Podcasts about northeastern

Directional divisions marked on a compass

  • 918PODCASTS
  • 1,568EPISODES
  • 41mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Sep 26, 2022LATEST
northeastern

POPULARITY

20152016201720182019202020212022

Categories



Best podcasts about northeastern

Show all podcasts related to northeastern

Latest podcast episodes about northeastern

PUCKS IN DEEP
Episode #120 of Pucks in Deep Feat: Devon Levi & Olivia Knowles

PUCKS IN DEEP

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 91:32


Joining us this week we have Devon Levi, the best goalie in college hockey and Olivia Knowles, former captain for the Gopher Women's Hockey team and current Minnesota White Cap. First, Connor and James announce: College Hockey is BACK. And so are their picks. Next (11:45), Olivia joins the pod to talk about her experience playing for the Gophers, why she loves college hockey, and how to grow the game. Next (30:58) Devon joins the boys to talk about his first full season playing for Northeastern, going to the NCAA tournament, winning the Mike Richter, expectations this year, Hockey East rivalries, what motivates him, and much more! Thanks again to our sponsors: Enduraphin & Draft Kings for helping us grow the great game of college hockey and thank YOU for listening! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Mid-Missouri Goal Lines
Lincoln Blue Tigers Football Podcast [Northeastern State preview, Sept. 24, 2022]

Mid-Missouri Goal Lines

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2022 13:28


Each week, Lincoln football beat writer Trevor Hahn and podcast host Tony Hawley break down everything to do with Blue Tigers football. In this podcast, they take a look back at the Blue Tigers' home loss to Fort Hays State and preview Lincoln's road game against Northeastern State.

The Big Possible
Be Courageous and Unapologetically Loving and Being yourself with Stephanie Thoma | Ep. 121

The Big Possible

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 28:02


Stephanie Thoma is the author of Confident Introvert and helps entrepreneurs become author-speaker coaches. She started her career as a networking strategy coach and event host. She has facilitated over 1,000 events and established a fulfilling career, helping people generate meaningful connections at online and in-person events. Her mission is to help introverts feel confident and establish relationships that catapult them forward in their career.As a connector, Stephanie's views around networking have been featured in Forbes, Business Insider, Entrepreneur, and Thrive Global. She has also been invited to speak at Harvard, Northeastern, and Boston Universities, as well as at international conferences. Stephanie has helped thousands of people celebrate their strengths, step into their authentic confidence, and make meaningful connections.Tune in!Segmented timestamps:[01:16] - The one thing that Stephanie has a passion for[02:28] - How she is making an impact and changing lives through her business and personal projects [04:14] - Taking the biggest risk of her life after an organized and comfortable life that collapsed [11:17] - Habits that Stephanie has cultivated over the years to keep her confidence up[14:07] - Coaching concepts you can put into practice today[17:57] - Stephanie's secrets to bouncing back after hitting a wall[24:28] - Decision-making frameworks that Stephanie has found to be particularly helpful when making decisions [26:43] - How to reach out, connect or support StephanieNotable Quotes:“A lot of us know that they are capable of achieving so much and making an impact. However, there's a fear of taking that first step sometimes.” ~ Noah Scott“Become the change that you wish to see.” ~ Stephanie Thoma"You were not equipped to solve all the problems in the world. Failures are necessary to keep you on track." ~ Noah ScottReach Stephanie at:Website: https://thestephaniemichelle.com/LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/stephaniemthomaFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/stephaniemthomaInstagram: https://instagram.com/stephaniemthomaYouTube: https://youtube.com/user/songsbysteph/?sub_confirmation=1Get Stephanie's book:Confident Introvert: A practical guide to connecting with others at networking events and beyond: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B089ZZ6T58/Get more from The Big Possible show:Website: https://www.thebigpossible.com   Follow us on social: @follownoah @thebigpossibleRSVP for our next epic retreat here 

Venture Unlocked: The playbook for venture capital managers.
Discovering talent before it's obvious, the challenges of raising a fund I without a traditional pedigree, and startup fund culture with Eric Tarczynski of Contrary

Venture Unlocked: The playbook for venture capital managers.

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 42:01


Follow me @samirkaji for my thoughts on the venture market, with a focus on the continued evolution of the VC landscape.This week we are joined by Eric Tarczynski, Founder and Managing Partner of Contrary, a firm backed by founders of Tesla, Reddit, Facebook, Airbnb, and many more iconic companies. The firm acts as a full stack platform to identify and support entrepreneurs often before they are starting a company. Contrary has raised nearly $100MM across funds. In our discussion Eric and I covered their thesis on talent, how he was able to raise a first fund without the normal background LPs often look for, and how they use culture to attract top talent. First, a word from our sponsor:Allocate is the digital operating system for investors looking to build and manage world-class private portfolios within venture capital and other technology-focused private assets.Despite the enormous growth of the private markets and the rapid increase of retail demand for private alternatives, investing in the highest quality private assets within the innovation sector remains inaccessible and opaque.Go to allocate.co to apply to be an early-access member and join 500+ active Allocate users.About Eric Tarczynski:Eric Tarcynski is the Founder and Managing Partner of Contrary, a venture fund that identifies and invests in the world's top talent. He took on $50,000 in debt to get Contrary off the ground, sleeping in the back seat of a rental car or on friends' couches. Prior to Contrary, Eric was a co-founder and operator at numerous startups. He got his undergrad degree at Northeastern.In this episode we discuss:01:11 Eric's journey to tech and startups04:42 How Eric's non-traditional background affected his first fundraise08:27 What happened in the two years between Fund I and Fund II that got his from a sub-$10MM fund to a $75MM fund11:09 Concrete factors that LPs weighed when investing in Contrary14:01 Why Contrary avoided “logo hunting”16:11 Contrary's unique thesis and why their model is the endgame for going earlier in the investing process19:00 Why Contrary has such a high NPS21:09 How Contrary invests in individuals “pre-company”24:10 The software platform that Contrary is building to help identify founders26:44 Building a platform without a lot of carry28:46 What Eric's schedule looks like as an emerging manager30:57 Aspects of VC that Eric underestimated34:04 The advice he would give himself five years ago35:36 Would he have done anything differently?36:36 Why you do need some name brand consensus investments37:35 The best advice he gives to emerging managers39:48 The importance of persistence as a competitive advantageI'd love to know what you took away from this conversation with Eric. Follow me @SamirKaji and give me your insights and questions with the hashtag #ventureunlocked. If you'd like to be considered as a guest or have someone you'd like to hear from (GP or LP), drop me a direct message on Twitter.Podcast Production support provided by Agent Bee Agency This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit ventureunlocked.substack.com

Nate Shelman Show
Porn In Idaho Schools? We're Not Seeing It.

Nate Shelman Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 90:25


The Idaho Freedom Foundation came out with an article yesterday that said the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare was paying for a sex education program that involved "porn literacy." Nate talked to Anna Miller from the Idaho Freedom Foundation about that article. Nate also talked to several teachers from across the valley who teach different grade levels to ask if they have taught this or seen it taught in their schools. In other local education news, The West Ada School District Board voted against an emergency levy. Do you have an issue with a school district raising taxes without your input? Moving into national news, today flights landed in Martha's Vineyard and the passengers were all illegal immigrants. Do you think that Governors of border states sending immigrants to North-Eastern states is a good or bad thing? (9/15/22)

Hunt Suburbia Podcast
Ep. 077: Lanny Benoit, Landon Benoit & Jake Bennett Live From Huntstock!

Hunt Suburbia Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 76:12


In his first ever podcast appearance Landon Benoit joins his father Lanny Benoit to talk about memories of his grandfather, good times on the track, and more. Joining us as a co-host on this one is Jake Bennett, a good tracker in his own right. Huntstock is a 3-day festival for Northeastern hunters celebrating our rich hunting culture. 

This Morning With Gordon Deal
This Morning with Gordon Deal September 15, 2022

This Morning With Gordon Deal

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022


US railroads, unions reach deal tentative as strike deadline loomed, Northeastern employee injured by package might have staged incident, and ways a national railroad strike could impact you.

Practice Disrupted with Evelyn Lee and Je'Nen Chastain

Episode 088: Latina Voices in Practice “Why is it that the largest community of color within the US still makes up such a small percentage of the profession?” ~ACSA Hispanic & Latinx in Architecture Four leaders in the profession share their diverse perspectives on race, equity, and architecture. Practice Disrupted is committed to elevating conversations on justice, equity, diversity, and inclusion to teach, empower, and build greater awareness across the industry. Building from prior diversity conversations, this week we learn about Hispanic & Latinx in Architecture. Guest: Venesa Alicea-Chuqui, AIA, NOMA, LEED AP BD+C, WELL AP, an Architect, Educator and Advocate, is Founding Principal of NYVARCH Architecture, a NYC based collaborative Architectural Practice focused on building community and equity through design.  With over 15 years of experience designing multi-family sustainable affordable, and supportive housing developments and civic projects, she is committed to working with local communities to develop good design, both sustainable and socially conscious. She's the Vice Chair of Outreach to the https://network.aia.org/communities/community-home?communitykey=5dccd29e-2089-48ae-8452-471d5068b76d&tab=groupdetails (AIA Small Firm Exchange) and President of the Architecture Alumni Group of the Alumni Association of the https://www.ccny.cuny.edu/ (City College of New York), her alma mater (B.Arch ‘05), where she has also taught the Coop Internship and Professional Practice classes. Committed to design justice in the built environment, she's an active contributor to https://darkmatteruniversity.org/ (Dark Matter University), https://www.dapcollective.com/ (Design as Protest), and a former co-chair to the https://www.aiany.org/committees/diversity-inclusion-committee/ (AIANY Diversity & Inclusion) and https://www.aiany.org/committees/emerging-new-york-architects/ (Emerging New York Architects) committees. She is past chair of the AIANY Puerto Rico Resiliency task force, an active member of the AIANY Planning and Urban Design Committee, and a 2019 Fellow of the https://www.communitydesign.org/ (Association for Community Design). Siboney Diaz-Sánchez is an affordable housing advocate and the community engagement administrator for the City of San Antonio's Neighborhood and Housing Services Department. She serves as a https://www.noma.net/e3/ (NOMA) Empowerment Committee Co-Chair, organizes with https://www.dapcollective.com/ (Design As Protest) Planning and Policy Committee, and is proud to teach Community Practice at The Boston Architectural College. In 2021 she joined the https://www.communitydesign.org/about (Association for Community Design) board of directors.  Prior to returning to San Antonio Siboney was an Enterprise Rose Fellow and project/design manager at https://www.oppcommunities.org/ (Opportunities Communities) in the Boston area working for two non-profit community development corporations, https://theneighborhooddevelopers.org/ (The Neighborhood Developers) and https://nuestracdc.org/ (Nuestra Comunidad).  While in Boston she developed design standards for affordable housing, helped secure funding for a low income housing tax credit housing development, led a community engagement process for a public arts park and served on the https://www.architects.org/ (Boston Society of Architects) board of directors. Siboney insists creative fields are viable vehicles for social change and believes in just redistribution of systemic power through design. She is committed to prioritizing community voices in design processes. She is a licensed architect in the state of Texas and holds her Bachelor of Architecture from https://aap.cornell.edu/academics/architecture (Cornell University).   Vanessa Smith Torres is a Puerto Rican born Architect based in Miami, FL. Vanessa received a Bachelors from https://camd.northeastern.edu/program/architecture-m-arch/ (Northeastern...

