Podcasts about Ivy League

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Athletic conference of eight American universities

  • 2,653PODCASTS
  • 4,113EPISODES
  • 44mAVG DURATION
  • 2DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Jul 5, 2022LATEST
Ivy League

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Best podcasts about Ivy League

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Latest podcast episodes about Ivy League

Under the Radar with Callie Crossley
Harvard confronts its historic ties to slavery

Under the Radar with Callie Crossley

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 31:19


This week on Under the Radar: Harvard pubilshed its “Harvard and the Legacy of Slavery” report back in April, which detailed the institution's clear, historical ties to slavery. That included enslaved individuals on campus, funding from enslavers and dozens of faculty — including past Harvard presidents — who were enslavers themselves. This was back in the 18th century, but the commercial aspects of slavery is linked in multiple ways today. To begin redressing the university's past involvement with slavery, Harvard has pledged $100 million to create a “Legacy of Slavery Fund.” Other universities, notably Brown, have also been engaged in the work of identifying ties to slavery and how the university benefited. So how will higher education continue to investigate its slavery linked past? And will Harvard's admission move the conversation about higher education and systemic racism? GUESTS: Ruth Simmons, president of Prairie View A&M University in Texas. Previously, Simmons served as president of Smith College in Massachusetts and of Brown University in Rhode Island, where she was the first Black woman to preside over an Ivy League school. Simmons began Brown's ongoing research and redress related to its ties to slavery. Tomiko Brown-Nagin, dean of Harvard Radcliffe Institute, professor of constitutional law at Harvard Law School and professor of history at Harvard University. In 2019, she was appointed chair of the presidential committee on "Harvard and the Legacy of Slavery." Sven Beckert, Laird Bell Professor of History at Harvard University and a Harvard presidential committee member.

Intuitive Connection with Victoria Shaw
My Story: How I Awakened My Intuition and Stepped Into My Greater Purpose

Intuitive Connection with Victoria Shaw

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 29:00


This podcast brings me so much joy, but sometimes what feels missing is YOU and your engagement and interaction alongside me. That's why I love hearing from listeners and having the opportunity to answer your questions on the show. This week's episode was inspired by a listener's question, asking me to share my story of how I went from being an Ivy League psychologist and overwhelmed mother to talking to spirit guides for a living. Tune in as I share stories from my childhood and how everything changed when I took my first intuition development class. As you listen to my story, remember that we're all unique and we each have our individual stories, all special and beautiful. Key Takeaways: From a young age I could feel other people's feelings, knew things I had no logical way of knowing and tuned in to wisdom and guidance far beyond my years. Spirituality wasn't talked about in my family, but I always felt a deep connection to the divine even if I did not have a frame of reference for understanding what I was experiencing. Like many children, I shut down aspects of my psychic knowing, because I was not supported in understanding my multisensory awareness. When we set the intention to connect with our inner wisdom, our intuition blossoms effortlessly and quickly.Everyone has intuitive gifts that are unique to them and their soul's expression. The more we raise our vibration and release what no longer serves us, the more space we create for our highest self to shine through.Intuition is the gift that keeps on giving: the more you connect with your inner wisdom, the stronger it becomes.Empaths lead the world with their love and expanded awareness. Learn to be more energized and uplifted by your empathic nature in my 6-week class, Enlightened Empath: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/369372351647Did you know I offer intuitive readings and coaching sessions to clients all over the world?   You can book your session here:  https://app.paperbell.com/checkout/packages?provider_id=13555Connect and learn with me here:https://victoriashawintuitive.com/www.instagram.com/victoriashawintuitiveIf you would like to connect with other like-minded souls, take a deeper dive into the topics discussed in these episodes, or learn more about how to awaken to your own inner magnificence, please join us in my Facebook group, Intuitive Connection Community here: https://www.facebook.com/groups/IntuitiveconnectioncommunityAre you ready to take the next steps in awakening your intuition?  Please enjoy and download a copy of my Free Activate Your Intuition Ebook: https://victoriashawintuitive.com/free-e-book/If you would like to take a deeper dive into leveraging the power of your intuition, please check out my self-paced, online course, Activating Your Intuition at:https://victoriashawintuitive.com/courses/activating-your-intuition/On Clubhouse: @victoriashaw

Roads Taken
Applied Lessons: Oliver Will on seeing the big picture and adjusting to the reality in front of you

Roads Taken

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 29:57


Guest Oliver Will was always good at math and when he got to college he figured he would parlay that into a science or engineering degree. While taking the mathematics prerequisites for a number of majors, he realized he liked the theoretical elegance of the math itself. And yet, he was interested in real-world applications, too. A course in bioethics introduced him to the idea of the computational work involved the human genome sequencing and the idea of bio-statistics. He applied to graduate programs straight from undergrad and got a PhD in applied mathematics.As other guests on Roads Taken have discussed, a tight job market for academic positions is complicated by factors such as timing, geography, and luck. Although he'd thought the life of professor would suit him, after a rather unfulfilling postdoctoral fellowship, Oliver decided that the business world might be better suited for his skills and expertise. Unfortunately, his first experience was with a start-up that ran out of its funding, so he made one more return to the academic world—halfway around the globe—only to discover industry was probably the better fit. He became a statistician for a marketing company and continued using both big picture thinking and his applied skills to tackle everyday realities at a number of companies in a variety of fields.While he got better at pivoting from his expected outcomes to the newer opportunities available to him in a business context,it was somewhat harder when the circumstances were personal. In this episode, find out from Oliver how sometimes sometimes envisioning a future and living into what's in front of you are two different things…on Roads Taken with Leslie Jennings Rowley. About This Episode's GuestOliver Will is has been a research scientist in advanced analytics for primary research at a number of companies, most recently Cerner Enviza, an Oracle company. He holds a PhD in Applied Mathematics from the University of Southern California. He lives in Pennsylvania with his wife and their cats. Executive Producer/Host: Leslie Jennings RowleyMusic: Brian Burrows Find more episodes at https://roadstakenshow.com Email the show at RoadsTakenShow@gmail.com 

Ivy League Prep Academy Podcast
The Student's Perspective; Daniel Waheed

Ivy League Prep Academy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 41:36


Daniel Waheed shares his impact projects, and talks through how he is tying in his core values and personal history to craft his application narrative.In this interview, we learn about how to think about an impact projectHow being more effective is easier than being less effective (in college prep)Why his impact project isn't even just about college prep-- it is his genuine calling.

PrepWell Podcast with Phil Black
How To Build An Extracurricular Activity From Scratch

PrepWell Podcast with Phil Black

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 3, 2022 19:08


Show Notes: In this episode, I reflect on a recent conversation I had with a rising sophomore who was intent on finding an extracurricular activity that would challenge him, feed his passion, and differentiate himself from the masses. We started with a single premise: He liked investing. How did we extend this simple idea into a 2-year blueprint that could put JP on the map and make him a compelling applicant for any college in the country?    0:01:45 JP's background   0:03:15 The big idea   0:04:10 Why a good idea   0:07:20 Short-term tactics   0:08:40 Benefits   0:10:20 It's a go   0:11:37 Long-term vision   0:12:05 How to build momentum   0:14:15 The feedback loop   0:16:00 How admissions would react   0:17:20 Your child?   Follow us: Enroll in PrepWell Academy Follow on Instagram Follow on Facebook If you want to support the show, here are three immediate steps to take.   Subscribe to the podcast where ever you listen to podcasts Follow me on Instagram or Facebook Give us a review Share this episode with a friend Join our mailing list Enroll your 9th or 10th grader in the program Podcast Host: PrepWell Academy's Founder, Phil Black, has spent a lifetime cracking the code on the world's most competitive programs: Yale University, Harvard Business School, Navy SEALs, Goldman Sachs, Entrepreneurship, Shark Tank (2X), etc.   Inside PrepWell Academy, Black teaches students everything they need to know about the college admissions process in a series of expertly-timed, 3-5-minute, weekly training videos starting in 9th grade and continuing through 12th grade [Note: this program can only be joined in 9th or 10th grade]. My specialties include military service academies, ROTC scholarships, Ivy League, and student-athletes.  

KUCI: Film School
Accepted / Film School Radio interview with Director Dan Chen

KUCI: Film School

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2022


ACCEPTED follows four high school seniors in rural Louisiana who are students at T.M. Landry, an unconventional K - 12 school housed in a sparse warehouse made famous for sending its graduates to elite universities like Harvard, Yale, and Stanford. The students aim to meet the intense expectations of Mike Landry, the imposing founder of the school who charts a relentless course towards their college dreams. When the New York Times publishes an expose on Landry's controversial methods, the school buckles under the scrutiny. Each senior is left to contend with uncomfortable truths about their school and the college admissions system, and decide for themselves what they are willing to do to be accepted. Accepted offers a unique and intriguing look at the world of Ivy League college admissions and the true cost of getting that first foothold into elite American society. In his first documentary feature, director Dan Chen grounds a broader look at the inequities in the American education system with unbelievable access to T.M. Landry and the deeply personal stories of four dynamic students looking to overcome countless obstacles to achieve their dreams. greenwichentertainment.com/film/accepted For more go to: acceptedfilm.com

SVG Superstar Podcast
Ep 29: 3 Reasons why you ABSOLUTELY need to create a non-toxic culture in your business with Jacquelyn (Clean Beauty Biz Coach)

SVG Superstar Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2022 41:58


Reality Life with Kate Casey
Ep. - 505 - DIRECTOR OF ACCEPTED LUKE GULBRANSON FROM SUMMER HOUSE

Reality Life with Kate Casey

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 42:43


Kate discusses All Star Shore on Paramount + and the latest updates to the Chrisley Knows Best case. Dan Chen, Director of Accepted, a documentary about four high school seniors in rural Louisiana attending T.M. Landry, an unconventional school housed in a warehouse made famous for sending its graduates to elite universities. Accepted gives a unique and intriguing look at the world of Ivy League college admissions and the true cost of getting that first foothold into elite American society. Luke Gulbranson from Summer House on Bravo discusses not being asked back this season, who he will still keep in touch with, and whether he would like to do other Bravo spinoffs. Reality Life with Kate CaseyPatreon: http://www.patreon.com/katecaseyCameo: https://cameo.com/katecaseyTwitter: https://twitter.com/katecaseyInstagram: http://www.instagram.com/katecaseycaTik Tok: http://www.tiktok.com/itskatecaseyClubhouse: @katecasey Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/113157919338245Amazon.com: www.amazon.com/shop/katecasey Make sure you're taking advantage of the opportunity to earn something back for all those Pampers you're going through. Download the Pampers Club app and start turning diapers into rewards. Earn $5 PampersCash with your first three product scans. Download Pampers Club app today and get access to exclusive Pampers coupons and more!”See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

TRAINED
Branden Collinsworth | Activate Your Potential Through Yoga

TRAINED

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 36:07


Yoga teacher and human-performance coach Branden Collinsworth knows what it means to push your potential. Through his journey with movement, he unlocked the perseverance to escape poverty, the tenacity to achieve an Ivy League master's degree in psychology, and the capacity to connect to the self. Now the Nike trainer is showing us how the skills learned through yoga can help us transcend our own limits. On this episode, he tells us why yoga is a missing link in sport performance and how it bridges the gap between the internal and the external. He also gives us simple steps for turning a flow into a daily habit.Learn MoreInterested in a Warrior Retreats experience? Get all the info you need from their website.For more focus on your mental fitness, get connected with Branden and other wellness experts on the app Mine'd.If Branden got you fired up to flow, keep the momentum going with this episode from Nike trainer and yoga instructor Jonah Kest, then get moving with the NTC app.

Black & A Half
S4 Ep203: Episode #203: New Documentary: - Accepted

Black & A Half

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 27:26


This week, Silas is joined by director Dan Chen and two people who were subjects for his premiere documentary Accepted, Isaac and Aighty. This documentary focuses on a K-12 school in Louisiana with a 100% college acceptance rate and a 33% Ivy League school acceptance rate. But something is rotten in the state of Denmark. Listen up and then watch the film coming out this July 1st. 

