Podcasts about Valdez

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  • 2,457EPISODES
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  • Nov 27, 2021LATEST

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Best podcasts about Valdez

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Latest podcast episodes about Valdez

Alaska News Nightly
Alaska News Nightly: Friday, November 26, 2021

Alaska News Nightly

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021


Kenai residents protest the federal COVID-19 vaccine mandate. Also, the Biden administration kicks off the comment period on restoring roadless protections in the Tongass National Forest. And a look at Alaska Native Medical Center's Traditional Native Foods Initiative.

El Ritmo de la Mañana
Kenny Valdez: Artistas y comunicadores desaparecidos en los medios

El Ritmo de la Mañana

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 23:57


Alaska News Nightly
Alaska News Nightly: Wednesday, November 24, 2021

Alaska News Nightly

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021


Kenai residents protest the federal COVID-19 vaccine mandate. Also, the Biden administration kicks off the comment period on restoring roadless protections in the Tongass National Forest. And a look at Alaska Native Medical Center's Traditional Native Foods Initiative.

The Sports Junkies
Bit Season, Episode 12: Super Junkie

The Sports Junkies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 57:58


Happy Thanksgiving from Valdez, Drab and Awadd!..Listen to Drab and Valdez explain why EB wants to constantly hear Pastor Jacques' story and why he's suspicious of happy people.  Make sure you have plungers handy for the guests using your bathroom during the holiday.  Also, when you're enjoying your dessert, think about Valdez scrolling through Pintrest to make Drab the most perfectly moist cheesecake. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Alaska News Nightly
Alaska News Nightly: Tuesday, November 23, 2021

Alaska News Nightly

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021


Kenai residents protest the federal COVID-19 vaccine mandate. Also, the Biden administration kicks off the comment period on restoring roadless protections in the Tongass National Forest. And a look at Alaska Native Medical Center's Traditional Native Foods Initiative.

How to Build a Happy Life
How to Identify What You Enjoy

How to Build a Happy Life

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 42:24


In adulthood, many of us are forced to recalibrate our relationship with joy. As responsibilities multiply exponentially, time grows limited, and challenges mount, it becomes harder to make time for fun, let alone remember what it feels like. As we explore the key components of happiness—pleasure, joy, and satisfaction—we ask the foundational question: What really brings me joy? In this special-edition, bonus episode of How to Build a Happy Life, the psychotherapist and Atlantic contributing writer Lori Gottlieb demystifies one of the vital components of a happy life: enjoyment. Gottlieb believes that we not only find it challenging to make time for day-to-day enjoyment, but also struggle to identify what it should feel like. This episode was produced by Rebecca Rashid and hosted by Arthur Brooks. Editing by A.C. Valdez. Fact-check by Ena Alvarado. Sound design by Michael Raphael. Be part of How to Build a Happy Life. Write to us at howtopodcast@theatlantic.com or leave us a voicemail at 925.967.2091. Music by Trevor Kowalski (“Daydream in Silver”), Stationary Sign (“Loose in the Park”), and Spectacles Wallet and Watch (“Last Pieces”). Click here to listen to every full-length episode in the series.

My Camino - the podcast
Saul Valdez walked the Camino to place his life-long stone at the Cruz de Ferro. Wait until you hear what it is......

My Camino - the podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 60:05


Saul Valdez lives in Hawaii and works in Los Angeles. He's a busy guy. He thought he was ready for retirement, so he headed to the Camino for an adventure. What he found was....himself. He placed a stone at the Cruz de Ferro he hoped would lighten what has weighed him down his whole life. It's an amazing story. You'll love Saul and his journey.

Alaska News Nightly
Alaska News Nightly: Monday, November 22, 2021

Alaska News Nightly

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021


A small plane catches fire after an emergency landing in Bethel. Also, commercial property owners in Juneau are livid about a 50 percent increase in their land values. And a cold snap across much of the state isn't going away any time soon.

Alaska News Nightly
Alaska News Nightly: Friday, November 19, 2021

Alaska News Nightly

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021


The Biden Aministration moves forward with restoring the roadless rule for the Tongass. Also, Dillingham students cheer a decision on place names from the Interior Secretary. And rough water and frozen spray turns around a ferry bound for Skagway.

Alaska News Nightly
Alaska News Nightly: Thursday, November 18, 2021

Alaska News Nightly

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021


Anger over the PFD fuels talk of a new constitutional convention. Also, Anchorage International Airport tries to position itself as a solution to West Coast supply chain woes. And the global supply crunch has bike shops in Anchorage drawing on a whole new set of skill.

The Sports Junkies
Bit Season, Episode 11: Achy Breaky Heart

The Sports Junkies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 66:06


EB has been hounding BDK about his sex life lately.  Awadd agrees to a half mile race against "fatso" Cakes.  Everyone should be rich fading Cakes' parlay picks.  Valdez and Drab are fascinated by Awadd and his Dad's trip to Nashville.  Find out who was more successful hitting on women:  Adam or Moorie. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Alaska News Nightly
Alaska News Nightly: Wednesday, November 17, 2021

Alaska News Nightly

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021


The tight rental market in Anchorage is forcing some families into homelessness. Also, the medical director of a local child abuse clinic draws scrutiny. And an Alaskan is turning his bear attack experience into a movie.

