Podcasts about Uva

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Best podcasts about Uva

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Latest podcast episodes about Uva

The CavsCorner Podcast
Episode 436: Found a Way to Do Both

The CavsCorner Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 91:48


On the latest episode of the CavsCorner Podcast, we tackle the one game you think we're going to talk about. We revisit the loss to the Hokies, break down what happened and why, try to take a look at the big picture, and do our best to navigate what's suddenly become a very gloomy situation for Wahoo fans. We also welcome Andy Luedecke from MyPerfectFranchise to talk about what he's seeing out there in terms of recent franchises that are catching on (34:11 to 44:09).   Credits: Brad Franklin (@Cavs_Corner) David Spence (@HooDaves) Justin Ferber (@Justin_Ferber) Damon Dillman (@DamonDillman)   Visit CavsCorner now!   SIGN UP TODAY  and  check out our message board  to talk with hundreds of fellow Wahoo fans about all things UVa sports!   Visit MyPerfectFranchise.net for more information on how you can find freedom in your next venture and discover the perfect franchise for you.      Links:   UVa PFF grades following the regular-season finale against VT   A lofty comp for new UVa QB commit Crawford   By the Numbers: A look at All-ACC quarterback voting   Five-star PG Johnson talks about the Wahoos   Who's Hoo: Recasting Rudolph with the UVa basketball team   Virginia's staff has lot all equity following Tech debacle   Take Two: Ramifications of Saturday's loss to the Hokies

Wahoo Central Podcasts
Wahoo Central Podcast: Steve Garland and Joanna Hardin

Wahoo Central Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 54:00


Wrestling coach Steve Garland provides an update on the Hoos and softball coach Joanna Hardin talks about UVA's fall campaign with host Jeff White.

Two Deep: Hokies Under The Influence
Hokies Outlast 'Hoos / Brent Pry Hired as VT Head Coach

Two Deep: Hokies Under The Influence

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 101:59


The Commonwealth Cup stays in Blacksburg! VT fans had to sweat it out, but after a sloppy affair, the Hokies emerged victorious over the 'hoos. With the help of Joe Lanza from thekeyplay.com, Pete and Robbie recap the big win before shifting their attention to the hiring of new VT football head coach Brent Pry. Since this was a long episode, here are some time stamps: UVA recap starts at 18:50, Pry hire at 58:30, Bowl game at 124:30. Once again, every episode is brought to you by Downtown Crown Wine and Beer and Dominion Wine and Beer, the official sponsor of Two Deep's 2021 football coverage.

RTD Podcasts
Teel and Barber Podcast, Episode 69, Nov. 30, 2021

RTD Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 54:14


Virginia Tech has the Commonwealth Cup and, it appears, its next football coach. What went wrong for UVA and where do the Hoos go from here? All that, football championship games, television contract news and plenty of ACC basketball  Support the show: http://www.richmond.com/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Green Light with Chris Long
NFL Week 12 Recap. Bucs vs Colts, Titans vs Patriots & UVA vs Virginia Tech.

Green Light with Chris Long

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 124:35


(2:29) - Hello, Golfing and UVA vs Virginia Tech Puke Fest. (17:14) - CFB Mentions: Michigan vs Ohio State, UNC vs NC State, Lincoln Riley and Bob Stoops and Fax's Deal of the Week. (27:47) - Housekeeping: Vitamin T Award, Night Cap Mention and Thad Moss Shout Out. (33:47) - Removing NFL Teams from Playoff Contention: Cincinnati Bengals vs Pittsburgh Steelers and Carolina Panthers vs Miami Dolphins. (50:35) - Philadelphia Eagles vs New York Giants. (55:44) - Jacksonville Jaguars vs Atlanta Falcons and New York Jets vs Houston Texans. (59:33) - San Francisco 49ers vs Minnesota Vikings and Lining Up Behind the Guard. (1:07:16) - LA Chargers vs Denver Broncos, Bad Beat and Viewing Party Mention. (1:15:32) - Indianapolis Colts vs Tampa Bay Buccaneers. (1:34:27) - New England Patriots vs Tennessee Titans and the Patriots' High Floor. (1:44:50) - Green Bay Packers vs LA Rams, Aaron Rodgers' Foot and Matthew Stafford and Clayton Kershaw Spending Too Much Time Together. (1:56:25) - SNF: Cleveland Browns vs Baltimore Ravens and Oweh's Own Mention. Green Light Spotify Music: https://open.spotify.com/user/951jyryv2nu6l4iqz9p81him9?si=17c560d10ff04a9b Spotify Layup Line: https://open.spotify.com/playlist/1olmCMKGMEyWwOKaT1Aah3?si=675d445ddb824c42 Green Light with Chris Long: Subscribe and enjoy weekly content including podcasts, documentaries, live chats, celebrity interviews and more including hot news items, trending discussions from the NFL, MLB, NHL, NBA, NCAA are just a small part of what we will be sharing with you. http://bit.ly/chalknetwork Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Law Ghost Stories
Episode 18: Hannah Graham

Law Ghost Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 20:49


Welcome back Law Ghost friends to our season one finale, episode 18! This episode Dani will tell Brenna about the kidnapping and murder of a local UVA student Hannah Graham and the pattern of behavior that followed her killer. You can follow us on our social media linked in our website! Sources used in this episode: https://www.nbcwashington.com/news/local/hannah-graham-jesse-matthew-search-court-docs-timeline/63743/ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GKGeznizTBU https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation-now/2016/03/02/hannah-graham-killer-murder-plea/81220126/ https://abcnews.go.com/US/back-uva-student-hannah-grahams-disappearance/story?id=28857580 https://hannahgraham.virginia.edu/ https://www.cbsnews.com/news/48-hours-hannah-graham-deadly-connections-jesse-matthews-update/ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rfYTnC2vRXA https://www.wfxrtv.com/news/local-news/lynchburg-central-virginia-news/convicted-murderer-named-in-liberty-university-lawsuit/ https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/education/murder-suspect-appeared-to-shake-tough-upbringing-but-came-undone/2015/09/30/e6442068-67c6-11e5-9223-70cb36460919_story.html Theme music: Nightmare by Alexander Nakarada From Complete Discography (Creative Commons BY 4.0), released October 10, 2017 https://alexandernakarada.bandcamp.com/track/nightmare-2 --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/law-ghost-stories/support

The CavsCorner Podcast
Episode 435: Not Another Weird One

The CavsCorner Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 70:47


On the latest episode of the CavsCorner Podcast, we have some UVa basketball results to discuss, namely the team's two victories in Newark at the Legends Classic. What do we think of this team and how things are shaping up? Once we've talked hoops, it's time to turn our attention Rivalry Week and Saturday afternoon's battle for the Commonwealth Cup. The Hoos go in as favorites so, should fans be expecting a big win? We'll break down the matchup and give you our picks for how things play out at Scott Stadium.   Credits: Brad Franklin (@Cavs_Corner) David Spence (@HooDaves) Justin Ferber (@Justin_Ferber) Damon Dillman (@DamonDillman)   Visit CavsCorner now!   SIGN UP TODAY  and  check out our message board  to talk with hundreds of fellow Wahoo fans about all things UVa sports!   Visit MyPerfectFranchise.net for more information on how you can find freedom in your next venture and discover the perfect franchise for you.    Links: Cavaliers show growth on defensive end in Legends wins   How the ACC sees the ACC: Week 13   UVa's PFF grades after falling at Pitt in Week 12   CavsCorner Video: Coordinators talk about preparing for the Hokies   The 3-2-1: Tech Week arrives for the Wahoos   Bronco Mendenhall talks VT matchup   Mistakes cost the Cavaliers a shot at the Coastal   Take Two: Revisiting UVa's Coastal clinching loss to Pitt

Charlottesville Community Engagement
November 22, 2021: Albemarle PC briefed on capital budget process; Another new owner for the Daily Progress?