School Sucks: Higher Education For Self-Liberation
20. Don't Be Anyone's Useful idiot

School Sucks: Higher Education For Self-Liberation

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 87:57


The Essential School Sucks, #20 of 50 Theme Two: Leaving Institutional Schooling and Finding Educational Alternatives In the previous episode you heard my first podcast with Zak from 2016. Today we'll fast-forward five years for updates on life and career advice in times of increasing uncertainty and instability. Favorite School Sucks neighbor Zak Slayback returns to offer some key 2021 updates to his past advice for young people at the beginning of their careers. Our previous conversation on this topic, called How High School Students Can Get Ahead In Their Careers [PODCAST #583], covered: Why young people need to start personal websites while in high school, and how this website can work as a portfolio, showcase of personality, a canvas and as insurance How to contact an existing expert in the area you want to go into, getting a better idea of how to get started Methods of signaling and building a portfolio growing your network of people who are a few steps ahead of you We'll make some adjustment to previous advice, and discuss what advice still stands and why. We'll also look at the big picture of politics, society, tech, and the hellstorm that's certainly on its way. Sorry. Additions include: - seriously ask yourself why you need to be on social media - how deep are your options? how fragile is your situation? - what consulting opportunities exist for you? Zak Slayback is an entrepreneur who writes, speaks and takes action on issues of education, innovation, and philosophy. He is an Ivy League dropout and a founding team member of Praxis (https://discoverpraxis.com/schoolsuckspodcast/) - an organization that creates apprenticeships for college-age people that lead directly to full-time jobs. Learn more about Zak at ZakSlayback.com. Zak is also one of the presenters in The Ideas Into Action Summit (https://sspuniversity.com/ideasintoaction/) The downloadable version of The Ideas Into Action Summit is now available. Use the coupon code independence to can get it for 30% off now until July 5th Learn more here (https://sspuniversity.com/ideasintoaction/). Our Partners https://files.fireside.fm/file/fireside-uploads/images/b/b9f98e30-82d3-4781-8400-880c6dc8086f/2gtm0QVk.png Get The Book For Free (https://discoverpraxis.com/schoolsuckspodcast/) Please Support School Sucks School Sucks was one of the longest running liberty-minded podcasts on the web, and the only one completely devoted to the issue of education (versus public school and college). Your support keeps the show alive, which keeps us at the top of the options for education podcasts and leads to new people discovering our work. Please help us continue to spread this important message further! One-Time Donation Options:Paypal/Venmo Crypto Addresses:DASH XcZfPP6GZGVo9VKViNBVJZja5JVxZDB229ETHEREUM 0x3c5504CE3401C028832173506fa30BD4db4b7D35LITECOIN LKNp24f5wwvZ2QzeDbvxXgBxyVwi1yXnu2BITCOIN 1KhwY836cfSGCK5aaGFv8Q7PHMgghFJn1UBITCOIN CASH 1AmqLVxjw3Lp9KT5ckfvsqfN2Hn3B1hCWSZCASH t1by1ZGJ63LoLSjXy27ooJtipf4wMr7qbu4 Recurring Options: Support Us On PATREONYou support our mission, and you want to help us continue to reach new people with our message and media. Your contribution helps us maintain presence, and to further build the legacy of School Sucks Project. And please bookmark and use this link for your Amazon shopping: Shop With Us Our Private Community: https://files.fireside.fm/file/fireside-uploads/images/b/b9f98e30-82d3-4781-8400-880c6dc8086f/fNnDUPqb.png Visit The Uni-iversity (https://sspuniversity.com/) Originally Released January 16th, 2021 “Plan B” With Zak Slayback [PODCAST #696]

SVG Superstar Podcast
Ep 28: When is it okay to rely on Youtube videos for selling SVGs

SVG Superstar Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 16:58


I know as crafters our no. 1 choice for learning something is to hop onto Youtube to learn literally anything and everything. Without giving it a second thought, we hop onto Youtube and get caught in the spiral of watching one video after another. So the question is, is this the right thing to do? Or is there a better alternative out there? Find out in today's podcast.

Wired For Success Podcast
Growing Your Business and Audience with Michael Schill | Episode #90

Wired For Success Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 26:11


EPISODE SUMMARY Join mindset & high-performance coach Claudia Garbutt and Grant Cardone mentee and business growth expert Michael Schill as they talk about what it takes to grow your business and audience.   In this episode we talk about: - Niching down vs diversifying to grow your business - Daily habits for sustainable success - Qualifying your prospects to protect your time & energy   EPISODE NOTES Michael Schill is a 21st-century entrepreneur who has managed to marry skill sets in business, music, fashion, and professional sports into a one-stop tour de force brand name. Under the tutelage of New York Times Bestselling author and Real Estate mogul Grant Cardone, Michael has earned an Ivy League-level of schooling in the Public Relations game from a ground zero perspective. Leveraging his credibility in a multitude of verticals, Michael has been able to demonstrate sustained production and mastery of SAAS Sales over a host of platforms using BI Visualization & Data Analysis all while spearheading the nations premier Sales Team. Working hand in hand with C-Level Executives and Stakeholders, Michael has a proven track record of implementing and executing big-business initiatives that have been able to drive consistent growth in revenue over a large sample size. Michael Schill was also an Executive Producer & Stakeholder of ‘The Crib Radio Show' on DASH Radio, an Internet radio platform that reaches over 10 million people monthly. The show, ‘The Crib', is a vehicle Michael uses to shed light on the Hip Hop/Urban scene by introducing musical acts, social influencers, and industry shakers.   Instagram/ Twitter: @mikeschill_   Tiktok: @themikeschill ------------------ Music credit: Vittoro by Blue Dot Sessions (www.sessions.blue) ----------------- If you enjoyed this episode, learned something new, had an epiphany moment - or were reminded about a simple truth that you had forgotten, please let me know by rating & reviewing this show on https://ratethispodcast.com/wiredforsuccess.   Oh, and make sure you subscribe to the podcast so you don't miss out on any of the amazing future episodes! If you don't listen on iTunes, you can find all the episodes here.   If you'd like to connect more, you can find me here: Website: www.wiredforsuccess.solutions Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/wired_for_success/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/claudia.garbutt.1 LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/claudia-garbutt/   HELPFUL RESOURCES Wanna prime your brain for success in less than 5min each day? Download my Brain Priming Affirmations For Entrepreneurs here: https://bit.ly/2VXC9VY   Wanna find out how I can help you leverage the power of your mind and tap into the wisdom of your body to feel fully aligned, trust your intuition, and achieve your goals with ease and joy rather than with constant hustle and pushing yourself to the point of exhaustion – book a free 20min Strategy Session with me: https://bit.ly/2YemfIe   Looking for great podcast guests for your own show or great shows to guest on? Try PodMatch, the platform that automatically matches ideal podcast hosts and guests for interviews. Like Tinder for podcasters. Or Guestio, the app that helps content creators interview high-level guests. Gives you access to those busy, hard-to-reach, next-level guests that you want to have on your show.    

Scam Goddess
The Rogue Runner of Princeton W/ Nimesh Patel

Scam Goddess

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 61:27


What's poppin' con-gregation? This week we have comedian Nimesh Patel on to discuss James Hogue, named one of Time's Top 10 Imposters, this runner turned bike thief fooled an Ivy League school into thinking he was a student but was really a 31 year old con man. Plus, the Red Power Ranger has been arrested by the FBI because of COVID fraud. Stay Schemin'!Sources:https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/red-power-ranger-actor-charged-multimillion-dollar-ppp-covid-relief-fr-rcna29813https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2001/09/03/the-runnerhttps://www.aspentimes.com/news/famed-con-man-who-lived-in-ajax-shack-arrested-again-in-aspen/https://paw.princeton.edu/article/strange-case-james-arthur-hogue

The Dream Catcher Podcast
[Interview] Finding Wisdom & Enlightenment in the Classics of Western Literature (feat. Dean Sluyter)

The Dream Catcher Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 51:31


Enlightenment can be found in the most unexpected places, including in Western literature. According to my guest, Dean Sluyter, there's a lot we can learn from several beloved classics.  We can read Hemingway as haiku, learn mindfulness from Virginia Woolf, see Dickinson and Whitman as Buddhas of poetry, and Huck Finn and Gatsby as seekers of the infinite. In this interview, we'll learn more about Dean's unique insights into mindfulness and awakening. Dean Sluyter has taught natural methods of meditation and awakening since 1970. His five highly acclaimed books include the bestsellers such as Natural Meditation. Dean gives sessions throughout the United States and beyond, from Ivy League colleges to maximum-security prisons. His media appearances have included The New York Times, The Dr. Oz Show, and The Oprah Magazine. A student of Eastern and Western sages in several traditions, Dean has completed numerous pilgrimages and retreats in India, Tibet, Nepal, and the West. During our discussion, Dean explains the wisdom we can glean from several literary giants he mentions in his new book, “The Dharma Bum's Guide to Western Literature: Finding Nirvana in the Classics,” and how we can apply them in daily life. He also offers advice on enhancing our meditation and mindfulness practice.

Roads Taken
Executive Function: Brendan Doherty on staying, going, and planning for the future

Roads Taken

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 23:02


Guest Brendan Doherty had entered college thinking he was a math and science person, was then drawn to government but his choice of major—geography—ultimately felt made for him when the government courses were all full. His post-college decision points, however, seemed to always weigh the balance between two weighty options. First he needed to decide whether he would stick with the favored idea of law school and not fully enjoy the work or choose a riskier unsure path. Then, when conflicting religious beliefs complicated his burgeoning relationship with a wonderful woman, he needed to decide whether they should break up or figure out a compromise. He weighed keeping a commitment to the Peace Corps with returning to a safer environment with loved ones and then whether to cut a west coast adventure short to move east or make a 5,000-mile trip to keep the California dream alive. Not always was the first choice the choice that stuck.In this episode, find out from Brendan how sometimes just making any choice shows you, ultimately, the way to the right path…on Roads Taken with Leslie Jennings Rowley. About This Episode's GuestBrendan Doherty is a Professor of Political Science at the United States Naval Academy. Fittingly for someone who was our class president for much of his time at college, he focuses his research and teaching on the U.S. presidency, campaigns, and elections. Brendan lives in the D.C. area with his wife and their two children. Executive Producer/Host: Leslie Jennings RowleyMusic: Brian Burrows Find more episodes at https://roadstakenshow.com Email the show at RoadsTakenShow@gmail.com  

One Nation Under Crime
1849: The Harvard Murder Case

One Nation Under Crime

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 93:27


A murder? Literally INSIDE the walls of an Ivy League? Um, also... a toilet? WTD?! (What the duck?!)Join the ONUC gals this week as they discuss the Harvard Murder Case and the spirit that is still attached to the George Parkman House. Trigger Warning Level: LowVisit our website www.onenationundercrime.com for all of the ways to contact and follow us. We are on Twitter @onucpod, Instagram @onenationundercrime, and on both YouTube and Facebook by searching 'One Nation Under Crime'.Follow One Nation Under Crime on your favorite podcast platform and you will get the shows as soon as they come out!Remember, there isn't always liberty and justice for all.Sources: The West End Museum, PBS , New England Historical Society, Boston Ghosts, and Ghost City Tours Support the show

