Podcasts about vcu

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  • 462PODCASTS
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Best podcasts about vcu

Show all podcasts related to vcu

Latest podcast episodes about vcu

3 Bid League
Feast Week Recap & Mailbag

3 Bid League

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 53:22


Tyler and Matt recap Feast Week, including Dayton's victory at the ESPN Events Invitational and VCU's showing at the Battle 4 Atlantis. We then open the mailbag to answer questions about the first month of the season, and give our initial All-Conference first team.Follow us on Twitter! @3BidLeaguePodEmail: 3bidleague@gmail.com

Beale Street Bullies: A Memphis basketball podcast
Atlantis Reactions! Breaking down UConn's week in the Bahamas from every angle

Beale Street Bullies: A Memphis basketball podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 37:57


We got our first real taste of what UConn basketball is going to be this season, as the Huskies went down to Atlantis and played three thrillers, beating Auburn and VCU but losing a heartbreaker to VCU in the semifinals of the event. In this week's episode of TOP DOGS, Rob breaks down the week from every conceivable angle. TOP DOGS is presented by Bet Rivers SUBSCRIBE to the Field of 68 THE FIELD OF 68 IS POWERED BY BET RIVERS FOLLOW: Rob Dauster Twitter Instagram Youtube https://thefieldof68.com U C O N N

Screen The Screener Basketball Podcast

Happy Thanksgiving! College Hoops Podcast Crossover Alert: @3BidLeaguePod joins forces with @STheSpodcast to explore #A10MBB. Tyler, Matt and Gus discuss: Richmond v. Middle School, unhinged Primo Spears, VCU defensive metrics, and URI's shot blocking. Please be safe this holiday weekend and tune in-cheers!Follow us @STheSPodcast on Twitter.  Rate and subscribe on Spreaker, iTunes, Stitcher, and TuneIn Radio!Subscribe to our YouTube channel:  https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC0r14k3YJBdOaT9Lz6RJTEwEmail the show StheSPodcast@gmail.com

'Cuse Militia Podcast
Episode 337- Syracuse Basketball: Atlantis Wrap Up!

'Cuse Militia Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 63:47


What's up Cuse Nation?!?! Syracuse goes 1-2 in Paradise Island. Guys, it's better than 0-3. We see the issues with this team. The question is will it be fixed and if so, when? A 67-55 loss to VCU, a 92-84 win over Arizona state and a 89-68 loss to Auburn. You'll hear from us and we'll hear from you in Fan Feedback.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Locked On Syracuse - Daily Podcast On Syracuse Orange Football & Basketball
Syracuse FLOPS Against VCU, Cole Swider Struggles Again and What's the Panic Level After 2 Losses? 11/25

Locked On Syracuse - Daily Podcast On Syracuse Orange Football & Basketball

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 30:41


Syracuse opened up the Battle 4 Atlantis with a rough loss against VCU. The zone looked overmatched again and Cole Swider's struggles continued. Which bad trend has the best chance of correcting itself? Plus, what's the panic level for the Orange after this losing streak? Tim Leonard and Tyler Aki discuss it all and more on the Thursday edition of the Locked on Syracuse Podcast. SUBSCRIBE TO THE LOCKED ON SYRACUSE YOUTUBE PAGE! Follow the show on Twitter @LO_Syracuse and follow the guys @Tim_Leonard4 and @TylerAki_. Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKED15,” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline AG There is only 1 place that has you covered and 1 place we trust. Betonline.ag! Sign up today for a free account at betonline.ag and use that promocode: LOCKEDON for your 50% welcome bonus. PrizePicks Don't hesitate, check out PrizePicks.com and use promo code: “LOCKEDON” or go to your app store and download the app today. PrizePicks is daily fantasy made easy! NetSuite Over twenty-seven thousand businesses already use NetSuite and RIGHT NOW through the end of the year NetSuite is offering a one-of-a-kind financing program to those ready to upgrade at NetSuite.com/LOCKEDONNCAA.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

'Cuse Militia Podcast
Episode 336- Syracuse Football/Basketball: Pitt/VCU Previews!

'Cuse Militia Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 54:49


What's up Cuse Nation?!?! We are back with back with our previews in the overlap for Syracuse Basketball and Fooball! We'll let you know what we think about Pitt football coming into the dome and Syracuse basketball in the Bahamas taking on VCU. We'll let you know what we think and give you our always accurate picks for football!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Locked On Syracuse - Daily Podcast On Syracuse Orange Football & Basketball
Syracuse Basketball/VCU Battle 4 Atlantis Preview, Why The Orange Should Roll In DREAM Matchup & Keys

Locked On Syracuse - Daily Podcast On Syracuse Orange Football & Basketball

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 32:57


Despite a terrible defensive showing against Colgate, Syracuse has a perfect chance to bounce-back against VCU. Tim Leonard breaks down how this is a dream matchup for the Orange, lays out his four keys to the game and talks about the new plans to (finally) improve the football facilities. All that and more on the Tuesday edition of the Locked on Syracuse Podcast. SUBSCRIBE TO THE LOCKED ON SYRACUSE YOUTUBE PAGE! Follow the show on Twitter @LO_Syracuse and follow the guys @Tim_Leonard4 and @TylerAki_. Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKED15,” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline AG There is only 1 place that has you covered and 1 place we trust. Betonline.ag! Sign up today for a free account at betonline.ag and use that promocode: LOCKEDON for your 50% welcome bonus. PrizePicks Don't hesitate, check out PrizePicks.com and use promo code: “LOCKEDON” or go to your app store and download the app today. PrizePicks is daily fantasy made easy! NetSuite Over twenty-seven thousand businesses already use NetSuite and RIGHT NOW through the end of the year NetSuite is offering a one-of-a-kind financing program to those ready to upgrade at NetSuite.com/LOCKEDONNCAA.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Circulation on the Run
Circulation November 23, 2021 Issue

