Series B Kubernetes Blog: PodSecurityPolicy: The Historical Context Pod Security Admission Controller in Stable CSI Inline Volumes have graduated to GA cgroup v2 graduates to GA Kubernetes was never designed for batch jobs by Kurt Schelfthout 7 years of GKE General Availability Links from the interview Portworx Teleport 24 February 2022: Russia invades Ukraine BeyondCorp Teleport open source hunter2 Okta breach Sandworm: A New Era of Cyberwar and the Hunt for the Kremlin’s Most Dangerous Hackers by Andy Greenberg War in Ukraine Kateryna’s sister’s T-shirt Independence Day Chris Lentricchia and Operation Dvoretskyi CNCF crowdfunding DevOpsDays Kyiv International Snack Exchange Kateryna Ivashchenko on Twitter

DevOps and Docker Talk
Managing Enterprise Kubernetes with Replicated

DevOps and Docker Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 58:44 Very Popular


Going to KubeCon? Me too! We're planning a meetup on my Discord server #kubecon channel.The Loot Box is Live! Get your DevOps and tech-inspired t-shirts, mugs, and more.Bret is joined by Marc Campbell of Replicated to discuss the challenges of deploying your software on other people's Kubernetes.Following a discussion of the problems Replicated is solving, they go over all the great open source projects they are developing for deploying, managing, and troubleshooting Kubernetes.Streamed live on YouTube on June 23, 2022.Unedited live recording of this show on YouTube (Ep #175).★Topics★Replicated Replicated OSS Projects Kubernetes TroubleshooterSchema Hero Kubelist podcast, CNCF project leader interviewsEnterprise Ready assessment and podcastkURL - Customize your Kubernetes Installer KOTS - Manage COTS on K8s Find Outdated ImagesUnfork your custom Helm charts ★Marc Campbell★Marc Campbell on Twitter★Join my Community★Best coupons for my Docker and Kubernetes coursesChat with us on our Discord Server Vital DevOpsHomepage bretfisher.com ★ Support this podcast on Patreon ★

Getup Kubicast
#99 - Kubernetes 1.25 - O que há de novo?

Getup Kubicast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 43:22


Com alguns de seus companheiros de Getup, João Brito comenta as mudanças mais relevantes da versão 1.25 do Kubernetes. Algumas delas são a remoção definitiva do PSP (PodSecurityPolicy), a depreciação do suporte para GlusterFS e a morte do Autoscaling v.2 beta 1. Tem também a entrada, ainda em estágio alfa, do recurso de namespace de Linux (não o do Kubernetes, heim!?) e o avanço para estável das features Pod Security Admission e Local Ephemeral Storage Capacity Isolation.Outra novidade é que o PDB (Pod Disruption Budget) vai para versão default, por isso recomendamos que mantenham os deploys produtivos com pelo menos duas réplicas para não ter dor de cabeça na hora de uma atualização, por exemplo.Em meio às observações da nova versão, a turma falou sobre os prós e contras de trabalhar com um cluster gerenciado vs um cluster no On-Premise; e se tem alguma future gate que faz falta num cluster de produção.LINKS do que foi comentado no programa:Artigo da Karol Valencia da Aqua Security: https://blog.aquasec.com/kubernetes-version-1.25KubiLab - Vídeo tutorial do Adonai Costa sobre o KEDA: https://gtup.me/KubilabKeda RECOMENDAÇÕES dos participantes:One Punch Man (livro de mangá)Attack on Titan (série de mangá)The Sandman (filme) Narradores de Javé (filme)Five Days at Memorial (série na Apple TV+)CONVITE! Estamos perto do Kubicast #100 e vamos comemorar esse marco de um jeito muito especial! No formato “ASK ME ANYTHING”, a audiência vai poder tirar todas as suas dúvidas sobre Kubernetes e afins! Inscreva-se para participar: https://getup.io/participe-do-kubicast-100. O evento acontece no dia 15/9 às 19h no Zoom.SOBRE O KUBICASTO Kubicast é uma produção da Getup, especialista em Kubernetes. Todos os episódios do podcast estão no site da Getup e nas principais plataformas de áudio digital. Alguns deles estão registrados no YT. #DevOps #Kubernetes #Containers #Kubicast 

IBM Analytics Insights Podcasts
Let's talk tech strategy: IBM strategy with Roger Premo, General Manager, Strategy and Corporate Development at IBM. The state of the industry, hybrid cloud, containers, competition. We hit it all.