The Better Leaders Better Schools Podcast with Daniel Bauer

Jean Burk is the author of the award-winning College Prep Genius program and has written numerous articles about the SAT and PSAT tests, high school prep, college prep, and how to get free college. She is a Fox News contributor on radio interviews and has been featured as an SAT expert on ABC, NBC, CBS, Fox, TXA21, CW33, Choice Media TV, WE, Forbes, UShop TV and The Homeschool Channel. She homeschooled both her children and they each earned free college and incredible scholarships because of their PSAT and SAT scores. Some of the benefits included full tuition, room and board, unlimited laundry and lunchroom passes, study abroad stipends, etc. Her son also earned free law school and her daughter earned free grad school.   She currently travels and speaks about the importance of college preparation at conventions, book fairs, schools, libraries, etc. She has taught her revolutionary, award-winning “Master the SAT” Prep Class all over the United States, mainland China, India, Hong Kong, Puerto Rico and Thailand. Many of her students have raised their SAT score as much as 700 points, ACT 9 points, become National Merit Scholars and have gone to an Ivy League for free! Her Vocabcafé book series helps teenagers and younger children increase their knowledge of SAT level vocabulary words through fun and wholesome books and her “High School Prep Genius” book won the “Blue Ribbon Award” for the best and favorite college prep resource along with 21 unsolicited awards for her program.      Show Highlights  How to play the game to go college for free despite income. The specific skill set the standardized test truly assesses.  Common Data Set formula for matching you to the right college.  A Coffee donut negotiation for better offers and scholarships. The Summer Melt and what upperclassmen should focus on this summer. Ace the PSAT, SAT, ACT,  and CRT with College Prep Genius.  The P6 framework that can set you on a direction in life. best fit in? to get you pointed in the direction to lead to your ultimate career choice. FAFSA mistakes and the secret formula colleges use your learning community need to know.  Learn the shortcut  strategy needed to improve standardized test scores.    “It's all about the test. I'm a big believer that test taking should be a separate class. It doesn't conflict with your math or your science or your English, it actually compliments.” -Jean Burk Jean Burk's Resources & Contact Info: YouTube Twitter FB Instagram Pinterest LinkedIn Read my latest book! Learn why the ABCs of powerful professional development™ work – Grow your skills by integrating more Authenticity, Belonging, and Challenge into your life and leadership.   Read Mastermind: Unlocking Talent Within Every School Leader today! Join the “Back to School Boot Camp” The one thing you need to start next year off with energy momentum is a solid 90-day plan.   In the “Back to School Bootcamp” I will teach you how to create your 90-day plan in just 5-days.   Join the challenge today! Apply to the Mastermind The mastermind is changing the landscape of professional development for school leaders.    100% of our members agree that the mastermind is the #1 way they grow their leadership skills.   Apply to the mastermind today!   SHOW SPONSORS: HARVARD GRADUATE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION Transform how you lead to become a resilient and empowered change agent with Harvard's online Certificate in School Management and Leadership. Grow your professional network with a global cohort of fellow school leaders as you collaborate in case studies bridging the fields of education and business. Apply today at http://hgse.me/leader.   TEACHFX School leaders know that productive student talk drives student learning, but the average teacher talks 75% of class time! TeachFX is changing that with a “Fitbit for teachers” that automatically measures student engagement and gives teachers feedback about what they could do differently.  Learn more about the TeachFX app and get a special 20% discount for your school or district by visiting teachfx.com/blbs.   ORGANIZED BINDER Organized Binder is the missing piece in many classrooms. Many teachers are great with the main content of the lesson. Organized Binder helps with powerful introductions, savvy transitions, and memorable lesson closings. Your students will grow their executive functioning skills (and as a bonus), your teachers will become more organized too. Help your students and staff level up with Organized Binder.   Copyright © 2022 Twelve Practices LLC  

Ivy League Prep Academy Podcast
The Student Perspective: George Banke

Ivy League Prep Academy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 20:45


George Banke felt like he was floating along in life, and lacked the focus that he needed to feel confident in his college prep. In this interview, he shares what happened to give him the clarity he needed, and what he is doing now to prepare for college in a way that is exciting, motivating, and effective. Listen in to learn about his impact project as well. 

Cafe con Pam Podcast
On Following Your Path with Laura Tejeda

Cafe con Pam Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022 61:41


Listeners, we're back this week with Laura Tejeda.Laura Tejeda is a lifelong East LA resident. She has a Masters Degree in Higher Education and works with college students, particularly in Equity & Social Justice based education. Laura is also a freelance writer for L.A. TACO and she is the founder of Instagram-based page @hungryineastlos which began in 2016 in efforts to challenge gentrification in East LA and raise awareness and support to family-owned & people of color owned businesses. Laura is host of LA TACO LIVE where she explores LA Culture, news, politics, lifestyle, and FOOD, with dynamic guests! During this episode we talked about:5:44 - Being 2nd gen on his dad's side17:38 - Her education journey19:14 - Going to college not knowing what's gonna come from it22:56 - Ivy League - do I belong here?24:30 - Representation32:49 - Her mentor and going grad school37:03 - Creativity39:45 - Welcoming things in life 45:21 - On Inspiration52:02 - Mental Health This  episode is brought to you by MagicMind is the world's first productivity drink.

PrepWell Podcast with Phil Black
A Change Of Heart

PrepWell Podcast with Phil Black

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022 18:01


Show Notes: In this episode, I reflect on a recent conversation I had with a rising senior PrepWeller (KIna). What started off as a brainstorming session for her college essay, took an unexpected turn. As I dug into her background, likes/dislikes, and aspirations, we came to the conclusion that Computer Science may not be the path for her. This came as a surprise, as she has always thought of herself as a Computer Science person. What was her true calling? How did she handle this tension? What was her new major preference?   0:01:27 Kina's profile   0:02:15 The big assumption   0:03:00 Why Computer Science?   0:03:45 Outside influences   0:04:20 Robotics Club   0:07:05 Non-robotics interests   0:11:25 A new major preference   0:12:15 Unchallenged assumptions   0:13:50 Application just got easier   0:14:15 How to be competitive   0:14:50 Beyond admissions   0:15:25 Moral of the story   Follow us: Enroll in PrepWell Academy Follow on Instagram Follow on Facebook   If you want to support the show, here are three immediate steps to take.   Subscribe to the podcast where ever you listen to podcasts Follow me on Instagram or Facebook Give us a review Share this episode with a friend Join our mailing list Enroll your 9th or 10th grader in the program Podcast Host: PrepWell Academy's Founder, Phil Black, has spent a lifetime cracking the code on the world's most competitive programs: Yale University, Harvard Business School, Navy SEALs, Goldman Sachs, Entrepreneurship, Shark Tank (2X), etc.   Inside PrepWell Academy, Black teaches students everything they need to know about the college admissions process in a series of expertly-timed, 3-5-minute, weekly training videos starting in 9th grade and continuing through 12th grade [Note: this program can only be joined in 9th or 10th grade]. My specialties include military service academies, ROTC scholarships, Ivy League, and student-athletes.

Top of the Class
#20 The Reality of a Law Career - Insights From Crimson Strategist & Law Grad, Kevin Paul

Top of the Class

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022 31:06


#20 The Reality of a Law Career - Insights From Crimson Strategist & Law Grad, Kevin PaulSummary: Crimson Strategist, Kevin Paul, discusses his journey to Duke Law School and how working in law firms wasn't all he imagined it to be.Are you aiming for Ivy League schools and other top US and UK universities and want the support of Crimson experts? Request a free consultation with an Academic Advisor near you to get started or learn more about Crimson Education.

School Sucks: Higher Education For Self-Liberation
19. Succeeding Without Schooling

School Sucks: Higher Education For Self-Liberation

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022 92:40


The Essential School Sucks, #19 of 50 Theme Two: Leaving Institutional Schooling and Finding Educational Alternatives Zak Slayback is an entrepreneur who writes, speaks and takes action on issues of education, innovation, and philosophy. He is an Ivy League dropout and a founding team member of Praxis (https://discoverpraxis.com/schoolsuckspodcast/) - an organization that creates apprenticeships for college-age people that lead directly to full-time jobs. Learn more about Zak at ZakSlayback.com. Discussion: * the power and opportunity of apprenticeships * What's the difference between school and education? * career guidance (or lack thereof) in high school * The truth about college admissions * The Ivy League liability * deschooling The Ideas In Action Summit (https://sspuniversity.com/ideasintoaction/) The downloadable version of The Ideas Into Action Summit is now available. Use the coupon code independence to can get it for 30% off now until July 5th Learn more here (https://sspuniversity.com/ideasintoaction/). Our Partners https://files.fireside.fm/file/fireside-uploads/images/b/b9f98e30-82d3-4781-8400-880c6dc8086f/2gtm0QVk.png Get The Book For Free (https://discoverpraxis.com/schoolsuckspodcast/) Please Support School Sucks School Sucks was one of the longest running liberty-minded podcasts on the web, and the only one completely devoted to the issue of education (versus public school and college). Your support keeps the show alive, which keeps us at the top of the options for education podcasts and leads to new people discovering our work. Please help us continue to spread this important message further! One-Time Donation Options:Paypal/Venmo Crypto Addresses:DASH XcZfPP6GZGVo9VKViNBVJZja5JVxZDB229ETHEREUM 0x3c5504CE3401C028832173506fa30BD4db4b7D35LITECOIN LKNp24f5wwvZ2QzeDbvxXgBxyVwi1yXnu2BITCOIN 1KhwY836cfSGCK5aaGFv8Q7PHMgghFJn1UBITCOIN CASH 1AmqLVxjw3Lp9KT5ckfvsqfN2Hn3B1hCWSZCASH t1by1ZGJ63LoLSjXy27ooJtipf4wMr7qbu4 Recurring Options: Support Us On PATREONYou support our mission, and you want to help us continue to reach new people with our message and media. Your contribution helps us maintain presence, and to further build the legacy of School Sucks Project. And please bookmark and use this link for your Amazon shopping: Shop With Us Our Private Community: https://files.fireside.fm/file/fireside-uploads/images/b/b9f98e30-82d3-4781-8400-880c6dc8086f/fNnDUPqb.png Visit The Uni-iversity (https://sspuniversity.com/) Originally Released October 10th, 2016 as "[PODCAST] #454: Building A Credential Better Than the College Degree, With Zak Slayback"

Talking USMLE
How To Be In The Top 1% of All Residency Applicants

Talking USMLE

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022 9:43


Have you ever wondered what it would be like to be at the top of the pile of residency applicants to your dream program?You probably think you need to be from an Ivy League school... Or just a US-based school...Believe it or not, while your school does matter, it plays a much smaller role than you think...And in fact, if you're willing to put in some work, where you went to school can become almost irrelevant.So... If you're ready to learn what it takes to put yourself into the upper echelon of all Residency applicants... Let's dive in!Check out the full episode on our YouTube channel at: https://youtu.be/wLbx__Ybl-g or listen to it here on our podcast channel.If you're looking for help with your residency application, personal statement, LORs, interview prep, and everything in between, checkout our small group Residency Coaching Program, available for a limited time at usmleguys.com/RRMPThanks for tuning in. Be sure to subscribe for reminders every time we release a new episode.

SVG Superstar Podcast
Ep 27: 5 secrets for running a successful business as a caregiver with Melissa Miller

SVG Superstar Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022 75:41


For this week's podcast episode, I invited Melissa - a Caregiving Coach to share tips on caregiving while running a business. In this episode we talked about:

Dr. Caroline Leaf Podcast
Podcast 384: How to Find Freedom From the Shame Spiral (en español)

Dr. Caroline Leaf Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 34:08


DESCRIPCIÓN DEL EPISODIO: En este podcast y blog, hablo sobre cómo salir de una espiral de vergüenza. En nuestra sociedad actual, puede ser difícil sentir algún grado de autoestima. Nos bombardea la vergüenza de no estar a la altura de nuestras propias expectativas o de las expectativas de los demás. No podemos estar a la altura de las imágenes manipuladas y manipuladas que parecen decirnos que para ser felices, debemos lucir, vestirnos o actuar de cierta manera, o sacar A's e ir a una universidad de la Ivy League. No podemos competir con celebridades y personas influyentes, solo somos una red social como en un mar de fanáticos que quieren ser alguien o hacer algo.

American Conservative University
Woke, Inc.: Inside Corporate America's Social Justice Scam by Vivek Ramaswamy

