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Public research university in Los Angeles, California

  • 8,461PODCASTS
  • 21,372EPISODES
  • 49mAVG DURATION
  • 10+DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Jun 26, 2022LATEST

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    Best podcasts about ucla

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    Latest podcast episodes about ucla

    Presence And Practice
    Dr. Lou Cozolino - Shame Spirituality Trauma + Attachment Based Teaching

    Presence And Practice

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022 59:33


    IntroDr. Lou Cozolino practices psychotherapy and consulting psychology in Beverly Hills, California. He received his Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from UCLA and an M.T.S. from Harvard University. He has been a professor at Pepperdine since 1986 and lectures worldwide on psychotherapy, neuroscience, trauma, and attachment. https://www.drloucozolino.com/ Some of Dr. Cozolino's books are: Why Therapy Works, The Making of a Therapist and the Development of a TherapistSocial Neuroscience of Education and Attachment-Based Teaching1st Question - As you see it - what is the biggest issue people are facing these days?He shares an interesting answer.ShameWhat is the difference between Core Shame and Appropriate Shame?What can people do with power (Parents, Pastors, small group leaders) regarding shame?TraumaWhat is Trauma?And, how can people identify trauma in such a way that moves them towards healing?SpiritualityWhat does unhealthy spirituality and healthy spirituality look like?Attachment-Based TeachingWhat can pastors and small group leaders learn from this?If anyone is interested in how Sungshim and John integrate the knowledge from Interpersonal Neurobiology you can find out more at our Therapy Practice - Loppnow Relationship Center.We integrate this brain science with spirituality and shame.  Just kidding about the shame, we help you understand how shame works and how to experience God's love.  This is the core of our task - learning how to receive love.

    We the People
    What the Supreme Court's Opinion in NYSRPA v. Bruen Means for the Second Amendment

    We the People

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022 56:17


    On Thursday, June 23, the Supreme Court released its opinion in New York State Rifle & Pistol Association v.Bruen. In a 6-3 opinion by Justice Clarence Thomas, the Court held that New York's law requiring anyone seeking a concealed carry license to demonstrate they had “proper cause” for the license—or a special need for self-defense—violated the Second Amendment rights of law-abiding citizens. The decision expands the Second Amendment right to bear arms to include outside the home. To help us understand the opinion and what it means for gun rights, gun control measures and future reforms and legislation surrounding guns—including assault weapons bans—are Adam Winkler of UCLA, author of Gunfight: The Battle Over the Right to Bear Arms in America, and Clark Neily of the Cato Institute, who served as co-counsel in the landmark Second Amendment case District of Columbia v. Heller. Jeffrey Rosen, president and CEO of the National Constitution Center, moderates. Questions or comments about the show? Email us at podcast@constitutioncenter.org. Continue today's conversation on Facebook and Twitter using @ConstitutionCtr. Sign up to receive Constitution Weekly, our email roundup of constitutional news and debate, at bit.ly/constitutionweekly.

    We The People
    What the Supreme Court's Opinion in NYSRPA v. Bruen Means for the Second Amendment

    We The People

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022 56:17


    On Thursday, June 23, the Supreme Court released its opinion in New York State Rifle & Pistol Association v.Bruen. In a 6-3 opinion by Justice Clarence Thomas, the Court held that New York's law requiring anyone seeking a concealed carry license to demonstrate they had “proper cause” for the license—or a special need for self-defense—violated the Second Amendment rights of law-abiding citizens. The decision expands the Second Amendment right to bear arms to include outside the home. To help us understand the opinion and what it means for gun rights, gun control measures and future reforms and legislation surrounding guns—including assault weapons bans—are Adam Winkler of UCLA, author of Gunfight: The Battle Over the Right to Bear Arms in America, and Clark Neily of the Cato Institute, who served as co-counsel in the landmark Second Amendment case District of Columbia v. Heller. Jeffrey Rosen, president and CEO of the National Constitution Center, moderates. Questions or comments about the show? Email us at podcast@constitutioncenter.org. Continue today's conversation on Facebook and Twitter using @ConstitutionCtr. Sign up to receive Constitution Weekly, our email roundup of constitutional news and debate, at bit.ly/constitutionweekly.

    KJ Live
    KJ Live - BONUS CONTENT - Bob Myers

    KJ Live

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 53:07


    On this special bonus episode, Warriors GM Bob Myers and KJ had a conversation last summer after a disappointing season, and you'll see why it's no surprise they were able to turn things around and be crowned champions this season. They chopped it up about: Winning the 1995 NCAA Championship at UCLA. How working for Arn Tellum  prepared him to be an NBA GM. Will the Warriors win another NBA Championship in the next 5 years? Managing egos and personalities on the Warriors championship squads. Relationships and why they matter.  Why “winning” is an attitude. Ed O'Bannon in all his chair slinging glory. Warriors organization commitment to social change.  Is Steph Curry the greatest PG to ever play? #allball See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    All Ball with Doug Gottlieb
    KJ Live - BONUS CONTENT - Bob Myers

    All Ball with Doug Gottlieb

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 53:07


    On this special bonus episode, Warriors GM Bob Myers and KJ had a conversation last summer after a disappointing season, and you'll see why it's no surprise they were able to turn things around and be crowned champions this season. They chopped it up about: Winning the 1995 NCAA Championship at UCLA. How working for Arn Tellum  prepared him to be an NBA GM. Will the Warriors win another NBA Championship in the next 5 years? Managing egos and personalities on the Warriors championship squads. Relationships and why they matter.  Why “winning” is an attitude. Ed O'Bannon in all his chair slinging glory. Warriors organization commitment to social change.  Is Steph Curry the greatest PG to ever play? #allball See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Rio Bravo qWeek
    Episode 99 - Intermittent Fasting

