Podcasts about Fordham

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  • 528PODCASTS
  • 1,484EPISODES
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  • Jan 14, 2022LATEST

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Best podcasts about Fordham

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Latest podcast episodes about Fordham

The OddsBreakers
The Deeper Dive with Michael Fordham–Episode 4–January 14th NBA Breakdowns + College Basketball Buy Low/Sell High Teams

The OddsBreakers

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 38:47


On today's episode of "The Deeper Dive", Michael breaks down 4 NBA games on Friday's card. Then, he looks at 2 College Basketball teams he is "buying low" on and 2 teams he's "selling high" on in the near future. Follow Michael on Twitter @FordhamGambling and find all of his free picks at https://theoddsbreakers.com/author/michaelfordhamsportsgambling-com/.

Buried Secrets Podcast
Haunted Dorms (Haunted Fordham University)

Buried Secrets Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 62:20


Creepy ghost children, a man disappearing into walls, priests blessing haunted dorms, and more, about in these haunted dorms at Fordham University in the Bronx, NY. This episode is a look at some of Fordham University's "less haunted" dorms: meet the ghosts of Loschert Hall, O'Hare Hall, Martyrs' Court, and Loyola Hall. Highlights include: • Thoughts about hauntings based on recent deaths • Some debunking attempts • Sleep paralysis • A dorm built on the former site of a cemetery Got a Fordham haunting to report? Send it to buriedsecretspodcast@gmail.com. For the shownotes and sources, visit buriedsecretspodcast.com.

The OddsBreakers
The Deeper Dive with Michael Fordham–Episode 3–January 6th NBA Breakdowns + Early Alabama/Georgia Look

The OddsBreakers

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 27:42


In this episode of "The Deeper Dive", Michael breaks down the January 6th NBA card and also gives his early look in the CFB National Championship game.

ENN with Peter Rosenberg
ENN with Peter Rosenberg: 1/5/22

ENN with Peter Rosenberg

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 21:33


On Wednesday's ENN, we discuss Fordham's ranking among other universities in US News & World Report. Plus, Aaron Rodgers thinks Hub Arkush is a bum and Brian Kelly doesn't think the people of Boston have accents.

The Education Gadfly Show
#801: Grumpy New Year with Checker Finn - 1/5/22

The Education Gadfly Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 29:38


On this week's Education Gadfly Show podcast (listen on Apple Podcasts and Spotify), Checker Finn, Fordham's senior fellow and president emeritus, joins Mike Petrilli and David Griffith to discuss the big education issues of the past year and look ahead to 2022. Then, on the Research Minute, Amber Northern examines a study showing that Black and Hispanic students are less likely to major in lucrative fields.Feedback welcome!Have ideas or feedback on our podcast? Send them to our podcast producer Pedro Enamorado at penamorado@fordhaminstitute.org.

College Hoops Chat - WVOX Talk Radio Show
Big Games of New Year, Iona Over Marist & Rescheduling Problems, Fordham, Seton Hall, Xavier, Poland, 1/3/22

College Hoops Chat - WVOX Talk Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 48:14


Here's the full episode of the College Hoops Chat radio show (48 mins) from January 3, 2022. I open with thoughts on top games of weekend like Villanova over Seton Hall, Baylor over Iowa St and Auburn over LSU, plus Iona's win over Marist. I also review Iona's schedule changes due to Covid cancellations. Next, we chat with 6 guests: Kent Washington on his book "Kentomania: A Black Basketball Virtuoso in Communist Poland," Sam Basel from A10 Talk website on Fordham, Patrick Madden from Big Big East Blog on Seton Hall & Big East, Tim Daniel from 48 Minutes Podcast on Xavier, Ken Nixon, #KennyFromRye, on Iona & Providence wins, Mikey Maisano, my son, on Iona win over Marist. This weekly college basketball radio show airs on WVOX, 1460AM in New Rochelle, NY every Monday night from 8 to 9pm. Check out our website at: collegehoopschat.com. Email me if you have any questions or suggestions for the show. Jim Maisano CollegeHoopsChat@gmail.com (Season 2/Episode 14)

D1Baseball.com
Fourth Coach Conversations – January 2, 2021

D1Baseball.com

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2022


In our latest Fourth Coach Convo, Mike Rooney is joined by volunteer coaches from WIU, Arizona State, Fordham, Rice, and LMU.

Dreamweaver's Business and Career Coaching Podcast
Episode 143: Episode 143 w/ Michael Pirson on The Davidson Hang Podcast on Love, and Being Team 1 Team Leader at Landmark Worldwide for Team New York

Dreamweaver's Business and Career Coaching Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 46:19


Join us on another episode about healing, love, restoring integrity, and leadership.Michael Pirson is the Area Chair and is a Professor at Gabelli School of Business at Fordham and he is the president of the International Humanistic Management Association. If you want to connect with him on LinkedIn, here is his profile.https://www.linkedin.com/in/michael-pirson-5541b0/These were my top ten lessons from my conversation with Michael Pirson. 1. Achievement and being authentic vs intentionally choosing powerfully what we want to focus on.2. What we have gotten out of Landmark's Team Leadership and Management Program so far. 3. Accountability, Transformation, and being our word4. Cleaning things up and taking 100% responsibility and the power that brings.5. Empowering your children and parenthood6. Common Humanity7. What we got out of Landmark's Communication Power to Create and Access To Power8. Vulnerability Is Power9. Relationships and Love/Affinity10. GratitudeCheck out this episode if you are having family/relationship breakdowns. What a wholesome episode just in time for the new year, check this out if you are looking to make any new year resolution with some inspiration from such a powerful leader!

The OddsBreakers
The Deeper Dive with Michael Fordham–Episode 2–CFP and NY6 Bowl Breakdowns

The OddsBreakers

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 48:13


On this episode of "The Deeper Dive", Michael Fordham breaks down each of the College Football Playoff matchups for New Year's Eve as well as the 3 NY6 bowl games on New Year's Day.

Coast to Coast Hoops
12/30/2021-Coast To Coast Hoops

Coast to Coast Hoops

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 109:58


Greg recaps Wednesday's college basketball results, talks to Brendan Marks of The Athletic about the ACC landscape and some of the health & safety protocol changes conferences are making & Greg picks & analyzes EVERY Thursday College basketball game! Podcast Highlights 1:43-Recap of Wednesday's college basketball results 19:00-Interview with Brendan Marks 35:14-Start of picks with Louisiana vs Appalachian St 37:45-Picks & analysis for Old Dominion vs FIU 34:10-Picks & analysis for Central Michigan vs Kent St 39:41-Picks & analysis for ETSU vs Chattanooga 42:12-Picks & analysis for Brown vs Maryland 44:52-Picks & analysis for UW Green Bay vs Northern Kentucky 46:44-NY Post Pick Michigan vs UCF 48:43-Picks & analysis for Fordham vs La Salle 50:32-Picks & analysis for Robert Morris vs Oakland 52:53-Picks & analysis for UW Milwaukee vs Wright St 54:52-Picks & analysis for LA Monroe vs Coastal Carolina 56:57-Picks & analysis for St. Joseph's vs Richmond 58:59-Picks & analysis for UTEP vs UAB 1:00:55-Picks & analysis for Georgia So vs Little Rock 1:03:00-Picks & analysis for Lamar vs Sam Houston St 1:05:28-Picks & analysis for South Dakota St vs North Dakota St 1:07:01-Picks & analysis for South Alabama vs UT Arlington 1:08:58-Picks & analysis for Troy vs Texas St 1:10:57-Picks & analysis for Denver vs Oral Roberts 1:13:09-Picks & analysis for SE Missouri St vs Murray St 1:14:52-Picks & analysis for Chicago St vs Grand Canyon 1:16:54-Picks & analysis for Abilene Christian vs Utah Valley 1:18:51-Picks & analysis for UT Martin vs Austin Peay 1:20:54-Picks & analysis for Marshall vs LA Tech 1:23:03-Picks & analysis for Weber St vs Montana St 1:25:00-Picks & analysis for Sacramento St vs Southern Utah 1:26:50-Picks & analysis for Idaho St vs Montana 1:28:33-Picks & analysis for Utah vs Oregon St 1:30:34-Picks & analysis for Tarleton St vs Dixie St 1:32:25-Picks & analysis for Eastern Washington vs Portland St 1:34:37-Picks & analysis for CS Fullerton vs CS Bakersfield 1:36:56-Picks & analysis for UC Santa Barbara vs UC San Diego 1:39:07-Picks & analysis for IPFW vs Cleveland St 1:41:01-Start of extra game picks with Maine vs Rutgers 1:43:16-Picks & analysis for Alabama A&M vs Lipscomb Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

The OddsBreakers
The Deeper Dive with Michael Fordham–Episode 1–CFB Bowl Breakdowns(Dec.28th-Dec.30th)

The OddsBreakers

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 86:13


In episode 1 of The Deeper Dive with Michael Fordham, I break down each CFB Bowl Game from Tuesday, December 28th through Thursday, December 30th. Episode 2 will drop on Thursday(12/30) and will cover the CFB action on New Years Eve and New Years Day!

Sharp & Benning
Dec 27 Seg 5 Best Of Fordham #3 BONUS Pod Cast Only

Sharp & Benning

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 10:56


Dec 27 Seg 5 Best Of Fordham #3 BONUS Pod Cast Only

Sharp & Benning
Dec 27 Seg 4 Best Of Fordham #2

Sharp & Benning

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 26:19


Dec 27 Seg 4 Best Of Fordham #2

Sharp & Benning
Dec 27 Seg 3 Best Of Fordham #1

Sharp & Benning

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 19:25


Dec 27 Seg 3 Best Of Fordham #1

Buried Secrets Podcast
The Demon in the Basement (Haunted Fordham University)

Buried Secrets Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 61:22


A look at my own paranormal experiences living in Fordham University's former medical school building. My time in Finlay Hall was uneasy, permeated by the feeling that I was always being watched. Though there were reasonable explanations for why I may have felt that way, I don't think that's all that was afoot. I tell the stories of an uneasy possible encounter with an entity in the laundry room in the basement (near where cadavers were once kept), a mysterious bell that seemed to ring throughout the building, and an unusual, regularly occurring gibbering sound that only my roommate and I seemed to be able to hear. Highlights include: • Conspiracy theories and the paranormal • A primal scream • My attempts to debunk my own experiences • A bizarre experimental college Got a Fordham haunting to report? Send it to buriedsecretspodcast@gmail.com. For the shownotes and sources, visit buriedsecretspodcast.com.

The Steve Gruber Show
Michael Petrilli, Fordham's significant new report, America‘s Best and Worst Metro Areas for School Quality

The Steve Gruber Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 11:00


Michael Petrilli is the president of the Thomas B. Fordham Institute. Fordham's significant new report, America's Best and Worst Metro Areas for School Quality  

The Education Gadfly Show
#800: Why we need virtue education in our classrooms - 12/21/2021

The Education Gadfly Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 34:17


On this week's Education Gadfly Show podcast, Jennifer Frey, associate professor at the University of South Carolina and a regular guest writer for Fordham's Flypaper blog, joins Mike Petrilli and David Griffith to discuss why and how we should incorporate virtue education in classrooms. Then, on the Research Minute, Amber Northern runs down the best education research of 2021. You can find this and every episode on all major podcast platforms, as well as share it with friends.Recommended content:Jennifer's ongoing Flypaper blog post series on virtue education: “Reconnecting knowledge and virtue”“What is virtue and why does it matter?”“Teaching gratitude beyond Thanksgiving”“Civility, democracy, and education”Amber's list of the top six studies she reviewed this past year on the Research Minute.Feedback welcome!Have ideas or feedback on our podcast? Send them to our podcast producer Pedro Enamorado at penamorado@fordhaminstitute.org.

The Rex Chapman Show with Josh Hopkins
Episode 29 - Mike Breen

The Rex Chapman Show with Josh Hopkins

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 57:41


On the latest episode of the Rex Chapman Show with Josh Hopkins, Rex is joined by Mike Breen, who has been in the building for so many classic NBA moments, for both the Knicks plus ABC and ESPN. Whether it was Steph Curry's record-breaking 3-pointer at Madison Square Garden, or one of the 16 NBA Finals Mike has been there for, he shares his life and best moments with Rex. 6:30 - Rex remembers when Mike first started calling the games for the Knicks and wondering who that one young guy was that was sitting in the booth next to all the old guys. 8:45 - How Mike has bonded with Jeff Van Gundy and Mark Jackson over the last few decades after they all grew up with the New York Knicks and have since been in the booth together for ESPN. 11:00 - It's never been about "dealing with Mark and Jeff". Mike says it's a shared passion for the game and respect for their wealth of knowledge that makes broadcasting with them so fun. Basketball is a team sport and basketball broadcasting certainly is too. 14:20 - Growing up one of 6 boys, and with a father who was an avid sports fan, there was no shot Mike wouldn't be playing sports. There's a poster of Walt Frazier that went up on his childhood bedroom wall 50 years ago that still hangs to this day. 17:00 - Mike discusses why Knicks fans are so passionate, and the difference between the fans growing up with the Championship Knicks of the 70's and the Ewing led team of the 90's that made a pair of Finals appearances. 20:00 - How long was it after Breen called "BANG" before it took on a life of its own? Mike didn't like to use his trademark call on the radio, but finally found it worked best on TV. Of course, Breen first shouted BANG when he was still in the student section at Fordham. 22:15 - Mike details who his favorite broadcasters are across sports, and why Marv Albert will always serve as his inspiration and his biggest influence as a basketball broadcaster. 25:00 - How Mike went from idolizing Clyde and then having the ability to broadcast games with Walt Frazier.  30:20 - When the Knicks are on the doorstep of greatness, how does the lifelong fan keep himself from hyperventilating when he could make the call for a Knicks Championship. In 1994, Mike wasn't sure if John Starks was about to clinch the Championship if it weren't for the fingertips of Hakeem Olajuwon. 30:00 - One of the most iconic Knicks of all-time, and how impactful Patrick Ewing is to the city of New York. Mike details how their friendship has blossomed over the last three decades and is proud of how he's always been such a wonderful person. 32:00 - Mike says the most fun he's ever had broadcasting were during the two weeks of Linsanity. What Jeremy Lin did as a role player, becoming one of the most recognizable players on the planet was so improbable and how he handled himself was something Mike will never forget. 34:00 - How special it was when Steph Curry broke the 3-point record and everything came to a halt at Madison Square Garden? Mike says with the type of person he is and how he's changed the game created a type of moment usually reserved for when teams make the NBA Finals. 39:00 - Mike draws on his experience calling the NBA Finals, and other than the Knicks, he thinks Ray Allen's 3-pointer against the Spurs, or the LeBron James chasedown block for Cleveland's title were the two most impactful he's called. 48:45 - LeBron James has gone above and beyond the high expectations that were place on him as a high schooler, and Mike says he takes a backseat to no one, with how his teams, in this era, are always in championship contention. 46:30 - As COVID concerns continue to affect the NBA, Mike details what it took for the 2020 season to conclude in the bubble. As Mike put it, fans are the oxygen in sports, so not having them made it so hard to make it feel like an authentic experience. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Big Fellas Basketball
352. Early Haircut, Joe Cuomo Recording, Fordham Triple Header

Big Fellas Basketball

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 18, 2021 21:29


Follow Us On All Our Social Media @GenZHoops! Tune In On Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Youtube, And All Major Platforms!!