Your Brain on Facts
Amazing Races (do-over, ep. 171)

Your Brain on Facts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 33:52


Quick, switch over to Vodacast to see the pictures I talk about in the episode! From using a train in a car race to marathon doping with deadly poison, there's far more excitement in racing than simply declaring a winner. YBOF Book; Audiobook (basically everywhere but Audible); Merch! Hang out with your fellow Brainiacs  .Reach out and touch Moxie on Facebook, Twitter,  or Instagram. Support the show Music by Kevin MacLeod, Steve Oxen, David Fesliyan.   Links to all the research resources are on our website.     Born in New York in 1901, Frank Hayes dreamed of being a race horse jockey.  Though he was short in stature, he was too heavy for the job, so he found himself working as a groom and stablehand instead.  Sadly, Hayes wouldn't live to see himself ride a horse to victory, but he *would win a race.  My name's...   LeMans, Grand Prix, Bathurst, the Indy 500, car races are big business around the world, but there was a time when people believed these new horseless carriages were a novelty item, too flimsy for such an activity.  In 1908, a race was organized to prove otherwise, in which six teams of drivers tried to be the first to get from New York to Paris.  Considering the state of the automobile technology and the lack of road infrastructure at the time, that was no mean feat.  Only three of the six competitors would even complete the course.  The race was a 169-day ordeal, still the longest motorsport event ever held. The starting line was set up in Times Square, on a gray morning, the 12th of February.  The six driving teams competed under four flags, Germany, France, Italy and the United States. The French set off with the highest number of cars, as three distinct automobile manufacturers participated.  The event brought almost 250,000 people on the streets of New York City to witness the start of the contest, considerably more crowd than the very first ball drop in New York at the New Year's Eve celebration, welcoming 1908.  The starter's gun fired at 11:15 AM, 15 minutes late.  Mayor George McClellan was supposed to fire the pistol, but he wasn't there on time and apparently, an impatient bystander did the job and the racers took off.  This was the first of many unexpected challenges.The planned route would take the racers across the United States, north through Canada into Alaska, over the frozen Bering Strait to Siberia, across Russia to Europe and finally to Paris.  The decision to have the race rolling in the midst of winter-time added to the challenges of the racers.  Drivers needed to stop often to repair their cars. They even used locomotive lines when it was impossible to find the road.  Not the rails, though.  The American car straddled the rails, bumping along on the ties for hundreds of miles.  The Italian team complained that this was cheating.  The car that would win had a 4 cylinder, 60 hp engine and a top speed of 60 mph.  Cars of the day offered little in rider comfort or amenities, like a roof.  They drove around the world, fifteen hours a day, in winter, in open-top cars without windshields.  Antifreeze hadn't been invented yet, so the radiators had to be drained each night.    While most teams were made of a driver and a mechanic, some teams included journalists, and even a poet, instead.  The first car, a French Sizaire-Naudin, dropped out after only 96 miles, with a broken differential they could not repair.  Another French team lost a man after they became stuck in the snow and the teammates began to fight.  They were about to duel with pistols, when the mechanic fired his assistant, an Artic travel expert he would be sorely lacking later on.  Not even in Iowa yet, the Italian car had mechanical troubles and the driver tried to cheat by loading the car onto a freight train.  He abandoned the plan when a photographer caught him in the act.  The car's owner then sent him a telegram, received a cable from the owners of his car: “Quit race, sell car and come home.”  The American team, driving a Thomas Flyer, took the lead when crossing the United States. The team managed to arrive in San Francisco in 41 days, 8 hours, and 15 minutes, 9,000 miles ahead of the car in second place.  This was actually the very first crossing of the US by an automobile in winter.  The route then took the drivers to Valdez, Alaska, by ship.  The American driver, George Schuster wasted no time investigating the Valdez-Fairbanks Trail in a single-horse sleigh, and concluded that the only way to cross Alaska in a car would be to dismantle it and ship the parts by dogsled.  The Parisian race committee abandoned the idea of Alaska and the Bering Strait and ordered the Americans to return to Seattle. The new plan was for the cars to sail to Vladivostok and drive to Paris from there.  While the Americans were still at sailing back to Seattle, their competitors arrived there and set sail for Russia. Then the Americans lost time getting their Russian visas in order.  The Flyer had been the first to arrive on the Pacific coast but was now the last to leave, a weeks behind the competition.  The race committee also decided that  the American team was given an allowance of 15 days, meaning the remaining teams could beat them to Paris by two weeks and still lose, *and penalized the team that tried to use a train.    The driving resumed from Vladivostok, but by this point, there were only three competitors left: The German Protos, the Italian Züst, and the Flyer from America.  Not an American Flyer; a little red wagon wouldn't fair well in these conditions.  What do all these cars look like anyway?  I'm glad you asked!  I put pictures in the Vodacast app, partner for this episode.  Vodacast is a brand new podcast player that makes it easy to see all the bonus content the creator wants to show you all in one place.  It even syncs to the audio, so you can see what I'm talking about right then and there!  It's still early-days, but it's going to be a real boon for both listeners and creators.   So the drivers, who you can see on Vodacast, agreed to start again evenly matched.  They had extreme difficulty finding petrol in Siberia, leading the French driver to try to bribe the other teams to let him ride on one of their cars, so he could still at least be *on a winning car.  This prompted his sponsor to pull him from the race.  The two two teams faced another set of major challenges as passing through the tundra realms of Siberia and Manchuria.  The spring thaw turned the Asian plains into a seemingly endless swamp.  Progress measured in *feet per hour, rather than miles.  The driver had to push their cars as much as drive them and even resorted to hitch up teams of horses to pull them along.  They also got lost, a lot.  The racers couldn't ask locals for directions as no one spoke Russian and a wrong turn could cost you 15 hours.  Once they neared Europe, roads improved and the race sped up. The Germans arrived in Paris on July 26, while the Americans were still in Berlin, but the 15 day allowance for the Americans and the 15 day penalty for the Germans meant that the Flyer had a month to drive to the next country.  The American team arrived in Paris on July 30th, 1908, to win the race, having covered approx 16,700 km/10377.  Even though the victor had been declared, the Italians trove on and made it to Paris in September 1908. The victory meant huge recognition for Shuster, who in 2010 was also inducted into the Automotive Hall of Fame.  If you're ever in Reno, NV, you can see the Flyer in the National Automobile Museum.   ADS - Podcorn and Healthy Postnatal   America's first Olympics, held in 1904 in St. Louis as part of that year's World's Fair, stand unchallenged for the title of most bizarre.  The Olympics' signal event, the marathon, was conceived to honor the classical heritage of Greece and underscore the connection between the ancient and modern.  The outcome was so scandalous that the event was nearly abolished for good.  