Circulation on the Run

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 24:40


Please join first author Yuan Lu and Guest Editor Jan Staessen as they discuss the article "National Trends and Disparities in Hospitalization for Acute Hypertension Among Medicare Beneficiaries (1999-2019)." Dr. Carolyn Lam: Welcome to Circulation on the Run: your weekly podcast, summary and backstage pass to the journal and it's editors. We're your co-hosts. I'm Dr. Carolyn Lam, associate editor from the National Heart Center and Duke National University of Singapore. Dr. Greg Hundley: And I'm Dr. Greg Hundley, associate editor, and director of Pauley Heart Center at VCU health in Richmond, Virginia. Dr. Carolyn Lam: Greg, today's feature discussion is about the national trends and disparities and hospitalizations for hypertensive emergencies among Medicare beneficiaries. Isn't that interesting? We're going to just dig deep into this issue, but not before we discuss the other papers in today's issue. I'm going to let you go first today while I get a coffee and listen. Dr. Greg Hundley: Oh, thanks so much, Carolyn. My first paper comes to us from the world of preclinical science and it's from professor Christoff Maack from University Clinic Wursburg. Carolyn, I don't have a quiz for you, so I'm going to give a little break this week, but this particular paper is about Barth syndrome. Barth syndrome is caused by mutations of the gene encoding taffazin, which catalyzes maturation of mitochondrial cardiolipin and often manifests with systolic dysfunction during early infancy. Now beyond the first months of life, Barth syndrome cardiomyopathy typically transitions to a phenotype of diastolic dysfunction with preserved ejection fraction, one of your favorites, blunted contractile reserve during exercise and arrhythmic vulnerability. Previous studies traced Barth syndrome cardiomyopathy to mitochondrial formation of reactive oxygen species. Since mitochondrial function and reactive oxygen species formation are regulated by excitation contraction coupling, these authors wanted to use integrated analysis of mechano-energetic coupling to delineate the pathomechanisms of Barth syndrome cardiomyopathy. Dr. Carolyn Lam: Oh, I love the way you explained that so clearly, Greg. Thanks. So what did they find? Dr. Greg Hundley: Right, Carolyn. Well, first defective mitochondrial calcium uptake prevented Krebs cycle activation during beta adrenergic stimulation, abolishing NADH regeneration for ATP production and lowering antioxidative NADPH. Second, Carolyn, mitochondrial calcium deficiency provided the substrate for ventricular arrhythmias and contributed to blunted inotropic reserve during beta adrenergic stimulation. And finally, these changes occurred without any increase of reactive oxygen species formation in or omission from mitochondria. So Carolyn what's the take home here? Well, first beyond the first months of life, when systolic dysfunction dominates, Barth syndrome cardiomyopathy is reminiscent of heart failure with preserved rather than reduced ejection fraction presenting with progressive diastolic and moderate systolic dysfunction without relevant left ventricular dilation. Next, defective mitochondrial calcium uptake contributes to inability of Barth syndrome patients to increase stroke volume during exertion and their vulnerability to ventricular arrhythmias. Lastly, treatment with cardiac glycosides, which could favor mechano-energetic uncoupling should be discouraged in patients with Barth syndrome and left ventricular ejection fractions greater than 40%. Dr. Carolyn Lam: Oh, how interesting. I need to chew over that one a bit more. Wow, thanks. But you know, I've got a paper too. It's also talking about energetic basis in the presence of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction, but this time looking at transient pulmonary congestion during exercise, which is recognized as an emerging and important determinant of reduced exercise capacity in HFpEF. These authors, led by Dr. Lewis from University of Oxford center for clinical magnetic resonance research sought to determine if an abnormal cardiac energetic state underpins this process of transient problem congestion in HFpEF. Dr. Carolyn Lam: To investigate this, they designed and conducted a basket trial covering the physiological spectrum of HFpEF severity. They non-invasively assess cardiac energetics in this cohort using phosphorous magnetic resonance spectroscopy and combined real time free breathing volumetric assessment of whole heart mechanics, as well as a novel pulmonary proton density, magnetic resonance imaging sequence to detect lung congestion, both at rest and during submaximal exercise. Now, Greg, I know you had a look at this paper and magnetic resonance imaging, and spectroscopy is your expertise. So no quiz here, but could you maybe just share a little bit about how novel this approach is that they took? Dr. Greg Hundley: You bet. Carolyn, thanks so much for the intro on that and so beautifully described. What's novel here is they were able to combine imaging in real time, so the heart contracting and relaxing, and then simultaneously obtain the metabolic information by bringing in the spectroscopy component. So really just splashing, as they might say in Oxford, just wonderful presentation, and I cannot wait to hear what they found. Dr. Carolyn Lam: Well, they recruited patients across the spectrum of diastolic dysfunction and HFpEF, meaning they had controls. They had nine patients with type two diabetes, 14 patients with HFpEF and nine patients with severe diastolic dysfunction due to cardiac amyloidosis. What they found was that a gradient of myocardial energetic deficit existed across the spectrum of HFpEF. Even at low workload, the energetic deficit was related to a markedly abnormal exercise response in all four cardiac chambers, which was associated with detectable pulmonary congestion. The findings really support an energetic basis for transient pulmonary congestion in HFpEF with the implication that manipulating myocardial energy metabolism may be a promising strategy to improve cardiac function and reduce pulmonary congestion in HFpEF. This is discussed in a beautiful editorial by Drs. Jennifer Hole, Christopher Nguyen and Greg Lewis. Dr. Greg Hundley: Great presentation, Carolyn, and obviously love that MRI/MRS combo. Carolyn, these investigators in this next paper led by Dr. Sara Ranjbarvaziri from Stanford University School of Medicine performed a comprehensive multi-omics profile of the molecular. So transcripts metabolites, complex lipids and ultra structural and functional components of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy energetics using myocardial samples from 27 hypertrophic cardiomyopathy patients and 13 controls really is the donor heart. Dr. Carolyn Lam: Wow, it's really all about energetics today, isn't it? So what did they see, Greg? Dr. Greg Hundley: Right, Carolyn. So hypertrophic cardiomyopathy hearts showed evidence of global energetic decompensation manifested by a decrease in high energy phosphate metabolites (ATP, ADP, phosphocreatine) and a reduction in mitochondrial genes involved in the creatine kinase and ATP synthesis. Accompanying these metabolic arrangements, quantitative electron microscopy showed an increased fraction of severely damaged mitochondria with reduced crystal density coinciding with reduced citrate synthase activity and mitochondrial oxidative respiration. These mitochondrial abnormalities were associated with elevated reactive oxygen species and reduced antioxidant defenses. However, despite significant mitochondrial injury, the hypertrophic cardiomyopathy hearts failed to up-regulate mitophagic clearance. Dr. Greg Hundley: So Carolyn, in summary, the findings of this study suggest that perturbed metabolic signaling and mitochondrial dysfunction are common pathogenic mechanisms in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and these results highlight potential new drug targets for attenuation of the clinical disease through improving metabolic function and reducing myocardial injury. Dr. Carolyn Lam: Wow, what an interesting issue of our journal. There's even more. There's an exchange of letters between Drs. Naeije and Claessen about determinants of exercise capacity in chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. There's a "Pathways to Discovery" paper: a beautiful interview with Dr. Heinrich Taegtmeyer entitled,"A foot soldier in cardiac metabolism." Dr. Greg Hundley: Right, Carolyn, and I've got a research letter from Professor Marston entitled "The cardiovascular benefit of lowering LDL cholesterol to below 40 milligrams per deciliter." Well, what a great issue, very metabolic, and how about we get onto that feature discussion? Dr. Carolyn Lam: Let's go, Greg. Dr. Greg Hundley: Welcome listeners to our feature discussion today. We have a paper that is going to address some issues pertaining to high blood pressure, or hypertension. With us, we have Dr. Yuan Lu from Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut. We also have a guest editor to help us review this paper, Dr. Jan Staessen from University Louvain in Belgium. Welcome to you both and Yuan, will start with you. Could you describe for us some of the background that went into formulating your hypothesis and then state for us the hypothesis that you wanted to address with this research? Dr. Yuan Lu: Sure. Thank you, Greg. We conducted this study because we see that recent data show hypertension control in the US population has not improved in the last decades, and there are widening disparities. Also last year, the surgeon general issued a call to action to make hypertension control a national priority. So, we wanted to better understand whether the country has made any progress in preventing hospitalization for acute hypertension. That is including hypertension emergency, hypertension urgency, and hypertension crisis, which also refers to acute blood pressure elevation that is often associated with target organ damage and requires urgent intervention. We have the data from the Center for Medicare/Medicaid, which allow us to look at the trends of hospitalization for acute hypertension over the last 20 years and we hypothesize we may also see some reverse progress in hospitalization rate for acute hypertension, and there may differences by population subgroups like age, sex, race, and dual eligible status. Dr. Greg Hundley: Very nice. So you've described for us a little bit about perhaps the study population, but maybe clarify a little further: What was the study population and then what was your study design? Dr. Yuan Lu: Yeah, sure. The study population includes all Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries 65 years and older enrolled in the fee-for-service plan for at least one month from January 1999 to December 2019 using the Medicare denominator files. We also study population subgroups by age, sex, race and ethnicity and dual eligible status. Specifically the racial and ethnic subgroups include Asian, blacks, Hispanics, North American native, white, and others. Dual eligible refers to beneficiary eligible for both Medicare and Medicaid. This study design is a serial cross sectional analysis of these Medicare beneficiaries between 1999 and 2019 over the last 20 years. Dr. Greg Hundley: Excellent. Yuan, what did you find? Dr. Yuan Lu: We actually have three major findings. First, we found that in Medicare beneficiaries 65 years and older, hospitalization rate for acute hypertension increased more than double in the last 20 years. Second, we found that there are widening disparities. When we look at all the population subgroups, we found black adults having the highest hospitalization rate in 2019 across age, sex, race, and dual eligible subgroup. And finally, when we look at the outcome among people hospitalized, we found that during the same period, the rate of 30 day and 90 day mortality and readmission among hospitalized beneficiaries improved and decreased significantly. So this is the main findings, and we can also talk about implications of that later. Dr. Greg Hundley: Very nice. And did you find any differences between men and women? Dr. Yuan Lu: Yes. We also looked at the difference between men and women, and we found that actually the hospitalization rate is higher among females compared to men. So more hospitalizations for acute hypertension among women than men. Dr. Greg Hundley: Given this relatively large Medicare/Medicaid database and cross-sectional design, were you able to investigate any relationships between these hospitalizations and perhaps social determinants of health? Dr. Yuan Lu: For this one, we haven't looked into that detail. This is just showing the overall picture, like how the hospitalization rate changed over time in the overall population and by different population subgroups. What you mentioned is an important issue and should definitely be a future study to look at whether social determine have moderated the relationship between the hospitalization. Speaker 3: Excellent. Well, listeners, now we're going to turn to our guest editor and you'll hear us talk a little bit sometimes about associate editors. We have a team that will review many papers, but when we receive a paper that might contain an associate editor or an associate editors institution, we actually at Circulation turn to someone completely outside of the realm of the associate editors and the editor in chief. These are called guest editors. With us today, we have Dr. Jan Staessen from Belgium who served as the guest editor. He's been working in this task for several years. Jan, often you are referred papers from the American Heart Association. What attracted you to this particular paper and how do you put Yuan's results in the context with other studies that have focused on high blood pressure research? Dr. Jan Staessen: Well, I've almost 40 years of research in clinical medicine and in population science, and some of my work has been done in Sub-Saharan Africa. So when I read the summary of the paper, I was immediately struck by the bad results, so to speak, for black people. This triggered my attention and I really thought this message must be made public on a much larger scale because there is a lot of possibility for prevention. Hypertension is a chronic disease, and if you wait until you have an emergency or until you have target organ damage, you have gone in too late. So really this paper cries for better prevention in the US. And I was really also amazed when I compared this US data with what happens in our country. We don't see any, almost no hospitalizations for acute hypertension or for hypertensive emergencies. So there is quite a difference. Dr. Jan Staessen: Going further on that, I was wondering whether there should not be more research on access to primary care in the US because people go to the emergency room, but that's not a place where you treat or manage hypertension. It should be managed in primary care with making people aware of the problem. It's still the silent killer, the main cause of cardiovascular disease, 8 million deaths each year. So this really triggered my attention and I really wanted this paper to be published. Dr. Greg Hundley: Very nice. Jan, I heard you mention the word awareness. How have you observed perhaps differences in healthcare delivery in Belgium that might heighten awareness? You mentioned primary care, but are there any other mechanisms in place that heighten awareness or the importance? Dr. Jan Staessen: I think people in Belgium, the general public, knows that hypertension is a dangerous condition. That it should be well treated. We have a very well built primary care network, so every person can go to a primary care physician. Part of the normal examination in the office of a primary care physician is a blood pressure measurement. That's almost routine in Belgium. And then of course not all patients are treated to go. Certainly keeping in mind the new US guidelines that aim for lower targets, now recently confirmed in the Chinese study, you have to sprint three cells. And then the recent Chinese study that have been published to the New England. So these are issues to be considered. I also have colleagues working in Texas close to the Mexican border at the university place there, and she's telling me how primary care is default in that area. Dr. Jan Staessen: I think this is perhaps part of the social divide in the US. This might have to be addressed. It's not only a problem in the US, it's also a problem in other countries. There is always a social divide and those who have less money, less income. These are the people who fell out in the beginning and then they don't see primary care physicians. Dr. Jan Staessen: Belgium, for instance, all medicines are almost free. Because hypertension is a chronic condition prevention should not only start at age 65. Hypertension prevention should really start at a young age, middle age, whenever this diagnosis of high blood pressure diagnosis is confirmed. Use blood pressure monitoring, which is not so popular in the US, but you can also use home blood pressure monitoring. Then you have to start first telling your patients how to improve their lifestyle. When that is not sufficient, you have to start anti hypertensive drug treatment. We have a wide array of anti hypertensive drugs that can be easily combined. If you find the right combination, then you go to combination tablets because fewer tablets means better patient adherence. Dr. Greg Hundley: Yuan we will turn back to you. In the last minutes here, could you describe some of your thoughts regarding what you think is the next research study that needs to be performed in this sphere of hypertension investigation? Dr. Yuan Lu: Sure. Greg, in order to answer your question, let me step back a little bit, just to talk about the implication of the main message from this paper, and then we can tie it to the next following study. We found that the marked increase in hospitalization rate for acute hypertension actually represented many more people suffering a potential catastrophic event that should be preventable. I truly agree with what Dr. Staessen said, hypertension should be mostly treated in outpatient setting rather than in the hospital. We also find the lack of progress in reducing racial disparity in hospitalization. These findings highlight needs for new approaches to address both the medical and non-medical factors, including the social determinants in health, system racism that can contribute to this disparity. When we look at the outcome, we found the outcome for mortality and remission improved over time. Dr. Yuan Lu: This means progress has been made in improving outcomes once people are hospitalized for an acute illness. The issue is more about prevention of hospitalization. Based on this implication, I think in a future study we need better evidence to understand how we can do a better job in the prevention of acute hypertension admissions. For example, we need the study to understand who is at risk for acute hypertensive admissions, and how can this event be preempted. If we could better understand who these people are, phenotype this patient better and predict their risk of hospitalization for acute hypertension, we may do a better job in preventing this event from happening. Dr. Greg Hundley: Very nice. And Jan, do you have anything to add? Dr. Jan Staessen: Yes. I think every effort should go to prevention in most countries. I looked at the statistics, and more than 90% of the healthcare budget is spent in treating established disease, often irreversible disease like MI or chronic kidney dysfunction. I think then you come in too late. So of the healthcare budget in my mind, much more should go to the preventive issues and probably rolling out an effective primary care because that's the place where hypertension has to be diagnosed and hypertension treatment has to be started. Dr. Greg Hundley: Excellent. Well, listeners, we've heard a wonderful discussion today regarding some of the issues pertaining to hypertension and abrupt admission to emergency rooms for conditions pertaining to hypertension, really getting almost out of control. We want to thank Dr. Yuan Lu from Yale New Haven and also our guest editor, Dr. Jan Staessen from Louvain in Belgium. On behalf of Carolyn and myself, we want to wish you a great week and we will catch you next week on the run. This program is copyright of the American Heart Association, 2021. The opinions express by speakers in this podcast are their own and not necessarily those of the editors or of the American Heart Association for more visit aha journals.org.

Pod So 1
Episode 124: Dr Richard Sander

Pod So 1

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 80:30


Dr. Richard Sander joins the podcast today via a connection with former VCU Basketball player Rodney Ashby (Episode #115). Dr. Sander is from Cincinnati and Paul, Kevin and Richard talked about his childhood and then playing sports in high school. This led to playing football and basketball in college where he also participated in ROTC. Richard discussed his time in the U.S. Army and his career path afterwards which led him to VCU. Richard was the Athletic Director at VCU for twenty plus years. They talked about his fondest memories and his proudest moment at VCU. Richard finished up by talking about raising money for a charity related to one of his grandkids and about his family.

AP Sports Science Podcast
#23 - Chris Mignogna: Director of VCU Sports Medicine, Women's Basketball

AP Sports Science Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 43:23


In this episode we cover all things workload management, from working with the VCU women's basketball team to educated high school coaches on how they can fundamentally use sports science to improve training, conditioning and performance. 

Sports Gambling Podcast Network
College Basketball Predictions 11-17 | The College Basketball Experience (Ep. 46)

Sports Gambling Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 27:35


The College Basketball Experience (@TCEonSGPN) on the Sports Gambling Podcast Network previews and picks all of Wednesday, November 17th's college basketball action. Pick Dundee aka (@TheColbyD) gives out his top plays of the day and picks every game on the college basketball slate. Will Trayce Jackson-Davis get past Julian Champagnie and St. John's in Bloomington? Can Gabe Brown and Michigan State grab a huge road win against Chuck Harris and the Butler Bulldogs? Will Dereon Seabron and NC State get past Bryce Thompson and the Oklahoma State Cowboys? Will Josh Oduro and George Mason knock off Fatts Russell and the Maryland Terrapins in College Park? Can KeShawn Curry and VCU take down Scotty Pippen Jr. and Vanderbilt in Nashville? We talk it all and more on this episode of The College Basketball Experience. Get all of our College Basketball picks for free - sg.pn/cbbpicks Make sure you subscribe to The College Football Experience at sg.pn/tcfe Follow - Twitter | Instagram Watch - YouTube | Twitch Subscribe - Apple | Spotify Read - SportsGamblingPodcast.com Discuss - Slack | Reddit Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Retired College Athletes
073: The Side Of College Sports No One Talks About w/Briana DuBose

Retired College Athletes

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 30:59


This week's guest is Briana DuBose. She played basketball at VCU and American University, and currently has a book coming out called The ABC's of College Athletes. Today we're discussing everything they don't tell you about college athletics, especially before you sign.Today's Scout:- Name: Briana DuBose- Sport: Basketball- School: VCU and American University- Instagram: @brianalduboseHer Platform: Alpha Girl Confidence- Website- InstagramWin A Copy of Her Book: click hereHousekeeping:- Website: www.retiredcollegeathletes.com- Instagram: @retiredcollegeathletes- Facebook: Retired College Athletes- YouTube: Retired College Athletes- Twitter: @RCAathletes- Email: retiredcollegeathletes@gmail.com- Patreon - If you love RCA and want to give financially to support the podcast you can do so through Patreon. Depending on what tier you give, you will receive exclusive content as a thank you for supporting us.

With Good Reason
In Another Life

With Good Reason

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 51:59


A lot of parents are tired of telling their kids to put down the video games, and pick up the textbooks. But now, video games are part of school. Lisa Heuvel says that Minecraft creates a unique opportunity for practicing effective teamwork. And IT specialist Jan Dougherty says that through games, students begin dealing with complex topics without even realizing it. Later in the show: A lot of people avoid exercising the parts that ache as they age. But James Thomas says that's the worst thing you could do. He's working with a team at VCU's Motor Lab to create virtual reality games that move people beyond their fear of movement, and into feeling better. Plus: Jacob Enfield says that not all games are created equally. Without a real challenge, he says, educational games can be rather useless.