New Books in Intellectual History
Cinthia Gannett and John Brereton, "Traditions of Eloquence: The Jesuits and Modern Rhetorical Studies" (Fordham UP, 2016)

New Books in Intellectual History

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 65:17


Traditions of Eloquence: The Jesuits and Modern Rhetorical Studies (Fordham UP, 2016) explores the important ways Jesuits have employed rhetoric, the ancient art of persuasion and the current art of communications, from the sixteenth century to the present. Much of the history of how Jesuit traditions contributed to the development of rhetorical theory and pedagogy has been lost, effaced, or dispersed. As a result, those interested in Jesuit education and higher education in the United States, as well as scholars and teachers of rhetoric, are often unaware of this living 450-year-old tradition. Written by highly regarded scholars of rhetoric, composition, education, philosophy, and history, many based at Jesuit colleges and universities, the essays in this volume explore the tradition of Jesuit rhetorical education-that is, constructing "a more usable past" and a viable future for eloquentia perfecta, the Jesuits' chief aim for the liberal arts. Intended to foster eloquence across the curriculum and into the world beyond, Jesuit rhetoric integrates intellectual rigor, broad knowledge, civic action, and spiritual discernment as the chief goals of the educational experience. Consummate scholars and rhetors, the early Jesuits employed all the intellectual and language arts as "contemplatives in action," preaching and undertaking missionary, educational, and charitable works in the world. The study, pedagogy, and practice of classical grammar and rhetoric, adapted to Christian humanism, naturally provided a central focus of this powerful educational system as part of the Jesuit commitment to the Ministries of the Word. This book traces the development of Jesuit rhetoric in Renaissance Europe, follows its expansion to the United States, and documents its reemergence on campuses and in scholarly discussions across America in the twenty-first century. Traditions of Eloquence provides a wellspring of insight into the past, present, and future of Jesuit rhetorical traditions. In a period of ongoing reformulations and applications of Jesuit educational mission and identity, this collection of compelling essays helps provide historical context, a sense of continuity in current practice, and a platform for creating future curricula and pedagogy. Moreover it is a valuable resource for anyone interested in understanding a core aspect of the Jesuit educational heritage. Cinthia Gannett is Professor Emerita of English at Fairfield University where she directs the Core Writing Program. She is the author of a variety of articles in composition and has previously directed writing programs, writing centers, and Writing Across the Curriculum programs at the University of New Hampshire and Loyola University in Maryland. John C. Brereton is Professor Emeritus of English at the University of Massachusetts at Boston and the Editor of The Origins of Composition Studies in the American College, 1875-1925. Tom Discenna is Professor of Communication at Oakland University whose work examines issues of academic labor and communicative labor more broadly. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/intellectual-history

New Books in Communications
Cinthia Gannett and John Brereton, "Traditions of Eloquence: The Jesuits and Modern Rhetorical Studies" (Fordham UP, 2016)

New Books in Communications

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 65:17


Traditions of Eloquence: The Jesuits and Modern Rhetorical Studies (Fordham UP, 2016) explores the important ways Jesuits have employed rhetoric, the ancient art of persuasion and the current art of communications, from the sixteenth century to the present. Much of the history of how Jesuit traditions contributed to the development of rhetorical theory and pedagogy has been lost, effaced, or dispersed. As a result, those interested in Jesuit education and higher education in the United States, as well as scholars and teachers of rhetoric, are often unaware of this living 450-year-old tradition. Written by highly regarded scholars of rhetoric, composition, education, philosophy, and history, many based at Jesuit colleges and universities, the essays in this volume explore the tradition of Jesuit rhetorical education-that is, constructing "a more usable past" and a viable future for eloquentia perfecta, the Jesuits' chief aim for the liberal arts. Intended to foster eloquence across the curriculum and into the world beyond, Jesuit rhetoric integrates intellectual rigor, broad knowledge, civic action, and spiritual discernment as the chief goals of the educational experience. Consummate scholars and rhetors, the early Jesuits employed all the intellectual and language arts as "contemplatives in action," preaching and undertaking missionary, educational, and charitable works in the world. The study, pedagogy, and practice of classical grammar and rhetoric, adapted to Christian humanism, naturally provided a central focus of this powerful educational system as part of the Jesuit commitment to the Ministries of the Word. This book traces the development of Jesuit rhetoric in Renaissance Europe, follows its expansion to the United States, and documents its reemergence on campuses and in scholarly discussions across America in the twenty-first century. Traditions of Eloquence provides a wellspring of insight into the past, present, and future of Jesuit rhetorical traditions. In a period of ongoing reformulations and applications of Jesuit educational mission and identity, this collection of compelling essays helps provide historical context, a sense of continuity in current practice, and a platform for creating future curricula and pedagogy. Moreover it is a valuable resource for anyone interested in understanding a core aspect of the Jesuit educational heritage. Cinthia Gannett is Professor Emerita of English at Fairfield University where she directs the Core Writing Program. She is the author of a variety of articles in composition and has previously directed writing programs, writing centers, and Writing Across the Curriculum programs at the University of New Hampshire and Loyola University in Maryland. John C. Brereton is Professor Emeritus of English at the University of Massachusetts at Boston and the Editor of The Origins of Composition Studies in the American College, 1875-1925. Tom Discenna is Professor of Communication at Oakland University whose work examines issues of academic labor and communicative labor more broadly. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/communications

New Books in Education
Cinthia Gannett and John Brereton, "Traditions of Eloquence: The Jesuits and Modern Rhetorical Studies" (Fordham UP, 2016)

New Books in Education

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 65:17


Traditions of Eloquence: The Jesuits and Modern Rhetorical Studies (Fordham UP, 2016) explores the important ways Jesuits have employed rhetoric, the ancient art of persuasion and the current art of communications, from the sixteenth century to the present. Much of the history of how Jesuit traditions contributed to the development of rhetorical theory and pedagogy has been lost, effaced, or dispersed. As a result, those interested in Jesuit education and higher education in the United States, as well as scholars and teachers of rhetoric, are often unaware of this living 450-year-old tradition. Written by highly regarded scholars of rhetoric, composition, education, philosophy, and history, many based at Jesuit colleges and universities, the essays in this volume explore the tradition of Jesuit rhetorical education-that is, constructing "a more usable past" and a viable future for eloquentia perfecta, the Jesuits' chief aim for the liberal arts. Intended to foster eloquence across the curriculum and into the world beyond, Jesuit rhetoric integrates intellectual rigor, broad knowledge, civic action, and spiritual discernment as the chief goals of the educational experience. Consummate scholars and rhetors, the early Jesuits employed all the intellectual and language arts as "contemplatives in action," preaching and undertaking missionary, educational, and charitable works in the world. The study, pedagogy, and practice of classical grammar and rhetoric, adapted to Christian humanism, naturally provided a central focus of this powerful educational system as part of the Jesuit commitment to the Ministries of the Word. This book traces the development of Jesuit rhetoric in Renaissance Europe, follows its expansion to the United States, and documents its reemergence on campuses and in scholarly discussions across America in the twenty-first century. Traditions of Eloquence provides a wellspring of insight into the past, present, and future of Jesuit rhetorical traditions. In a period of ongoing reformulations and applications of Jesuit educational mission and identity, this collection of compelling essays helps provide historical context, a sense of continuity in current practice, and a platform for creating future curricula and pedagogy. Moreover it is a valuable resource for anyone interested in understanding a core aspect of the Jesuit educational heritage. Cinthia Gannett is Professor Emerita of English at Fairfield University where she directs the Core Writing Program. She is the author of a variety of articles in composition and has previously directed writing programs, writing centers, and Writing Across the Curriculum programs at the University of New Hampshire and Loyola University in Maryland. John C. Brereton is Professor Emeritus of English at the University of Massachusetts at Boston and the Editor of The Origins of Composition Studies in the American College, 1875-1925. Tom Discenna is Professor of Communication at Oakland University whose work examines issues of academic labor and communicative labor more broadly. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/education

New Books Network
Cinthia Gannett and John Brereton, "Traditions of Eloquence: The Jesuits and Modern Rhetorical Studies" (Fordham UP, 2016)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 65:17


Traditions of Eloquence: The Jesuits and Modern Rhetorical Studies (Fordham UP, 2016) explores the important ways Jesuits have employed rhetoric, the ancient art of persuasion and the current art of communications, from the sixteenth century to the present. Much of the history of how Jesuit traditions contributed to the development of rhetorical theory and pedagogy has been lost, effaced, or dispersed. As a result, those interested in Jesuit education and higher education in the United States, as well as scholars and teachers of rhetoric, are often unaware of this living 450-year-old tradition. Written by highly regarded scholars of rhetoric, composition, education, philosophy, and history, many based at Jesuit colleges and universities, the essays in this volume explore the tradition of Jesuit rhetorical education-that is, constructing "a more usable past" and a viable future for eloquentia perfecta, the Jesuits' chief aim for the liberal arts. Intended to foster eloquence across the curriculum and into the world beyond, Jesuit rhetoric integrates intellectual rigor, broad knowledge, civic action, and spiritual discernment as the chief goals of the educational experience. Consummate scholars and rhetors, the early Jesuits employed all the intellectual and language arts as "contemplatives in action," preaching and undertaking missionary, educational, and charitable works in the world. The study, pedagogy, and practice of classical grammar and rhetoric, adapted to Christian humanism, naturally provided a central focus of this powerful educational system as part of the Jesuit commitment to the Ministries of the Word. This book traces the development of Jesuit rhetoric in Renaissance Europe, follows its expansion to the United States, and documents its reemergence on campuses and in scholarly discussions across America in the twenty-first century. Traditions of Eloquence provides a wellspring of insight into the past, present, and future of Jesuit rhetorical traditions. In a period of ongoing reformulations and applications of Jesuit educational mission and identity, this collection of compelling essays helps provide historical context, a sense of continuity in current practice, and a platform for creating future curricula and pedagogy. Moreover it is a valuable resource for anyone interested in understanding a core aspect of the Jesuit educational heritage. Cinthia Gannett is Professor Emerita of English at Fairfield University where she directs the Core Writing Program. She is the author of a variety of articles in composition and has previously directed writing programs, writing centers, and Writing Across the Curriculum programs at the University of New Hampshire and Loyola University in Maryland. John C. Brereton is Professor Emeritus of English at the University of Massachusetts at Boston and the Editor of The Origins of Composition Studies in the American College, 1875-1925. Tom Discenna is Professor of Communication at Oakland University whose work examines issues of academic labor and communicative labor more broadly. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in History
Cinthia Gannett and John Brereton, "Traditions of Eloquence: The Jesuits and Modern Rhetorical Studies" (Fordham UP, 2016)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 65:17


Traditions of Eloquence: The Jesuits and Modern Rhetorical Studies (Fordham UP, 2016) explores the important ways Jesuits have employed rhetoric, the ancient art of persuasion and the current art of communications, from the sixteenth century to the present. Much of the history of how Jesuit traditions contributed to the development of rhetorical theory and pedagogy has been lost, effaced, or dispersed. As a result, those interested in Jesuit education and higher education in the United States, as well as scholars and teachers of rhetoric, are often unaware of this living 450-year-old tradition. Written by highly regarded scholars of rhetoric, composition, education, philosophy, and history, many based at Jesuit colleges and universities, the essays in this volume explore the tradition of Jesuit rhetorical education-that is, constructing "a more usable past" and a viable future for eloquentia perfecta, the Jesuits' chief aim for the liberal arts. Intended to foster eloquence across the curriculum and into the world beyond, Jesuit rhetoric integrates intellectual rigor, broad knowledge, civic action, and spiritual discernment as the chief goals of the educational experience. Consummate scholars and rhetors, the early Jesuits employed all the intellectual and language arts as "contemplatives in action," preaching and undertaking missionary, educational, and charitable works in the world. The study, pedagogy, and practice of classical grammar and rhetoric, adapted to Christian humanism, naturally provided a central focus of this powerful educational system as part of the Jesuit commitment to the Ministries of the Word. This book traces the development of Jesuit rhetoric in Renaissance Europe, follows its expansion to the United States, and documents its reemergence on campuses and in scholarly discussions across America in the twenty-first century. Traditions of Eloquence provides a wellspring of insight into the past, present, and future of Jesuit rhetorical traditions. In a period of ongoing reformulations and applications of Jesuit educational mission and identity, this collection of compelling essays helps provide historical context, a sense of continuity in current practice, and a platform for creating future curricula and pedagogy. Moreover it is a valuable resource for anyone interested in understanding a core aspect of the Jesuit educational heritage. Cinthia Gannett is Professor Emerita of English at Fairfield University where she directs the Core Writing Program. She is the author of a variety of articles in composition and has previously directed writing programs, writing centers, and Writing Across the Curriculum programs at the University of New Hampshire and Loyola University in Maryland. John C. Brereton is Professor Emeritus of English at the University of Massachusetts at Boston and the Editor of The Origins of Composition Studies in the American College, 1875-1925. Tom Discenna is Professor of Communication at Oakland University whose work examines issues of academic labor and communicative labor more broadly. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in Christian Studies
Cinthia Gannett and John Brereton, "Traditions of Eloquence: The Jesuits and Modern Rhetorical Studies" (Fordham UP, 2016)