American Conservative University

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 26:13


Woke Capitalism Against America. Vivek Ramaswamy https://youtu.be/a5gwJ382dIw 188,064 views May 20, 2021 Hillsdale College 407K subscribers Speech delivered on April 28, 2021. Vivek Ramaswamy is the author of Woke, Inc.: Inside Corporate America's Social Justice Scam. Support Hillsdale College: https://secured.hillsdale.edu/hillsda... Visit our website: http://hillsdale.edu Learn from our online courses: http://online.hillsdale.edu Read Imprimis: https://imprimis.hillsdale.edu/ Undergraduate programs: https://www.hillsdale.edu/information... Graduate School of Statesmanship: https://www.hillsdale.edu/academics/g... Graduate School of Government: https://dc.hillsdale.edu/School-of-Go... Listen to Hillsdale Dialogues Podcast: http://blog.hillsdale.edu/online-courses Hillsdale College is an independent institution of higher learning founded in 1844 by men and women “grateful to God for the inestimable blessings” resulting from civil and religious liberty and “believing that the diffusion of learning is essential to the perpetuity of these blessings.” It pursues the stated object of the founders: “to furnish all persons who wish, irrespective of nation, color, or sex, a literary, scientific, [and] theological education” outstanding among American colleges “and to combine with this such moral and social instruction as will best develop the minds and improve the hearts of its pupils.” As a nonsectarian Christian institution, Hillsdale College maintains “by precept and example” the immemorial teachings and practices of the Christian faith. The College also considers itself a trustee of our Western philosophical and theological inheritance tracing to Athens and Jerusalem, a heritage finding its clearest expression in the American experiment of self-government under law. By training the young in the liberal arts, Hillsdale College prepares students to become leaders worthy of that legacy. By encouraging the scholarship of its faculty, it contributes to the preservation of that legacy for future generations. By publicly defending that legacy, it enlists the aid of other friends of free civilization and thus secures the conditions of its own survival and independence.   Woke, Inc.: Inside Corporate America's Social Justice Scam by Vivek Ramaswamy  AN INSTANT NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER! A young entrepreneur makes the case that politics has no place in business, and sets out a new vision for the future of American capitalism. There's a new invisible force at work in our economic and cultural lives. It affects every advertisement we see and every product we buy, from our morning coffee to a new pair of shoes.  “Stakeholder capitalism” makes rosy promises of a better, more diverse, environmentally-friendly world, but in reality this ideology championed by America's business and political leaders robs us of our money, our voice, and our identity.   Vivek Ramaswamy is a traitor to his class. He's founded multibillion-dollar enterprises, led a biotech company as CEO, he became a hedge fund partner in his 20s, trained as a scientist at Harvard and a lawyer at Yale, and grew up the child of immigrants in a small town in Ohio. Now he takes us behind the scenes into corporate boardrooms and five-star conferences, into Ivy League classrooms and secretive nonprofits, to reveal the defining scam of our century.   The modern woke-industrial complex divides us as a people.  By mixing morality with consumerism, America's elites prey on our innermost insecurities about who we really are. They sell us cheap social causes and skin-deep identities to satisfy our hunger for a cause and our search for meaning, at a moment when we as Americans lack both.   This book not only rips back the curtain on the new corporatist agenda, it offers a better way forward. America's elites may want to sort us into demographic boxes, but we don't have to stay there. Woke, Inc. begins as a critique of stakeholder capitalism and ends with an exploration of what it means to be an American in 2021—a journey that begins with cynicism and ends with hope.      Hillsdale College https://online.hillsdale.edu/ Free Course Offerings- American Citizenship and Its Decline The David Story: Shepherd, Father, King Dante's Divine Comedy Mathematics and Logic: From Euclid to Modern Geometry Civil Rights in American History Introduction to Western Philosophy Classic Children's Literature The Great American Story: A Land of Hope Constitution 101: The Meaning and History of the Constitution The Genesis Story: Reading Biblical Narratives Introduction to Aristotle's Ethics: How to Lead a Good Life The Second World Wars Congress: How It Worked and Why It Doesn't The Young Jane Austen: Northanger Abbey Western Heritage: From the Book of Genesis to John Locke Mark Twain: Tom Sawyer, Huckleberry Finn, and Selected Short Stories Introduction to the Constitution Theology 101: The Western Theological Tradition American Heritage: From Colonial Settlement to the Current Day Shakespeare: Hamlet and The Tempest The U.S. Supreme Court Athens and Sparta Public Policy from a Constitutional Viewpoint An Introduction to C.S. Lewis: Writings and Significance Winston Churchill and Statesmanship The Federalist Papers A Proper Understanding of K-12 Education: Theory and Practice Great Books 102: Renaissance to Modern The Presidency and the Constitution Great Books 101: Ancient to Medieval Constitution 201: The Progressive Rejection of the Founding and the Rise of Bureaucratic Despotism Economics 101: The Principles of Free Market Economics   Hillsdale College 33 E. College St. Hillsdale, MI 49242 | Email: onlinecourses@hillsdale.edu | Phone: (517) 607-2738

Guide to the Unknown « TalkBomb
241: Skull and Bones

Guide to the Unknown « TalkBomb

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 64:37


Skull & Bones is an Ivy League secret society for muckety mucks...and there aren't a lot of chuckles or yuckety yucks going on there. More like social climbing and...self-celebration IRL, and MURDER in the early 2000s movie The Skulls based on it. Wanna join?? VIDEO VERSION HERE For full sources and links, visit http://www.gttupod.com/home/gttu241 Support GTTU on Patreon! Depending on the tier you choose, you get one, two, or FOUR full bonus episodes per month, a private Discord, and more at patreon.com/gttupod. Thank you so much! See everything GTTU-related at gttupod.com. Watch videos of all of our episodes at youtube.com/gttupod Follow us online: https://www.instagram.com/gttupod https://www.facebook.com/gttupod https://www.twitter.com/gttupod Join our private Facebook group at facebook.com/groups/gttupod

The Story of a Brand
Abbott NYC - Fragrances that Transports You to the Natural World

The Story of a Brand

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 41:49


This episode is brought to you by Sendlane.   Jose Alvarez, Co-founder of Abbott NYC, started the brand because he believes nature is healing. The company makes clean fragrances inspired by beautiful destinations.   "Urban life is very stressful, and nature provides an escape for us to reconnect with ourselves," Jose says. "I also believe in the power of fragrances to transport you to a particular place, a memory, and I think we've all experienced that. When you do experience it, it's something very visceral, something very emotional. So I wanted to start a line of fragrances that transports you to the natural world."   Jose grew up in Nicaragua, surrounded by what he calls "very virgin nature." He fell in love with beaches and surfing in his home country. When he moved to New York City, he found that he came to miss nature, so he began traveling across the country and fell in love with the natural destinations around the U.S.   "All these destinations that I fell in love with ended up being the inspiration behind each one of our fragrances," he says. "I also wanted to ensure that we were protecting it - leaving Mother Earth in a better place than without it. So the first thing we did was ensure that all of our ingredients are sustainable."   For example, for the brand's sandalwood scent, a green synthetic ingredient is used instead of actual sandalwood, a tree that takes a long time to grow. Likewise, recyclable parts of grapefruit are used for the brand's Montecito scent. Even the products' glass containers and boxes are recyclable.   Another Abbott commitment is to avoid any ingredient that could adversely affect consumers.   "This means no parabens, no phthalates, no hormone disruptors, no carcinogens," he says. "If you look at most perfume ingredient lists, they'll just put all the perfume in alcohol. We list our full list of ingredients. We believe consumers should know what they're putting on their skins."   The idea for the fragrance line began with his travels. Jose and his co-founder Michael Pass used trips to escape their high-pressure careers. A shared passion for fragrances led them to connect the dots.   In Part 1, Jose talks about:   * Gratitude to his first boss out of college, which gave him a shot working on Wall Street even though he lacked the traditional Ivy League credentials. * Our emotional connection to nature. * His childhood in Nicaragua and how moving to New York changed his perspective. * How he fell in love with natural destinations around the United States. * The need to make products with sustainable ingredients. * The brand's work with charities. * The need to make scents unisex. * How he and his co-founder turned travel into a brand. * How their career success to date helped them gain an advantage with potential investors. * How he re-engaged the creative side of his energy.   Join Ramon Vela and Jose Alvarez as they break down the inside story on The Story of a Brand.   For more on Abbott NYC, visit: https://abbottnyc.com/    Subscribe and Listen to the podcast on all major apps. Simply search for “The Story of a Brand,” or click here to listen on your favorite podcast player: Listen now.   *   This episode is also brought to you by Sendlane.   If all DTC companies were forced to turn off Facebook ads, they'd be dead on arrival. Why is that?   They over-invest in paid acquisition and under-invest in retention.   Luckily, Sendlane makes it easy to solve this problem. Sendlane is an E-Commerce Customer Experience Platform helping hundreds of DTC brands to tighten their existing customer relationships.   Sendlane automates personalized customer experiences through Welcome and Abandoned Cart workflows, SMS, Deep Data Integrations with Shopify and WooCommerce, multi-store functionality, and much more.   Plus, they don't stand for lazy customer support. Their San-Diego-based team has an average 1-minute response time from a live human, making sure you never get stuck in a chat queue ever again.   Curious about how Sendlane can help your DTC brand grow? Schedule a demo with a Specialist. Visit https://www.sendlane.com/story 

FCS Podcast
FCS National Storylines w/ Craig Haley

FCS Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 37:19


Craig Haley, the FCS Senior Editor for Stats Perform and The Analyst, joins the show to talk about top storylines in the FCS. Sam and Craig discuss:-voting panel for the Top 25 media poll and national awards -Early favorites for the Walter Payton and Buck Buchanan Award-Will Sam Houston and Jacksonville State be eligible for Top 25 votes this season?-FCS-to-FBS realignment concern -FCS playoff expansion -Ivy League in the playoffs -Top storyline in the FCS entering this season -National title picture-Frisco-Future of D1 football The podcast is presented by HERO Sports and BetMGM.Visit https://herosports.com/ for FCS coverage and https://sports.betmgm.com/en/sports for online betting odds.

Ivy League Murders
The Professor's Obsession Part 2

Ivy League Murders

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 25:27


This episode concludes our Combat Zone series. In this episode Laura and I dive into the investigation into Robin Benedict's murder and the eventual capture of the perpetrator. This is the second part of the episode, If you've not listened to The Professor's Obsession, Part 1, please go back and listen.

Ivy League Prep Academy Podcast
Build Your Teen's Confidence Masterclass pt. 1

Ivy League Prep Academy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 14:38


Teen (and preteen) confidence is one of the most important traits to help develop. But how? Unfortunately a lot of advice on the topic is incomplete.In my Facebook Group (Parents of Ambitious Teens: Personal Growth & Healthy College Prep) I taught a masterclass to help parents help their teens. In part one, you'll hear about one form of confidence, and why the advice "just do it" or "just get started" can be counterproductive.To join my Facebook group and be able to participate in future masterclasses, go to TILC.to/FB and don't forget to answer the questions. See you there!

Ivy League Murders
RE-RELEASE: The Combat Zone Episode Four: A Professor's Obsession Part 1

Ivy League Murders

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 27:50


This week we discuss how an Ivy-league educated Tufts professor became obsessed with Robin Benedict, a sex worker from the Combat Zone. Tomorrow's episode is part two of A Professor's Obsession and the end of our Combat Zone series.