Charlottesville Community Engagement

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 19:05


It doesn’t seem at this moment like a holiday week, with so many items happening at public meetings before Thanksgiving. But, I’m grateful you are listening to this installment of Charlottesville Community Engagement, and I’m hopeful that you’ll share it with others. Most people read the newsletter, but the secret is that each one is produced for audio, as my professional career in journalism began in radio. More than a quarter-century later, I’m glad to be bringing you information as often as I can and this is what I have for November 22, 2021. Let’s begin today with a Patreon-fueled shout-out! WTJU is hosting Classical Listening Parties, a series of four free, casual events on Tuesdays in November. These four events are led by Chelsea Holt, pianist, teacher, and one of WTJU’s newest and youngest classical announcers. She’ll guide you through all the eras of classical music and tomorrow night at 7 p.m.: the Romantic period. For a list of the others, visit wtju.net to learn more and sign up! On today’s show:Albemarle’s Planning Commission gets an update on the county’s capital improvement budget for the next fiscal yearA hedge fund sets its sights on the Daily Progress and its parent company The EPA seeks to reestablish jurisdiction in the Waters of the United StatesAnd the University of Virginia seeks a tuition increase for undergraduatesPandemic updateAs the week begins, the seven-day average for new COVID cases is at 1,644 new cases a day and the percent positivity is at 5.9 percent. The Blue Ridge Health District reports another 29 new cases today and a percent positivity of 5.5 percent. Three more fatalities have been reported since Friday for a total of 311 since the pandemic began. Fatal fireA fire in an apartment in the 1200 block of Carlton Avenue in the Belmont neighborhood on Sunday has killed one person, according to a release from the Charlottesville Fire Department. Crews began fighting the fire soon after arriving and then looked for anyone trapped. One adult was rescued but died soon after being taken to an unidentified hospital. Fire marshals are investigating the cause. This is the third fatality from a fire this year. Newspaper consolidation continuesThe Charlottesville Daily Progress and most other daily newspapers in Virginia might soon have a new owner. Alden Global Capital has announced in a letter that it will pay $24 a share for Lee Enterprises, thirty percent over the Friday’s closing stock price. “We believe that as a private company and part of our successful nationwide platforms, Lee would be in a stronger position to maximize its resources and realize strategic value that enhances its operations and supports its employees in their important work serving local communities,” reads the letter. Alden Global Capital is a New York based hedge fund that owns the Tribune Publishing Company and Media NewsGroup. Among their newspapers are the Chicago Tribune, the Denver Post, the Mercury News, and the New York Daily News. The company already owns six percent of Lee Enterprises. “Scale is critical for newspapers to ensure necessary staffing and in order to thrive in this challenging environment where print advertising continues to decline and back office operations and legacy public company functions remain bloated, thus depriving newsrooms of resources that are best used serving readers with relevant, trustworthy, and engaging content,” the letter continues. Lee Enterprises completed the purchase of the Daily Progress from BHMedia in March 2020. BHMedia is a subsidiary of Berkshire Hathaway, which purchased the Progress from Media General in May 2012. Media General purchased the paper from Thomas Worrell Jr. in 1995 as part of a $230 million deal. The Progress was first published on September 14, 1892. Other Virginia papers owned by Lee Enterprises include the Richmond Times-Dispatch, the Lynchburg News Advance, and the Roanoke Times. Learn more about the potential takeover from Rick Edmonds on Poytner.org or at Virginia Business. The real question is - who gets the Daily Progress March? In April 2005, the Charlottesville Municipal Band unveiled a tune written by Nellysford composer Paul T. Richards. Check out my news story from that time!Crozet school redistrictingAn Albemarle committee appointed to study scenarios to alleviate overpopulation of elementary schools in the western part of the county has unveiled their recommendation. After meeting four times and holding two public comment sessions, the Crozet-Brownsville Redistricting Committee has suggested a total of 219 students be moved from Brownsville to Crozet Elementary at the beginning of the 2022-2023 school year. By then, Albemarle should have completed a $21.25 million addition to that school which includes 16 new classrooms. (committee website)Water quality rulesTwo federal agencies that regulate land use as it relates to water quality have announced plans to reinstate a more robust definition of what constitutes the “waters of the United States.” Both the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers use that phrase as a basis for enforcement of the Clean Water Act of 1972 which among other things regulates industrial discharges into “navigable waters.” A rule change made in the previous presidential administration reduced the geographic scope of the definition, potentially limiting the jurisdiction  of the EPA and the Army Corp’s reach. The Southern Environmental Law Center and other conservation groups sued to overturn the rule. “The prior administration stripped protections under the Clean Water Act from countless streams, lakes and wetlands, leaving thousands of stream miles, many public recreational lakes, and millions of acres of wetlands without protections that have been in place for decades through every other administration and putting our communities and water supplies at risk,” reads a statement issued last week.The SELC argues that preserving wetlands can help preserve the ability of communities to reduce flooding and deal with extreme weather events. To learn more, visit the EPA’s Waters of the United States website. UVA tuitionThe Cavalier Daily reports that tuition at the University of Virginia could increase between 3.5 percent and 4.9 percent in the each of the next two academic years. That’s according to two representatives from the UVA Finance office who spoke to Student Council last week. Public comment will be taken at a forum on December 2 followed by a vote by the Board of Visitors at their meeting a week later. Tuition was frozen for the current academic year. For a sense of scale, the current tuition for most undergraduate student in the College of Arts and Sciences is $14,188 for a Virginia resident and $48,036 for an out-of-state resident. Third-year students pay slightly higher. First-year engineering students from Virginia pay $22,566 for a year’s tuition, with non-Virginians paying $56,730. These figures don’t include fees. Take a look at the UVA website to learn more about how much students are charged for their education. To learn more about the proposed increase, read Eileen Powell’s article in the Cavalier Daily. You’re reading Charlottesville Community Engagement. Let’s have two more Patreon-fueled shout-outs. The first comes a long-time supporter who wants you to know:"Today is a great day to spread good cheer: reach out to an old friend, compliment a stranger, or pause for a moment of gratitude to savor a delight."The second comes from a more recent supporter who wants you to go out and read a local news story written by a local journalist. Whether it be the Daily Progress, Charlottesville Tomorrow, C-Ville Weekly, NBC29, CBS19, WINA, or some other place I’ve not mentioned - the community depends on a network of people writing about the community. Go learn about this place today!Albemarle Planning Commission’s capital budget briefingTomorrow afternoon at 2 p.m., an advisory committee appointed to help Albemarle County shape its capital improvement program budget for the next fiscal year will hold its first meeting. Last week, the seven-member Planning Commission got an overview including a reminder that last year was very different. (watch the meeting)“Last year when we were putting together the FY22 budget, there was no [capital improvement program],” said Andy Bowman, the chief of budget in the Finance and Budget office. “The county was in the middle of the pandemic and there was a tremendous amount of uncertainty and really at that time it was decided instead of focusing on a long-range picture, to focus on the impacts of the pandemic and what might be able to be unpaused from a number of projects that were paused at the start of the pandemic.”Bowman said the economy has rebounded much better than initially anticipated with outlooks becoming more favorable with each passing month. As the FY23 budget approaches, Bowman said the county is not immune to inflationary pressure, with bids for some capital projects coming in higher than budgeted. The process starts with a review of what’s currently in the works.“We have a capital program currently underway, before we even start anything from 2023 to 2027, of around $147 million for about 65 projects,” Bowman said. “Of that $147 million, $91 million has been appropriated in the last eleven months now, from what was unpaused in January which included the expansion at Crozet Elementary.” Bowman noted that over the course of the next five years, the county will adopt a new Comprehensive Plan and the Board of Supervisors will update their strategic plan. Both documents as well as the School Board’s strategic plan will guide future decisions on capital spending. Bowman said the focus this cycle will be on the immediate year to give flexibility on future needs. The CIP advisory committee consists of Supervisors Bea LaPisto-Kirtley and Donna Price, School Board members Kate Acuff and Jonno Alcaro, and former Planning Commissioners Bruce Dotson.and Cal Morris. “They’re charged to do a few things,” Bowman said. “First they will review and evaluate a proposal that is recommended by staff as a starting point and then the CIP committee will sort of make a recommendation and modify that starting point.” Bowman said there will be additional revenue from the cigarette tax and potential revenue from a tax on plastic bags. The county also refinanced its debt earlier this year.“Given the current market we were able to issue a large amount of [borrowed proceeds] at low interest rates and that will create some capacity that didn’t exist in the prior plan prior to the pandemic,” Bowman said Bowman said staff is also reviewing through the details of the American Rescue Plan Act to see how that funds can be used to leverage local dollars capital spending. In August, Supervisors used $4.5 million in federal COVID-relief funds for broadband expansion. One of the biggest items in the capital improvement program is the need for school maintenance and expansion. Rosalyn Schmitt is the chief operating officer of Albemarle County Public Schools. She briefed the Planning Commission on the school’s strategic plan.“Getting the right resources to educators and students for their teaching and learning is key to our success,” Schmitt said The school system has a Long-Range Planning Advisory Committee and their most recent recommendations were published on September 9, 2021. The eleven projects have a cumulative cost estimate of $196 million, with most of the projects containing either word “renovations” or “capacity.”“Adequate capacity continues to be a need for the school division,” Schmitt said. “This is supported by the ten-year enrollment projections and reinforced by both the recently completed development and student yield analysis, and a thirty-year population forecast.”  One item is $40 million for another elementary school in the northern feeder pattern and another would be to purchase land for the western feeder pattern. “As these schools all reach a saturation point where expansion is no longer practical, we recommend a strategy for land acquisition and the construction of new facilities,” Schmitt said. “I think for the first time in a long time you’ll see several new schools on this list.” There’s also a recommendation to improve air quality within schools. There is a possibility that federal ARPA funding could be used for that purpose. “That is a comprehensive program around mechanical improvements that there is some opportunity to have some matching funds from ARPA funding that we are pursuing,” Schmitt said. Luis Carrazana is the associate architect of the University of Virginia and a non-voting member of the Albemarle Planning Commission. He noted that the recent adoption of the Crozet Master Plan update called for capital infrastructure, as did the relatively recent update of the Pantops Master Plan and adoption of the Rio Small Area Plan. “And so I’m wondering how we’re looking at those approved master plans with the CIP and putting the same rigor as we seem to be doing with the School Board,” Carrazana said. Planning Director Charles Rapp said implementation of many projects in the master plans are dependent on lining up ideas with funding opportunities.“A lot of those infrastructure related improvements, we identify them in these master plans or small area plans or corridor studies and that’s often the first phase of identifying a project,” Rapp said. The next day, Bowman gave a similar presentation to the Board of Supervisors. This one has more specifics about the developing budget. (watch the presentation)Supervisors were reminded that there is a significant “positive variance” from the FY21 budget of more than $13 million that can be used for one-time money.“We are proposing, not really for discussion today but this will come back on December 15, to invest some of the one-time fiscal year 21 funding into the economic development fund,” Bowman said. At their December 15 meeting, the Board will also be asked for direction on whether to explore tax relief programs. They’ll also be given a review of what additional revenue sources could be pursued in Richmond.The Board of Supervisors will have a work session on December 1 related to the way the FY23 budget will be developed. Another change this year is the December release of Albemarle’s property assessments for 2022. That will be presented to the Board of Supervisors on December 15, a month earlier than usual. See also: Albemarle may close FY21 with $13.2M in one-time money, November 9, 2021Unsolicited fact of the dayFinally today, sometimes there are pieces of information I come across during my reporting, or facts that people tell me that don’t quite make their way into a news story. These facts are not entirely random, but they may seem that way.First up, the commercial portions of the Stonefield development have paid a total of $841,955 in connection fees to the Albemarle County Service Authority for water and sewer between 2012 and 2020. That’s according to information provided to me by Gary O’Connell, the director of the ACSA. That figure does not include residential connections. Before anyone can connect to water and sewer in Albemarle, they have to pay a hefty connection fee. For instance, for one commercial unit on Bond Street to connect in 2021, they had to pay $14,280 for water and $13,505 for sewer. Both of these fees include a portion paid to the Rivanna Water and Sewer Authority to cover the cost of capital projects to expand capacity. Special announcement of a continuing promo with Ting! Are you interested in fast internet? Visit this site and enter your address to see if you can get service through Ting. If you decide to proceed to make the switch, you’ll get:Free installationSecond month of Ting service for freeA $75 gift card to the Downtown MallAdditionally, Ting will match your Substack subscription to support Town Crier Productions, the company that produces this newsletter and other community offerings. So, your $5 a month subscription yields $5 for TCP. Your $50 a year subscription yields $50 for TCP! The same goes for a $200 a year subscription! All goes to cover the costs of getting this newsletter out as often as possible. Learn more here! This is a public episode. Get access to private episodes at communityengagement.substack.com/subscribe

The Fast Lane with Ed Lane
Johnny McGonigal from Pittsburg Post Gazette previews Pitt vs UVA

The Fast Lane with Ed Lane

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 14:12


Johnny McGonigal from Pittsburg Post Gazette previews Pitt vs UVA by Ed Lane

Charlottesville Community Engagement
November 18, 2021: Public housing agency preparing annual plan; State of the James measures the health of the big river