New Books in Christian Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 65:17


Traditions of Eloquence: The Jesuits and Modern Rhetorical Studies (Fordham UP, 2016) explores the important ways Jesuits have employed rhetoric, the ancient art of persuasion and the current art of communications, from the sixteenth century to the present. Much of the history of how Jesuit traditions contributed to the development of rhetorical theory and pedagogy has been lost, effaced, or dispersed. As a result, those interested in Jesuit education and higher education in the United States, as well as scholars and teachers of rhetoric, are often unaware of this living 450-year-old tradition. Written by highly regarded scholars of rhetoric, composition, education, philosophy, and history, many based at Jesuit colleges and universities, the essays in this volume explore the tradition of Jesuit rhetorical education-that is, constructing "a more usable past" and a viable future for eloquentia perfecta, the Jesuits' chief aim for the liberal arts. Intended to foster eloquence across the curriculum and into the world beyond, Jesuit rhetoric integrates intellectual rigor, broad knowledge, civic action, and spiritual discernment as the chief goals of the educational experience. Consummate scholars and rhetors, the early Jesuits employed all the intellectual and language arts as "contemplatives in action," preaching and undertaking missionary, educational, and charitable works in the world. The study, pedagogy, and practice of classical grammar and rhetoric, adapted to Christian humanism, naturally provided a central focus of this powerful educational system as part of the Jesuit commitment to the Ministries of the Word. This book traces the development of Jesuit rhetoric in Renaissance Europe, follows its expansion to the United States, and documents its reemergence on campuses and in scholarly discussions across America in the twenty-first century. Traditions of Eloquence provides a wellspring of insight into the past, present, and future of Jesuit rhetorical traditions. In a period of ongoing reformulations and applications of Jesuit educational mission and identity, this collection of compelling essays helps provide historical context, a sense of continuity in current practice, and a platform for creating future curricula and pedagogy. Moreover it is a valuable resource for anyone interested in understanding a core aspect of the Jesuit educational heritage. Cinthia Gannett is Professor Emerita of English at Fairfield University where she directs the Core Writing Program. She is the author of a variety of articles in composition and has previously directed writing programs, writing centers, and Writing Across the Curriculum programs at the University of New Hampshire and Loyola University in Maryland. John C. Brereton is Professor Emeritus of English at the University of Massachusetts at Boston and the Editor of The Origins of Composition Studies in the American College, 1875-1925. Tom Discenna is Professor of Communication at Oakland University whose work examines issues of academic labor and communicative labor more broadly. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/christian-studies

Diamond Diehards
The Historic 100th Episode of Diamond Diehards: Mets Manager Finalists, Clint Hurdle, Jeff Frye #SheGone, Mike Shildt, Roland Hemond, Fordham Baseball

Diamond Diehards

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021


Joe Rizzo brings you baseball ... for the 100th time! It's the historic 100th episode of the top podcast about baseball and about life, as Riz & "The Dawg" Jeff Healy bring the show to you. Rundown: ~Veteran of the Day ~History of the show: How we got to #100 ~Mets manager search down to Buck Showalter, Joe Espada, Matt Quatraro ~Clint Hurdle named Rockies Assistant GM - what he brings back to Colorado ~Standing alongside Jeff Frye & #SheGone Nation on baseball fundamentals ~Mike Shildt joins Commissioner's Office in On-Field Operations ~Roland Hemond dead at 92 (three-time Executive of the Year) ~Reliving one of the greatest moments in Fordham Baseball history ~Diehard Dads This one streamed live on the Facebook group. As with all the shows, it's also available on YouTube, iTunes and Spotify (links are below). There are a lot of podcasts out there, and many of them are great. What is special about us? THIS. This is what we bring to the table. It's a podcast about baseball and about life. So follow, subscribe, get the alerts, and join us on the journey! Please check out FMS Graphics (https://www.fmsgraphics.com) for all your print and promotional needs. Big Ed's Car Wash http://www.bigedscarwash.com/ is the place to go if you're in Bergen County, NJ. Get over to Fair Lawn and get your car cleaned and your oil changed. Tell Big Ed that Diamond Diehards sent you! We need you to subscribe to the podcast! Please hit the SUBSCRIBE or FOLLOW button from wherever you get your podcasts. Watch, Listen Subscribe: iTunes: https://apple.co/2JzUd5e Spotify: https://spoti.fi/2KPgZq9 Youtube: https://bit.ly/3pBAvFE Interact: Website: https://DiamondDiehards.com TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@diamonddiehards? LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/diamond-diehards Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/DiamondDiehards Twitter: https://twitter.com/DiamondDiehards

Buried Secrets Podcast
Ghosts in the Morgue (Haunted Fordham University)

Buried Secrets Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 48:26


Chilling urban legends and ghost stories from people who lived in an old medical school building, which featured a morgue and a large operating theater. From 1905-1921, Fordham University had a medical school. After its short, troubled existence, the medical school was mostly forgotten. One of the few reminders of the school is Finlay Hall, the old medical school building that was converted into a dorm in the 1980s. Since students have begun living there, haunting stories have emerged: some people claim to see ghostly students looking down on them during the night, as if they're a cadaver being dissected. Others wake to being choked by cold hands. This episode looks at the stories and seeks to sort out urban legend from credible paranormal experiences, and to corroborate or debunk popular stories. Highlights include: • Carl Jung giving lectures at the medical school • Cadavers being kept in the basement • Secret tunnels Got a Fordham haunting to report? Send it to buriedsecretspodcast@gmail.com. For the shownotes and sources, visit buriedsecretspodcast.com.

Kathy's Kids Storytime
The Silent Culprit — by Sari Fordham

Kathy's Kids Storytime

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 6:24


Have you ever woken something and not wanted to admit it because you were embarrassed or afraid of the repercussions? In our story today, Sari learns an important lesson of owning up to your actions. If you're interested in any other books published by the Seventh-day Adventist Church, please visit adventistbookcenter.com or call 1-800-765-6955.Visit our website: www.kathyskidsstorytime.org We'd love to hear from you. Write to us at:Kathy@kathyskidsstorytime.orgorKathy's Kids StorytimePO Box 44270Charlotte, NC 28215-0043Special Thanks:Recorded by: Kathy Russell, Children's Ministry Director Edited by: Communication Department

The Education Gadfly Show
#798: Which metro areas are accelerating student learning? - 12/08/21

The Education Gadfly Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 26:51


On this week's Education Gadfly Show podcast, Adam Tyner, Fordham's Associate Director of Research, joins Mike Petrilli and David Griffith to discuss our new analysis, America's Best and Worst Metro Areas for School Quality, some of which may surprise you. And on the Research Minute, Amber Northern examines the effectiveness of efforts to diversify the teacher workforce.Recommended content:Fordham's new report at metro.fordhaminstitute.org.More of our work on metro areas:What You Make Depends on Where You Live: College Earnings Across States and Metropolitan Areas.How Aligned is Career and Technical Education to Local Labor Markets?The study that Amber reviewed on the Research Minute: Dan Goldhaber and Etai Mizrav, “The Prospective Teacher Pipeline: Simulation Evidence on Levers to Influence Teacher Diversity,” CALDER Working Papers (December 2021).Feedback welcome!Have ideas or feedback on our podcast? Send them to our podcast producer Pedro Enamorado at penamorado@fordhaminstitute.org.

Big Bets On Campus
College Basketball Betting Preview | Wednesday, December 8th

Big Bets On Campus

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 46:45


It's our sixth college basketball episode of the season! Every Wednesday morning, the Three Man Weave crew of Jim Root, Ky McKeon and Matt Cox will join Big Bets On Campus to talk all things gambling in college hoops! This week, the guys give out their favorite underdogs (01:21), most-likely candidates for big blowouts (13:21), favorite Power 5 matchups (17:08), favorite mid-major matchups (26:43), and the “Trashman Games of the Week” (33:34). They wrap up the episode with a spotlight on their favorite rivalry games coming up this week (36:35). Game previews include St. John's vs. Monmouth (02:10), Memphis vs. Murray State (03:54), Louisville vs. DePaul (06:51), Washington State vs. South Dakota State (08:54), Boise State vs Prairie View A&M (10:31), Pittsburgh vs. Colgate (11:37), Marquette vs. UCLA (11:54), Gonzaga vs. Merrimack (13:49), Houston Baptist vs. Rice (14:32), Providence vs. Central Connecticut State (15:43), Seton Hall vs. Texas (17:28), Alabama vs. Houston (19:25), Illinois vs. Arizona (22:27), Baylor vs. Villanova (24:15), BYU vs. Utah State (28:10), Brown vs. Vermont (28:51), Richmond vs. Toledo (30:28), Iona vs. Yale (31:51), Old Dominion vs. VCU (33:57), Fordham vs. LIU (35:24), UMKC vs. UW-Green Bay (36:10), Iowa State vs. Iowa (36:40), Kansas vs. Mizzou (38:52), Xavier vs. Cincinnati (41:33), and Georgetown vs. Syracuse (44:06).

College Hoops Chat - WVOX Talk Radio Show
Iona, St. John's, Pat Kennedy, Michael Szabo, Last Week's Big Games, 12/6/21

College Hoops Chat - WVOX Talk Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 48:40


Here's the full episode of the College Hoops Chat radio show (48 mins) from December 6, 2021. I open the show with thoughts on Iona's wins last week vs Marist & Rider, plus Purdue over Iowa, St. Bonaventure over Buffalo (strange game for me) & Alabama over Gonzaga. Next, I'm joined by former coach Pat Kennedy to discuss Iona's progress under Rick Pitino and how the Gaels are becoming a typical gritty/tough Pitino team to close out games. We discuss how teams can play so differently in successive games. Pat also takes us back to how he and Jim Valvano built their legendary Iona teams. Then, I interview Michael Szabo, a senior at St. John's who is Sports Director for WSJU Radio, and we discuss the Red Storm's inconsistent opening of season with so many transfers, along with recent loss to Kansas and win over Fordham. I also chat with callers in final segment - #KennyFromRye & #JohnFromPortChester. This weekly college basketball radio show airs on WVOX, 1460AM in New Rochelle, NY every Monday night from 8 to 9pm. Check out our website at: collegehoopschat.com. Email me if you have any questions or suggestions for the show. Jim Maisano CollegeHoopsChat@gmail.com

3 Bid League
Respecting Rose Hill

3 Bid League

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 51:47


Tyler and Matt are joined by Sam Basel of A10 Talk to discuss Fordham's strong start to the season and the beginning of the Kyle Neptune era. We then discuss the initial NET rankings for the 2021-22 season, revisit some of our preseason takes, and take a trip down memory lane with a look back at some old A10 transfers.Follow us on Twitter! @3BidLeaguePodEmail: 3bidleague@gmail.com

Coach and Coordinator Podcast
Defining Practice Tempos And Finishes For Better Performance - Vince DiGaetano, Fordham

Coach and Coordinator Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 36:33


On today's podcast, Fordham assistant coach Vince DiGaetano shares the system which defines the tempo and finishes of their practices and how these definition create a synergy within different periods of practice and most importantly how it translates to game day. Shownotes: -Vertical alignment with the head coach/program -Tempo and finish carrying over to drill periods -Being a better Thud team -Keeping players off the ground -Meeting "on demand" player needs -Using acronyms -TAG: Tackle Grass and Angles -Eating up space -Translating to game reps -If you don't bend knees you are not making a tackle -TUC Tackle Under Control -Redistributing weight -Ball carrying hop into air = strike on the rise -Dig -Translate TUC into speed and power -Designing drills to work in the content of game/11 v 11 -Back to the vertical alignment to head coach on top -Staying off the ground -THUD Tackle High Until Domination -Tightening from the Grips to the Hips -If you are good enough to keep him up, you are definitely good enough to put him down -Not having text book tackles -70% of all plays end in a tackle -BALL Be At Leverage and Learn -How non-contact periods are like shadow boxing -Walk-thru periods -The results Sharing concepts and learning - Clayton Kendrick-Holmes, "I don't want to see someone else's drill tape. I want to see what meaningful for our players."