CFR On the Record
Higher Education Webinar: Equitable Access to Global Education

CFR On the Record

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022


Andrew Gordon, chief executive officer and founder of Diversity Abroad, leads the conversation on the importance of providing equitable access to global education.   CASA: Hello, and welcome to CFR's Higher Education Webinar. I am Maria Casa, director of the National Program and Outreach at CFR. Thank you all for joining us. Today's discussion is on the record, and the video and transcript will be made available on our website, CFR.org/academic if you would like to share them with your colleagues after today. As always, CFR takes no institutional positions on matters of policy. We are delighted to have Andrew Gordon with us to discuss the importance of providing equitable access to global education. Mr. Gordon is the founder and chief executive officer of Diversity Abroad, an organization focusing on topics pertaining to access, diversity, inclusion, and equity in international education. He works with higher education institutions, nonprofit and for profit organizations, and government agencies for developing strategies for increasing access to international education for diverse, first-generation, and high financial needs students. Mr. Gordon is a member of NAFSA: Association of International Educators, the Association of International Education Administrators, the European Association for International Education, the National Association of Black Accountants, and the Association of Latino Professionals in Finance and Accounting. He is an alum of INROADS and the Association for the International Exchange of Students in Economics and Commerce. Welcome, Andrew. Thank you very much for speaking with us today. GORDON: It's great to be here. Thank you. CASA: Can you begin by giving us an overview of what equitable access to global education means and its importance in higher education? GORDON: Yeah. Absolutely. First, just want to say thank you, Maria, for the invitation to speak and to CFR Academic for hosting this session, particularly, this important topic. As I delve into my remarks, I'll give a little bit of background as to the—where my remarks are going to come from. As Maria mentioned, I founded an organization, Diversity Abroad, that centers diversity, equity, inclusion in global education. And over the last sixteen years had an opportunity to work with higher-education institutions, everything from community colleges to liberal arts, R-1s to Ivy Leagues, on this question of what does equitable access to global learning and global education mean. And we get this question often and, usually, when I get this question sitting in meetings with academic professionals, I, in some ways, put the question back and I say, well, what's the benefit of global education and global learning. Why do our campuses invest in infrastructure for global education and global learning, whether that's sending students abroad, supporting international students, ensuring that global themes are embedded into the curriculum? We often hear in the field of international education the term campus internationalization. Why are we investing in that in the first place? Well, when we think about global education and global learning and the students that engage in it, one of the organizations that many on the call may be familiar with, AAC&U, puts global learning and global education as a high impact practice, the kind of opportunities that help our students excel academically, grow interpersonally, and also be positioned that much better to thrive professionally once they leave school. And so taking a step back and thinking of the benefits of global education, we talk about students who engage in global learning opportunities. Many times this helps open their—broaden their perspective of the world as a whole. If they're participating in a physical—or education abroad program, many times it helps them in building resilience, a deeper sense of self, having more empathy for those who are, if you will, “different” than they are, embracing difference, something I think we can all appreciate we need that much more so in our society. So when we think—and we could probably, Maria, spend the entire time that we have talking about the benefits of global education and global learning. But the thing is that we know that—those of us who work in higher education know that and in many ways we are the gatekeepers to the kind of experiences inside the classroom, outside the classroom, that we say will fall under the umbrella of global learning. So if we know the benefits of these opportunities, we know how it can impact our students, then it is—well, the onus is on us to ensure that all of our students have equitable access to the benefits of global learning. We can't, on one side, say these are all the benefits of these phenomenal opportunities and so on and so forth, and then on the other side be OK with only certain students having access to global learning opportunities because, essentially, what we're saying is, well, this is a great thing that we have but only certain students are able to. And when we think about what—I would say, for many folks, when we talk about global learning, I would say one of the first things we often go to is study abroad. Study abroad is a phenomenal, phenomenal experience, and we'll talk about other forms in a moment. When we think about that particular opportunity that, I would say, is very high profile on many campuses, students graduating from high school going into university, the percentage is that eightieth, ninetieth percentile of students who are interested in study abroad. We know that is one of the global—one of the experiences that would fall under global education. We also know that, traditionally, study abroad has not reached a vast—too many of our students, we'll say, particularly our students of color, those who are first generation, those who are coming from lower socioeconomic backgrounds. And so I think, in many ways, we'll get students who we say are—the growing population of students on our campuses are also those that study abroad has not supported, and even when campuses have been more successful in getting students to study abroad they haven't necessarily been as—we haven't necessarily been as successful in supporting the success of our students while they're there. So, when we think back to study abroad, if you will, being an aspect of global learning, which is a high-impact practice, you know, high-impact practice is only a high-impact practice if it's properly administered. So we send students but we're not prepared to really support our students in a very holistic way, in an inclusive way. Great, we've sent them but we're not really giving them equitable access to the benefits of a global education. And, likewise, global education exists in different parts of the campus as well. Think about what happens in our classrooms. In the curriculum we have a variety of different area—academic areas of focus. Frankly, how we support our incoming international students—our international students—every student is not going to study abroad, but our campuses are globally diverse environments where our students from all backgrounds exist and our international students and how they acclimate to U.S. culture, how we prepare them to engage with students from a variety of different backgrounds, Americans from a variety of different backgrounds. That's also part of the global learning that happens. And so when we take a step back and just, again, think about why is it that we invest in global education and global learning, it's because we know the benefits of it. We are 5 percent of the world's population, and I think if anything in the last two years, sort of two and a half, three years, we—it is very clear and currently as well is very clear how incredibly interconnected we are as a globe, even as their call—you hear the pundits and otherwise say, like, oh, well, globalization is dead, and so on and so forth. It was, like, regardless of what those conversations are, we know that as a world we are all reliant on each other, and the world that the students, particularly the younger students, if you will—younger age college students—are going to inherit is going to be that much more interconnected. And so for us, as a country, the United States, to be able to take on the challenges and the opportunities that the twenty-first century puts before us and to be successful in taking on the—both challenges and opportunities that has to be a global approach because we're not on this globe by ourselves, and for our future leaders to be prepared to do that it's incredibly important for them to appreciate the importance of global learning and global education, have equitable access to a variety of those opportunities. And, frankly, we are shooting ourselves in the foot if we only allow our—maybe we say not intentionally but structurally the situation is such that only a certain population of students has access, real access, to these kind of learning opportunities. And so, I think, as higher education institutions we have to ask ourselves, what does that mean, yes, for the International Education Office, but also what does that mean for our academics in the classroom? What does that mean for our senior administrators who are deciding where to invest funds and otherwise of an institution? What does it mean for our chief diversity officers, for our VP of student affairs, and otherwise, who also were tasked with ensuring equitable access to a variety of opportunities that are available on campus? And so, when we think about these questions at Diversity Abroad, I think being in association and being able to work with the three hundred-plus institutions that we do on these topics, we really do look at it holistically. What does that mean—global education, equitable access, and education abroad? Global learning at home, what happens in and outside the classroom domestically? Support for our international students? But also how are we also ensuring that the professionals—faculty, staff, and otherwise who are engaged in global educational opportunities or experiences in and outside the classroom—that those faculty members and those staff are reflective of the rich diversity that our students embody? CASA: Thank you. Thank you for that introduction. Now let's open it up to questions. As a reminder, please click the raise hand icon on your screen to request to ask a question. On an iPad or Tablet, click the more button to access the raise hand feature. When you are called upon, accept the unmute prompt and please state your name and affiliation, followed by your question. You may also submit a written question via the Q&A icon or vote for other questions you would like to hear answered in your Zoom window at any time. We do have a raised hand from Basilio Monteiro, associate dean and associate professor of mass communication at St. John's University. Basilio? (No response.) You could accept the unmute prompt. Q: Thank you very much, Mr. Gordon, for your introductory remarks. You know, this internationalization of education—oftentimes what happens is I find that students go and stay within the one small bubble instead of mixing up with other students from the country where they go to. That interaction is not there, and oftentimes, it's not even promoted to go. They will go—they go as tourists. They don't go as learners to learn, and that seems to be the kind of trend, so I find. And I talk to the students. They'll say, OK, oh, I went here. I went there. I saw this and I saw that, and that's it. So that is—what is your overall national experience at this point on this particular context? GORDON: Yeah. Thank you for that comment, and you're right. I think that as the field of international education we have not been as intentional as we could be in ensuring that once we've put in the investment dollars, human capital, and otherwise that helps get students overseas that we're really creating kind of an environment where our students are going to have the kind of experiences that they come back and they really have been able to develop deeper empathy, embracing difference, and so on and so forth. We think about it here in the U.S., right. The students at our campus, a lot of them are having a good time but they're still learning. They're still having very, in some cases—I hate to overuse the word transformative, but experiences that are shaping who they are becoming as people. That doesn't have to change when our students go abroad, and so whether we're talking about programs that are led directly by faculty, I'm thinking about how are we intentionally finding opportunities for our students to engage in the host community; what are opportunities of reciprocity when they're in country in a certain location so that our students don't just have a stamp on their passport but they'd have the kind of experience that is changing how they view themselves, how they view the world, and, frankly, how they view both the challenges and the opportunities that lie before all of us. What is incumbent on, I think, institutions as well as the organizations, institutions that work with a lot of third party organizations to help facilitate study abroad, it's incumbent on those organizations as well to say, we know our students want to have a good time. They're going to have a good time. That's excellent. We want that. But we also—the core reason why our students are engaging in these opportunities needs to be academic, self-development, and otherwise. The fun is going to happen, but that other piece needs to be there because if it's not then, frankly, we become glorified travel agents, taking students from point A to point B. I don't think if you asked anyone in international education what their role is that we would say that's what our role is because it's not. But we need to be intentional about ensuring that the kind of outcomes that we want, that we say our students can gain—we've built the structure to be able to—for our students to be able to achieve those outcomes. Thank you for that question. CASA: Our next question comes from Beverly Lindsay from the University of California system. Q: Thanks to both of you for your introductory comments, Maria and Andrew, for your statement. As a former member of NAFSA and a number of other professional organizations, I actually have several questions, but I will limit them. One is, as you know, throughout higher education, particularly in comprehensive research universities, there is an emphasis on the African diaspora, the Latino diaspora. So many of the undergraduate students tend to go to those countries that are African, the Caribbean, or South America, for example. How do we encourage students, regardless of demographic background, to go anywhere in the world because they would get more experience? For example, when I was the international dean at Hampton we set up a program where the undergraduates could go and do internships at the British parliament, which was really innovative. The second question I would ask you is to what extent do you involve graduate students through your organization? Now, I realize that they're often focused on their thesis or, in rare cases, we don't think of study abroad. We think of research opportunities for our doctoral students. But to what extent do you involve students from different levels? Because I know in community colleges there is considerable emphasis now in terms of having the Los Angeles Community College system, the Dade County students in the community colleges, go abroad. So, as I said, I had many but I'll just focus on those right now. But thank you for your forthcoming answer. GORDON: Yeah. Thank you for that, Beverly. I think when it comes to destination, where our students go, again, unfortunately, I think, that our field has an opportunity to go in a different direction as far as a narrative about certain places. I think, unfortunately, in the U.S., when we think of Africa, when we think of the Global South as a whole, it's often positioned through the lens of deficit of the people, of the governments, health care systems, and so on and so forth. And, without question, there's work to be done. But there's a lot that's happening of innovation in—I mean, Africa, the continent, I mean, obviously, the different countries. Same thing in Latin America. But if we position these locations as you go here to help, you go here almost in a savior type mentality, whereas if we position locations like Europe and Australia and otherwise, like, well, you go here, this is where you're going to learn, this is where you go on internships and this is where you're going to prepare yourself professionally, really, seems like amplifying this narrative of parts of the world are important for learning, growth, innovation. Other parts of the world are more focused on philanthropy, giving, and so on and so forth. And I think that puts us, frankly, as a nation in peril. There was a recent survey that came out—I want to say it was in the last couple weeks—and it—they surveyed youth in Africa. I can't remember which countries. But it