    Rio Bravo qWeek

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 22:51


    Episode 99: Intermittent Fasting 99. By Danish Khalid, MS4; Sapna Patel, MS4; Ross University School of Medicine. Comments by Valerie Civelli, MD; and Hector Arreaza, MD.Intermittent caloric restriction may seem like a new trend, but Sapna and Danish discussed that actually fasting is practiced in different cultures and it has many health benefits, including weight loss. .  This is the Rio Bravo qWeek Podcast, your weekly dose of knowledge brought to you by the Rio Bravo Family Medicine Residency Program from Bakersfield, California. Our program is affiliated with UCLA, and it's sponsored by Clinica Sierra Vista, Let Us Be Your Healthcare Home. This podcast was created for educational purposes only. Visit your primary care provider for additional medical advice.D: Welcome and thank you for tuning back to our Nutrition series! Today, we want to give a shout out to one of our listeners. She brought up a topic that has recently gained public interest. Intermittent fasting. So, if you're listening, Hina Asad, this one's for you! Let's jump in! V: 2/3 women are overweight and obese. 1.5 pounds gained/yr on avg age 50-60's.S: So like we said earlier, intermittent fasting has recently gained much public interest as a weight loss approach. Or should I say, revitalized itself, as it has been around for years. It describes an eating pattern in which you alternate between periods of eating and fasting (or not eating). The length of each fast can vary in duration. A: There are feasting and fasting periods, or fed states and fasting states. What is more effective: Intermittent restriction of calories or continuous restriction of calories?  D: Before we dive in, let's go back. We know that calorie reduction has been consistently found to produce reduction in body weight and improve overall health. We talked about how to calculate our basal metabolic rate and subtracting calories from our daily caloric intake to result in weight loss. However, this can be difficult to sustain over a long period. Additionally, it requires that you adjust your caloric needs every so often as you lose weight, which can further make it difficult. So how is intermittent fasting different from this?   S: Well, in contrast to calorie reduction, intermittent fasting focuses on when calories are consumed and the total quantity consumed. Intermittent fasting works through an altered liver metabolism, referred to as the “metabolic switch.” It's where the body periodically switches from liver-derived glucose to adipose-derived ketones. In doing so, it stimulates an adaptive response including improved glucose regulation, improved insulin sensitivity, and increased stress resistance via conditioning. V: When you eat is more important than what you eat. Benefits: reducing cancer, Alzheimer's, DM risk, better sleep, less hangry(*find evidence).  D: What happens when we fast? In our previous podcast we mentioned ketosis, but let's talk about the physiology behind fasting.Feeding: blood sugar levels rise as we absorb food and insulin levels rise in response to move glucose into the cell. Excess glucose is stored as glycogen in the liver to convert it to fat.S: Postabsorptive phase (6-24hrs after beginning fasting): Blood glucose and insulin start to drop. To supply energy ,the liver starts to breakdown glycogen, releasing glucose. Glycogen stores last 24-36hrs. V: Insulin levels are low, and fat stores are available and improves mental clarityD: Gluconeogenesis (24hrs - 2 days after beginning fasting): Glycogen stores run out. The liver manufactures new glucose from amino acids called “gluconeogenesis” ( literally “making new glucose) S: Ketosis (2- 3 days after beginning fasting). A: Autophagy: “Auto” means self and “phagy” means eat. So the literal meaning of autophagy is “self-eating.”S: The protein conservation phase (5 days after beginning fasting): High levels of growth hormone maintain muscle mass and lean tissues. The energy for basic metabolism is mostly supplied by fatty acids and ketones. Blood glucose levels are maintained by gluconeogenesis using glycerol. Increased adrenaline levels prevent any decrease in metabolic rate. There is a normal amount of protein turnover, but it is not being used for energy. V: How long should we fast for?  D: Fasts can range from 12 hours to three month or more. We can categorize them as short (24 hours). However, shorter regimens are generally used by those mostly interested in weight loss. The short daily fasting regimens can be divided into the length of fasting - 12 hours fasts, 16 hours fasts, and 20 hours fasts.  S: Daily 12 hour fasting introduces a period of very low insulin levels during the day with 3 equally spaced meals throughout the day. This prevents the development of insulin resistance, making the 12 hour fast effective against obesity. Although a great preventative strategy, it is not the most effective at reversing weight gain.  D: Fun Fact: In years past, the 12 hour fasting period was considered a normal eating pattern. This probably explains why prior to the 1970s, there was much less obesity. It wasn't until the 1970s when the USDAs made dietary changes making a higher-carb and lower-fat diet a staple. That's when obesity started to rise.  S: On the other hand, during the 16 hour fasts most people skip the morning meal to account for the extra hours. In this regimen, you have an 8-hour eating window period, this is why it's also called time-restricted eating. Although you can still eat 3 meals most people tend to stick to 2 meals. The 16 hour fast certainly has more power than the 12 hour fast, but it should be combined with low-carb diets to allow for a slow and steady weight loss.  A: Feasting periods should not be so liberal, and over time it becomes easier to control hunger.  V: Feeding hours: healthy fats, proteins, fish, avocados, grass fed butter, unprocessed carbs (especially Low glycemic berries, squash, quinoa, vegetables, Low sugar, low alcohol intake… eating healthy basically. D: Fun Fact: A Swedish bodybuilder named Martin Berkha popularized this regimen, which is why you will also hear it being called the LeanGains method. V: Skipping breakfast reduces caloric intake by 20-40%, addresses visceral fat.S: Lastly, the 20-hour fasting regimen, also known as “the Warrior diet.”  Ancient warrior tribes such as Spartans and Romans devised a “warrior diet” in which all meals are eaten in the evening during a 4 hour window. This results in a 20-hour fasting period each day. This diet also emphasizes natural, unprocessed foods and high-intensity interval training. A: Summary: 12-hour, 16-hour, 20-hour. Dr. Jason Fung also recommends 24-hour fasting. It is basically skipping breakfast every day and skipping lunch 3 times a week. “Hunger is your friend”. D: Before we move forward, I just want to add that not all fasts are the same. For instance, I'm a Muslim, and there's a month where we fast for religious purposes, called Ramadan. During this time we fast from sunrise to sunset, or dawn to dusk. In contrast to traditional fasting, this fasting differs in that we don't eat or drink anything. Even water. Whereas in intermittent fasting it's different. Now, there have been studies done where they studied individuals during this time to see if there was any weight loss during this period. It was found that people typically lost about 1-2 pounds of weight. However, I do want to clarify this weight loss could be fat loss or muscle loss.  A: Another group of people who fast are Mormons. They traditionally fast once a month, the first Sunday of every month. It's a complete abstinence of food and water for 24 hours, skipping 2 meals. Fasting periods are linked to improve your spiritual well-being as well.  S: Certain Hindu festivals and holy days require devotees to observe fasting as part of their worship.  For example, Navarātrī, the nine-night celebration that occurs yearly. Some people take only water during these nine days, while some eat fruit while some eat one meal a day.  Hindus will observe fasts of varying strictness depending on individual beliefs or practices. Here are some examples of common fasts observed by Hindus:not partaking any food or water for a set number of days.limiting oneself to one specific vegetarian meal during the day.eating or drinking only certain food types for a set number of days.Avoiding eating certain food types for a set number of days.' S: So what can I consume when I fast? Do I have to completely stop eating and drinking for those hours? D: Only certain fluids can be consumed during fasting periods: water, tea and coffee ( iced or hot) and homemade bone broth. It's important for you to drink water frequently throughout the day. You can enjoy flat, mineral or carbonated water.   V: While Fasting: ok to have coffee, tea and water. Fasting creates a state of alertness.   S: What can you add to your water? Limes, lemons, sliced fruit (do not eat the fruit itself), vinegar, Himalayan salt, chia, and ground flaxseeds ( 1 tbsp in 1 cup water). Do not add sweetened powders even if it's sugar-free. D: You can consume up to 6 cups of caffeinated or decaffeinated coffee on a fasting day. Black coffee is preferred, but you can add up to 1 tbsp of certain fats in your coffee. These include: coconut oil, medium chain triglyceride oil (MCT oil), butter, ghee, heavy whipping cream (35% fat), half and half, whole milk, ground cinnamon for flavor. V: Ghee butter is clarified butter with no lactose.  A: You can curve appetite by drinking water, eating grains of salt, and drinking pickle juice (use a straw to avoid dental problems) S: You can consume unlimited herbal tea during your fasting period.  I know Danish and I both are Tea Connoisseurs. Right Danish? Teas can suppress your appetite, lower your blood sugar levels and are otherwise beneficial (positivi-tea). Bitter melon tea, black tea, cinnamon chai tea and oolong tea, help lower blood sugar levels. Peppermint tea and green tea help suppress appetite. Peppermint is good for GI discomfort such as gas and bloating. A: Peppermint oil is good for IBS. D: It's not uncommon to experience some lightheadedness during your first few days of fasting periods. This is often caused by dehydration and decreased levels of electrolytes. An easy remedy is a good homemade broth. Both vegetable and meat or bone broth will work. Things you can include in your broth: any vegetable that grows above the ground, leafy greens, carrots, onions, bitter melon, animal meat and bones (mostly bones, any animal), Himalayan salt, any herbs or spices, ground flaxseeds. Avoid vegetable puree, potatoes, yams, beets or turnips and store bought broths. (Dr. Fung). A: This is the end of this part on “How to fast”. Some people think fasting includes being hungry the whole day, but the “hungry” feeling goes away after 1 hour, and you learn to recognize the cues from your body about hunger and satiety. ___________________________________________________________________________ Now we conclude our episode number 99 “Intermittent Fasting 99.” This is not a complete guide to fasting, it's only a brief overview. Fasting has become a new nutritional trend with proven benefits. Remind your patients that one of the secrets of fasting is “delay, don't deny”, meaning they can delay eating a few hours and then enjoy what they like the most. Sapna, Danish and Dr. Civelli also reminded us to eat with moderation after breaking our fast to maintain the benefits of fasting. Even without trying, every night you go to bed being a little wiser.This week we thank Hector Arreaza, Sapna Patel, Danish Khalid and Valerie Civelli. Audio edition: Suraj Amrutia. Thanks for listening to Rio Bravo qWeek Podcast. If you have any feedback, contact us by email at RioBravoqWeek@clinicasierravista.org, or visit our website riobravofmrp.org/qweek. See you next week!_____________________Resources: Fung, Jason, MD; and Jimmy Moore. “The Complete Guide to Fasting.” Victory Belt Publishing. 2016. p179-189;199-209. 

    Pickaxe and Roll
    Gordon Gross on Christian Braun, Peyton Watson, and the Nuggets 2022 NBA Draft

    Pickaxe and Roll

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 76:28


    Ryan Blackburn and Gordon Gross, senior writer for Denver Stiffs, break down the Denver Nuggets 2022 NBA Draft picks: Christian Braun, Peyton Watson, and Ismael Kamagate (as well as Collin Gillespie on a two-way contract). They discuss what they liked and didn't like about the way the Nuggets handled draft night. Then, they went through scouting reports on each of the new additions and what Nuggets fans can expect to see now and going forward.

    The Driven Entrepreneur with Matt Brauning
    Driven To Courage Author Linda Shively on Reclaiming Joy

    The Driven Entrepreneur with Matt Brauning

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 27:58


    EP #298 -This week on the podcast, I'm joined by Linda Shively, a best-selling author, award-winning speaker, and neuroscience and mindset expert as we discuss Driven To Courage Author Linda Shively on Reclaiming Joy. Linda Shively has been featured in the Wall Street Journal, is a best-selling author, award-winning speaker, and neuroscience and mindset expert. She has presented across the country at places like the Harvard Club of Boston, the New York City Bar Association, Walmart, and Carnegie Hall. Linda has been a multiple-time guest and a host on cable television, featured in a feature-film with Winona Ryder and Jeff Daniels, and even performed at the Rose Bowl for over 90,000 people.  After healing from an abusive marriage, and navigating the diagnosis and eventual death of her 3-year-old daughter, Linda found her way to bounce back and reclaim her joy in life. Today she helps successful women defeat the dragons in their life and elevate their joy to new levels.  Linda has studied brain and mind function for over 30 years, earning a psychobiology degree from UCLA, is a certified Master Life and Executive Coach, a Master Practitioner of NLP (Neuro-Linguistic Programming), a Master Hypnotherapist, and a Certified Laughter Yoga Leader.   Learn More About Linda Shively: Visit Linda's Website Joy-Stealing Dragons Quiz Follow Linda Shively on social media on LinkedIn, and Facebook   Whether you are new to 'The Driven Entrepreneur' podcast or a recurring fan, please help out by subscribing to the show on Apple, Spotify, or Google, and leave us that 5-Star love and a quick review over at Apple Podcasts! Your support and your reviews mean a lot to me, and really help the show to reach more people. Plus, it provides me with valuable feedback, so that I can continue to bring value to you each and every week. I love hearing from fans and listeners. Please share your feedback, guest suggestions, or ideas for show topics with me on social media.   Connect with Matt Brauning On Social Media: Follow Matt Brauning on Facebook, Instagram, and Youtube. Check out more on this podcast, PLUS subscribe to my other podcast “Speaking of Getting Booked” This one's for anyone who wants to get booked to speak. We interview people who book and hire speakers just like you, and share all their strategies for you to get booked!" mattbrauningpodcast.com Get a signed copy of my #1 Best-selling book, "The Firebox Principle" PLUS take the Firebox quiz FREE at: fireboxbook.com Want to sponsor the show? Email inquiries to: mattbrauningpodcast@gmail.com

    Informed Dissent
    Informed Dissent - The Out of Control Group - Dr Edward Geehr

    Informed Dissent

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 36:15


    Episode 85 of Informed Dissent featuring Dr. Edward Geehr with a factual and candid conversation about research conducted on everything COVID.  Dr. Geehr did his undergraduate work at Yale, finished medical school at Duke, studied emergency medicine at UCLA, was on staff at UC San Francisco, ran the emergency department at San Francisco General, and had a second career in the pharma industry. He brings a uniquely qualified research and academic perspective to the COVID discussion. Find out exactly when "the science" became "not-science science." While Dr. McDonald is away, Dr. Jeff Barke holds down the IDM fortress. Give a listen now as you continue to build your personal Informed Dissent.Support the show

    After The Glory
    Alterraun Verner

    After The Glory

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022


    Season 05 Episode 06 36:24 Alterraun Verner played college and professional football from 2006 to 2017 and was known not only for his success as an elite cornerback, but also for being one of the most academically gifted athletes in history. Now age 33, he is a mathematics teacher at the middle school level and a philanthropist following his accomplishments on the field, in the classroom at UCLA, and in the NFL.

    Bruin Success
    Emily Baxt '92 of Baxt Consulting

    Bruin Success

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 32:22


    Emily Baxt, career coach and principal at Baxt Consulting, specializes in professional growth and development for teams and individuals in the private, public, and nonprofit sectors. She has supported students and alumni at the University of San Diego (USD) Career Development Center for over 20 years. She particularly enjoys helping people find purpose and meaning in the workplace, and facilitating groups to promote increased self-awareness, team effectiveness, and workplace skills. An experienced presenter and facilitator, Emily enjoys working with groups of all sizes. As an adjunct faculty member in the Shiley-Marcos School of Engineering at USD, she developed curriculum around NACE's Career Readiness Competencies and teaches emerging engineers. She is a popular guest lecturer in departments across campus and organizations in the community. Emily received a Master of Arts in Counseling with an emphasis in Career Counseling from USD and a Bachelor of Arts in Women's Studies from UCLA. She is a Myers-Briggs Type Indicator® Master Practitioner, a Gallup-Certified Strengths Coach, and a California Licensed Clinical Counselor (LPCC 314).