Charlottesville Community Engagement

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 17:25


Let’s begin with a Patreon-fueled shout-out. Colder temperatures are creeping in, and now is the perfect time to think about keeping your family warm through the holidays. Make sure you are getting the most out of your home with help from your local energy nonprofit, LEAP. LEAP wants you and yours to keep comfortable all year round, and offers FREE home weatherization to income- and age-qualifying residents. If you’re age 60 or older, or have an annual household income of less than $74,950, you may qualify for a free energy assessment and home energy improvements such as insulation and air sealing. Sign up today to lower your energy bills, increase comfort, and reduce energy waste at home!On today’s program: The overall health of the James River has dropped slightly The Food and Drug Administration approves focused ultrasound to treat some symptoms of Parkinson’s diseaseArea transportation officials want your input tonight on the region’s transit futureAn update on planning for Smart Scale’s fifth round The Charlottesville Redevelopment and Housing Authority prepares its annual plan to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban DevelopmentWhile the number of vaccinated Virginians has increased due to the extension of shots into people between the ages of 5 and 11, the number of cases has been up slightly over the past two days. However the Virginia Department of Health reports Wednesday figure of 2,592 new cases as a technical error that includes counts from previous days. The seven day average is now at 1,475 a day and the percent positivity is at 5.5 percent today. The Blue Ridge Health District reports another 49 new cases today and the fatality count is at 309. Do you have something to say about how our area bus systems should work? Tonight you’ll have your chance to weigh in on a Regional Transit Vision that could guide the future. Lucinda Shannon is a transportation planner with the Thomas Jefferson Planning District who briefed a technical committee of the Metropolitan Planning Organization on Tuesday.“I’m really hoping you guys will all sign up for the public meeting which is Thursday night at 6:30 p.m.,” Shannon said. “There’s also surveys on both of the TJPDC transit projects.”The TJPDC is also conducting a separate study of the expansion of transit in Albemarle County.Changes to the Charlottesville Area Transit system have been studied and presented to the public this year, but there is no schedule for when they may go into effect as there are more procedural steps to go through. (story map) (presentation)This week, the Norfolk City Council adopted a resolution approving a plan called Multimodal Norfolk that seeks to increase frequency of some buses. “The Recommended Network focuses 70 percent of resources on service that will maximize access to opportunity for most residents and are likely to get high ridership relative to cost,” reads the resolution adopted Tuesday night. “The other 30 percent of resources are focused on service that is not likely to get high ridership but will provide service in areas where there is relatively high need.”Service in Norfolk is provided by Hampton Roads Transit, which that city pays about $20 million a year to operate service.  That includes the Tide light rail system. Meanwhile, work continues to prepare the next round of applications for the Virginia Department of Transportation’s Smart Scale funding process.  Chuck Proctor is a planner with VDOT’s Culpeper District and he’s assisting Albemarle and the MPO come up with potential submissions.“Most of them are bike-ped related, a lot of them are multimodal projects like Avon Street, 5th Street, the 29-250 bypass,” Proctor said. Other projects that could be submitted include the intersection of Old Trail and Crozet Avenue, a recommendation from the ongoing North 29 corridor study, projects on Pantops, as well as various intersections of U.S. 250 east of Pantops. The Thomas Jefferson Planning District can submit up to four applications on behalf of localities. Proctor said he was not aware of what applications the city of Charlottesville might advance. Jeannete Janiczek, the city’s urban construction initiative. In most cases, Charlottesville administers its own projects without involvement from VDOT. “I just want to remind everyone this is still early in the process,” Janiczek said. “We have a new City Council coming online. The city does plan to apply for Smart Scale but we haven’t yet decided which projects.” In four rounds, Charlottesville has been awarded millions for various streetscape projects, none of which has yet gone to construction. In September, Council indicated they would no longer support contributing a local match for funds received for the first two phases of West Main Streetscape. VDOT has not yet been formally informed of any decision, according to spokesman Lou Hatter. Janiczek said potential Charlottesville projects for Round 5 a fourth phase of West Main Streetscape, or in the East High Street, Rose Hill, and the Preston Avenue corridors. There is no information about any of these potential projects available on the city website. In contrast, Albemarle and the TJPDC have been discussing potential projects since the spring. In recent years, Albemarle County has increased its capacity to design and build non-vehicular transportation projects. Kevin McDermott is a chief of planning.“We are now finally after many years in the construction phase for a lot of sidewalk improvements including new sidewalks out on Avon Street Extended, both north and south of the Mill Creek intersection,” McDemott said. The others are:New sidewalk along U.S. 250 near the Harris Teeter including a pedestrian crossing New sidewalk along Rio Road East from John Warner Parkway heading east and south toward CharlottesvilleNew crosswalk at Mountain View Elementary School on Avon Street ExtendedNew sidewalk and shared-use path on Lambs Road to the Lambs Land CampusNew sidewalk on Ivy Road between city limits and the UVA Musculoskeletal CenterThe U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the use of focused ultrasound to treat patients with Parkinson’s disease, according to a release from the University of Virginia Health System. Specifically, medical device regulators have authorized medical centers to use something called Exablate Neuro by the company Insightec to treat mobility problems associated with tremors caused by Parkinson’s disease. “Prior to the approval, available treatments for the Parkinson’s symptoms included drugs, which not all patients respond to, and invasive deep-brain surgeries,” reads the release.” Focused ultrasound, in comparison, does not require incisions or cutting into the skull.” During the procedure, highly focused sound waves are used to target faulty brain cells and used together with Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), treatment can help ease symptoms. The releases stresses that this is not a cure. The medical technology has been pioneered at UVA and shepherded by the Focused Ultrasound Foundation. Other potential uses include treatment for essential  tremors, uterine fibroids and some forms of cancer.. Research is ongoing. For more information visit the UVA Health website or watch videos on the Focused Ultrasound Foundation’s YouTube page. Water quality in the James River has declined slightly over the past two years, according to a report card issued this week by an advocacy group that seeks to promote practices to reduce pollution. Since 2007, the James River Association has issued the State of the James and this year’s B- is based on a score of 61 percent. Every two years that score is factored by looking at 18 indicators split into the two categories of River Health and River Restoration Progress. In 2017 the grade was 63 percent. “The decline that has occurred since 2017 reflects the impact of abnormally high rainfall experienced across the watershed in recent years causing increased polluted runoff throughout the James,” reads the press release. “While oysters and tidal water quality showed promising resilience over the past year by bouncing back from the surge of rainwater and pollution, the river also revealed stalled progress in phosphorus, nitrogen, and sediment pollution reductions, as well as stream health.” Among the indicators are gauges of how healthy various wildlife populations are. The good news is that the bald eagle scores at 100 percent due to an increase in breeding pairs to 352, indicating the ban on DDT as well as passage of the Endangered Species Act in 1973 has led to the resurgence. The bad news is that American shad are rated at zero and efforts to stock the James River watershed with hatchery shad have not worked because of the presence of dams, water intakes for water supply, invasive catfish, and fishing nets intended for other species. “Given the dire situation, Virginia must develop an emergency recovery plan that clearly identifies restoration actions,” reads the report card. “But it will take a long-term and sustained effort to bring American shad back from the brink of collapse in the James.” To look through all of the indicators, visit the State of the James website and explore their story map. What are you most interested in? Let me know in the comments. You’re reading Charlottesville Community Engagement and it’s now time for a second Patreon-fueled shout-out. The Plant Northern Piedmont Natives Campaign, an initiative that wants you to grow native plants in yards, farms, public spaces and gardens in the northern Piedmont. The leaves have started to fall as autumn set in, and as they do, this is a good time to begin planning for the spring. Native plants provide habitat, food sources for wildlife, ecosystem resiliency in the face of climate change, and clean water.  Start at the Plant Northern Piedmont Natives Facebook page and tell them Lonnie Murray sent you!The Charlottesville Redevelopment and Housing Authority’s Board of Commissioners will hold a closed meeting today to discuss a personnel matter. Last week, the appointed body held a work session on a report the CRHA must turn in to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. Kathleen Glenn-Matthews is the deputy director of the CRHA. (FY20-FY21 adopted plan) (FY21-22 draft plan) (FY22-23 draft plan)“The public housing authority PHA plan is a pretty comprehensive guide to all of our agency’s policies and programs,” said Glenn-Matthews. “We spent a lot of time on our goals.”There are two parts to the plan, one of which is a five-year review that won’t be due until 2023. The second part is an annual plan with details about what will happen in the next fiscal year. The fiscal year for the CRHA runs from April 1 to March 30, a different calendar than the city, state, and federal government.  HUD classifies CRHA as a “troubled agency” based on the Public Housing Assessment System (PHAS) and the Section Eight Management Assessment Program (SEMAP). Glenn-Matthews said that means CRHA has to give more information in its annual plan. One of the first items in the draft plan is a listing of the number of public housing units and the number of housing choice vouchers. The number of units has dropped from 376 to 324 due in part to the temporary closure of Crescent Halls due to renovations. The number of housing vouchers has increased due to their use to provide temporary places for temporarily displaced residents. Those vouchers are separate from a program funded directly by the City of Charlottesville but administered by CRHA to increase their number. The city has had a line item of $900,000 a year in the capital budget for this supplemental program. Highlights from the past year include the adoption of policies on security cameras as well de-concentration of poverty.“The PHA’s admission policy is designed to provide for de-concentration of poverty and income mixing by bringing higher income tenants into lower income communities and lower income tenants into higher income communities,” reads a statement in the plan.Glenn-Matthews said the CRHA wants to build a homeownership program as well as augment the family self-sufficiency program.“We don’t have funding for it and we’re penalized by being troubled but we are looking at alternate sources for that and it’s definitely a big priority for us,” Glenn-Matthews said. The draft plan indicates that the CRHA will continue to engage in “mixed finance modernization or development” as well as “demolition and/or disposition” in the coming year. One project is development of between 39 and 50 units at Sixth Street SE. There is also a pending demolition and disposition application for the second phase of South First Street, which would replace 58 existing units with a larger project. Planning for redevelopment of Westhaven is expected to begin in the next fiscal year. “We want to make sure everything in this plan is there that we want to do this year because if not we’ll have to do an amendment, and nobody wants to go through the process,” Glenn-Matthews said. The plan also explains how nonprofit companies have been formed to serve to secure funding for redevelopment. There’s also data on who lives in the units. As of August 31, 76 percent of households had incomes below 30 percent of the area median income, 14 percent are between 30 and 50 percent, and three percent are between 50 and 80 percent. Six percent of households do not have their income data available. Only one percent of residents are classified as Hispanic or Latino, three percent are classified as Asian, 21 percent are white, and 75 percent are Black.There are a total of 736 people living in Charlottesville public housing and the average household size is 2.6 percent. The public hearing on the annual plan will be held on Monday, December 20. Thanks to Ting for their support in helping this program be produced each day. Today the newsletter ends with a limerick from show supporter Harry Landers honoring Ting for their commitment to match your initial payment to a paid Substack subscription!There once was a writer from C-ville,Who sought to shine light upon evil.He did his own thing,With some help from Ting.If there's news to report, we know he will.Special announcement of a continuing promo with Ting! Are you interested in fast internet? Visit this site and enter your address to see if you can get service through Ting. If you decide to proceed to make the switch, you’ll get:Free installationSecond month of Ting service for freeA $75 gift card to the Downtown Mall This is a public episode. Get access to private episodes at communityengagement.substack.com/subscribe

The CavsCorner Podcast
Episode 434: Pulling on the Rope

The CavsCorner Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 66:55


On the latest episode of the CavsCorner Podcast, we begin with a look back at Virginia's disappointing 67-47 loss down in Houston as the Hoos move to 1-2 on the year following a turnover-prone defeat to the Cougars. And then we discuss this weekend's matchup at Pitt with the Coastal Division crown hanging in the balance. Will Brennan Armstrong play? And if he does, how much does that realistically change things given his time away from the field since being injured at BYU? We get into all of that and more and give our picks for how we see this one playing out in the Steel City.   Credits: Brad Franklin (@Cavs_Corner) David Spence (@HooDaves) Justin Ferber (@Justin_Ferber) Damon Dillman (@DamonDillman)   Visit CavsCorner now!   SIGN UP TODAY  and  check out our message board  to talk with hundreds of fellow Wahoo fans about all things UVa sports!   Visit MyPerfectFranchise.net for more information on how you can find freedom in your next venture and discover the perfect franchise for you.    Links: Rayman has built a reputation on the practice field   UVa's PFF grades following Week 11 loss to the Irish   How the ACC sees the ACC: Week 12   CavsCorner Video: Coordinators talk matchup with Panthers   The 3-2-1: Virginia's Coastal hopes ride on visit to Pitt   Younger Teel eager to enroll early and join his brother at UVa   Woolfolk holds his own in his first UVa start

We Build Great Apartment Communities
063: Digital Advertising and Technology to Maximize Real Estate Investments with Chad Gallagher

We Build Great Apartment Communities

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 67:15


Technology, especially since the Covid-19 pandemic started, has seeped its way into everything that we do - business and leisure wise. It has taken the world by storm that almost everything that we do not relies and is made possible and effective by technology - and the world of real estate is no different! In our today's episode, John Brackett sits down with Chad Gallagher and talks about ways to use technology to solve real estate problems as well as how to not just make great apartment building but great investment returns too. Chad Gallagher is the co-founder and co-owner of SlateHouse Group.  SlateHouse, founded in 2014, manages over 3,800 units across PA, NJ, and MD for investment owners, with over 100 employees.  SlateHouse also has a brokerage division in both NJ and PA with 20 real estate agents that focus on working with investors to buy and sell real estate Episode Highlights: Chad talks about technology and digital marketing Technology as a big help on all facets of real estate investment Digital advertising to drive showings and leads Technology and digital database to help improve and manage property Chad gives landlords advice on how to better maintain the process of property management Creating real estate management systems that are easy to follow Technology to make or break you as a leader The importance of SEO in driving traffic to your website   Connect with Chad: Email  LinkedIn  Facebook  About Our Guest: Chad Gallagher graduated with a Systems Engineering degree from UVA and has since used technology to reshape advertising and real estate. He built a mobile advertising business which eventually did $100M in revenue and eventually was sold to Verizon. Co-Founded SlateHouse Group with Nate Jones --- what is now a modern real estate company with over 105 people. We manage over 4,000 units across PA, MD, VA, and NJ and own over 200 units across residential SFH, residential multi-family, and commercial. Also have a real estate brokerage (SlateHouse with a focus on working with investors to buy and acquire investment properties. Our podcast and conference is called "Real Estate Hackers", a new episode each week focusing on the intersection of real estate and technology systems If you are looking to save money on insurance on your investment properties, we launched Red Rabbit Insurance which has saved investors hundreds of thousands of $$ by focusing specifically on property insurance for investment properties. Only thing I love more than real estate is the Eagles. And my wife and daughter. :)   --- Did you enjoy today's episode? Please click here to leave a review for The We Build Great Apartment Communities. Be sure to subscribe on your favorite podcast app to get notified when a new episode comes out! Do you know someone who might enjoy this episode? Share this episode to inspire and empower! Connect with John Brackett and We Build Great Apartment Communities Instagram @webuildgreatcommunities Facebook @buildingreatcommunities LinkedIn @brackettjohn Website www.fidelitybps.com Subscribe to The We Build Great Apartment Communities Apple Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts Do you think you would be a great fit for the show? Apply to be a guest by clicking . Fidelity Business Partners, Inc. 6965 El Camino Real Suite 105-190 Carlsbad, CA 92009 D: 760-301-5311 F: 760-987-6065

Bold Dominion
48 - What powers does the Virginia governor really have?

Bold Dominion

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 28:53


Episode Notes Governor-elect Glenn Youngkin campaigned on a raft of culture war issues. But it still takes the General Assembly to pass new laws, and Virginia's State Senate still has a Democratic majority. So what powers does the Virginia governor really have? What can a governor do even without new legislation? This week, Bold Dominion sits down with a pair of UVA politics professors for a deeper look at these civics questions that are suddenly relevant to Virginia.

CBS Sports Eye On College Basketball Podcast
No suspension for Duke's Paolo Banchero; Big East, WCC off to great starts; the Big Ten is suspect already; Loyola Chicago to A-10 (College Basketball 11/17)

CBS Sports Eye On College Basketball Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 70:09


It's the second Tuesday in the college basketball season and the day was loaded with news and notes -- and then games happened! Michigan becomes the first top five team in the country to lose a game, the Virginia Cavaliers get stomped by the Houston Cougars and BYU looks like an unstoppable wrecking machine early in this season. But first, Parrish and Norlander must discuss Duke's Paolo Banchero and his citation for aiding and abetting DWI of his own jeep. Plus, Sister Jean and the Ramblers of Loyola Chicago are moving to the Atlantic 10. Check out Matt Norlander's piece on the Missouri Valley possibly expanding HERE: https://www.cbssports.com/college-basketball/news/missouri-valley-conference-loses-loyola-chicago-but-pursuing-murray-state-ut-arlington-and-kansas-city/ (02:15) - Duke's Paolo Banchero gets cited with aiding and abetting DWI and still plays against Gardner Webb! (21:48) - Michigan loses to Seton Hall at home. (29:05) Illinois/Marquette recap (36:00) UNC tested by College of Charleston (41:32) UVA spanked by Houston (45:31) BYU rolls Oregon (51: 37) Loyola Chicago to the A-10! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Irish Sports Talk: Notre Dame Football
Notre Dame Beats UVA Georgia Tech — IST617

Irish Sports Talk: Notre Dame Football

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 17:56


Randall and Reuben discuss Notre Dame's 28-3 victory over UVA, the college football playoff, and the upcoming matchup vs Georgia Tech.