asked—the question was who has a more positive impact on your country, China or the U.S., or maybe it was a variety of countries. But China eked out ahead the U.S. So the continent with the youngest population in the world, and we know what that means for the future, of future work and otherwise, views of different countries having a positive impact. We don't see a lot of study abroad programs on the African continent, for example, or Latin America that are focused on innovation and technology. I can—I can go on and on. And so I think we have to take a step back as a field of international education—I think, higher education as a whole—and push back against narratives of how certain regions of the world, certain countries, are viewed so that our students are encouraged to want to engage anywhere in the world as they're looking to deepen their understanding, grow interpersonally, be that much better positioned for their post-degree careers, and so on and so forth. So that—I think that onus is on us as institutions, as organizations, to increase that perspective. But I also think that that also has an aspect to deal with incoming international students as well. With the incoming international students how are we helping them have opportunity to tell more their story about the countries they come from, the contributions their countries make to the U.S., to other parts of the world, and so on and so forth. As to the other question as far as how we engage with graduate students, we were—I would say primarily graduate students who are working in higher education programs, international education programs, that are interested specifically in this work will engage with Diversity Abroad in a variety of ways, either participating in one of the communities of practice that we have, coming to our annual conference, Global Inclusion, in a kind of variety of different ways from that perspective. As far as specifically looking at mobility-based programs for graduate students, that's not our focus at this time. CASA: Our next question comes from Hemchand Gossai, associate dean of humanities and social sciences at Northern Virginia Community College. Q: Maria and Andrew, thank you very much for your comments and also for providing this opportunity. My institution is very large with a multi-campus sort of setting with seventy-five thousand students. It's almost ubiquitous among institutions of higher education, particularly in their admissions process, to extol the importance of how many countries are represented at the college or university, and that's a great thing. We have that as well, and we have a large contingent of international students. One of the things that has struck me and that you have sort of alluded to, Andrew, has to do with the role of our international students as they arrive on our campuses, and I'm wondering if you can reflect a little bit about how best our large contingent of international students might not only be integrated but might actually interact and shape our local community of first-generation students, of students of color, and so on. If you would, I'd appreciate it. Thanks. GORDON: Yeah. Excellent, excellent question. Let me start off by saying, for us, when we think of international students—well, not when we think of international students—but the process of the experience that our international students have operationally, if you will, in many ways it's the flip of our students going abroad. We had a question earlier about how do we better ensure our domestic students are integrating once they're in country. We're just flipping that and saying that for our international students. So what we're saying is that we want the same for both. We don't want our international students to be seen as, hey, this is a revenue source. You're here on campus. Now we're done. No. We want them to be successful, and our international students embody the same identities that our domestic students do. They're students of color. They're first-gen, disabilities, come from different religious backgrounds, LGBTQI. They embody all these same identities that we're trying to support with our domestic students and we want to do the same thing for international students. So and thinking of what that means is really asking the question is what does holistic support look like for our international students. Too often, our international students once they get on campus, they're seen as that international student. I mean, simply, that's their passport. That's where you're actually born. They need the same support, and then some additional at times, as our domestic students. Are we asking them, what contributions do you want in the classroom? Are we appreciating that our international students are coming from a different perspective during certain discussions and are we giving them space to be able to share those perspectives and honor the fact that it comes from a different perspective but that's still important? Because that's part of global learning that our domestic students benefit from as well when you have those rich discussions in the classroom, when you have a variety of different perspectives that are being shared, and we think about being able to hear that, analyze what's being said, and develop your own sense of, OK, this is my thought on this topic or otherwise. But when we just have a conversation, for example, in the classroom that's focused on domestic, even though we have a wide or very diverse population of students that—of international students in our classroom we're really missing an opportunity to both engage with the international students, help them have a deeper sense of belonging on our campus and, frankly, for our domestic students and all students to be to be able to learn that much more so. The other part of the question I mentioned, and kind of tying back to what I mentioned a second ago of how our international students embody so much of that—so many of the identities of our domestic students, you know, when we have programs for first-generation college students are we just thinking about our domestic first-generation college students? Our international students can be the same way. When we think about our disability services, when we think about programs that are maybe related to race in ways, are we thinking intentionally about that? Yes, an African American and an international student from Africa who's from Africa and who's Black and has grown up in Africa their entire life very well are—some shared experiences, but very different. Are we thinking about opportunities for learning and growth from that way? So as I would say it's the intentionality in the programming and the intentionality in thinking of what is our role in—and, obviously, helping our students be successful, but particularly from an equitable access to global education, we have all the ingredients to the salad, if you will. What's our role in making sure that this comes together and this works in a way that serves our students, our domestic, our international students—frankly, serves the institution. And so there's broader goals that we have in higher education around learning but also preparing a generation of citizens that are thoughtful not just about home but thoughtful about the relationship between home and abroad and how our world is broadly interconnected and reliant on each other. CASA: Thank you. Our next question comes from Mojúbàolú Olufúnké Okome, associate professor in the department of political science in Brooklyn College. Q: Good evening. I'm calling from Nigeria now. And I'm a professor, not associate. I was wondering if there is a two-way stream in terms of the way in which international education is conceived of thinking about students coming from foreign countries as exchange students, and I'm particularly interested in this from an African perspective. It's unbelievably difficult for many African students to come to the U.S. as exchange students. They face formidable visa barriers, and for many of them that are from socioeconomic backgrounds where they are not flush with money it is actually an impossibility. So, I mean, is there any kind of thinking about how skewed the pool is that the educational institutions in the U.S. is joined from, given all the constraints that are put in the way of students from the Global South, especially Africa— GORDON: Yeah. Q: —who want to just come to the U.S. just like our students go to those places? GORDON: Yeah. Yeah. No. Wonderful, wonderful question, and I'd kind of bifurcate my answers. I think with respect to visas, I think that's a question—offices handle that at State and I think there has to be a broader question of are we creating enough opportunities for students or making it easy enough for students or talented students that want to come take advantage of the rich diversity and the academic opportunities, some professional opportunities that exist in the U.S. Are we making it easy enough for those students to come to our shores? And I think that's a question that—State has to continue to be evaluated from that aspect. I'm not by any means an expert with visas, so I'm going to—I'm going to stay in my lane to an extent. But I think, broadly speaking, is we do—I think as a nation have welcomed and want to continue to welcome talented folks from all over the world to be able to come. And then I think the second part of the question, what's the role of institutions, I think similar to our—to domestic students, we know who our students are. We know what the challenges they have and being able to access opportunities that we have. And so we say—going back to what I mentioned earlier, we say we know what these—we know the benefits of these kind of opportunities. We're the gatekeepers to that. We know who our students are, and we know the challenges they have and this includes international students that are interested in coming, be it exchange or otherwise. How do we in higher education create more opportunities for talented students to be able to take advantage of these opportunities that we're very clear the benefits to them? And so from an exchange standpoint, looking and saying are we building exchanges—do we have the infrastructure, are we investing in the infrastructure so that we can have more exchanges with the Global South? Because many times exchanges, while not always cost neutral, is usually much more cost neutral than a paid study abroad or otherwise. So are we creating those kind of opportunities? Again, realizing that that benefits the student—the international student, the domestic student. It benefits our campus community and our broader community as a whole when our international students are out and engaging with the broader community around the universities and otherwise. So are we investing in that? And then when it comes to fully matriculated students, whether at the undergraduate, graduate, or doctorate level, are we doing enough? Is there more we should be doing to ensure that if funding is a challenge that the funding is—funding schemes that are available to better create opportunities for students to be able to come, and then also like we've mentioned in the last question is our campus infrastructure—our campus set up in such that our international students feel like they belong, the campus is thinking about them, and this is a place where they want to, frankly, stay and contribute their knowledge or insights, their experience, and otherwise, which, again, benefits them, benefits the campus, and benefits the community and the nation as a whole. Q: Next we have a comment from Pamela Waldron-Moore, a professor at Xavier University of Louisiana. You have touched on this topic but you might want to go a little deeper. She writes, as a professor at Xavier University of Louisiana, I know that this is a helpful conversation. One area of global education that does not seem to have had much exposure is the opportunity for national institutions to provide exchange opportunities that allow low-income students to appreciate diverse education. For example, students can learn much from institutions located in naturally global environments—New York, DC, California, et cetera. Many U.S. institutions are teeming with international students who are happy to interact with a wider body of learners. GORDON: Yeah. I'll just comment on that briefly, and I know Xavier does great work with our national exchange as well as with international. But your point is right on. When we think of the globally diverse cities that exist in the U.S., they're learning labs. I'm from the Bay Area. I like going to San Francisco. I go to places in Oakland and otherwise. These are learning opportunities. I think when you think of the flow of migration to certain areas within the country, there's so much to learn there for our domestic students as well as for our international students. And so when we think of global learning holistically, as much as—I started Diversity Abroad based on study abroad. I'm a fan of study abroad, absolutely. But I think when we think about global learning, we have to get—mobility from the standpoint of getting on a plane, crossing an ocean, and using your passport is not the only way. And when we think about the institutions, where our institutions exist, what does the community look like? How globally diverse is our local community? Are there opportunities for us, thinking of co-curricular activities, to better engage with our local communities as well, because part of the broader goal that we talked about, the benefits of global learning, those benefits can be gained—different benefits, different places, in different ways, but can be gained locally but also can be gained abroad. So, an excellent point. CASA: Again, as a reminder, please click the raise hand icon on your screen if you would like to ask a question, or write it in via the Q&A icon. Andrew, can you talk a little bit about the specific activities that Diversity Abroad engages in as an organization? GORDON: Yeah. Absolutely. Happy to. So Diversity Abroad founded in 2006. We're a member-based consortium, around three hundred and fifty colleges and universities. As I mentioned, it ranges from small liberal arts to community colleges, Ivies to R-1s, and, really, we—our focus is looking at diversity, equity, and inclusion within internationalization and global education. And so what does that mean? We look at four key areas of our work. It's education abroad, international students, global learning at home, and then career and organizational advancement, and we—the actual practices of the work that we do focuses heavy on learning and development. So everything from our annual conference, Global Inclusion, to our DEI certificate for folks who are engaged in global education or are interested in global education, as well as a leadership certificate for student leaders who want to embed DEI, global, into their leadership. We publish a set of good practices called the Global Equity Inclusion Guidelines, it's a set of policy practices for embedding DEI into a campus's global education operation, and then there's a ton of thought leadership that we do, collaboration with organizations. We have a phenomenal team that is always working to continue to push this conversation forward, and maybe more than moving the conversation forward, to push forward resources, learning opportunities, and otherwise to ensure that, frankly, as a field a decade from now we're not having this same conversation but that we've made some real tangible progress in going forward. So, much harder to execute on a daily and weekly basis than to kind of go over in a couple of seconds. But I'm really proud of the work that we're doing and always interested in collaborating with professionals and institutions that share—frankly, share our vision of equitable access to global educational opportunities. CASA: Great. Our next question comes from Krishna Garza-Baker from the University of Texas at San Antonio. She's assistant director of experiential learning. Q: Hello, Maria and Andrew. Thank you so much for this conversation. I'm actually a current member of Diversity Abroad and absolutely love all their resources. I'm there on a daily basis. So I would like to reflect back to the idea on promoting the benefits of global learning. As much as I promote the benefits of global programs to my students—I work specifically with business students at the Alvarez College of Business—what are some ways in which you have seen or experienced navigating the topic of the financial investment into educational experience and what are some other barriers to global learning that you have seen for domestic students? GORDON: Krishna, thank you for that comment and happy to have you as part of the Diversity Abroad community. So finance is interesting. Without question, finances can be a barrier to students engaging in global educational opportunities, particularly mobility-based ones. What's interesting, though, is that at times when you ask a student, are you interested in studying abroad, for example? They say, no, I can't afford it. And I was, like, well, do you know how much it costs? Well, I'm not actually sure. Are you sure how your financial aid works and how