News Headlines in Morse Code at 10 WPM

Morse code transcription: vvv vvv Is Biden responsible for dip in inflation Presidents victory lap is premature, experts say Senator Lindsey Graham files national abortion ban legislation WHAS11 Michelin awards first stars to 13 Toronto restaurants William and Harry to join King Charles in silent procession behind Queens coffin Iowa girl who said she killed the man who raped her receives sentence KCCI Heres what Russian soldiers left behind when they withdrew from Izyum New Hampshire, Rhode Island primary election results and news for 2022 midterms Northeastern explosion Package explodes on Boston campus 1 injured, FBI involved Klopp unimpressed by Boehlys All Star game plan Clarence House staff told jobs are at risk Ken Starr, independent counsel who pursued Clinton, dies Ukraine war Accounts of Russian torture emerge in liberated areas Chinas Xi to meet Putin in first foreign trip since pandemic Herbert Jacobson killed during WWII attack on Pearl Harbor buried Kharkiv offensive Ukraine targets Donbas as advance gathers pace Russia covertly spent 300m to meddle abroad US Prominent Georgia attorney Page Pate drowns in rip current while swimming with son West Virginia Legislature passes abortion ban with few exceptions US markets sink on unexpectedly high inflation Ukraine war EU chief sets out plans to tackle energy crisis

News Headlines in Morse Code at 20 WPM

Morse code transcription: vvv vvv Iowa girl who said she killed the man who raped her receives sentence KCCI Northeastern explosion Package explodes on Boston campus 1 injured, FBI involved Herbert Jacobson killed during WWII attack on Pearl Harbor buried Ken Starr, independent counsel who pursued Clinton, dies Russia covertly spent 300m to meddle abroad US Is Biden responsible for dip in inflation Presidents victory lap is premature, experts say Ukraine war Accounts of Russian torture emerge in liberated areas West Virginia Legislature passes abortion ban with few exceptions Ukraine war EU chief sets out plans to tackle energy crisis Heres what Russian soldiers left behind when they withdrew from Izyum Clarence House staff told jobs are at risk Senator Lindsey Graham files national abortion ban legislation WHAS11 New Hampshire, Rhode Island primary election results and news for 2022 midterms Klopp unimpressed by Boehlys All Star game plan William and Harry to join King Charles in silent procession behind Queens coffin Kharkiv offensive Ukraine targets Donbas as advance gathers pace Prominent Georgia attorney Page Pate drowns in rip current while swimming with son Michelin awards first stars to 13 Toronto restaurants Chinas Xi to meet Putin in first foreign trip since pandemic US markets sink on unexpectedly high inflation

News Headlines in Morse Code at 25 WPM

Morse code transcription: vvv vvv Kharkiv offensive Ukraine targets Donbas as advance gathers pace New Hampshire, Rhode Island primary election results and news for 2022 midterms Russia covertly spent 300m to meddle abroad US Klopp unimpressed by Boehlys All Star game plan Senator Lindsey Graham files national abortion ban legislation WHAS11 Heres what Russian soldiers left behind when they withdrew from Izyum Iowa girl who said she killed the man who raped her receives sentence KCCI Herbert Jacobson killed during WWII attack on Pearl Harbor buried Ukraine war Accounts of Russian torture emerge in liberated areas Prominent Georgia attorney Page Pate drowns in rip current while swimming with son Clarence House staff told jobs are at risk West Virginia Legislature passes abortion ban with few exceptions Chinas Xi to meet Putin in first foreign trip since pandemic Northeastern explosion Package explodes on Boston campus 1 injured, FBI involved Ukraine war EU chief sets out plans to tackle energy crisis Michelin awards first stars to 13 Toronto restaurants US markets sink on unexpectedly high inflation William and Harry to join King Charles in silent procession behind Queens coffin Ken Starr, independent counsel who pursued Clinton, dies Is Biden responsible for dip in inflation Presidents victory lap is premature, experts say

News Headlines in Morse Code at 15 WPM

Morse code transcription: vvv vvv Michelin awards first stars to 13 Toronto restaurants Herbert Jacobson killed during WWII attack on Pearl Harbor buried Ukraine war EU chief sets out plans to tackle energy crisis Ukraine war Accounts of Russian torture emerge in liberated areas Ken Starr, independent counsel who pursued Clinton, dies Russia covertly spent 300m to meddle abroad US Klopp unimpressed by Boehlys All Star game plan Senator Lindsey Graham files national abortion ban legislation WHAS11 Chinas Xi to meet Putin in first foreign trip since pandemic William and Harry to join King Charles in silent procession behind Queens coffin Kharkiv offensive Ukraine targets Donbas as advance gathers pace Heres what Russian soldiers left behind when they withdrew from Izyum Prominent Georgia attorney Page Pate drowns in rip current while swimming with son Is Biden responsible for dip in inflation Presidents victory lap is premature, experts say New Hampshire, Rhode Island primary election results and news for 2022 midterms Northeastern explosion Package explodes on Boston campus 1 injured, FBI involved US markets sink on unexpectedly high inflation Clarence House staff told jobs are at risk West Virginia Legislature passes abortion ban with few exceptions Iowa girl who said she killed the man who raped her receives sentence KCCI

Newshour
Kyiv re-captures northeastern villages: A turning point in Ukraine?

Newshour

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 48:34


Over the last 48 hours there have been gains on the Ukrainian side, particularly in the north east. The Ukrainian army says it has taken back another twenty villages. The defence minister Oleksii Reznikov has said the priority now is to secure the territorial gains made in a week of rapid advances in the Kharkiv region. The Russian army abandoned equipment and ammunition as it withdrew from areas it had held since the first weeks of the war. The head of the Russian administration in the Kharkiv region, Vitaly Ganchev, said Ukrainian forces had outnumbered Russian by eight to one and so Russia decided to withdraw. Also on the programme: three days after the death of his mother, her Majesty the Queen, King Charles the III, addresses Members of Parliament and Peers in Westminster Hall; and we hear about the outcome of elections in Sweden, where an anti-immigration party with neo nazi roots has done very well. (Photo: A Ukrainian serviceman pets a dog after return from the village of Udy, recently liberated by Ukrainian Armed Forces, amid Russia's attack on Ukraine, in the town of Zolochiv, Kharkiv region, Ukraine September 12, 2022. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich)

PBS NewsHour - World
News Wrap: Ukraine pushes Russian troops back in northeastern region

PBS NewsHour - World

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2022 4:15


In our news wrap Saturday, a Ukrainian counteroffensive has made major gains against Russian forces in the northeastern part of the country, Charles III was ceremonially proclaimed king in the U.K., the DOJ and Donald Trump's legal team have each proposed independent arbiter candidates to review the material found at Mar-a-Lago, and Carlos Alcaraz defeated American Frances Tiafoe at the U.S. Open. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
News Wrap: Ukraine pushes Russian troops back in northeastern region

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2022 4:15


In our news wrap Saturday, a Ukrainian counteroffensive has made major gains against Russian forces in the northeastern part of the country, Charles III was ceremonially proclaimed king in the U.K., the DOJ and Donald Trump's legal team have each proposed independent arbiter candidates to review the material found at Mar-a-Lago, and Carlos Alcaraz defeated American Frances Tiafoe at the U.S. Open. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Politics
News Wrap: Ukraine pushes Russian troops back in northeastern region

PBS NewsHour - Politics

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2022 4:15


In our news wrap Saturday, a Ukrainian counteroffensive has made major gains against Russian forces in the northeastern part of the country, Charles III was ceremonially proclaimed king in the U.K., the DOJ and Donald Trump's legal team have each proposed independent arbiter candidates to review the material found at Mar-a-Lago, and Carlos Alcaraz defeated American Frances Tiafoe at the U.S. Open. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Sexy Unique Podcast
TEASER: Never Trust A Monty

Sexy Unique Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 1:52


On this week's bonus, the bone-chilling saga of Addison Rae's parents' divorce and more in-depth discussions about the Manti Te'o Netflix doc. Meanwhile, an EXPLOSIVE Reader Mail segment continues to be #Loadtember heavy, featuring a Jersey Shore Cougar and a proud Northeastern glory hole devotee who apologizes to Lara. Join the SUP Patreon to hear this glorious episode in its entirety. Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

From Boomers to Millennials: A Modern US History Podcast
Episode 17B - Henry Cabot Lodge Jr.: 10-Minute Profile

From Boomers to Millennials: A Modern US History Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 14:09 Transcription Available


This episode debuts a new format of very brief profiles of interesting historical figures that we haven't given sufficient attention to in regular episodes. Henry Cabot Lodge Jr. is a prime example of the Northeastern elites who had a disproportionate (albeit declining) amount of power in mid-20th Century America. Both of Lodge Junior's parents were descended from Republican Senators, so you could say politics was in their blood. Lodge launched a successful political career during the 1930s. When Lodge, who was a Moderate Republican,  lost his Massachusetts US Senate seat to John F. Kennedy in 1952, he pivoted to a diplomatic career. He became US Ambassador to the United Nations under President Eisenhower. He then served as Richard Nixon's running-mate in the razor-thin 1960 presidential election. After losing that race, his former opponent President Kennedy appointed Lodge to serve as Ambassador to South Vietnam, & Lodge remained involved in diplomatic negotiations in Southeast Asia for the remainder of the disastrous Vietnam conflict. The Lodge family is a prime example of a New England WASP political dynasty, one that never achieved the glamour & fame gained by the Kennedys, but which nevertheless wielded considerable power.Support the show

Augmented - the industry 4.0 podcast
Episode 96: The People Side of Lean

Augmented - the industry 4.0 podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 49:37