Screen The Screener Basketball Podcast
Richmond Spiders Preview - Jacob Gilyard

Screen The Screener Basketball Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 12:19


Mike Randle (@RandleRant) talks with Jacob Gilyard (@G1LYARD) of Richmond Men's Basketball to preview the Spiders for the 2021-2022 season. Mike talks with Jacob about his pursuit of the NCAA All-Time steals record, the bond among the returning seniors, battling St. Bonaventure and VCU, and Richmond's focus on their first NCAA Tournament bid since 2011. Follow us @STheSPodcast on Twitter.  Rate and subscribe on Spreaker, iTunes, Stitcher, and TuneIn Radio!Subscribe to our YouTube channel:  https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC0r14k3YJBdOaT9Lz6RJTEwEmail the show StheSPodcast@gmail.com

3 Bid League
2021-22 Team Previews #4

3 Bid League

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 39:22


Tyler and Matt wrap up the team preview series with Richmond, VCU, and George Mason.Follow us on Twitter! @3BidLeaguePodEmail: 3bidleague@gmail.com

Circulation on the Run
Circulation November 2, 2021 Issue

Circulation on the Run

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 21:04


Please join author Ole Fröbert and Associate Editor Dharam Kumbhani as they discuss the article "Influenza Vaccination After Myocardial Infarction: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Multicenter Trial." Dr. Carolyn Lam: Welcome to Circulation on the Run, your weekly podcast, summary and backstage pass to the journal and its editors. We're your co-hosts. I'm Dr. Carolyn Lam, associate editor from the National Heart Center in Duke National University of Singapore. Dr. Greg Hundley: I'm Dr. Greg Hundley, associate editor, director of the Poly Heart Center at VCU health in Richmond, Virginia. Well, listeners, this week we've got a really hot feature topic pertaining to flu vaccines, which are coming in the US, North America, South America, coming up soon, and their relationship to myocardial infarction. But before we get to that feature discussion, let's grab a cup of coffee and jump in to some of the other articles in this issue. Oh, wait a minute. Our first article, we've got a co-author here. Carolyn, something about the VICTORIA trial, which you were a part of. Can you tell us a little bit about this? Dr. Carolyn Lam: I would love to, and first of all, I'm doing this on behalf of a big team, and I want to really, really call up first Dr. Paul Armstrong who's the senior author from University of Alberta. But let me tell you first about the VICTORIA study. VICTORIA evaluated vericiguat, a soluble guanylate cyclase stimulator, compared to placebo, in patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction with a recent worsening heart failure event and the primary result was actually a significant reduction in the primary composite outcome of cardiovascular death or heart failure hospitalization with vericiguat compared to placebo. Dr. Carolyn Lam: Now, interestingly though, in VICTORIA, we found that anemia occurred more often in patients treated with vericiguat at a rate of about 7.6% compared to placebo, which was 5.7%. Now, although earlier studies of another soluble guanylate cyclase stimulator like riociguat was found to be associated with anemia. The etiology really remains unknown. In the current paper, we explored the relationship between markers of anemia and vericiguat versus placebo in VICTORIA. We further explored the changes in hemoglobin and hematocrit over the course of the trial and their relationships with the primary composite outcome. Dr. Greg Hundley: Carolyn, this is such an important new study heart failure therapy for those with reduced ejection fraction, and again, an important topic related to anemia. What did they find? Dr. Carolyn Lam: Thanks, Greg. First, approximately a third of patients in VICTORIA had anemia at randomization, and this is using the standard sex-based definitions. With a lower hemoglobin indeed predicting a higher risk for cardiovascular death, heart failure hospitalization, all-cause mortality. As I had already mentioned, we found more anemia with vericiguat than with placebo. The interesting thing though is after 16 weeks, no further decline in hemoglobin occurred over the remaining and over 96 weeks of follow up, and the ratio of hemoglobin to hematocrit remained constant. Now, overall, the adverse event of anemia occurred in 7.1% of the patients. Dr. Carolyn Lam: Importantly, the lower hemoglobin was not related to the beneficial effect of vericiguat over placebo on the primary outcome. Now, I know all of that may be more descriptive and reassuring than really understanding the mechanism by which it occurred. Further mechanistic studies are certainly warranted to better understand the basis of the anemia development, and it's of principle importance because as you said, vericiguat I think it's going to be an important new medication that we can consider in high-risk patients with recent worsening heart failure with reduced ejection fraction. Dr. Greg Hundley: Thanks so much, Carolyn, especially the perspective of being an author on this particular study. Well, Carolyn, my next study is going to come to us from Dr. Zhao Wang from University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, and it's really about the integrated stress response, and that's an evolutionary conserved process to cope with intracellular and extracellular disturbances. Myocardial infarction is a leading cause of death worldwide. Coronary artery perfusion is the most effective means to mitigate cardiac damage resulting from myocardial infarction. However, that can cause, as we know, additional reperfusion injury. This study aim to investigate the role of the integrated stress response in myocardial ischemia reperfusion injury. Dr. Carolyn Lam: Oh, very interesting. What were the results? Dr. Greg Hundley: Right, Carolyn. The authors found that the integrated stress response is activated by ischemia reperfusion injury in the heart, and the perk branch of the integrated stress response protects the heart from ischemia reperfusion injury through inhibition of protein synthesis. Also, Carolyn, mitochondrial complex proteins are selectively suppressed and oxidative stress is reduced by the integrated stress response. Carolyn, the takeaway is that this integrated stress response is cardioprotective against cardiac ischemia reperfusion injury. Perhaps pharmacological stimulation of the integrated stress response at reperfusion, well, that may reduce heart damage and improve cardiac outcomes after ischemia reperfusion injury. Dr. Carolyn Lam: Cool. Thanks, Greg. Well, I've got one more paper, and this deals with coronary microcircuitry dysfunction and acute rejection after heart transplantation. Co-corresponding authors, Doctors Lee and Choi from Heart Vascular Stroke Institute in Samsung Medical Center sought to evaluate the prognostic implications of coronary microcircuitry dysfunction assessed by the index of microcircuitry resistance or IMR for the risk of acute cellular rejection after heart transplantation. They did this by prospectively enrolling 154 heart transplant recipients who underwent scheduled coronary angiography and invasive coronary physiological assessment one month after transplantation.   Dr. Greg Hundley: Very interesting, Carolyn. What did they find here? Dr. Carolyn Lam: IMR measured early after heart transplantation was significantly associated with the risk of acute cellular rejection, and an IMR above or at 15 was highly predictive for the recurrence of acute cellular rejection during two years of follow up following heart transplantation. Adding IMR to the prediction model with clinical variables significantly increase discriminant and reclassification ability for the risk of acute cellular rejection. In addition to surveillance endomyocardial biopsy, the implications are that early stratification using IMR could be a clinically useful tool to identify patients at higher risk of future acute cellular rejection after heart transplantation, and this is discussed in an editorial by Doctors Fearon and Valentine from Stanford University. Dr. Greg Hundley: Very nice, Carolyn. Dr. Carolyn Lam: Great. Greg, before we go to the exciting feature discussion, let's round it up by just a quick tour of what else there is in today's issue. There is an exchange of letters between Doctors Pappone Leor on atrial fibrillation as a cardiomyopathy, global rounds on United Kingdom by Dr. Cowie, an ECG challenge by Dr. Tsai on grouped beating following acute inferior myocardial infarction, and a research letter by Dr. Salem on electrocardiographic manifestations of immune checkpoint inhibitor myocarditis. Dr. Greg Hundley: Great, Carolyn. Well, I can't wait to get to this next feature discussion and learn a little bit more about the relationship between flu vaccines and future myocardial infarction. Dr. Carolyn Lam: Today's feature discussion was a really hot topic at the ESC 2021, and in fact, a simultaneous publication. It is about influenza vaccination after myocardial infarction, a very important topic and a very novel paper. We are so pleased to have the first and corresponding author, Dr. Ole Fröbert from Orebro University in Sweden to discuss this paper, as well as our associate editor, Dr. Dharam Kumbhani, from UT Southwestern. Welcome, gentlemen. Only if I could start with asking you to describe the rationale for why you did this study, and then perhaps quickly summarize the results. Dr. Ole Fröbert: Yeah, thank you so much, Carolyn. The background of the study was that during influenza epidemics, more people die from cardiovascular causes, and out in the literature, there are numerous observational studies suggesting a protective effect from influenza vaccination on cardiovascular events. There are also three smaller single-center randomized trials supporting these registered findings. Currently influenza vaccination carries a Class I, Level of Evidence B recommendation in both American and European secondary prevention guidelines, but uptake is low and vaccination timing is unclarified. Our aim was to determine whether influenza vaccination improves clinical outcomes in patients with a recent myocardial infarction or with high risk corona artery disease. Dr. Ole Fröbert: The study was international, multi-centers investigator initiated, double-blind randomized control trial, and we enrolled patients at 30 centers across eight countries in both the Northern and the Southern Hemisphere, Sweden, Denmark, Norway, Latvia, Scotland, Czech Republic, Bangladesh and Australia. We enrolled patients between October 2016 and March 2020. We had quite broad inclusion criteria. We included hospitalized patients with STEMI or non-STEMI, or high-risk stable patients over 75 years of age undergoing an angio or PCI. We excluded patients already vaccinated or intending to be vaccinated during the current season. We also included, of course, patients if they had allergy to X or influenza vaccine, if they had infection or if they were immunosuppressed or previously randomized in the trial. Dr. Ole Fröbert: Over these four years of inclusion, we enrolled a total of 2,571 participants. The primary outcome was a composite of all-cause death, MI and stent thrombosis. This outcome occurred in 67 participants assigned influenza vaccine and 91 assigned placebo corresponding to a reduction of the primary endpoint of 28% with a P value of 0.04. Also, rates of all-cause death and of cardiovascular death were reduced and both with a hazard ratio of 0.59 corresponding to a reduction of 41% in all-cause death and cardiovascular death. Based on these results, we think that this trial and what we know from previous smaller trials should be sufficient to establish influenza vaccination as a new standard of care as part of in-hospital treatment after an MI. Dr. Carolyn Lam: Heartfelt congratulations, Ole. What an elegant intervention in a very frankly challenging situation that the trial obviously carried on through COVID as well, multinational. May I just double check? Was it investigator-led? Because- Dr. Ole Fröbert: Yes, this was- Dr. Carolyn Lam: That's amazing. Dr. Ole Fröbert: ... an idea that just popped up, and then yeah, we did it, but it was seven years of work. Dr. Carolyn Lam: Wow. Hard work as I can just imagine. First, heartfelt congratulations. Very impactful results. Dharam, could I invite you to put those results in context and why we single this out? Dr. Dharam Kumbhani: Yeah. No, thank you, Carolyn. Ole, I want to amplify or recapitulate the amazement and wonder that Carolyn just articulated. I think this is a huge endeavor. It's a very important topic. It's "a fairly simple intervention." It's vaccination, and you've just really shown that even in the acute setting, that A, this is as feasible, B, it is safe, and three, it is effective. I think it's potentially ... Given the magnitude of influenza in the world, I think this has tremendous public health ramifications. I really want to congratulate you and your investigators for pursuing this important question and then just executing this, I'm sure despite multiple challenges over a long period of time. Dr. Ole Fröbert: Thank you very much. Dr. Dharam Kumbhani: Yeah, no. I guess you already alluded to the fact that this may influence guidelines. As you mentioned, it's a 1B. Maybe get your thoughts, I suppose this may move the needle towards becoming perhaps a little stronger on the recommendation front, both in the US and the European guidelines? Dr. Ole Fröbert: Yeah. I think what has been the challenge until now is that many places, of course, you commend patients to take a flu jab when treatment is over in the hospital. But then the responsibility is diffused. Who should take care of that? Is that up to the patient or the primary care physician? Who is in charge? One important finding of this study is, as you said, it's safe. There were no differences, adverse events between the two groups. It's safe and it could be given early. I think a take-home factor from the study is that it should be given at the hospital and it's a responsibility of the cardiologist. Dr. Dharam Kumbhani: Yeah, I really like that. Actually, I'm sure this would resonate across the board in the cardiology community. We've taken ownership for starting from statin and now SGLT-2 inhibitors, which kind of ... All of these medications have come from non-cardiology realms, so to say. But now we prescribe those medications. We know they have clear cardiovascular benefits. I suppose you could make a case to say we, the cardiology community, has to adopt this. The implementation gap that exists for a lot of these therapies, that also comes to us and for us to move that forward. It's thought provoking. I certainly felt very strongly after your study. I don't know how you feel about that. We should really be the ones driving this and help with more widespread immunization in these patients. Dr. Ole Fröbert: I think because not just this study, but also the previous studies and what we know from observational findings is that this is safe and it works. What we also saw in our study, and it has been indicated in previous meta analysis, is that the maximum effect is seen in the acute setting. It's the acute coronary syndrome patients, the patients we had in our study, that benefit the most. That's also a case for actually doing this in the hospital and not postponing it. Dr. Carolyn Lam: Wow. That's amazing. Ole, I do have one question. Just for clarification. You were careful to say that you did this during influenza seasons, right? Coming from my part of the world in Singapore where we don't really have influenza seasons, don't have any seasons, frankly, what would you think? What would you advise? Dr. Ole Fröbert: There is influenza seasons in all parts of the world, I'm sorry. Dr. Carolyn Lam: True. Dr. Ole Fröbert: For example, we had Bangladesh on board in our study. It's in the Northern Hemisphere, but influenza-wise, it's in the Southern, and their season is between May and September. But it's not as clearly defined as the Northern Hemisphere season. It's almost always in two waves during that season. One practical challenge with influenza vaccine is that it's produced for the seasons. It's difficult to say, "Yeah, we can just do it all year round," and also we didn't test that. I, of course, feel we should give it all year round, but it's not available, the vaccine. Perhaps it should be tested, but it is probably difficult to find funding for such a study. Dr. Carolyn Lam: Very fair, and thanks for the correction. It's true though. Singapore's on the Equator, so we don't have maybe weather seasons. But yeah, we do get vaccinated for both North and South. It's quite fascinating. But nonetheless, could I now switch topics a little bit and just over the next couple of minutes just ask you, could you please perhaps share with the audience what it was like to work with Circulation, to do this simultaneous publication? You see, our associate editor, Dharam Kumbhani, really leads this effort to get simultaneous a fast-track publication from major conferences, and it means a lot to us that investigators like you chose us. Could you share a bit? Dr. Ole Fröbert: Yeah, thank you very much. Overall, it was a pleasure. Of course, we were ... With every study of this size, you are under stress, you get the results late, and there's a conference coming up, and you would like your paper to come out at the same time across to maximize impact and attention. What I really like with working with Circulation was turnaround time was ultra fast, really extremely fast. Of course, we had a lot of questions to our study, but these were ... Some of them of course were quite difficult, but they were fair. In a way, they were also helpful in a way that made it easier to address the questions in a more, you could say, collaborative way. It was very smooth. No hiccups. Dr. Carolyn Lam: Thank you. Dharam, any final responses to that? Dr. Dharam Kumbhani: No, thank you, Carolyn. Yeah. Well, Ole, it was really a pleasure to work with you on this. I think we all recognize that this was an important study and wanted to make sure that we were able to accomplish the goal of simultaneous publication. Thank you for working with us on that. I just want to put a pitch in, I think this, for Joe, Dr. Hill and the rest of the editorial team, having a robust simultaneous publication program has been very, very important. We are very committed to working with investigators and authors on this. We are really blessed with our team on the backside that works seamlessly with us nights, weekends, just to get these things done. I just want to end with that to say this is very important for us, and we look forward to the opportunity to work with Ole and others on future papers as well.   Dr. Carolyn Lam: I love that. Thank you both for being on this podcast today. Today I want to especially call out David Rivera, a wonderful managing editor who really, really is part of leading this entire group that supports us, but also even this very podcast. You've been listening to Circulation on the Run. Thank you, from both Greg and I, for joining us today, and don't forget to tune in again next week. Thank you. Dr. Greg Hundley: This program is copyright of the American Heart Association 2021. The opinions expressed by speakers in this podcast are their own and not necessarily those of the editors or of the American Heart Association. For more, visit ahajournals.org.