Sons of Saturday - Irish
In The Hunt in November | Recapping Notre Dame's Win Over Virginia (Ep. 53)

Sons of Saturday - Irish

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 51:24


The guys are back to recap Notre Dame's ho-hum 28-3 win over Brennan Armstrong-less UVa. The Irish faced a personnel shortage of their own on defense, with Drew White and MTA sidelined by a flu bug that hindered the rest of that side of the ball all week. Despite that adversity, the defense did not allow a touchdown for the second straight week. We discuss some younger players getting some more run, and applaud (sarcastically) some Notre Dame fans for still finding something to be angry about in a 25-point victory. After a boring, snoozy victory that brought Notre Dame's winning streak to 23 against ACC opponents in the regular season, we discuss the conference relationship in general, and how it's grown stale. To cap the show, we start to warm up the College Football Playoff fire. Tune in to hear us start to get our hopes up once again. 

Cardiac Hill: for Pitt Panthers fans
UnScripted: The Cardiac Hill Podcast w/ Corey Cohen (#19 Pitt beats UNC, Coastal on the line)

Cardiac Hill: for Pitt Panthers fans

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 50:57


In this episode of UnScripted: The Cardiac Hill Podcast, Corey Cohen welcomes Cardiac Hill's Collin Sturchio to break down the win over UNC and the upcoming battle for the Coastal vs. UVA. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Sports Brew
NFL Week 9 Madness, OBJ to the Rams, Cam, Bills BSE, Aaron Rodgers Blowback, Jordan Love, Duke – Kentucky, Braves Parade Bus, IFL Science Rona RAS, Gummy Bears, Ref Hip Check Taunting Fail 11-11-2021

Sports Brew

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 142:54


Segment 1: NFL Week 9. The Ravens crush survivor pools, Dolphins roll, and Baltimore's number three time. Duke – Kentucky fun, Navy takes down UVA, and the Coach K retirement tour cranks up. Aaron Rodgers fact finding missions, the blowback train, semi-apologies, and the marital foxhole. Bovada rocks the Rodgers vaxx prop bets. Jordan Love BSE, Jackson Mahomes, and the KC upper decker mom fail. OBJ signs with the Rams, getting wined and dined in LA, and a Packers whiff. Saints speculation. Icehouse memories. The Braves speeding parade bus rolls Failhorn style. Segment 2 (1.04.00): Salud o'clock! Eli Manning's double birds gets FEC complaints from Philly (weak!). The Manningcast Curse strikes again. The Halloween Gummy Bear Song, IFL Science's COVID induced restless anal syndrome, the RAS punk band, and the Brown Elf (1.25.22). Arby's Curly Fry vodka. Snake bite scrotal necrosis. NFL week 9 upset party roundup. The Titans whoop the Rams. Cardinals – 49ers. The Jags stun the Bills plus the other Josh Allen. The Browns hammer the Bengals. The 1966 Redskins vs Giants 72-41 shootout plus Otto Graham's jovial nudes. The Broncos roll the Cowboys. Vikings – Ravens. Patriots – Panthers. Giants – Raiders. Cam Newton goes home to the Panthers. Steelers – Bears and the ref hip check of fail. Taunting – you know it when you see it (and this isn't it). MP3 format, 11-11-2021. This is how we Brew it: Join the Brew Crew on Facebook @SportsBrew Twitter: vasportsbrew Find us on Podbean, iTunes, Stitcher Radio, LiveSportscaster.com, Amazon Music, and the Google Play Store - Key words: Sports Brew Cheers and beers flavored by Captain Morgan 100 Proof, Jack Daniel's, Coca-Cola, El Segundo Brewing's Stone Cold Steve Austin's Broken Skull IPA, Adroit Theory Heretics of IX DIPA, Hardywood Gingerbread Stout, Hardywood Rum Barrel Pumpkin, Beale's Your Manager is Bitch American Porter, Dancing Kilt's Centaur IPA, Hardywood Bourbon Barrel GBS, Hardywood Farmhouse Pumpkin, Victory Sour Monkey Tripel, and the general deliciousness of beer.

Green Light with Chris Long
Torrey Smith! Talks Cam Newton Back To Carolina. Stanford Steve & James Koh On NFL WK10 Gambling & Fantasy Football.

Green Light with Chris Long

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 102:02


(3:18) - Chris on Odell Signing with Rams and Rams' Playoff Outlook. (12:15) - Hello, Layup Line and Best Division 2 College Football Rivalry Ever. (20:36) - Torrey Smith on Cam Newton Heading Back to the Carolina Panthers, Cam's Immediate Impact, Outlook for Carolina's Receivers and Cam's Future. (32:19) - Stanford Steve on College Football Week 11, Georgia at Tennessee, Washington State at Oregon, Notre Dame at UVA, Uncle Steve is Coming to Town and NFL Week 10 Gambling Picks. (1:21:40) Macon Applies for Weekend Hangout Pass. (1:26:55) - James Koh on NFL Week 10 Fantasy Football Outlook, Cordarrelle Patterson, Mike Gesicki and Two Headed Monster Draft with Kickers. Green Light Spotify Music: https://open.spotify.com/user/951jyryv2nu6l4iqz9p81him9?si=17c560d10ff04a9b Spotify Layup Line: https://open.spotify.com/playlist/1olmCMKGMEyWwOKaT1Aah3?si=675d445ddb824c42 Green Light with Chris Long: Subscribe and enjoy weekly content including podcasts, documentaries, live chats, celebrity interviews and more including hot news items, trending discussions from the NFL, MLB, NHL, NBA, NCAA are just a small part of what we will be sharing with you. http://bit.ly/chalknetwork Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Streaking the Lawn: for Virginia Cavaliers fans
Streaking the Lawn Podcast - 11/11/21- Notre Dame Preview w/ Mike Golic Jr.

Streaking the Lawn: for Virginia Cavaliers fans

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 44:15


Pierce and Zach are back this week with another very special guest: ESPN's Mike Golic Jr! Mike, of course, is a Notre Dame alum and he stops by the pod to help us detail Notre Dame's football season so far - their standing in the national landscape, the ups and downs of their season, and the strengths and weaknesses that they'll be bringing to Charlottesville. The crew chat about Brennan Armstrong, how doubtful they are in his availability for the weekend, and what that obviously means for the Hoos and the game. Mike shares a lot of great details on the ND team, what UVA fans can expect, and what the team would need to do to pull off the upset. They also get into the state of the ACC, the Coastal Division race, and how things might shake out towards the end of the regular season for both teams. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The BarnBurner Podcast Network
Theater In College Hoops (Ep. 116)- Champions Classic & Bad Losses

The BarnBurner Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 69:19


I believe it was Phil from the Hangover who said "We are back, baby!" The new season is finally here so we break down the Champions Classic first and foremost. Coach K's farewell tour is already tiresome, Paolo Banchero isn't the only stud on Duke and Kansas is fielding a team filled with AARP members... but they're lethal. We also discuss some of the worst losses we saw on day 1. Georgia Tech, UVA, Pitt, Washington, Nebraska and Cal should all be ashamed of themselves. Houston, Wichita State, Ohio State & Colorado not off the hook either as they all had pretty poor debuts despite winning. Then we round it out with You're Old As Fuck and finally some hugs. It's been a while since we've given out some hugs. Gear up for the season, folks. We got a long road to NOLA.

The CavsCorner Podcast
Episode 433: Maybe Wait a Week

The CavsCorner Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 64:22


On the latest episode of the CavsCorner Podcast, we look back at UVa's season opener on the hardwood as the Wahoos come up short in a frustrating loss to Navy. We'll get into what it all means and how concerned we should be before the conversation turns to the gridiron, where Virginia will be back at home this Saturday night against Notre Dame. We'll give you our view of the way this one unfolds under the lights as the Irish look to take advantage of a leaky UVa secondary…and maybe an offense without one of the best quarterbacks in the nation.   Credits: Brad Franklin (@Cavs_Corner) David Spence (@HooDaves) Justin Ferber (@Justin_Ferber)   Visit CavsCorner now!   SIGN UP TODAY  and  check out our message board  to talk with hundreds of fellow Wahoo fans about all things UVa sports!   Visit MyPerfectFranchise.net for more information on how you can find freedom in your next venture and discover the perfect franchise for you.    Links: Hoos officially welcome star-studded 2022 recruiting class   Growing pains on display as UVa opens with loss to Navy   How the ACC sees the ACC: Week 11   CavsCorner Video: Coordinators talk Notre Dame matchup   The 3-2-1: Questions abound as the Hoos prepare to host the Irish   Game-Week Presser: Bronco Mendenhall talks Notre Dame   Late-rising OT to visit Charlottesville this weekend   UVa's Armstrong has forced NFL scouts to pay attention

JMU Sports News
The AUBC is amazing and Football crushed the Camels | JMU Sports News Podcast

JMU Sports News

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 49:42


JMU football took down Campbell with ease and Kris Thornton scored 4 TDs on 8 receptions and DID NOT win CAA player of the week. The CAA is a joke. We visited the Atlantic Union Bank Center for JMU WBB's opening game vs. UVA and wow. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Sing Second Sports
21-22 Season Ep14 [Nov 04 '21] "Veteran's Classic Preview"

Sing Second Sports

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 50:58


Welcome to the Sing Second Sports Podcast! A podcast covering the physical mission of the U.S. Naval Academy, and featuring the athletes, coaches and staff at USNA. The Band...is all....together! On this episode we are in person at Dry 85 and joined by Bill Wagner of the Annapolis Capital to discuss the big upset for men's basketball against UVA...and we look ahead to this Friday's Veteran's Classic matchup vs Virginia Tech. Share feedback on Twitter @wesingsecond...slide into our DMs or tweet at us directly. BEAT ARMY!

CFR On the Record
Higher Education Webinar: The Role of Hispanic-Serving Institutions