Augmented reveals the stories behind the new era of industrial operations, where technology will restore the agility of frontline workers. The topic is "The People Side of Lean." Our guest is Jeffrey Liker, academic, consultant, and best-selling author of The Toyota Way (https://www.amazon.com/Toyota-Way-Management-Principles-Manufacturer/dp/B09BDC3525/ref=sr_1_1?crid=2JABTVWQBAZC8&keywords=the+toyota+way&qid=1661872838&sprefix=the+toyot%2Caps%2C107&sr=8-1). In this conversation, we talk about how to develop internal organizational capability and problem-solving skills on the frontline. If you liked this show, subscribe at augmentedpodcast.co (https://www.augmentedpodcast.co/). If you liked this episode, you might also like Episode 84 on The Evolution of Lean (https://www.augmentedpodcast.co/84). Augmented is a podcast for industry leaders, process engineers, and shop floor operators, hosted by futurist Trond Arne Undheim (https://trondundheim.com/) and presented by Tulip (https://tulip.co/). Follow the podcast on Twitter (https://twitter.com/AugmentedPod) or LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/company/75424477/). Trond's Takeaway: Lean is about motivating people to succeed in an industrial organization more than it is about a bundle of techniques to avoid waste on a factory production line. The goal is to have workers always asking themselves if there is a better way. Transcript: TROND: Welcome to another episode of the Augmented Podcast. Augmented brings industrial conversations that matter, serving up the most relevant conversations on industrial tech. Our vision is a world where technology will restore the agility of frontline workers. In this episode of the podcast, the topic is the People Side of Lean. Our guest is Jeffrey Liker, academic, consultant, and best-selling author of The Toyota Way. In this conversation, we talk about how to develop internal organizational capability, problem-solving skills on the frontline. Augmented is a podcast for industry leaders, process engineers, and shop floor operators, hosted by futurist Trond Arne Undheim and presented by Tulip. Jeffrey, how are you? Welcome to the podcast. JEFFREY: Thank you. TROND: So I think some people in this audience will have read your book or have heard of your book and your books but especially the one that I mentioned, Toyota. So I think we'll talk about that a little bit. But you started out as an engineering undergrad at Northeastern, and you got yourself a Ph.D. in sociology. And then I've been reading up on you and listening to some of the stuff on the musical side of things. I think we both are guitarists. JEFFREY: Oh, is that right? TROND: Yeah, yeah, classical guitar in my case. So I was wondering about that. JEFFREY: So I play also a classical guitar now. I played folk and rock earlier when I was young. But for the last more than ten years, I've been only studying classical guitar. TROND: Well, so then we share a bunch of hours practicing the etude, so Fernando Sor, and eventually getting to the Villa-Lobos stuff. So the reason I bring that up, of course, beyond it's wonderful to talk about this kind of stuff with, you know, there aren't that many classical guitarists out there. But you said something that I thought maybe you could comment on later. But this idea of what happened to you during your studies of classical guitar actually plays into what you later brought into your professional life in terms of teaching you something about practicing in particular ways. So I hope you can get into that. But obviously, you've then become a professor. You are a speaker and an advisor, and an author of this bestseller, The Toyota Way. Now you run some consulting. And I guess I'm curious; this was a very, very brief attempt at summarizing where you got into this. What was it that brought you into manufacturing in the first place? I mean, surely, it wasn't just classical guitar because that's not a linear path. [laughs] JEFFREY: No. So for undergraduate, I had basically studied industrial engineering because I didn't really know what I wanted to do with my life. And my father was an engineer. And then I literally took a course catalog and just started reading the descriptions of different kinds of engineering. And industrial engineering was the only one that mentioned people. And in theory, industrial engineering is a systems perspective which integrates people, materials, methods, machines, the four Ms. And in the description from Northeastern University, they said it's as much about human organization as it is about tools and techniques. So that appealed to me. When I got to Northeastern...I was not a particularly good high school student. So I didn't have a lot of choices of what colleges I went to, so Northeastern was pretty easy to get into. But they had a cooperative education program where you go to school, and you work. You go back and forth between school and work and had a pretty elaborate system for setting you up with jobs. I got one of the better jobs, which was at a company called General Foods Corporation at the time, and they make things like Jell-O, and Gravy Train dog food, and Birds Eye vegetables, and a lot of other household names, Kool-Aid, all automated processes, even at that time in the 1970s. And they had been experimenting with something called socio-technical systems, which is supposed to be what I was interested in, which is bringing together the social and technical, which no one at Northeastern University had any interest in except me. But I was very interested in this dog food plant where they were written up as a case study pioneer. And the basic essence of it was to give groups of people who are responsible, for example, for some automated processes to make a certain line of Gravy Train dog food, give them responsibility for all their processes, and they called them autonomous workgroups. And what we try to do is as much as possible, give them all the responsibility so they can work autonomously without having to go and find the engineer or deal with other support functions, which takes time and is kind of a waste. So that fascinated me. I studied it. I wrote papers about it even in courses where it didn't fit. But the closest I could get to the social side was through sociology courses which I took as soon as I was able to take electives, which was about my third year. And I got to know a sociology professor closely and ultimately decided to get a Ph.D. in sociology and did that successfully, published papers in sociology journals at a pretty high level. And then discovered it was really hard to get a job. TROND: Right. [laughs] JEFFREY: And there happened to be an advertisement from an industrial engineering department at University of Michigan for someone with a Ph.D. in a social science and an undergraduate degree in industrial engineering. And I was probably the only person in the world that fit the job. And they were so excited to hear from me because they had almost given up. And I ended up getting that job quickly then getting to Michigan excited because it's a great university. I had a low teaching load. They paid more than sociology departments. So it was like a dream job. Except once I got there, I realized that I had no idea what I was supposed to be doing [chuckles] because it wasn't a sociology department. And I had gotten away from industry. In fact, I was studying family development and life's course development, and more personal psychology and sociology stuff. So I was as far away as I could be. So I had to kind of figure out what to do next. And fortunately, being at Michigan and also being unique, a lot of people contacted me and wanted me to be part of their projects. And one of them was a U.S.-Japan auto study comparing the U.S.-Japan auto industry going at the same time as a study at MIT and Harvard that ultimately led to the book The Machine That Changed the World, which defined lean manufacturing. So this was sort of a competitive program. And they asked me to be part of it, and that's what led to my learning about Toyota. I mean, I studied Toyota, Nissan, Mazda mainly and compared them to GM, Ford, and Chrysler. But it was clear that Toyota was different and special. And ultimately, then I learned about the Toyota Production System. And from my perspective, not from people in Toyota, but from my perspective, what they had done is really solve the problem of socio-technical systems. Because what I was seeing at General Foods was workers who were responsible for technical process and then were given autonomy to run the process, but there was nothing really socio-technical about it. There was a technical system, and then there was social system autonomous work groups and not particularly connected in a certain way. But the Toyota Production System truly was a system that was designed to integrate people with the technical system, which included things like stamping, and welding, and painting, which were fairly automated as well as assembly, which is purely manual. And Toyota had developed this back in the 1940s when it was a lone company and then continued to evolve it. And the main pillars are just-in-time and built-in quality. They have a house, and then the foundation is stable and standardized processes. And in the center are people who are continuously improving. Now, the socio-technical part the connection is that just-in-time for Toyota means that we're trying to flow value to the customer without interruption. So if what they do is turn raw materials into cars that you drive, then anything that's turning material into a component or car physically is value-added, and everything else is waste. And so things like defects where you have to do rework are waste. And machines are shut down, so we have to wait for the machines to get fixed; that's waste. And inventory sitting in piles doing nothing is waste. So the opposite of waste is a perfect process. And Toyota also was smart enough, and all that they figured out was more like folk learning or craft learning. It was learning from doing and experience and common sense. And they didn't particularly care about linking it to academic theories or learning from academic theories, for that matter. So their common sense view is that the world is complicated. Humans are really bad at predicting the future. So the best we can do is to get in the ballpark with what we think is a good process and then run it and see how it fails. And then the failures are what lead to then the connection of people who have to solve the problems through creative thinking. So that was the integration that I did not see before that. TROND: Just one thing that strikes me...because nowadays, comparing the U.S. or Europe and Asia in terms of business practices, it's sort of like, oh, of course, you have to compare them because they are culturally different. But it strikes me that in the automotive industry, was it immediately really clear to you at the outset that there would be such striking differences between the Japanese and the U.S. auto industry? Or is that actually something that had to be studied? Or was it something that was known, but no one really knew exactly what the differences were? JEFFREY: So it wasn't like the American auto companies figured out that if they get good at using chopsticks, they'll be good at making cars. They weren't looking for something peculiar in Japanese culture. But they were addressing the more general problem, which was that Japanese companies were making small fuel-efficient cars at low cost with high quality. And none of the American companies could do that. The costs were higher. The quality was terrible compared to Japan. They took a long time to do everything, including developing cars. So somehow, the Japanese were purported, they weren't convinced this was true, but according to the evidence, the Japanese were purported to be better at just about everything. And the Americans wanted to know why particularly. And at that time, there had been an oil crisis, and there was a demand for small cars. The real question they were interested in is how could they make small cars that were competitive with the Japanese? So they had to understand what the Japanese were doing. Now, they realized that some of what the Japanese were doing were purely technical things that had nothing to do with culture. And then there was also a level of attention to detail and motivation that maybe was, for some reason, peculiar to Japan. But they needed to figure out how to replicate it in the United States. And then, in addition to that, they had Americans like Dr. Deming, who had gone to Japan and taught the Japanese supposedly quality control methods. And Japanese companies had taken quality control methods that were created in the United States more seriously than the American companies. So part of it was relearning what came from America to Japan and got done better. So it wasn't necessarily this kind of strange place, and how can we emulate this strange culture? TROND: Right. But that becomes then your challenge then, right? Because what you then discover is that your field is immensely important to this because what you then went on to do is...and I guess part of your consulting work has been developing internal organizational capability. These are skills that particular organizations, namely Toyota, had in Japan. So you're thinking that this then became...it's like a learning process, the Japanese learned some lessons, and then the whole rest of the automotive industry then they were trying to relearn those lessons. Is that sort of what has been happening then in the 30 years after that? JEFFREY: Yeah, the basic question was, why are they so good? Why are we so bad? And how can we get better in America? Then there were lots of answers to that question coming from different people in different places. My particular answer was that Toyota especially had developed a socio-technical system that was extremely effective, that was centered on people who were developed to have the skills of problem-solving and continuous improvement. And while the study was going on, they were doing a study out of MIT that led to The Machine That Changed the World. And around that same time, a joint venture between Toyota and General Motors had been formed called NUMMI. It was in California. And in their first year, it was launched in 1983, and in the first year, they had taken what was the worst General Motors plant in the world, with the worst attendance, the worst morale, workers who were fighting against supervisors every day, including physically fighting with them, terrible quality, and General Motors had closed the plant because it was so bad. And then, in the joint venture, they reopened the plant and took back 80% of the same workers who were like the worst of the worst of American workers. And within a year, Toyota had turned the plant around so that it was the best in North America with the best workers. TROND: That's crazy, right? Because wouldn't some of the research thesis in either your study or in the MIT study, The Machine That Changed the World, would have to have been around technology or at least some sort of ingenious plan that these people had, you know, some secret sauce that someone had? Would you say that these two research teams were surprised at finding that the people was the key to the difference here or motivating people in a different way? JEFFREY: Well, frankly, I think I probably had a better grasp that people were really the key than most other researchers because of my background and my interest in human-centered