Coast to Coast Hoops
12/5/2021-Coast To Coast Hoops

Coast to Coast Hoops

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2021 121:32


Greg discusses why hedging is different for everyone, recaps Saturday's college basketball results, talks to John Fanta of FOX Sports & the Field of 68 about the start of the season for the Big East & Greg picks & analyzes EVERY Saturday college basketball game. Podcast Highlights 1:49-Why hedging is different for everyone 4:39-Recap of Saturday's results 23:48-Interview with John Fanta 41:52-Start of picks with Northwestern vs Maryland 44:09-Picks & analysis for Fairfield vs Niagara 46:08-Picks & analysis for Monmouth vs Canisius 48:07-Picks & analysis for Western IL vs Central Michigan 50:16-Picks & analysis for Valpo vs Western Michigan 52:14-Picks & analysis for Minnesota vs Mississippi St 54:14-Picks & analysis for Richmond vs Northern Iowa 56:06-Picks & analysis for Marist vs Rider 57:49-Picks & analysis for Quinnipiac vs Manhattan 59:54-Picks & analysis for Siena vs St. Peter's 1:00:57-Picks & analysis for Detroit vs UIC 1:03:42-Picks & analysis for Georgetown vs South Carolina 1:05:52-Picks & analysis for Denver vs Texas St 1:08:28-Picks & analysis for Belmont vs Samford 1:10:17-NY Post Pick UNC vs Georgia Tech 1:12:15-Picks & analysis for St. Thomas vs Drake 1:14:20-Picks & analysis for Cal Poly vs San Diego 1:16:17-Picks & analysis for Arizona vs Oregon St 1:18:04-Picks & analysis for VMI vs Seattle 1:20:15-Picks & analysis for Xavier vs Oklahoma St 1:22:27-Picks & analysis for California vs Utah 1:24:13-Picks & analysis for Kansas St vs Wichita St 1:26:04-Picks & analysis for Fordham vs St. John's 1:28:01-Picks & analysis for Arizona St vs Oregon 1:29:59-Picks & analysis for Ohio St vs Penn St 1:31:59-Start of extra game picks with Kennesaw St vs Wofford 1:33:38-Picks & analysis for NJIT vs Lafayette 1:35:29-Picks & analysis for UMBC vs Delaware 1:37:11-Picks & analysis for Bethune Cookman vs UCF 1:38:53-Picks & analysis for Sacred Heart vs Brown 1:41:06-Picks & analysis for Hartford vs St Francis NY 1:42:57-Picks & analysis for North Florida vs FAU 1:44:49-Picks & analysis for SE Louisiana vs Troy 1:46:37-Picks & analysis for Chattanooga vs Lipscomb 1:48:33-Picks & analysis for Bryant vs Cincinnati 1:50:47-Picks & analysis for Charleston Southern vs Tarleton St Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Bleav in NFL Draft Prospects
Fordham Offensive Lineman Nick Zakelj

Bleav in NFL Draft Prospects

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 18:37


Ryan Roberts talks with 2022 Senior Bowl Participant and NFL Draft prospect, Fordham Offensive Lineman Nick Zakelj

Coast to Coast Hoops
11/28/2021-Coast To Coast Hoops

Coast to Coast Hoops

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 131:16


Greg explain why to never bet a college basketball teaser, EVER, recaps Saturday's college basketball results, talks to Tristan Freeman of Busting Brackets about how Duke was able to take down Gonzaga and look ahead to the ACC Big Ten Challenge & Greg picks & analyzes EVERY Sunday college basketball game. Podcast Highlights 1:32=Why to ever bet a college basketball teaser 3:27-Recap of Saturday's results 19:07-Interview with Tristan Freema 36:05-Start of picks with Troy vs Florida 38:09-Picks & analysis for Montana St vs SE Missouri St 40:41-Picks & analysis for Chicago St vs Bowling Green 43:05-Picks & analysis for Eastern Michigan vs DePaul 45:07-Picks & analysis for James Madison vs FAU 46:49-Picks & analysis for Rider vs South Carolina 48:49-Picks & analysis for Evansville vs Eastern Illinois 50:43-Picks & analysis for LA Monroe vs SMU 52:49-Picks & analysis for UMKC vs Arkansas St 54:43-Picks & analysis for Wofford vs Georgia 56:50-Picks & analysis for Brown vs Quinnipiac 59:15-Picks & analysis for Penn vs Arkansas 1:01:18-Picks & analysis for North Dakota vs Kansas St 1:03:10-Picks & analysis for Villanova vs La Salle 1:05:10-Picks & analysis for CSUN vs San Diego 1:07:15-NY Post Pick Stanford vs Colorado 1:09:10-Picks & analysis for Fresno St vs California 1:11:31-Picks & analysis for Drake vs North Texas 1:13:37-Picks & analysis for Iona vs Kansas 1:15:20-Picks & analysis for Dayton vs Belmont 1:17:18-Picks & analysis for Miami vs Alabama 1:19:41-Start of Extra game picks with North Florida vs FIU 1:21:17-Picks & analysis for Bethune Cookman vs Seton Hall 1:22:56-Picks & analysis for Fordham vs Central Connecticut St 1:24:31-Picks & analysis for Yale vs Stony Brook 1:26:31-Picks & analysis for Merrimack vs Boston U 1:28:13-Picks & analysis for Western Michigan vs SE Louisiana 1:30:13-Picks & analysis for American vs Duquesne 1:31:53-Picks & analysis for Alcorn St vs UW Milwaukee 1:33:53-Picks & analysis for Loyola MD vs Fairfield 1:35:33-Picks & analysis for Siena vs Bucknell 1:37:33-Picks & analysis Citadel vs South Carolina St 1:39:16-Picks & analysis for Portland vs Incarnate Word 1:41:36-Picks & analysis for Southern vs Tennessee St 1:43:20-Picks & analysis for Charleston So vs Kennesaw St 1:45:17-Picks & analysis for Dartmouth vs Bryant 1:47:07-Picks & analysis for Fairleigh Dickinson vs Princeton 1:49:17-Picks & analysis for Stephen F Austin vs Northwestern St 1:51:06-Picks & analysis for Eastern Kentucky vs Radford 1:53:02-Picks & analysis for North Alabama vs Alabama St 1:54:53-Picks & analysis for IPFW vs Florida Gulf Coast 1:56:37-Picks & analysis for St. Francis PA vs Lehigh 1:58:32-Picks & analysis for Hampton vs Norfolk St 2:00:18-Picks & analysis for Grambling vs Morgan St Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Buried Secrets Podcast
Ghost Priests (Haunted Fordham University)

Buried Secrets Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 53:49


A look at some stories of ghost priests in an old library and classroom building. Plus, something strange that supposedly happened in the cemetery while The Exorcist was being filmed nearby. Highlights include: • A 1980s ghost priest who apparently knew computer programming • A cemetery (and human remains) that was relocated twice • Phantom voices heard by security guards • Lightning striking a cemetery Got a Fordham haunting to report? Send it to buriedsecretspodcast@gmail.com. For the shownotes and sources, visit buriedsecretspodcast.com.

Coast to Coast Hoops
11/23/2021-Coast To Coast Hoops

Coast to Coast Hoops

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 144:06


Greg recaps Monday's college basketball results, talks to Andy Dieckhoff of Heat Check CBB to look at the most impactful players thus far this season & look forward to this Tuesday's big games, & Greg picks & analyzes EVERY Tuesday college basketball game. Podcast Highlights 1:35-Recap of Monday's results 20:12-Interview with Andy Dieckhoff 36:21-Start of picks with Penn vs Towson 38:01-Picks & analysis for Nevada vs George Mason 39:52-Picks & analysis for Louisiana vs Marshall 41:57-Picks & analysis for Wofford vs South Carolina 43:28-Picks & analysis for Omaha vs Texas Tech 45:12-Picks & analysis for Tennessee St vs Nebraska 46:56-Picks & analysis for Washington vs South Dakota St 48:58-Picks & analysis for Northern Colorado vs San Jose St 50:52-NY Post Pick UCLA vs Gonzaga 53:06-Picks & analysis for Portland vs Portland St 54:58-Picks & analysis for Sacramento St vs UC Davis 57:00-Picks & analysis for Evansville vs Vermont 59:20-Picks & analysis for Akron vs Appalachian St 1:01:24-Picks & analysis for Rice vs Oakland 1:03:29-Picks & analysis for Fordham vs Delaware 1:05:32-Picks & analysis for Charlotte vs Drexel 1:07:45-Picks & analysis for Tulane vs Toledo 1:09:36-Picks & analysis for Valparaiso vs Coastal Carolina 1:11:27-Picks & analysis for James Madison vs Wright St 1:13:11-Picks & analysis for Long Beach St vs Murray St 1:15:03-Picks & analysis for Kent St vs George Washington 1:16:49-Picks & analysis for Missouri St vs East Tennessee St 1:18:46-Picks & analysis for Southern Utah vs Yale 1:20:36-Picks & analysis for UW Milwaukee vs Bowling Green 1:22:34-Picks & analysis for Middle Tennessee St vs Rider 1:24:23-Picks & analysis for Bucknell vs Mercer 1:26:03-Picks & analysis for Texas A&M vs Butler 1:27:49-Picks & analysis for Wisconsin vs Houston 1:29:28-Picks & analysis for Chaminade vs Notre Dame 1:31:16-Picks & analysis for Oregon vs St. Mary's 1:33:10-Picks & analysis for Georgia vs Northwestern 1:35:09-Picks & analysis for Virginia vs Providence 1:36:48-Picks & analysis for Buffalo vs Stephen F Austin 1:38:38-Picks & analysis N Illinois vs St. Louis 1:40:44-Picks & analysis for Illinois vs Kansas St 1:42:44-Picks & analysis for Arkansas vs Cincinnati 1:44:32-Picks & analysis for CS Fullerton vs UT Rio Grande Valley 1:46:44-Start of Extra Game Picks with Quinnipiac New Hampshire 1:48:35-Picks & analysis for Liberty vs Bethune Cookman 1:50:39-Picks & analysis for UNC Asheville vs UNC 1:52:28-Picks & analysis for Hartford vs Merrimack 1:54:04-Picks & analysis for Lipscomb vs Tennessee Tech 1:55:46-Picks & analysis for USC Upstate vs South Carolina St 1:57:31-Picks & analysis for American vs UMBC 1:59:15-Picks & analysis for LIU vs St. Peter's 2:01:03-Picks & analysis for Central Connecticut St vs Maine 2:03:05-Picks & analysis for Jackson St vs Indiana 2:04:52-Picks & analysis for St. Francis NY vs St. John's 2:06:37-Picks & analysis for Lehigh vs Columbia 2:08:27-Picks & analysis for Rhode Island vs FGCU 2:10:26-Picks & analysis for Bellarmine vs Central Michigan 2:12:04-Picks & analysis for Kennesaw St vs Wake Forest 2:13:36-Picks & analysis for North Carolina A&T vs Stanford Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

New Books in Psychoanalysis
Gila Ashtor, "Homo Psyche: On Queer Theory and Erotophobia" (Fordham UP, 2021)

New Books in Psychoanalysis

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 73:32


In this episode, I interview Gila Ashtor, a practicing psychoanalyst and critical theorist, about her new book, Homo Psyche: On Queer Theory and Erotophobia (Fordham University Press, 2021). This book proceeds from the perplexing observation that for all of its political agita, rhetorical virtuosity, and intellectual restlessness, queer theory conforms to a model of erotic life that is psychologically conservative and narrow. Even after several decades of combative, dazzling, irreverent queer critical thought, the field remains far from grasping that sexuality's radical potential lies in its being understood as “exogenous, intersubjective and intrusive” (Laplanche). In particular, and despite the pervasiveness and popularity of recent calls to deconstruct the ideological foundations of contemporary queer thought, no study has as yet considered or in any way investigated the singular role of psychology in shaping the field's conceptual impasses and politico-ethical limitations. Through close readings of key thinkers in queer theoretical thought—Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick, Leo Bersani, Lee Edelman, Judith Butler, Lauren Berlant, and Jane Gallop—Homo Psyche introduces metapsychology as a new dimension of analysis vis-à-vis the theories of French psychoanalyst Jean Laplanche, who insisted on “new foundations for psychoanalysis” that radically departed from existing Freudian and Lacanian models of the mind. Staging this intervention, Ashtor deepens current debates about the future of queer studies by demonstrating how the field's systematic neglect of metapsychology as a necessary and independent realm of ideology ultimately enforces the complicity of queer studies with psychological conventions that are fundamentally erotophobic and therefore inimical to queer theory's radical and ethical project. Britt Edelen is a Ph.D. student in English at Duke University. He focuses on modernism and the relationship(s) between language, philosophy, and literature. You can find him on Twitter or send him an email. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/psychoanalysis

New Books in Gender Studies
Gila Ashtor, "Homo Psyche: On Queer Theory and Erotophobia" (Fordham UP, 2021)

New Books in Gender Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 73:32


In this episode, I interview Gila Ashtor, a practicing psychoanalyst and critical theorist, about her new book, Homo Psyche: On Queer Theory and Erotophobia (Fordham University Press, 2021). This book proceeds from the perplexing observation that for all of its political agita, rhetorical virtuosity, and intellectual restlessness, queer theory conforms to a model of erotic life that is psychologically conservative and narrow. Even after several decades of combative, dazzling, irreverent queer critical thought, the field remains far from grasping that sexuality's radical potential lies in its being understood as “exogenous, intersubjective and intrusive” (Laplanche). In particular, and despite the pervasiveness and popularity of recent calls to deconstruct the ideological foundations of contemporary queer thought, no study has as yet considered or in any way investigated the singular role of psychology in shaping the field's conceptual impasses and politico-ethical limitations. Through close readings of key thinkers in queer theoretical thought—Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick, Leo Bersani, Lee Edelman, Judith Butler, Lauren Berlant, and Jane Gallop—Homo Psyche introduces metapsychology as a new dimension of analysis vis-à-vis the theories of French psychoanalyst Jean Laplanche, who insisted on “new foundations for psychoanalysis” that radically departed from existing Freudian and Lacanian models of the mind. Staging this intervention, Ashtor deepens current debates about the future of queer studies by demonstrating how the field's systematic neglect of metapsychology as a necessary and independent realm of ideology ultimately enforces the complicity of queer studies with psychological conventions that are fundamentally erotophobic and therefore inimical to queer theory's radical and ethical project. Britt Edelen is a Ph.D. student in English at Duke University. He focuses on modernism and the relationship(s) between language, philosophy, and literature. You can find him on Twitter or send him an email. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/gender-studies