CFR On the Record

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021


Antonio Flores, president and chief executive officer of the Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities (HACU), leads a conversation on the role of Hispanic-Serving Institutions in higher education. FASKIANOS: Welcome to CFR's Higher Education Webinar. I'm Irina Faskianos, vice president of the National Program and Outreach here at CFR. Today's discussion is on the record, and the video and transcript will be available on our website, CFR.org/academic. As always, CFR takes no institutional positions on matters of policy. We are delighted and honored to have Dr. Antonio Flores with us today to discuss the role of Hispanic Serving Institutions. Dr. Flores is president and chief executive officer of the Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities. Established in 1986, HACU represents more than five hundred colleges and universities committed to Hispanic higher education success in the United States, Puerto Rico, Latin America, and Europe. During his tenure as president of HACU, the association has nearly tripled its membership and budget, expanded its programs, and improved legislation for Hispanic Serving Institutions, and increased federal and private funding for HSIs. He previously served as director of programs and services for the Michigan Higher Education Assistance Authority, and the Michigan Higher Education Student Loan Authority. And, needless to say, he's taught at public and private institutions, conducted research and policy studies on higher education issues. And so it really is wonderful to have him with us today to talk about HACU, how HACU is committed to the role of Hispanic Serving Institutions, and to serving underrepresented populations. Obviously, we are very much looking to develop talent for the next generation of foreign policy leaders, and really look forward to this conversation. So, Antonio, thank you for being with us. It would be great if you could talk about the Hispanic Serving Institutions, their role in higher education, and your strategic vision for HACU broadly. FLORES: Thank you, Irina, for those very flattering remarks and introduction. And of course, we're delighted to be part of the series here today and talk a little bit about what HSIs are doing and how they can do more of the great work they've been doing for the nation, and HACU's role as well in promoting them. And suffice to say that Hispanic Serving Institutions have become the backbone of not only Hispanic higher education, but also the American labor force. Because there are more—there are more than 560 now HSIs across the nation, enroll the vast majority, more than 5.2 million of them, of underserved students who historically have not been adequately served in higher education, including Latinos. And it just happens that this population, the Hispanic population, is contributing more than half of all the new workers joining the American labor force today. And that proportion is likely to continue to increase in the years ahead. In addition, of course, they serve scores of African Americans, of Asian Americans, Native Americans, and all Americans. So they are really a microcosm of American diversity. And for that very reason, going forward as these populations continue to increase demographically, their representation in the labor force will only continue to develop. The latest Census Bureau report for 2010 to 2020 indicates that more than 51 percent of all the population growth in the nation is attributed to Hispanics. So there we have it. It's just the reality of the facts. And therefore, HSIs are now the backbone of America's labor force, because ultimately the demands of the global economy are such that we need to step up to the plate and really educate at a much higher level, and train at a much higher level those underserved populations, particular Hispanics, so that we can remain competitive in that global economy. And that includes the preparation of top-notch leaders for foreign service careers. And so if we were to summarize how we view HSIs with respect to America's challenges today, and opportunities in the future, I would say that there are three dimensions that define HSIs vis a vis the United States of America and its future in the world. Number one is diversity. And I already alluded to some of that. But diversity is not just with respect to the fact that they have the most diverse student population on their campuses. But it's also the diversity across types of institutions because we have community colleges, we have regional universities, and we have research-intensive, or R1 institutions. So we have within campuses tremendous diversity, and we have across campuses nationwide institutionally diversity as well. And so that's the name of the game. And that's the name of the game for America, is diversity. And it's the name of the game for the world. It's a very diverse world out there. And so the more attuned those top-notch leaders that were looking to educate in our institutions are with respect to their diversity, the more not only knowledgeable and experienced and sensitive to that diverse reality of the world and of America, the much better leaders they are going to be. And so diversity, again, is that one unavoidable element of our world and of our country. The second, I think, very important element or dimension of HSIs is the dynamism. They are very dynamic institutions that are really doing a magnificent job with fewer resources than the rest of the field. They don't have the big pockets or big endowments. They don't have the applications they need from the federal government they should get. And yet, they excel at educating those who come to their campuses. Just to give you an idea, Opportunity Insights is a name of an organization that does socioeconomic analysis of graduates from students from colleges across the country. And particularly they focus on how institutions educate and position in careers those who come from the lowest quintile of entering freshmen to college. And they believe that those who graduate, they graduate and see what proportion of those who came in the lowest quintile move to the top quintile in terms of earnings. And in the last report I saw, nine of the ten top institutions in that regard were Hispanic Serving Institutions. Nine of the top ten. It's not the Ivy League institutions, for sure. It is those institutions that I mentioned that are part of our group of HSIs. And in fact, the number one is Cal State LA in that report that I saw. And so, again, because they are very dynamic, creative, innovative, and resourceful with respect to using what little they have to optimize the educational outcomes of those who come to their campuses. And not just educational outcomes, but career outcomes. Once they are in the workforce, their earnings are higher than those of others from the same lowest quintile when they enter college. So dynamism is the second major component. And I would say deliverance. Deliverance for underserved populations is another important quality that HSIs represent, because they are ultimately serving—for the most part, the majority of their students are first-generation college students, many of them from immigrant families who are unfamiliar with the educational system and with the intricacies of going through a college education, because they themselves never had that opportunity to pass down. So they are at a very distinct socioeconomic disadvantage coming from those types of families who are also low income, because to be an HSI not only does an institution have to have more than 25 percent of its enrollment being Hispanic, but also they have to show that the majority of their students are Pell Grant eligible—in other words, needy, low-income students. And the other criterion is that they have to spend on average per student less than the average of their peer institutions. So they are efficient, very cost-effective, and they serve the neediest of our society. So there you have it. Diversity, dynamism, and deliverance for the most needed in our society. That's what HSIs are all about. And so they really are in need of much greater support from the federal government, the state governments, and from the corporate community and the philanthropic community. And our association advocates for that to be the case, with some success but not enough. We have been able to increase the appropriations for them from Congress over the years, but they are way behind other cohorts of minority-serving institutions that get much more money per student than HSIs do, despite the fact that they—for instance, they not only educate 67 percent of all the 3.8 million Hispanics in college today; they also educate three times as many African Americans as all the HBCUs combined. Let me repeat that: More than three times as many African Americans go to HSIs as they go to HBCUs, OK? And more than 42 percent of all the Asian Americans in college today attend HSIs. They also educate more than twice as many Native Americans as all the tribal colleges and universities put together. And then we have other groups of different national origins who come to our campuses. So they are extremely diverse. And so that's, in a nutshell, what HSIs are all about. And they've been growing, about thirty new HSIs per year, because demographically it's how the country's moving. There are more Hispanic young people emerging from high school and going to college than from any other group. And conversely, the non-Hispanic White student enrollment has been declining continually year after year for the last ten years. Look at the numbers. And that's not going to stop. In major states, like California and Texas, for example, the two largest in the nation, more than 50 percent—about 52-55 percent of the K-12 enrollment is Hispanic. If you add the other minority populations, overwhelmingly these states futures are diverse and Hispanic. And so is the country. Other states are moving in the same direction, whether it's Florida, or Illinois, or New York, New Jersey. The main states in the nation are moving in those—in that direction. So that's why it's so essential for Congress, the states, corporate America, and philanthropic America to invest in these institutions much more than they have been doing, because they represent the very future of this nation. To the extent that the new generations of graduates coming out of them are equipped with the right tools to succeed as scientists, as technicians, as professionals in whatever field they choose, our country will thrive. And the opposite will happen if we don't. It's that simple. And so that's what I wanted to just briefly say as an introductory commentary on HSIs. FASKIANOS: Fantastic. Thank you very much for that. We're going to go to the group now for their questions. (Gives queuing instructions.) So I'm going to first go to Manuel Montoya, who has raised his hand. Q: Thank you very much, Irina. And, Dr. Flores, it's a real pleasure to have you on the call. I appreciate all the work that you do for HACU and for Hispanic Serving Institutions. I am with the University of New Mexico. I'm an associate professor in international management at UNM, but I also do a lot of work with my cohorts on supporting HSI—our HSI designation. We are a Hispanic Serving Institution and an R1 institution as well. All of the things you said are really important. And I had a comment and then a question. I think this question of—this idea of diversity being the name of the game is not to be underestimated. I think that the students that go through HSI-designated institutions, I think that they have the potential to reshape and recalibrate what we mean when we say we are ambassadorial in the world. And the United States needs to upgrade and change its relational dynamics, political and economic, to include diverse voices that come from the learned and lived experiences of people who traditionally come from first-generation families, first-generation students. And HSIs are equipped to do that. So my question becomes, you mentioned wanting to track some people into the foreign service exam. But what other types of experiences or opportunities do you think are best practices for students that are coming out of HSIs to participate in the larger international relations frameworks and careers that are setting the global agenda? FLORES: That's a good question, Professor Montoya. And let me share with you briefly something that I mentioned before we started the webinar to friends at CFR. And that is that HACU has a very robust national internship program that places upwards of five hundred undergraduates, and some of our graduate students, with federal agencies, including the State Department. We signed an MOU with the late Secretary Powell, who at that time was very much committed to increasing the number of Latinos in the Foreign Service, and other underrepresented populations. And that remains in place, although not with the numbers that we would like to see. And yet, there are other agencies that also have a foreign or abroad projection, like Department of Agriculture, for example. And others that have offices across the world. And so we are very much into helping them find the right talent they need, and getting them also as interns experience those agencies, and putting them on the right track to become full-fledged employees once they graduate. So that's one of the things that we've been doing. We need to do much more of that. I accept that the number is, as impressive as they may sound, are very minute when it comes to the populations that we're talking about. And our own association has made it a priority to expand its international reach. And we have, depending on the year, anywhere from forty to fifty universities across Latin America, the Caribbean, and Spain that are affiliated with us to do precisely what you suggest, which is student mobility and experience abroad. And so—and in both directions, also that they would come to be in the U.S. And so we have the beginnings, I think, of a major push to make sure that many, many more young people who—they have a kind of an almost organic connection to international affairs, in this case Latinos, because most of them come from families who immigrated or have roots in other countries, and are really very much culturally adept to international roles. So your point is well-taken. And you'll see a lot more activity from our end as an association in that regard. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to take the next question from Shoshana Chatfield. Q: Yes, hello. I wanted to say thank you for such a wonderful presentation and for really exposing me to some of the issues that I wasn't aware of previously. I am the president of the United States Naval War College. And since I've been here over the past two years, I have been actively trying to expand our recruiting effort to make our vacancies on our faculty available to members of the community. And yet, I'm not seeing any appreciable difference in the applicant pool. And I wondered if you could advise me how I might approach this differently to raise awareness about hiring to these war colleges who have not traditionally had a high representation of faculty who come from the same backgrounds that you described. FLORES: Thank you. Thank you for your very timely question, President Chatfield. Let me say that one of the first things that I would suggest is that you join our association as a college. Why would that be helpful to your effort? Because then you will connect with presidents and CEOs of five hundred-plus community colleges, regional university, and so forth, and school districts that are also affiliated with that, that are defined as Hispanic-serving school districts. So that even in high school you will have a presence through our association's outreach to them, and that you also would network with peers of diverse institutions across the country who may have robust pipelines of Ph.D. graduates and others who could fit your own aspirations, in terms of getting some of those faculty on your campus, some of those administrators, and some of those as students. Because, at the end of the day, probably—you probably want to have a much more diverse student body. And that can come from precisely that opportunity to not only interact but formally establish relationships with some of those colleges to transfer, for instance, from community colleges or from high schools that we interact with on a regular basis. So that would be one suggestion. We also have in our association a very, very nimble system called ProTalento. It's online. That is P-R-O-T-A-L-E-N-T-O, ProTalento. And that that—you can go to our website, find it. And we have on that website a very robust database of individuals who are looking for opportunities at different colleges. That are already teaching, or doing research, or both, and are looking for other opportunities. And also, we have institutions that are looking for them. And the system basically matches them. So you can go there and find a goldmine, so to speak, of talent. FASKIANOS: Thank you very much. Great question. And we have a written question, a couple written questions in the chat. This one comes from Andrea Purdy, who is an associate professor of Spanish at Colorado State University. We are anticipating reaching HSI status. And in talking to my students, a comment they have made to me is that they don't always feel welcomed all over the university. There are niches, but overall the sense of belonging is not felt. They also commented that while they are beginning to see themselves in classrooms, they don't see themselves in the faculty. What suggestions do you have for universities to make sure that the inclusivity is felt at all levels? FLORES: Well, it's similar to the previous question in some—in some regards, because ultimately the first thing you want to do as a college or university, it has to be job number one, is to create a climate—a campus climate of support and welcoming feelings for the students, that they feel not only appreciated but they feel really supported and welcome to the institution. And so the point made is how can we recruit or how can we diversify faculty and staff? Well, again, you go—you know, when you want to catch fish, you go fishing where the fish are. And the fish are in some of the HSIs, those that are already more developed institutions. And many of them are regional universities or R1s or R2s. And those could be a source of talent for institutions like Colorado State, that is lacking some of their representation. And of course, I want to insist that please visit ProTalento. And you may be surprised how much success you could have in getting people from that database to consider your institution. But of course, faculty and staff who look like the students are essential to create that culture, that campus climate of appreciation and welcoming, I would say. FASKIANOS: Thank you. Let's go next to Rosa Cervantes, who has a raised hand. And please unmute yourself and tell us your affiliation. Q: Good afternoon. Thank you for taking my questions. My name is Rosa Isela Cervantes. I'm the director of El Centro de la Raza at the University of New Mexico, and also special assistant to the president on Latino Affairs. And I really interested in what you said, Mr. Flores, about the diversity of students at HSIs, and that we serve three times the amount of—if I heard correctly—of African American students at HSIs than BCUs, is that correct? Is that— FLORES: That is correct, yes. Q: OK. And I wanted to see if you could expand a little bit about that, and also maybe think through or talk to how we can do some coalition building with folks. Because I really feel like HSIs are completely underfunded, right? You've stated it, we've heard it. But yet, they're so robust and they do so many different things for so many different students. I wonder how we might continue—and we're a member of HACU—but I wonder how we maybe think through some conversations to really get out the word about that idea, that HSIs are that robust, that HSIs do served large populations of students. And sometimes some of the most neediest students that require more money, right, for their funding. And so I just think that's very interesting. I think—I don't think a whole lot of people know about it or understand that. I had a faculty member at a different institution actually question me, because I had read that somewhere. And I think we need to talk more about it. So I'm just wondering your thoughts about coalition building and what else we can do, and how other ways that HACU needs our support to make that happen. FLORES: Thank you for your excellent question, Ms. Cervantes. And let me share with you that last week I was in Washington, D.C. most of the week and met with a number of Congress individually, including your great senator, Mr. Lujan. And guess what? There was a lot of good conversation about that point. And I have also talked with a number of African American members of Congress who didn't know that, and who actually had themselves—(background noise)—and who actually have themselves a significant number of HSIs in their districts. And they didn't know that they had all these HSIs in their districts. And so I think the word is getting out there. And, more importantly, the appreciation for the fact that these institutions really are very diverse, and not only do they educate the vast majority of Latinos and Latinas, but they also educate a larger number, as we said, of African Americans and others than the HBCUs, for example. And they didn't know that. And then—so I think that mindset might begin to change, because at the end of the day the funding and support should be focused on the students. And ultimately, if you help the neediest of students you have the more diverse population, but you have the fewest dollars per student coming from Congress. There has to be something wrong there with that equation. So there is an inequity that we are, as an