manufacturing. So I was kind of looking for that. And it was what the Toyota people would say...whenever they made a presentation or whenever you interviewed them, they would say, "People are kind of distracted by the tools and methods, but really at the center are people." And generally, most people listening to them didn't believe it, or it didn't register. Because Toyota did have cool stuff, like, for example, something called a kanban system, which is how do you move material around in the factory? They have thousands of parts that have to all be moved and orchestrated in complicated ways. And Toyota did it with physical cards. And the concept was a pulse system that the worker; when they see that they're getting low on parts, they take a card and they post it. They put it in a box, and then the material handler picks it up. And they said, okay, they need another bin of these. On my next route, I'll bring a bin of whatever cards I get. So they were replenishing the line based on a signal from the operator saying, "I need more." So it was a signal from the person who knows best what they need. And it also, from Toyota's point of view, put the employee in the driver's seat because now they're controlling their supply in addition to controlling their work process. And it didn't require that you predict the future all the time because who knows what is happening on the line and where they're backed up, and where they maybe have too many parts, and they don't need more? But the worker knows. He knows when he needs it and when he doesn't. It was kind of an ingenious system, but the fact that you had these cards moving all over the factory and thousands of parts are moving just to the right place at the right time based on these cards, that was fascinating. So a lot of the consumers were more interested in that than they were in the people aspect, even though Toyota kept talking about the people aspect. TROND: But so this is my question, then there was more than one element that they were doing right. JEFFREY: There were multiple elements, yeah. TROND: There were multiple elements. Some of them were structural or visual, famously. JEFFREY: Right. TROND: But you then started focusing, I guess, on not just the people aspect, but you started structuring that thinking because the obvious question must have been, how can we do some of this ourselves? And I guess that's my question is once you and the team started figuring out okay, there are some systematic differences here in the way they motivate people, handle the teams, but also structure, honestly, the organizational incentives minute by minute, how then did you think about transferring this? Or were you, at this point, just really concerned about describing it? JEFFREY: Like I said, I was kind of unusual in my background, being somewhere between industrial engineering and sociology and being in industrial engineering departments. So maybe I wasn't as constrained by some of the constraints of my academic colleagues. But I never believed this whole model that the university gathers information structures that formulates it, then tells the world what to do. I never thought that made any sense. And certainly, in the case of lean, it didn't, and it wasn't true. So the way that companies were learning about this stuff was from consultants, largely, and from people who had worked for Toyota. So anybody who had worked for Toyota, even if they were driving a forklift truck, in some cases, suddenly became a hot commodity. I consulted to Ford, and they were developing the Ford Production System. They were using a consulting firm, and all their consulting firm's business was to poach people from Toyota and then sell them as consultants to other companies. And that company literally had people every day of the week who were in their cars outside the gates of Toyota. And as people came out, they would start talking to them to try to find people that they could hire away from Toyota. TROND: It's funny to hear you talking about that, Jeff, right? Because in some way, you, of all people, you're a little bit to blame for the fame of Toyota in that sense. I mean, you've sold a million books with The New Toyota -- JEFFREY: Well, that was -- TROND: I'm just saying it's a phenomenon here that people obsess over a company, but you were part of creating this movement and this enormous interest in this. [laughs] JEFFREY: I didn't feel that that was...I personally had a policy because I had a consulting company too. So I personally had a policy that I would not hire somebody away from Toyota unless they were leaving anyway. That was my personal policy. But the important point was that there were a lot of really well-trained people coming out of Toyota who really understood the whole system and had lived it. And they could go to any other company and do magic, and suddenly things got better. [laughs] And what they were doing was setting up the structures and the tools, and they also were engaging the people and coaching the people. They were doing both simultaneously, and that's how they were trained. Toyota had sent an army of Japanese people to America. So every person who was in a leadership position had a one-on-one coach for years, a person whose only reason for being in the United States was to train them. So they got excellent training, and then they were able to use that training. And then other people once they had worked with a company and then that company got good at lean, then, within that company, you'd spawn more consultants change agents. Like, there was a company that I was studying called Donnelly Mirrors that made exterior mirrors for cars. And one of the persons that was trained by a Toyota person became a plant manager. And he ended up then getting offered a job as the vice president of manufacturing for Merillat Kitchen Cabinets. And now he's the CEO of the parent company that owns Merillat. And he's transformed the entire company. So little by little, this capability developed where most big companies in the world have hired people with lean experience. Sometimes it's second generation, sometimes third generation. And there are some very well-trained people. So the capability still resides within the people. And if you have someone who doesn't understand the system but they just set up a kanban system or they set up quality systems, and they try to imitate what they read in a book or what they learned in a course; usually, it doesn't work very well. TROND: Well, that was going to be my next question. Because how scalable is this beyond the initial learnings of Toyota and the fact that it has relied so heavily on consulting? Because there is sort of an alternate discourse in a lot of organizational thinking these days that says, well, not just that the people are the key to it but actually, that as a leader, however much you know or how aware you are of people processes, it is the organization itself that kind of has to find the answers. So there's perhaps some skepticism that you can come in and change a culture. Aren't there organizations that have such strong organizational practices, whether they are cultural in some meaningful way or they're simply this is the way they've done things that even one person who comes in has a hard time applying a Toyota method? What do you think about that kind of challenge? JEFFREY: Okay, so, anyway, I think what you said is...how I would interpret it is it's a gross oversimplification of reality. So first of all, in the second edition of The Toyota Way, because I realized from the first edition, which was fairly early back in the early 2000s, I realized that some people were taking my message as copy Toyota, even though I didn't say that in the book. And I specifically said not to do that, but I said it in the last chapter. So I put out the second edition a year ago, and I say it in the first page or first few pages. I say, "Don't copy Toyota," and explain why. And then, throughout the book, I say that, and then, in the end, I say, "Develop your own system." So it's probably repeated a dozen times or more with the hope that maybe somebody would then not ask me after reading it, "So, are we supposed to copy Toyota?" So the reason for that is because, as you said, you have your own culture. And you're in a different situation. You're in a different industry. You're starting in a different place. You're drawing on different labor. You have maybe plants around the world that are in different situations. So the other thing I said in the book, which is kind of interesting and counterintuitive, is I said, "Don't copy Toyota; even Toyota doesn't copy Toyota." TROND: So what does that mean? Did they really not? JEFFREY: What it means is that...because Toyota had this dilemma that they had developed this wonderful system in Japan that worked great, but they realized that in auto, you need to be global to survive. So when they set up NUMMI, that was the first experiment they did to try to bring their system to a different culture. And in reality, if you look at some of the cultural dimensions that make lean work in Japan, the U.S. is almost opposite on every one of them, like, we're the worst case. So if you were a scientist and you said, let's find the hardest place in the world to make this work and see if we can make it work, it would be the United States, particularly with General Motors workers already disaffected and turned off. So Toyota's perspective was, let's go in with a blank sheet of paper and pretend we know nothing. We know what the total production system is and what we're trying to achieve with it. But beyond that, we don't know anything about the human resource system and how to set it up. And so they hired Americans, and they coached them. But they relied a lot on Americans, including bringing back the union leader of the most militant union in America. They brought him back. TROND: Wow. JEFFREY: And said, "You're a leader for a reason. They chose you. We need your help. We're going to teach you about our system, but you need to help make it work." So that created this sort of new thing, a new organizational entity in California. And then what Toyota learned from that was not a new solution that they then brought to every other plant, whether it was Czechoslovakia, or England, or China. But rather, they realized we need to evolve a cultural system every time we set up a plant, starting with the local culture. And we need to get good at doing that, and they got good at doing it. So they have, I don't know, how many plants but over 100 plants around the world and in every culture you can imagine. And every one of them becomes the benchmark for that country as one of their best plants. And people come and visit it and are amazed by what they see. The basic principles are what I try to explain in The Toyota Way. The principles don't change. At some level, the principle is we need continuous improvement because we never know how things are going to fail until they fail. So we need to be responding to these problems as a curse. We need people at every level well trained at problem-solving. And to get people to take on that additional responsibility, we need to treat people with a high level of respect. So their model, The Toyota Way, was simply respect for people and continuous improvement. And that won't change no matter where they go. And their concept of how to teach problem-solving doesn't change. And then their vision of just-in-time one-piece flow that doesn't change, and their vision of building in quality so that you don't allow outflows of poor quality beyond your workstation that doesn't change. So there are some fundamental principles that don't change, but how exactly they are brought into the plant and what the human resource system looks like, there'll be sort of an amalgam between the Japanese model and the local model. But they, as quickly as possible, try to give local autonomy to people from that culture to become the plant managers, to become the leaders. And they develop those people; often, those people will go to Japan for periods of time. TROND: So, Jeff, I want to move to...well, you say a lot of things with Toyota don't change because they adapt locally. So my next question is going to be about future outlook. But before we get there, can we pick up on this classical guitar lesson? So you were playing classical guitar. And there was something there that, at least you said that in one interview that I picked up on, something to do with the way that guitar study is meticulous practice, which both you and I know it is. You literally will sit plucking a string sometimes to hear the sound of that string. I believe that was the example. So can you explain that again? Because, I don't know, maybe it was just me, but it resonated with me. And then you brought it back to how you actually best teach this stuff. Because you were so elaborate, but also you rolled off your tongue all these best practices of Toyota. And unless you either took your course or you are already literate in Toyota, no one can remember all these things, even though it's like six different lessons from Toyota or 14 in your book. It is a lot. But on the other hand, when you are a worker, and you're super busy with your manager or just in the line here and you're trying to pick up on all these things, you discovered with a colleague, I guess, who was building on some of your work some ways that had something in common with how you best practice classical guitar. What is that all about? JEFFREY: Well, so, first of all, like I said, the core skill that Toyota believes every person working for Toyota should have is what they call problem-solving. And that's the ability to, when they see a problem, to study what's really happening. Why is this problem occurring? And then try out ideas to close the gap between what should be happening and what is happening. And you can view that as running experiments. So the scientific mindset is one of I don't know. I need to collect the data and get the evidence. And also, I don't know if my idea works until I test it and look at what happens and study what happens. So that was very much central in Toyota. And they also would talk about on-the-job development, and they were very skeptical of any classroom teaching or any conceptual, theoretical explanations. So the way you would learn something is you'd go to the shop floor and do it with a supervisor. So the first lesson was to stand in a circle and just observe without preconceptions, kind of like playing one-string guitar. And the instructor would not tell you anything about what you should be looking for. But they would just ask you questions to try to dig deeper into what's really going on with the problems or why the problems are occurring. And the lesson length with guitar, you might be sweating after 20 minutes of intense practice. This lesson length was eight hours. So for eight hours, you're just on the shop floor taking breaks for lunch and to go to the bathroom and in the same place just watching. So that was just an introductory lesson to open your mind to be able to see what's really happening. And then they would give you a task to, say, double the productivity of an area. And you would keep on trying. They would keep on asking questions, and eventually, you would achieve it. So this on-the-job development was learning by doing. Now, later, I came to understand that the culture of Japan never really went beyond the craftsman era of the master-apprentice relationship. That's very central throughout Japan, whether you're making dolls, or you're wrapping gifts, or