    Press Play with Madeleine Brand
    Who's most likely to become homeless? LA uses new prediction tool

    Press Play with Madeleine Brand

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 50:06


    More than 66,000 people are unhoused in LA County. UCLA researchers are trying to predict who is most likely to become homeless, so officials can intervene before it happens.  The Supreme Court issued two sweeping decisions today on gun rights and Miranda rights.  LeBron James joined the Cleveland Cavaliers in 2003, and the team's fans waited 13 years for their first NBA championship. A new play looks at the star through the eyes of two Cavs fans.  Critics review the latest film releases: “Elvis,” “The Black Phone,” “Marcel the Shell with Shoes On,” “Beavis and Butthead Do the Universe.”

    California Sun Podcast
    Alexa Koenig leads U.C. Berkeley's Human Right Center

    California Sun Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 33:16


    ​​Alexa Koenig is using Silicon Valley tech for the prosecution of war crimes. As the executive director of the Human Rights Center at the University of California, Berkeley, she is proving how the device that each of us has in our pockets and which gives us the ability to bear witness to the world might be used to help secure international justice. At a time when atrocities from Ukraine to Uganda are being documented like never before, Koenig, a product of Marin, UCLA, UC Berkeley, and the University of San Francisco School of Law, is evolving the framework for professionals to use social media and other digital tools to strengthen human rights advocacy and accountability.

    Keen On Democracy
    Dr. Natalie Petouhoff: Can Digital Technology Really Deliver More Human Empathy?

    Keen On Democracy

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 31:28


    Hosted by Andrew Keen, Keen On features conversations with some of the world's leading thinkers and writers about the economic, political, and technological issues being discussed in the news, right now. In this episode, Andrew is joined by Dr. Natalie Petouhoff, author of Empathy in Action: How to Deliver Great Customer Experiences at Scale. Dr. Natalie Petouhoff joined Genesys after years of being a strategic executive advisor and leading Industry Analyst at Forrester and Constellation, CX VP at Salesforce, a PWC strategic management consultant, Chief Digital/Social Officer and ROI expert at Weber Shandwick, a digital transformation lecturer at UCLA, with humble beginnings as a product engineer at General Motors and Hughes Electrics. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    Inside the Headset with the AFCA
    Bobby Hauck, Head Coach - Montana

    Inside the Headset with the AFCA

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 18:20


    This week on Inside the Headset, we are featuring the University of Montana's head coach, Bobby Hauck. Coach Hauck discusses his deep history with the university, explains Montana's unique football culture, and shares why he decided to serve on the AFCA Board of Trustees.  Bobby Hauck is preparing for his fourth season in his second stint as the head coach at the University of Montana. Hauck first coached at Montana in 1988 after graduating in 1987 and is now the winningest coach in Montana's history. In addition, Hauck's Grizzlies are the most academically successful of any program in school history, including five 4.0 GPAs. In this second stint as Montana's head coach, it is likely that Coach Hauck will seek to win more Big Sky Conference championships and again outscore his opponents by over 1,000 points in under 100 games. Hauck got his start in coaching immediately after he graduated college, he served as a defensive line and defensive backs coach at Montana from 1988 to 1989. Hauck then took on many responsibilities as he joined the UCLA staff from 1990 to 1992, served as the OLB coach from 1993 to 1994 at Northern Arizona, and then took on more responsibility at Colorado from 1995 to 1998 and spent 1999 to 2002 coaching at Washington before heading back to Montana. In 2003 Hauck returned to Montana as head coach and remained there until 2009. From 2010 to 2014 Hauck served as the head coach at UNLV and then as the associate head coach and special teams coordinator at San Diego State from 2015 to 2017. Starting in 2017 Hauck is serving as the head coach at Montana once again. [0:30] Start of Interview [1:04] History with the University of Montana [3:35] Montana's Recruiting Philosophy and Unique Culture [6:34] Staffing Characteristics [8:21] Making Connections [9:50] Staff Retention [11:35] FBS vs.FCS football [14:17] Serving on AFCA Board of Directors

    Reach Out and Read
    How the Human Brain Learned to Read

    Reach Out and Read

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 36:02


    The human brain doesn't come wired to read. Remarkably, recognizing, decoding, and comprehending a single word takes many different repurposed brain circuits working together.  Dr Maryanne Wolf, Dir. of the Center for Dyslexia, Diverse Learners, and Social Justice at UCLA breaks down the science of the reading brain — from the neuroscientific importance of oral language, to recognizing the alphabet, reading words, and ultimately, the experience of novel thought while reading.

    Filmcourage
    How To Conquer Hollywood And Achieve Screenwriting Success - Gary W Goldstein

    Filmcourage

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 155:06


    Want to see the video version of this podcast? Please visit Youtube here: https://buff.ly/3ydv72q Gary W. Goldstein has produced some of Hollywood's biggest box-office hits (Pretty Woman, Under Siege, The Mothman Prophecies and more), generating well over One Billion Dollars in worldwide revenue, receiving multiple Academy Award nominations, People's Choice Awards, a Golden Globe and other honors. Before moving to Los Angeles, Gary practiced as an attorney in San Francisco. He later served as president of two divisions of IAM.com, an internet entertainment company successfully funded at $50MM. Gary's passion as a storyteller goes beyond producing the work of gifted screenwriters. He's committed to sharing with everyone who desires real success and enduring careers as a creative professional his smart, simple strategies that magically transform talent into business success more rapidly and with greater ease. Gary's spoken at TEDx La Jolla, been published by the Huffington Post, and was a contributing author for the Napoleon Hill Foundation's newest publication "Stickability". Gary also regularly speaks to creative audiences and has given talks at American Film Institute, UCLA, Emerson College, De Anza College, the Dallas Screenwriters Association, the Great American Pitchfest and beyond. MORE VIDEOS WITH GARY W. GOLDSTEIN https://bit.ly/3kVkYjs CONNECT WITH GARY W. GOLDSTEIN http://garywgoldstein.com http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0326214/ https://www.facebook.com/garywgoldstein https://www.instagram.com/garywgoldstein https://twitter.com/garywgoldstein http://www.youtube.com/garywgoldstein RELATED VIDEOS A Professional Writer Doesn't Wait For Inspiration - Danny Strong [FULL INTERVIEW] - https://youtu.be/iSsBYP9atGE The Screenwriter's Blueprint for Career Success - Gary W. Goldstein [FULL INTERVIEW] - https://youtu.be/A5JfcTifiE8 Beginners Guide To Screenwriting - Shannan E. Johnson [FULL INTERVIEW] - https://youtu.be/pwcTge9iF0E Writing A Great Movie: Key Tools For Successful Screenwriting - Jeff Kitchen [FULL INTERVIEW] - https://youtu.be/xCCzm4n506o Conquering Hollywood: The Screenwriter's Blueprint For Career Success - Gary W. Goldstein Interview - https://youtu.be/yWh9Wgur9hI SUPPORT FILM COURAGE BY BECOMING A MEMBER https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCs8o1mdWAfefJkdBg632_tg/join CONNECT WITH FILM COURAGE http://www.FilmCourage.com http://twitter.com/#!/FilmCourage https://www.facebook.com/filmcourage https://www.instagram.com/filmcourage http://filmcourage.tumblr.com http://pinterest.com/filmcourage SUBSCRIBE TO THE FILM COURAGE YOUTUBE CHANNEL http://bit.ly/18DPN37 LISTEN TO THE FILM COURAGE PODCAST https://soundcloud.com/filmcourage-com Stuff we use: LENS - Most people ask us what camera we use, no one ever asks about the lens which filmmakers always tell us is more important. This lens was a big investment for us and one we wish we could have made sooner. Started using this lens at the end of 2013 - http://amzn.to/2tbtmOq AUDIO Rode VideoMic Pro - The Rode mic helps us capture our backup audio. It also helps us sync up our audio in post http://amzn.to/2t1n2hx Audio Recorder - If we had to do it all over again, this is probably the first item we would have bought - http://amzn.to/2tbFlM9 LIGHTS - Although we like to use as much natural light as we can, we often enhance the lighting with this small portable light. We have two of them and they have saved us a number of times - http://amzn.to/2u5UnHv COMPUTER - Our favorite computer, we each have one and have used various models since 2010 - http://amzn.to/2t1M67Z EDITING - We upgraded our editing suite this year and we're glad we did! This has improved our workflow and the quality of our work. Having new software also helps when we have a problem, it's easy to search and find a solution - https://goo.gl/56LnpM *These are affiliate links, by using them you can help support this channel.

    Michael Maher Show
    MMS #81 - Devon Newberry (UCLA Beach Volleyball)

    Michael Maher Show

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 20:39


    Last week, I interviewed Devon Newberry! We discussed her beach volleyball career at UCLA, playing for the USA national team, and her future in the sport! Make sure to drop a like & subscribe!! · USA National Team – 0:22 · UCLA Beach Volleyball – 4:06 · Indoor Volleyball – 7:47 · Los Angeles – 11:44 · Career Goals – 16:46 · Outro – 20:12 Linktree: https://linktr.ee/MichaelMaherShow Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/mikemshow/ Tik Tok: https://www.tiktok.com/@mikemshow? Follow Devon on Instagram! Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/devnewberry/ Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCjuMDJO2uHchPkoFd1uwo2A LISTENING PLATFORMS Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/michael-maher-show/id1498977289 Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/0VkK6hX0mB36WjDQED6yDJ iHeart Radio: https://www.iheart.com/podcast/269-michael-maher-show-57854913/ Google Podcasts: https://www.google.com/podcasts?feed=aHR0cHM6Ly9hbmNob3IuZm0vcy8xM2U5YWY2Yy9wb2RjYXN0L3Jzcw== RadioFreeRadford: http://ruhsm.com/RFR Anchor: https://anchor.fm/michael-maher-show

    Untangle
    Encore - Diana Winston - Why Forgiveness is an Act of Self-Compassion

    Untangle

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 43:17


    Diana Winston is the Director of Mindfulness Education at UCLA's Mindful Awareness Research Center (MARC) and the author of several mindfulness books. In this interview, we talk about the importance of forgiveness in our lives and why carrying our anger or resentment around with us is like carrying hot coal. Dropping the hot coal can lead us to more freedom, openness, and joy. It doesn't mean we have to condone or forget, but it is truly an act of self-compassion. It's simply good for us and the practices she teaches can be really powerful. The first step, she says, is to have the willingness to even start working on forgiveness — whether it's forgiving another person for hurting you, asking another person to forgive you, or, also extremely important, forgiving yourself. None of this is easy…but it can make a big difference in our own health and ease. Letting go of these difficult feelings is a great way to begin a new year filled with more open, positive, and productive energy.