association, trying to remedy. And we need all the help we can get from all—our own Latino organizations and HSIs, but also from others including the HBCUs. It's not about reducing funding for them or anything like that. They can and should be getting even more. But not—but HSIs shouldn't be treated as second-class institutions. They are not. They are the backbone, again, of America's labor force, in terms of training that labor force to be competitive in the global economy. So they have to be treated appropriately and equitably. Basically, it's about equity in terms of funding. And right now, things are not at all equitable, but we're changing that gradually. And thank you for your question. Q: Gracias. FASKIANOS: So we have a written—several written questions. So Sandra Castro, who is assistant dean of the undergraduate programs at Adelphi University says: What recommendations do you have for institutions that are striving to become HSIs in preparing for this designation? What internal changes and institutional infrastructure is necessary to truly serve the Latino student body? FLORES: I will suggest three things. One is, begin to work more closely with institutions that are already HSIs and that are doing a good job being HSIs, that are recognized for having, as they say, best practices with respect to being an HSI. And learn from them. Learn how it is that they do what they do well. And begin to then—and the second point is, educate your own leadership at your institution about how they can be much more effective and receptive to the inevitable demographic change in their student population to become an HSI, and how they can make the most of it in terms of student success, and also learning the ropes of how to get grants and funding to improve services for this population. And the third thing that I would recommend very strongly is that, you know, take a very hard look at all of your outreach and marketing materials, and revise them accordingly so that you reflect that commitment to diversity, in particular to Latino inclusion, in terms of bilingual materials and outreach to families and communities. Because many times the decision about whether to go to college or where to go to college by a student is really influenced very heavily by the family, the parents particularly, because of the tremendous pressure that many of them have in starting to work to contribute to the family income, because they come from low-income families. So working with those families and making them aware of the importance of getting a degree, a college degree, and postponing some of that lower-income—some of the minimum-wage salary that they could get as a high school graduate, and working with those families is very important. Working in their language and culture is even more important for some of them. FASKIANOS: Great. I think this is a good segue to the next question from Eric Hoffman, who got an upvote. He's the dean of the Honors College at Miami Dade College. And his question is: How can we get the Hispanic and Latinx students out of their community and expand their aspirations to colleges and universities in states and areas far from home? FLORES: Well, you know, it's an excellent question, in the sense that historically—because these are first-generation college students for the most part, whose families have not had the opportunity to educate themselves in college. And their temptation is to stay home. Especially sometimes it's worse for female students to move away from home. And my suggestion is that you, again, will work with those families as closely as you can to make them aware of the fact that moving away doesn't mean—moving away physically doesn't mean moving away from the family otherwise, that they will ultimately remain connected to the family. And now with technology it's even easier. You know, we have Facetime. We have all kinds of other ways of interacting that were not available just some years ago. And they ultimately need to consider the best options in terms of financial aid and the quality of education they're going to get, and a few of the studies that they want to pursue. Sometimes all of those things are not available locally, so you have to go where all of those are. And I think that once there is a process of education for the family in that regard, they tend to be much more flexible. We experience some of that with our own national internship program, because we place them primarily in the Washington area, but also in other places. And I personally get to intervene sometimes with some families in their language, in Spanish, to reassure them that the young woman that was going to be placed somewhere else in Washington, D.C. or elsewhere was going to be OK, and she was going to come back home after the ten-week experience, or fifteen-week internship. And, guess what? After they experienced that, their siblings—they were trailblazers for their siblings and for neighbors, and all that. Now we don't have that problem, at least with our internship program. We have thousands of applicants and, unfortunately, we can only place about five hundred a year, annually. And so it does pay off to invest in working with families closely. And again, it's a generational effect, because then younger siblings or relatives will not have that kind of issue going forward. FASKIANOS: You had mentioned that you were in D.C. last week meeting with members of Congress. And we obviously have a new secretary of education, Dr. Cardona. Have you seen a shift from the Biden administration in their approach and what they're doing from a federal level to support the HSIs? FLORES: Oh, absolutely. I mean, there is just no question about that. The shift has been dramatic. And this administration and Congress are—have shifted gears and are actually investing more than anything else in people, investing in the economy to create more jobs, investing in education to prepare the labor force much better, investing in health to protect people from not just the pandemic but from other diseases that we experience. And just in general, the infrastructure, they just passed that bill in the House, is to improve the lives of people across cities, across states, by improving their infrastructure. It is not just about roads and bridges. It is also about water systems that are decaying and are affecting the health of people. It is about the lack of access to broadband connectivity. It is all of those things that will improve the lives of people. And so there, no question. And HSIs have improved—again, not to the extent that they should be supported. But we are in a much better situation now than we were just a couple of years ago. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to take Nathan Carter's written question, and then Mike Lenaghan, I know you wrote a comment/question in the chat, but I'd love for you just to raise it and speak it, because I'm afraid I might not get it exactly correct. So Nathan Carter from Northern Virginia Community College in the Washington D.C. metro area. I am the—NOVA's chief diversity equity and inclusion officer. We are an emerging HSI. When we look at our enrollment data here in fall 2021, we see a clear decline in quote/unquote “new” Hispanic students, both male and female. We wish to discuss this growing issue and recognize what may be the current obstacles or community issues happening right now in the Hispanic community that will help us explain what we see and how we can reach out to the Hispanic community to help address what could be a growing problem across various states. So I think if you could comment on that, and how to, you know, have that discussion. FLORES: Well, thank you for that question. It's something that, of course, has been exacerbated by the pandemic. Because a lot of our colleges and universities, HSIs and others, did not have the endowments or the money to immediately make—shift gears in the direction of the technology required to move from in-person to online teaching and learning, and to train faculty and staff to manage all of those new systems. And that's on the institutional side, that there was that kind of reality of not getting all of the necessary resources to make that shift immediately and successfully. On the receiving end you have families and communities that do not always have the connectivity to broadband and the devices at home and the space at home to learn online. And so it was a one-two punch—institutional and students were hit very hard. And therefore, many of them withdrew. And apart from the fact that when it comes to the rate of infection, hospitalization and death, Latinos were worse hit than any other population, so much so that during the pandemic Latinos shrank their life expectancy by three years, compared to two years for Black and 0.68 years, so less than a year, for non-Hispanic Whites. So you do have all of those things. And ultimately, that means that the students served by these institutions come from those very families that were hardest hit in their health as well. So they couldn't go to school. They were trying to survive. And many did not. And so there was a drop in the enrollment, and particularly at community colleges, is where the—they were the hardest hit with respect to that, just like that community that is emerging as an HSI. So we are pushing very hard for that to be remedied, not just for the pandemic, but for the long term. Because I think the hybrid models of teaching and learning should—will remain in place for the long haul. And we need to make sure that those families, those communities that have been historically underserved and underfunded get that necessary technology at home to do that type of educational experience. We also need to make sure that the institutions that are suffering the most get the most help to beef up their infrastructure. And not just in terms of technology, but also in terms of expanding classrooms and also creating labs that are very expensive to create for technology of science or engineering types of degrees, which are the most in demand. And in some states, it's even—it's worse than in others because a lot of students are homeless. A lot of students are homeless. And in a state like California, where we have the largest concentration of Latinos, for example, that problem has been rampant and recognized by the state as a huge priority. So what they need to do is also build affordable housing even on campuses, so that those students have a place to live in a decent, humane way. And so there are many things that come to create this perfect storm against populations like low-income Latinos, and African Americans, and others. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to ask Mike Lenaghan to ask his question live. Q: Thank you very much, Irina. And it's a pleasure to see you, Dr. Flores. I am Mike Lenaghan from Miami Dade College, and truly cherish the empowerment we've enjoyed through the vehicle of HACU. It's been my experience, basically with a great deal of labor-intensive and purposeful leadership development, to have my scholars—just me, as one faculty member—successfully transfer to over 139 colleges and universities in the United States, all of whom required financial support and almost all of whom were able to avoid loans. This is over a twenty-year period. My question is: How might I, as a faculty member, also someone who's labor-intensive, be empowered, possibly mediated by HACU, to share basically how to set up my Hispanic students and their families and their relatives for the kind of success my scholars have enjoyed at Princeton, Yale, Cornell, Georgetown, UVA, Duke, UCal Berkeley, and so on? Which, when the right combination of chemistry and self-identification occurs, each of my Hispanic/Latinx scholars basically knows what they uniquely bring and add, as well as what they uniquely can address and engage in each school. I realize I am just a microcosm in a larger macrocosm, but I'm wondering does HACU have a role to play that might mediate some education and sharing, not just a book or a strategy, but something that could be shared, including some of what I like to call my all-stars, who have enjoyed operating in the context of HACU as a launching pad. Thank you, sir. FLORES: Thank you for your very, very important work, Professor Lenaghan. And thank you for your very caring teaching and supporting our students, your scholars. And ultimately, you have a lot to offer to the academic community as a faculty who cares about these students not only doing well but excelling and going to places that perhaps their families never thought of them being able to go. And I think it begins with learning from people like you what is it you've been doing so well to help those that you have helped to excel. And HACU can be a platform for you to share that. We ultimately have annual conferences and other meetings where your expertise and your success can be shared with others to adapt it to their own needs and replicate what you've been doing so well in other places, so that many more can go onto those very selective institutions, and others. And of course, I don't know if we've been connecting—I insist on this point, on connecting with families, because many of the Latino families—and maybe in the Miami area it's a little different because a lot of the Cuban and South American families perhaps come from a more middle-class background than in places like Texas or California. And maybe they had already some collegiate experience in their home countries, and they immigrated there, or whatever. But that helps a lot, OK? When they come with that background. But when they don't, when they are immigrants who come without even a high school diploma from their home countries, and they don't know the language, their highest expectation is at least to get their high school diploma and start working somewhere. And so taking them to the next level, it takes a lot of work. And it takes a lot of work in terms of making sure that they understand that if their child has the talent, and has the persistence and discipline, et cetera, et cetera, to go places, that they can be very helpful to him or her in ensuring that there is a space at home where they can study, that they do concentrate on their studies, and that they really aim for those places that you mentioned and don't settle for second-best of going to some institution, but make that their goal: I'm going to go to X or Y Ivy League or very selective institution because I have with it takes, but it's going to take a lot of nurturing and support. And the parents can be very helpful, even if they don't have an education, by really making sure that their child has the space and the time at home to concentrate and study. That will go a long way. But really, let them flourish. And so HACU can be a platform in three different ways. One is, allowing individuals like yourself, who are excelling in their teaching, to share their best practices with others. Secondly, we also, of course, have to recognize that we have some programs already in HACU that are very effective, especially those that are focused on moving a critical mass into STEM degrees. And we're going to emphasize that even more going forward. And thirdly, that we, as an association, have the ability to influence federal agencies and others—and corporations to invest in the kinds of practices that you may be successful at. And I'll give you a couple examples. We just got a planning grant from NSF, HACU did. And we are almost done with the planning for one year, because we want to submit a multiyear, multimillion grant to NSF with an emphasis on moving as high as possible, to the PhD. in fact, Latinos all the way from community college up to the research one institutions. And we are working on that proposal to be submitted early next year. But we could, I'm sure, learn from what you're doing. And so we could influence agencies to also invest more. We have a new program under NSF for HSIs that you can apply for a grant to expand what you're doing with more students, more parents. And the same thing is true with respect to other agencies. I was just in Washington last week and met with the undersecretary of the Department of Commerce to discuss the technology program, where our institutions will each have a role to play. And so we have the role of advocating and influencing agencies and Congress to invest in institutions like yours, Miami Dade, and professors like you, so that you can do more of exactly what you are doing. So please feel free to send us an email at HACU. You can send it to my attention. And I'll make sure that it finds its way to the right staff in charge of the kinds of programs that you are dealing with. We do have great staff that follows up on situations like yours. FASKIANOS: Fantastic. We will circulate after this an email with some of the resources you've mentioned and the email that we should be sharing, Dr. Flores. So we have another question, and it follows onto Mike's question, from Arturo Osorio, who's an associate professor at Rutgers University. Any advice or programs that you know to help connect the parents of the Hispanic Latino Students to the higher education experience? Many of our students are first-generation Americans and also first-generation college students. This creates a large cultural and experiential gap for parents to bridge on their understanding of what kids are going through and support them. As a result, many of the students have very stressful moments as they navigate away from the family to their college life. FLORES: Yeah. Excellent question. And my suggestion is that please send us an email. We have an office in HACU that is designated to promote pre-K-12 and higher education collaboration. The executive director of that office is Jeanette Morales. Jeanette Morales has a team, and they work with clusters or consortia of colleges, universities and K-12 schools, particularly secondary schools, to move out successfully many more of those underserved students to college and be better prepared to succeed in college. It is more substantive than just a college visitation thing or admissions officers talking with them at an event. They actually have early college interventions for high school students. So they actually earn even college credit when they are creating high school for the most advanced students. But they also have opportunity for professors from some of those universities and community college to teach as visiting teachers in those high schools, where they may not get the resources to hire faculty for advanced courses and for the courses that are required to be successful in especially STEM degrees, like advanced math, advanced science, and so forth. So that office and our association has been in place for the last seventeen years. It was that far back when we first saw that more than half of the battle to succeed in college has to be won in K-12. And it has to be won with families on your side, because first-generation college students do depend largely on families to make decision after high school. So please feel free to contact Jeanette Morales or myself in my email at our San Antonio headquarters. FASKIANOS: Thank you very much. We are at the end of our time. I just wanted to ask if you could just do really briefly what you're doing internationally to encourage—you know, and we don't have a lot of time. But I don't want to leave without—you had told me in our pre-call just a little bit. So if I you could just give us a wrap-up on that, that would be fantastic. FLORES: Yeah. We think of international education not as an appendage, not as a luxury, not as an add-on proposition, but as an integral part of a college education, in this case. And we hope that the vast majority of our young people will have a chance to experience a study abroad. And of course, it's like a big dream, because right now if you look at the numbers, only about 5 to 7 percent, max, of all the 350,000 American students going to study abroad are Latino. And the same number, roughly the same percentage, is African Americans and others. And conversely, only about maybe 3 percent of all the students coming from other countries come from Latin America—1.3 percent only from Mexico, which is right next door to us, OK? So that has to change. And it has to change because people who have an international experience ultimately expand their horizons and their vision of the world and are more effective not only professionals but citizens of the world. And we feel that it is very important for our young people to do that, not as a—as a kind of a luxury, or anything like that, but as an integral part of their development as professionals. And so we plan on being even more keen on affecting legislation that will provide more resources for our institutions and international programming, and ourselves as an association being much more engaged in getting more international institutions to affiliate with us to promote that mobility, that experience, independent of whether the government decides to invest or not. FASKIANOS: Wonderful. Thank you very much. Antonio Flores, this has been really a great discussion. And thanks to everybody for their terrific questions and comments. We really appreciate it. HACU is lucky to have you. We're fortunate to have you leading this great association. As I mentioned, we will send out a link to this webinar, also some of the resources you mentioned, email addresses and the like. And I'm sure everybody knows it, but it's worth repeating, the HACU website, HACU.net. You can follow them on Twitter at @HACUnews. So go there. You can also follow us at @CFR_Academic. And please go to CFR.org, ForeignAffairs.com, and ThinkGlobalHealth.org for CFR's resources on international affairs and the like. So I hope you're all staying well. Dr. Flores, thank you again. And we look forward to your continuing involvement in this webinar series. The next invitation will be for December, and we will be sending that out under separate cover. FLORES: Thank you very much, Irina. Thank you, everyone. (END)