your financial aid can support? It was, like, no, I'm not actually sure. So you have students sometimes that see study abroad and there's an interest, but for a variety of other reasons, maybe they're becoming a little bit more hesitant, and finance is an easy one to go to say, oh, I can't afford it. And so I think it's important for, one, us to understand, from a financial standpoint, A, is the students—can they really not afford it? How are we addressing that? Or is this a question of, I'm interested and I'm on the fence and so on and so forth and I'm just kind of saying financial. I think for the aspect of students not being able to afford it, as an institution, again, we have to go back and say what's the value of global educational opportunities. We know that students who are statistically—we're saying that students who study abroad graduate sooner, graduate with higher GPAs as well. So that is hitting part of a broader goal that we have of higher education about persistence and completion. And so as an institution are we investing in the kind of activities like global education opportunities that are supporting the broader goals that we have as an institution around persistence and completion, and that is something that's strategically at institutions that—are questions we have to ask ourselves. We say, you know, yes, global, you know, the importance of all these opportunities to study abroad and so on and so forth. Are we investing in it in a way that any of our students that are interested finance is not going to be the barrier that pushes them back? Now, I think, on the other aspect of it with respect to finance and being able to talk with students and their families, students and their families who are from lower socioeconomic backgrounds. They're on campus, and they're on campus, in a way, because they've seen being a student at your campus as an investment, something that is valuable enough to either, personal finances—going out and fundraising in a variety of different ways because they see the value in that. The question, I think, that we have as—in higher education and particularly in international education are we positioning global education as this is an investment? And this goes back to a comment that was made a little bit earlier about, hey, you know what, we're sending these students abroad. They're not really engaging with the populations. It's kind of like it's just vacation. OK. Well, if I'm a serious student and I'm concerned about finances, and I have to make choices about what I invest in, if study abroad is positioned as, you know, go have fun abroad I'll say, well, listen, I'll go on vacation at another point in my life. I'm focused on getting in school, doing the kind of things that's going to position me to be able to thrive, support family, and otherwise. So in education abroad and study abroad, the onus is on us to make sure that the way we're talking about these opportunities, the way that opportunities are actually taking place, is such that a student that has to make that decision looks at study abroad or other global opportunities and says, you know what, this is where I want to invest my time, my resources, and otherwise because this is something that's going to help me continue to grow with the broader goals that I have. CASA: Our next question comes from Maggie Mahoney, director of global engagement at the University of Houston. Q: Good afternoon, Maria and Andrew. Nice to talk with you. Hello from Houston, Texas. Andrew, my question is about our teams, because we want to bring the best of our teams to our students. We know that burnout is an ongoing issue. We've had the pandemic. We've had the murder of George Floyd that kind of shifted things even more for the bigger focus of DEI and that has become exhausting, not to mention in Texas we face our own Texas state issues and now inflation changing. So there's a lot of stress on our teams, and in institutions of higher ed we should have offices that mirror the diversity of our students. But we don't always have that. Do you have any recommendations for our diverse staff team members and their self care in the face of this burnout and too often being turned to in the support of DEI efforts whenever we should all be doing the work? And do you have any recommendations for team leaders on how to continue doing our work while supporting our diverse team members, as we know they're overwhelmed? GORDON: Yeah. Thank you for that comment. And that's—I think a very important point is that we can't ignore—when we think of—we think of some of the organizations that we've looked AT and say, hey, these are great companies or great organizations that I'll support. The folks who are at the table many times come from incredibly diverse backgrounds, and in international education if we want the work that we do to have the kind of impact, we want to make sure that we're drawing the best and brightest, most diverse folks that say, hey, higher education, international education, specifically, this is a place where I want to go work. Our faculty members who may potentially be leading programs abroad, there's a lot that our faculty members can be doing over the summer when we say, you know what, I want to lead a study abroad program because this is—not only the impact this could have on students, but I know I'm going to be supported by the international office and otherwise as I'm going abroad. So what I would say is a couple of things. One is from a team leader perspective, and I think what you pointed out being something that is really a very salient topic. You know, DEI work cannot fall on folks of color or folks who we look at and say, OK, well, you represent XYZ identity so, yes, diversity worked for you. All that does, as stated, is it leads to burnout and it doesn't lead to us moving the needle. So, organizationally, are the practices or the policies in place. So, operationally, DEI is just embedded into what we do and regardless of what your role is, the DEI tasks that are there, is there for you to do. So regardless of what your background is, whatever the DEI tasks are connected to your role, those are there for you to be able to do. And so that'd be one aspect of it, really looking operationally from that perspective. But then another question is asking ourselves whether it's at the department level within an office, like a global education office or whatever it may be, are we building a climate of belonging. Are we building a climate where our staff that come from historically marginalized backgrounds feel like, hey, we can come—we can come here. We can be ourselves. When we're having challenges we're being supported and otherwise because, again, then we're able to be able to do the work that's needed to increase participation in global educational opportunities, being able to work with the faculty members to think through how do we better embed global themes into the curriculum, being able to support our international students. Which is saying none of this happens automatically. It is run by people, on people power, and we've got to take care of our people. If we don't take care of our people, all the other things that we want to do, ultimately, we won't be as successful as we'd like. CASA: We have a question now from Professor Waldron-Moore from Xavier. She says—she asks, how can we generate interest in study abroad from the classroom? Shouldn't we address seriously ways to motivate students to learn more about diversity in order to raise their awareness about higher education? We need to get the excitement about other countries and people going before we grow an interest in study abroad or a study exchange. GORDON: Yeah. So that's—I would say it's not an either/or but I would say they very much work in tandem. So the more—and to the point, the more that we—the more that global themes are presented to our students, the more interest that will start to generate with our students. If you have a population of students that from the time they set foot on campus they know they're going to study abroad and so and so forth, that's great. We want those students. But you have another population of students who maybe that's not the case, and so how are we embedding global themes into the curriculum regardless of what our fields may be? What are—are we finding opportunities to embed global themes into the curriculum so that, one, we're helping to promote the idea of there's a lot to learn outside of the shores of the U.S. as well, but, two, for our students—and every student's not going to study abroad. For our students who aren't going abroad are we finding opportunities to ensure that they still have access to global learning themes within the classroom. And so they very much play off each other, and I will say that now much more so for the students who, ultimately, decide not to participate in a study abroad or a formal study abroad program it's an opportunity for them to still get access to global learning opportunities. But I will say—one other thing I want to bring up and I started bringing this up in my earlier comments, I think when we're thinking about global education and diversity, equity, and inclusion, definitely thinking of it through, say, two lenses. One is the lens of what we've primarily been talking about of how are we supporting our historically marginalized students, supporting our staff and our faculty, our people, as they're engaged in global education, and that many times, again, are folks in historically marginalized populations. But when we think about learning global DEI competencies, all of our students need to access that. DEI is not just populations to support or competencies to be learned—to learn. So inside the classroom, when they're participating in study abroad or otherwise, are we thinking through how we position our students to learn the kind of competencies that can position them to be better citizens, to be better—that much more thriving in their professional careers and otherwise. And, again, that takes place—many times that takes place in the classroom. CASA: Our next question is also written and comes from Wendy Kuran, associate vice president for development and alumni engagement at Duke Kunshan University. Actually, she has two questions. The first is, following up on the earlier question and Andrew's great answer, is the career and self-development value proposition of study abroad clear to diverse students? Is there credible, accessible research about the value? What could we, at universities, including students, do to help make that case in new ways more effectively? And the second shorter question, do you ever work in secondary education intercultural exchange programs and, if not, are those in your ecosystems? Are there those in your ecosystems who do? GORDON: Yeah. So I'll start with the second question first. We work with some secondary institutions and organizations that support secondary students at that level. I would not say that that has been the traditional group of professionals or organizations or institutions that have come to us. But we are seeing some growing traction there. So I'm always interested in connecting with folks who have interest with that. With respect to career, I would say there are definitely institutions who have been at the forefront of centering the connection between global education and career, and I think as the field of global education that's work that's improving. But there's still work to do, I think, particularly for being able to make the case for students who, for a variety of reasons may be hesitant about study abroad. What we find in engaging with students, yes, research is important. Using more factoids are important. Firsthand experiences being important of students who embody similar identities and otherwise that can say, I had this kind of experience. I went from point A to point B to point Z. I know when I've had an opportunity to go to campuses and speak and otherwise telling a little bit about my own personal trajectory from doing accounting consulting to becoming an entrepreneur and otherwise and how study abroad impacted that, that's one of the things that attract students is really wanting to understand, OK, you look like me. You had a similar experience. How did you do that? So which is to say particularly with that—the part of your question asking about historically marginalized student populations, are we telling the stories of success? Are we telling the stories of how our students from historically marginalized backgrounds have been able to leverage global opportunities to advance in their career? For them to be able to say very concretely, I had this experience and then I'm working in this job and this is how this experience helped me and so on so forth. Again, that is intentional work, yes, by our global education offices but also, frankly, in collaboration with our career centers, our offices that are doing career development on campus. How are we working with them to be able to bring them back to connect with the students, the alum, and otherwise to be able to tell those stories, which, again, is part of the broader ecosystem of what does engagement look like to be able to increase participation and the success of students who are interested in study abroad? CASA: Have you been able to develop dedicated assessment and evaluation tools for success or gauging the success or the results of study abroad programs? GORDON: So we, ourselves, have not. There are some tools out there and some studies that are out there. Gosh, I'm trying to think of his name right now at the University of Georgia. There was a study in the early kind of 2000s called the Glossary Study. It was just recently built—they built upon that with a new study that showed the connection between academic success. I wouldn't say that for me, I'm familiar with a survey or research that goes as deep on the career success aspect of it. But I know there are some resources out there that talk deeper about the connection between career development and—study abroad and career development. CASA: And do you have thoughts on how global education and study abroad contribute to U.S. foreign policy creation and international relations? GORDON: Yeah. Well, in part, I mean, I think there's an aspect of just civics that's connected to every time you get on a plane, you travel, and you flash that green—I always say green—that blue passport, why is that so easy? Because even being able to understand the ability that you have to travel to the vast majority of the world without having a visa, without—and, frankly, other countries aren't able to do that. So almost, certainly, encourage deeper appreciation for the privilege that we have as U.S. citizens, being able to travel as freely as we do for most of the world, but also being able to engage, I think, for students of—U.S. students to be able to engage in other populations, hear their perspective. You know, sometimes there's perspectives that are critical to the U.S. Sometimes there are perspectives that are wildly in love with the U.S., and that's great. It's important to hear all of that, to hear how you're perceived, and then you bring that back home with you. Now you're thinking about your role as a citizen, what that does to you to be able to understand positionality of the U.S. and the rest of the world and what role that you personally want to take with that. And so I—and I guess I say for myself having a deeper appreciation for the, frankly, benefits of being a U.S. citizen by traveling and having had the opportunity to travel as much as I do and interact with folks all over the world. And so I think for all of our populations I think the populations that maybe haven't been as civically engaged or as deeply civically engaged it creates that many more opportunities to have that appreciation for. CASA: Yes. GORDON: And then, frankly, just people-to-people. I would just say—this is the last thing I'll say. It's funny, I mean—I mean, people-to-people exchanges, what they say it's hard to hate someone you know. (Laughs.) I mean, it's true. I mean, and I think that it's easy to turn on the news and hear XYZ about any number of people and locations in the world. I think when you sit down you break bread and you have coffee, whatever it may be, with folks from other parts of the world it does develop, I think, a deeper appreciation, really helping push us down that road of embracing difference and, I think, developing a deeper empathy, which we could all use more of that. CASA: Great. Well, we've come to the end of our time and, Andrew, thank you so much for sharing your insights with us, and to all of you for your questions and comments. You can follow Diversity Abroad on Twitter at @DiversityAbroad. You will be receiving an invitation to our next Higher Education webinar under separate cover. In the meantime, I encourage you to follow at @CFR_Academic on Twitter and visit CFR.org, ForeignAffairs.com, and ThinkGlobalHealth.org for research and analysis on global issues. I hope you're all having a great summer, and thank you again for joining us today. We look forward to your continued participation in the Higher Education Webinar Series. (END)