    Then & Now
    University in Crisis: Disruption, Response, and Transformation During the Young Administration at UCLA

    Then & Now

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 46:38


    This episode features a conversation with UCLA graduate and undergraduate students who authored a new LCHP report exploring the history UCLA's response to crises of major scale.  Jazz Kiang, Jannelle Dang, and Nayiri Artounians join Then & Now to discuss UCLA administrators' approaches to the student movement for ethnic studies in the late 1960s, and the on-campus killings of students Bunchy Carter and and John Huggins. They also discuss the firing of Angela Davis, and the implications for present-day university administrators. This episode is moderated by Prof. Eddie Cole, an advisor for the project. Read the report here.

    The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast
    Nutrition Tips For Hair - Julieanna Hever, MS

    The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 11:27


    Nutrition Tips For Hair -  Julieanna Hever, MSJulieanna Hever, M.S., R.D., C.P.T. •           https://plantbaseddietitian.com/•           Book - Healthspan Solution: How and What to Eat to Add Life to Your Years: 100 Easy, Whole-Food Recipes There is nothing Julieanna loves more than diving into a colossal bowl of salad. Known as The Plant-Based Dietitian, Julieanna has a Bachelor of Arts degree in Theatre from UCLA in and a Master of Science degree in Nutrition from Cal State Northridge, bridging her three biggest passions for food, performing, and helping people. As a Registered Dietitian, Julieanna has authored five books, including The Healthspan Solution, Plant-Based Nutrition (Idiots Guide), Vegiterranean Diet, and two peer-reviewed journal articles on plant-based nutrition for healthcare professionals (in Journal of Geriatric Cardiology and Permanente Journal), and is the nutrition columnist for VegNews Magazine. Past projects have included being the host of What Would Julieanna Do?; giving a TEDx talk; and teaching the eCornell Plant-Based Nutrition Certification Program. She recently co-hosted Science and Saucery and Facebook Watch's Home Sweat Home, and has appeared on Harry, The Dr. Oz Show, The Steve Harvey Show, Reluctantly Healthy, The Marie Osmond Show, and E! News.New adventures include speaking, presenting, traveling, helping a wide variety of clients achieve their goals, and sharing her passion for healing and happiness eating a whole food, plant-based diet. #JulieannaHever #TheRealTruthAboutHealth  #WholeFood #Vegan #Vegetarian #PlantBasedNutrition  CLICK HERE - To Checkout Our MEMBERSHIP CLUB: http://www.realtruthtalks.com Social Media ChannelsFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/TRTAHConferenceInstagram : https://www.instagram.com/therealtruthabouthealth/Twitter: https://twitter.com/RTAHealthLinkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/company/the-real-truth-about-health-conference/Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TheRealTruthAboutHealth    Check out our Podcasts Visit us on Apple Podcast and Itunes search:  The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast Amazon: https://music.amazon.com/podcasts/23a037be-99dd-4099-b9e0-1cad50774b5a/real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcastSpotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/0RZbS2BafJIEzHYyThm83JGoogle:https://www.google.com/podcasts?feed=aHR0cHM6Ly9mZWVkcy5zaW1wbGVjYXN0LmNvbS8yM0ZqRWNTMg%3D%3DStitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcastAudacy: https://go.audacy.com/partner-podcast-listen-real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcastiHeartRadio: https://www.iheart.com/podcast/269-real-truth-about-health-li-85932821/Deezer: https://www.deezer.com/us/show/2867272 Other Video ChannelsYoutube:  https://www.youtube.com/c/TheRealTruthAboutHealthVimeo:  https://vimeo.com/channels/1733189Rumble:   https://rumble.com/c/c-1111513Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/TRTAHConference/videos/?ref=page_internalDailyMotion: https://www.dailymotion.com/TheRealTruthAboutHealthBitChute:  https://www.bitchute.com/channel/JQryXTPDOMih/ Disclaimer:Medical and Health information changes constantly. Therefore, the information provided in this podcast should not be considered current, complete, or exhaustive. Reliance on any information provided in this podcast is solely at your own risk. The Real Truth About Health does not recommend or endorse any specific tests, products, procedures, or opinions referenced in the following podcasts, nor does it exercise any authority or editorial control over that material. The Real Truth About Health provides a forum for discussion of public health issues. The views and opinions of our panelists do not necessarily reflect those of The Real Truth About Health and are provided by those panelists in their individual capacities. The Real Truth About Health has not reviewed or evaluated those statements or claims. 

    What I Want to Know with Kevin P. Chavous
    55. Are our schools doing enough to support autistic students?

    What I Want to Know with Kevin P. Chavous

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 19:41


    According to the latest research from the CDC, nearly 2 percent of all children in the United States sit on the autism spectrum. And of those millions of kids, the vast majority attend America's public schools. With diagnoses of autism on the rise in the U.S., are we equipped to provide these students with the assistance they need? In this episode, Dr. Connie Kasari, Professor of Human Development and Psychology at UCLA, joins Kevin to help us better understand the challenges that students with autism face and what our schools can be doing to help overcome those obstacles.

    Many Minds
    The ABCs of writing systems

    Many Minds

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 74:50


    Have you ever pondered the letter P, or maybe reflected on the letter R? As in, thought about their structures, their shapes, and how they came to be. I, to be honest, had not. I have never given these letters—or any other letters—much thought. But that's what we're up to today. In this episode, we're looking across the world's hundred plus scripts and asking some basic questions: How are they alike? How do they differ? And why do they have the shapes that they do? My guests are Dr. Yoolim Kim and Dr. Olivier Morin. Yoolim is a Psycholinguist at the Korea Institute at Harvard University, and Olivier is director of the Minds and Traditions research group (aka ‘The Mint') at the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History in Jena, Germany. Olivier and Yoolim, along with other colleagues, have recently launched a new online game called Glyph. You can play right now. It asks players to help describe, break down, and classify the characters of dozens of writing systems around the world.   Here, we talk about Glyph and what Yoolim and Olivier hope to learn from it. We do a bit of ‘Writing Systems 101' and shine a spotlight on two scripts with fascinating origin stories: Hangul, the Korean script which was devised in the 15th century and Vai, a script invented in Liberia in the 19th century. We also talk about how universal cognitive factors shape writing systems and about whether the writing system you use shapes how you think. Finally, we discuss the earliest writing systems and what they were used for; the myth that the alphabet is the most advanced type of writing system; and the understudied—but not uncommon!—phenomenon of “biscriptalism.” If you enjoy this episode, be sure to check out Glyph. It sounds super fun and engrossing—and I'll definitely be playing it myself! On to my conversation with Dr. Yoolim Kim and Dr. Olivier Morin. Enjoy!   A transcript of this episode will be available soon!   Notes and links 2:30 – You can sign up to play Glyph and watch a video about the game here. 6:30 – The International Phonetic Alphabet or IPA. 10:00 – In addition to writing, Dr. Morin's group at the MPI has also studied coin designs and other aspects of visual culture. 16:30 – A paper by Dr. Morin and colleagues about writing as one of many kinds of “graphic codes.” 18:40 – An explanation of the international laundry symbols. 19:50 – A video about how Egyptian hieroglyphs were decoded. A website where you can see your name written in Egyptian hieroglyphs. 24:50 – An article laying out five major types of writing system, distinguished by the linguistic unit they encode. 27:40 – More information about Hangul and Vai. 33:00 – A pioneering early paper by Mark Changizi and colleagues about the origins of letter shapes. 34:00 – A research paper by Dr. Morin about how cognitive biases for cardinal shapes and vertical symmetry shape letter forms. 37:30 – A cuneiform tablet, which shows how the script has a distinctive three-dimensional “wedge-shaped” quality. 41:30 – A research paper by Dr. Morin and colleagues on how the Vai script seems to have gotten simpler over its short history. A general audience treatment of the same study by co-author Piers Kelly. 42:00 – A research paper by Dr. Helena Miton and Dr. Morin about what determines the complexity of written letters. 45:00 – The Ogham script, which may have needed to grow more complex over time rather than simplify. 46:00 – An article on the origins of writing in different parts of the world. An article on the rebus principle. 48:30 – Our earlier essay on footprints, which discusses the idea that bird tracks inspired the Chinese writing system. 50:00 – A paper in which Dr. Morin and colleagues discuss the role of early writing in “recitation practices”. 52:00 ­– The idea that literacy profoundly affects cognition was famously articulated by Jack Goody in The Domestication of the Savage Mind. A paper by Stanislas Dehaene and a colleague about the “Visual Word Form Area” and how it becomes rapidly specialized for reading. 55:00 – Korean readers are often “biscriptal” in that they are familiar with both Hangul and Hanja. 57:30 – A paper by Dr. Kim and colleagues on whether Hanja shapes the mental lexicon of Korean speakers. 59:00 – A research paper examining some of the effects of biscriptalism. 1:03 – A paper by Isabelle Dautriche and colleagues about how word forms are clustered in the lexicon.   Dr. Kim recommends: In the Land of Invented Languages, by Arika Okrent Highly Irregular, by Arika Okrent Frindle, by Andrew Clements   Dr. Morin recommends: The Greatest Invention, by Silvia Ferrara Stories of Your Life, by Ted Chiang Codes of the Underworld, by Diego Gambetta You can read more about Dr. Morin's lab on the Mint website and follow him on Twitter. You can read more about Dr. Kim's research here.   Many Minds is a project of the Diverse Intelligences Summer Institute (DISI) (https://disi.org), which is made possible by a generous grant from the Templeton World Charity Foundation to UCLA. It is hosted and produced by Kensy Cooperrider, with help from assistant producer Cecilia Padilla. Creative support is provided by DISI Directors Erica Cartmill and Jacob Foster. Our artwork is by Ben Oldroyd (https://www.mayhilldesigns.co.uk/). Our transcripts are created by Sarah Dopierala (https://sarahdopierala.wordpress.com/). You can subscribe to Many Minds on Apple, Stitcher, Spotify, Pocket Casts, Google Play, or wherever you like to listen to podcasts. **You can now subscribe to the Many Minds newsletter here!** We welcome your comments, questions, and suggestions. Feel free to email us at: manymindspodcast@gmail.com. For updates about the show, visit our website (https://disi.org/manyminds/), or follow us on Twitter: @ManyMindsPod.

    Corporate Competitor Podcast
    Basketball Pioneer Ann Meyers Drysdale celebrates 50 years of Title IX

    Corporate Competitor Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 31:30


    Ep. 101: Celebrating the 50th anniversary of Title IX with the first woman to be signed to a collegiate scholarship at UCLA. There she earned All-American honors four times, spent her summers as a member of the U.S. Women's National Team, and won silver at the 1976 Olympics.  The barrier breaker went on to have an All-Star career in women's professional basketball before moving into the broadcast booth and now the front office as the Vice President of the NBA's Phoenix Suns and WNBA's Phoenix Mercury.  Subscribe to the podcast here for a free gift and today's show notes! Special thanks to Dane Massey and Brian Schnorr for making this episode possible.