New Books Network
Gila Ashtor, "Homo Psyche: On Queer Theory and Erotophobia" (Fordham UP, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 73:32


In this episode, I interview Gila Ashtor, a practicing psychoanalyst and critical theorist, about her new book, Homo Psyche: On Queer Theory and Erotophobia (Fordham University Press, 2021). This book proceeds from the perplexing observation that for all of its political agita, rhetorical virtuosity, and intellectual restlessness, queer theory conforms to a model of erotic life that is psychologically conservative and narrow. Even after several decades of combative, dazzling, irreverent queer critical thought, the field remains far from grasping that sexuality's radical potential lies in its being understood as “exogenous, intersubjective and intrusive” (Laplanche). In particular, and despite the pervasiveness and popularity of recent calls to deconstruct the ideological foundations of contemporary queer thought, no study has as yet considered or in any way investigated the singular role of psychology in shaping the field's conceptual impasses and politico-ethical limitations. Through close readings of key thinkers in queer theoretical thought—Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick, Leo Bersani, Lee Edelman, Judith Butler, Lauren Berlant, and Jane Gallop—Homo Psyche introduces metapsychology as a new dimension of analysis vis-à-vis the theories of French psychoanalyst Jean Laplanche, who insisted on “new foundations for psychoanalysis” that radically departed from existing Freudian and Lacanian models of the mind. Staging this intervention, Ashtor deepens current debates about the future of queer studies by demonstrating how the field's systematic neglect of metapsychology as a necessary and independent realm of ideology ultimately enforces the complicity of queer studies with psychological conventions that are fundamentally erotophobic and therefore inimical to queer theory's radical and ethical project. Britt Edelen is a Ph.D. student in English at Duke University. He focuses on modernism and the relationship(s) between language, philosophy, and literature. You can find him on Twitter or send him an email. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Psychology
Gila Ashtor, "Homo Psyche: On Queer Theory and Erotophobia" (Fordham UP, 2021)

New Books in Psychology

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 73:32


In this episode, I interview Gila Ashtor, a practicing psychoanalyst and critical theorist, about her new book, Homo Psyche: On Queer Theory and Erotophobia (Fordham University Press, 2021). This book proceeds from the perplexing observation that for all of its political agita, rhetorical virtuosity, and intellectual restlessness, queer theory conforms to a model of erotic life that is psychologically conservative and narrow. Even after several decades of combative, dazzling, irreverent queer critical thought, the field remains far from grasping that sexuality's radical potential lies in its being understood as “exogenous, intersubjective and intrusive” (Laplanche). In particular, and despite the pervasiveness and popularity of recent calls to deconstruct the ideological foundations of contemporary queer thought, no study has as yet considered or in any way investigated the singular role of psychology in shaping the field's conceptual impasses and politico-ethical limitations. Through close readings of key thinkers in queer theoretical thought—Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick, Leo Bersani, Lee Edelman, Judith Butler, Lauren Berlant, and Jane Gallop—Homo Psyche introduces metapsychology as a new dimension of analysis vis-à-vis the theories of French psychoanalyst Jean Laplanche, who insisted on “new foundations for psychoanalysis” that radically departed from existing Freudian and Lacanian models of the mind. Staging this intervention, Ashtor deepens current debates about the future of queer studies by demonstrating how the field's systematic neglect of metapsychology as a necessary and independent realm of ideology ultimately enforces the complicity of queer studies with psychological conventions that are fundamentally erotophobic and therefore inimical to queer theory's radical and ethical project. Britt Edelen is a Ph.D. student in English at Duke University. He focuses on modernism and the relationship(s) between language, philosophy, and literature. You can find him on Twitter or send him an email. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/psychology

96.1 FM WSBT Radio
Sportsbeat AM – Friday

96.1 FM WSBT Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 97:50


Darin Pritchett hosts Sportsbeat AM weekday mornings from 6-to-9 on Sports Radio 960 WSBT.  On Friday's show, more on the Notre Dame match-up with Georgia Tech.  A recap of the Irish women's basketball team beating Fordham while

Weekday Sportsbeat - 96.1 FM WSBT Radio
Weekday Sportsbeat 11-18-21

Weekday Sportsbeat - 96.1 FM WSBT Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 41:43


Sean is at Purcell Pavilion for tonight’s Irish women’s basketball game against Fordham. Sean talks to Christian McCollum from Irish Sports Daily about the latest in Notre Dame recruiting.

96.1 FM WSBT Radio
Weekday Sportsbeat 11-18-21

96.1 FM WSBT Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 41:43


Sean is at Purcell Pavilion for tonight's Irish women's basketball game against Fordham. Sean talks to Christian McCollum from Irish Sports Daily about the latest in Notre Dame recruiting.

CFR On the Record
Academic Webinar: Energy Policy and Efforts to Combat Climate Change