Figure It Out Baseball
Kurt Elbin- Virginia Tech | Offensive Coaching Philosophy

Figure It Out Baseball

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 79:13


Kurt Elbin is the recruiting coordinator for Virginia Tech's baseball team, a NCAA Division I program in Blacksburg, Virginia.  Coach Elbin played collegiately at Lock Haven University a Division II program in Lock Haven, Pennsylvania.  He started his coaching career at Muhlenburg College in 2007, then from 2008-2010 he coached at Teal College.  From there he was an assistant coach at Shippensburg University from 2011-2012, then from 2013-2017 he was an assistant coach at VCU an NCAA Division I program in Richmond, Virginia.  Later, in June of 2017 he was hired at Virginia Tech as the recruiting coordinator where he still remains.   In this podcast episode, we start off talking about Coach Elbin's coaching journey and the path that he has taken in his career, taking on coaching at many different collegiate levels.  We than dive into Coach Elbin's offensive coaching philosophy and what he believes to be important, also talking about if that changes from level to level.   We also talk about recruiting at the NCAA Division I level and what coach Elbin looks for in a player when recruiting them. We finish this podcast talking about owning your approach in the batter's box, what that looks like and how to improve it.  As well as, how to go about this while coaching it to your players.  Listen to this podcast to hear and learn from NCAA Division I recruiting coordinator and assistant coach Kurt Elbin.  --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/fiob/support

Good Morning, RVA!
Good morning, RVA: Digital vaccine cards, ARPA spending approved, and a CRB Task Force presentation

Good Morning, RVA!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021


Good morning, RVA! It's 58 °F, and it rained! The storms have moved through, though, and now we've got a pleasant fall day ahead of us. Expect highs in the mid 60s, some clouds, and dry weather for at least the next couple of days. Water cooler One quick coronaupdate this morning for iPhone users: iOS 15.1 came out yesterday, and that means you can now store your vaccination card in the Wallet app. Just fill out this form on vaccinate.virginia.gov, and you'll end up with a QR code and a link that'll automatically load up your information as a fun card in Wallet.app. I think once you get boosted, you can even update it with that information, too. Neat! The Richmond Times-Dispatch's Chris Suarez has the update from last night's final City Council meeting on the Mayor's proposed ARPA spending plan, and it sounds like Council approved the whole shebang. You can find more details on the City's ARPA page, but the big-ticket investments are parks, trails, and community centers; the Affordable Housing Trust Fund; stormwater infrastructure; and a new Healthy Equity Trust Fund. While the full spending plan is approved, this huge bucket of money will be allocated over two years. Someone should definitely set up a spreadsheet or a Trello or something to track progress on all these rad projects. In particular, I can't wait for some of the new trails! Whoa there is a lot in this piece from Jessica Nocera in the RTD about how Chesterfield County Public Schools' unnecessary and mostly imaginary battle against Critical Race Theory does in fact have a chilling effect on folks in the County working against systemic racism. It's not hard to see how a policy banning CRT-related professional development has already led to the District rejecting a principal's request to take diversity, equity, and inclusion training from VCU. Not great—both scary and embarrassing. Side note: I really love the way Nocera reports this story without a lot of both-sidesism (or as NYU journalism professor Jay Rosen calls it, The View From Nowhere). Tonight at 5:00 PM, Council's Public Safety Committee will meet and hear recommendations presented by the Civilian Review Board Task Force. As a fun pregame to tonight's meeting, you can read the Task Force's recommendations yourself, one of which is "that the CRB will have its own department to avoid conflicts of interest; this is aligned with the recommendations of the City Attorney's Office. As such, we recommend creating a department or office of 'Community Oversight and Police Accountability' independent from other City departments or offices." I don't know a ton about how CRBs should work, but that is exactly why we tasked a taskforce to come up with recommendations! If you'd like to holler at your councilmember in support of the Task Force's recommendations—including the creation of an Office of Community Oversight and Police Accountability—you can find the big list of councilmember contact information here. One final note, and I'll assume that it was not intentional, but it does not seem particularly even-handed to schedule the Richmond Police Department to present on "Police Staffing and Morale" immediately before the CRB Task Force gives their presentation on police accountability. Well, I guess it's official. VPM's Ben Paviour reports that "The Virginia Redistricting Commission has missed a final deadline to draw new state legislative maps, kicking the process to the Virginia Supreme Court." Paviour helpfully lays out the next steps and timeline for the judges to get these maps drawn. This coming Thursday, October 28th, the Community Foundation will host a free, online panel focused on Everyday Nonprofit Advocacy. We've got a lot of issues to tackle in Richmond, and a ton of them are systemic issues requiring big-time policy changes to make our city a better place to live. Nonprofit advocacy (and regular-person advocacy!) plays a big role in that, and I deeply agree with this bit from the event description: "the community needs leaders who engage decisions makers well." Maybe systems-change work is too daunting or exhausting to think about—that's fine! How about this, then: Richmond Public Schools needs volunteers to provide no-contact grocery delivery to RPS families. That's about as finite and concrete of a task as you can get. This morning's longread Could removing parking requirements help revitalize Virginia's cities? I thought I'd move this extensive piece from Wyatt Gordon at the Virginia Mercury down to the longread section—it's packed with the impacts of free parking on a city like Richmond. Luckily, at least one of our councilmembers wants to make some incremental changes to the currently broken system. “People see the language of the resolution and worry I'm getting rid of parking,” said Addison, “But eliminating parking minimums just means we're not putting a burden on business owners and developers to provide and build more parking than they actually need. Parking minimums are a big barrier to housing affordability and people choosing other modes of mobility. Eliminating those outdated calculations on how much parking establishments need gets us closer to a market for shared parking that works better for everybody.” If you'd like your longread to show up here, go chip in a couple bucks on the ol' Patreon.