The New Yorker: Politics and More
Dexter Filkins on the Rise of Ron DeSantis

The New Yorker: Politics and More

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 18:59


Florida Governor Ron DeSantis has shown himself uniquely skilled at attracting attention beyond the borders of his home state. Just this month, DeSantis blocked state funds for the Tampa Bay Rays' stadium after players voiced support for gun control in the wake of the mass shooting in Uvalde, Texas. He's also continuing a fight to punish the Disney corporation for criticizing Florida's so-called “Don't Say Gay” law. An Ivy League-educated anti-élitist firebrand, he is willing to pick a fight with anyone—reporters, health officials, teachers, Mickey Mouse—to grab a headline. DeSantis “practically radiates ambition,” the staff writer Dexter Filkins tells David Remnick. “He sounds like Trump, except that he speaks in complete sentences. . . . He's very good at staking out a position and pounding the table and saying, I'm not giving in to the liberals in the Northeast.” Yet, despite having been anointed by Donald Trump in his primary election, DeSantis has refused to “kiss the ring,” and many see DeSantis as a possible opponent to Trump in a 2024 Republican primary.

Shadow Warrior by Rajeev Srinivasan
Ep. 72: Nupur Sharma, neo-feudalism and the geopolitical squeeze on India

Shadow Warrior by Rajeev Srinivasan

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 12:51


A version of this essay was published by firstpost.com at Nupur Sharma, neo-feudalism and the geopolitical squeeze on IndiaThe commentariat has rightly focused on the specifics of the Nupur Sharma incident, such as the alleged blasphemy, the apparent provocation, the possibly pro-forma outrage and the street-veto (cheered on by certain politicians who spoke ominously about tinder and spark). I couldn’t possibly improve on their perspectives. For instance Utpal Kumar wrote an excellent piece excoriating the cringe-inducing and thunderous ‘liberal’ response https://www.firstpost.com/opinion/nupur-sharma-has-erred-no-doubt-but-why-are-liberals-mutedly-supporting-islamist-challenge-to-her-right-to-life-10767521.html; and I would add that ‘feminists’ were also notable by their absence. The blood-curdling death threats being hurled at Nupur, the fact that she has been hanged in effigy, and the related riots that appear to be astroturfed, are all deplorable.  I would like to look at the whole thing from the point of view of geopolitics. India is in the process of being squeezed badly.Thanks for reading Shadow Warrior! Subscribe for free to receive new posts and support my work.Soft StateThere are a couple of perspectives of interest. One is a throwback to the dark days of 1989-90, when the fall of Afghanistan to the Taliban induced the most recent genocide of Kashmiri Hindus, because the terrorists Pakistan had assigned to their Afghan battle were (as they are now) available; and this time, thanks to Biden’s largesse, they have billions worth of weapons. A related historical incident is the hijack of Indian Airlines 814 in 1999, and what, in hindsight, was a strategic blunder committed by India, with Jaswant Singh personally escorting the freed terrorists to Kandahar, who then proceeded to wreak general havoc.  In both cases, the Pakistani takeaways were predicated on triumphalism. They could see the dictum in their Brigadier General SK Malik’s The Qoranic Concept of War being put in place. “Terror struck into the hearts of the enemies is not only a means, it is the end itself.” They could with good reason argue that they were on a trajectory towards a final victory, and urge a final thrust that would bring the house of cards down.The result was the Parliament attack, 2001. Operation Parakram. Godhra, 2002. And eventually 26/11 Mumbai in 2008.Pakistan and its friends in India have been nothing if not lucid: they openly declare their intent to wreak havoc on India, balkanize it, massacre people, do gazwa-e-hind. There is every reason to believe that they mean what they say. To pretend otherwise is to repeat the US folly vis-a-vis China: China kept saying what they intended to do, and the US kept pretending not to hear; and we know where that got Obama and Biden. The point is that every capitulation, every demand conceded, is viewed as a sign of weakness, and invites the next, ever more outrageous demand. India today may be going down this slippery slope, again. As it did repeatedly in the 20th century. The deep freeze on CAA was a capitulation. The withdrawal of the Farm Bills was a capitulation. And now the silencing of Nupur Sharma is a capitulation. If the State blinks on Agnipeeth, that would be another capitulation. There may well be good reasons for all of them, but the fact is that they perpetuate the notion that India is a Soft State.Thank you for reading Shadow Warrior. This post is public so feel free to share it.Neo-Feudalism and the Serf StateThe second perspective of interest is global. Sociologist and demographer Joel Kotkin writes in his latest book The Coming of Neo-Feudalism that we are slipping into a period where there is a stark contrast between the ruling elites, in particular the tech billionaires, and the ruled proletariat. In other words, a return to the European era of feudalism, where a ruling class lorded it over the serfs, who basically had no rights. On Singularity Radio, leftist and former finance minister of Greece, Yanis Varoufakis, echoes the same sentiment and argues it is ‘techno-feudalism’. He goes one step further to state that Capitalism is dead, whereas Kotkin only goes so far as to argue that a zaibatsu-ization of the US economy is happening, and the economic systems of the US and China are converging.In a Hoover Institution podcast based on his Foreign Affairs article, geo-strategist John Mearsheimer suggests a convergence from a political angle too. He argues that the difference between a democracy and an autocracy are limited so far as great-power rivalries go, and that the US made an extraordinarily foolish move to enable China to rise. Says he: Engagement may have been the worst strategic blunder any country has made in recent history: there is no comparable example of a great power actively fostering the rise of a peer competitor. And it is now too late to do much about it.Put these two arguments together, and you get an interesting picture. On the one hand, feudalism requires an upper class and a lower class. It could be argued that feudalism never in fact went away in Europe, or even the supposedly class-less US. Social mobility there is far less than one has been led to believe, according to research by Raj Chetty, then at Stanford. There indeed are traditional elites in the US: the East-Coast Wall Street types, for instance. Their kids all go to prep school like Philipps Andover or Exeter, then on to Ivy League colleges, and then on to Goldman Sachs or Morgan Stanley, and eventually maybe to government. This is, for all intents and purposes, an upper caste, which is also largely endogamous. Just try breaking into it: it is well-nigh impossible. Then there are the lower-caste serfs, the plebeian yahoos who are subjected to ‘manufacturing consent’ on a daily basis. They were earlier manipulated via the big newspapers, but now the tech platforms do an even better job. If you don’t believe me, see how the Overton window has shifted sharply in favor of woke tropes over the last few years. Or, for a more tactical shift, note how the topic of heated discussion has gone from Roe v Wade to school shootings to Jan 6 within days. I am reminded of a line from Pink Floyd, Welcome to the Machine: “What did you dream? It’s alright, we told you what to dream”.In contrast to Kotkin, I would argue that there is no neo-Feudalism, it is the same lovely practice that never went away. Kotkin also said, in passing, “Silicon valley is full of indentured servants from Asia”. He meant India. He is right, and that is the role of India in the game: producing raw materials, including serfs, for the consumption of the upper caste feudal lords.Feudalism applies also to nations. Whites have for a few centuries been the feudal lords, and their colonies, especially India, have been the untermenschen serfs. That is their pre-ordained role. As Mearsheimer candidly admits, the US blundered in allowing China to escape from serfdom. And it is too late. But of course it is not too late to contain India! They have no intention of blundering again, or allowing India to rise to be a great power as well. China has become an honorary upper caste country by bulking up its economy and especially its military. But applications are now firmly closed for membership in this club. Even rich Japan has only a tenuous membership. It is in the interests of the feudal lord countries to keep the serf countries as they are.In this, the US and China are as one: there is no way India can be allowed to gain power. This may explain the fury with which US and European commentators (eg Bruno Macaes) greeted India’s stance in the Ukraine war, of keeping aloof from it. That’s not how a serf state is supposed to act: it should do the Gunga Din tango.This mindset is why the US has continually armed and financed Pakistan, propping up a failed state that should have been dismantled long ago: it is meant to contain India. This is also why you have the likes of Thenmozhi Soundararajan running rampant in the US shouting about caste. This is why a propagandist like Audrey Truschke is not ejected from polite company. This is why USCIRF, an evangelist propaganda body, gets free rein to pontificate about India. This is why India is marginalized in the Quad, and the upper caste countries (Anglosphere is by definition upper caste) close ranks to form AUKUS. India must be put in its place, and that’s why a million mutinies are funded by the Ford Foundation and George Soros, and Xinhua and other CCP arms. There are plenty of sleeper cells armed and ready to riot on command. Add to this mix the oil states of West Asia. Qatar has its giant natural gas reserves, and India is increasingly addicted to LNG including for its newly-minted rural women consumers of cooking gas. Furthermore, Biden is genuflecting at the feet of Saudi Arabia, as Glenn Greenwald writes in a stinging comment on substack. Having successfully prevented India from buying cheap Iranian oil, and pushing hard to prevent it from buying cheap Russian oil, the Americans are forcing India to be ever-more dependent on West Asian states. Never mind that India has buyer power: of course the sellers have to sell the stuff to somebody to keep their economies ticking over.Also never mind the fallacy of the argument that India must kowtow to these Gulf states, in case they send back the Indians working there. Well, that is not charity, either. If the Indians were ejected (let us recall what happened to Uganda in Idi Amin’s time), the serfs running everything would be gone, and the feudal lords would actually have to get their hands dirty doing something other than being rich and idle. The fact that India has not asserted itself forcefully means that the pressure tactics are working: the malign forces have drawn first blood. Chances are that worse is yet to come. 1600 words, Jun 15, 2022 updated Jun 19, 2022 This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit rajeevsrinivasan.substack.com

How HR Leaders Change the World
Episode 60: A holistic approach to excellence: Sergio Ezama, CHRO, Netflix

How HR Leaders Change the World

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 28:22


Sergio shares Netflix's holistic approach to excellence, an approach that empowers individuals to lead their own performance, and results in Netflix's policies such as for annual leave: ‘take as much time as you need'. Providing insights into Netflix's work on representation behind and in front of the camera, and on eliminating bias, Sergio discusses the risk of missing unexpected talent, including colleagues such as himself, who didn't get an MBA or study at an Ivy League university. Highlighting the benefits, Sergio calls on everyone in HR to work with an open approach to talent. Here's a snapshot of a few things we talked about: [3:00] A holistic approach to excellence: vacation and parental leave at Netflix [7:00] Performance: a Netflix of one [10:50] Representation behind and in front of the camera [17:00] People profiles in corporate America [21:40] Eliminating bias: Legitimate drivers for advancement [25:50] Taking an open approach to talent Referenced resources Cutting Edge Parental & Family Leave Policy and Practice “I love How HR Leaders Change the World” – if that sounds like you, please consider rating and reviewing our show! This helps us achieve our goal, to reach more of your peers, so we can all contribute to further and faster change. Scroll to the bottom, tap to rate with five stars, and select “Write a Review”. Be sure to let me know what you loved most about the episode! Also, if you haven't done so already, follow the podcast. We'll add a bunch of bonus episodes to the feed and, if you're not following, there's a good chance you'll miss out. Follow How HR Leaders Change the World today! 

KNX In Depth
KNX In Depth: Are LA and other cities prepared for longer and hotter heat waves?--Airlines cancel hundreds of flights as Summer travel season picks up--God isn't dead but he's not as popular--Tombstone's hidden message said to be obscene

KNX In Depth

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 49:25


Summer officially begins tomorrow but don't tell that to much of the country, including people here in southern California. They're already feeling the Summer weather as heat waves roll across the U.S. Scientists say expect more and more that'll get hotter and hotter. We go In Depth into whether big cities and states are prepared to deal with more extreme heat waves.  Flying has become a roll of the dice lately. Will your flight take off as scheduled or will it be canceled? Who knows. But is it time for the government to get involved with new regulations?  Ukraine is worried Russia will get even more aggressive in the east.   The Republican Party in Texas adopts a resolution, saying President Biden didn't really win in 2020. Is it moving to the far right? We go In Depth.  We talk to an Ivy League scholar about January 6th and its place in American history. Can these hearings lead to an historical indictment of a former president?  Is God dead? A new poll indicates no but he's not as popular with people anymore.  A man's tombstone message is really touching and nice but some officials in Iowa say the hidden message is a big obscene problem.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Roads Taken
The Deep End: Lara Fowler on Staying Curious and Nurturing Expertise

Roads Taken

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 27:27


Guest Lara Fowler had been a cross-country ski racer and studied Japanese in high school in Portland, Oregon. She took those two pursuits to college and pursued them to their highest. With all of the language requirements and a study abroad program that she wanted to undertake, she had nearly completed a major in Asian Studies. But she also had a long-standing interest in water. So in fulfilling her distribution requirements, she found ways to study water from multiple angles, did off-campus research in the topic, and ultimately won a senior fellowship to devote her final year to writing a book on water policy, in effect creating her own second major in water resource management.After graduation, she took a year to pursue ski racing but decided to hang up the skiis and get a job in the water world. Recognizing that much of the discourse around water intersected with the law, she went to law school and ultimately worked as a water mediator, bringing disparate voices together to find solutions in water allocation. When her husband got the academic job he had long wanted, she found a new way to apply her skills and spark new interests.In this episode, find out from Lara how keeping curiosity alive and being willing to ask questions helps you move from novice to expert…on Roads Taken with Leslie Jennings Rowley. About This Episode's GuestLara Fowler is an attorney and mediator who focuses on environmental, energy, and natural resource law, with a specific focus on water-related issues. She has a joint appointment at Penn State Law where she teaches natural resource law and negotiations and the Penn State Institutes of Energy and the Environment where she is working on questions related to water, the Chesapeake Bay, and systems-level behavioral change. She lives in Pennsylvania with her husband and two children. Executive Producer/Host: Leslie Jennings RowleyMusic: Brian Burrows Find more episodes at https://roadstakenshow.com Email the show at RoadsTakenShow@gmail.com

Ivy League Prep Academy Podcast
Harvard Leader Dr. Weissbourd on Healthy College Prep

Ivy League Prep Academy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 20:28


Harvard professor Dr. Richard Weissbourd is currently a senior lecturer on education at the Harvard Graduate School of Education and at the Kennedy School of Government. In our discussion today, we are particularly excited to hear about the Making Caring Common Project that he directs, and the Turning the Tide initiative, which is a national effort to reform college admissions that has engaged almost 200 college admissions offices in promoting ethical engagement, reducing damaging achievement pressure in high school and increasing equity and access for economically disadvantaged students. Listen in to get his take on the following questions: 1. Of all the things you could be doing with your time and expertise, you devote a lot of yourself to Making Caring Common & Turning the Tide. Why is this effort so important right now?2. you know from our previous conversations that I am a strong advocate of Turning the Tide, and many of my listeners are high school guidance counselors and other youth leaders. What can we be doing better to support ambitious teens today?3. Is it possible for college prep to be the catalyst to inspire teens to find their core values and become healthier rather than stressed out?4. What advice would you have for the ambitious 14 year-old listening in now?

PrepWell Podcast with Phil Black
Mash-up Of Summer Advice

PrepWell Podcast with Phil Black

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2022 21:27


Show Notes: In this episode, I reflect on my conversations with students and parents over the last few weeks. At the beginning of every summer, I meet with lots of students who want me to assess how they've been doing, what they have planned for the next few months, and where this will place them in the admissions process. This is a mash-up of the most common themes that we discuss.   0:01:30 Acceptance rate differential   0:03:30 Extracurricular activities   0:04:50 Letters of recommendation   0:07:55 The undecided student   0:12:40 If you get a B, should you give up?   0:15:40 A winning list of ECAs   0:16:20 Connecting the dots   0:17:35 Changing gears   0:19:15 Have this discussion now   Follow us: Enroll in PrepWell Academy Follow on Instagram Follow on Facebook   If you want to support the show, here are three immediate steps to take.   Subscribe to the podcast where ever you listen to podcasts Follow me on Instagram or Facebook Give us a review Share this episode with a friend Join our mailing list Enroll your 9th or 10th grader in the program Podcast Host: PrepWell Academy's Founder, Phil Black, has spent a lifetime cracking the code on the world's most competitive programs: Yale University, Harvard Business School, Navy SEALs, Goldman Sachs, Entrepreneurship, Shark Tank (2X), etc.   Inside PrepWell Academy, Black teaches students everything they need to know about the college admissions process in a series of expertly-timed, 3-5-minute, weekly training videos starting in 9th grade and continuing through 12th grade [Note: this program can only be joined in 9th or 10th grade]. My specialties include military service academies, ROTC scholarships, Ivy League, and student-athletes.

Apple News In Conversation
There's a science to happiness. This Ivy League professor has cracked the code.

Apple News In Conversation

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 28:22


At Yale University, psychology professor Laurie Santos saw firsthand how so many college students were anxious or depressed. So she decided to teach a class on the science of happiness — and how to apply it in real life. It became the school’s most popular course ever. Apple News In Conversation host Shumita Basu spoke with Santos about her podcast, The Happiness Lab, and the evidence-based strategies that can help us improve our lives and outlook.

Homer & Tony
2PM: Wisconsin's favorite reporter

Homer & Tony