CFR On the Record

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021


Jason Bordoff, cofounding dean, Columbia Climate School, founding director of the Center on Global Energy Policy, and professor of professional practice in international and public affairs at Columbia University, leads a conversation on energy policy and efforts to combat climate change.   FASKIANOS: Welcome to today's session of the CFR Fall 2021 Academic Webinar Series. I am Irina Faskianos, vice president of the National Program and Outreach here at CFR. Today's discussion is on the record. And the video and transcript will be available on our website, CFR.org/academic. As always, CFR takes no institutional positions on matters of policy. We are delighted to have with us today Jason Bordoff to talk about energy policy and efforts to combat climate change. Jason Bordoff is cofounding dean of the Columbia Climate School, founding director of the Center on Global Energy Policy, and professor of professional practice in international and public affairs at Columbia University. He previously served as special assistant to President Obama and senior director for energy and climate change on the National Security Council, and he has held senior policy positions on the White House's National Economic Council and Council on Environmental Quality. He is a columnist for Foreign Policy magazine and is often on TV and radio. So, we're really happy to have him with us today. So, Jason, thank you very much. We are just coming off the COP26 conference that took place in Glasgow that started on October 31, I believe, and concluded last Friday, November 12. Could you talk about what came out of the conference at a high level, if you think that the agreements that were reached went far enough or didn't go far enough, and what your policy recommendations are to really advance and fight the countdown that we have to the Earth warming? BORDOFF: Yeah. Thanks. Well, first, thanks to you, Irina, and thanks to CFR for the invitation to be with you all today. Really delighted to have the chance to talk about these important issues. I was there for much of the two-week period in Glasgow representing the Energy Center and the Climate School here at Columbia. I think it's kind of a glass half-full/glass half-empty outlook coming out of Glasgow. So I think the Glasgow conference was notable in several respects. We'll look back on it, I think, and some of the things we will remember are—some of the things we'll remember—(dog barking)—sorry—are the role of the private sector and private finance, I think, was much more prominent in Glasgow this year. I think there were commitments around some important things like methane, a very potent greenhouse gas, was much higher on the priority list in this U.N. climate meeting than in prior ones. You had pledges on deforestation and other things that are important. And then the final agreement did have some important elements to it, particularly around Article 6, how you design carbon markets around the world. But the glass half-empty outlook is still we are nowhere close to being on track for the kind of targets that countries and companies are committing to: net zero by 2050 or 1.5 degrees of warming. I think there were—there should be hope and optimism coming out of COP. The role of the youth—at Columbia, we were honored to organize a private roundtable for President Obama with youth climate activists. It's hard to spend time with young people in COP or on campus here at Columbia or anywhere else and not be inspired by how passionately they take these issues. So the activism you saw in the streets, the sense of urgency among everyone—activists, civil society, governments, the private sector—felt different, I think, at this COP than other COPs that I have attended or probably the ones I haven't attended. But there was also for some I saw kind of we're coming out of this and we're on track for below two degrees. Or, you know, Fatih Birol, the head of the International Energy Agency, tweeted that when you add up all the pledges we're on track for 1.8 degrees Celsius warming. He's talking about all of the pledges meaning every country who's promised to be net zero by 2050, 2060, 2070, and at least from my standpoint there's a good reason to take those with a grain of salt. They're not often backed up by concrete plans or ideas about how you would get anywhere close to achieving those goals. So it's good that we have elevated ambition, which is kind of one of the core outcomes of the COP in Glasgow. But it is also the case that when you elevate ambition and the reality doesn't change as fast or maybe faster than the ambition is changing, what you have is a growing gap between ambition and reality. And I think that's where we are today. Oil use is rising each and every year. Gas use is rising. Coal use is going up this year. I don't know if it's going to keep going up, but at a minimum it's going to plateau. It's not falling off a cliff. So the reality of the energy world today—which is 75 percent of emissions are energy—is not anything close to net zero by 2050. It is the case that progress is possible. So if you go back to before the Paris agreement, we were on track for something like maybe 3.7 degrees Celsius of warming. If you look at a current outlook, it's maybe 2.7, 2.8 (degrees), so just below three degrees. So progress is possible. That's good. If you look at the nationally determined contribution pledges—so the commitments countries made that are more near term, more accountability for them; the commitments they made to reduce emissions by 2030, their NDCs—we would be on track for about 2.4 degrees Celsius warming, assuming all those pledges are fulfilled. But history would suggest a reason to be a little skeptical about that. The U.S. has a pledge to get to a 50 to 52 percent reduction in emissions by 2030, and look at how things are working or not working in Washington and make your own judgment about how likely it is that we'll put in place the set of policies that would be required to get to that ambitious level of decarbonization by 2030. And I think the same healthy dose of skepticism is warranted when you look elsewhere in the world. But even if we achieve all of those, we're still falling short of below two degrees, nevertheless 1.5 (degrees). And so, again, I think the outcome from COP for me was optimism that progress is possible—we have made a lot of progress in the last ten years—but acute concern that we're nowhere close to being on track to take targets like 1.5 degrees Celsius or net zero by 2050 seriously. And we just need to be honest as a climate and energy community—and I live in both of those worlds; there's a lot of overlap between them, obviously—about how hard it is to achieve the goals we are talking about. Renewables have grown incredibly quickly. Optimistic headlines every day about what is happening in solar and wind. Costs have come down more than 90 percent. Battery costs have come down more than 90 percent in the last decade. But solar and wind create electricity, and electricity is 20 percent of global final energy consumption. The outlook for electric vehicles is much more promising today. Lots of companies like Ford and others are committing to be all-electric by a certain date ten or twenty years from now. Cars are 20 percent of global oil demand. About half of the emission reductions—cumulative emission reductions between now and 2050 will need to come from technologies that are not yet available at commercial scale and sectors of the economy that are really hard to decarbonize like steel and cement and ships and airplanes. We're not—we don't have all the tools we need to do those yet. And then, in Glasgow, the focus of a lot of what we did at Columbia was on—we did a lot of different things, but one of the key areas of focus was the challenge of thinking about decarbonization in emerging and developing economies. I don't think we talk about that enough. The issue of historical responsibility of loss and damage was more on the agenda this year, and I think you'll hear even more about it in the year ahead. The next COP is in Africa. There was growing tension between rich and poor countries at this COP. I think a starting point was what we see in the pandemic alone and how inequitable around the world the impacts of the pandemic are. Many people couldn't even travel to Glasgow from the Global South because they couldn't get vaccinated. We need, between now and 2050, estimates are—a ballpark—$100 trillion of additional investment in clean energy if we're going to get on track for 1.5 (degrees)/net zero by 2050. So the question that should obsess all of us who work in this space: Where will that money come from? Most of it's going to be private sector, not public. Most of it is going to be in developing and emerging economies. That is where the growth in energy is going to come from. Eight hundred million people have no access to energy at all. Nevertheless, if you model what energy access means, it's often defined as, you have enough to turn on lights or charge your cellphone. But when you talk about even a fraction of the standard of living we take for granted—driving a car, having a refrigerator, having an air conditioner—the numbers are massive. They're just huge, and the population of Africa's going to double to 2.2 billion by the year 2050. So these are really big numbers and we need to recognize how hard this is. But we should also recognize that it is possible. We have a lot of the tools we need. We need innovation in technology and we need stronger policy, whether that's a carbon price or standards for different sectors. And then, of course, we need private-sector actors to step up as well, and all of us. And we have these great commitments to achieve these goals with a lot of capital being put to work, and now we need to hold people accountable to make sure that they do that. So, again, I look back on the last two weeks or before, two weeks of COP, the gap between ambition and reality got bigger. Not necessarily a bad thing—ambition is a good thing—but now it's time to turn the ambition into action. We need governments to follow through on their pledges. Good news is we have a wide menu of options for reducing emissions. The bad news is there's not a lot of time at our current rate of emissions. And emissions are still going up each and every year. They're not even falling yet. Remember, what matters is the cumulative total, not the annual flow. At our current rate of emissions, the budget—carbon budget for staying below 1.5 (degrees) is used up in, around a decade or so, so there's not much time to get to work. But I'm really excited about what we're building with the first climate school in the country here at Columbia. When it comes to pushing—turning ambition into action, that requires research, it requires education, and it requires engaging with partners in civil society and the public sector and the private sector to help turn that research into action. And the people we're working with here every day on campus are the ones who are going to be the leaders that are going to hopefully do a better job—(laughs)—than we've done over the last few decades. So whatever you're doing at your educational institution—be it teaching or research or learning—we all have a role to play in the implementation of responsible, forward-thinking energy policy. I'm really excited to have the chance to talk with you all today. Look forward to your questions and to the conversation. Thank you again. FASKIANOS: Jason, that's fantastic. Thank you very much for that informative and sobering view. So let's turn to all of you now for your questions. So I'm going to go first to—I have one raised hand from Stephen Kass. Q: OK. Thank you. Jason, thank you for the very useful and concise summary. What specific kinds of energy programs do you think developing countries should now be pursuing? Should they be giving up coal entirely? Should they be importing natural gas? Should they be investing in renewables or nuclear? What recipe would you advise developing countries to pursue for their own energy needs? BORDOFF: It's going to need to be a lot of different things, so there's no single answer to that, of course. And by the way, I'll just say it would be super helpful if people don't mind just introducing yourself when you ask a question. That would be helpful to me, at least. I appreciate it. I think they need to do a lot of different things. I think I would start with low-hanging fruit, and renewable electricity is not the entire answer. The sun and wind are intermittent. Electricity can't do certain things yet, like power ships and airplanes. But the low cost of solar and wind, I think, does mean it's a good place to start, and then we need to think about those other sectors as well. I think a key thing there comes back to finance, and that's why we're spending so much time on it with our research agenda here. Access to financing and cost of capital are really important. Clean energy tends to be more capital-intensive and then, like solar and wind, more CAPEX, less OPEX over time. But attaining financing in poor countries is really difficult and expensive. Lack of experience with renewable energy, local banks are often reluctant to lend to those kinds of projects. And then foreign investors, where most of that capital is going to come from, view projects often in emerging markets and developing economies particularly as more risky. Local utilities may not be creditworthy. There's currency inflation risk in many developing countries, people worry about recouping their upfront investment if bills are paid in local currency. There's political risk, maybe corruption, inconsistently enforced regulations. And it can be harder to build clean energy infrastructure if you don't have other kinds of infrastructure, like ports, and roads, and bridges and a good electrical grid. So I would start there. And I think there's a role for those countries to scale up their clean energy sectors, but also for policymakers and multilateral development banks and governments elsewhere—there was a lot of focus in Glasgow on whether the developed countries would make good on their promise made in Copenhagen to send $100 billion a year in climate finance to developing countries. And they fell short of that. But even that is kind of a rounding error, compared to the one to two trillion (dollars) a year that the International Energy Agency estimates is needed. So there are many other things besides just writing a check that government, like in the U.S. or elsewhere, can do. The Development Finance Corporation, for example, can lend to banks in local and affordable rates, finance projects in local currency, expand the availability of loan guarantees. I've written before about how I think even what often gets called industrial policy, let's think about some sectors—in the same way China did with solar or batteries fifteen years ago. Are there sectors where governments might help to grow domestic industries and, by doing that, scale—bring down the cost of technologies that are expensive now, the premium for low-carbon or zero-carbon cement or steel. It's just—it's not reasonable to ask a developing country to build new cities, and new highways, and all the new construction they're going to do with zero-carbon steel and cement because it's just way too expensive. So how do you bring those costs down? If we think about investments, we can make through U.S. infrastructure or other spending to do that, that not only may help to grow some domestic industries and jobs here, that can be its own form of global leadership if we're driving those costs of those technologies down to make it cheaper for others to pick up. So I think that's one of the places I'd start. But there are a lot of other things we need to do too. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to take the next question—and let me just go back. Stephen Kass is an adjunct professor at NYU. So the next question is a written question from Wei Liang, who is an assistant professor of international policy studies at Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey. And the question is: I wonder if you could briefly address the Green Climate Fund and individual countries' pledge on that. BORDOFF: Yeah, I mean, it touches a little bit on what I said a moment ago about the need for developed countries to provide climate finance to developing countries. And so I think that's—it's important that we take those obligations seriously, and that we, in advanced economies, step up and make those funds available. And but, again, we're talking—the amount we're still talking about is so small compared to the amounts that are needed to deal both with the impacts of climate change, and then also to curb climate change, to mitigate climate change. Because we know that developing countries are in the parts of the world that will often be most adversely impacted by climate impacts—droughts, and heat waves, and storms, and food security issues—from a standpoint of equity are the parts of the world that have done the least to cause this problem, responsible for very few emissions. If you look cumulatively at emissions since the start of the industrial age, about half—nearly half have come from the U.S. and EU combined. Two percent from the entire continent of Africa. So they are using very little energy today, haven't therefore contributed to the problems, and have the fewest resources, of course, to cope with the impacts, and also to develop in a cleaner way. Sometimes it's cheaper to develop in a cleaner way. Renewables are often today competitive with coal, even without subsidy. But there are many areas where that's not the case, and there is a cost. And we need to help make sure that, you know, we're thinking about what a just transition looks like. And that means many different things for different communities, whether you're a coal worker or an agricultural worker in California that may, you know, be working outside in worse and worse heat. But it also means thinking about the parts of the world that need assistance to make this transition. So I think we need to be taking that much more seriously. FASKIANOS: Next question is a raised hand from Tara Weil, who is an undergraduate student at Pomona College. Q: Hi. So, given that developed nations are the largest contributors to carbon emissions, as you've said, how can larger powers be convinced as to the importance of addressing global inequality with regards to climate change? And thank you so much, also, for giving this talk. BORDOFF: Yeah. Thank you for being here. I don't have a great answer to your question. I mean, the politics of foreign aid in general are not great, as we often hear in events at CFR. So I do think one—we need to continue to encourage, through political advocacy, civil society, and other ways, governments in advanced economies to think about all the tools they have at their disposal. I think the ones that are going to be—I'm reluctant to try to speak as a political commenter rather than a climate and energy commenter on what's going to work politically. But part of that is demonstrating what—it's not just generosity. It is also in one's self-interest to do these things. And just look at the pandemic, right? What would it look like for the U.S. to show greater leadership, or any country to show even greater leadership and help cope with the pandemic all around the world in parts of the world that are struggling to vaccinate their people? That is not only an act of generosity, but it is clearly one of self-interest too, because it's a pretty globalized economy and you're not going to be able to get a pandemic under control at home if it's not under control abroad. Of course, the same is true of the impacts of climate change. It doesn't matter where a ton of CO2 comes from. And we can decarbonize our own economy, but the U.S. is only 15 percent of annual emissions globally. So it's not going to make a huge difference unless everyone else does that as well. There is also the potential, I think, to—and we see this increasingly when you look at the discussion of the Biden infrastructure bill, how they talk about the U.S.-China relationship, which of course are the two most important countries from the standpoint of climate change. It is one of cooperation. That was one of the success stories in Glasgow, was a commitment to cooperate more. We'll see if we can actually do it, because it's a pretty difficult and tense U.S.-China relationship right now. So the question is, can you separate climate from all those other problems on human rights, and intellectual property, and everything else and then cooperate on climate? It's been hard, but there's a renewed commitment to try to do that. But also, a recognition that action in the clean energy space is not only about cooperation but it's also about economic competition. And you have seen more and more focus on both the Republican and Democratic sides of the aisle on thinking about the security of supply chains, and critical minerals, and the inputs in lithium and rare earth elements that go into many aspects of clean energy. To my point before about aspects of industrial policy that might help grow your own domestic economy, I think there are ways in which countries can take measures that help—that help their own economies and help workers and help create jobs, and that in the process are helping to drive forward more quickly the clean energy technologies we need, and bring down the cost of those technologies to make them more accessible and available in some of the less-developed countries. So I think trying to frame it less as do we keep funds at home, do we write a check abroad? But there are actually many steps you could do to create economic opportunities and are win-win. Without being pollyannish about it, I think there is some truth to some of those. And I think we can focus on those politically as well. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to take an international question from Luciana Alexandra Ghica, who is an associate professor for international cooperation at the University of Bucharest. What type of topics do you think we should address immediately in university programs that provide training in climate, development, global policies, or international public affairs, so that a new generation of leaders really pushes forward the agenda on climate change? BORDOFF: Yeah. Well, I'll say a quick word about what we're doing at Columbia, and maybe it's relevant to that question, because Columbia has made this historic commitment to build a climate school. There are many initiatives, and centers, and institutes. There was not only a handful of schools—law school, business school, medical school, engineering school. And it is the largest commitment a university can make to any particular topic, is something on the scale of a school with degree-granting authority and tenure-granting authority, and all the things that come with a school. And it's just the scale at a place like Columbia, and many other places, is just enormous. That's what we're doing on climate. We have created a climate school. And I'm honored President Bollinger asked me to help lead it. And we're going to build a faculty. We have our first inaugural class of masters' students, about ninety students that are going through the program right now, and we have a building in Manhattan for the climate school, and on and on. The idea—but the question is, what is climate, right? Because academia has been historically organized into traditional academic disciplines. So you have people who you hire through a tenured search, and they go to the engineering faculty and build their lab there. And there's law professors, and their business school professors, and on and on and on, social work. But for climate, you need all of those, right? They all kind of need to come together. And, like, interdisciplinary doesn't even sort of do justice to what it means to think about approaching this systemic—it's a systemic challenge. The system has to change. And so whatever solution you're talking about—if you want to get hydrogen to scale in the world, let's—you know, for certain sectors of the economy that may be hard to do with renewable energy, or in terms of renewable energy and, say, green hydrogen. You need engineering breakthroughs to bring down the cost of electrolyzers, or you need new business models, or you need financial institution frameworks that figure out how you're going to put the capital into these things. You need the policy incentives. How are you going to—you need permitting and regulation. How do we permit hydrogen infrastructure? It's barely been done before. There are concerns in the environmental justice community about some aspects of technologies like that or carbon capture that need to be taken seriously and addressed. There are geopolitical implications, potentially, to starting to build a global trade in ammonia or hydrogen, and what security concerns—energy security concerns might accompany those, the way we thought about oil or gas from Russia into Europe. I have an article coming out in the next issue of Foreign Affairs about the geopolitics of the energy transition. So we need disciplines that come together and look at a problem like that in all of those multifaceted dimensions, so we can figure out how to get from a lab to scale out in the world. And so when we think about the areas of concentration here, climate finance, climate justice, climate in society, climate in international security—I mean, a range of things that I think are really important to help people understand. And that's going to be a major focus of what we do at the climate school here. FASKIANOS: Fantastic. Let's go next to Sean Grossnickle, who has raised his hand. A graduate student at Fordham University. Q: Speak now? Hi, this is not Sean but Henry Schwalbenberg, also at Fordham, where I teach in our international political economy and development program. I went to a conference about a month ago in Rome. And there was a physicist from CERN. And he was a big advocate of something I'd never heard of, and this is this thorium for nuclear reactors. And he was going through all the pros, but I wanted a more balanced perspective on it. And I'm hoping that you might give me a little pros and cons of this thorium nuclear reactor technique. BORDOFF: Yeah. I will be honest and say that nuclear is not my area of focus. We have a pretty strong team here that works in nuclear, and I think is optimistic about the breakthroughs we're going to see in several potential areas of nuclear—advanced nuclear technology, that being one of them, or small modular reactors, and others. At a high level, I will say I do think if you're serious about the math of decarbonization and getting to net zero by 2050, it's hard to do without zero-carbon nuclear power. It's firm, baseload power. It runs all the time. Obviously, there are challenges with intermittency of solar and wind, although they can be addressed to some extent with energy story. Most of the analyses that are done show not necessarily in the U.S. but in other parts of the world significant growth in nuclear power. The International Energy Agency just modeled what it looks like to get to net zero by 2050, and this pathway that got a lot of attention for saying things like we would not be investing in new oil and gas supply. The world has to change a lot pretty quickly. And they have about a hundred new nuclear plants being built by 2030, so that's a pretty big number. So we're going to need all tools—(laughs)—that we have at our disposal. And unfortunately, I worry we may still fall short. So I think at a high level we need to think really hard about how to improve nuclear technology. The people who know that really well I think are optimistic about our ability to do that. And I will follow up on thorium in particular with my colleagues at Columbia, and happy to follow up with you offline about it. FASKIANOS: Great. I'm going to take a written question from Stephen Bird, who's an associate professor of political science at Clarkson University. He thanks you, and he wanted you to talk a little bit more about political will. The overall dollar amounts are clear. Much cheaper to address climate change than to ignore it. That said, countries are, clearly, lagging. Is it a case of countries just don't want to take action now because of issues of fairness or because of lack of domestic political support, i.e., citizens aren't convinced that they should pay costs now with payoffs that come later, and what might we do to improve that issue in terms of persuading or arguing for more political will? BORDOFF: Yeah. It's a question for, you know, a political scientist as much as an energy or climate expert, and I wish I had a better answer to it. I think it is—climate is one of the trickiest problems for so many reasons but one of those is there is no acute event now that you sort of respond to, hopefully, and pull everyone together. It's a set of things that, you know, of course, there would have been storms and droughts before but we know they're intensified and made worse. It's hard to rally public support. We often respond to a crisis kind of proverbial, you know, frog in the boiling water kind of thing. So that makes it hard. There are huge issues—we talked about a just transition a few minutes ago—there are huge issues with intergenerational equity when we talk about climate. There are, clearly, climate impacts and damages today but some of the worst will be in the future, including for people who may not be born yet, and we don't do a great job in our political environment about thinking about those and valuing them today and how you do that, and from an economic standpoint, of course, there are questions about discount rates you apply and everything else. I think, politically, one of the things that has mobilized stronger climate—support for climate action, so it is encouraging that if you look at polling on climate change, the level of urgency that the public in many countries, including the U.S., broadly, ascribe to acting on climate has gone up a lot. It's higher today than it was, you know, a decade or so ago. That's a result of people seeing the impacts and also advocacy campaigns and political campaigns. It is often tied to—it's like a win-win. Like, President Biden says when he thinks of climate he thinks of jobs, and so we're going to deal with climate and we're going to grow the economy faster and we're going to create jobs, and there is truth to that. It is also the case that there are costs. The cost of inaction are higher, but there are costs associated with the transition itself. So if you survey the American public, I think, climate, according to the latest YouGov/Economist poll I saw, you know, it was number two on the list of things they cared the most about. That's much higher than in the past. And then if you ask the American public are they willing to pay $0.25 a gallon more at the pump to act on climate, 75 percent say no. And you look at the challenges the Biden administration is having right now sort of thinking about a really strong set of measures to put in place to move the ball forward on climate, but acute concern today about where oil prices are and inflation and natural gas prices as we head into the winter. If the weather is cold then it's going to be really expensive for people to heat their homes in parts—some parts of the country like New England, maybe. So that's a reality, and I think we need to—it was interesting, in the roundtable we did with President Obama with climate activists, that was a message he had for them. You know, be impatient, be angry, keep the pressure on, but also be pragmatic. And by that he means, like, you know, try to see the world through the eyes of others and people who are worried about the cost of filling up at the pump, the cost of paying their heating bills. They're not—some of them may not be where you are yet. They may not have the same sense of urgency with acting on climate that many of us on this Zoom do and need to take those concerns seriously. So I think that's a real challenge, and it can be addressed with good policy, to some extent, right, if you think about the revenue raised from a carbon tax and how it could be redistributed in a way that reduce the regressive impacts. I've written about how, at a high level—I'll say one last point—if we get on track for an energy transition, which we're not on yet, right. (Laughs.) Oil and gas use are going up each and every year. But imagine we started to get on track where those were falling year after year. It's still going to take decades, and that process of transition is going to be really messy. It's going to be really volatile. We're going to have fits and starts in policy from Obama to Trump to Biden. We're going to make estimate—we're going to make bets on technologies and maybe get those technologies wrong or misunderstand the cost curves, the potential to shut down investment in certain forms of energy before the rest are ready to pick up the slack. If it's messy and volatile and bumpy, that's not only harmful economically and geopolitically, it will undermine public support for stronger climate action. So you see, like, in Washington they're selling off the Strategic Petroleum Reserve because we're moving to a world beyond oil and also we have all this domestic oil now with shale. We need more, not fewer, tools to mitigate volatility for the next several decades if we're serious about making this transition, and I think the same is true for thinking about sort of buffers you could build into geopolitics, foreign policy, and national security, because there will be—in a post-oil and gas world, you know, you may say, well, we're not going to worry as much about the Middle East or about, you know, Russia's leverage in Europe. But there will be new risks created and we can talk about what some of those might be, and we need new tools of foreign policy to mitigate those potential foreign policy risks. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to take the next question. Raised hand from Chloe Demrovsky, adjunct instructor at NYU. Q: Hey, can you hear me? BORDOFF: Yes. Thank you. FASKIANOS: Yes. Q: Hi. Chloe Demrovsky, adjunct at NYU and president and CEO of Disaster Recovery Institute International. Thanks for being with us, Jason. So my question is about the feasibility and your thoughts on artificially altered clouds or solar geoengineering. What are the ethical and geopolitical implications of, perhaps, using this to buy a little time for our energy transition? Thanks. BORDOFF: Yeah. A super interesting question, and I will say, again, I'm sort of—think of myself as an energy expert. So that is where I spend more time than thinking about tools like solar geoengineering. I guess, it seems there's, obviously, huge risks associated with something like that and we need to understand them. We need to do research. We need to figure out what those risks may be. There are global governance concerns. It's actually pretty cheap to do solar geoengineering. So what happens when some country or some billionaire decides they want to start spraying stuff into the atmosphere to cool the planet? And for those who don't know that, you know, solar—I mean, you think of after a volcano the planet cools a little bit because of all the particulates up in the atmosphere. When you model in an energy system model how much phasing out coal will reduce warming, you, obviously, have much less carbon dioxide emissions but that's offset slightly—not completely, of course—it's offset a little bit by the fact that you have less local air pollution, which is a good thing from air pollution. But air pollution has a slightly cooling effect, because you have these little particles floating around that reflect sunlight. So the idea is can we create that artificially and cool the planet, and you can imagine lots of reasons why that could go wrong when you're trying to figure out what—how much to put in there, what unintended consequences could be. You still have other impacts of carbon dioxide like ocean acidification. Maybe you go too far in one direction, that's like you're setting the thermostat. That's why one of the companies doing carbon removal is called Global Thermostat. You're kind of figuring out what temperature it should be. But I will say so it's an area that needs research and I think, given how far we are away from achieving goals like 1.5 and net-zero 2050, I guess what I would say is in the same way that when I worked in the Obama administration it was—I wouldn't say controversial, but there were some people who didn't want to talk about adaptation because it was kind of a more—there was a moral hazard problem there. It was, you know, less pressure to mitigate and reduce emissions if we thought adaptation was a solution. People worry about that from the standpoint of solar geoengineering. But the likelihood—I hope I'm wrong, but the likelihood that we roll the clock forward, you know, later this decade and we realize we've made progress but we're still pretty far short, and the impacts of climate change in the same way the IPCC 1.5 report said, you know what, 1.5 is going to be pretty bad, too, and that's even worse than we thought, the more we learn about climate the more reason there is to be concerned, not less concerned. It seems very plausible to me that we will kind of come to a growing consensus that we have to think about whether this technology can, as you said, buy us time. This is not something you do permanently. You need to get to net zero to stop global warming. But if you want to reduce the impacts of warming on the rate of Arctic sea ice melt and all the rest, can you buy time, extend the runway, by doing this for some number of decades. And I think—I don't have a strong view on the right answer to that. But I think it's something we, certainly, need to be thinking about researching and understanding what the consequences would be because we're going to have to figure out how to take more abrupt actions to close that gap between ambition and reality unless the reality starts to change much more quickly than is the case right now. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I saw a raised hand from Maya but she lowered it. So if you want to raise your hand again, please do so. And in the meantime, I'm going to take a written question from Jennifer Sklarew, who's an assistant professor of energy and sustainability at George Mason University. Was CCS/CCUS, which carbon capture and storage/carbon capture utilization and storage, to write out those acronyms, promoted as a climate change solution in Glasgow and was there a pushback against this technology option as both a climate change solution and a support mechanism for continued fossil fuel use? BORDOFF: There was some pushback but, I think, actually, more in the other direction. So I think there has been a growing recognition from many in the climate world that carbon capture technology, carbon removal technology, need to be part of the solution. I think there's almost no climate model at this point that shows how you would get to 1.5 degrees or net zero—1.5 degrees without huge amounts of negative emissions—carbon removal. Some of that can be nature based, but a lot of it will be—some of it will be technology based as well and focusing on what we care about, which is the emissions, is the most important thing. So and this is not, I don't think, the primary thing you're going to do. You want to do the things that are easiest and cheapest and present the fewest risks. So putting a lot of renewables into the grid, getting electrification into the vehicle fleet—there's a lot of things that you would do before that. But if you think about some of the sectors in the economy we talked about before that are hard to decarbonize like steel and cement, it may well be the case that carbon capture is part of the technology there. There was a big announcement yesterday from the NET Power Allam Cycle gas plant in Texas that they had finally come online with delivering net-zero power to the grid. It was sort of a milestone in that technology. So we need to advance this technology and figure out how we're going to—how we're going to get where we need to be. We need to hold that kind of technology accountable to make sure that it's actually meeting the standards we're talking about so that it actually is very low, if not zero, carbon. But if you look at, you know, most of the scenarios I'm aware of, whether it's—Princeton did the study “Net-Zero America,” how we get to net zero by 2050 in the U.S. The International Energy Agency, as I said, did it for net zero globally. There is a meaningful role for carbon capture, to some extent, in the power sector in these heavy industry sectors like steel and cement, and then making, say, hydrogen some of that will be blue hydrogen. Most of it, eventually, will be green, but there may be some role for blue hydrogen, which is—which is gas with carbon capture. So I think, if anything, there's been a growing understanding that we need all tools on deck right away and, again, I fear even with all the tools we may still fall short. FASKIANOS: Great. There's a written question from Laila Bichara, who's at SUNY Farmingdale, international business. There was a New York Times article, “Business Schools Respond to a Flood of Interest in ESG,” talking about the issue of the scarcity of skills in recent graduates to help with social impact, sustainable investments, climate finance, and social entrepreneurship. And she wanted to know if there are resources that you could point the group to in terms of foundation courses or certification that would provide all students with a basic foundation. BORDOFF: Yeah. That's a really good question and it's a growing area of focus and I think universities should be doing more in. The Tamer Center of Columbia Business School does a lot of work in ESG. We hosted a really interesting roundtable at the Center on Global Energy Policy yesterday on ESG and actually been doing a lot of work thinking about that in the context of state-owned enterprises and national oil companies, which we don't talk about enough. But they're a really, really big part of the problem we're talking about. We tend to focus more on these very well-known private sector companies or financial institutions in places like New York. So there—Bloomberg Philanthropies has done a huge amount in this space. I think there's some really good educational programs with some universities and business schools that have done a lot in the ESG space. But I think it's a need, to be frank. I mean, the fact that you're asking the question and I'm pointing to a few examples, but not a huge number, and it is something that universities need to educate themselves about but then is an opportunity for us to educate others. Maybe a revenue one, too, with executive education or something. But there's a lot of companies and financial institutions that want to understand this better. I worry that while there's a huge growing focus on climate, which is a good thing, in the financial community, the phrase ESG kind of means so many different things right now. It's this alphabet soup of regulations and standards and disclosure requirements, and some may make a difference and some may not and it's hard to figure out which ones matter, and for people who want to do the responsible thing what does that really mean. That's an area where research is needed. I mean, that's a role for what we do every day to think about if the SEC is going to regulate what makes a difference and what doesn't, if you're going to create green bonds. If you're going to call everything green in the finance community, what's real and what's not? What moves the needle? What doesn't? What are the returns for greener portfolios? How is that affecting the cost of capital for clean energy versus dirty energy? You know, on and on. I think those are important research questions for us to take on and then it's our job to help educate others as well. FASKIANOS: Great. So the next question I'm going to take from—oh, OK. Good. Maya Copeland (sp) has written her question. She's a political science major at Delaware State University. Do you believe developed nations like the U.S. have done a lot in reference to climate change or mostly talk? If you believe nations like the U.S. have dropped the ball in this aspect, what do you think it would take to get those powerhouses serious about environmental change? BORDOFF: I think advanced economies have done—many have done a lot. I mean, the European Union has taken climate seriously and has reduced emissions and has pretty strong measures in place with a carbon market, for example, with a pretty high carbon price right now. The politics of this issue are not quite as favorable in the U.S., but the U.S. has seen emissions decline more than most over the last decade and a half, in part because of policy measures that have, you know, advanced renewable energy and brought the cost of that down as well as cheaper natural gas displacing coal for a while. But at a broader level, you know, have we done enough? The answer is no one's done enough—(laughs)—which is why emissions are still going up every single year. So that—so the answer is no, we haven't done enough. Almost no country has done enough at home to be on a trajectory for net zero 2050. You saw the announcements from countries like India saying, we'll get to net zero by 2070, and, you know, people said, oh, well, that's terrible. They're not saying 2050. And implicit in that is sort of saying, well, if you want to get global to net zero by 2050 we're not all going to move at the same speed, right. Some countries have advanced with the benefit of hydrocarbons since the Industrial Age and some haven't. So, presumably, the pathways are going to look different, right. And, you know, that's not always how countries in the advanced—in the developing—in the developed world talk about it. The commitment from the Biden administration is net zero by 2050. So I would say there's been—there are some models to point to of countries that have taken this issue seriously but we're not doing enough and partly because the political will is not there and partly—I come back to what I said before—this problem is harder than people realize. So you say which countries are doing enough, like, point to some models, right, and somebody might point to Norway, which, you know, the share of new vehicles sold that are electric in Norway went from zero to, I think, it's 70 percent now. I mean, that's amazing. Seventy percent of new car sales are electric. And if you go back to the start of that trajectory, about a decade or decade and a half, oil demand is unchanged in Norway. So we can talk about why that is and it's because a lot—as I said earlier, a lot of oil is used for things other than cars, and it's increased for trucks and planes and petrochemicals. It takes time for the vehicle fleet to turn over. So when you start selling a bunch of electric cars, you know, average car is on the road for fifteen years so it takes a while before that—the vehicle stock turns over. So I saw that kind of mapped out on a chart recently, just two lines—one is electric vehicle sales going straight up and then the other is oil demand in a flat line. It's a reminder of how unforgiving the math of decarbonization is. The math of climate is really unforgiving, like, you know, the kind of harmful impacts we're going to see with even 1.5 degrees warming. But the math of energy and decarbonization is really unforgiving, too. It's—and we just need to be honest with ourselves about what it takes to get where we need to go. Because I think it's good to have optimism and ambition, but I worry there should be optimism but not happy talk. We should recognize that there's a lot of work to do and let's get to work doing it. FASKIANOS: Great. So there are several questions in the chat about China. I'm going to start off with Andrew Campbell, who's a student at George Mason University. Is LNG—liquefied natural gas—a bridge toward renewable energy still being considered? If not, how are India and China's expected growth and increase in coal use going to be addressed? And then there are a couple of other comments or questions about China. You know, what's your take on China as the biggest emitter and return somewhat to coal? Can we actually even make stated and adequate new goals? And, you know, given the relationship between U.S. and China, which is contentious, you know, what is the cooperation going to be between U.S. and China on climate? So there's a lot packed in there, but I know you can address it all. (Laughs.) BORDOFF: Yeah. I think the China question is really hard, as I said earlier, this kind of, like, competition and cooperation and we're going to try to do both, and I think there was a hope early on—Secretary Kerry said it—that climate could be segmented from the broader challenges in the U.S.-China relationship, and I think that has proven harder to do than people had hoped, in part, because, you know, you need both parties to want to do that. I think China has signaled it's not necessarily willing to segment cooperation on climate from lots of other issues. And then these things bleed together where, you know, there's measures being taken in Washington to restrict imports of solar panels from China, that there were concerns that were made with—in ways that have human rights abuses associated with them with forced labor or maybe have unfair trade practices in terms of subsidies. China is—you know, the leadership in China takes climate seriously. This is a country that recognizes, I think, climate change is real and that needs to be addressed. They have a set of national interests that matter a lot, obviously, to them in terms of economic growth, and the pathway to get there is challenging. So it's a country that's growing clean energy incredibly quickly, as we're seeing right now, in part because there's a(n) energy crunch throughout Europe and Asia. They are ramping up the use of coal quite a bit again, but also taking some pretty strong measures to advance clean energy and, over time, hopefully, move in a lower carbon direction for reasons both about concerns over climate but also local air pollution, which is much, much worse in many parts of China than it is here and that's a huge source of concern for the public there. So when it comes to things like coal they need to figure out how to address those air pollution problems. And then for reasons of economic competition, like I mentioned a minute ago. I mean, China dominates the global market for refining and processing of critical minerals for solar panels, and there are economic and national competitiveness and strategic reasons to do that. So all of those things motivate them to move in the direction of clean energy, but they need to be moving faster to phase down hydrocarbon energy for sure. And then you ask a really hard question about—not hard, but one of the most contentious questions is about the role of natural gas in the transition, and we can have a whole separate session about that. I think there is a view of many in the climate community and many in developing countries—in developed countries that there's not space left in the carbon budget for natural gas, and you saw the Biden administration recently declare through the Treasury Department that, except in very rare cases of the poorest of the poor like Sierra Leone or something, they would not finance natural gas projects through the multilateral development banks. The vice president of Nigeria, I think, responded—speaking of CFR—in Foreign Affairs by writing that this was not fair and you need to think about a viable pathway for a country like Nigeria to develop and it just—it doesn't work to get there that fast. There has to be a bridge. The role of gas looks very different in different parts of the world. It looks different in the U.S. than it does in an emerging or a developing economy. It looks different in the power sector, where there are a lot more alternatives like renewables than it does in heavy industry or how we heat our homes. It looks different for, say, in the Global South, where you're talking about people who are still using coal and charcoal and dung for cooking to think about solutions like liquefied petroleum gas. So all of those things are true, but we need to think about gas also with the carbon budget in mind. I mean, the math is just the math. (Laughs.) If you're going to build any gas infrastructure and not have it blow through the carbon budget, it's going to have to be retired before the end of its normal economic life and you need to think about how that might look in different parts of the world. So you need to be fair to people, to allow them to grow, but also recognize that the math of carbon, you know, is what it is. FASKIANOS: Great. I just want to credit those last—the China questions came from Lada Kochtcheeva at North Carolina State University and Joan Kaufman, who's director of Schwarzman Scholars based in China. We are really at the end of our time—we started a couple minutes late—and I just wanted to go back to—there are students on the call who are following with a professor on the webinar who wanted you just to comment on blue hydrogen, whether or not it is contributing or helping to reduce greenhouse gases. BORDOFF: I think the answer is it can. You just need to make sure that it actually does. So the question of—and by blue hydrogen we mean, you know, using gas with carbon capture to create hydrogen. It needs to have very low methane leakage rates. It needs to have very high capture rates, and we know that is technically possible. It doesn't mean it will be done that way. So if people are going to pursue blue hydrogen as part of the solution in the—particularly in the near term, you need to make sure that it's meeting those standards. I think in the long run my guess and, I think, most guesses would be that green hydrogen is going to make more sense. It's going to be cheaper. The cost is going to come down. And so if we have a significant part of the energy sector that is hydrogen and ammonia in, say, 2050, more of that's going to be green than blue. But there can be a role for blue if you make sure it's done the right way. You just have to actually make sure it's done the right way. FASKIANOS: Great. And, Jason, we are out of time, but I wanted to give you one last, you know, one-minute or thirty seconds, whatever you want, just to say some parting words on your work at the center or, you know, to leave the group with what they can do, again. So— BORDOFF: Well, I would just say thanks for the chance to be with you all and for the work that you're doing every day. You know, I think Glasgow was a moment when the world came together to elevate ambition and roll up our sleeves and say this is—this is the decisive decade. Like, we'll know ten years from now—(laughs)—if we got anywhere close to making it or not. And so it's time for everyone to kind of roll up their sleeves and say, what can we do? We're doing that, I think, at Columbia with the creation of this new climate school. We do that every day at the Center on Global Energy Policy. And so just in all of your institutions, you know, what does that mean for you? What does it mean for the institution? What does that mean for your own research and time and how you allocate it? How do we step up and say, what can we do in the biggest and boldest way we can? Because we need—we're creating a climate school because I think the view is—you know, a hundred years ago there were no schools of public health and now it's how would you deal with a pandemic without a school of public health? So I think our view is decades from now we'll look back and wonder how we ever thought it was possible to handle a problem as complex and urgent as climate change without universities devoting their greatest kind of resource to them. And the measure of success for universities has to be research and new knowledge creation. It has to be education. It has to be serving our own communities. For us, it's, you know, the community here in New York, Harlem. But also are we focusing the extraordinary resources and capacity and expertise of these great institutions to solve humanity's greatest problems? That has to be a motivating force, too, for much of—maybe not all of but a lot of what universities do. So I'd just ask all of us to go back and think about how we can do that in our own work every day. and we have to do it through partnerships. I think universities don't work together as well as they need to. But this is only going to work if we work together. FASKIANOS: Great way to end. Thank you very much, Jason Bordoff. We really appreciate it. We'll have to look for your article in Foreign Affairs magazine, which is published by CFR. So, we are excited that you continue to contribute to the magazine. You can follow Jason Bordoff on Twitter at @JasonBordoff. Very easy to remember. Our final academic webinar of the semester will be on Wednesday, December 1, at 1:00 p.m. (ET). Michelle Gavin, who is CFR's Ralph Bunche senior fellow for Africa policy studies, will talk about African politics and security issues. So in the meantime, follow us at @CFR_Academic. Come to CFR.org, ForeignAffairs.com, and ThinkGlobalHealth.org for research and analysis on global issues, and we look forward to continuing the conversation with you. Take care. BORDOFF: Thank you. (END)

Now More Than Ever
Brian Lyman: Reporter For The Montgomery Advertiser

Now More Than Ever

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 57:45


Brian Lyman is one of the best reporters in America. He covers politics and the legislature for The Montgomery Advertiser. Like Vince Lombardi before him, Brian is a proud Fordham Ram though he was not one of The Seven Blocks of Granite, the famous 1936 Fordham football team who's Rose Bowl hopes were dashed after they tied The University of Georgia!  Brian is also an autodidact who can recommend reading on almost any subject, has his own “Becoming Lincoln” podcast, and speaks truth to power whenever the opportunity arises.  He can be found on twitter at: lyman (@lyman) Becoming Lincoln Twitter: Becoming Lincoln (@BecomingLincoln) Becoming Lincoln Podcast: ‎Becoming Lincoln on Apple Podcasts Subscribe, Rate and Review the show. Recommend it to your friends, and follow all of our accounts. NOW!  Podcast Instagram Podcast Twitter Dave Instagram Dave Twitter Chris Twitter Chris Instagram  Show email: nowmorethaneverpod@gmail.com  

College Hoops Overtime - Betting
11/12/2021-Hoopin' With Hoops

College Hoops Overtime - Betting

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 175:54


Greg talks about why he does not do in-game bets, recaps Thursday's college basketball results, talks to Jim Root of the Three Man Weave his opening night takeaways and his thoughts on Thursday's games, & Greg picks & analyze EVERY Thursday college basketball game! Podcast Highlights 2:52-Why Greg doesn't do in game bets 3:57-Recap of Thursday's college basketball action 10:32-Picks & analysis for Northeastern vs Georgia St 12:44-E Washington vs UC Davis 14:45-N Dakota St vs Cal Poly 16:49-Utah St vs Richmond 19:03-Illinois St vs E Michigan 21:24-W Michigan vs Michigan St 23:36-E Tennessee St vs Appalachian St 25:55-Picks & analysis for Ket St vs Xavier 28:09-Picks & analysis for Wright St vs Marshall 30:39-Picks & analysis for Niagara vs Ohio St 32:44-Picks & analysis for UNC Greensboro vs N Kentucky 34:59-Picks & analysis for Marist vs Columbia 37:28-Picks & analysis for N Illinois vs Indiana 39:26-Picks & analysis for Canisus vs E Carolina 41:38-Picks & analysis for Furman vs Louisville 43:57-Picks & analysis for Fordham vs Manhattan 46:13-Picks & analysis for Wofford vs Clemson 48:28-Robert Morris vs Kentucky 50:23-Penn vs George Mason 52:14-Morehead St vs UAB 54:10-W Carolina vs Wake Forest 56:02-Picks & analysis for UMKC vs Iowa 57:49-Picks & analysis for E Illinois vs St. Louis 59:56-Picks & analysis for Abilene Christian vs Texas A&M 1:01:45-Picks & analysis for Louisiana vs So Miss 1:03:53-Picks & analysis for S Dakota St vs Alabama 1:06:02-Picks & analysis for UW Green Bay vs Wisconsin 1:07:46-Picks & analysis for LA Monroe vs Auburn 1:09:36-Tarleton St vs Kansas 1:11:41-Picks & analysis for Rice vs Houston 1:13:35-Picks & analysis for Oakland vs Oklahoma St 1:15:29-Picks & analysis for Oregon St vs Iowa St 1:17:32-Picks & analysis for UTSA vs Oklahoma 1:19:35-Picks & analysis for UMass vs Yale 1:21:21-Picks & analysis for Texas St vs LSU 1:23:12-Picks & analysis for SIU Edwardsville vs Chicago St 1:25:38-Picks & analysis for Austin Peay vs S Illinois 1:27:39-Picks & analysis for Indiana St vs Purdue 1:29:51-Picks & analysis for Pitt vs W Virginia 1:32:02-Picks & analysis for Sam Houston vs Nebraska 1:34:07-Picks & analysis for Arkansas St vs Illinois 1:35:57-Picks & analysis for So Illinois vs Dixie St 1:38:01-Picks & analysis for San Diego St vs BYU 1:39:48-Picks & analysis for Brown vs UNC 1:41:54-Picks & analysis for UT Rio GV vs Arizona 1:43:54-Picks & analysis for Idaho St vs Pepperdine 1:45:42-Picks & analysis for San Diego vs Nevada 1:47:56-Picks & analysis for Seattle vs Washington St 1:49:41-Picks & analysis for Stanford vs Santa Clara 1:51:45-Picks & analysis for SMU vs Oregon 1:54:13-NY Post Pick Villanova vs UCLA 1:56:19-Picks & analysis for W Kentucky vs Minnesota 1:58:34-Picks & analysis for Princeton vs S Carolina 2:02:58-Start of extra game picks with Hartford vs Campbell 2:04:49-Picks & analysis for S Carolina St vs Loyola MD 2:06:25-Picks & analysis for FDU vs Drexel 2:08:10-Picks & analysis for Bryant vs Rhode Island 2:09:56-Picks & analysis for C Arkansas vs Butler 2:11:29-Picks & analysis for USC Upstate vs Charlotte 2:13:14-Picks & analysis for American vs William & Mary 2:14:55-Picks & analysis for VMI vs Presbyterian 2:16:57-Picks & analysis for Radford vs Virginia 2:18:54-Picks & analysis for Army vs Duke 2:20:23-Picks & analysis for Coppin St vs Rider 2:22:27-Picks & analysis for Bethune Cookman vs Middle Tennessee 2:24:43-Charleston So vs Ole Miss 2:26:18-Holy Cross vs Boston College 2:28:15-Jackson St vs LA Tech 2:30:36-Lipscomb vs Charleston 2:32:34-Stetson vs GA Tech 2:34:14-Cornell vs Lafayette 2:36:00-High Point vs Northwestern 2:38:15-Grambling vs Texas Tech 2:40:05-New Hampshire vs Marquette 2:42:00-Incarnate Word vs Baylor 2:43:46-Virginia Tech vs Navy 2:45:39-N Florida vs Grand Canyon 2:47:40- Arkansas PB vs Colorado St 2:49:28-LIU vs Fresno St 2:51:22-Texas So vs St. Mary's Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Signal Boost
Corey Brettschneider!

Signal Boost

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 20:23


Professor of Constitutional Law at Brown and Fordham Universities Corey Brettschneider joins Jess and Zerlina on the show to discuss his work editing Penguin Classics' 'Free Speech' and 'Religious Freedom,' out now!FREE SPEECH and RELIGIOUS FREEDOM edited by Corey Brettschneider will give readers even more contextual background on the historic texts that are the bedrock of our democracy.Corey is a professor of constitutional law and politics at Brown and Fordham. With the Penguin Liberty Series, Corey hopes to create a curated series of historical, political, and legal classic texts that give readers an in-depth scope of our constitutional rights. FREE SPEECH is a collection of writings on the American liberty of freedom of speech. RELIGIOUS FREEDOM is a collection that addresses religious freedom, including the right to religious belief and expression, and a guarantee that the government neither prefers religion over non-religion nor favors particular faiths over others.As America continues to grapple with how to uphold our constitution and make a true democracy for all, the Penguin Liberty series is  a great reference to the foundations of our government, what the Constitution says about the role of free speech, religious freedoms, and how these basic principles impact the everyday lives of Americans.