Circulation on the Run
Circulation October 26, 2021 Issue

Circulation on the Run

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 26:58


Please join author Jonathan Newman and Associate Editor Sandeep Das as they discuss the article "Outcomes of Participants With Diabetes in the ISCHEMIA Trials." Dr. Carolyn Lam: Welcome to circulation on the run, your weekly podcast, summary, and backstage pass to the journal and its editors. We're your co-hosts; I'm Dr. Carolyn Lam, Associate Editor from the National Heart Center and Duke National University of Singapore. Dr. Greg Hundley: And I'm Dr. Greg Hundley, Associate Editor, Director of the Pauley Heart Center at VCU health in Richmond, Virginia. Well, Carolyn, this week's feature, a couple of weeks ago, we had that feature forum on the ischemia trial. Now we're going to explore some of the outcomes in patients with diabetes, from the ischemia trial in the feature discussion today. But, before we get to that, let's grab a cup of coffee and start in on some of the other articles in this issue. So, how about if I go first, this time? This particular paper, Carolyn, we're going to start on one of your topics. I know you're a fan of diet related interventions. So high intake of added sugar is linked to weight gain and cardio-metabolic risk. And in 2018, the U S National Salt and Sugar Reduction Initiative proposed government supported voluntary national sugar reduction targets. Dr. Greg Hundley: This intervention's potential health and equity impacts and cost effectiveness are unclear. And so Carolyn, these authors, led by Dr. Renata Micha from Tufts University, incorporated a validated micro-simulation model - CVD Predict coded in C++, and used it to estimate incremental changes in type two diabetes, cardiovascular disease, quality adjusted life years, cost and cost effectiveness of this national policy. The model was run at the individual level and the model incorporated national demographic and dietary data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey across three cycles spanning from 2011 to 2016, added sugar related diseases from meta-analysis and policy costs and health-related costs from established sources and a simulated nationally representative us population was created and followed until age 100 years or death with 2019 as the year of intervention start and findings were evaluated over 10 years and a lifetime from healthcare and societal perspectives. Dr. Carolyn Lam: Ooooh, You so got my attention, Greg, a very important topic and so, what did they find? Dr. Greg Hundley: Right, Carolyn. So achieving the NSRI sugar reduction targets could prevent 2.48 million cardiovascular death related events, 0.5 million cardiovascular disease deaths, and three quarters of a million diabetes cases, gain 6.7 million quality adjusted life years, and save $160.8 billion in net cost from a societal perspective over a lifetime. The policy became cost-effective, defined as less than $150,000 for quality adjusted life years at six years and highly cost-effective at seven years with a cost savings noted at nine years. And therefore, Carolyn, implementing and achieving the NSSRI sugar reformation targets could generate substantial health gains, equity gains, and cost savings. Dr. Carolyn Lam: Wow, thanks Greg. So, moving from a very publicly health focused paper to this paper that really focuses on hypoplastic left heart syndrome with very, very scientifically significant findings. Now, first, we know hypoplastic left heart syndrome is the most common and severe manifestation within the spectrum of left ventricular outflow tract obstruction defects occurring in association with ventricular hypoplasia. The pathogenesis is unknown, but hemodynamic disturbances are assumed to play a prominent role. Authors led by Doctors Moretti and Laugwitz from Technical University of Munich in Germany, as well as Dr. Gruber from Yale University School of Medicine, and their colleagues combined whole exome sequencing of parent offspring, trios, transcriptome profiling of cardiomyocytes from ventricular biopsies and immuno-pluripotent stem cell derived cardiac progenator or cardiomyocyte models of 2D and 3D cardiogenesis, as well as single cell gene expression analysis to decode the cellular and molecular principles of hypoplastic left heart syndrome phenotypes. Dr. Greg Hundley: Wow, Carolyn, there is a lot of data, very complex preclinical science here. So what did they find? Dr. Carolyn Lam: Indeed, Greg. As I said, scientifically incredible and rigorous, and they found that initial aberrations in the cell cycle unfolded protein response, autophagy hub led to disrupted cardiac progenator lineage commitment, consequently, impaired maturation of ventricular cardiomyocytes limited their ability to respond to growth cues. Resulting in premature cell cycle exit and increase apoptosis under biomechanical stress in 3D heart structures. Together, these studies provide evidence that the hypoplastic left heart syndrome pathogenesis is not exclusively of hemodynamic origin, and they revealed novel potential nodes for rational design of therapeutic intervention. Dr. Greg Hundley: Wow, Carolyn, we really need research in this topic and this is great preclinical science that we're getting here in our journal. Congratulations to the authors and what a great presentation of that by you. Well, Carolyn and my next paper there remain major uncertainties regarding disease activity within the Retain Native Aortic Valve, as well as bioprosthetic valve durability, following transcatheter aortic valve implantation. And these authors led by Doctor Jacek Kwiecinski, from the Institute of Cardiology, aimed in a multi-center cross-sectional observational cohort study to assess native aortic valve disease activity and bioprosthetic valve durability in patients with TAVI in comparison to subjects with bioprosthetic surgical aortic valve replacement or SAVR. Dr. Carolyn Lam: Oh, very interesting. And what were the results? Dr. Greg Hundley: An interesting comparison, Carolyn. So in patients with TAVI, native aortic valves demonstrated 18 F sodium fluoride uptake around the outside of the bioprosthesis that showed a modest correlation with the time from TAVI. Next, 18 sodium fluoride uptake in the bias prosthetic leaflets was comparable between SAVR and TAVI groups. Next, the frequencies of imaging evidence of bioprosthetic valve degeneration at baseline were similar on echo cardiography 6 and 8% respectively, CT, 15 and 14% respectively, and with PET scanning. Next, baseline 18 F sodium fluoride uptake was associated with subsequent change in peak aortic velocity for both TAVI and SAVR. And on multi-variable analysis, the 18 F sodium fluoride uptake was the only predictor of peak velocity progression. And so Carolyn, therefore, in patients with TAVI, native aortic valves demonstrate evidence of ongoing active disease and across imaging modalities, TAVI degeneration is of similar magnitude to bioprosthetic SAVR suggesting comparable midterm durability. Dr. Carolyn Lam: Very nice, important stuff. Dr. Carolyn Lam: Well, thanks, Greg. Let's tell everyone about the other papers in today's issue. There's an exchange of letters between Doctors Baillon and Blaha regarding the article very high coronary artery, calcium and association with cardiovascular disease events, non-cardiovascular outcomes and mortality from MESA. There's an ECG challenge from Dr. Bell Belhassen on a left bundle branch block, tachycardia following transcatheter aortic valve replacement. And On My Mind paper by Dr. Neeland on cardiovascular outcomes trials for weight loss interventions, another tool for cardiovascular prevention, another Research Letter by Dr. Nakamura on clinical outcomes of Rivaroxaban Mono therapy in heart failure, patients with atrial fibrillation and stable coronary artery disease. So insights from the AFIRE trial, and finally, a Research Letter from Dr. Kumoro three-dimensional visualization of hypoxia induced, pulmonary vascular remodeling in mice. Dr. Greg Hundley: Great, Carolyn, and I've got an in-depth piece from Professor Jia Sani entitled breadth of life, heart disease, linked to developmental hypoxia. Dr. Greg Hundley: Well, Carolyn, how about we get onto that feature discussion and learn more about results from the ischemia trial? Dr. Carolyn Lam: Let's go Greg. Dr. Carolyn Lam: Well, we all know how important diabetes is as a risk factor for atherosclerotic coronary disease. And we know it's a very common comorbidity among patients with chronic coronary disease, but the question is do patients with diabetes and chronic coronary disease on top of guideline directed medical therapy and lifestyle interventions, of course, do they derive incremental benefit from an invasive management strategy of their coronary disease? Well, we are going to try to answer that question today in our feature discussion. Thank you so much for joining us today. The first author and corresponding author of today's feature paper, which tells us about results from the ischemia trials. And that's Dr. Jonathan Newman from New York university Grossman School of Medicine. We also have associate editor Sandeep Das from UT Southwestern. So welcome both of you. And if I could please start with Jonathan reminding us, perhaps, what were the ischemia trials and then what you tried to answer and do in today's paper, Dr. Jonathan Newman: Of course, Carolyn, and thank you so much for having me and for the discussion with Sandeep. It's a pleasure to be here. So sure has a little bit of background, as you indicated, the ischemia trials basically enrolled and for the purposes of this discussion and this analysis, I'm referring to both the main ischemia trial and the ischemia chronic kidney disease trials. So ischemia CKD under the umbrella of the ischemia trials. Ischemia stands for the international study of comparative health effectiveness with medical and invasive approaches. And the purpose of the trial was to test to see whether a routine invasive approach on a background of intensive guideline directed medical therapy for high risk patients with chronic coronary disease and at least moderate ischemia and obstructive coronary disease documented on a blinded CCTA or computed coronary tomography angiography prior to randomization was associated with benefits for a cardiovascular composite. And we looked in this analysis at whether or not there was appreciable heterogeneity of treatment effect or a difference in treatment effect for patients compared without diabetes in the ischemia trials, in ischemia and ischemia CKD. Dr. Carolyn Lam: Great, thanks for lining that up so nicely. So what, Dr. Jonathan Newman: So the results of our analysis really highlighted a couple of things that I think you touched upon initially, the first thing that I would highlight is that diabetes was very common in this high risk cohort with chronic coronary disease, over 40% of participants in the ischemia trials, 43% with obstructive coronary disease and moderate to severe, you may have had diabetes. Perhaps not surprisingly patients with diabetes had higher rates of death or MI than those without diabetes. And the rates were highest among those patients that required insulin, had insulin treated diabetes, but using really robust methods to assess for heterogeneity using a Bassen assessment of heterogeneity of treatment effect accounting for violation of proportional hazards. The fact that there was an upfront hazard and a late benefit, we really saw no difference in death or MI, between the invasive or conservative strategies for patients with, or without diabetes over about three years of follow-up. Dr. Jonathan Newman: And the results importantly were consistent for ischemia and ischemia CKD and provided the rationale for us when we started by looking to see if the distribution of risk and characteristics allowed the trials to be combined. The study really confirms this higher risk of death or a MI for chronic coronary disease patients who have diabetes extends these findings for those patients with moderate or severe ischemia. And I think really notably also adds information about chronic coronary disease patients with diabetes and CKD. That's sort of the overall findings. And I'm happy to talk in more detail about that. Dr. Carolyn Lam: I love the way you explain that Jonathan and especially, going into detail on what was so different about the paper and the really important statistical methods that made these findings robust, very important and impactful findings. If I could ask Sandeep to share your thoughts. Dr. Sandeep Das: Thanks, Carolyn. You know, I am just a big fan of everything that's come out of the ischemia group. One of the things that I really most enjoy as a consumer of the literature is when well done studies give me results that are unexpected. And I know it's become fashionable now to say that everybody knew that all along that this is what going to be the result. But honestly, I think we all sort of are many of us thought that there's going to be a subgroup somewhere that's really going to benefit from an invasive approach in terms of preventing heart outcomes. I think the key here that really jumped out at me was that this is identifying what we typically think of is a very high risk subgroup. You know, patients with diabetes patients with multi-vessel coronary disease patients with insulin dependent diabetes. Dr. Sandeep Das: And we did see the association with mortality across the increased disease severity and the increased severity of diabetes as expected. But really we didn't see a signal that revascularization, routinely revascularizing patients, even the higher risk patients led to clinically relevant heart outcome benefits. So I thought that that was a really interesting top line finding and really that's kind of. I mean, it would have been interesting if it was the other way too, but it was, it really was kind of the hook that got me into the paper. Dr. Sandeep Das: I actually have a question for Jonathan, one of the things that I think we spend a lot of time as an editorial group thinking about and talking about, and we bounce back and forth with the authors a few times was the idea that relatively few of these patients with multi-vessel CAD ended up having CABG. So, you would typically think of diabetes multi-vessel CAD as being a pretty strong signal for patients that may benefit in terms of mortality from having bypass surgery. And here it was a relatively small group about a third, or maybe even less than a third. And I realized up front, they excluded the left main and the patients that had angina had a CTA, et cetera. But what I'd be curious as to your thoughts about, the benefits of bypass surgery and diabetes, which have been established in other trials. Dr. Jonathan Newman: It's a great question. And I think we really appreciated the questions from you and from the editors to try and get at some of the nuance with this issue. As you indicated in the ischemia and ischemia CKD trials overall, and the patients in the invasive treatment arm, it was about 25% or so 26% and 15% were revascularized with CABG. Part of the issue here is that it gets a little tricky with the use of CCTA of pre randomization CTA to define coronary artery severity, which was not required in the CKD population due to impaired renal function. But what we can say is among the patients with diabetes and multi-vessel coronary disease, 29% were revascularized surgically in their combined analysis, which is comparable to the 30% in Bery 2d that were revascularized via bypass surgery, as we've discussed. And as you know, the decision for surgical versus percutaneous revascularization in ischemia, as in Barry 2d was non-randomized though we might want to, we really tried to be very, very cautious in terms of comparing revascularization strategies on outcomes for patients with diabetes and multi-vessel CAD, which has you suggested. Dr. Jonathan Newman: And as we pointed out, the proportion with multi-vessel CAD was more common amongst in patients with diabetes compared with those patients without diabetes. The other thing I would sort of say in the framework of, the revascularization and strategies for revascularization, comparing, let's say ischemia to Barry 2d or to freedom. Basically we have very little data about revascularization approaches for those patients with creatinine with impaired renal function and, patients with the crediting greater than two were excluded from Barry 2d. So while we had about 15% or so that had severe CKD. So in the GFR, less than 30 are on dialysis. And we know that's an extremely high risk group of patients with diabetes and chronic coronary disease. And we don't have great evidence on which strategy for revascularization if at all provides additional benefit. So I think it's a really a tough question to answer, and we tried to be as judicious as possible in our comments about revascularization approaches, given the nature of the trial design. Dr. Carolyn Lam: Gee, thanks so much, Jonathan, for explaining that. So, well, I actually have a related question now, referring to the medical therapy. Can I, sort of ask you about the fact that, these days that the rage is all about GLP one receptor agonist, for example, that are known to reduce the risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and diabetes. So these ischemic trials, I assume, did not have a high usage of these medications. And what do you think would be the impact, if anything, I suppose even more for guideline directed medical therapy. Huh? Dr. Jonathan Newman: Yeah. So it's a great question, Carolyn. As you know, in strategy trials and clinical trials in general, that take a while it's always a real challenge to keep the trial contemporary with current clinical practice, whether it's revascularization strategies or changes in medical therapy. And as you indicated, the real revolution and glucose lowering therapies with profound cardiovascular benefit for patients with diabetes, we worked hard to try and stay up to date and encourage sites around the world with the use of best SGLT2 inhibitors and GLP ones. The rates were very, very low and we don't actually given the fact that the ischemia trials were conducted a real multinational and is really an international trial is over 330 sites worldwide. So we really had to balance the data that we could get from sites with the reality of collecting and running this trial across the whole world. Dr. Jonathan Newman: So we don't actually know. We know insulin use or non-use or oral medication use or non-use or no medication use or non-use, but not much more than that. From what, as, you know, unfortunately, even after now, six going on seven years of impressive data for the benefit of these agents, uptake remains low for patients with diabetes, whether it's with coronary disease or heart failure. And there was certainly the case with the trial, which started back in 2015, or sorry, before 2015, even before the results of EMPA-REG. So the rates of those agents were low. I would expect as you indicated that if we did have greater use of these beneficial therapies. Medical therapy may have performed even better and potentially given an added boost potentially for our high risk, even higher risk subgroups that we'd looked at that were available in these trials. Dr. Carolyn Lam: Oh, thanks again. I wish we could go on forever, but we've got just a little bit of time left. So I'd like to ask you both for your quick take home messages for the audience. Could I start with Sandeep and then Jonathan? Dr. Sandeep Das: Yeah. You know, I think a key take home from this is that, although it may be naively intuitive that a very aggressive invasive strategy would be superior, especially in high risk patients. You know, the data are very, very convincing that it's not. And so therefore I think in an absolute minimum, you have plenty of time and ability to think about these patients carefully, to select who, if anybody would be a great candidate for revascularization, more aggressive therapy and more invasive therapy, but the most patients will do well with conservative management. Dr. Sandeep Das: And I think that that's the, that's a real key take home here. And I think that the points that Jonathan raised about, you know, poor uptake of GLP one RAs and SGLT 2 inhibitors in the community as they're so far are key, right? So we have great medicines that we just under used, and that to me is the other sort of clarion call here is that if in the context of a nice trial, that you can see similar result for invasive conservative approaches, then lets, let's get our medical therapy where it needs to be to provide our patients the best outcomes we can Speaker 3: Love it, Jonathan. Dr. Jonathan Newman: Yeah. So I'm really glad that Sandeep brought up the issue of medical therapy in the trial. And maybe I can take a minute to sort of frame what San kind of build off of what Sandeep just said, you know, we, in the context of this clinical trial, you know, Dr. Judy Hawkman, the study chair and Dr. David Marin, the co-chair and I, we worked very hard with optimizing medical therapy across the trials, for all participants. So really getting patients on the maximum tolerated doses of high-intensity statins, lowering patient's LDL as aggressively as possible evolving our systolic blood pressure targets. And it was extremely challenging. And at the end of the day, we see that patients with diabetes were more likely than those without to get to our LDL goal. We used a threshold problematic concept that that still may be to some extent, but they were less likely to achieve their systolic blood pressure goals. Dr. Jonathan Newman: And I think Sandeep was exactly right. We have a way to go with implementing existing therapies, existing medical therapy. There may be a benefit for as demonstrated in Dr. S. for patients that remain highly symptomatic to derive symptom benefit with revascularization. The other context I would sort of add with the medical therapy issue is that despite really aggressive medical therapy, and we really did as much as we could, patients with diabetes still had, a 40, 50% greater risk of death or MI than those without diabetes. So there's still this idea of kind of residual risk. And these were patients with diabetes that were very well managed from a medical and glycemic control perspective. So we still have a lot of work to do. And I think understanding ways we can benefit our patients is really that challenge. Speaker 3: Thanks so much, Jonathan, and thank you Sandeep for joining us today. Speaker 3: And thank you audience for listening from Greg and I. This has been "Circulation On The Run", please tune in again. Next week. Dr. Greg Hundley: This program is copyright of the American Heart Association, 2021. The opinions expressed by speakers in this podcast are their own and not necessarily those of the editors or of the American Heart Association for more visit AHJjournals.org.

We Hate Politics
Barack Obama campaigns for McAuliffe in Richmond

We Hate Politics

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 33:23


Former President Barack Obama came to Richmond on Saturday to campaign for Democratic gubernatorial candidate Terry McAuliffe at VCU's Monroe Park Campus.Obama talked about the work he did with McAuliffe during his first term as governor, and mocked his Republican opponent, Glenn Youngkin, as well.

101 Part Time Jobs
Matthew E. White

101 Part Time Jobs

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 40:50


Matthew E. White joins me talking about the beginnings of Spacebomb, Fight the Big Bull, Richmond, studying at VCU, teaching guitar lessons, emailing Steven Bernstein and having a lesson with him, how Sounds of the South came about, email determination and more.Get your beers delivered! 101 Part Time Jobs is supported by Signature Brew: listeners can get 10% off all their beers by visiting signaturebrew.co.uk and using the code '101PODCAST'Songs: Matthew E. White 'Let's Ball', Cock Sparrer 'Working' See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Screen The Screener Basketball Podcast
VCU Rams Preview - Wayne Epps Jr.

Screen The Screener Basketball Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 19:44


Mike Randle (@RandleRant) talks with Wayne Epps Jr. (@wayneeppsjr) of The Richmond Times-Dispatch to preview the VCU Rams for the 2021-2022 season. Mike talks with Wayne Epps Jr. about replacing the great Bones Hyland, the leadership of seniors Vince Williams and KeShawn Curry, transfers Marcus Tsohonis and Jimmy Nichols, and can VCU position for a late-season run when Ace Baldwin returns?Follow us @STheSPodcast on Twitter.  Rate and subscribe on Spreaker, iTunes, Stitcher, and TuneIn Radio!Subscribe to our YouTube channel:  https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC0r14k3YJBdOaT9Lz6RJTEwEmail the show StheSPodcast@gmail.com

Pod So 1
Episode 115: Rodney Ashby

Pod So 1

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 72:20


Rodney Ashby is the sixth VCU basketball player to be on the podcast! Rodney talks with Paul and Kevin about his unlikely basketball journey and how he ended up being a part of the VCU family. He referred to this as the “Ramily” and he discussed the culture and the special life long connections of the program and the school itself. He talked about his business and how he also does broadcasting as well. Rodney, Paul and Kevin finished up by discussing golf and then Rodney talked about his kids.

Abstract
The Promise of Public Education: College in a New Era

Abstract

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 46:59


Jose Alcaine (Director of Research Services, VCU SOE) spoke with Sera Lee (Pharmacy Student at VCU), Paige Elizabeth (Sophomore at VCU), and Sofia Alcaine (Sophomore at CNU) about the future of higher education during and after the COVID-19 pandemic.

Retired College Athletes
065: All About Confidence w/Shay Haddow

Retired College Athletes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 28:08


This week's guest is Shay Haddow. She was a soccer player at VCU and University of Boulder Colorado.  In this episode, we chat about confidence, how to be a good teammate when things aren't going your way, imposture syndrome, and so much moreToday's Scout:- Name: Shay Haddow- Sport: Soccer- Schools: VCU and University of Colorado Boulder- Instagram: @AlphaGirlConfidenceHer Platform: Alpha Girl Confidence- Website- Instagram- PodcastEnter to win Shay's Book, She The Confident: click hereThis giveaway will close on October 18th. Winners will be notified on October 19th.Housekeeping:- Website: www.retiredcollegeathletes.com- Instagram: @retiredcollegeathletes- Facebook: Retired College Athletes- YouTube: Retired College Athletes- Twitter: @RCAathletes- Email: retiredcollegeathletes@gmail.com- Patreon - If you love RCA and want to give financially to support the podcast you can do so through Patreon. Depending on what tier you give, you will receive exclusive content as a thank you for supporting us.

Nuggets Ink
Bones Hyland hype, Michael Porter Jr.'s breakout season and Bol Bol's shot at redemption

Nuggets Ink

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 49:26


In the latest Nuggets Ink podcast, beat writer Mike Singer is joined by deputy sports editor Matt Schubert to talk about Singer's time at the Nuggets' training camp in San Diego and storylines that have emerged over the past two weeks. Among the topics discussed... + Is the Bones Hyland hype real? Could Nuggets head coach Michael Malone give real minutes to a rookie? What does the VCU product, a +8,000 underdog for rookie of the year, need to do to find a spot in Denver's crowded backcourt? + Will Bol Bol finally appease the masses and make his long-awaited debut as a rotation staple? What's the story behind his reported attitude change? What happened that produced a more focused player ahead of camp? + What is the Nuggets' place in the Western Conference ahead of the 2021-22 NBA season? With Jamal Murray's return date unknown, what are reasonable expectations for this team? + Is this conference still the Lakers' to lose? Who should come out of the East? Does Kyrie Irving's bizarre behavior put the Nets at risk of squandering their real chance for an NBA title?

Pod So 1
Episode 111: Ward Fasold

Pod So 1

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 64:11


Ward Fasold joins the podcast courtesy of guest host, Kevin Flippen. Ward grew up in Alexandria, VA and went to T.C. Williams (Remember the Titans fame!) He went to VCU, majored in Mass Communications and has been covering sports as a  cameraman and as a producer for twenty-eight years. Ward talks with Paul and Kevin about winning an Emmy, Texas HS football and his twin boys.

CEO Podcasts: CEO Chat Podcast + I AM CEO Podcast Powered by Blue 16 Media & CBNation.co
IAM1140- CEO Leads a Strategic PR and Communications Firm

CEO Podcasts: CEO Chat Podcast + I AM CEO Podcast Powered by Blue 16 Media & CBNation.co

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2021 16:31


Lauren Stewart is the CEO and founder of Stewart Media – a strategic PR and communications firm located in Washington, D.C. Prior to launching Stewart Media in 2019, she led the public relations, communications, special events and fundraising for the Richard T. Robertson School of Media and Culture at Virginia Commonwealth University. Career highlights include: Renaming and re-branding the “School of Mass Communications” to the “Richard T. Robertson School of Media and Culture;” launching the School's first-ever major gift fundraising program; building and managing an internationally known media advisory board; and serving as the special event planner for the annual Virginia Communications Hall of Fame. Stewart is an active member of PRSA and has served on the DE&I Committee since 2018. Stewart holds a M.S. (Summa Cum Laude) from VCU in strategic public relations and a B.S. (Summa Cum Laude), also from VCU, in mass communications. She is the recipient of the coveted National Kappa Tau Alpha Top Scholar Award— the National Honor Society in Journalism and Mass Communications— for earning the highest class ranking of 4.0. Website: http://stewart-media.com/   Facebook: https://www.instagram.com/stewartmediapr/ Instagram: https://web.facebook.com/StewartMediaPR/

Not In My House
Marc Jackson: Jacko (Former VCU, Temple & NBA Player)

Not In My House

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 71:37


We finally got Philly represented on the podcast! Marc Jackson joins us to share his inspiring hoops journey and plenty of amazing stories that involve some of the best players from that early 2000's era. Jacko is a player that every team loved to have and we know you will understand why after you give this one a listen.Jackson grew up in Philly in the same neighborhood of Temple University. He played one season at VCU before transferring back home to play his last three seasons of college hoops for Temple. Jackson was selected by the Golden State Warriors as the 37th pick of the 1997 NBA Draft. He had a successful career both overseas and in the NBA and was a key contributor on every team he suited up for. He shares great stories about the high school hoops scene in Philly, Rasheed Wallace, Faron “Meatball” Hand, Coach John Chaney, business of the NBA, Gilbert Arenas, Kevin Garnett, Allen Iverson, Jason Kidd, his WILD experiences overseas, his non-profit Team Jacko and MUCH more.BIG thanks to Marc Jackson for taking the time to share his experiences with us. We learned so much about the game with plenty of laughs. We love that he is giving back to the youth, his city and the game with his non-profit organization and we know he will have a huge impact on plenty of lives.Thanks Marc Jackson!Follow Marc and his Non-Profit on Instagram at the accounts posted below.Twitter - @Jacko2544Instagram @Team_jackoInstagram @TheMarcJacksonAlso be sure to checkout his Podcast that will be releasing soon titled “Puttin' on a Clinic"You can find this episode on Apple, Spotify or any source for podcasts.Follow us on social media for news, updates and highlight reels!Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/notin.myhouse.79Instagram- @Not_in_my_house_podcastTwitter - @NOTINMYHOUSEpc

Eco-Fashion Podcast at VCU
Episode #9: CLOVO Brand

Eco-Fashion Podcast at VCU

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2021 23:21


Welcome back returning listeners and everyone new to the Eco Fashion Podcast at VCU. In today's episode, our host Natalie B. talks with Megan Martis, the founder of CLOVO Brand! Natalie and Megan talk about the founding of CLOVO and being a woman-owned business. Megan talks about what lead her to create CLOVO, what brands inspire her and the future of fashion. Natalie was inspired to hear from Megan, who studied physics, but saw a need for a sustainable hosiery line and the strong need for fashion to have a positive effect on the environment. Megan also touches on future expansions for CLOVO and what she has in mind for the future of her brand! Everyone, be sure to keep up with CLOVO via Instagram—@clovobrand! In need for new hosiery, shop from CLOVO Brand www.clovobrand.com

Inside Out Health with Coach Tara Garrison
DANNY VEGA All Things Keto, Carnivore and Training Optimization

Inside Out Health with Coach Tara Garrison

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 54:28


A native of Miami, Florida, Danny Vega received his bachelor's degree in political science from Columbia University in 2004, where he played football and was a three-time Dean's List recipient. Danny earned his Master's of Science in Human Performance from the University of Florida, where he worked with the national championship men's basketball team along with the tennis and golf programs.  He then went on to become the Strength & Conditioning coordinator for VCU basketball, helping the Rams to the 2007 conference champions and making it to the second round of the NCAA tournament. As a raw powerlifter, he had met bests of 640 squat in wraps (610 raw), 400 bench, and 700 deadlift. He has competed in indoor rowing, where he has personal bests of 1:19.9 in the 500 meter, 14.5 in the 100 meter, and 389 meters in the minute for distance—all 3 of them are Florida state records. In this episode Danny gives so much practical wisdom about getting strong and also about his new mindset book - for children! Find out more about Danny here: www.fatfueled.family Instagram:@dannyvega.ms Upgraded Formulas - Inside Out Health Podcast Special Offers: Click HERE for the Upgraded Formulas Hair Test Kit Special Offer Click HERE for the Upgraded Formulas Main Site & Get 10% OFF  Everything with Coupon Code: INSIDEOUT Ready to enhance your metabolism? Learn about my Keto In & Out system HERE. Podcast Listeners get 10% off my Keto In & Out System with coupon code PODCASTKIO10. Want one on one coaching? Learn more about it HERE.

The Educator's Room Presents: The Teacher Self-Care Podcast
Episode 138: How Therapy and Being a Virtual Audience Member Saved My Mental Well-Being

The Educator's Room Presents: The Teacher Self-Care Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2021 29:31


In this episode, Franchesca interviews Tanya Boucicaut- a college professor as she discusses how the 18 months in solitude forced her to go to therapy and address her mental well-being. Tanya Boucicaut, M.F.A., M.Div. (she/hers), is Assistant Professor at Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) and a licensed Baptist clergywoman. Prior to her appointment at VCU, she founded a faith-based non-profit youth theatre education organization called Perfect Love Community Youth Theatre. Boucicaut co-founded the Graduate Writing Center for Theological Studies at the Samuel DeWitt Proctor School of Theology at Virginia Union (STVU). At STVU, she has also served as project director of STREAM, a high school youth theology institute, a member of the editorial team for the school's 2017 accreditation process, and a database consultant. She is currently a Writing and Rhetoric Ph.D. student at George Mason University focusing on the intersection of Black Church Studies, Hip Hop Pedagogy, and Community Building. Boucicaut is a lover and student of hip hop with rose gold bottoms, rapped her first rhyme in Mr. Magee's 6th health case for a presentation to the beat of Puff Daddy and Mase's "Been Around the World", and she was a playwright at 17. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/teacher-self-care/support

Faithful Politics
"Kids, Christians, & COVID-19" - w/Dr. Danny Avula

Faithful Politics

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 49:24


With school starting in many states around the country, a lot of parents are wondering if it's safe for their kids to be back in public school especially with the prevalence of the Delta Variant. We talk with Dr. Danny Avula this week to answer many of your COVID-19 questions about this. Dr. Avula is the Virginia State Vaccination Coordinator, as well as, a practicing pediatrician so if anyone can answer these questions it's definitely him! We also talk about why kids have been relatively sparred from high rates of covid and whether or not he expects that to change. Then we discuss the important role of the church in promoting vaccinations. As a practicing Christian, Dr. Avula has some thoughts on this as well!Guest Bio:Dr. Danny Avula is Director of the Richmond City and Henrico County Health Departments. He is a public health physician board certified in pediatrics and preventive medicine, and he continues to practice clinically as a pediatric hospitalist. After graduating from the University of Virginia, he attended the VCU School of Medicine, and completed residencies at VCU and Johns Hopkins University, where he also received a Master's in Public Health. He is an Affiliate Faculty member at VCU, where he regularly serves as an advisor and preceptor to graduate and medical students.Governor McAuliffe appointed Dr. Avula to the State Board of Social Services in 2013 and he served as Board Chair from 2017 to 2019. He is the Immediate Past Chair of the Richmond Memorial Health Foundation, and serves on several other community boards. He has been named one of Richmond's "Top Docs" every year from 2013-2019. He is a recent recipient of the Virginia Center for Inclusive Community's Humanitarian Award, and in 2019, he was a Richmond Times Dispatch ‘Person of the Year' honoree.At home, Danny devotes his time to life with his wife and five kids, and to learning how to be a good neighbor in the rapidly changing community of Church Hill, where he has lived for the past fifteen years. His work has been featured nationally by the CDC, The New York Times, NPR, PBS Newshour, Christianity Today, and MSNBC.Support the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/faithpolitics)

Something (rather than nothing)
Episode 113 - Joyce A. Miller

Something (rather than nothing)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 33:16


When Joyce A. Miller turned 60, her curiosity fueled the writing for her debut historical fiction novel, Joe Harris, the Moon, based on her granduncle's life at the beginning of the Twentieth Century. Her cousin, Bob Harris, who is a huge baseball fan and cares deeply about their family history, did most of the research for the story. It was a joy for Miller to piggyback on his research and dig deeper into the history of southwestern Pennsylvania and the baseball world. She wanted to unravel the truth of Joe Harris' story through fiction. Miller retired at 60 and moved to the Church Hill section of Richmond, Virginia. She moved to Richmond to be closer to her adult children, who went to college at VCU and never returned home. She lives in renovated, red brick building that was once a 1910 industrial brush factory. Miller can almost see her Uncle Joe as a young man leaning against the massive twelve-inch by twelve-inch oak wooden pillars in her living room.   Miller lives with her husband, Alan, and her retired racing greyhound, Coheed. Coheed, like all racing greyhounds, was registered with a racing name. The breeder gave him and his littermates the names of rock and roll bands, and he became CoheedandCambria. Miller just kept the Coheed part. Miller wonders if Coheed could name her, would he keep “Joyce” or name her something else. Before Miller retired to write full time, she worked as a mechanical designer at Jefferson Lab, a nuclear physics laboratory, in Newport News, VA for over thirty years. How does a little girl born in southwestern Pennsylvania grow up to work at a state-of-the-art, cutting edge nuclear physics laboratory? She always loved to draw but was also good at math. Her dad told her to “learn a trade.” So, after a short stint at college to study German, she switched to a technical school and became a draftsman. Miller believes she had the same wanderlust that her granduncle Joe had. Her first job, where she was the only woman draftsman, was at a vacuum products company in Pittsburgh where most of their archived drawings had been destroyed in a flood. Her job, since her hand lettering was so neat, was to lay a piece of vellum over the wrinkled and water stained drawings and trace them. She learned about vacuum drying systems like freeze dryers for coffee, rotary dryers for pharmaceuticals and autoclave dryers for impregnating telephone poles with creosote. Because she had gained a little vacuum experience, her next job was at a German company that produced vacuum vane pumps in the United States. Miller's job was to translate the German drawings into English. When she moved to Virginia, she worked for a ship design company making waste and oily wastewater piping drawings for Navy frigates. And with that accumulated experience of vacuum and piping, Miller got the job at the nuclear physics laboratory designing cryogenics piping, vacuum systems and superconducting magnets.  It was at the physics laboratory where she met several French colleagues who came to the laboratory to do their experiments. As their work relationship blossomed into friendship, Miller traveled with them to unique areas of France about once every three years or so. They introduced her to great wine, stinky cheese and gourmet food. One day, Miller will have them take her to the Argonne Forest where Joe fought in the trenches. When Miller is not writing, her friends say that she intentionally curates experiences for them. She still likes to draw and paint like she did when she was a child. In 2001, Miller adopted her first ex-racing greyhound named A Bar Kit and trained her to be a therapy dog. She and Kit visited the local library where kids would read to Kit. A friend suggested to Miller that she should try canine freestyle, also called dog dancing, with Kit. Canine freestyle is a dog sport where one teaches the dog to do certain tricks which are then choreographed to a piece of music; and it looks like the dog and handler are dancing. So, when Miller turned 50 years old, she signed up for an adult tap and jazz class so she could be a better dog dancer with her greyhounds. She likes to tap dance because it makes such a joyful noise. She continues to train dogs and volunteers with the greyhound adoption group. She likes to practice yoga and swim at the beach now and then. But if Miller really had to swim to save her life, she would just perish.

Beyond the Box Score Podcast
Interview w/ Donny Lind (Assistant Coach at UNCG)

Beyond the Box Score Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 60:04


Coach Donny Lind shares his journey from attempting to walk on at Loyola Maryland to becoming one of the highly touted up-and-coming coaches in NCAA Division 1. He was a Student Manager under Jimmy Patsos at Loyola Maryland before being hired as a Graduate Assistant at VCU under Shaka Smart. Coach Lind was eventually promoted to Video Coordinator, while at VCU they had unprecedented success winning 84 games, a CAA Championship, and appeared in the NCAA Tournament in each of his three years on staff. In 2011 the Rams advanced to the Final Four. Jamion Christian hired him at Mount St Mary's where they would win the NEC Tournament and advanced to the NCAA Tournament in Lind's first season on staff. In April of 2016 Coach Lind was named to National Association of Basketball Coaches (NABC) Under Armor 30-under-30 list and subsequently moved on to Radford to be an Assistant Coach under Mike Jones. During his five seasons at Radford he was an integral part of their regular season and post season success. He was instrumental in the development of Carlik Jones and was named one of the top 50 Impactful Low Major Coach in DI and the third best AC in the Big South by Jeff Goodman, Stadium Basketball Insider. After Wes Miller accepted the job at Cincinnati, Mike Jones was named the Head Coach at UNCG and Coach Lind went with him.

Teaching Artist Podcast
#72: Andy Harris: Super Powers, Scissors, & Glue

Teaching Artist Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2021 78:51


Andy Harris talked about teaching with a focus on bringing out the super powers within his students. He shared some amazing projects that use art to consider identity and build relationships within the classroom. He also shared some great advice for artists around seeking opportunities and being ready when doors open. I loved hearing about his process - from collecting images to painting, cutting, and glueing paper, drawing on his experience hanging wallpaper. Andy Harris graduated from VCU, currently works out of his studio in Norfolk Virginia and teaches art in Virginia Beach City Public Schools. Blog Post with links and images: https://www.teachingartistpodcast.com/72-andy-harris/ www.aharrisart.com @andy.andy.harris . . . Follow: @teachingartistpodcast @pottsart @playinspiregallery Check out the featured artists: https://www.teachingartistpodcast.com/featured-artists/ Take the audience survey: https://iter.ly/bnrm2 Art Educators' Lounge meeting registration: http://arteducatorslounge.eventbrite.com/ Submit your work to be featured: https://www.teachingartistpodcast.com/featuredartist/ Book an Art Critique Session with Rebecca: https://www.teachingartistpodcast.com/mentor/ --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/teachingartistpodcast/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/teachingartistpodcast/support

Good Morning, RVA!
Good morning, RVA: New data, the history of Westwood, and welcome back VCU!

Good Morning, RVA!

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2021


I love when VCU students return to the city! Welcome back!

PsychU Community Podcast
Racial Trauma In The Workplace

PsychU Community Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2021 18:21


Topics to be discussed: 1. What is racial trauma, and does it show up in the workplace amongst our providers? 2. As a Black professional yourself, what challenges do Black MH providers face in the workplace and how does it impact the providers mental health? 3. What are the best strategies for Black providers to use when they encounter racial trauma and workplace stress? 4. What can organizations and employers do to provide support to Black MH providers who experience workplace stress or trauma? 5. What resources do you want to highlight on PsychU? Listen to Amica Simmons-Yon, PharmD, PhD and Jacquelyn Canning, PharmD, BCPP as they spill the tea about this week's hot topic: Racial Trauma in the Workplace with a special guest, Kirby Patmon Williams, PMHNP-BC. Mrs. Williams is a psychiatric nurse practitioner at RBHA in Richmond, VA. She mentors graduate nursing students at various universities across the country and is an adjunct professor at VCU. Kirby is a current member of the American Psychiatric Nurses Association (APNA) and is the founder of the Black PMHNP Collective of Virginia. Join the PsychU podcast team this week and learn more about addressing stress and racial trauma to improve workplace mental health. Featuring: • Amica Simmons-Yon, PharmD, PhD, OPDC MSL • Jacquelyn Canning, PharmD, BCPP, OPDC MSL • Kirby Patmon Williams, MSN, PMHNP-BC Addressing Racial Bias In Health Care: Practice & Organizational Perspectives - PsychU https://bit.ly/2VNLVwB Impact & Trauma Of Racism - PsychU https://bit.ly/3scOEvl Take A Stand On Racial Injustice: Perspectives From Mental Health Experts In Advocacy And Psychiatric Health Care - PsychU https://bit.ly/3sb9D1r Kirby Patmon Williams is a paid consultant of Otsuka Pharmaceutical Development & Commercialization, Inc. Amica Simmons-Yon and Jacquelyn Canning are employees of Otsuka Pharmaceutical Development & Commercialization, Inc. PsychU is supported by Otsuka Pharmaceutical Development & Commercialization, Inc. (OPDC), Otsuka America Pharmaceutical, Inc. (OAPI), and Lundbeck, LLC – committed supporters of the mental health treatment community. The opinions expressed by PsychU's contributors are their own and are not endorsed or recommended by PsychU or its sponsors. The information provided through PsychU is intended for the educational benefit of mental health care professionals and others who support mental health care. It is not intended as, nor is it a substitute for, medical care, advice, or professional diagnosis. Health care professionals should use their independent medical judgement when reviewing PsychU's educational resources. Users seeking medical advice should consult with a health care professional. No CME or CEU credits are available through any of the resources provided by PsychU. Some of the contributors may be paid consultants for OPDC, OAPI, and / or Lundbeck, LLC.

Source & Co.
Kelli Lemon - The Ubiquitous (Episode 63)

Source & Co.

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2021 61:18


When one thinks of the 804, there are a few names that come to mind. But there is one name, regardless of topic, that can be brought up in almost any 804 conversation. Wanna find something to do in the city? ✔️ Looking for those weekend lottery numbers? ✔️ Need a spot to chill downtown? ✔️ Trying to figure out who that woman is hyping up the Art of Noise crowd? ✔️ Heard of the Jackson Ward Collective? ✔️ Waiting for the next Richmond Black Restaurant Experience event? ✔️ And the list goes on and on. We talked about: -how she made her way from the 757 to the 804 -her connection to UVA and VCU -being a social entrepreneur -her top 5 musical artists -…and much more. Welcome to the stage, today's company… Ms. Dope and Different herself, Kelli Lemon @likethefruit -Source

Eat It, Virginia!
Ida Mamusu: Africanne On Main

Eat It, Virginia!

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2021 68:33


When Chef Ida Mamusu fled Liberia after a coup d'état in 1980, she landed in New York City alone and without a plan. A stranger approached Mamusu, crying at the airport, and took her back to her apartment to help get her on her feet.  After connecting with family in the states, Mamusu made her way to Richmond where she opened businesses to earn money to bring her family over from Africa. It was family, she said, specifically her grandmother, who set her on the path to opening her restaurant Chef Mamusu's Africanne on Main. "When I turned 10 years old, she put an apron on me and gave me a cooking spoon," Mamusu said. "That day was the day that I knew that I was going to be a cook, just the apron and spoon was in my hand, it transformed my whole idea of what I wanted to do in my life." It wasn't long before her father made Mamusu the chef of the house. She was just 13 years old. "I was feeding 11 people, doing the menus, the budget, everything," she said. "I knew that this was it, there wasn't anything else that I ever wanted to do in my life. And I say this to everyone, if I die and had to come back in any form, I will be doing the same thing. Because this is all I know. And it is all I love to do." After several moves since its 1995 opening, Chef Mamusu recently re-opened Africanne on Main in a larger space at 1102 West Main Street near VCU. There she hopes to connect with more international students seeking a taste of home and Richmonders looking for healthy meal options. "I want to be the chef that will heal you with food by natural herbs and spices," she said. "[If you ask for advice] I will start you off with vegetables and I've done that with customers. Looking at their tray, I would say to them, 'I don't see any vegetables on your tray.' They will say, 'I got a little greens right here.' Sometimes I will send them back to the buffet and say take some spinach, it is good for you." Africanne On Main offers mainly West African cuisine served buffet style at $7.99 per pound. The restaurant is open Tuesday thru Saturday from 11 a.m. - 8 p.m. This episode of Eat It, Virginia is sponsored by Farmer Focus. Learn more about Farmer focus here. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Pharmacy Podcast Network
Henry Agyeman PharmD., BSc | PharmGradWishList Podcast

Pharmacy Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2021 19:40


Caroline L. Ko, PharmD, BCPS, BCCCP, co-founder of the PharmGradWishList interviews Henry Agyeman PharmD., BSc.  Dr. Agyeman grew up in Ghana and moved to the US to pursue an undergraduate degree in Chemistry from VCU. His desire to help people led him to pursue the pharmacy profession. He just graduated from the University of Cincinnati with his PharmD degree and will be relocating from Ohio to Virginia to begin a PGY1 residency with VCU and Publix. The #PharmGradWishlist community will be raising funds to help with his moving costs and licensing fees as he will be required to be licensed in both Virginia and Florida for his residency. He aspires to be an accessible community health professional to provide optimal medication therapy and care for his patients.  Henry Agyeman moving fund #PharmGradwishlist https://www.gofundme.com/f/henry-agyeman-moving-fund-pharmgradwishlist  Dr. Agyeman is thankful for the generous support of the pharmacy community to help him into the next stage of his career. He is being sponsored by the #PharmGradWishList movement (@PharmWishList) to get the word out about his support.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Constructing Greatness
Helping Small Businesses Dream Big with Julie Traxler and Corey Harris

Constructing Greatness

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2021 32:31


One of the many challenges small businesses face is the lack of affordable options for hiring consulting firms. Large consulting firms won't bother to work with solopreneurs or firms with less than ten employees because of their uniqueness. Most of those small firms are hands-on businesses that can't afford to invest the time or the resources, and on the other hand, those high-priced consultants tend to sell services that aren't needed, ignoring their clients' needs.Having these issues in mind, using their background in the corporate world and their experience working for Fortune 500 companies, Julie Traxler and Corey Harris founded SB PACE, whose mission is to offer value to every client, never sell services that aren't needed, and fully understand what a client needs before selling them anything. Julie Traxler and Corey Harris are business coaches passionate about helping small businesses owners succeed. They also have a podcast, QuizBiz, and they are best-selling authors of the book "Seriously? Now What?!: A Small Business Guide to Disaster Preparedness."Julie is a Certified Business Coach, an expert at project management, communication, and mergers & acquisitions. Corey is an expert at process planning, execution, and disaster preparedness. He owned and managed restaurants; he completed his Undergrad at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University and his Master's at VCU. In this episode, we talk about Julie and Corey's mission at SB PACE, how they started their business, its name origin, and the thinking process behind its creation. We also chat about the challenges small businesses face, the growth of the construction industry during the pandemic, and their passion for helping small firms. Some Questions I Ask: I am learning that you guys are best-selling authors. How did that come about? (5:28)When did you guys meet? And, you know, what was the business plan? (7:25)You guys had families that were business owners. Do you think that that's why you have your entrepreneurial spirit and desire to help entrepreneurs? (12:21)Could you talk about your services, how you're different? (21:34)In This Episode, You Will Learn:A bit about Julie and Corey, their decision to start a business, and the origin of their book (3:23)What if you fail? The origin of Julie's entrepreneurial spirit (13:17)The effects of the pandemic on entrepreneurship (14:48)Why Julie and Corey feel good about the services they offer (25:13)Resources:SB PACE websiteQuizBiz PodcastSB PACE LinkedInSB PACE InstagramSB PACE YouTubeSB PACE TwitterSB PACE FacebookBook: Julie Traxler and Corey Harris - Seriously? Now What?!: A Small Business Guide to Disaster Preparedness.Let's Connect!LinkedInInstagram TwitterMPC Builders - WebsiteMPC Builders - Facebook See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Full Disclosure
On Cancer ...

Full Disclosure

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2021 58:12


Dr. Robert Winn, director of VCU's Massey Cancer Center, on breakthroughs in prevention, detection and intervention in the COVID era. Plus, Traci Eagle and Vickie Brooks (musical duo Tray and Vickie) on how fighting hate has helped Eagle's fight against cancer.

Marching to Madness
Episode 664: VCU head coach Mike Rhoades

Marching to Madness

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2021 17:31


In this episode of Marching to Madness, hosts Blake Lovell and Ken Cross welcome back VCU head coach Mike Rhoades. Topics of discussion include: "Bones" Hyland as an NBA draftee The injury to dynamic point guard "Ace" Baldwin Additional responsibilities for leading returning scorer Vince Williams Losing the NCAA Tournament opener via COVID-19 protocols ... And much more! About the Hosts: Blake Lovell has over 14 years of experience in sports media. His work has been featured on The New York Times, Athlon Sports, Blue Ribbon College Basketball Yearbook, Rivals, Scout.com, Time Warner Cable, and many more. He covers national college basketball for College Hoops Watch and is the founder of SoutheastHoops.com. He's also a member of the USBWA. You can follow him on Twitter @theblakelovell. Ken Cross has a plethora of experience over 23 years in both print and broadcast journalism. He has worked in some capacity for ESPN Radio, CBS Sports Radio, Fox Sports Radio, Sporting News Radio, Yahoo! Sports Radio and many more. This includes coverage of college football, college basketball, Carolina Panthers, Charlotte Hornets/Bobcats, Carolina Hurricanes, Tampa Bay Buccaneers, Orlando Magic, and the Tampa Bay Lightning. His print and internet experiences include a college basketball writer and internet writer for Lindy's Sports Annuals and www.lindyssports.com, Streamline Media, Blue Ribbon College Basketball Yearbook, Field Level Media, and Rivals.com. He's the founder and editor of collegehoopswatch.com. You can follow him on Twitter @KennyBuckets333.

Pod So 1
Episode 98: Lyndee Cabo

Pod So 1

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2021 73:04


Lyndee Cabo used to work with Paul and has wanted to be on the podcast since we first started.  Lyndee stated she is from Virginia, but told Paul that she moved around a lot due to her dad being in the U.S. Navy.  She moved around the states and also spent some time in Japan which she loved.  Lyndee spent the most time in Virginia, went to high school in Chesapeake and said she was a handful for her parents.  She talked about her dad and described him as a “bad ass” for what he did (EOD) in the Navy.  She also talked about the rest of her family … her mom, her sister (whom she has always idolized) and her brother who is ten years younger than her.   After high school, Lyndee took a different route than her friends and did some traveling and didn't go to college until she was 23 years old.  She attended VCU and graduated with a BFA in Interior Design.  Lyndee worked for a tile distribution company and now has her own interior design company.  Lyndee said interior design is like “interior architecture” and she really likes the puzzle aspect of her job as well as putting herself in other's peoples shoes and helping them figure out what do with their residential or commercial space.     She wrapped up by talking about the future in regards to her company and family. We chatted about her husband, Matt, who is seventeen inches taller than Lyndee and their daughter Gwendolyn.  

BSN Denver Nuggets Podcast
The Nuggets draft Bones Hyland from VCU: Instant reaction, analysis and what this pick means for Denver

BSN Denver Nuggets Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2021 76:28


The guys break down the Nuggets first round selection of Bones Hyland from VCU live from the Lounge following Thursday night's draft. Why Denver selected Hyland, if they were surprised about the pick and how the point guard will fit in Denver.

Ketogeek's Podcast
70. Wisdom and Lessons Learned from COVID, Current Social Landscape & a Healthy Lifestyle | Danny Vega

Ketogeek's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2021 102:51


Prepare yourself for an absolute wisdom-heavy podcast with Danny Vega as we reflect on what we have learned and what's in store for the future. A philosophical and thought-provoking episode that takes you into a very internal journey. BIO A native of Miami, Florida, Danny received his bachelor's degree in political science from Columbia University in 2004, where he played football and was a three-time Dean's List recipient. Danny earned his Master's of Science in Human Performance from the University of Florida, where he worked with the national championship men's basketball team along with the tennis and golf programs. He then went on to become the Strength & Conditioning Coordinator for VCU basketball, helping the Rams to the 2007 conference champions and making it to the second round of the NCAA tournament. As a raw powerlifter, he had meet bests of 640 squat in wraps (610 raw), 400 bench, and 700 deadlifts. He has competed in indoor rowing, where he has personal bests of 1:19.9 in the 500 meters, 14.5 in the 100 meters, and 389 meters in the minute for distance—all 3 of them are Florida state records. TIMESTAMPS 0:23 - Ketogeek updates, ghee & Energy Pods 11:49 - Danny's life during COVID and how the experience changed how he thinks 19:58 - What was a huge turning point in how you thought about the whole situation with COVID and life in general? 22:00 - Have you ever done a trip? 27:40 - How can you distinguish between authoritative and inquisitive people on the internet? 35:30 - How has home schooling been going for his family? 38:38 - What are concerns you have with traditional schooling methods? 48:16 - Danny's new children's self-development book he's working on 53:54 - Are you working on an new app? 1:01:40 - How Fahad's journey as evolved as well 1:04:59 - How has Danny's mindset evolved since the start of his fitness and health journey? 1:13:25 - Mindset of giving to the world versus attaining materialistic value when it comes to entrepreneurship 1:14:45 - What's going on in Cuba, socially and politically, and its implications in USA and globally? 1:27:16 - How did events escalate downhill for Cuba? 1:33:08 - Why do we, human beings, gravitate towards celebrity pictures but not care about large acts of violence committed across the globe? 1:40:15 - Final plugs GUEST LINKS: Book site: www.unexplainableadventures.com Site: www.fatfueled.family Instagram: @dannyvega.ms KETOGEEK LINKS: Ketogeek Ghee on Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07B29HM3D Ketogeek Merchandise, Ghee & Energy Pods: https://ketogeek.com/collections Shop Energy Pods: https://ketogeek.com/collections/energy-pods

THINK Business with Jon Dwoskin
Importance of Building Relationship Capital

THINK Business with Jon Dwoskin

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2021 32:04


Jon talks with Kelley Powell, CEO of MacLaurin Group, where she specializes in creating partnerships between private equity firms and the portfolio companies they acquire. They discuss the importance of building relationship capital! KELLEY W. POWELL is CEO and partner of MacLaurin Group, a company providing technology operating partner services to portfolios of private equity companies. Supporting companies in growth and M&A activities, Kelley brings a unique experience from founder-led organization to multiple private equity-led cycles. Kelley is an avid mentor, angel investor, and chairwoman for the da Vinci Center for Innovation Angels Advisory Board at VCU. She's also a board member of the Richmond chapter of the Association for Corporate Growth.   Connect with Jon Dwoskin: Twitter: @jdwoskin Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/jonathan.dwoskin Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thejondwoskinexperience/ Website: https://jondwoskin.com/LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jondwoskin/ Email: jon@jondwoskin.com Get Jon's Book: The Think Big Movement: Grow your business big. Very Big!   Connect with Kelley Powell: Website: kelleywpowell.com LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/kelleywpowell/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/ke11eyp?lang=en

Pod So 1
Episode 95: TJ Gwynn

Pod So 1

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2021 88:16


TJ Gwynn was born in Chapel Hill, NC and grew up in Burlington, NC which is in Alamance County.  Basketball was the only organized sport he played until he got to middle school.  He started in recreation and then started playing AAU when he was 10 years old. In high school, TJ also played football and track, but he said that was mainly so he could hang out with his friends.  He did mention that it didn't hurt to get out of school early as well! Basketball was TJ's focus though and at 6'4” in 9th grade, he was making an immediate impact on the court.  TJ said he was skinny, but tough due to his older brothers Brendon and Jamal.  He started to get noticed by colleges in 9th grade when his high school won the state championship and TJ was named the tournament MVP. TJ got a lot of interest and offers, but decided to take his talent to Virginia Commonwealth University. At VCU, TJ had a very good career, but learned that college basketball was a business. Amazingly, and TJ believes he is the only college player to experience this, he had three head coaches during his time at VCU.  He discussed with Paul and Kevin the ups and downs of that experience.  TJ ended by talking about his family.

Somebody's Son
Keep The Faith

Somebody's Son

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2021 40:11


You don't want to miss our first episode of our LinkedIn podcast series, Bigger Than You Think. Excited to share with you our first guest, is an author, and world traveler whose visited 60+ countries. In our conversation, Robin explores what it means to be a woman living life on her terms. There is so many talented women in the world, and today's guest is a modern day renaissance woman. Known for her joyful presence, Faith Wilkerson is easily one of the top 5 women leaders blossoming in Richmond Virginia. Her Unlocking RVA events serve as a social hub for men and woman of all shades to come together throughout the city. Subscribe, share with others, and enjoy today's show. Roll Call: Knight, Russ, Ali Guests: Dr. Faith Wilkerson Dr. Faith Wilkerson shares how Richmond and Virginia Commonwealth University created a foundation for her to grow in her career while impacting the city. How do our experiences help us choose a home? [3:28] Dr. Wilkerson reflects on being a former VCU student who achieved three degrees and only saw four faculty members of color. [5:50] Are for profit universities and colleges better than state funded schools? [7:40] Can Spike Lee help students do the right thang? [14:54] Should we be frustrated when others can get people dear to us to change? [16:00] Does K-12 prepare you for college? [25:50] Learn how a college job gave Faith the exposure needed to become an entrepreneur [29:39] Dr. Faith Wilkerson leverages intentional thought to create a subtle change in the classroom and among students. We applaud her efforts as an educator and community leader. QUOTES People don't like it when you tell them they have to change. [14:36] I saw the impact that it made especially with kids. [20:33] People hate to read, people want to just show up for things. [29:51] CONNECT WITH US: Website Instagram Facebook --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/somebodys-son/support