UVA Throws
21. Thelma Lind Kristjánsdóttir - UVA Discus Thrower

UVA Throws

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 53:00


Welcome, welcome , to UVA Throws Podcast! Today with us we have Thelma Lind Kristjánsdóttir. Thelma is Icelandic National Record holder, 4th on UVA Discus All-Time list and one of our brightest students. Thelma will talk to us today about her experience as UVA Student-athlete, why she chose UVA, growing up and training in Iceland and many more things. So, without further ado, listen well and take some notes from Thelma Lind Kristjánsdóttir !

Light 'Em Up - Liberty Flames Podcast
Where Are They Now Wednesday? (Larry Jackson)

Light 'Em Up - Liberty Flames Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 29:31


The former Liberty MBB all-conference guard drops by to reflect on helping the Flames get their first ever win at UVA and much more! Hosted by Nick Pierce.

Irish Sports Talk: Notre Dame Football
Can Notre Dame Beat UVA Without Hamilton? — IST616

Irish Sports Talk: Notre Dame Football

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 30:07


Kyle Hamilton's status is still up in the air for Saturday's matchup with UVA. The Cavaliers have their own injury issues to worry about with starting QB, Armstrong, listed as day-to-day. Reuben and Randall offer their opinions about the matchup and what it means for the Irish playoff run.

The I Love CVille Show With Jerry Miller!
Alex Urpí, CEO Of Emergent Financial Services, Joined Jerry Miller Live On The I Love CVille Show!

The I Love CVille Show With Jerry Miller!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 60:16


Alex Urpí, CEO of Emergent Financial Services, joined me live on The I Love CVille Show! The I Love CVille Show headlines (Tuesday, November 9) Chief Brackney Press Conference Brackney Suing City For $3,000,000 Brackney Would Consider Returning What Is The Impact On CVille? What Is Impact On Central VA? Notre Dame (-5.5) @ UVA, 730, ABC Navy @ UVA (-14), 9PM, ACCN The Winter Wander, Boar's Head Alex Urpi Interview The I Love CVille Show airs live before a worldwide audience Monday – Friday from 12:30 pm – 1:30 pm on The I Love CVille Network.

RTD Podcasts
Teel and Barber Podcast, Episode 66, Nov. 9, 2021

RTD Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 49:08


Will he or he won't he? Will Brennan Armstrong play Saturday night when UVA takes on Notre Dame? And will Virginia Tech's offense show up on senior day against Duke? College basketball season is here, and we have all the numbers with Aaron McFarling's puppy chow Support the show: http://www.richmond.com/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The I Love CVille Show With Jerry Miller!
Jerry Miller Was Live On The I Love CVille Show!

The I Love CVille Show With Jerry Miller!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 48:55


Jerry Miller was live on The I Love CVille Show! The I Love CVille Show headlines (Monday, November 8) Council Tabs New Interim City Manager What's Future For New City Manager? 85%+ Of AlbCo Fully Vaccinated NBC29 Founder Dies – Harold Wright John Freeman Named “Voice Of Cavs” Thanksgiving Most Expensive Ever USA Ends International Travel Ban Notre Dame (-5) at UVA, 730PM, ABC UVA Men's Hoops – #24 In Both Polls The I Love CVille Show airs live before a worldwide audience Monday – Friday from 12:30 pm – 1:30 pm on The I Love CVille Network.

Roads Taken
Making Space: Julie Kline Dixon on listening to life's rhythms and creating a place to call home

Roads Taken

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 26:58


Had Dartmouth offered a course of study in architecture, guest Julie Kline Dixon may have taken it. At an early age, she would cover her school notes with sketches of floor plans and seemed drawn to the field. She had sat through one day of the sole architecture course she saw offered, but dropped the course when she realized it was mostly focused on the structure of bridges and that didn't appeal to her.  When, as a history major, she approached graduation, she didn't have an idea of what she was going to do. Still, she couldn't shake the idea of architecture. She found a pre-professional program in architecture and design the summer after graduation and finally felt at home. She worked at a small firm in Cambridge and decided to apply to architecture school, which she did at UVa with an emphasis on historic preservation.At the same time, she met her husband and committed to a life with him on a farm in rural Virginia. As such, she needed to figure out how to make a life in architecture fit into that reality. She realized, in time, that she could marry the two and build a successful practice focused on rural residential projects while raising her own growing family from her farmhouse. Taking the time to listen to the rhythms of farm life, she began incorporating that into her approach to making spaces for others.In this episode, find out from Julie how making space for people is often about much more than the structural components…on ROADS TAKEN...with Leslie Jennings Rowley. About This Episode's GuestJulie Kline Dixon is founder and partner of Rosney Company Architects in Charlottesville, Virginia, specializing in beautiful rural residential work. She lives on a farm in the middle of nowhere Virginia with her husband and their three feral (but now well grown) children. Executive Producer/Host: Leslie Jennings RowleyMusic: Brian Burrows Find more episodes at https://roadstakenshow.comEmail the show at RoadsTakenShow@gmail.com 

Minds Of Medicine
Ep. 12 Health Advocacy & Family Medicine ft Dr. Teresa Babineau

Minds Of Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 30:14


Terri Babineau, MD, FAAFP, MSt, is an associate professor of family medicine at UVA. Her clinical interests are in underserved populations. She helps others manage burnout and stress through her role as volunteer CMO for SafeHaven. She is interested in all aspects of teaching with residents and medical students as she feels this sharpens her thinking skills and broadens her knowledge base. Dr. Babineau is a lifelong Virginian who attended the University of Virginia as an undergraduate and Eastern Virginia Medical School for medical school and her family medicine residency, where she served as chief resident. She is the founder of a number of free clinics and has developed ongoing clinics in Honduras and Haiti. Dr. Babineau completed a master's degree (MSt) from the University of Oxford in England in mindfulness-based cognitive therapy, studying the science and theory of mindfulness and meditation practices. When she is not working, she stays busy on her small horse farm with her husband and her many children coming and going frequently. Music: Jaze Beats by Jon Echols

UVA Law
The Charlottesville Trial: An Overview of Sines v. Kessler

UVA Law

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 44:44


UVA Law professors John C. Jeffries Jr. '73, Leslie Kendrick '06 and Micah J. Schwartzman '05 join UVA history professor James Loeffler to discuss Sines v. Kessler, a federal lawsuit against white supremacists involved in the Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville during Aug. 11-12, 2017. The event was sponsored by the Karsh Center for Law and Democracy and the UVA College of Arts & Sciences Jewish Studies Program. (University of Virginia School of Law, Nov. 2, 2021)

The Marketing Book Podcast
356 Positioning For Advantage by Kim Whitler

The Marketing Book Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 88:16


Positioning for Advantage: Techniques and Strategies to Grow Brand Value by Kimberly Whitler About the Book: Most of us have an intuitive sense of superior branding. We prefer to purchase brands we find distinctive―that deliver on some important, relevant dimension better than other brands. These brands have typically achieved positional advantage. Yet few professionals have had the formal training that goes beyond marketing theory to bridge the “theory-doing gap”―understanding the specific techniques and strategies that can be used to create brands that attain positional advantage in the marketplace. Positioning for Advantage is a comprehensive how-to guide for creating, building, and executing effective brand strategies. Kimberly A. Whitler identifies essential marketing strategy techniques and moves through the major stages of positioning a brand to achieve in-market advantage. Introducing seven tools―from strategic positioning concepts to strategy mapping to influencer maps―Whitler provides templates, frameworks, and step-by-step processes to build and manage growth brands that achieve positional advantage. This book presents real-world scenarios, helping readers activate tools to increase skill in creating brands that achieve positional advantage. Brimming with insights for students and professionals alike, Positioning for Advantage helps aspiring C-level leaders understand not only what superior branding looks like but also how to make it come to life. About the Author: Dr. Kimberly A. Whitler is currently the Frank M. Sands Sr. Associate Professor of Business Administration at the University of Virginia's Darden School of Business.  Previously, she spent nearly 20 years in general management, strategy, and marketing roles within the consumer packaged goods and retailing industries, managing global, U.S., and Eastern European-based businesses. She spent most of her career at Procter & Gamble and more recently served as the general manager of the Breakfast Division for Aurora Foods, the CMO of David's Bridal, the country's leading bridal apparel retailer, and as an officer of PetSmart, the U.S.' largest pet specialty retailer. She has written over 350 articles as a Forbes senior contributor and has published in Harvard Business Review, MIT Sloan Management Review, The Washington Post, Ad Age, and numerous academic journals and other publications.  Her Forbes articles have garnered over 3,500,000 views, and she has been ranked as a Top Five influencer of CMOs, a Top 10 influencer of Tech B2B CMOs, and a Top 100 MarTech influencer. She has been interviewed, cited, or quoted over 2,100 times, including The Wall Street Journal, Bloomberg, The Washington Post, New York Times, NBC, ABC, USA Today, Entrepreneur, Fox Sports, Huffington Post, and a variety of international media outlets. And, interesting fact – she is an avid UVA men's basketball fan! Click here for this episode's website page with the links mentioned during the interview... https://www.salesartillery.com/marketing-book-podcast/positioning-advantage-kim-whitler

Aaron Falk on the Utes trip to The Farm, Pac-12 perception, BYU, bowl projections, Beckerman + more

"The Drive" with Spence Checketts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 21:07


SL Trib sports lead Aaron Falk joins The Drive to discuss the latest with Utah football, a trip to The Farm, Pac-12 perception, Cam Rising's rise, BYU vs UVA shootout, bowl projections, RSL honors Kyle Beckerman, MLS decision day + more

The CavsCorner Podcast
Episode 432: Tacked On At the End

The CavsCorner Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 60:36


As the Wahoos head into a much-needed bye week, the latest episode of the CavsCorner Podcast looks back at a deflating 66-49 loss at BYU last weekend and tries to get a sense of where things stand. We discuss the consistent and concerning defensive issues, what the team can do during this off week to try to make some significant changes, and how that might look going forward. We also talk about Brennan Armstrong, the offense, the receiver depth, and how tweaks to the running game could help, especially in light of the injury Armstrong suffered late in Provo.   Credits: Brad Franklin (@Cavs_Corner) Damon Dillman (@DamonDillman)   Visit CavsCorner now!   SIGN UP TODAY  and  check out our message board  to talk with hundreds of fellow Wahoo fans about all things UVa sports!   Visit MyPerfectFranchise.net for more information on how you can find freedom in your next venture and discover the perfect franchise for you.    Links: Four-star LB Godfrey (2023) to visit UVa   UVa Hoops Media Day Coverage   How the ACC sees the ACC: Week 10   Coach Speak: 1-on-1 with UVa's Kyle Getter   UVa's PFF grades following a rough night at BYU in Week 9   Coach Speak: 1-on-1 with UVa's Jason Williford   Take Two: Revisiting Saturday's resounding loss to the Cougars   Defense again the focus as Hoos head into bye week  

RTD Podcasts
Teel and Barber Podcast, Episode 65, Nov. 3, 2021

RTD Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 44:09


A blowout loss and an injury to its star quarterback sent UVA into its open date on a sour note. A road trip proved to be just what Virginia Tech needed to get back in the win column. And the first College Football Playoff rankings are out. The ACC is on the outside looking in. All that and Aaron McFarling's puppy chow Support the show: http://www.richmond.com/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Official Seattle Seahawks Podcasts
Seahawks Stories: Ray Roberts

Official Seattle Seahawks Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 85:59


Robert Turbin is joined by former offensive tackle and current radio analyst Ray Roberts to discuss his journey to the NFL and beyond. Today's show: Ray Roberts carrying the football (02:36), Journey to UVA (11:18), Switch from defensive line to offensive tackle (17:21), Being drafted to Seattle (29:50), Practicing against Cortez Kennedy, Jeff Bryant and Michael Sinclair (42:33), Going to Detroit (01:00:05), Famous Thanksgiving Day coin toss (01:04:19), Playing with Barry Sanders (01:11:02), and Ray's work with Unified Champion Schools and Special Olympics (01:20:08).

Markley, van Camp and Robbins
Markley, van Camp and Robbins | November 2, 2021

Markley, van Camp and Robbins

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 116:12


MVC&R have not canceled one flight onboard MVCR Air, but American Airlines canceled more than 2,000 flights, and blamed high winds. An MSNBC analyst claims Virginia going red would be “dangerous” somehow, and only 42% believe President Biden is mentally sharp. Senator Joe Manchin blew up the infrastructure deal, and Alec Baldwin bashed Sen. Manchin on Twitter. San Francisco blames conservative media for the perception of their city being so bad, and a UVA professor and political analyst believes white people are making things up in Virginia. AT&T race theory says “the problem” is due to white employees, and NBC News called the Secret Service over a “Let's Go Brandon” joke. The United Kingdom is considering a law that would send online trolls to jail, and New York City mayor Bill de Blasio is demanding firefighters get to work. Mike Rowe debunked the mystery of 11 million job openings, and the skills gap, while Philadelphia has banned traffic stops.

Nutrition Lifestyles with Kim & Johane
4: What You Should be Doing Year-Round so Ashy Season Doesn't Get You w/Danielle Gray

Nutrition Lifestyles with Kim & Johane

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 38:16


Ashy season is upon us, and for us melanated folks, this can be the bane of our existence! If you're like us and are still trying to figure out which products works best for your skin and may even still believe because black don't crack you don't need to use sunscreen, this is the perfect episode to learn how to get your skin products together. Today we have with us skin expert Danielle Gray, The Style and Beauty Doctor, who is a veteran online fashion and beauty expert who has appeared on Dr. Oz, The Real, Dr. Phil, Rachael Ray, and more!  She is here to breakdown which skin products on the market are best for protecting our skin.  She goes into why we should be protecting our skin no matter our age or skin color, the difference between UVA and UVB, and which sunscreen will not have your skin looking like Casper! Connect with Danielle Gray IG: https://www.instagram.com/stylenbeautydoc/ Website: https://www.thestyleandbeautydoctor.com Youtube: youtube.com/styleandbeautydoctor Connect with Johane: IG: https://www.instagram.com/blacknutritionistmama/ FB: Wonderfully Nutritious by Johane Website: www.johanefilemon.com FREE Guide to 50 Foods That May Help Your GI Symptoms https://digestivetherapy.johanefilemon.com Connect with Kim: IG: https://www.instagram.com/the.bloodsugar.nutritionist/ Website: www.kimrosedietitian.com FIND OUT 'What your diet says about your health': CLICK HERE Music by: Lakey Inspired https://soundcloud.com/lakeyinspired

Cam Mellor talks Pac-12 football, Utah vs Stanford, BYU's shootout win + NFL storylines

"The Drive" with Spence Checketts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 19:39


PFN's Cam Mellor joins The Drive to discuss NFL week 8 storylines, Taysom starting in NO(?), Mike White in winning in NY, Utah downs UCLA 44-24, Utes head to The Farm vs Stanford, BYU's beats UVA in a shootout, Bronco's return, Pac-12 champ outlook + more 

Orange Bowl Boys
Week 9 Recap vs PITT

Orange Bowl Boys

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 49:50


Orange Bowl BoysWeek 9 Recap vs PITTShow NotesSafe to say, the Miracle Baby has arrived! We mocked Manny when he made the analogy that this season was the labor pains and soon, we'd receive the miracle of a birth, or turnaround of the season. And we mocked it rightfully so, as it was idiotic. However, it actually seems like it may be happening! We just knocked off NCST and PITT in successive weeks. Our chances for a Coastal Crown are still alive and one Pitt and UVA loss away from becoming a reality. Does a 6-game win streak that follows a 2-4 start enough for Manny to keep his gig? And we haven't even started on TVD or X yet!You can find us on all social platforms under the handle: @orangebowlboysSponsors: Ed Morse Automotive Group, BeatinTheBookie.com, Caneswear & Draftkings SportsbookOrange Bowl Boys are owned and produced by OBB Media Inc. You can visit us online at www.obbmediainc.com. Copyright 2021.

Stormy Buonantony on UCLA @ UTAH, UVA @ BYU, Pac-12 South + more

"The Drive" with Spence Checketts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 14:06


ESPN's Stormy Buonantony joins The Drive to discuss UCLA's trip to Salt Lake City, scouting the Utes and Bruins, BYU vs UVA, Pac-12 South outlook, remembering Ty Jordan/Aaron Lowe + more

Hemmer Time Podcast
The Virginia Governor's Race: A Flashforward To The 2022 Midterms

Hemmer Time Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 25:54


On the latest episode of Hemmer Time, Bill sits down with Managing Editor of Sabato's Crystal Ball at UVA's Center for Politics, Kyle Kondik, to re-visit their conversation about the 2021 Virginia gubernatorial election. Kyle points out both advantages and disadvantages for Republican candidate Glenn Youngkin and Democratic candidate Terry McAuliffe and shares key details for listeners to watch on election night. Follow Bill on Twitter: @BillHemmer

BYU Sports Nation
Happy Holmoeween

BYU Sports Nation

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 49:53


Spencer Linton and Jarom Jordan link up live from Studio C ahead of the UVA game tomorrow. Tom Holmoe reveals his Holloween costume this year, Dennis Pitta joins to give his take on the Bronco Mendenhall Return and Cameron Tucker joins too.

Greg Wrubell on Bronco's return, BYU over WSU, Tyler Allgeier + more

"The Drive" with Spence Checketts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 20:55


BYU PxP voice Greg Wrubell joins The Drive to discuss Bronco Mendenhall's return to Provo, BYU's win over Wazzu, Tyler Allgeier standing out, a scouting report on UVA, previewing MBB + more

Locked On Cougars
How should BYU football defend Virginia & BYU commit Parker Kingston 1-on-1 - October 28, 2021

Locked On Cougars

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 34:25


The Locked On Cougars Podcast for Thursday, October 28, 2021 Thursday's show began with Jake Hatch pontificating on the BYU vs. Virginia matchup on Saturday and how he would like to see the Cougars go about trying to defend the high-flying UVA offense led by Brennan Armstrong. Jake thinks a similar approach to how BYU went about beating Houston in 2020 could be the blueprint Attention then shifted to our ticket giveaway for the BYU-Virginia matchup as Jake shared the responses from listeners about their favorite memories of Bronco Mendenhall during his time in Provo before Jake revealed who had won the pair of tickets to attend the game Saturday night Finally, the show wrapped up with a one-on-one conversation Jake had with Roy High star Parker Kingston as they talked about first-round playoff loss for the Royals in addition to talking about his future as a Cougar before sharing the Thursday night schedule for other BYU sports teams in action Support Us By Supporting Our Locked On Podcast Network Sponsors!  Built Bar - Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to BuiltBar.com and use promo code “LOCKEDON15,” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline.AG - There is only one place that has you covered and one place we trust to place our wagers. That's BetOnline! Sign up today for a free account at betonline.ag and use the promo code "LOCKEDON" for your 50% welcome bonus. Rock Auto - Amazing selection. Reliably low prices. All the parts your car will ever need. Visit RockAuto.com and tell them Locked On sent you. SweatBlock - Get it today for 20% off at SweatBlock.com with promo code "LOCKEDON," or at Amazon and CVS. PrizePicks - Don't hesitate, check out PrizePicks.com and use promo code: “LOCKEDON” or go to your app store and download the app today. PrizePicks is daily fantasy made easy! Follow the Locked On Cougars podcast on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter to stay up-to-date with the latest with regards to the podcast and BYU sports news. Please remember to subscribe, rate and review the show. Also, please consider subscribing to the Yawk Talk Newsletter that Jake writes and is delivered directly to your email inbox. If you are interested in advertising with Locked On Cougars or the Locked On Podcast Network, please email us at LockedOnBYU@gmail.com or contact us here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The CavsCorner Podcast
Episode 431: Building His Case

The CavsCorner Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 75:32


On the latest episode of the CavsCorner Podcast, we look back at Virginia's 48-40 win over Georgia Tech in a game that should have been much easier than that score would indicate. We talk about the way the offense continues to impress, how rare the air in which Brennan Armstrong is playing in truly is, and look at where he figures into the All-ACC and awards discussion. After spending some time talking to Andy Leudecke of MyPerfectFranchise.net (37:00 to 47:05), we then get into Bronco Mendenhall's return to Provo, the matchup with BYU, the emotion therein, and how we think things play out (late) Saturday night.   Credits: Brad Franklin (@Cavs_Corner) David Spence (@HooDaves) Justin Ferber (@Justin_Ferber) Damon Dillman (@DamonDillman)   Visit CavsCorner now!   SIGN UP TODAY  and  check out our message board  to talk with hundreds of fellow Wahoo fans about all things UVa sports!   Visit MyPerfectFranchise.net for more information on how you can find freedom in your next venture and discover the perfect franchise for you.    Links: Film Room: Hoos put Thompson's versatility to good use   UVa's PFF grades for wild Week-8 win against Jackets   How the ACC sees the ACC: Week 9   The 3-2-1: Bronco, Hoos prepare for visit to BYU   Roles remain up for grabs on UVa pitching staff   Busy November on tap for 2024 four-star Adams   Cavaliers stay focused on process, not “crazy” offensive stats   Take Two: Revisiting UVa's eventful win over GT

Wrestling Changed My Life Podcast
#282 Rock Harrison - ACC and ESPN Wrestling Analyst

Wrestling Changed My Life Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 42:14


ABOUT THIS EPISODE Lots of passion in this one folks! Rock Harrison (@rockreax) is an ACC and ESPN wrestling analyst. Rock wrestled at the University of Virginia, where he finished 3rd in the ACC. Prior to his time at UVA, Rock was a two-time Maryland state champion. Rock is also a D-1 official. Enjoy! * PRESENTED BY SPARTAN COMBAT This episode is presented by Spartan Combat. The Spartan Combat Nationals are returning to Jacksonville, Florida on April 8-10, 2022. Register now at SpartanCombat.Com * FANS If you enjoy the podcast, would you please consider leaving a short review on Apple Podcasts/iTunes? It takes less than 60 seconds, and it really makes a difference in helping to convince hard-to-get guests. I also love reading the reviews! * TEXT THE SHOW –Keyword: Wrestle –Number: 224-54 * FOLLOW the PODCAST Twitter: @Ryan_N_Warner Instagram: Wrestling Changed My Life Facebook: Wrestling Changed My Life Website: wrestlingchangedmylife.com Shop merchandise at our Online Store: Store.WrestlingChangedMyLife.com *** ABOUT Presented by Spartan Combat, the Wrestling Changed My Life Podcast features long-form interviews with amateur wrestlers - past and current - MMA fighters and titans of industry. New episodes are released every Monday and Wednesday, where host Ryan Warner talks college wrestling, Olympic wrestling and more with some of the biggest names in the sport. Wrestling Changed My Life also produces original audio documentaries including Slaying Saitiev, The Smiths and Gable the GOAT.