you're in a factory making a car. So the master-apprentice relationship system is similar to you having a guitar teacher. And then, if you start to look at modern psychology leadership books, popular leadership books, there's a fascination these days with the idea of habits, how people form habits and the role of habits in our lives. So one of my former students, Mike Rother, who had become a lean practitioner, we had worked together at Ford, for example, and was very good at introducing the tools of lean and transforming a plant. He started to observe time after time that they do great work. He would check in a few months later, and everything they had done had fallen apart and wasn't being followed anymore. And his ultimate conclusion was that what they were missing was the habit of scientific thinking that Toyota put so much effort into. But he realized that it would be a bad solution to, say, find a Toyota culture -- TROND: Right. And go study scientific thinking. Yeah, exactly. JEFFREY: Right. So he developed his own way in companies he was working with who let him experiment. He developed his own way of coaching people and developing coaches inside the company. And his ultimate vision was that every manager becomes a coach. They're a learner first, and they learn scientific thinking, then they coach others, which is what Toyota does. But he needed more structure than Toyota had because the Toyota leaders just kind of learned this over the last 25 years working in the company. And he started to create this structure of practice routines, like drills we would have in guitar. And he also had studied mastery. There's a lot of research about how do you master any complex skill, and it was 10,000 hours of practice and that idea. But what he discovered was that the key was deliberate practice, where you always know what you should be doing and comparing it to what you are doing, and then trying to close the gap. And that's what a good instructor will do is ask you to play this piece, realize that you're weak in certain areas, and then give you an exercise. And then you practice for a week and come back, and he listens again to decide whether you've mastered or not or whether he needs to go back, or we can move to the next step. So whatever complex skill you're learning, whether it's guitar, playing a sport, or learning how to cook, a good teacher will break down the skill into small pieces. And then, you will practice those pieces until you get them right. And the teacher will judge whether you got them right or not. And then when you're ready, then you move on. And then, as you collect these skills, you start to learn to make nice music that sounds good. So it turns out that Mike was developing this stuff when he came across a book on the martial arts. And they use the term kata, which is used in Japanese martial arts for these small practice routines, what you do repeatedly exactly as the master shows you. And the master won't let you move on until you've mastered that one kata. Then they'll move to the second kata and then third. And if you ask somebody in karate, "How many katas do you have?" They might say, "46," and you say, "Wow, you're really good. You've mastered 46 kata, like playing up through the 35th Sor exercise. So he developed what he called the improvement kata, which is here is how you practice scientific thinking, breaking it down into pieces, practicing each piece, and then a coaching kata for what the coach does to coach the student. And the purpose of the scientific thinking is not to publish a paper in a journal but to achieve a life goal, which could be something at work, or it could be that I want to lose weight. It could be a personal goal, or I want to get a new job that pays more and is a better job. And it becomes an exploration process of setting the goal. And then breaking down the goal into little pieces and then taking a step every day continuously toward, say, a weekly target and then setting the next week's target, and next week's target and you work your way up the mountain toward the goal. So that became known as Toyota Kata. He wrote a book called Toyota Kata. And then, I put into my model in the new Toyota Way; in the center of the model, I put scientific thinking. And I said this is really the heart and soul of The Toyota Way. And you can get this but only by going back to school, but not school where you listen to lectures but school where you have to do something, and then you're getting coached by someone who knows what they're doing, who knows how to be a coach. TROND: So my question following this, I think, will be interesting to you, or hopefully, because we've sort of gone through our conversation a little bit this way without jumping to the next step too quickly. Because the last question that I really have for you is, what are the implications of all of this? You have studied, you know, Toyota over years and then teaching academically, and in industry, you've taught these lessons. But what are the implications for the future development of, I guess, management practice in organizations, in manufacturing? Given all that you just said and what you've previously iterated about Toyota's ideas that not a lot of things change or necessarily have to change, how then should leaders go about thinking about the future? And I'm going to put in a couple of more things there into the future. I mean, even just the role of digital, the role of technology, the role of automation, all of these things, that it's not like they are the future, but they are, I guess, they are things that have started to change. And there are expectations that might have been brought into the company that these are new, very, very efficient improvement tools. But given everything that you just said about katas and the importance of practicing, how do you think and how do you teach preparing for the future of manufacturing? JEFFREY: And I have been working with a variety of companies that have developed what you might call industry 4.0 technologies, digital technologies, and I teach classes where a lot of the students are executives from companies where in some cases, they have a dual role of lean plus digitalization. So they're right at the center of these two things. And what I learned going back to my undergraduate industrial engineering days and then to my journey with Toyota, I was always interested in the centrality of people, whatever the tools are. And what I was seeing as an undergraduate was that most of the professors who were industrial engineers really didn't have much of a concept of people. They were just looking at techniques for improving efficiency as if the techniques had the power themselves. And what I discovered with people in IT, and software development, and the digital movement is often they don't seem to have a conception of people. And people from their point of view are basically bad robots [laughs] that don't do what they're supposed to do repeatedly. So the ultimate view of some of the technologists who are interested in industry 4.0 is to eliminate the people as much as possible and eliminate human judgment by, for example, putting it into artificial intelligence and having the decisions made by computers. I'm totally convinced from lots of different experiences with lots of different companies that the AI is extremely powerful and it's a breakthrough, but it's very weak compared to the human brain. And what the AI can do is to make some routine decisions, which frees up the person to deal with the bigger problems that aren't routine and can also provide useful data and even some insight that can help the person in improving the process. So I still see people as the ultimate customer for the insights that come out of this digital stuff, Internet of Things, and all that. But in some cases, they can control a machine tool and make an automatic adjustment without any human intervention, but then the machine breaks down. And then the human has to come in and solve the problem. So if you're thinking about digitalization as tools to...and sometimes have a closed loop control system without the person involved. But in addition, maybe, more importantly, to provide useful data to the human, suddenly, you have to think about the human and what makes us tick and what we respond to. And for example, it's very clear that we're much better at taking in visual information than text information. And that's one of the things that is part of the Toyota Production System is visual management. So how can you make the results of what the AI system come up with very clear and simple, and visual so people can respond quickly to the problem? And most of these systems are really not very good. The human user interface is not well designed because they're not starting with the person. And the other thing is that there are physical processes. Sometimes I kind of make a sarcastic remark, like, by the way, the Internet of Things actually includes things. TROND: [laughs] JEFFREY: And there's a different skill set for designing machines and making machines work and repairing machines than there is for designing software. There are a lot of physical things that have to go on in a factory, changing over equipment, be it for making different parts. And the vision of the technologists might be we'll automate all that, which may be true. Maybe 30 years from now, most of what I say about people will be irrelevant in a factory. I doubt it. But maybe it's 100 years from now, but it's going to be a long time. And there was an interesting study, for example, that looked at the use of robots. And they looked at across the world jobs that could be done by a human or could be done by a robot. And they found that of all the jobs that could be done by a human or a robot, 3% were done by robots, 97%...so this kind of vision of the robots driven by artificial intelligence doing the work of people is really science fiction. It's mostly fiction at this point. At some point, it might become real, but it's got a long way to go. So we still need to understand how to motivate, develop people. But particularly, the more complex the information becomes and the more information available, the more important it is to train people first of all in problem-solving and scientific thinking to use the data effectively and also to simplify the data because we're actually not very good at using a lot of data. We actually can't handle a lot of bits of data at a time like a computer can. So we need simple inputs that then allow us to use our creativity to solve the problem. And most of the companies are not doing that very well. They're offering what they call digital solutions, and I hate that term, on the assumption that somehow the digital technology is the solution. And really, what the digital technology is is just information that can be an input to humans coming up with solutions that fit their situation at that time, not generic solutions. TROND: It's fascinating that you started out with people. You went through all these experiences, and you are directly involved with digital developments. But you're still sticking to the people. We'll see how long that lasts. I think people, from the people I have interviewed, maybe self-selected here on the podcast, people and processes seem enormously important still in manufacturing. Thank you for your perspective. It's been a very rich discussion. And I hope I can bring you back. And like you said if in X number of years people are somehow less important...well, I'm sure their role will change, will adjust. But you're suspecting that no matter what kind of technology we get, there will be some role, or there should be some role for people because you think the judgment even that comes into play is going to be crucial. Is that what I'm -- JEFFREY: There's one more thing I want to add. If you look at industry 4.0, it'll list these are the elements of industry 4.0, and they're all digital technologies. But there's something that's becoming increasingly popular called industry 5.0, where they're asking what's beyond industry 4.0? Which has barely been implemented. But why not look beyond it? Because we've talked about it enough that it must be real. Once we kind of talk about something enough, we kind of lose interest in it. We want to go on to the next thing. So none of these things necessarily have been implemented very well and very broadly. But anyway, so industry 5.0 is about putting people back in the center. So I call it a rework loop. Uh-oh, we missed that the first time. Let's add it back in. TROND: So then what's going to happen if that concludes? Are we going to then go back to some new version of industry 4.0, or will it -- JEFFREY: Well, industry 4.0 is largely a bunch of companies selling stuff and then a bunch of conferences. If you go and actually visit factories, they're still making things in the same way they've always made them. And then there's a monitor that has information on a screen. And the IT person will show you that monitor, and the person on the floor may not even know what it is. But there's a disconnect between a lot of these technologies and what's actually happening on the shop floor to make stuff. And when they do have a success, they'll show you that success. You know, there's like hundreds of processes in the factory. And they'll show you the three that have industry 4.0 solutions in there. And so it's a long way before we start to see these technologies broadly, not only adopted but used effectively in a powerful way. And I think as that happens, we will notice that the companies that do the best with them have highly developed people. TROND: Fantastic. That's a good ending there. I thank you so much. I believe you've made a difference here, arguing for the continued and continuing role of people. And thank you so much for these reflections. JEFFREY: Welcome. Thank you. My pleasure. TROND: You have just listened to another episode of the Augmented Podcast with host Trond Arne Undheim. The topic was the People Side of Lean. Our guest was Jeffrey Liker, academic, consultant, and best-selling author of The Toyota Way. In this conversation, we talked about how to develop internal organizational capability. My takeaway is that Lean is about motivating people to succeed in an industrial organization more than it is about a bundle of techniques to avoid waste on a factory production line. The goal is to have workers always asking themselves if there is a better way. Thanks for listening. If you liked the show, subscribe at augmentedpodcast.co or in your preferred podcast player, and rate us with five stars. If you liked this episode, you might also like Episode 84 on The Evolution of Lean. Hopefully, you will find something awesome in these or in other episodes. And if you do, let us know by messaging us, and we would love to share your thoughts with other listeners. The Augmented Podcast is created in association with Tulip, the frontline operation platform that connects people, machines, devices, and systems used in a production or logistics process in a physical location. Tulip is democratizing technology and empowering those closest to operations to solve problems. Tulip is also hiring, and you can find Tulip at tulip.co. Please share this show with colleagues who care about where industry and especially where industrial tech is heading. To find us on social media is easy; we are Augmented Pod on LinkedIn and Twitter and Augmented Podcast on Facebook and YouTube. Augmented — industrial conversations that matter. See you next time. Special Guest: Jeffrey Liker.