IBM Analytics Insights Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 51:02


Let's talk tech strategy: IBM strategy with Roger Premo, General Manager, Strategy and Corporate Development at IBM. The state of the industry, hybrid cloud, containers, competition. We hit it all.Show Notes02:00 Roger Premos path to strategy08:37 First impressions of IBM10:42 Hybrid cloud15:33 Facts to support hybrid18:57 Cloud's future21:40 Why containers, Why Redhat?25:55 Addressing lock-in30:08 The IBM bar pitch34:04 Start with outcomes36:10 The most exciting technology38:50 Continuous learning43:09 The chips actLinkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/ropremo/Website: https://www.ibm.com/Want to be featured as a guest on Making Data Simple? Reach out to us at almartintalksdata@gmail.com and tell us why you should be next. The Making Data Simple Podcast is hosted by Al Martin, WW VP Technical Sales, IBM, where we explore trending technologies, business innovation, and leadership ... while keeping it simple & fun.

Afternoon Drive with John Maytham
NSRI swimming survival containers

Afternoon Drive with John Maytham

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 7:07


Guest: Andrew Ingram | Drowning Prevention Manager   at NSRISee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Kube Cuddle
Divya Mohan

Kube Cuddle

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 65:10


Show notes:Thanks for all of the support that the podcast is getting on Patreon. If you'd like to help keep the podcast sustainable for only $2 a month, you can get more info here.Episode TranscriptDivya'sTwitterRich's TwitterKube Cuddle TwitterLinks:Content creators mentioned:Kunal | Saiyam | Anaïs | Nana | SavithaKelsey HightowerTim BannisterSIG DocsKubernetes docs | Rancher docs | Litmus Chaos docsThe CNCF SlackThe CNCF Ambassador applicationDivya's talk on burnoutDivya's talk on the CNCF LandscapeMatty and Whitney's talk about the CNCF LandscapeLogo by the amazing Emily Griffin.Music by Monplaisir.Thanks for listening. ★ Support this podcast on Patreon ★

GOTO - Today, Tomorrow and the Future
Expert Talk: What's Next For .NET? • Hannes Lowette & Martin Thwaites

GOTO - Today, Tomorrow and the Future

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 43:05 Transcription Available


This interview was recorded for GOTO Unscripted at CodeNode in London.gotopia.techRead the full transcription of this interview hereHannes Lowette - Head of Learning & Development at AxxesMartin Thwaites - Developer Advocate at HoneycombDESCRIPTION.NET has been undergoing a massive development since its very beginning. Martin Thwaites, developer advocate for Honeycomb, and Hannes Lowette, head of learning and development at Axxes, enjoyed every step of its path.Join them as they reveal important milestones in .NET's evolution as well as gain practical insights into web performance, running .NET at scale, and how to implement observability.RECOMMENDED BOOKSAnthony Brown • Reactive Applications with Akka.NETJamie Allen • Effective AkkaRoestenburg, Bakker & Williams • Akka in Action 1st Ed.Francisco Lopez-Sancho Abraham • Akka in Action 2nd Ed.Chantzis, Stais, Calderon, Deirmentzoglou & Woods • Practical IoT HackingTwitterLinkedInFacebookLooking for a unique learning experience?Attend the next GOTO conference near you! Get your ticket at gotopia.techSUBSCRIBE TO OUR YOUTUBE CHANNEL - new videos posted almost daily.Discovery MattersA collection of stories and insights on matters of discovery that advance life...Listen on: Apple Podcasts Spotify Health, Wellness & Performance Catalyst w/ Dr. Brad CooperLooking for a catalyst to optimize your health, wellness & performance? You've found it!!Listen on: Apple Podcasts Spotify

Getup Kubicast
Kubicast #98 - Kubernetes no Azure e .NET com Renato Groffe

Getup Kubicast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 46:37


Nesse episódio, trazemos o ilustre Renato Groffe, o cara das lives de Azure, .NET e desenvolvimento de software em geral. Engenheiro de Software Sênior e MVP da Microsoft, o Renato está com o .NET desde que tudo era mato!  Para explorar tudo o que ele sabe a respeito, falamos sobre .NET no Kubernetes, Linux Containers, benefícios de rodar Kubernetes no AKS, tracing para encontrar os bugs em microsserviços e Azure DevOps. LINKS do que comentamos no episódio:Kubicast #60 - http://gtup.me/kubicast-60LinkedIn do Renato - https://www.linkedin.com/in/renatogroffe/Medium do Renato - https://renatogroffe.medium.com/Coding Night - https://www.youtube.com/codingnightCanal .Net - https://www.youtube.com/canaldotnetGitHub - https://github.com/renatogroffeAzure na prática - https://azurenapratica.com/ - https://www.youtube.com/azurenapraticaAs RECOMENDAÇÕES do programa:Acompanhar os jogos da NBA AL- Andalus: O Legado - Documentário no canal HistoryTrês anúncios para um crime - Filme que está na Star +LEMBRETE! Estamos perto do Kubicast #100 e vamos comemorar esse marco de um jeito especial! Aguarde! SOBRE O KUBICASTO Kubicast é uma produção da Getup, especialista em Kubernetes. Todos os episódios do podcast estão no site da Getup e nas principais plataformas de áudio digital. Alguns deles estão registrados no YT. #DevOps #Kubernetes #Containers #Kubicast #AzureDevOps #.NET

The Wright Conversations
Ep. 6 - A Conversation About Creating Containers

The Wright Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 18:45


Hey everyone! Welcome to today's episode of the Wright Conversations Podcast! For today's episode, I will be talking about the concept of a container, creating containers, and I'll be reading some of my clients thoughts about the use of containers in their lives. I'll also get into how, when, where, and why you should be creating containers.   Let's delve in!   In this Episode You'll Learn: [02:15] Finding answers. [05:57] Creating a container separate from the rest of life. [09:17] Setting the intention for a container. [11:39] The safe space. [13:38] Consent. [17:04] How to create containers in your life. [17:52] Your action item.   Quotes:  “When we create a container for ourselves, we can then not have it spill over into the other parts of our lives.” [08:16] “You get to create the agreements inside this container.” [14:47]   Connect with Rachel Wright Website:            https://rachelwrightnyc.com Instagram:          @thewright_rachel Twitter:              @thewrightrachel   WIN A FREE INTIMACY AFTER DARK DECK!   Get 30% OFF the NEW After Dark Deck! Use Promo Code: Rachel   Get your Zumio Discount!   Call to Action Please if you love this episode, and know someone else who is a passionate soul on a mission just like you share it with your friends and others. To help this podcast grow please leave an iTunes review and don't forget to subscribe.

Cybr Podcast
DevOps, Containers, Kubernetes, and their security implications

Cybr Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 34:39


In this episode, we talk about DevOps, what containers are and when they're helpful, and Kubernetes. We also discuss security concerns to be aware of when using these technologies. Our guest, Chad Crowell, has extensive experience as a DevOps engineer and working with cloud environments. He's a Microsoft Certified Trainer and author, and currently a Director of IT for an IT services provider.

Ancestral Kitchen
#39 - The Sustainable Kitchen: Practical Advice

Ancestral Kitchen

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 73:48


From our kitchens, through what we do every single day, we can make a huge difference in the impact we have on the world. - Alison Try to find what the land around you can provide and use that in your kitchen. That is the absolutely central thing to making your kitchen sustainable. - Alison The idea of a sustainable kitchen is simultaneously alluring, and intimidating; not the least of which because as interest in this subject has grown, an entire host of products have ironically cropped feed on our lack of confidence and self-questioning when it comes to the world of ethical sustainability. However, there is a type of sustainability that is, well, sustainable, and that is what we talk about in this episode. We also address some of the reasons we think it is so important to work towards a sustainable kitchen, and some of the practical tips we use to achieve this goal. We have not always been so destructive, and extractive, and disposable in our habits and in our kitchens. Let's look back at what our grandmothers and great-grandmothers did. - Alison Want more? Come be part of our community and help support the continued work of the podcast! Our podcast is sponsored by our patrons and listeners who are also supported by the extra content that we share (think exclusive podcasts, live chats, cook ups and recipes) over at our http://patreon.com/ancestralkitchenpodcast (Patreon community!) From $5 a month (or equivalent in your currency) you'll be helping us with the costs of recording, editing and putting this work out into the world. And you'll get to be part of our community on a deeper level. Let's remember how people lived before we had the ability to ship foods literally across the entire world, on a whim, as normal. - Alison The Run Down: 04:14 What we ate and Lazy Verenicke 17:15 Were Alison and Andrea on the same train in Russia, at the same time?! 19:45 Why Make Your Kitchen More Sustainable 23:15 Achieving the best of both worlds How can you say that someone in Korea should be eating the same thing as someone in Ireland? - Alison 30:37 Sourcing and shipping The politicians are not going to do anything ... It's up to us to take responsibility. - Alison 44:54 Bonus content for listeners 46:45 Sustainable agriculture and the true cost to consumers 51:22 Food Scraps 55:43 Containers and wraps, freezing in glass jars 56:55 Cleaning 01:02:45 Tools & tips If you like us and use Apple Podcasts, we'd love it if you left a review! Here's how: Open the Apple Podcast app Find Ancestral Kitchen Podcast in your library (you can search for it) Scroll down to 'ratings and reviews' Click on 'write a review', choose how many wonderful stars you would like to give us (!), title your review and then, in the lower box type a review of up to 300 words. Thank you. We really appreciate you taking the time to support us! Take the wisdom of the ancient days and combine it with modern technology, and see if we can find a better way to live. - Andrea Resources: https://thatswhatshehad.com/how-to-make-russian-tvorog-recipe/ (Tvorog) https://natashaskitchen.com/cheese-dumplings-recipe/ (Lazy Verenicke) Pierogi Dough Beat together: 8 eggs 1 cup warm water Teaspoon salt Mix in: 6 cups floiur Knead together, leave overnight or for an hour. Roll into sheets, cut in squares, fill with desired filling. Fold over to seal, and boil in water to cook. https://bookshop.org/a/86014/9780399580390 (Dara Goldstein, Beyond the North Wind) Previous Episode: #10 - Elly's from Elly's Everyday Sourdough Previous Episode: #35 - The Easy Way Previous Episode: #21 - Our Reads for 2022 Previous Episode: # - includes information on freezing in glass jars https://bookshop.org/a/86014/9780963810984 (Joel Salatin, Your Successful Farm Business) Lindsey Miles, Treading My Own Path https://treadingmyownpath.com/2014/04/07/how-i-quit-the-supermarket/ (Lindsey's Article) https://store.bokashicycle.com/...

A Gardener's Notebook
Sunday tasks in the garden including repotting into new containers, planting some seeds, and a check in on the squash and peppers in the raised beds.

A Gardener's Notebook

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2022


@douglaswelch Sunday tasks in the garden including repotting into new containers, planting some seeds, and a check in on the squash and peppers in the raised beds. #garden #gardening #nature Continue Reading Read more on this topic: Flowering Now: Cherry-leafed Plum Blossoms In The Neighborhood 3 via Instagram [Photography] Garden Scene 17 from the 2022 Mary Lou Heard Memorial Garden Tour via Instagram [Photography] Lady Bank's Rose In The Garden via Instagram [Video] Geranium (2 Photos) From the 2022 Mary Lou Heard Memorial Garden Tour via Instagram [Photography] Brunfelsia in bloom via Instagram

DevOps and Docker Talk
Docker Extensions: Using and Building Them

DevOps and Docker Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 35:24 Very Popular


Bret is joined by Guillaume Tardif and Felipe Cruz of Docker Inc. for a deep dive into Docker extensions.Docker Extensions are a favorite new feature. Guillaume and Felipe are both engineers at Docker and they walk us through how extensions came about, how to install them, and how to submit them to the marketplace.By the time Docker released extensions at DockerCon in May 2022, there were already a dozen solid extensions, including a disk manager, log explorer, and other third-party tools like Portainer, Snyk, and Anchor. Docker extensions will be most helpful to people who use Docker Desktop.Streamed live on YouTube on June 16, 2022.Unedited live recording of this show on YouTube (Ep #174). Includes demos.★Topics★Docker Extensions homepageDocker Extensions announcement at DockerCon 2022Build your first Docker ExtensionSubmit your extension for the MarketplaceVackup, an example custom extensionExtension SDKOther Extension resources★Guillaume and Felipe★Guillaume Tardif on TwitterFelipe Cruz on Twitter★Join my Community★Best coupons for my Docker and Kubernetes coursesChat with us on our Discord Server Vital DevOpsHomepage bretfisher.com ★ Support this podcast on Patreon ★

Grit Grace & Mindfulness
MIndfulness Moment: Gratitude & Toothpaste ~ Words are Containers for Fear or Growth

Grit Grace & Mindfulness

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 9:46


Gratitude & Toothpaste ~ Words are Containers for Fear or GrowthExercise at school with students ~ Toothpaste for each student was placed on a napkin. Then the tube of toothpaste was given to each student, asking each to place their toothpaste back in the tube.Dangers of Social MediaThoughts become words, and our words become our actions.Gratitude Activities for Studentshttps://www.teachingexpertise.com/classroom-ideas/gratitude-activities-for-middle-school/Welcome to the Grit Grace & Mindfulness Podcast! Y'all know about Grit & Grace, but what about this thing called Mindfulness and how does it transfer to wellness, health and spirituality? I'm your host and life coach, Rachael Arnold, and here on this podcast you can be part of discussions that include laughter, tears, challenges and hope, which guide us to greater Mindfulness by sharing your story ~ Let's begin! Thank you for listening to this weekly podcast ~ If you would like to share your story, favorite quote or scripture, please DM me or take a screenshot of this episode & tag me on IG at gritgracemindfulness. You can also send an email to gritgracemindfulness@gmail. Until next time ~ Have an Amazing week!

Getup Kubicast
#97 - Segue o fio com Leandro Damascena

Getup Kubicast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 75:23


O entrevistado desse episódio é o ilustre Leandro Damascena, o maior tricoteiro do mundo DevOps no Twitter! Para começar a conversa, resgatamos um fio que ele fez sobre uma saga de atualização de EKS - da 1.17 para 1.21 - em um cluster em produção! Seguindo, falamos sobre capacity planning no Kubernetes, dimensionamento de recursos para um autoscaling saudável, ferramentas que ajudam no dia a dia de quem mexe com Kubernetes e política de Zero-trust. Vale a pena conferir esse papo sensacional, que você precisa ouvir e compartilhar com seus amigos nerds :DLINKS do que comentamos no episódio:Artigos  do Leandro no Medium - https://leandrodamascena.medium.com/Vídeo de pessoas trocando pneu com carro em movimento em Dubai - https://youtu.be/B_1bAnLqlMoAs RECOMENDAÇÕES do programa:Sempre vai ter alguém precisando saber de algo que você já conhece, então perca o medo e compartilhe conhecimento! Comece a fazer isso escrevendo no Medium.@precisamosassistir - Conta do Instagram que mostra os bastidores das cenas de cinemaPaternidade (filme que está na Netflix)Tricô de Pais (podcast que está no Spotify)Podpah com Rodrigo Santoro: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kNItlFMdG_cCisne Negro com Nathalie Portman (filme que está na Star+)ATENÇÃO: Estamos perto do Kubicast #100 e vamos comemorar esse marco de um jeito especial! Prepare-se!SOBRE O KUBICASTO Kubicast é uma produção da Getup, especialista em Kubernetes. Os episódios do podcast estão no site da Getup e nas principais plataformas de áudio digital. Alguns deles estão registrados no YT. #DevOps #Kubernetes #Containers #Kubicast

Admin Admin Podcast
Admin Admin Podcast #098 – Contain Your Enthusiasm

Admin Admin Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 57:36


In this episode we talk about Containers, Jerry’s new gig, and running containers with Kubernetes and other technologies. Show Notes: https://www.adminadminpodcast.co.uk/ep098sn/

IT Availability Now
What are cloud containers, and how should businesses use and secure them?

IT Availability Now

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 13:05


Container adoption has been increasing for years, and the trend is expected to continue. Gartner forecasts that 70% of businesses will run containerized applications by 2023 and 90% will do so by 2026. Yet, while organizations constantly throw around the term containerization, many don't fully understand the concept.On this episode of IT Availability Now, host Servaas Verbiest and guest Erik Krogstad, Senior National Cloud Architect at Sungard AS, explore this popular topic, breaking down what a container is, and how businesses should use and secure them. Listen to this full episode to learn:The benefits of containers Why organizations use containers, and what's driving recent adoptionWhat containers can be used forContainer security best practicesHow compliance requirements influence container usageAs Director of Product Field Strategy at Sungard AS, Servaas Verbiest assists businesses and organizations in realizing the full potential of cloud computing by thinking strategically, deploying rapidly, and acting as an ambassador for the cloud ecosystem. While at Sungard AS, Servaas has worked with more than 1,000 unique clients across multiple industries on complex application deployments, re-platforming, public cloud integrations, private cloud deployments, application lifecycle, and hybrid cloud model development.Erik Krogstad is the Senior National Cloud Architect at Sungard AS and serves as lead for the company's Cloud Center of Excellence. With more than 20 years in the IT industry, Erik has extensive experience in designing and transforming IT infrastructures and architectures to meet the business and IT needs of fortune 1000 companies. Listen and subscribe to IT Availability Now on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Podchaser, deezer, Podcast Addict, Listen Notes, and more.

Kubernetes Podcast from Google
Kubernetes 1.25, with Cici Huang

Kubernetes Podcast from Google

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 26:51 Very Popular


It’s release day! We discuss today’s Kubernetes 1.25 with release team lead Cici Huang, Software Engineer at Google Cloud. What’s in, what’s out, and what is it like to lead a release you are also promoting a feature in? Do you have something cool to share? Some questions? Let us know: web: kubernetespodcast.com mail: kubernetespodcast@google.com twitter: @kubernetespod Chatter of the week Nelson underwater England underwater A picture of a sheep Follow Craig on Twitter for more like that News of the week Kubernetes 1.25 release Introducing Acorn Acorn Labs: Rancher Co-Founders’ New Kubernetes Startup by Christine Hall Episode 57, with Darren Shepherd GKE updates: New observability metrics GKE Autopilot now default 256 pods per node KubeCon schedule published Cloud Native Rejekts Scaling Kubernetes to thousands of CRDs by Nic Cope Links from the interview IBM Watson Kubernetes Community Awards SIG API Machinery Chair & Cici’s hiring manager: Fede Bongiovanni Kubernetes 1.25 release team Release blog Highlights: PodSecurityPolicy is removed; Pod Security Admission is stable cgroups v2 KMS v2alpha1 CRD valdation experession language Registry change Kubernetes 1.24 delay Theme and logo Envelopes: 1.24 lead: Episode 178, with James Laverack 1.26 lead: Leonard Pahlke Cici Huang on GitHub

House for All Sinners & Saints
11th Sunday after Pentecost – “Containers”

House for All Sinners & Saints

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022 12:46


The post 11th Sunday after Pentecost – “Containers” appeared first on House for All Sinners & Saints.

The John Batchelor Show
#ScalaReport: Global slowdown continues from housing to energy to containers from Asia. Chris Riegel, CEO Scala.com #Stratacache.