    Awaken The Dawn Podcast
    Thai Lam : Jesus, College Campuses, Gen Z, and the why the phrase "Revival Is Family".

    Awaken The Dawn Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 37:50


    Thank you for listening to the Jesus Movement Podcast. This is our 10th Episode and it is a great one. We have special guest and friend Thai Lam from the International House of Prayer Kansas City. Thai is the Executive Director of Luke18 Project.  We hope you enjoy todays episode as Matthew caught up  with Thai for a powerful time of discussion about the Luke 18 Project, College campuses, Gen Z, revival, and spiritual awakening.Thai gives some great insight into the Gen Z generation and provokes us to remember the relevancy of the gospel in our day. Thai encourages us to to slow down, listen, and love well. Thai Lam is part of the leadership team of the International House of Prayer Missions Base of Kansas City and serves as the executive director of Luke18 Project. Thai has pioneered and led campus ministries for 20 years at UC Berkeley, Stanford, San Jose State, UCLA, KU, and UMKC. Thai came to faith in Jesus as a freshman at UC Berkeley, graduated in Religious Studies, and then studied Cross-Cultural Missions at Fuller Seminary. Thai and his wife Angela reside in Kansas City with their 3 children, Noah, Cohen, and Selah.Find out more:https://luke18project.comhttps://collegiatedayofprayer.orghttps://www.ihopkc.orgGive to ATD to support the podcast - https://awakenthedawn.com/giveJoin Revive School - https://www.reviveschool.comHost a tent event in your city with Tent America - https://awakenthedawn.com/tent-america

    What You're Craving
    69. Going on the Upward Spiral with Dr. Alex Korb (Part 2 of 2)

    What You're Craving

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 35:33


    Dr. Alex Korb is back for part 2 of the Upward Spiral discussion with Molly. In the second half of the interview, Molly and Alex talk all things related to brain-based solutions to overcome the downward spiral.  The two start off the discussion by talking about the power of reframing certain situations in our minds. Dr. Alex describes it as the power to be able to imagine things that don't exist yet and being able to make decisions based on those imagined solutions. With the power of reframing, instead of criticism, our prefrontal cortex can differentiate between feelings and actions and know that they are separate. This segues into Molly's question to Alex. What else can we do to not go through a downward spiral? Dr. Alex talks about several things here, but two important topics of note are the already mentioned separating feelings from action. When we are able to do this, we realize that our feelings are not our reality. This also lends itself to the next suggestion from Dr. Alex, we have to know the difference between things we can control and things that we can't control. As he explains in the episode, literally the second we make a mistake, there is nothing we can do about it. We can't go back and *not* eat the cookie. What we can do is take a moment to become aware and use this mistake to learn from and influence our future decisions. Tune in! Episode Quotes “There are millions of things in the world that are true– most of them are irrelevant.” –Dr. Alex Korb “Negative emotions are good if you use them to take positive action.” –Dr. Alex Korb Key Highlights Deeper parts of our brains follow an animal-type response rather than follow logic, this is why we habitually do the things we do at certain stress points; Our prefrontal cortex and habit circuitry are often at odds with each other when it comes to goal attainment; Reframing is a mindset shift that is the exact same as imaginary play with children, being able to imagine a solution that does not exist and then act on it; Awareness is key when we are wanting an upward spiral, when awareness is present, our analytical prefrontal cortex is able to separate feeling from action; Some upward skills include recognizing thoughts and emotions aren't your reality, sleep, compassion, and realizing what is in our control; When we make a mistake, rather than trigger a downward spiral, we should recommit to what is important to us. About Dr. Alex Korb Dr. Alex Korb has PhD in neuroscience from UCLA, and currently teaches there in the Department of Psychiatry. Outside of the lab he is a personal coach who helps smart, successful, and passionate professionals get unstuck and unlock their brain's peak performance. Dr. Korb is also head coach of the UCLA Women's Ultimate Frisbee team, and has a wealth of experience in yoga and mindfulness, physical fitness, and even stand‑up comedy. He's the author of the amazing book, The Upward Spiral, and a crowd favorite on our podcast. For more info visit alexkorbphd.com or follow @alexkorbphd on twitter, facebook, and instagram. Connect with Alex Instagram: @alexkorbphd Facebook: Alex Korb, PhD Twitter: @alexkorbphd Website: alexkorbphd.com About Molly Carmel Molly is a leading addiction and eating disorder therapist and the founder of the Beacon Program, which offers individual and group solutions to help people break free from their destructive relationships with food and dieting. She is also the author of ‘Breaking up with Sugar' and the host of ‘What You're Craving' Podcast. Connect with Molly Want to spend MORE time together? Me too! Here are all the ways: Instagram: @mollycarmel Facebook: Molly Carmel YouTube: Molly Carmel Free Mini Masterclass: mollycarmel.com/signup Breaking Up with Sugar Course: molly-carmel.mykajabi.com/buws-course Breaking Up with Sugar Facebook Group: facebook.com/groups/buwsbook Monthly Group Coaching: mollycarmel.com/coaching-with-molly Weekly IntenSati Spiritual Fitness Class: mollycarmel.com/intensati

    KYW Newsradio's 1-On-1 with Matt Leon
    ESPN's Jon Crispin treasures his roots: 'Nothing like riding the firetruck' around Pitman, NJ

    KYW Newsradio's 1-On-1 with Matt Leon

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 75:23


    Jon Crispin is a basketball analyst for ESPN and Westwood One. He is a native of Pitman, New Jersey who starred in multiple sports at Pitman High School before going on to play college basketball at Penn State (helping the Nittany Lions reach the Sweet 16 in 2001) and then UCLA. In Episode #136 of “1-on-1 with Matt Leon,” Matt talks with Crispin about his life in basketball. They discuss his broadcasting work, look back at his days starring at Pitman High School, talk about what it was like being teammates with his older brother Joe and much, much more. "1-on-1 with Matt Leon" is a KYW Newsradio original podcast. You can follow the show on Twitter @1on1pod and you can follow Matt @Mattleon1060.

    Ordinarily Extraordinary - Conversations with women in STEM
    Dr. Prineha Narang; Quantum Engineering; Assistant Professor at Harvard University

    Ordinarily Extraordinary - Conversations with women in STEM

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 75:43


    Dr. Prineha Narang is an Assistant Professor at the John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences at Harvard University. She leads an interdisciplinary group at Harvard SEAS at the intersection of computational science, phenomena away from equilibrium, and quantum dynamics in matter. She has won numerous awards, fellowships, and grants including Forbes "30 Under 30". She has a PhD and Master's Degree in Applied Physics from California Institute of Technology (Caltech) and did her post-doctoral work at MIT. Episode NotesDr. Pri Narang shares her experiences as an Assistant Professor at Harvard University, a researcher, and a CTO in the field of Quantum Physics and Quantum Theory. She also shares what that is...and how she got interested in it and her journey from having an interest in Physics - she says she's always been a physicist, even at a young age - to how she started the Narang Lab. She shares what a day in her life is like, how she manages to juggle the many demands of her professional career and run marathons and Ironman Triathlons - she's an absolute rockstar. She also talks about having imposter syndrome and how finding a place that was welcoming led her down her career path.Dr. Narang will join UCLA's faculty in the College of Physical Sciences as the Howard Reiss Chair on July 1st. This information came out after our podcast recording. Information on her transition can be found here. https://www.chemistry.ucla.edu/news/faculty-news-4Music used in the podcast: Higher Up, Silverman Sound StudioAcronyms, Definitions, and Fact CheckQuantum theory describes the behavior of things — particles or energy — on the smallest scale. In addition to wavicles, it predicts that a particle may be found in many places at the same time. (https://www.sciencenewsforstudents.org/article/quantum-world-mind-bogglingly-weird)Quantum mechanics is a fundamental theory in physics that provides a description of the physical properties of nature at the scale of atoms and subatomic particles. It is the foundation of all quantum physics including quantum chemistry, quantum field theory, quantum technology, and quantum information science. Classical physics, the collection of theories that existed before the advent of quantum mechanics, describes many aspects of nature at an ordinary (macroscopic) scale, but is not sufficient for describing them at small (atomic and subatomic) scales. (Wikipedia)Quantum entanglement is the physical phenomenon that occurs when a group of particles are generated, interact, or share spatial proximity in a way such that the quantum state of each particle of the group cannot be described independently of the state of the others, including when the particles are separated by a large distance. The topic of quantum entanglement is at the heart of the disparity between classical and quantum physics: entanglement is a primary feature of quantum mechanics lacking in classical mechanics. (Wikipedia)A dilution refrigerator is a cryogenic device first proposed by Heinz London. Its refrigeration process uses amixture of two isotopes of helium: helium-3 and helium-4. When cooled below approximately 870 millikelvin, themixture undergoes spontaneous phase separation to form a 3He-rich phase and a 3He-poor phase. As with evaporative cooling, energy is required to transport 3He atoms from the 3He-rich phase into the 3He-poorphase. If the atoms can be made to continuously cross this boundary, they effectively cool the mixture. Becausethe 3He-poor phase cannot have less than 6% helium-3 at equilibrium, even at absolute zero, dilution refrigerationcan be effective at very low temperatures. The volume in which this takes place is known as the mixing chamber.  (https://en-academic.com/dic.nsf/enwiki/249751)

    No Laying Up - Golf Podcast
    NLU Podcast, Episode 572: KPMG Women's PGA Championship Preview

    No Laying Up - Golf Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 64:48


    Soly and Randy are on location in DC for this week's KPMG Women's PGA Championship at Congressional. Our preview pod is a three part episode. In part one we check in with Alison Lee and Bronte Law on their outlook for the week ahead, their friendship dating back to their college days at UCLA, dealing with struggles on tour and some off course fun as well. In part two, (33:00) NLU Young Hitter Madelene Sagstrom is back to discuss competing in major championships, the reaction to her appearance on our Week in the Life video, her mental approach to the game and a ton more. Finally, we hear from Congressional superintendent Peter Wendt (55:00) on the changes to the course in the last few years, what it's like to prepare for a major championship and working with Kerry Haigh of the PGA on the course's setup.

    Hacks & Wonks
    Tyler Crone, Candidate for 36th LD State Representative

    Hacks & Wonks

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 52:42


    On this midweek show, Crystal chats with Tyler Crone about her campaign for State Representative in the 36th Legislative District - why she decided to run, how the last legislative session went and her thoughts on addressing issues such as COVID response and recovery, public safety, drug decriminalization, housing affordability and zoning, homelessness and climate change. As always, a full text transcript of the show is available below and at officialhacksandwonks.com. Find the host, Crystal, on Twitter at @finchfrii and find Tyler at @electtylercrone.   Resources Campaign Website - Tyler Crone: https://www.electtylercrone.com/   Transcript [00:00:00] Crystal Fincher: Welcome to Hacks & Wonks. I'm Crystal Fincher, and I'm a political consultant and your host. On this show, we talk with policy wonks and political hacks to gather insight into local politics and policy in Washington State through the lens of those doing the work with behind-the-scenes perspectives on what's happening, why it's happening, and what you can do about it. Full transcripts and resources referenced in the show are always available at officialhacksandwonks.com and in our episode notes. Today, I'm very happy to welcome Tyler Crone to the podcast, who is a candidate for the State Representative seat in the 36th legislative district. Thank you for joining us today. [00:00:48] Tyler Crone: Thank you so much, Crystal, for having me. I'm really delighted to be in conversation with you. [00:00:53] Crystal Fincher: Absolutely. I'm very excited to have this conversation. And starting off, I'm wondering - what made you run? [00:01:00] Tyler Crone: That is the question - I never expected to run for office, I never expected to be a candidate. And yet having been part of the HIV movement and having been part of the HIV response, partnering with governments and the UN and the WHO to rise to the other health and social justice crisis of our time, I felt we could be doing better on COVID-19. And I was concerned and invested - as a parent, as a public health professional - that we needed a spotlight on COVID-19, that we were not through yet, and that that was something unique and extraordinary I had to offer at this moment - and that made me take a second look when my husband asked me if I was gonna run for the open seat. And the piece that really pushed me over the edge into saying - okay, I'm gonna do this, is that my middle daughter is trans, and the campaigns of hate and criminalization against kids like mine and families like my own across this country made it clear to me that the stakes were really high for states like Washington to lead. And I am proud and excited to be in it. And every day that I'm in it, the stakes become more clear. And I just thank you for the chance to be in conversation, to share a little bit more about what I'm hearing, what I'm learning, and what I'm thinking. Thank you. [00:02:22] Crystal Fincher: Absolutely. And so you talked about your background in global health, referencing the HIV movement. What is it that you feel from your background uniquely helps you be prepared to lead today? [00:02:40] Tyler Crone: So there are a couple of elements - one, of that pandemic response and recovery piece from HIV - if there's any roadmap for where we are and what happens next, it is HIV and AIDS. The other piece that that experience has provided me has been the opportunity to see what it looks like, and what leadership and durable solutions are when you partner with the most impacted communities. And it is that being on the front lines of the HIV movement, of seeing how activists - those who are living with HIV, impacted communities - came together with decision makers, policymakers, researchers, funders to transform the reality, right? To advance new medications, to take a whole-of-government approach - where we were thinking about the impacts and legacy of HIV on education, on gender equity, the impacts in association and connection to gender-based violence. There are so many ways in which HIV provides us a roadmap to understand how we have to innovate, how we have to reinforce our public health systems, and how we have to take a whole-of-society, whole-of-community approach to partnership so that we are building back with strength, we are reinforcing our public schools, we are reinforcing our public health infrastructure, and we're thinking holistically about what getting back to healthy means. [00:04:18] Crystal Fincher: There are still a lot of people frustrated at some commonalities with the HIV epidemic, and that right now, it seems like there's a lot of people largely ignoring it, that policy is no longer addressing it, that people have decided to be done and the pandemic is still going on. We just saw headlines today saying that hospitals are saying, "Mask Up," because hospitalizations are increasing, that this is still happening. Should we be doing more right now to be addressing COVID-19, to be protecting people from it. And in the role of a legislator, what would you work to have - what would you work to do to solve this? [00:05:02] Tyler Crone: So I've been thinking a lot about this this morning. Like you, Crystal, I am concerned that the United States of America is the outlier of wealthy nations in the amount of deaths and cases of COVID-19. I remember, over two years ago, when two mentors that I've worked with - Debbie Birx and Tony Fauci - estimated that the worst-case scenario is that we would have 200,000 people lost to COVID. The worst case scenario. And we have now reached a point in time where we have lost over a million people to COVID. Research coming out of the University of California San Francisco is suggesting that those whose jobs were deemed essential, who could not stay at home - died at twice the rate as their peers. We have not even begun to dress or prepare for what's happening in our long-term care facilities and our nursing homes. As we rev up, modelers are suggesting that we will see another surge with cold and flu season this winter, and that is deeply concerning to me. So what are we gonna do? And what could we do better? And what does this moment of opportunity present us? One, it is about reinforcing our public health infrastructure and leadership so that we have coherent messaging. It is about keeping and ensuring that we are surveilling what happens, we're tracking. Right now, we've closed down a lot of our mass testing sites. It's easier to access an at-home test, which is fantastic, a rapid at-home test, but when we test at home, that data doesn't go anywhere. So we don't know what we don't know. And I think that we need to be investing in and looking at those systems of surveillance as one strategy that's proactive. We need to do a very basic learning from what we did well, where we fell short, and how we get ready for what comes next. There are some simple strategies that this moment provides a really unique opportunity for, that would have a much greater impact around air quality. If we were investing in improving indoor air quality, we could be impacting cold and flu season, we could be helping those who have allergies, we could be taking toxins out of the air, as well as mitigating COVID-19. And the thing that's great about improving indoor air quality is that it doesn't require individual masking, it doesn't require each of us to take responsibility for our own health. It provides us a context of health and protection. So that indoor air quality piece is something that I would really be paying attention to, and that there was investment made available from the federal government for. Another piece that I would really pay attention to and a conversation we've not yet started is Long COVID, and how are we recovering from that and what is gonna be the impact of that on our healthcare system and on our communities? The estimates now, even if they're very small of one third to one fifth of the people who have had COVID will have long-term health impacts from that, that's a big problem. And we're not yet getting there of what we're going to do about. And I think that the last piece that I want to underscore here is that there are some really common-sense ways that we can be depoliticizing public health, that we can be ensuring we're up-to-date on access and availability and using the treatments that are available and the preventative tools such as vaccines and boosters, and that we should not be afraid to bring back layered mitigation measures, if and as necessary, to keep our economy open and to ensure our kids don't have any more disruption of school closures. So for example, I still wear my mask when I go grocery shopping, and my kids still wear their masks at school. And we are able to go about, still go out to dinner, still meet up with people, still be part of community. And I just hope that that conversation around COVID-19 is one in the public sphere, because the impacts of who gets disproportionately burdened are those who don't have insurance, are those who are working on the frontlines, are those who are vulnerable with cancer or who are elderly - let alone even talking about how overstretched our healthcare system is already, and how overstretched our nurses are and we're facing a major nursing shortage. [00:09:58] Crystal Fincher: Yeah, we are facing major shortages, so certainly addressing healthcare infrastructure needs, staffing needs are very important. Now we recently came out of a legislative session that - there were some great things that happened in that session. There were also some things that disappointed some folks. What was your evaluation of this past session? [00:10:21] Tyler Crone: I am so proud, as a Washingtonian and as a parent and as someone committed to public health, to see Washington State's leadership on gun safety. Gun violence is a public health emergency - just as we were talking about COVID-19 as a public health emergency, I think that gun safety is top of mind for families and for everyone in our state, as we look at the headlines and as we come through to the end of an intense school year. So I am pleased to see Washington State lead. I would like to see even more leadership and I will be excited to be a partner in that when I am elected and/or as a community advocate and a parent on the outside. I was really excited to see the investment and attention around mental health and school nurses. I know when I'm talking to teachers and principals, that it has been extraordinarily difficult for them to be frontline responders in school settings, it has been extraordinarily difficult for them to navigate the pandemic without school counselors. And now all of that isolation has exacerbated a crisis that we already knew existed - the mental health crisis facing our young people, our kids - and that is top of mind for parents. So that's a piece of the work that happened this past session that I'm excited to see and carry forward into the next. [00:11:53] Crystal Fincher: In that session, there were some rollbacks of some of the highly touted steps taken to increase accountability and transparency and public safety when it comes to law enforcement. Do you agree with the action that was taken this past session? [00:12:15] Tyler Crone: I'm deeply troubled by it. I have been in conversation with the elected officials in my district to better understand how public safety is upheld. I believe that we should all feel - we all deserve to feel safe and we all deserve to be safe. And I feel like I am ill-equipped to understand the nuances of why those decisions were taken. Because as an outside individual, it seems deeply troubling to roll back efforts to address police accountability, to address use of force. And what I see from families who have been impacted by police violence is that they don't see those actions addressing the kind of transparency and safety that they look for. So, I have been told by elected representatives in my district that those were important steps to ensure that local communities could make decisions that would make sense for them, that they were important steps to ensure that someone would come when you call 911. I feel ill-equipped to answer because I am - I want everybody to be safe, I want someone to call when I need help. And I know that communities who are Black and Brown are over-policed. I know that my transgender daughter feels afraid when she sees police, and I think that there has got to be a way that we can advance and uphold public safety, which is top of mind for my district, with accountability and with the deep structural systemic reforms that are needed. [00:14:09] Crystal Fincher: So would you have voted against rolling back those reforms? [00:14:14] Tyler Crone: I'm pretty sure I would have - yeah. I don't - I, again, I wasn't in it, I am not fully informed, but I would, I'm pretty sure I would've voted against rolling back those reforms. Yeah. [00:14:32] Crystal Fincher: We're also sitting here near another anniversary of the War on Drugs, which is largely - has been proven not to be effective. We have spent so much money and have invested so much in that approach, and have not received a return on it. Should possessing drugs be a crime, and should we be treating drug possession and use as a public health problem or a criminal problem? [00:15:06] Tyler Crone: So I wanna agree with you that the War on Drugs has been a failure. It has had incredible harmful impacts. I have worked - in my public health work in HIV sphere - utilizing a harm reduction framework and approach, and looking at issues from a human rights vantage point. I also am a parent and I see that my teen and her peers are inundated with substances that I am concerned about, that they are accessing things that - yeah, I'm alarmed by the substance use amongst my teens' peers. So how do we hold all of this all together? I am keen to learn more about the work that the ACLU - and the initiative and the coalition that they are leading. I have begun preliminary conversations with my friend, Michele Storms, to understand what this initiative is. My husband's organization, the Northwest Immigrant Rights Project, I understand, is also part of the coalition to advance this work. And I'm eager to understand more - how we are not incentivizing substance use, we're not advancing the addiction crisis we face, but that we are addressing this as a human rights and public health concern, rather than an issue of criminalization - because criminalization lands us not with safe, healthy communities. [00:16:48] Crystal Fincher: So, is it fair to say that you are not in favor of criminalization and are exploring other avenues for intervention, or do you think that criminal intervention should be on the table? [00:17:07] Tyler Crone: I think it has to be a nuanced discussion, right? I think my first focus is on using a public health and human rights framework and using a harm reduction approach. I guess I would like to better understand - and this is where I'm on my learning journey as a person running for office - of what are we specifically talking about when we're criminalizing possession? 'Cause I do - it is not helping the person who is using substances and maybe struggling with addiction to criminalize them. It is an extremely costly approach that does not bring us back together and make us healthy and whole, and so I am very keen to learn more and understand those nuances because I - yes I don't think criminalization is an approach that works. [00:18:02] Crystal Fincher: Makes sense. Another thing that's top of mind for a lot of people is housing affordability and addressing people who are living out on the streets and getting them into housing. In specifically, in your role as a state legislator, what would you do to help both housing affordability and to get people off of the street? [00:18:30] Tyler Crone: This is a great question and I thank you for asking it. I was able to be in a conversation yesterday where I was learning more about the middle housing movement as a way to grow density, to strengthen livable, walkable, connected communities that have treelined streets and the amenities that we all love, and as a way to increase the housing stock across price points. So there are a number of different elements here to pull apart. And let me try to start, and maybe you can ask me some follow up questions if I go off-the-rails one way or the other. I believe housing is a human right. We currently do not have enough places for all of our unsheltered neighbors. We do not have enough staff to get people who are on the street into the places that we do have, and we don't fix a problem by moving people from place to place. We need to get people into housing. People need a roof over their head and a door so that they can sleep well at night, and so that they can get back on their feet. Part of addressing our crisis of unsheltered neighbors is also about incorporating and addressing the health, mental health, and addiction needs those communities might have - the behavioral health crisis they face. So that is a key priority of mine as a person who comes at this from a public health perspective. This loops back to not only do we need more housing for people at all price points, and particularly a place for everybody who is on the street to go to call home - we need to be making Seattle more livable, more accessible for everyone. And I think that we can do that with a lot of smarts, and a lot of planning, and more conversation. Because when I listen to my neighbors and I listen to the voters in this district, there is a shared understanding that families and people are getting priced out, that our housing stock shortage is a real problem for our businesses, that families want to live here and benefit from the ability to walk their kid to school, to have playgrounds, to walk their dogs, whatever it is. That seniors want to be able to retire and size down in the neighborhoods that they love, but they can't get out of their big homes 'cause they can't find someplace else to go. So there's a lot of need and a lot of consensus. The elements that I hear and that aligns with what I'm seeing that's been introduced before in the legislature - and what I was getting a more nuanced understanding around yesterday in the session I was part of, with an architect from Berkeley - is that this idea of smart density, of building up arterials, which is already underway is a shared value and source of consensus. The other idea that we need to be building on and building with is building up, in a thoughtful way, our secondary arterials. For example, in the neighborhood I live in - Queen Anne - Third Avenue West has bus connection all the way through it. We could be smartly changing the - building those areas up where we have bus connections, where we could be creating more housing across the price points that make our neighborhoods more inclusive - that enables us to have more great small businesses, more live and work options. And we can be doing so with planning and - yeah, I think that the missing middle piece is a really smart approach. I have heard a few concerns raised around some of the ways in which your land would be, the value of your house would be assessed of your property - based on its fullest potential use - that may make it hard for people who have larger lots to continue to stay in their lots. So we have to look at that and figure it out. But I see that middle housing piece as a thing that we can do with intention and with planning that creates vibrant, walkable, connected communities, where like I do - you walk to your grocery store, you walk your kid to school, you can walk to your providers, you can go pick up your dog food, you can drop your cat at the vet. And if we do that, we can start to tackle the housing crisis we face across the board, where we just don't have enough housing stock for everyone. I also think that as a state legislator, we have to be looking at this outside of Seattle too, right? We have to be taking a kind of regional approach to housing. [00:23:41] Crystal Fincher: So would you have voted for the missing middle bill that was not successful this past session? [00:23:48] Tyler Crone: So this is a piece that - I would like to understand why it failed, I would like to understand why the Seattle City Council has not worked to change zoning in some areas already. I think that the piece that before I'd say - yeah, hooray, I'll go for that - that I'd want to double check and dig in around more is this assessed value of my, of people's property and what that impact would be for our seniors being able to stay in their homes and what it would - for example, I finally, after renting for 15 years, my landlord died in a pandemic and I was finally able to secure my home that I had rented, which is a little fixer upper, off-market. Otherwise I would not have been able - my husband and I have had social justice careers - we would not be able to live in the part of Queen Anne that we do. But we have a nice lot, we have a nice front yard and a nice backyard, and it would be great to be able to put more units on it, but that takes resources, and complex regulation - navigating complex regulations that we can't, we're not in the position to do right now. But I would wanna know what the impact would be on our taxes, on our property taxes. Because I wouldn't wanna drive unintended consequences that would upend the fabric of our strong neighborhoods. [00:25:12] Crystal Fincher: Well, I guess one of the questions there - there are two things that were consistently brought up in opposition to that. On one hand, I think you probably heard a lot of reasons in the session that you were just in, about middle housing - how it is a necessary component of ensuring places stay affordable, preventing them from being more expensive, that supply needs to keep up with demand - when it doesn't do that, prices increase. And an area of tension is - well, should single-family, current single-family areas, be zoned more inclusively? Should we be looking at upzoning single-family areas? A lot of the people who live in those - well, I should not characterize that as a lot, 'cause polling actually tells an interesting story. There are some vocal people - a significant percentage, a significant number, even if the percentage is smaller - of people who are saying - no, I don't want to absorb any density, I don't want any change to my neighborhood, I don't want duplexes and triplexes coming in that fundamentally alters my neighborhood, and I don't like it. On the other side, we have a growing homelessness crisis that is being contributed to by people not being able to afford to stay in their housing, people feeling insecure in the housing that they are currently in. And if we want to keep our neighborhoods livable, there is going to have to be livable and affordable. There's going to have to be action taken soon. And if we're - we can talk about rent control, we can talk about a lot of other things - but one component that seems to be universally acknowledged is that we need to have housing to accommodate the people who are moving into these communities. So I guess starting from that point, would you - do you think we should be more inclusively zoning areas that to date have been, that are single-family areas? [00:27:26] Tyler Crone: So I live in a single-family neighborhood and I see that there are very smart ways that we could be doing more inclusive zoning - that doesn't need - I don't think these have to be necessarily opposed strategies. And this is - what it was so interesting about being part of this session yesterday - learning from other cities across the country, where they have done graduated zoning to create more inclusive zoning, to enable more density, but to do it in a smart way so that we keep - I think people are getting these ideas that more density necessarily means these gigantic buildings or really ripping apart their neighborhoods. What I saw yesterday were models from other cities across the country, where on arterials and secondary arterials that are connected to transportation, we could be inclusively zoning, to be creating more housing options that fit within the character of the neighborhood, but that enable us to have our grandma live next door, or have our teacher be able to live not a 45-minute commute from their public, from the school where they teach, that would enable the young couple to move in or a single professional, or would also - I was talking to a neighbor who is an architect, who lives in a single-family home in Queen Anne, and was saying - I really love the example of Europe, where they have built up that kind of density that doesn't disrupt a neighborhood, but where you can downsize into a smaller flat, and I could still be walkable in my community. So I do think we need to be looking at and changing some of our zoning, at the very minimum. That the housing piece is one that runs through so many issues that are top of mind right now. Climate, right? If we keep making it such that everybody has to have longer and longer commutes or that we're sprawling, we're not taking the climate action we need. We need smart density as a key component of our climate strategy. It is a piece of, as you were saying, addressing the crisis we have where we are not serving those who are on the street, who don't have a place to call home. And it is not enabling if we don't have housing stock for anyone - we're not able to get ahead of or address the homelessness crisis we face. And we've been saying we've been in crisis now for a very long time, nearly a decade. And we need to take that action. The piece that I wanna also bring in here, and this is where I'm interested to dig in with more community councils and be in conversations with neighbors, because I think that there are fears for what will happen that don't have to happen. We could be having these community conversations around what communities want, what they don't want, what the buildings could look like, how we could fit this in that would strengthen the fabric of our neighborhoods, not tear it apart. And one of the things I'm mindful of - I grew up in a city, Charleston, in South Carolina, where we had a lot of fear of change. And so what we ended up creating was a city that had such expensive housing that nobody could - no families could live there anymore, no older people could live there anymore. And we ended up with a city of beautiful homes that people came - wealthy people had as second homes to come visit - but we didn't have those thriving, healthy, safe, vibrant neighborhoods. And I think all of us in Seattle, pretty much, probably love our neighborhood. We love our corner coffee shop, we love getting to know who lives next door - and I am convinced that there has to be a way with conversation, planning, thought, care, and community engagement to get this done. I do have to flag up one of the pieces that came up in this discussion yesterday and that I'm seeing all around me in my neighborhood - is when a small house is bought, it's knocked down and there is a gigantic mansion put up, or really, really expensive town homes. And that's not solving our housing issues and that is not creating more attainable housing. [00:32:07] Crystal Fincher: Well, and it seems like part of that is - there aren't options to build anything in some areas but single-family homes - and true, that is not solving that. And so if more density was an option, that seems like it would be something there. And that at the end of the day, I mean that middle housing bill was stakeholdered, worked on and developed in consultation with developers, business leaders, community members, people from A to Z - unusually so - just to make sure that all of those viewpoints were heard and accepted. But at the end of the day, as with some issues, not everybody is going to agree. And yes, there are impacts that different groups feel - some positive, some negative. And so at the end of the day, you're left with some groups saying - this is key to us being able to remain in our neighborhoods, to age in place, to afford to live near where we work. We have other groups saying I'm afraid of what this may do to my property value, I'm afraid of the type of people who may be moving in the neighborhood, I'm afraid of what this could do in terms of taxation. And you are then in the position to weigh the pros and cons and to decide what brings a bigger benefit to the community. And so in that, I guess looking at the people who are centered in the conversation, or the ultimate or most pressing problem that you're looking to solve, is it appears that what's held this up is that people, usually on the more privileged end of the spectrum, do have concerns. Now, are those concerns wholly unfounded? No. And are those impacts made up? No. In some cases - in other cases - they have been, but there are different impacts. But I guess if the choice is between - hey, let's enable the possibility and have local governments do what they do and make sure that development happens in a way they feel is appropriate for their own city - and allow that possibility rather than not enable more development. How do you process that? [00:34:43] Tyler Crone: I think that there are examples from other cities and examples from inside Seattle that we could be drawing from to make a very compelling case to be growing our density, doing it with smart planning, holding - I love the trees in my neighborhood - holding the green and the gray infrastructure together. And enabling a lot more people to call my beloved neighborhood home. And I actually think, and call me an optimist, but when I start to dig into these details and I triangulate that with the conversations I'm having with real estate agents, with people who have lived here forever, with young people, all sorts of folks - I think we all really love the same things, we recognize the need, and there could be - there's some interesting examples. For example, in Magnolia, there's going to be a grocery - the Albertsons is going to be torn down - it's an older grocery store across from the community center and the pool. And the neighbors of that site worked together with developers - they're going to create a really innovative green building, which is going to be on the cutting edge of good environmental practice, it is going to have units across all the price points, it is going to vastly expand who can live in Magnolia and who can walk to the coffee shops and who can walk to their groceries and whatever, walk to school. And the community's really excited about it. So I think that if we were to do this, I'm still hopeful that with planning and community engagement and thought and care, we can get this done. I think that there has been anxiety perhaps, without necessarily understanding on all sides of what connected, livable, vibrant, more dense communities could look like. And I'm excited to be part of those conversations and figure out - do the hard work of making it work. [00:37:04] Crystal Fincher: Got it. That makes sense. And I guess you brought up a little bit before, but oftentimes we're in similar situations when we talk about addressing our climate crisis - both in terms of reducing greenhouse gas emissions and helping to mitigate climate change, and in reducing the amount of pollutants that are in our communities. And in this state, as with a lot of other places, transportation is responsible for the majority of our emissions. And so when we talk about transportation packages, investments in more transit - and there was record investment in transit and mobility, which was great - something that was not so great is that there was also an increase in highway expansion, which a lot of people find challenges with and obviously creates more emissions and pollution. And so starting off, would you support further transportation packages that did include highway expansion? [00:38:13] Tyler Crone: So, what I am trying to do my research around is to understand what is the alternative to highway expansion. I'm terrified of driving in the Bay Area, I drove my kid from - who graduated Ballard High School - to UCLA, and it was terrifying with all those lanes. And then I do not like driving in LA - again, it gives me heart palpitations - so many lanes and it's like a game of Frogger. So I don't love the idea of expanding our highway lanes. I also love road trips. My family and I - we love going to national parks, we love going to small town America - we love a road trip and I know that there are parts of Washington State that are just terrible in terms of traffic. So I wanna better understand what are the alternatives that we are propping up to get people from place to place and to get goods from place to place that can take the pressure off our highways so that we don't expand them. I love the idea of high-speed rail - I'm not sure where that is today and that's something again - digging into. I love the train, but right now we can't take the train to Vancouver, correct? Isn't that rail line off? But anyway, that's another topic. I do not love the idea of paving over more, but I also see the traffic - yeah - [00:39:48] Crystal Fincher: Well, and giving that expanding highways doesn't actually improve traffic, it makes it worse. And there's been that misconception out there for a long time and planners, and especially recently, there've been a ton of articles and talks and discussions about that. And that, unfortunately adding lanes does not help traffic. But getting cars off of the road does help traffic. So with that, do you think that highway expansion is the right intervention for traffic? And I guess if it's not for traffic, is there a reason that you would have to vote for further highway expansion? [00:40:33] Tyler Crone: So I will say upfront that the ins and outs of the intricacies of this is something that I need to learn more about and be in more conversations, so I can be an informed legislator in this area. My instinct on what I have read to date and being a person who loves transit and loves being in cities, where you can get from place to place without ever getting in a car, a person who loves to walk everywhere and would prefer not to drive. I would love us to be looking at what are those ways we're getting people from place to place that don't require a car, what are the ways that we're getting goods from place to place that don't require our highways. And I remember when I first moved out here nearly 20 years ago, and that every car just had one person in it was shocking. Right? When you come from the East Coast where there is - you can take buses and you can take trains and everything is so connected. And I didn't really learn how to drive until I was almost 30. I think that there are a lot of models to look to where we could be better connected. I also, though - I wanna put in there one point that my kiddo, who takes the bus everywhere - it takes her an hour and a half to visit friends in another part of the city. We don't - our buses, our transit system - I think maybe for folks who don't, who haven't traveled as much in other cities or perhaps as much on the East Coast or in Europe, where you get on your trolley or your tram or your subway and you're getting places and you're going great big distances - I don't think, I don't know if folks necessarily understand that we don't yet have a transit system that is as efficient and as connected as it could be. I also am hearing from older folks - and this goes to a question that you've posed a bit before and a concern that is top of mind - that neighbors are feeling unsafe riding the bus. So that kind of public safety lens of what are we doing to care for people in crisis, care for people who need a place to call home, care for people who need services that we're failing to provide them - that is part of this as well. That's a kind of way off trajectory, but if we're getting more, if we want more people to be taking transit, it needs to be efficient. It needs to be connected and people need to be safe, to feel safe - I should say - riding it. [00:43:15] Crystal Fincher: Yeah. Do you - are you a bus rider? Do you take the bus to, as part of your commutes and travels? [00:43:22] Tyler Crone: I do a little bit. I do a little bit. I have not - I find it sometimes difficult, if I'm trying to get kids or groceries or dogs or what have you, to use public transit in this city as I would wish. I loved - I lived in New York City on the Upper West Side, in the 1990s, and I loved it. And I loved the subway - I would love for Seattle to be - it to be easier to get around our city, because I would love to use transit more regularly when I'm trying to get to - oftentimes, I'm trying to get to doctor's appointments that would just have an hour and a half bus commute to get to. So I end up driving the 20 minutes instead. [00:44:09] Crystal Fincher: That makes sense. And I think - [00:44:12] Tyler Crone: I prefer to take transit. I don't like parking, either - I hate to park. [00:44:14] Crystal Fincher: Yeah, especially with that experience, does that color how you would invest or what you would prioritize given - you're in that situation, I've certainly experienced that situation - I think a lot of people think I would use the bus, I would like to use the bus, driving isn't exactly fun, it's a necessity, and parking can be downright miserable. If you could get from Point A to B without driving, that would be great - but that's directly related to the investments that we're making in transit, the money that's available out of the transportation budget - highway dollars competing with transit dollars. So I guess that kind of begins - [00:44:59] Tyler Crone: Oh yeah - I see your point. [00:45:01] Crystal Fincher: Does that translate into how we need to be looking at funding transit, what we need to be prioritizing, and providing an infrastructure that does make transit an appealing choice for people, an appealing way to get people out of their cars and address the transportation crisis, a way that doesn't force the expense of car ownership, and gas that's sky high right now, on people, and actually have an infrastructure that makes that a doable decision and an attractive decision rather than one that feels burdensome. [00:45:41] Tyler Crone: Absolutely. I absolutely would love better transit. I would love to be able to get around our city without ever having to park or get into my car. Also, speaking of our cars - our cars are like 17 years old and they're both about to die and this is not a time - when you have college tuition, running for office, and a used car is impossible to find and purchase, that you have to replace either of them. So I'm all - I love being able to get from place to place. It solves a lot of the challenges we face, and I think that I do think we need to keep a Yes, and... approach because people are gonna need their - until we're there, people are gonna need their cars to get around occasionally. But I do think we could do a much better job - and that's something that would work for families, it would work for - I keep meeting a lot of seniors who would love to never, they don't feel safe driving, they don't ever wanna be in a car driving, but they don't, they can't get all the places they need or they don't feel comfortable on the bus at this time. So I think part of how we also get - when you go to other cities and everybody takes the, like in New York, everybody takes the subway. The mayor takes the subway, the person who is selling things at a small bodega takes the subway, your kid, your 12 year old kid who's commuting to school takes the subway. Everybody takes the subway and it's a great unifier. It's a great way of having a very dense city function. And it's a - yeah, it's a smart choice. So I, yeah - I love, I would love to be more connected across the City. [00:47:26] Crystal Fincher: I guess as our time is coming to a close today, and as you're speaking to people who are trying to make up their minds about who they want to vote for in this 36th district race, for this open seat with no incumbent and a number of people running for this seat, what would you say about you and what differentiates you from your opponents? And how, what a voter would see that is different, what result would happen that is different that they would be able to see and feel in their lives with you elected as opposed to your opponents? [00:48:05] Tyler Crone: Absolutely. Thank you, Crystal, for this time to be in conversation and for this thoughtful question. There are a few different ways I would look at this question and answer it - of one that my style of leadership is from leading from behind, of creating space for others, and of centering those who are most impacted. I, the piece I have learned from my work in HIV and sexual reproductive health and rights is that when you ask those who are most impacted first, what their solutions, what their priorities are, what they want - when you listen and learn and ask questions first, you get to a much better result at the end. You get to a durable, structural solution. You come up with something that's transformative. And so I think that there is one piece of this that is about my leadership style, which is again from behind, of partnering, of building diverse, inclusive coalitions, of being - a colleague of mine called it a transparent collaborator - and being a convener of someone who brings - I'm not gonna have the answers for everything. And I shouldn't, that's not my job. My job is to bring people together, to bring, to build a big table, to bring diverse expertise around that table, to ensure that those who are most impacted or who have been most harmed or who have been most marginalized, whatever the issue is, are there hand-in-hand working toward the solution. I think that the other piece that I would really say differentiates me, or that I'm maybe I'll just say - instead of differentiating me, I'll just say that I'm super proud of. I'm super proud of having been on the frontlines of addressing some of the biggest and most complex challenges of our time. And I think that that experience from HIV where we had to build a new roadmap, we had to move the pharmaceutical industry to develop the drugs, we had to save lives, and we did - is something I'm super proud of and it's that sense of possibility, and I don't - no matter how big the challenge is, no matter how complex it is, I'm excited to dig in. And I think that the other piece that I would say is that human rights are my heart. And I see myself as a person who lives my values. And so particularly in this moment where we see the rollback of Roe v Wade, and we are gonna need more than ever to be thinking about reproductive choice and agency. When we see these campaigns of criminalization of kids like my own and those impacts on broad, more broadly on LGBTQI youth, my husband is an immigrant. These are the, some of the big fights of our day, where we need Washington State to continue to lead and be a shining beacon. And so that piece of what I've learned from the frontlines of rising to complex challenges, that piece of living my values and rising as a human rights advocate, and that piece of being a mom of three kids and having gotten the great joy and privilege of raising those kids across the neighborhoods of this district - are what set me apart. And I'm excited to partner with the constituents of the 36th to bring positive structural change and for a very, very bright future. And I thank you for this chance to be in dialogue, and I'm eager to continue the dialogue I am having with everyone who calls the 36th home. [00:51:58] Crystal Fincher: I thank you all for listening to Hacks & Wonks on KVRU 105.7 FM. The producer of Hacks & Wonks is Lisl Stadler with assistance from Shannon Cheng. You can find me on Twitter @finchfrii, spelled F-I-N-C-H-F-R-I-I. Now you can follow Hacks & Wonks on iTunes, Spotify, or wherever else you get your podcasts - just type "Hacks and Wonks" into the search bar. Be sure to subscribe to get our Friday almost-live shows and our midweek show delivered to your podcast feed. If you like us, leave a review wherever you listen to Hacks & Wonks. You can also get a full transcript of this episode and links to the resources referenced in the show at officialhacksandwonks.com and in the episode notes. Thanks for tuning in - we'll talk to you next time.