Wired To Hunt
Archers Are Killing More Deer Than Ever Before

Wired To Hunt

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022


Bowhunters are taking record numbers of deer across the whitetail's range, with crossbows accelerating the long-term increases compound bows triggered a half-century ago. That surge is most obvious in Midwestern and Northeastern states, where archery seasons are typically longer and warmer, given their early starts each fall. Those traits often appeal to older hunters who take up crossbows to stay afield longer. But despite more bowhunting...

The Jacob Buehrer Show
Interview with Governor Michael Dukakis

The Jacob Buehrer Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 16:59


On this episode I interview the 1988 Democratic Nominee for President. Prior to being the Democratic Nominee Michael Dukakis was Governor of Massachusetts. After he ended up becoming a professor at Northeastern and UCLA.

Les chemins de la philosophie
Le pouvoir peut-il être vraiment légitime ? 3/4 : Résister au pouvoir, est-ce un désir ou un devoir ?

Les chemins de la philosophie

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 58:37


durée : 00:58:37 - Avec philosophie - par : Géraldine Muhlmann - Quelle forme peut prendre la lutte pour la reconnaissance et l'égalité ? Ne faut-il pas nécessairement désobéir pour se faire entendre ? - invités : Marc Crépon directeur de recherche à l'Université Paris Sorbonne et directeur du département de philosophie à l'École normale supérieure; Candice Delmas Philosophe franco-américaine à l'université Northeastern de Boston

Florida Keys Weekly Podcast
Pat "Coach" Labrada - King of the Conchs & Voice of the Cuzzies

Florida Keys Weekly Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 37:37


Key West natives, also known as “Conchs,” are one of the most unique and endearing sub-cultures in the United States. Many Conchs share ancestry from various regions of Europe and North America, yet most migrated by way of the Bahamas in the early 1800s for the thriving agriculture, fishing and sponging trade around Key West. Today, many locals (or Conchs) remain in Key West with shared attributes and traits that include hard work, craftsmanship, generosity and a “family first” approach above all else. Conch attributes are often distinguishable at first glance. They share a unique accent that many describe as a "mix of Cajun and Northeastern dialect." Conchs are typically history lovers and adept storytellers, serving as the scribes of local maritime mythology and remarkable tales of old Key West. In this edition of the Florida Keys Weekly Podcast, we celebrate Pat Labrada, born and raised in Key West and a respected Conch who has impacted many generations of Key West men and women through his service as a teacher and football coach. The Key West High School grad earned an Arts degree from Bethany College, but remained in Key West throughout his early adult life, serving 8 years on the Monroe County School Board, past President of the Rotary Club of Key West, past chairman of the Military Affairs Committee and currently serves as an elected official on the Key West Utility Board. Labrada has worked in the local mortgage industry for over three decades, but his proudest accolades are centered around his family and faith. Labrada is a parishioner of St Mary's Star of the Sea and he and his wife Terri have three children and six grandchildren.  Stay up to date with the Florida Keys only locally owned newspaper at www.KeysWeekly.com with the Florida Keys Weekly Podcast. #LocalMediaMatters  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Friderikusz Podcast
"FRIDERIKUSZ": MIK AZOK A HÁLÓZATOK? - BARABÁSI ALBERT-LÁSZLÓ, HÁLÓZATKUTATÓ, 2015. /// F.A.101.

Friderikusz Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 48:00


Barabási Albert-László Erdélyben született, de jó ideje az Egyesült Államokban kutat és bármiről legyen is szó, könnyen eljut a hálózatok felismerésééig. Bostonban a Northeastern és a Harvard Egyetemen dolgozik, az elmúlt években több könyve jelent meg, a többi között a Behálózva – a hálózatok új tudománya című kötete. Már öt éve dolgozott a hálózatokkal, anélkül, hogy bármilyen kézzel fogható eredménye lett volna ennek. És bár nem sokakat érdekelt, de a tudós mégis bízott benne, hogy ez olyan téma, amellyel érdemes foglalkozni, mert idővel nagy hatást fog gyakorolni a tudományra. Barabási eredeti szakmája statisztikus fizikus, tehát a véletlen szerepét kutatja a komplex rendszerekben. Akkoriban New Yorkban élt, és rájött arra, amit senki sem vizsgál, nevezetesen, hogy hogyan néznek ki az igazi hálózatok. Megdöbbentette, hogy bár rengeteg háló befolyásolja a város élhetőségét, a vízszolgáltatástól az elektromos hálózatig, minden akkor elérhető szakirodalom véletlenszerűként írta le ezeket a hálózatokat. De véletlenszerű hálókból nem lehet várost építeni, ezért is gondolta a tudós, hogy nagy lehetőségek vannak ezen a területen, és meg volt győződve arról, hogy a statisztikus fizika eszköztára alkalmas rá, hogy a látszólagos véletlenszerűség mögött rejlő törvényszerűségeket valamilyen módon megragadja. Jó hangulatú beszélgetés kerekedett abból, amikor Friderikusz Sándor 2015-ben megpróbálta megérteni Barabási Albert-László segítségével, hogy mi az értelme ennek az egésznek. Hogyan támogathatja a munkánkat? Legyen a patronálónk, és a támogatása mértékétől függően egyre több előnyhöz juthat: https://www.patreon.com/FriderikuszPodcast Egyszeri vagy rendszeres banki átutalással is segíthet. Ehhez a legfontosabb adatok Név: TV Pictures Számlaszám: OTP Bank 11707062-21446081 Közlemény: Podcast-támogatás Ha külföldről utalna, nemzetközi számlaszámunk (IBAN - International Bank Account Number): HU68 1170 7062 2144 6081 0000 0000 BIC/SWIFT-kód: OTPVHUHB Akármilyen formában támogatja munkánkat, köszönjük! Kövessenek, kövessetek itt is: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/FriderikuszPodcast YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/FriderikuszPodcast Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/friderikuszpodcast Spotify: https://spoti.fi/3blRo2g Google Podcasts: https://bit.ly/3fc7A7t ApplePodcasts: https://apple.co/3hm2vfi #FriderikuszPodcast #FriderikuszArchiv

Locked On Sharks - Daily Podcast On The San Jose Sharks
Mitchell Brown on Cameron Lund

Locked On Sharks - Daily Podcast On The San Jose Sharks

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 26:45 Very Popular


The San Jose Sharks used a second-round pick on forward Cameron Lund. Director of NA Scouting at Elite Prospects, Mitchell Brown, joins to analyze what he saw in Lund when he scouted him. Mitchell breaks down Lund's game and what changed from the beginning of the season to the end and what Lund needs to work on (7:30). We also look at his expectations going to Northeastern (12:30) and his timeline to become a professional (15:30). Check out the podcast on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, and YouTube. Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKED15,” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline BetOnline.net has you covered this season with more props, odds and lines than ever before. BetOnline – Where The Game Starts! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Friends in Beauty Podcast
Ep. 126: How Germaine Bolds-Leftridge Uses Her Sales Expertise To Broker Deals For Some Of Your Favorite Beauty Brands

Friends in Beauty Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 82:01


On this episode of the Friends in Beauty podcast I welcome Germaine Bolds-Leftridge to the Friends in Beauty guest chair. Germaine is the President of GBL Sales, Inc., & has been in the Health and Beauty industry since 1984. Germaine began her career in 1984 as a merchandiser for Soft Sheen Products in the Baltimore-Washington Metropolitan area. Two years later, she started working as a sales representative in the northeast for one of the most progressive broker organizations prior to becoming the Regional Manager for Worlds of Curls located in Los Angeles, California.   When she was presented with an opportunity to become a broker in 1990, she enthusiastically accepted the challenge and GBL Sales opened its doors for business on March 1, 1990. The company is headquartered in Columbia, MD, and specializes in the sales and marketing of Health and Beauty Aids in the Northeastern and Southeastern markets. She founded GBL Sales, Inc. as a means of serving the diverse needs of her clients and has brokered deals for some of your favorite beauty brands. Germaine is also the Founder of the Ubiquitous Women's Expo, IKnow Skincare, and just an all around businesswoman.   I had such a wonderful time chatting with Germaine I didn't want our conversation to end. In this interview Germaine shares:   -How she began working in the beauty industry & ultimately opened her own marketing and sales firm -How brands can bring their brand stories to life in their marketing -The power of the black consumer -Advice on holding your own as a woman in a male dominated industry -All about the upcoming Ubiquitous Expo going down on Aug 27 & 28th 2022 -Her latest venture IKnow Skincare catered to mature women -Redefining the word failure -And so much more   Germaine did not come to play. She dropped so many gems and life lessons from us to learn from and I truly enjoyed my time with her. Let's go ahead and jump into this amazing chat with Germaine and if you prefer to watch our beautiful faces then tune in on YouTube. Enjoy this episode! Leave us a 5 star review and share this episode with a friend or 2 or 3. info@friendsinbeauty.com   FRIENDS IN BEAUTY FACEBOOK COMMUNITY www.facebook.com/groups/friendsinbeauty   FOLLOW FRIENDS IN BEAUTY ON IG  www.instagram.com/friendsinbeauty   SUBSCRIBE TO YOUTUBE CHANNEL bit.ly/FIBTube   SEND ME A TEXT! (202) 519-4652   JOIN PATREON TO SUPPORT THE FRIENDS IN BEAUTY PODCAST https://www.patreon.com/friendsinbeauty   ADVERTISE YOUR BUSINESS OF THE PODCAST https://www.friendsinbeauty.com/fibadrequest   ENROLL IN THE FRIENDS WITH BENEFIT$ CLUB https://friends-with-benefits.teachable.com/p/friends-with-benefits-club Resources Mentioned In This Episode: -Oyin Handmade -Book: Who Moved My Cheese -Ubiquitous Women's Expo -IKnow Skincare -Mielle   Additional Resources:   -https://www.amazon.com/shop/akuarobinson   -Skillshare - Use this link for 2 months free of the premium plan: https://skl.sh/30t352q   -Shop Mented Cosmetics - https://www.mentedcosmetics.com/?rfsn=1290937.f2481  Use Code “AKUAROBINSON” for 10% of your purchase  Announcements:   We're on Apple Podcasts - www.bit.ly/FIBPodItunes!   Join our Facebook community…   If  you're looking for a community of like minded, ambitious, and supportive #FriendsinBeauty all working to leave our mark on the beauty industry, join us here: https://www.facebook.com/groups/friendsinbeauty Join the Friends in Beauty Mailing List: www.bit.ly/FIBTribe Social Media Info: Germaine (Instagram) - @detroitgermaine IKnow Skincare (IG) - @iknowskincare Ubiquitous Expo (IG) -@ubiquitous_expo Friends in Beauty (Instagram, Facebook, Twitter) - @friendsinbeauty Friends in Beauty (YouTube) - Friends in Beauty https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCcYPyO8nAosEmjEE5nza9Zg?view_as=subscriber Akua Robinson (Instagram,Twitter) - @akuarobinson AkuaRobinson (Facebook) - Akua Robinson MUA Akua Robinson (Website) - www.akuarobinson.com