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2022 9:40


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow #ScalaReport: Global slowdown continues from housing to energy to containers from Asia. Chris Riegel, CEO Scala.com #Stratacache. https://www.freightos.com/freight-tools/container-shipping-cost-calculator-free-tool/

Livin Loud Outdoors - Buster Holzer

Containers! How big a box would it take? --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/buster-holzer/support

Voice of the DBA
How Hard is Kubernetes?

Voice of the DBA

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2022 3:15


We've run Kubernetes inside Redgate for some research projects (like Spawn) and we are building some skills running this orchestrator. At the same time, we've had no shortage of challenges in keeping the clusters up at times, patching, fixing issues, upgrading to new configurations, etc. Like any software, there is work involved with managing the orchestrator. I've watched Andrew Pruski and Anthony Nocentino write about containers and Kubernetes and overall they've made me view the clusters like email. It's useful and I want to use it, but I don't want to manage or administer it. I'd want some service like AKS or EKS instead. Let someone else build expertise. Read the rest of How Hard is Kubernetes?

Data Protection Gumbo
154: Keys to Accelerate Your AI Journey - KUNGFU.AI

Data Protection Gumbo

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2022 21:56


Michael Wharton, Principal Machine Learning Engineer at KUNGFU.AI discusses some of the biggest hurdles to AI adoption today, his view on artificial intelligence and machine learning, and his vision around containers and the role they will play in the next few years.

The John Batchelor Show
#MrMarket: Unsolved supply chain: Two containers of Brie cheese abandoned in the Port of New York. Jim McTague, former Washington editor of Barron's.

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2022 9:32


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow #MrMarket: Unsolved supply chain: Two containers of Brie cheese abandoned in the Port of New York. Jim McTague, former Washington editor of Barron's. https://www.nytimes.com/live/2022/08/10/business/inflation-cpi-report#supply-chain-inflation

DevOps and Docker Talk
Kubernetes Autoscaling with Karpenter

DevOps and Docker Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 52:39 Very Popular


Bret is joined by Nirmal Mehta, a Principal Specialist Solution Architect at AWS, and a Docker Captain, to discuss Karpenter, an autoscaling solution launched by AWS in 2021. Karpenter simplifies Kubernetes infrastructure by automating node scaling up and down, giving you "the right nodes at the right time."Autoscaling, particularly for Kubernetes, can be quite a complex project when you first start. Bret and Nirmal discuss how Karpenter works, how it can help or complement your existing setup, and how autoscaling generally works.Streamed live on YouTube on June 9, 2022.Unedited live recording of this show on YouTube (Ep #173). Includes demos.★Topics★Starship Shell PromptBret's favorite shell setupKarpenterKarpenter release blogK8s Scheduling ConceptsOther types of autoscalers:Horizontal Pod AutoscalerVertical Pod AutoscalerCluster Autoscaler★Nirmal Mehta★Nirmal on TwitterNirmal on LinkedIn★Join my Community★Best coupons for my Docker and Kubernetes coursesChat with us on our Discord Server Vital DevOpsHomepage bretfisher.com ★ Support this podcast on Patreon ★

The Mind Of George Show
6 Relationship Mistakes that Prevent You from Scaling

The Mind Of George Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 79:22


It's easy to get wrapped up in the hustle  of entrepreneurship and lose yourself along the journey. For nearly twenty years  I struggled to understand that the most important relationship you will ever have in life is the one staring back at you in the mirror. And in today's episode, I get raw with you and share a different podcast than what you hear on Fridays. I had the pleasure to be interviewed by my friend Laura Poburan on all things relationships and much of what we talk about has never been shared until a few weeks ago. This is one of the most raw and vulnerable episodes I've ever done. Listen in as you discover why it's so important to accept yourself before you help others, how you can create meaningful and lasting relationships  with yourself and others, plus so much more.Listen in to discover The most important relationship you can ever develop in your life How to create containers to avoid blurry lines in relationshipsAdvice for coaches who aren't willing to be transparent and vulnerableHow to empower others in a  relationship without creating codependency How to ensure you are in alignment  so you can build a business that thrives Connect With Laura on Her Instagram Notable Quotes & Time Stamps 00:00 Introduction To Why I Am Sharing This Podcast With You 07:36 I always cared about people  and wanted to connect deeper, but I never realized that my heart was in the passenger seat and my trauma was the driver- George Bryant 08:14 On paper  I had everything that I  wanted:  a New York Times bestseller, number one app in the world, millions of social media followers, and was forced to develop a relationship with the number one person that I'm guaranteed to spend the rest of my life with whether I liked it or not-myself. 15:35 You are unable to create a safe container filled with intimacy and vulnerability for people that you don't really personally know until you are able to be intimate and vulnerable with yourself first and make yourself feel safe.- Laura Poburan16:27 Without our own intimacy, we can't have clear boundaries and containers for our energy. - George Bryant 19:49 It's easy to get wrapped up into stories, posts, and content. But we have to honor where we currently are and then make sure we're being at least integrous with ourselves so that what we're sharing  matches and aligns to where we are. - George Bryant 26:06 Leadership is not at the finish line. Leadership is willing to take the journey next to somebody and having the humility to acknowledge where you are. _ George Bryant 29:09 The reason I use a lighthouse in my branding is because a Lighthouse's job is not to jump in the water. The Lighthouse's job is to remain consistent and congruent, constantly spinning that light- George Bryant 35:48 - Blurred lines come from us getting disconnected from what we said we wanted to do and not holding ourselves accountable to what it looks like.- George Bryant 45:28 - You're responsible for saving your own ship because no one is coming to save you- George Bryant

Synopsis
Η σημερινή κατάσταση που επικρατεί με τις μεταφορές εμπορευματοκιβωτίων: κ. Στράτος Σκούφαλος 2ο Μέρος

Synopsis

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 16:35


Καλεσμένος ο κ. Στράτος Σκούφαλος, πρόεδρος της Stellar Freight, μιας αμερικανικής εταιρείας που ασχολείται με μεταφορές.  Έλλειψη προϊόντων, καθυστερήσεις στις παραδόσεις και τιμές που έχουν εκτοξευθεί στα ύψη.Η ακρίβεια που «καίει» τις τσέπες των καταναλωτών οφείλεται σε μεγάλο βαθμό στα σημαντικά προβλήματα που αντιμετωπίζει το παγκόσμιο εμπόριο, που διεξάγεται μέσω θαλάσσης. 

Resilient Cyber
S3E14: Jon Meadows - The Secure Software Factory

Resilient Cyber

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 34:22


 Nikki: In some ways I think "software supply chain security" has become almost a buzz word, or buzz phrase? But to me it's more of a concern for security programs at large, since so many products and services are being developed in-house at organizations. What are the top three concerns that CISO's or security leaders should know? Chris: We're obviously seeing a lot of buzz around SBOM, and now VEX. What are your thoughts on where things are headed with software component inventory and SBOM as part of cyber vulnerability management?Chris: You were involved in the CNCF Secure Software Factory Reference Architecture. How was that experience and do you think organizations will be able to adopt the practices and guidance laid out there? There are a lot of moving parts. Nikki: How do you feel about how pentests should be involved in a software supply chain security program? I personally am curious about possible implications and benefits of actively (and consistently) testing dependencies and potentially finding unknown vulnerabilities.Chris: So we've talked about frameworks and guidance. Another big one is SLSA, Supply Chain Levels for Software Artifacts. What are your thoughts on SLSA and it's utility in the broader software supply chain security conversation.Chris: SCRM can be like eating an elephant when you look at CSP's, MSP's, Software, and so on - what are your thoughts for organizations that don't have the resources of say a CitiBank, such as an SMB. Where do they start?Nikki: I think we're still missing the human element of what a software supply chain security program looks like - how do you feel about that? Do you think we need to take more into account how people are using software, from a developer and a user perspective?Chris: There has been a lot of focus on Containers of course in the conversation around Cloud-native ecosystems, coupled with Kubernetes, IaC and so on. Do you think these innovations make the challenge of software supply chain easier, or more difficult to manage?