A few of the runners were recognized marathoners, rest could be described as “assorted.”  There was a man who did all his training at night because he had a day job as a bricklayer, ten Greeks who had never run a marathon, two men of the Tsuana tribe of South Africa who were in St. Louis as part of the South African World's Fair exhibit and who arrived at the starting line barefoot, and a Cuban mailman named Félix Carbajal, attired in a white, long-sleeved shirt, long, dark pants, a beret and a pair of street shoes, who raised money to come to the States by demonstrating his running prowess by running the length of the island.  Upon his arrival in New Orleans, he lost all his money on a dice game and had to walk and hitchhike to St. Louis.   The race was run on August 30, starting at 3:03 p.m.  If you know anything about daytime temperatures, that's what we call hot time.  Heat and humidity soared into the 90s.  The 24.85-mile course involved roads inches deep in dust, seven hills, varying from 100-to-300 feet high, some with brutally long ascents, cracked stone strewn across the roadway, the roadway that was still open to traffic, trains, trolley cars and people walking their dogs.  There were only *two places where athletes could secure fresh water, from a water tower at six miles and a roadside well at 12 miles.  Cars carrying coaches and physicians drove alongside the runners, kicking the dust up and launching coughing spells.   William Garcia of California nearly became the first fatality of an Olympic marathon we he collapsed on the side of the road and was hospitalized with hemorrhaging; the dust had coated his esophagus and ripped his stomach lining.  Len Tau, one of the South African participants, was chased a mile off course by wild dogs.  Félix Carvajal trotted along in his cumbersome shoes and billowing shirt, making good time even though he paused to chat with spectators in broken English.  A bit further along the course, he stopped at an orchard and snacked on some apples, which turned out to be rotten. Suffering from stomach cramps, he lay down and took a nap.  At the nine-mile mark cramps plagued Fred Lorz, who decided to hitch a ride in one of the accompanying automobiles, waving at spectators and fellow runners as he passed.   Thomas Hicks, the bricklayer, one of the early American favorites, begged his two-man support crew for a drink at the 10-mile mark. They refused, instead sponging out his mouth with warm distilled water.  (Purposeful dehydration was considered a positive 115 years ago.)  Seven miles from the finish, his handlers fed him a concoction of strychnine and egg whites—the first recorded instance of drug use in the modern Olympics.  Strychnine, in small doses, was commonly used a stimulant.  Hicks' team also carried a flask of French brandy but decided to withhold it until they could gauge his condition.   Meanwhile, Lorz, recovered from his cramps, emerged from his 11-mile ride in the automobile. One of Hicks' handlers saw him and ordered him off the course, but Lorz kept running and finished with a time of just under three hours. The crowd roared and began chanting, “An American won!”  Alice Roosevelt, the 20-year-old daughter of President Theodore Roosevelt, placed a wreath upon Lorz's head and was just about to lower the gold medal around his neck when, one witness reported, “someone called an indignant halt to the proceedings with the charge that Lorz was an impostor.” The cheers turned to boos. Lorz smiled and claimed that he had never intended to accept the honor; he finished only for the sake of a “joke.”  You know, it was just a prank, bro.   Hicks, pumping with strychnine, had grown ashen and limp.  When he heard that Lorz had been disqualified he perked up and forced his legs to keep going.  His trainers gave him another dose of strychnine and egg whites, this time with some brandy to wash it down. They fetched warm water and soaked his body and head.  He began hallucinating, believing that the finish line was still 20 miles away.  In the last mile he begged for something to eat, then he begged to lie down. He was given more brandy and two more egg whites. Swinging into the stadium, he tried to run but was reduced to a graceless shuffle. His trainers carried him over the line, holding him aloft while his feet moved back and forth, and he was declared the winner.   It took four doctors and one hour for Hicks to feel well enough just to leave the grounds. He had lost eight pounds during the course of the race, and declared, “Never in my life have I run such a touch course. The terrific hills simply tear a man to pieces.” Hicks and Lorz would meet again at the Boston Marathon the following year, which Lorz won fair and square.  Bonus fact: The 1904 Olympics also saw gymnast George Eyser earned six medals, including three gold, despite his wooden leg.   MIDROLL  Patreon, names and increase Review and CTA While it's usually easy for humans on a race course to navigate, how then do homing pigeons figure out where they are?  A researcher at the US Geological Survey, Jonathan Hagstrum, has come up with a novel suggestion. It involves, of all things, pigeon races.  In Europe, and to a lesser extent in the US, pigeon racing has become a passionately-followed sport for which birds are carefully bred and trained.  Birds from many lofts are taken to a common distant location, released together, and their return speeds timed.  90% of the birds usually return within a few days, and eventually almost all do.   On Sunday, June 29, 1997, a great race was held to celebrate the centenary of the Royal Pigeon Racing Association.  More than 60,000 homing pigeons were released at 6:30 AM from a field in Nantes in southern France, flying to lofts all over southern England, 400-500mi/640-800km away.  By 11:00 AM, the majority of the racing birds had made it out of France and were over the English Channel.  The fastest birds should have arrived at their lofts by early afternoon. But they didn't.   A few thousand of the birds straggled in over the next few days.  Most were never seen again. The loss of so many birds was a disaster of previously unheard proportions in the pigeon racing world.  One bird could get lost, maybe a hundred, but tens of thousands?   A theory would later emerge.  At the very same time the racing pigeons were crossing the Channel, 11:00 AM, the Concorde supersonic airliner was flying along the Channel on its morning flight from Paris to New York.  In flight, the Concorde generated a shock wave that pounded down toward the earth, a carpet of sound almost a hundred miles wide. The racing pigeons flying below the Concorde could not have escaped the intense wave of sound. The birds that did eventually arrive at their lofts were actually lucky to be more tortoise than hare.  They were still south of the Channel when the SST passed over, ahead of them.  Perhaps racing pigeons locate where they are using atmospheric infrasounds that the Concorde obliterated.  Low frequency sounds can travel thousands of miles from their sources. That's why you can hear distant thunder.  Pigeons can hear these infrasounds very well as they use them for navigation.   What sort of infrasounds do pigeons use for guidance?  All over the world, there is one infrasound, the very low frequency acoustic shock waves generated by ocean waves banging against one another!  Like an acoustic beacon, a constant stream of these tiny seismic waves would always say where the ocean is.  This same infrasound mapping sense may play an important part in the long distance navigation of other creatures. It could explain how Monarch butterflies in the US are able to find one small locality in Mexico, or how Brazilian sea turtles are able to find their way to their homes on tiny Ascension Island a thousand miles out in the Atlantic.  Even more valuable to a racing pigeon looking for home, infrasounds reflect from cliffs, mountains, and other steep-sided features of the earth's surface. Ocean wave infrasounds reflecting off of local terrain could provide a pigeon with a detailed sound picture of its surroundings, near and far.  The enormous wave of infrasound generated by the Concorde's sonic boom would have blotted out all of the normal oceanic infrasound information. Any bird flying in its path would lose its orientation.  The incident is referred to as the Great Pigeon Race Disaster.  The Concorde stopped flying six years later, for reason unrelated to the pigeons. Not every race goes to the swiftest, one was meant to go to the friskiest.  Charles Vance Millar practiced law in Ontario for 45 years until his death in 1926.  He was also a shrewd investor, which meant there was a nice fat bank account before his fatal heart attack.  A lifelong bachelor with no close relatives, Millar wrote up a will that was as mischievous as he had been. For example, Millar would amuse himself by dropping dollar bills on the sidewalk and then watching the expressions of the people who bent to furtively pocket the cash.  In death, Millar outdid himself in roguishness. He wrote “This Will is necessarily uncommon and capricious because I have no dependents or near relations and no duty rests upon me to leave any property at my death and what I do leave is proof of my folly in gathering and retaining more than I required in my lifetime.”  He left the shared tenancy of a Jamaican vacation spot to three men who could not stand the sight of each other.  He tested the resolve of teetotallers by leaving them shares in companies involved in the alcohol business.  The Ontario Jockey Club is an august body whose membership is drawn from society's upper crust, so Millar left shares in the club to an unsavoury character who existing members would find repellent and to two opponents of racetrack gambling.   He parcelled out much of his estate to test his theory that every person had a price; the only mystery being at what level would greed trump principle.  But, it was Clause 9 of the will that caused the most fuss; it was the legacy that triggered a race to conceive.  Simply put, he directed the residue of his estate be given to the Toronto mother who gave birth to the most children in the ten years immediately following his death.  The money involved wasn't chump change. By the time the race came to an end, the total prize was worth $750,000; that would be a bit more than $12 million today.  What came to be called the Stork Derby was on, especially at the three year mark, when the Stock Market Crash of 1929 ushered in the Great Depression.  You might have heard of it. With so many people experiencing unemployment and poverty, the pot of gold offered by Charles Millar was enticing, even if the attempt meant creating a *lot for mouths to feed.   Newspapers followed the fortunes and fecundity of the contestants closely.  It was a welcome distraction from grim reality.  Five women leading the pack, mostly lower income and already with a slew of children, became household names.  Those five of most fruitful loins had delivered 56 kids between them, 32 of which had born by 1933.  From Time Magazine from Christmas Eve 1934: “Last week in Toronto each of the two leading contenders for the prize money bore a child. Mrs. Frances Lillian Kenny, 31, gave birth to a girl, her eleventh child since the race began. Mrs. Grace Bagnato, 41, gave birth to a boy, her ninth ...”  While citizens followed the race keenly, the Ontario provincial government was not amused. It called the maternal marathon “the most revolting and disgusting exhibition ever put on in a civilized country.”   VODACAST   Midnight on Halloween 1936 was the deadline for baby-birthing.  On October 19, The Daily Journal-World of Lawrence, Kansas carried a story that started, “A hesitant stork circled uncertainly today over 1097 West Dundas Street with what looked like a $750,000 baby in his well-worn bill.”  However, the productive resident of that address Grace Bagnato was soon disqualified from the derby; her husband turned out to be an illegal Italian immigrant and that didn't sit well with the authorities. Everything old is new again, eh?  Lillian Kenny, who had ten births to her credit, was also tossed out of the event because she had the misfortune to deliver two stillbirths and that was declared not to count.  Pauline Clarke also gave birth ten times during the competition period but several of her babies were conceived out of wedlock; an activity deeply frowned upon at the time, so they were out.   As the final whistle blew, four women were tied at nine babies each.  Annie Smith, Alice Timleck, Kathleen Nagle, and Isobel MacLean each received $125,000,or about $2mil today.  Lillian Kenny and Pauline Clarke were handed consolation prizes of $12,500 apiece, or $20K.  Mrs. Bagnato, got nothing.   When Millar's law partner found the will he thought it was a joke rather than a legal document. Others thought its purpose was to tie the legal system into knots.  According to The Canadian Encyclopedia, “The question of whether Millar intended his will to take effect or merely to amuse his lawyer friends remains in doubt.”  The Ontario government, which had earlier huffed and puffed about the unseemly nature of the Stork Derby, tried several times to have Charles Millar's will declared null and void. The premier, Mitchell Hepburn, had said it was “the duty of the government to stop this fiasco.”   A few of Millar's *distant relatives popped up to challenge the will; hoping to score the jackpot. But, the will, and its Stork Derby clause, held up and, eventually, the Supreme Court of Canada said it was valid.   It's pleasing to report that the winners handled their legacies sensibly and were able to buy homes and provide an education for their children. The winners, that is.  Nobody knows how many women started the Stork Derby and then dropped out. However, by the end, at least two dozen mothers had produced at least eight babies. This placed an enormous burden on the families who were suffering through the Great Depression with 25% of Toronto families receiving government support in 1935.   The prize money was a direct result of Millar's capricious nature.  He once missed the ferry between Windsor, Canada and Detroit.  This angered him so he bought the property that would eventually be used to construct the Detroit-Windsor Tunnel, which put the ferries out of business.  It was money from this investment that largely funded the Stork Derby.   And that's….When Frank Hayes was given the chance to fill in for another jockey, he had to lose a lot of weight fast, like 10 lbs/4kilos in 24 hours, which he probably did by not eating or drinking and possibly sweating or purging.  Doctors then and now think that's why he died suddenly of a heart attack in the second half of the race.  He didn't fall out of the saddle though, even after his horse crossed the finish line first.  He was declared the victor, and remains the only jockey to have ever won while dead.  The horse, Sweet Kiss, was immediately retired, because no one wanted to ride a horse nicknamed Sweet Kiss of Death.  Remember...Thanks    Some races go off the rails, but there are plenty that were made to be weird.  Every year, young women line the streets of Moscow to run for a higher purpose – shopping.  Glamour magazine hosts an annual stiletto race. Young women strap on their tallest heels (3.5”/9cm minimum), and run a 164ft/50 meter course in hopes of winning a $3,000 gift card. Most of the women taped their shoes to their feet, but that did not stop all the trips, slips, and falls.  Thanks for spending part of your day with me.   Sources: https://www.thevintagenews.com/2017/01/01/the-historic-new-york-to-paris-race-in-1908/ https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/the-1904-olympic-marathon-may-have-been-the-strangest-ever-14910747/ http://biologywriter.com/on-science/articles/pigeons/ https://owlcation.com/humanities/The-Toronto-Stork-Derby https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/paris-or-bust-the-great-new-york-to-paris-auto-race-of-1908-116784616/  

Alaska News Nightly
Alaska News Nightly: Tuesday, November 16, 2021

Alaska News Nightly

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021


Military leaders in Alaska say the Arctic is a strategic priority. Also, Anchorage's mayor throws his support behind a conservative parents rights group. And a Fairbanks restaurant is requiring customers prove they're vaccinated.

Alaska News Nightly
Alaska News Nightly: Monday, November 15, 2021

Alaska News Nightly

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021


Congressman Don Young ramps up his campaign for reelection. Also, a company is preparing to leave two barges to freeze in the Kuskokwim River this winter. And ahead of the Thanksgiving holiday, food banks are short on important staples.

Story time with Philip and Mommy!
Sofia Valdez, Future Prez

Story time with Philip and Mommy!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 13:18


A little girl learns how to make a park.

El Ritmo de la Mañana
Kenny Valdez y su lista de talentos con "Chepa" del entretenimiento

El Ritmo de la Mañana

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 19:20


Alaska News Nightly
Alaska News Nightly: Friday, November 12, 2021

Alaska News Nightly

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021


Natural gas has been a target of climate activists in Scotland, so where does that leave Alaska's vast reserves? Also, Sen. Lisa Murkowski dismisses attacks from Trump as she files for reelection. And a first-time Indigenous musical festival felt like a family reunion.

Best of News Talk 590 WVLK AM
Sylvia Lovely & Marcos Valdez

Best of News Talk 590 WVLK AM

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 15:21


Jack is joined by Sylvia Lovely from Azur and Marcos Valdez from Papi's.   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Sports Junkies
11/12 Hour 4- DeMaurice Smith, Tipping on takeout, Valdez's beef with Survivor

The Sports Junkies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 40:35


    :46 DeMaurice Smith 16:00 EB is fascinated by Viagra 24:33 Tipping on takeout 35:00 Valdez is upset with Survivor 41 See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Brand the Interpreter
Immigration Interpreting with Janet Valdez

Brand the Interpreter

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 67:48


Born of Mexican immigrant parents, Janet Valdez grew up in the Los Angeles County area. She earned her certificate in recording engineering, as well as degrees in music business and business administration. While in school, she attended various service trips to Mexico, where she acted as an interpreter while providing humanitarian aid to her team. Loving international service, she later became an assistant country director with Global Expeditions on various humanitarian trips to Panama and Mexico, where she unknowingly developed her consecutive and relay interpretation skills. After a decade of working at the Disneyland Resort as a multi-language sales specialist, trainer, and bilingual Traditions facilitator, she studied Spanish legal interpreting at the Southern California School of Interpretation with Nestor Wagner.   As part of her interpretation studies,  she completed internships with Teen Court, LACBA Domestic Violence Project, and Harriet Buhai Center for Family Law. She later completed the University of Arizona's National Center for Interpretation Court Interpreters Training Institute. She is currently a traveling senior interpreter, serving different courthouses across the United States to interpret for the Department of Justice Executive Office for Immigration Review (DOJ EOIR) and facilitating first-time interpreter orientations. She is a nine-time President of the United States Service Award recipient for her countless volunteer hours and the Harriet Buhai's 2020 Community Volunteer award recipient. She currently volunteers for the Los Angeles Dream Center as well as for Catchafire.When not interpreting or volunteering, Janet is the camera director at Angelus Temple and a video producer for the Spanglish Television Sports Network. She is also part of the “Ficción en Español” book club at the Last Bookstore in Los Angeles. Most recently, she was a speaker at the Lingua-Culture conference, where she shared the stage with other interpreters and translators speaking about her beloved profession.Connect with Janet ValdezLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/janetvaldez/Blog: https://interpreterlyfe.com/-----------------------------------------------------------------------Connect with Mireya Pérez, Hostwww.brandtheinterpreter.comFacebookTwitterLinkedInInstagram---------------------------------SPONSOR INFORMATIONThank you to Liberty Language Services for sponsoring this episode!To learn more about Liberty Language Services, please visit: https://www.libertylanguageservices.com/To learn more about The Professional Medical Interpreter course, go to: https://bit.ly/pmi-course-btiFor a limited time only, you can get $50 off the full price of The Professional Medical Interpreter: A Comprehensive 40-Hour Medical Interpreting Course. Use the following coupon code at checkout: BTI50

Alaska News Nightly
Alaska News Nightly: Thursday, November 11, 2021

Alaska News Nightly

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021


A crowd-sourced list of Alaskans accused of abuse may offer some accountability but in the form of vigilante justice. Also, Glacier Bay National Park studies the risk for landslides and tsunamis. And how Anchorage ended up with more than a foot of light snow, and why it matters.

The Sports Junkies
Bit Season, Episode 10: Flaberdasher

The Sports Junkies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 67:54


Drab is back and joins Valdez and Awadd after missing last week's show.  Drab is borderline psycho because he hates bar-b-que, citing it's messiness as the main reason.  The guys love chain restaurants and are not afraid to admit it.  Awadd's outrageous claim that hobbies suchs as "books on tape" are the reason singles are giving up sex See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Alaska News Nightly
Alaska News Nightly: Wednesday, November 10, 2021

Alaska News Nightly

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021


Not without controversy, the Alaska Redistricting Board finalizes it's legislative districts map. Also, a wolf hunt on Prince of Wales Island fuels controversy. And a classic Juneau hole-in-the-wall restaurant opens a replica in Anchorage.

Alaska News Nightly
Alaska News Nightly: Tuesday, November 9, 2021

Alaska News Nightly

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021


In a close vote, Alaska's redistricting board approves a final map. Also, the seaweed industry in Alaska could get a boost from a high-tech food preservation method. And a new study looks at how climate change has impacted subsistence harvesters in Northwest Alaska.

Purple Haze Radio
Business of Cannabis with David & Matt with - Christian Valdez - Traffic Roots - Cooraez Keshvani - ReThink Financial

Purple Haze Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 57:05


Business of Cannabis with David & Matt with - Christian Valdez - Traffic Roots - Cooraez Keshvani - ReThink Financial , on Haze Radio

How to Build a Happy Life
How to Live When You're In Pain

How to Build a Happy Life

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 49:54


As we wind down this series, a paradox remains in our pursuit of happiness—joy comes to those who have known pain. In order to overcome struggle—breakups, illness, even death—we must first accept and acknowledge its inevitability. Exploring the darkness of our suffering may seem counterintuitive, but often it's the only way to see the light.  In this week's episode, Arthur C. Brooks sits down with BJ Miller, a palliative-care physician, to uncover how we can face our deepest fears, why we should accept our natural limitations as human beings, and how to make peace with the ebb and flow of joy and suffering in human life—an experience we all share. This episode was produced by Rebecca Rashid and hosted by Arthur Brooks. Editing by A.C. Valdez. Fact-check by Ena Alvarado. Sound design by Michael Raphael. Be part of How to Build a Happy Life. Write to us at howtopodcast@theatlantic.com or leave us a voicemail at 925.967.2091. Music by Trevor Kowalski (“Lion's Drift,” “This Valley of Ours,” “Una Noche De Luces”), Stationary Sign (“Loose in the Park”), and Spectacles Wallet and Watch (“Last Pieces”). Click here to listen to every full-length episode in the series.

Alaska News Nightly
Alaska News Nightly: Monday, November 8, 2021

Alaska News Nightly

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021


Alaska is a big winner in the federal infrastructure bill. Also, hunters from Pilot Station describe being stranded at a fish camp for more than a week. And remembering Chuck Bundrant, who started as a deckhand and went on to lead America's largest seafood company.

Conversaciones Con Fernando Suarezserna Y Adrián Marcelo
Everardo Valdez | Humberto Suazo, ídolos albiazules, socialmente responsable y la afición.

Conversaciones Con Fernando Suarezserna Y Adrián Marcelo

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 106:34


Este lunes nos acompaña Everardo Valdez, quien actualmente forma parte del Club de Futbol Monterrey, y actualmente se desempeña como Secretario Técnico del equipo. Platicamos acerca de su experiencia en el club, anécdotas y su gran amistad con Humberto Suazo, jugadores y directivos, cuál es la función de un secretario técnico, cómo nace la reconocida frase "En la Vida y en la Cancha", su salida en Terra, su ingreso al club y mucho más.

Alaska News Nightly
Alaska News Nightly: Friday, November 5, 2021

Alaska News Nightly

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021


Petersburg deals with a significant COVID-19 outbreak. Also, an Anchorage artist is making her mark on the city, quite literally. And a musher from Patagonia finds a temporary home in Alaska.

The Sports Junkies
Bit Season, Episode 9: Still Pooping

The Sports Junkies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 63:40


Drab is MIA from episode 9 of Bit Season after fat-shaming himself into a much needed mental health day.  Awadd and Valdez talk about JP's book, "Still Barking" and his emotional announcement Tuesday.  They nitpick the promo picture, the title and speculate if Cakes will actually read JP's second book.  Note:  We needed to use back-up audio at the 21 minute mark.  Please forgive us.  Always blame Awadd for these type of snafus.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Alaska News Nightly
Alaska News Nightly: Thursday, November 4, 2021

Alaska News Nightly

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021


Seven hunters have been stranded at a fish camp for a week after the Yukon iced over. Also, Alaska parents rush to get their younger kids vaccinated against COVID-19. And as the pandemic drags on, childcare centers are struggling to find workers.

El Ritmo de la Mañana
Farándula con Kenny Valdez (4 de Noviembre)

El Ritmo de la Mañana

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 28:01


Alaska News Nightly
Alaska News Nightly: Wednesday, November 3, 2021

Alaska News Nightly

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021


Sen. Lisa Murkowski votes with Democrats to restore parts of the Voting Rights Act. Also, a study shows Alaska State Troopers are understaffed in Western Alaska. And a 30-year-old message in a bottle washes up on a beach near Skagway.

Alaska News Nightly
Alaska News Nightly: Tuesday, November 2, 2021

Alaska News Nightly

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021


Lawmakers contemplate future sessions where the price of oil brings some budget relief. Also, the NTSB concludes its investigation on the fatal plane crash in Unalaska in 2019. And a training in Anchorage can help friends and family learn how to intervene before a suicide attempt.

El Ritmo de la Mañana
Kenny Valdez nos habla de las personalidades del medio que no necesitan caretas

El Ritmo de la Mañana

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 34:15


How to Build a Happy Life
How to Find the Secret to Meaningful Work

How to Build a Happy Life

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 41:24


The road to purposeful work is paved with good intentions; but for many, happiness at work can feel like a hopeless cause. What if the secret to happiness at work has less to do with our extrinsic motivations—money, rewards, and personal gain—and more to do with our intrinsic motivations—the meaningful relationships we build, and the ability to be in service to those who need it? In this episode of How to Build a Happy Life, we'll explore workplace practices to live out purpose-driven principles. We'll also talk about why authenticity is vital to strong leadership and “walking the talk,” and how to factor emotional needs into our workplaces. A conversation with Chief Happiness Officer and CEO of Delivering Happiness, Jenn Lim, helps us tackle one big question at work: Why do I do this everyday? This episode was produced by Rebecca Rashid and hosted by Arthur Brooks. Editing by A.C. Valdez. Fact-check by Ena Alvarado. Sound design by Michael Raphael. Be part of How to Build a Happy Life. Write to us at howtopodcast@theatlantic.com or leave us a voicemail at 925.967.2091. Music by Trevor Kowalski (“Lion's Drift,” “This Valley of Ours,” “Una Noche De Luces”), Stationary Sign (“Loose in the Park”), and Spectacles Wallet and Watch (“Last Pieces”).

Alaska News Nightly
Alaska News Nightly: Monday, November 1, 2021

Alaska News Nightly

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021


Anchorage's mayor speaks alongside prominent vaccine skeptics and proponents of unproven COVID-19 treatments. Also, Girdwood officials work to restore access to infrastructure and neighborhoods. And a debate in Wrangell over whether ancient petroglyphs were recently vandalized.

Lenny's Daily Podcast
Lenny's Daily Podcast Nov 1 ,2021

Lenny's Daily Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 42:38


AFL SurprisesBregman and Valdez for 2022?

Spartacus Roosevelt Podcast
Spartacus Roosevelt Podcast, Episode 258: Albedo and Occlusion

Spartacus Roosevelt Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021


"Preeminent Minds" by Nolan Potter from Music is Dead; "Call and Response" by Golden Hallway Music from Rules and Chance; "Disordered Minds" by Grouper from Shade; "Smilehenge" by Tonstartssbandht from Petunia; "Black Stone" by Mount Kimbie from Black Stone Blue Liquid; "Destroy Us" by Beachy Head from their self titled album; "Poleyn" by Smote from Drommon; "Apartment Loop #2" by Bruno Bavota from For Apartments: Songs and Loops; "Preoccupation" by Black Marble from Fast Idol; "Ana Lisan Wahad" by Jerusalem In My Heart from Qalaq; "Recessinater" by Birds of Maya from Valdez

Alaska News Nightly
Alaska News Nightly: Friday, October 29, 2021

Alaska News Nightly

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021


Alaska's chief medical officer calls out misinformation and distrust around COVID-19. Also, teachers are concerned about what they say is book censorship in the Kenai Peninsula Borough School District. And a spooky competition ramps up between neighbors in Skagway.

The Sports Junkies
10/29 Hour 1- Junks are all in costume, Sports Page, Hit the Skins

The Sports Junkies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 41:41


  3:33 Junks are all in costume 11:00 Drab upset with Valdez's "Michael Myers" mask 21:20 Sports Page 34:20 Hit the Skins See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Sports Junkies
Bit Season, Episode 8: Poor Katie

The Sports Junkies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 66:24


Valdez, Drab and Awadd speculate why EB and Lurch are being Halloweenies and won't wear a costume for Friday's show.  Valdez's Lil' Jon impression is surprisingly decent.  Drab was forbidden to trick-or-treat as a child.  And speaking of childhood, Drab shocks everyone with his horny playground shenanigans during daycare. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Felger & Massarotti
Why Did Astros Pitcher Framber Valdez Struggle in Game 1? // The Celtics & Bradley Beal // The Final Word - 10/27 (Hour 4)

Felger & Massarotti

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 39:23


(00:10) Felger and Mazz got back into last night's World Series game and the performance of pitcher Framber Valdez in the Astros Game 1 loss. (12:55) The guys discussed the possibility of the Boston Celtics adding Bradley Beal. (34:38) The Final Word with Jim Murray

Felger & Massarotti
Framber Valdez's Performance in Astros Game 1 World Series Loss // Television Ratings for Game 1 - 10/27 (Hour 2)

Felger & Massarotti

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 39:06


(00:15) Felger and Mazz continued to take calls on the Patriots, Bruins goaltending, and the Celtics roster. (11:29) Mike and Tony got into the World Series and last night's Atlanta Braves Game 1 win over the Houston Astros. (29:06) The guys continued to talk about last night's World Series game and last night's television ratings.

The Sports Junkies
10/27 Hour 4- Trying to get the Junks to dress up for Halloween, Hopkins signs with Chargers, Bert Kreischer

The Sports Junkies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 40:09


  2:50 Drab and Valdez try and get the Junks into the Halloween spirit 20:50 Hopkins signs with Chargers 30:00 Comedian Bert Kreischer See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Tha Boxing Voice
☎️ Shakur Stevenson Calls Out Oscar Valdez

Tha Boxing Voice

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 160:41


Shakur Stevenson on Oscar Valdez: "He can't keep ducking! It's time to fight! Me versus Oscar, there is nothing else to look forward to. The 130lbs division needs to unify, so let's get it"Join this channel to get access to perks:https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCcKT39KR_e3ZliHe4cyC06A/joinOne Free Month of Dazn On TBV http://bit.ly/ThaBoxingVoicexDAZNhttps://www.patreon.com/ThaboxingvoiceBUY THA BOXING VOICE T-SHIRT HERE http://thaboxingvoice.com/storePLEASE SUPPORT!!! SUBSCRIBE, SHARE & LIKEPlease check out our Facebook page and hit the like button. https://www.facebook.com/Thaboxingvoiceradio GOOGLE PLUS https://plus.google.com/107960664507143008932/posts?tab=XXiWeb Sitehttp://thaboxingvoice.com/Radio show: http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thaboxingvoiceradioTwitter: @Thaboxingvoicehttps://twitter.com/thaboxingvoiceAudio only Podcast subscribe herehttps://itun.es/us/oY7JJ.c#GervontaDavis #ShakurStevenson #OscarValdez

The Sports Junkies
Bit Season, Episode 7: The Green-Eyed Bandit

The Sports Junkies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 65:33


Awadd using his radio fame for Wizards tickets but doesn't know how to use it when he's pulled over by the police.  Drab befriends an old lady at the hospital who's watching the Junks TV simulcast.  The guys give you their tilts of the week, and one of Valdez's includes a major change for the show. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Tha Boxing Voice
☎️ Jamel Herring vs Shakur Stevenson

Tha Boxing Voice

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 181:50


The 130-pound division gets a Saturday evening showcase this week as Jamel Herring puts his WBO junior lightweight title on the line against undefeated former featherweight champ Shakur Stevenson. The undercard gets going at 7:25 p.m. ET and the main card starts at 10:30 p.m. The undercard will air via live stream on ESPN+ and the main card will air on ESPN.Main CardJamel Herring vs. Shakur Stevenson, 12 rounds, junior lightweight – Herring's WBO junior lightweight titleXander Zayas vs. Dan Karpency, 6 rounds, junior middleweightNico Ali Walsh vs. James Westley, 4 rounds, middleweightUndercardEvan Holyfield vs. Charles Stanford, 6 rounds, junior middleweightRoddricus Livsey vs. Eric Palmer, 6 rounds, junior welterweightHaven Brady Jr vs. Roberto Negrete, 4 rounds, featherweightAntoine Cobb vs. TBA, 4 rounds, junior welterweightHarley Mederos vs. TBA, 4 rounds, lightweightTroy Isley vs. TBA, 6 rounds, middleweightJoin this channel to get access to perks:https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCcKT39KR_e3ZliHe4cyC06A/joinOne Free Month of Dazn On TBV http://bit.ly/ThaBoxingVoicexDAZNhttps://www.patreon.com/ThaboxingvoiceBUY THA BOXING VOICE T-SHIRT HERE http://thaboxingvoice.com/storePLEASE SUPPORT!!! SUBSCRIBE, SHARE & LIKEPlease check out our Facebook page and hit the like button. https://www.facebook.com/Thaboxingvoiceradio GOOGLE PLUS https://plus.google.com/107960664507143008932/posts?tab=XXiWeb Sitehttp://thaboxingvoice.com/Radio show: http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thaboxingvoiceradioTwitter: @Thaboxingvoicehttps://twitter.com/thaboxingvoiceAudio only Podcast subscribe herehttps://itun.es/us/oY7JJ.cMUSIC CREDITCASH APP $Dolla Dibiase https://www.instagram.com/dolla_dibiase/?hl=en#JamelHerring #ShakurStevenson #StevensonHerring