The Athletes Project
The Athletes Project Episode 10: Featuring Ben Miller

The Athletes Project

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 34:15


On episode 10 Squints and Davis talk with Ben Miller on how he's had a overall successful career as a hockey player and his recent commitment to Northeastern. Music Credits: Broadway Girls Morgan Wallen Lil Durk

#OnTheStacks with Bill Corcoran Jr.
Ryan Leckey – Ep.122

#OnTheStacks with Bill Corcoran Jr.

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 69:14


Episode 122: #OnTheStacks in the blu door studio with Ryan Leckey, Emmy award-winning content creator, storyteller, and owner of Ryan Leckey Media. In this episode, Ryan asks the question, "what's stopping you?" When he was 13 years old, he was so determined to land a gig in television that he would regularly ride his bike to WJAC-TV, an NBC affiliate in his hometown of Johnstown PA, to pitch ideas to the general manager for ways to get teenagers to watch the news. Best known for his wildly successful and engaging morning show, 'Leckey Live,' on WNEP-TV, Ryan's on-air and online content has reached over 1-million weekly viewers. With a combined 100,000+ social media followers, Ryan dominates the Northeastern & Central Pennsylvania market. Ryan sits down with host Bill Corcoran Jr., to discuss why he left WNEP after 17 years, his new entrepreneurial journey, mental health, and being openly gay and your authentic self in this 'nothing off-limits' interview. Want to watch this episode? Tap here: https://youtu.be/6WsuZyXTyJo Please enjoy! This episode is brought to you by Brrrn. Get 15% Off at thebrrrn.com with code "STACKS15" at checkout! #ad This episode is brought to you by blu door Financial. blu door Financial helps you save money and reduce taxes to live a fuller financial life. To learn more, visit blu door Financial at www.bludoorFinancial.com. #ad Engage with us on social media: Instagram, Facebook, LinkedIn, or visit us at www.OnTheStacks.com.

Uninvited
Level Set - A Snapshot of a Conversation with Tanya Spacek [Western Kansas]

Uninvited

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2022 0:55


In this brief interaction with Tanya Spacek, we begin to explore how Western Kansas is under-resourced and neglected by most everyone in the more populated Northeastern part of the state. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/jerry-jones5/message

Cover 3 College Football Podcast
Mailbag! Cam Newton's 2010 run, QB battles, more. Plus: Trayveon Williams talks teaching, NIL, Aggies in 2022 (08/11)

Cover 3 College Football Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 70:48 Very Popular


The Cover 3 crew answers listener questions and talks to former Texas A&M standout Trayveon Williams. First, the Big Ol Bag of Mail gets rolling with a question of what's the “worst” team that the 2010 version of Cam Newton could have led to a national championship in 2021 (2:00). Then it's on to more listener questions on quarterback competitions (12:30) in fall camp and the recent history of Week Zero in college football (25:00). Former Texas A&M and current Cincinnati Bengals running back Trayveon Williams then stops by (29:03) for a wide-ranging discussion that covers NIL, his new role as a professor at Texas A&M's law school, the needs of the modern athlete and his expectations for the Aggies in 2022. Finally it's back to the mailbag to talk Tennessee's ceiling under Josh Heupel (45:00), the uphill battle for Northeastern schools to achieve national relevance (53:00) and more!   Cover 3 is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, Google Podcasts, Castbox and wherever else you listen to podcasts.  Nominate the Cover 3 Podcast in the “Sports” category of the The People's Choice Podcast Awards! http://podcastawards.com/app/signup Get 20% off Cover 3 merch in the CBS Sports Store:  https://store.cbssports.com/collections/cover-3?utm_source=podcast-apple-com&utm_medium=web&utm_campaign=buy-our-merch&utm_content=cover-3-collection Watch Cover 3 on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/cover3 Follow our hosts on Twitter: @Chip_Patterson, @TomFornelli, @DannyKanell, @BudElliott3 For more college football coverage from CBS Sports, visit https://www.cbssports.com/college-football/ To hear more from the CBS Sports Podcast Network, visit https://www.cbssports.com/podcasts/ To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Dark Histories
The Haunting of Willington Mill

Dark Histories

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 64:23 Very Popular


In England, the Tyne River, famously flowing through the centre of Newcastle on its way to the North Eastern coast, has for many centuries been a vein of industry. In the early 19th Century the banks were filled with shipbuilders, rope makers and flour, grain, textile and corn mills, creaking and grinding with the constant industrial din. On the Eastern outskirts of Newcastle stood Willington Mill, a flour mill built in 1801 with a local reputation. For decades folks had talked about the old mill house, of how a witch had once lived in an old cottage on the land and of the spirit of Old Jefferey. The stories eventually seeped out into national publications after a pair of curious locals carried out an overnight vigil which ended in chaos, earning the mill the title of “most haunted house in England”, but were the stories anything more than just local rumour and legend? SOURCES Proctor, Edmund (1894) The Haunted House At Willington. Journal for The Society of Psychical Research, Vol 5, 1891-92. The Society's Books, London, UK.   Hallowell, Michael J. & Ritson, Darren W. (2011) The Haunting of Willington Mill. The History Press, London, UK.   Summers, Montague (1927) The Geography of Witchcraft. A.A. Knopf; K. Paul, Trench, Trubner, London, UK.   Hudson, Tom (1887) The Monthly Chronicle of North Country Lore and Legend. Walter Scott, Newcastle, UK   Richardson, M.A. (1842) Authentic Account of a Visit to The Haunted House at Willington near Newcastle Upon Tyne. M.A. Richardson, Newcastle, UK   Crowe, Catherine (1850) The Night Side of Nature. J.S. Redfield, New York, USA.   Sidgwick, Eleanor (1892) On The Evidence For Clairvoyance. Proceedings of the Society for Psychical Research Vol VII, 1891-92. Kegan Paul, Trench & Turner LTD. London, UK.   Stead, William Thomas (1897) Real Ghost Stories. G. Richards. London, UK   Newcastle Guardian & Tyne Mercury (1867) Local and District News. 26 January 1867, p.2. Newcastle, UK.   Newcastle Guardian & Tyne Mercury (1867) Local and District News. 23 February 1867, p.6. Newcastle, UK.   Beck, Ben. (2022) Children of Elizabeth and Joseph Procter.[online] Benbeck.co.uk. Available at:   ---------- For almost anything, head over to the podcasts hub at darkhistories.com Support the show by using our link when you sign up to Audible: http://audibletrial.com/darkhistories or visit our Patreon for bonus episodes and Early Access: https://www.patreon.com/darkhistories The Dark Histories books are available to buy here: http://author.to/darkhistories Dark Histories merch is available here: https://bit.ly/3GChjk9 Connect with us on Facebook: http://facebook.com/darkhistoriespodcast Or find us on Twitter: http://twitter.com/darkhistories & Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dark_histories/ Or you can contact us directly via email at contact@darkhistories.com or via voicemail on: (415) 286-5072 or join our Discord community: https://discord.gg/cmGcBFf The Dark Histories Butterfly was drawn by Courtney, who you can find on Instagram @bewildereye Music was recorded by me © Ben Cutmore 2017 Other Outro music was Paul Whiteman & his orchestra with Mildred Bailey - All of me (1931). It's out of copyright now, but if you're interested, that was that.  

Between Two Posts
B2P 33: Northeastern's Hero and College Hockey Phenom - Aerin Frankel

Between Two Posts

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 71:48


Kyle's finally back! Besides that boring news, this week we sit down with the incredible Aerin Frankel! She's one of the best to ever put on the pillows at Northeastern, and certainly one of our heros!  We talked  -Northeastern -Shattuck -Her first and last ever face off win  -So much more!  Follow, Subscribe, and Rate the podcast!  --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/betweentwoposts/support

Audio Updates – Stunt Granny
Stunt Granny Audio 773 – Wrestlemania in Philly, More Vince McMahon and Ricky Starks

Audio Updates – Stunt Granny

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 101:04


In a moment of serendipity, Shahid joins Kevin to talk about Wrestlemania coming to Philadelphia. They discuss the criteria for going to a Wrestlemania in a Northeastern city. With another Stunt Granny meet up on the horizon, your hosts talk about the unavoidable topic this week, Vince McMahon‘s retirement. Because that is the main topic, […] The post Stunt Granny Audio 773 – Wrestlemania in Philly, More Vince McMahon and Ricky Starks appeared first on Stunt Granny.

Destination: YOUniversity
#131 Meet Max: This Rowing Entrepreneur Will Change The World at U Chicago

Destination: YOUniversity

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 17:49


Season 6: Episode 131 This Rowing Entrepreneur Will Change The World at U Chicago Alum of College Essay Bootcamp & Private Client MEET MAX: From: Ontario Canada Attends: Upper Canada College Admitted at: University of Chicago, U of Toronto: Rotman, Northeastern, St Andrews (UK) Coolness Factor: Committed to Climate Change, Rowing, Entrepreneur Major: Economics FREE: Download 10 Sample Essays https://www.drcynthiacolon.com/10-sam... FREE: Watch Mini College Essay Training https://www.drcynthiacolon.com/essay-... Book Call with Dr. C: https://www.drcynthiacolon.com/schedule Visit website: https://www.drcynthiacolon.com/

New England Baseball Journal Podcast
Coach Mike Glavine on MLB Drafting Northeastern Veterans

New England Baseball Journal Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 36:20


Coach Mike Glavine from Northeastern University joins The Base Path to talk about his recently-finished season and what it was like having three players drafted by Major League Baseball. The Billerica native also talks about growing up with a famous brother - Hall of Fame pitcher Tom Glavine.

TruVue Podcast
Master ( Let's Hang Out )

TruVue Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 64:26


This week the #TruVuePodcast review the #amazonprime #original #master . Three women strive to find their place at an elite Northeastern university. When anonymous racist attacks target a Black freshman, who insists she is being haunted by ghosts, each woman must determine where the real menace lies. Starring: #ReginaHall #ZoeRenee #JuliaNightingale Subscribe to “TruVue Podcast” wherever you listen to podcasts and follow along on social media. We bring the barbershop to the box office. https://www.truvuepodcast.com Instagram @TruVuePodcast Facebook: @TruVue Podcast Twitter @TruVue_ TruVueSocial@gmail.com 

WCTV Podcasting
Lost in Translation - Episode 12 - Joel Smith

WCTV Podcasting

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 66:12


*Discusses adult themes* Northeastern assistant coach and former player Joel Smith joined the L.I.T. podcast to talk about his journey from the Texas heat to the frigid winters of Boston. Smith spoke on his playing career, the heartbreak of coming so close to the NCAA Tournament that he could taste it, embarking on a profession playing career, before transitioning to coaching.

SBS Kurdish - SBS Kurdî
Has Moscow given Turkey the green light to attack northeastern Syria? - Gelo Putin çira kesk bide Tirkiyê ku êrişe bakur rojhilatê Sûriyê bike?

SBS Kurdish - SBS Kurdî

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 17:12


Presidents Vladimir Putin, Recep Tayyip Erdoğan and Ebrahim Raisi held a trilateral meeting in Tehran on Tuesday 19 July 2022, a few days after US President Joe Biden's visit to Israel and Saudi Arabia. The three leaders discussed the conflict in Syria and Turkey's president attack on north-eastern Syria. To learn more about the trilateral meeting, we speak to international security and foreign policy researcher, Ms Shukriya Bradost from Washington. - Serokê Rûsiya Vladimîr Pûtîn, û yê Îranê Îbrahîm Raîsî û yê Tirkiyê Recep Tayyîp Erdogan roja Sêşemê 19/07/2022 li Tehranê civîneke sêalî li dar xistin. Her sê rêberan behsa rewşa li Sûriyê kirin. Ji bo em zêdetir derbarê wê civîna sêalî bizanibin, lêkolînera ewlehîya navnetewî û sîyaseta derve, xatun Şukriya Bradost ji Washingting bi me re diaxafe.

Too Lazy to Read the Paper
Tina Eliassi-Rad - Dark Side of the Moon

Too Lazy to Read the Paper

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 16, 2022 75:33


It's a new season! And LazyPod is back with a strong line-up of guests. Today on the pod, for the inaugural episode of season 2, is Tina Eliassi-Rad. Tina is an incredibly accomplished scientist. She is a Professor of Computer Science at Northeastern University. She is also a core faculty member at Northeastern's Network Science Institute and the Institute for Experiential AI. In addition, she is an external faculty member at the Santa Fe Institute and the Vermont Complex Systems Center. Her research is at the intersection of data mining, machine learning, and network science. She has over 100 peer-reviewed publications (including a few best paper and best paper runner-up awards); and has given over 200 invited talks and 14 tutorials. Tina's work has been applied to personalized search on the World-Wide Web, statistical indices of large-scale scientific simulation data, fraud detection, mobile ad targeting, cyber situational awareness, drug discovery, democracy and online discourse, and ethics in machine learning.Tina received an Outstanding Mentor Award from the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science in 2010, became an ISI Foundation Fellow in 2019, was named one of the 100 Brilliant Women in AI Ethics in 2021, and received Northeastern University's Excellence in Research and Creative Activity Award in 2022.In this wide-ranging conversation, we talk about Tina's life, career and her paper "The Why, How, and When of Representations for Complex Systems" (1).---References:(1) Leo Torres, Ann Sizemore Blevins, Danielle S. Bassett, Tina Eliassi-Rad. The Why, How, and When of Representations for Complex Systems. SIAM Review (SIREV), 63(3): 435-485, 2021.

Backcountry Hunting Podcast
Bush Rifles & Brush-Busting Cartridges

Backcountry Hunting Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 62:46 Very Popular


This episode takes a deep dive into the realm of brush-country rifles, cartridges, and bullets. Inspired by a listeners question, we explore the concept of a "bush gun," and define rifle characteristics that fit. Rifle responsiveness, balance, fast function, accuracy, reach, and authority, along with appropriate scopes are addressed.  Next, species and habitat types likely to fit the deep-thicket hunting scene are detailed. Alaska and Canada's alder thickets, Northeastern and Northwestern big woods country, and Rocky Mountain dark timber and oak thickets. Deer, elk, bear, moose, and more.  Hard-hitting cartridges and bullets that fit the classic "brush-busting" mold come next, along with a discussion of whether any bullet can actually shrug off contact with twigs and leaves and other brush and still impact where you want.  Lastly, 10 of von Benedikt's favorite bush rifle models and cartridges are listed, wrapping up with a recommendation of just two that tick all the boxes.  ENJOY! FRIENDS, PLEASE SUPPORT THE PODCAST!  Join the Backcountry Hunting Podcast tribe and get access to all our bonus material on www.patreon.com/backcountry VISIT OUR SPONSORS HERE:  www.onxmaps.com www.browning.com www.leupold.com www.silencercentral.com www.timneytriggers.com https://www.portersfirearms.com/ www.siembidacustomknives.com https://javelinbipod.com

All The Kings Men
Jack Hughes Analysis, Offseason Update & Development Camp Preview

All The Kings Men

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2022 53:49 Very Popular


01:00 - 11:45        Jim Connelly on Jack Hughes12:15 - 32:38        10 Questions for the Offseason32:40 - 53:49     Development Camp Preview

The Daily Sun-Up
Colorado's abortion providers see surge in patients; Northeastern Coloradans attempt to secede

The Daily Sun-Up

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2022 10:53


Colorado's abortion providers are seeing a surge of patients seeking medical care after the U.S. Supreme Court overturned Roe-v-Wade and a swell of states ban abortions. And the are preparing for even more, with increased hiring, training, mobile clinics and telehealth services for  people who can use medication to terminate pregnancies. Colorado Sun reporter Tatiana Flowers spoke with several abortion service providers in Colorado about the expansion of services following the high court's controversial ruling. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

South Carolina from A to Z
“F” is for Florence

South Carolina from A to Z

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 0:59


“F” is for Florence (Florence County; 2020 population 38,525). In the 1850s Florence emerged around the intersection of three railroads: the Wilmington and Manchester, the Northeastern, and the Cheraw and Darlington.

Answers For Elders Radio Network
Veterans-Themed Celebration at MorningStar

Answers For Elders Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 12:28


MorningStar Senior Living community in SilverLake near Everett, Washington is having a reopening special weekend that celebrates veterans. Elena Cuevas, Regional VP of Sales, returns to introduce the program with Suzanne.  July 7-9, from 1-4, they're introducing renovations while appreciating veterans. Their bistro will be themed for West Point, the activity room will be the Colorado Air Force station with some giveaways and collateral, model apartments themed for Hawaii, then downstairs to the theater room which is themed for California's Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton with glitz and Hollywood glamour, then the last station in the patio area is themed for Naval Station Everett with BBQ and Northeastern delicacies.  Learn more about MorningStar Senior Living at SilverLake at their website.

The 401 Podcast with Kevin McNamara
The 401 Podcast - NCAA & National Basketball Hall of Fame Coach: Jim Calhoun

The 401 Podcast with Kevin McNamara

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 23:03


Join Kevin McNamara this week as he sits down with former Northeastern and University of Connecticut Men's Basketball Coach, Jim Calhoun to discuss his upcoming recognition at the NCAA Basketball Hall of Fame in Kansas City, MO. Kevin and Jim discuss his Boston basketball roots and the many great players he recruited to Connecticut. MANSCAPED Go to http://manscaped.com/ and get 20% off + free shipping with the code: KMC #manscapedpodHaxton's Liquors Haxton's has been Rhode Island's leading liquor store for 70 years! 1123 Bald Hill Road. Warwick, RI

NatureNotes with Rudy Mancke
Diamond back terrapin

NatureNotes with Rudy Mancke

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 1:21


The diamondback terrapin or simply terrapin (Malaclemys terrapin) is a species of turtle native to the brackish coastal tidal marshes of the Northeastern and southern United States, and in Bermuda. It belongs to the monotypic genus Malaclemys. It has one of the largest ranges of all turtles in North America, stretching as far south as the Florida Keys and as far north as Cape Cod.

HerbRally | Herbalism | Plant Medicine | Botany | Wildcrafting

The great jim mcdonald answered over EIGHTY herbalism questions for us a few months ago.  Although you can listen to the full THREE HOURS, we wanted to split it up into mini-episodes so you can pick and choose which answers you'd like to hear.  So here ya go!  You can also READ the answers to these questions HERE.  Visit jim online at HerbCraft.org Get 7 herbal freebies HERE Thanks for listening!  HerbRally.com  If you love the HerbRally Podcast, please consider leaving a written review in Apple Podcasts or your player of choice.  Simply let us know what your favorite episode is, how HerbRally has helped you, or anything else that may inspire you.  We read every single review and we really appreciate it! 

The John Batchelor Show
#Buckeye: The energy-rich Northeastern counties. SalenaZito.com:

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 8:00


Photo: #Buckeye: The energy-rich Northeastern counties. SalenaZito.com:  https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/opinion/columnists/centrist-democrats-last-stand-will-be-fought-in-ohio washingtonexaminer.com/opinion/columnists/centrist-democrats-last-stand-will-be-fought-in-ohio

Sportsmen's Nation - Whitetail Hunting
Pennsylvania Woodsman - Black Bear Knowledge with the State Biologist

Sportsmen's Nation - Whitetail Hunting

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2022 80:05


Black bears are one of the most intriguing animals in North America due to their high level of intellect. Across the nation the most popular way of bear hunting is by baiting or with hounds. There are a number of states that do not allow these forms of bear hunting, resulting in the ultimate chess match between man and beast. In Western states, however; the landscape and topography allow for spot and stalk situations as well as long range shooting. Arguably the most difficult place in the country to harvest a black bear is Pennsylvania and the surrounding Northeastern states which do not allow baiting or hounds. On this week's episode of the Pennsylvania Woodsman, Robby and Mitchell chat with Pennsylvania Black Bear biologist Emily Carrollo. As Pennsylvania's bear seasons continue to modify based on data and research, Emily shares some of the data management associated with making hunting season decisions. In addition to addressing public concern, we dive into food and cover habits typically associated in fall and how the age and sex of a bear may influence its home range. This episode is not only informative about the species but has plenty of hunting strategy ques to pull from. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices