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Unstoppable Mindset
Episode 96 – Unstoppable Bird and BirdNote Advocate with Nick Bayard

Unstoppable Mindset

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2023 67:53


On this episode of Unstoppable Mindset, we get to speak with Nick Bayard the executive Director of BirdNote. This organization is a nonprofit that provides sound-rich programs on over 200 radio stations that discuss the challenges faced by birds. The program includes the sounds of birds. It can be heard daily. You will get to learn more about BirdNote during our episode.   Nick holds a Master's degree in Public Administration and International Development from the Harvard Kennedy School and a bachelor's degree in Environmental Studies from Brown University. He served three years in the Peace Corps Paraguay and has held several social service policy decisions in the Northwest U.S.   Nick gives us much to think about, not only about birds and BirdNote, but also he helps us think more deeply about how we live our lives and how we can help make our whole planet a more friendly and good place to live.     About the Guest: Nick Bayard is the Executive Director of BirdNote. BirdNote is a public media nonprofit organization that tells vivid, sound-rich stories about birds and the challenges they face in order to inspire listeners to care about the natural world and take steps to protect it. BirdNote Daily is their beloved flagship show that has been in production since 2005. It is a one minute, 45 second daily radio show that broadcasts on over 250 radio stations across the US. You can listen to BirdNote Daily and other longform podcasts produced by BirdNote anytime, wherever you listen to podcasts. You can also learn what BirdNote is doing to contribute to more diverse and inclusive birding and environmental communities at www.birdnote.org.    Nick holds a master's degree in Public Administration and International Development from the Harvard Kennedy School and a bachelor's degree in Environmental Studies from Brown University. He served for three years in the environmental sector of Peace Corps Paraguay and has served in leadership roles in social services and racial equity in government policy in the Pacific Northwest. Nick is an Eagle Scout and also a musician, having released an award-winning children's album, Wishing Well, with his oldest son in 2014.    Nick and his wife Sedia live in Washington State with their three kids.   Ways to connect with Nick:   BirdNote website: www.birdnote.org  BirdNote daily podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/birdnote-daily/id79155128 BirdNote's Bring Birds Back podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/bring-birds-back/id1566042634 BirdNote's Threatened podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/threatened/id1538065542 BirdNote en Español podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/birdnote-en-espa%C3%B1ol/id1643711928 Nick Bayard's LinkedIn page: www.linkedin.com/in/nickbayard Nick Bayard's Twitter page: https://twitter.com/NickBayard Wishing Well children's album: https://www.amazon.com/Wishing-Well-Nick-Bayard/dp/B00IHIEUYE/ref=tmm_acd_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr=       About the Host: Michael Hingson is a New York Times best-selling author, international lecturer, and Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe. Michael, blind since birth, survived the 9/11 attacks with the help of his guide dog Roselle. This story is the subject of his best-selling book, Thunder Dog.   Michael gives over 100 presentations around the world each year speaking to influential groups such as Exxon Mobile, AT&T, Federal Express, Scripps College, Rutgers University, Children's Hospital, and the American Red Cross just to name a few. He is Ambassador for the National Braille Literacy Campaign for the National Federation of the Blind and also serves as Ambassador for the American Humane Association's 2012 Hero Dog Awards.   https://michaelhingson.com https://www.facebook.com/michael.hingson.author.speaker/ https://twitter.com/mhingson https://www.youtube.com/user/mhingson https://www.linkedin.com/in/michaelhingson/   accessiBe Links https://accessibe.com/ https://www.youtube.com/c/accessiBe https://www.linkedin.com/company/accessibe/mycompany/ https://www.facebook.com/accessibe/       Thanks for listening! Thanks so much for listening to our podcast! If you enjoyed this episode and think that others could benefit from listening, please share it using the social media buttons on this page. Do you have some feedback or questions about this episode? Leave a comment in the section below!   Subscribe to the podcast If you would like to get automatic updates of new podcast episodes, you can subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher. You can also subscribe in your favorite podcast app.   Leave us an Apple Podcasts review Ratings and reviews from our listeners are extremely valuable to us and greatly appreciated. They help our podcast rank higher on Apple Podcasts, which exposes our show to more awesome listeners like you. If you have a minute, please leave an honest review on Apple Podcasts.     Transcription Notes Michael Hingson  00:00 Access Cast and accessiBe Initiative presents Unstoppable Mindset. The podcast where inclusion, diversity and the unexpected meet. Hi, I'm Michael Hingson, Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe and the author of the number one New York Times bestselling book, Thunder dog, the story of a blind man, his guide dog and the triumph of trust. Thanks for joining me on my podcast as we explore our own blinding fears of inclusion unacceptance and our resistance to change. We will discover the idea that no matter the situation, or the people we encounter, our own fears, and prejudices often are our strongest barriers to moving forward. The unstoppable mindset podcast is sponsored by accessiBe, that's a c c e s s i  capital B e. Visit www.accessibe.com to learn how you can make your website accessible for persons with disabilities. And to help make the internet fully inclusive by the year 2025. Glad you dropped by we're happy to meet you and to have you here with us.   Michael Hingson  01:21 Welcome once again to unstoppable mindset. Hi, everyone. It's a nice fall day here in Southern California, supposed to get up to 96 degrees today. It is late September. So for those who remember, it is also the time of hurricane Ian in Florida. And our thoughts are with all the people and creatures down there. But today, we get to interview someone and talk about some of those creatures. Nick Bayard is a person who has been involved in dealing with natural resources and so on. He's the Executive Director of bird note. And we're going to get to that. And all things, Nick, as we go along. So Nick, welcome to unstoppable mindset.   Nick Bayard  02:05 Thank you so much. It's an honor to be here.   Michael Hingson  02:07 Well, it's our pleasure, and we really appreciate you taking the time to be here with us. Let's start just kind of learning a little bit about you, can you kind of tell us where you came from and how you got where you   Nick Bayard  02:18 are a little bit? Sure, well, I grew up in Delaware, in kind of a little bubble, to be honest, and, you know, my educational career kind of took a winding path, because I didn't really see a career out there that looks like something I wanted to do forever. I just feel like there's there's too much to try to pack into one life to commit to sort of, you know, doctor, lawyer, you know, etc. And so, I think that was both a blessing and a curse, because it led me to follow a lot of different paths. And it led to a lot of frustration too, because our, I think our society is set up to reward sort of monotony and continue building, you know, of a career over a period of time. But I wouldn't trade it for anything, because it's it's given me a lot of unique experiences, serving in the Peace Corps in South America, getting to do racial equity work and in government. And now being executive director of a wonderful organization that I've loved for a long time, came a bit out of left field, because I had done so many things that kind of added up to what the burden of board members wanted in this role that all of a sudden, things kind of fell into place for something that I never could have predicted. So it's it's been a winding road, but I'm really thrilled to be where I am and happy to get the chance to talk about it with you.   Michael Hingson  03:56 Winding roads are always kind of fun, you know, you never know where you're gonna go next. Or maybe you do but at the same time, it's always the adventure of getting there. That's at least half the fun.   Nick Bayard  04:07 And you've had that experience too, right? Yes, quite a number of lifetimes packed into one right.   Michael Hingson  04:14 It has been a fun adventure. And it continues to be and I can't complain about that a single bit. It's, you know, it's all about choices. And but it is all about embracing the adventure of life to exactly.   Nick Bayard  04:28 So what you went to college, I went to Brown University in Rhode Island and studied environmental studies and really had a wonderful experience there. And then   Michael Hingson  04:41 what got you from there to the Peace Corps?   Nick Bayard  04:43 You know, I thought I was gonna go down the path of biologist scientists, ecologist, spent a year doing a residency in environmental education in the Grand Tetons, and we're realized after that year that actually maybe halfway into that year that I would be, I would feel kind of limited myself, I guess if I were to just sort of pick that path and run with it, although lots of people do that and love it, it just wasn't for me. What I recognized is that I just didn't have enough experience out in the world to be able to even say what I wanted to commit to for, you know, even for at least the next few years, so I thought that the Peace Corps was this opportunity to, to really throw myself into the unknown and experience something completely different. And hopefully learn about people learn more about people learn more about institutions learn more about how different cultures and communities operate. And it was like, throw myself in the deep end, I got even more than I bargained for, I'd say, How so, you know, the Peace Corps was hard in ways that I didn't expect, I, I think I was conditioned to think of it as a just really an opportunity to help make the world a better place. But there's a danger of that Savior mindset. If you go to a place thinking that you have the skills or the resources to be able to help or save in a way that you've maybe seen it on TV, and you realize you're, you're with people, and you're, you know, you're not any better or worse than the folks that you're going to live with. And as a Peace Corps volunteer, you are very much reliant on your community to take care of you and teach you and that was jarring. I think it's jarring for a lot of folks who go abroad for service work. They've, there's this idea that, you know, we go and we save, or we help. But really, going with a mindset of humility, and learning and growth, I think is much more important. And so I had to sort of adjust my worldview in a lot of ways and recognize that, you know, I had never really thought about, oh, gosh, you know, I'm gonna go help a community. In every community, there are people who are unkind, who lie, who, who cheat, who steal, etc. And I don't know why I think part of my my upbringing was thinking, well, if people are underprivileged, they're all nice all the time. And it's just a community like any other. So I thought that was really interesting to go and experience, you know, humanity in a different context. And recognize that a lot of the preconceptions I had about about other parts of the world were completely wrong. And so it was perfect learning and growth. For me, that's exactly what I needed.   Michael Hingson  07:52 Interesting kind of way to put it when you talk about underprivileged and so on. Do you think today that there is underprivileged other parts of the world as you thought they were, when you were first starting out in the Peace Corps,   Nick Bayard  08:06 I think the biggest blind spot I had was really on, it wasn't even so much about global issues, it was about American history. And as I've, as I've grown, you know, and, and gotten older, the extent of the, the blind spots I had around race and racism in America, have really driven sort of this last 10 years of my my life and my career, really, from a place of just, you know, feeling like I was robbed of an understanding of how formative racism was at the at the heart of how the country was born, and how it's evolved, and how it's progressed, and why certain communities experienced the conditions that they do. And so that's something that I've really worked hard at to understand, because it's not history that I got in school, it's not history that I heard about in my community, you know, as I came to find out, that's very much by design. And so I, I don't blame myself for it. But I recognize the responsibility I have to keep to always keep learning and growing. Yeah.   Michael Hingson  09:19 Well, I think that we do oftentimes find that there. Are there any number of people who think well, we're so much better off than than they are. And I think it depends on what you mean, by better off if you think about the world being more technologically advanced, we have access to more technologies and more creature comforts, in some ways. Anyway, there's probably some truth to that. But when you get down into community, you get down into family and you get to dealing with those concepts, and the closeness and the loyalty that that people have. That's a whole different animal and it's not necessarily at all clear that we're really any better off as, as well as some people, at least from what I've heard and learned?   Nick Bayard  10:05 Yeah, I think back to, you know, I developed some really important friendships in Paraguay and really got close to folks in a way that can't really compare it to some of the friendships I've had in America even just because the cross cultural cross language divide, bridging, that is a powerful thing. And I've, I think I laughed more in Paraguay than I, I ever have in a similar stretch of time and in America, because there's, there's a sense of humor and a lightness in the Paraguayan culture that I experienced that it's just delightful. And, you know, there's, I hosted a weekly radio show. And every week, folks would, would give me jokes to tell in the, in the native language, Guarani. And it was, you know, on the radio show, we talked about things like, you know, the environment and agriculture and green manures and things like that. But the thing that really stood out to people are the jokes, because they, there were things that people connected with, and sense of humor is just a really important part of the culture. So it was, it was just interesting to to experience that the joy of being there with folks who really, really did not have infrastructure around them. Shiny water, paved roads, things like that. Just just having a great time in life. That that was a good, a good lesson for me.   Michael Hingson  11:47 Yeah. And oftentimes, I think, here in this country, we don't slow down and stop and think about life. And that's something that I've been thinking about a lot. And we're actually going to talk about it in the new book that I'm writing, which tentatively is titled The Guide Dogs Guide to Being brave, but it's about taking time each day to stop and really think about what you did that day, what worked, what didn't and just thinking about life, we don't meditate nearly enough, do we?   Nick Bayard  12:17 And you can say that, again, I don't know if you have any, go two ways to remind yourself, that's something I struggle with is just actually committing to a pause until I feel like I really need it. I don't know if you if you have any insight,   Michael Hingson  12:36 you know, what we're what we're talking about in the book are several different techniques that can help. One thing that I find a lot of people use our vision boards and treasure mapping and visioning, where you put something up on a refrigerator, or somewhere to remind you of something like if you're going to take a vacation. And you want to really keep in the mindset of getting prepared for that you put a picture of like if you're going to go to Hawaii, you put a picture of Hawaii up well, you can do the same thing with with what we're talking about here, you can put up something around the house that says Don't forget to meditate at the end of the day, or when you when you get into bed before you turn off the light. If there's someplace that you normally look, put there a note, don't forget to take five minutes or 10 minutes to meditate. And you can put reminders up to do that. And what eventually happens, if you do it, and are consistent about it, you'll create a mindset that will cause you to automatically do it. And you'll be able to go more into a mode of of meditating. I took a course in transcendental meditation in college. And what they suggested was this make it a habit to get up 20 minutes early and meditate in the morning or and take and set up a time to do it at night. Nowadays, we have other ways to help with visioning. I, for example, put a lot of reminders in my little Amazon Echo device, I got to be careful of what I say or she's going to talk to me, but But I I put reminders in of things that I want to do not just about meetings on the calendar, but other things. And that's another way to vision it doesn't have to be from an eyesight standpoint. So you if you have an echo, you can tell it to remind you at 11 o'clock every night hey, go meditate for 10 minutes. I mean, there are a lot of ways to use technology and techniques to create a visioning environment to get you into the habit of doing something.   Nick Bayard  14:46 That's great. Yeah, I My My issue is I think I have to keep coming up with new ways to get my attention but get my own attention. Sort of like exactly how sometimes the sign word Some other times, I feel like I need up a sign that all kind of slapped me in the face. Because I'm not, I'm not willing to listen to what my my past self had reminded me to do. Well, that's   Michael Hingson  15:11 why I like the idea of the echo device. And I can tell it to we have several echo devices around the house. So I can have the reminder play on every echo device as well, so that it will remind me wherever I am in the house that you can't escape it. For me, I'm pretty much in the habit of doing it all the time. But still, having the reminder doesn't hurt. Right, right, right. So there are a lot of ways to give yourself a reminder to do something that will force you to at least for the second set, it's on to listen, and hopefully that will help you move forward and doing what it is you want to do. And taking time really to stop and or at least slow down and think a little bit is always an important thing to do.   Nick Bayard  16:03 Hmm. Yeah, I think one of the challenges of work from home is there's, there's folks that do that is less, less travel, less transition. And so it's easy for things to kind of pile up and go just back to back to back. And it's like, oh, let me actually go into the other room here and sit down for a minute and or take a walk outside. That's Those are good reminders.   Michael Hingson  16:29 Yeah. And those can be verbal with an echo device, you can send yourself a calendar invite that just remind you, every day, it's such and such a time, take the time to go off and do something and you know, you may not be able to do it right at that moment. But the reminder is still there. And by having something that forces you to at least think about it that is reminders in various formats and forms. That helps. All right, right. So we can take the time to do it. The problem that I think we mostly have is, oh, I just don't have time to do that. I've got to get this done or that done. Yeah, we do have time. Mental health is one of the most important thing, if not the most important thing that we can be doing for ourselves that we normally don't pay attention to. But in reality, we can make work for us.   Nick Bayard  17:22 For sure, for sure. I think that's that's originally actually what drew me in to burn out which is, which is the organization where I am. And it's a the flagship show that we run on radio stations, and our podcast is it's called burnout daily, that people probably know it as burnout. It's a minute, 45 seconds, and it's got a catchy theme song that invites you in and invites you to pay attention to the lives of burns for just Just a minute, 45 seconds. And that seems to be enough time that you can go deeply into something but not so much time that you you can't justify just sitting there and listening. Which is originally why you know why I came to love the program so much. Well,   Michael Hingson  18:15 how long were you in the Peace Corps?   Nick Bayard  18:17 I was there for I did a a two year volunteer service term. And then I stayed on for an additional year to be the coordinator of the environment sector.   Michael Hingson  18:28 Where the volunteers were was that. I'm sorry, where was that? Where did you do that?   Nick Bayard  18:34 In Paraguay? Okay, one of two landlocked countries in South America and the other?   Michael Hingson  18:40 Yeah. Right. Yeah, there's a lot of water around South America.   Nick Bayard  18:46 Yeah. You know, and, unfortunately, if Paraguay has not been, as that benefited from a lot of the natural resources on the continent, partly due to the, you know, the history of war, there was a major war that Paraguay found itself in against Brazil, Argentina, and Uruguay, and it just turned into an actual massacre of genocide. It was, I think it was just after the US Civil War ended, or it was right around that time, and something like 80% of all boys and men are killed. And then the country shrunk. And then it was President Rutherford B. Hayes who brokered an agreement to give Paraguay back some of its land and so there's actually a county in Paraguay called President Hays County or it's been caught, but as they didn't they i Yes. And so I saw more busts and sort of recognitions of President Hayes in Paraguay than I ever expected to see anywhere. It's really interesting.   Michael Hingson  19:57 There's a historic fact I didn't know Cool. And that's, that's a good thing. And and we do have a Paraguay today. And so you spent time in the Peace Corps there, which is always a good thing.   Nick Bayard  20:10 Yeah. And it was, it was interesting to go and realize that Spanish wouldn't help me very much. I spoke a little bit of Spanish. I got there. But the Peace Corps trainer is quickly put me into a class to learn the language, quad knee, which is the language that most Paraguayan speak most of the time, and the class itself was taught in Spanish. And so I was just really having a hard time with that one, because I sort of it sort of felt like, you know, trying to use tweezers with oven mitts on it's like, I barely know what you're saying, I'm supposed to understand it enough to, to learn a whole new language, it ended up working out really well. But I ended up learning it very well, very, very, very fluently,   Michael Hingson  21:02 but but those first few months were pretty rough. Well, there's nothing like immersion to force you to learn something, which is going back to what we talked about, as far as giving yourself reminders to take time to think about life. You know, it's all about immersion.   Nick Bayard  21:18 Yeah, that the other really surprising thing that happened when I was first arriving in Paraguay was I was I was just starting to go bald. And I was dealing with all the emotions around that. And having a hard time with that, and, and some of the folks in my community where I was training, would ask me about it, and prod me about it, and even make fun of me about it. And so I, I realized, okay, if I'm gonna be able to have a snappy comeback or something, I've got a, I got to figure this out, because I just, I'm having a hard enough time with this already. And just to have people kind of prodding me in on something that I'm sensitive about, you know, I, I need to learn to communicate here.   Michael Hingson  22:03 Also a good way to maybe pick up some more jokes for a future radio program.   Nick Bayard  22:09 Yeah, exactly, exactly.   Michael Hingson  22:12 So what did you do after the Peace Corps?   Nick Bayard  22:15 Well, I came back to the US and wanted to be in DC, because that's where a lot of international development work was, was based, but actually ended up working for a nonprofit that develops high quality preschools in low income neighborhoods, called appletree. Institute, and help help them raise money and develop new schools. In areas where there hadn't traditionally been been very effective schools. And, you know, it was there that I really learned how to how to pitch an organization to funders. It was a, it was a fundraising role. And so that was really valuable for me, because I got to really understand how, you know what, what's compelling to people who might want to give and what is fundraising other than really giving somebody the opportunity to support something maybe they didn't know that they wanted to support. So I came to really enjoy fundraising and realize that if it's for something that I care about, it's it's a great opportunity for me and for the people that I connect with to to make the world a better place.   Michael Hingson  23:30 Yeah. How long did you do that?   Nick Bayard  23:33 I was there for two years. After about a year and a half, I felt like, Okay, I've kind of plateaued in this role, I'm going to apply to grad school, I got a very good score on my GRE and a friend of mine and her dad told her the score, and she said, you could go to Harvard. And I had not thought of that before she said it. And it sort of got the wheels turning, like maybe see what see what Harvard has gone on. And they had a master's program and Public Administration and International Development, which was really appealing because it was quantitative, heavy. It focused on economics, which everybody in international development just kept saying, you know, you got to have that foundation. And it ended up you know, being a program that the math was so advanced that it was sort of like being hit with a ton of bricks for the first year. You know, and then after the after that first year, I get into take more courses on, you know, things like public speaking and leadership and negotiation and writing, you know, the stuff that now feels a little bit more practical to my day to day, but it was actually that was where I met my wife and so I'm especially glad that that was worked out the way that it did because it completely. It completely, you know, formed every every moment since, you know, since I met Cydia, my wife. So that's probably the most valuable thing I got from Harvard.   Michael Hingson  25:18 Well that makes makes a lot of sense. So you got your master's degree was she in the same program,   Nick Bayard  25:23 she was in the School of Education getting she was getting her second master's degree. She had gotten a master's degree from the school for international training. And this master's degree was in learning and teaching at Harvard Graduate School of Education. And everybody at Harvard was just kind of blown away by her and what she knew about learning and teaching. Because she'd done it for so long understood it so well. And I think a lot of her classmates more and more from her than they did from some of the professors, to be honest. So she's she, she really understands how people learn better than anyone I've, I've met. And she's she's really helped me whenever I've given a training or had I sort of convey a concept to a group. Well just   Michael Hingson  26:16 give her permission to remind you every day to take some time to meditate and think about life. And I bet you'll have the habit in no time. I bet you're right. Wives, wives do that. And that's a blessing. So sure. So they're, and all that math. Well, everything needs math in one way or another. But I can appreciate the fact that once you survive the math, and sometimes I wonder when, when colleges and universities do those things that you don't expect, like in a program, like you're thinking of giving you so much math, or when I was at UC Irvine, the people who went into the bioscience program, before they got to the point of being able to take all of the regular bioscience courses other than introductory courses, they had to take a year of organic chemistry. And a lot of the people in the biocide program, we're gonna go into med so they were kind of pre med and all that. And what what happened is that people who enrolled in the biocide program at UC Irvine, I know the first year I was there, 1600 people enrolled. And there were 200 left by the end of their sophomore year, because organic chemistry and other courses like that weeded them out. And the bioscience department was very deliberate about insisting that you have to do all that before you can go on, even though and the reality is, of course, you would use that organic chemistry. But still, before you can get to the real practical stuff, you've got to be able to deal with the theory. So kind of wonder if they were doing that at Harvard, if that was part of the logic.   Nick Bayard  27:54 I wonder, you know, there's, you know, you wonder how sadistic some of these design these programs. One of the things that, you know, I feel like our program at Harvard does, you know, as it is it signals to folks who know about that degree, that you can do something very intense and difficult. Even if you don't end up using a lot of the hard skills, you know, that you you worked on there. So that's, that's been valuable for when folks know about that degree program. Anybody who's been through the Harvard Kennedy School will, I think set up a little straighter when you tell them that you have an NPA ID is that's that's the one that it's really the you know, the gut punch, especially in that first year.   Michael Hingson  28:45 Yeah, well, you survived it and you moved on, what did you do after you got that   Nick Bayard  28:50 degree? I actually spent a year working on music and recognize that like, there probably wouldn't be a time in a transition period when I'd have the opportunity to, to pursue music was something I've always loved and always done for, for, you know, just a full time thing for a while. And so when I when I met Cydia, she had been with our oldest son at the time, she'd come over as a single mom with her son, Wally, to Harvard, they kind of upgraded everything and came to Cambridge. And when I met Cydia, qualia was 10. And so we kind of became a family unit pretty quickly. And obviously when you know when to do it, and I got married, and so one of the things that came of that time we were living in DC was city I said, Why don't you write a children's album? And all of a sudden, all this music just started coming out of me, inspired by my conversation was with a query. And so it was really quite a fun time to, to be able to talk to him and understand his worldview and then write some music based on what I learned. And we, we ended up recording and producing this album together called wishing well. And it became pretty popular on the children's radio stations. And Wally and I were invited to be showcased performers at the world's only at the time Children's Music Conference. kindy calm, and at the time, we were the only act that had an actual kit, and you know, in the group, so that was quite a special time. And you know, we moved back out to cometa to put a trailer back in his his school he had been in, but we stayed on the East Coast for a year and did music and, you know, made some memories.   Michael Hingson  30:54 What good memories Wow, that's pretty amazing. I'm going to have to go look for the album.   Nick Bayard  31:00 Yeah, it was it was a surprise. To me, I had never thought of writing or recording children's music till Cydia suggested it. And I've, you know, I loved music as a kid Rafi has always been a hero of mine. And things kind of came full circle when I had a chance to take. Now our two youngest kids, we have four and a six year old to see Rafi alive. Just before the pandemic hit, we had a chance to meet him and give him a hug. And it just the you know, the the waterworks were turned on I it was more emotional than I expected it to be he so what did you do after music. That was we came out to Tacoma. And I was basically, you know, trying to figure out my place in this community and had a lot of meetings with folks and learned about an opening for the director of a social service organization that was working to support youth and young adults who were struggling with education and employment or housing, mental health, substance use disorders. And getting that job and really trying to build this thing into something that was, you know, trusted by young people and offered as many services as we can offer in one place. Because the young folks that have been burned by institutions are a lot less likely to trust institutions. And so we, as an institution could could help start to rebuild that trust a little bit by creating a space where people were, were welcomed and felt accepted, felt represented, and really could could be put on a path towards success, then we can make a big difference. And so it was a it was about as there for about five years, and we were able to increase mental health services on site, we were able to expand the the housing options for young people experiencing homelessness for our county. And we're able to really start the conversation around how institutional racism in the nonprofit sector is, is making our nonprofits not only in some cases, not effective, but in other cases, actually, the perpetuators of harm and so that's, that's something that I'm really pleased came out of that experience was was an opportunity to lead some of those conversations and be part of some of those efforts to to make it tough to make a change in the sector in terms of racial equity.   Michael Hingson  33:56 What made you go out to Tacoma in general,   Nick Bayard  34:00 well Cydia and equate my my wife and oldest son before I met them, they had been here my wife was born in eastern Washington and grew up in Tacoma. And so they had had they had a wife here before they went east to, to for city to get her second master's. And so we, you know, quaintly had his friends back here and I liked what I knew of Washington and so we decided to come out here and start a life together as a family. Less snow than the East Coast. Yes, sadly for me, but happily for much others in my family, who aren't as as big snow fans as I am,   Michael Hingson  34:47 but still get to snow.   Nick Bayard  34:49 We can. That's true. That's true. But it's a wonderful place to raise a family just because it's it is like you said you can get to almost anything Whether it's you know, the city, whether it is performing arts, venues, nature hikes, mountains, rivers, lakes, the ocean, you know, it's just, it's just great. And it's sort of like the home that I never knew I wanted.   Michael Hingson  35:20 And I'll bet being in Washington, you even know where Gonzaga University is where everyone else only knows once a year during basketball season.   Nick Bayard  35:28 That's right, we have some fierce, fiercely loyal folks, you know, in those, you know, in those in those fights, and I try to stay out of it. Yeah, the sports. The sports debates,   Michael Hingson  35:45 I had the honor of being invited to speak at Gonzaga several years ago, it was a lot of fun, and very much enjoyed being up there. So that's great. I've spent a lot of time around various places in Washington, which is always a good thing. We love Washington. Although we we love Victorville where we are we love it, especially because our house is very accessible, we built the house so that it's accessible for my wife. And so we can't complain. And then as you said, working at home, you know, you have all the things that you got to do. But we can create schedules and set it up to work, right. So it works out very well for us. So we're, we're pretty, we're pleased.   Nick Bayard  36:25 That's great. I'm curious if you, if you have any reflections on, you know, the people in Washington versus the folks where you are, one of the things I learned when I came out was that, that there's just sort of this, this norm of, it's okay to just start talking to somebody without even sort of an intro, sort of like you'd be at the supermarket and you can just, you can enter the middle of a conversation with somebody you've never met. I don't know if that was your experience when he came out here.   Michael Hingson  36:55 It was, and there are parts of California where you can do some of that. But I think the whole world is changing, we're getting to be such a polarized world, because of things that are happening in politics, that shouldn't happen, that people aren't talking to each other nearly as much as they used to, I don't know whether you're finding that out there. But we are seeing a lot more of it down here than we used to,   Nick Bayard  37:19 I find myself a lot more closed off. For a couple of reasons. One being, I still mask most places I go. And I also wear hearing aids. And so the combination of the mask and hearing loss, and, you know, just the mechanics of that, and then if somebody else is wearing a mask, it makes it really hard for me to, to hear what they're saying. Because I can't read their lips. And at the same time also, like, being a little bit wary of, you know, being around folks for too long and close environments. We've been lucky with COVID we haven't, haven't had it, but just, you know, I'm looking forward to, you know, science, figuring out more about how to how to prevent it, how to treat it, how to deal with long COVID, that kind of stuff. So yes, I've I've not been as gregarious as I think I always used to be. But I hope to get back to that at some point.   Michael Hingson  38:21 We have stayed pretty close to home, I've traveled a few times to speak, done a lot of virtual things, but we stay pretty close to home, just because it is safer. And you know, we can cope with that we we are pretty good at being flexible about things changing. And when people talk about getting back to normal. That just is never going to happen. And I first thought about that after September 11. Because people kept saying after September 11 With all the things that were going on and government being closed for a week and airports being closed and all that and just all the discussions and people started saying we got to get back to normal. And it was very frustrating to me. And I finally realized that it was frustrating, because normal will never be the same again.   Nick Bayard  39:09 Right. Right. And and what opportunities do we have to identify what what was bad about the old normal that we can we can change. One of the I think real blessings over the last few years has been people have been forced or and invited, I think to to examine how they're spending their time, what they give their time and effort to. And I see people being bolder about pursuing what they love and spending more time with their families. And I think that's a wonderful byproduct of what's been a really difficult couple of years.   Michael Hingson  39:53 Yeah. And I hope that that trend will continue in that path. People will recognize that, and that companies and bosses and leaders will recognize that there's value in letting people do that, because it'll be much better for their mental health. Absolutely. Well, you ended up going at least for a while into city government in Tacoma, right?   Nick Bayard  40:17 I did, I was the assistant chief equity officer in the Office of Equity and Human Rights, which is charged with supporting equitable representation in the workforce. Making sure that our community outreach is is, is really robust, making sure that policies and procedures are equitable, and, and that they recognize the harm that's been done over over decades, you know, against certain groups, and so it's, it's an office that I have a ton of respect for, and I was really happy to be able to serve for for a couple of years. And it was really, I think, it's really valuable to, to go back and forth between different sectors to, to be able to keep fresh eyes on things, one of the things I really appreciate being able to do was being able to come into the government role with lots of grassroots community development experience, and having relationships with a lot of folks that a lot of the city employees didn't have. And so I was able to kind of be a trusted liaison for a lot of those groups and for city staff, and, you know, everybody's got their own path. But for me, being able to, you know, take that experience, somewhere where it can be of good use is, is important. And that's that's also, you know, translated to coming back to the nonprofit sector and going into public media now, is that I've got, you know, that perspective of what it's like to be in government and, you know, as as an entity that reports to, to voters and to community members in a, you know, in the way that in the way that our elections are set up, and the way that our community engagement set up. So it was, it was a, it was quite a valuable experience,   Michael Hingson  42:19 did you in dealing with all of the various issues and aspects around equity? Of course, everybody talks about diversity and so on. But generally, when they do disabilities get left out of that, did you find that you were involved at all or very much in dealing with equity from the standpoint of dealing with persons with disabilities and making sure that they get into the, to the workforce, and that were treated fairly, and so on?   Nick Bayard  42:48 Yes, there actually, prior to my arrival, there had been a long standing Tacoma area commission on disabilities. And most of the members of that commission, if not all, experience, pretty significant disabilities, you know, carry those in their lives. And so our office was charged with being the liaison for that commission. And so whenever there was, the commission would bring a concern or a policy proposal to the city come through our office. One of the projects that was underway that we helped move forward while I was there, was around accessible taxis. And it, it's a good, it was a good window into just how complex is policy challenges can be. Because, you know, the the elected officials that would have to get put put this into place, you know, had to figure out, we had to figure out how much it costs, we had to figure out where folks would need to go, we had to figure out what it would mean to retrofit a taxi company's vehicles. And then how Uber and Lyft and others will be involved with that. And it was it's a multi year process that's still underway. But what we did was we commissioned a feasibility study, so that we could get a clearer and clearer sense of what the cost and scope would need to be so that the elected officials could make a good decision based on that. Something else that commission accomplished was I'm really proud of, but I didn't have any personal part of this is that they had the council pass an ordinance to require closed captioning in all places of business, restaurants and so on. So somebody that's hearing impaired or deaf, would be able to watch TV watch a sports game and know what's going on in a way that they hadn't before. So I think the the bigger issues to tackle had to do with accessible housing and accessible streets And, and that kind of thing. And those are those that's ongoing work. Of course,   Michael Hingson  45:03 other aspects of all that that still don't get addressed very well are things that deal with with eyesight and things like Braille menus in restaurants. So we're, now you've got many companies that we in one way or another are putting kiosks in their facilities and McDonald's and McDonald's is now starting to make those kiosks talk or even accessible voting machines, so that a person who happens to be blind or low vision can go in and use an accessible machine to be able to vote independently. And there are just a lot of challenges like that, that continue to get left out of a lot of the discussions, which is unfortunate.   Nick Bayard  45:47 Very unfortunate. So a question for me is always how do how do we elevate voices like yours and and others? Who? Who oftentimes, I think the, the discussion is it the, the the attention is ends up going on, you know, the, the group or the person that can shout the loudest? Yeah. And so that's not that shouldn't be the case, it should be, you know, we should take a look at intersecting issues of privilege and access and figure out, you know, if, if we can redesign our system so that those of us who you know, have the most barriers, or have have an easy time of it, I think we'll all have an easier time of it, boy struck by the universal design concepts that make things accessible for folks with disabilities, but also make them easier to access for folks without disabilities. It's hard to argue against a lot of investment and that kind of change, I think.   Michael Hingson  46:54 And therein lies one of the real keys that is that, in reality, a lot of the things that might make life more inclusive for us really would help other people as well. But so many people emphasize just one thing that it makes it more of a challenge, like eyesight, you know, so even and one of my favorite topics I've discussed a couple of times on this podcast are the Tesla vehicles were everything is really driven by a touchscreen. And to use not only voice input, what voice output is limited or non existent, there is some voice input to be able to do things. But I as a passenger in a Tesla can't even work the radio, because it's all touchscreen driven. That's really lovely. Except that whoever does it, and the case of a driver, a driver has to look at the screen. And yes, you do have some other capabilities of the Tesla helping with driving. But the reality is that with the state of technology today, people should be watching the road. And we've got the technologies to allow us to use other senses. And we don't do it nearly as much as we should. We have not and we have not embraced in inclusive mindset yet. And when we do, then a lot of the questions that people may have and the concerns that people may have will go away, because they'll realize that what affects some will really help everyone,   Nick Bayard  48:28 for sure. I think part of the part of the reason we get stuck on some of these things is that we tend to think about things in either or terms like either either you support blind people, or you support immigrants, or you support people of color or you support the LGBTQ community. And there's these like saying these soI completely separate projects is a recipe for complete failure to make anything change. And I think what we we need to recognize is that every group contains elements of every other group. Correct. And so helping helping one group fully is going to help other groups in different ways and thinking of ways that we can invest in those, you know, in the middle of those Venn diagrams, so that so that everybody benefits. Right.   Michael Hingson  49:30 Well, so you worked in government, and then how did you get to bird note from that?   Nick Bayard  49:35 Well, I've always loved birds and been fascinated by their behavior, their anatomy, their resilience, and had had taken some ornithology masters levels classes. I when I was out in Wyoming, and, you know, it hadn't been at the front of my mind. You know, since I started family hadn't been out bird watching too much. But then I saw that, you know, the executive director job at burnout had opened up. And it was interesting to me because I didn't realize that bird note itself was independent of radio stations. As a listener, I always thought the burden out was just part of our either part of our local radio station or part of NPR. But in fact, it's an independent nonprofit. And so it, it took me seeing the job opening to understand how the organization was set up. And all of a sudden, it I was just very excited about that opportunity. Because, you know, I'd had nonprofit leadership experience, I love birds, I love the burnt out daily show, and the long form podcasts that burned out, produces. And it it seemed to me that it was just a great next step, in terms of in terms of getting to know a new field of public media, in terms of being able to take some skills I've learned elsewhere and apply them. And it was, you know, it was it was a job where I didn't know anyone going into it. And so, you know, a lot of people and myself included, you know, get jobs through, you know, a personal connection, introduce you to somebody, and then you go through an application or interview process. With burnout, it was it was first time recently where I just applied and was invited to interview. And so in that way, it was, it was gratifying, just not that I, you know, not that there's anything wrong with, you know, having those connections, but, you know, it's It felt good to just apply and just on the nature of what they saw, have them give me a call and,   Michael Hingson  51:58 and asked me to, to interview. And the rest is sort of history.   Nick Bayard  52:05 That's right. That's right, as coming up on one year and November.   Michael Hingson  52:08 So tell us a little about bird note, I'd appreciate knowing more about what exactly the organization is, what it does, and so on.   Nick Bayard  52:17 Sure, we're an independent public media nonprofit organization that's been around since 2005. And it it started really, as a as a radio program under the auspices of Seattle Audubon. And eventually, after a few years it, it became its own nonprofit. And it started really with this vision that the founders vision was to produce a short, sound rich audio experience for radio listeners about birds. And it's just become a really beloved institution in the areas where it's broadcast. And it it's now we've got the flagship show is the minute 45 second show, copper note daily that broadcasts in about 250 public radio stations across the US. We've got long form podcasts, those are called threatened and bring birds back. And we do virtual events and things that most listeners know us for burning out daily. Because that's our biggest audience. We've got, we think around 5 million daily listeners to that show. And so what's really powerful about that, is that we're able to, I believe, create a mindset shift for all of those folks, in terms of inviting them to slow down, pay attention to nature, learn something amazing about birds, and hopefully get inspired to spend more time with nature, with birds, and to the point where we hope we inspire action. For conservation, whether that's something simple, like the way that you live your life, the way that you set up your bird feeders, the way that you turn off your lights during migration season, those kinds of things, all the way up to advocating for more federal legislation for conservation. You know, we hear from listeners that we we have changed their lives, which is really amazing to hear that we've inspired people to to pursue careers in ornithology bird science, that we have helped people with mental health. People say that the show calms them down. It's something that they look forward to every day. And I think the really, really big opportunity we have is to continue showcasing and diversifying people from every background on the show and stories that reflects different kinds of knowledge. folks that aren't, you know, this the the typical profile of somebody who's been centered a conservation over the last 100 years. white male, able bodied person recognize that every group is connected to burns and has a love of, of burning in the outdoors. And we have an opportunity to elevate those stories that haven't been elevated, you know, over over our country's history, which is, I think, very powerful.   Michael Hingson  55:20 So what is the typical one minute 45 second show, like what happens?   Nick Bayard  55:27 Well, sometimes we we start with our theme song, which I'm not going to attempt to recreate with my voice here on burnout.org. And hear that it's a it's a very short, little, just very catchy, you know, couple of seconds thing and then you'll hear the narrator say, this is bird note. And then you'll hear the sound of birds usually, and the narrator will talk you through what you're hearing. And well explained something about the birds behavior, something that we you know, we're learning about the birds something that scientists have just figured out, that kind of thing, then we'll take you back to the sounds of the birds, and then maybe one or two more pieces of information. And then from time to time, well, well let folks know what they can do to to learn more or to connect or to you know, to to make a difference for birds. This morning show was about the white Bennett storm petrel, which is a seabird lives off the coast of Chile and Peru. And it lives most of its life just over the water. And it took scientists eight years to figure out that this storm petrol actually nests about 50 miles inland and the desert and part of the continent that people describe as looking like the surface of bars. So anytime we can, we can drop in some surprising fun tidbits of information for our listeners, we love to do that too. So is bird node, a standard 501 C three nonprofit it is. And if you've got a burden on.org, you can learn more about how to get our email list, which gives you a sneak preview of all of our daily or weekly shows. You can support bird note, we, we we rely on the generosity of listeners to do what we do. And so, you know, unlike a radio station public radio station, which does a fun to drive every couple of years, or sorry, a couple times a year, we we are asking listeners over social media and have our email list to support us with gifts. And we're fortunate to have a lot of generous listeners who donate monthly and who give annually. And one of the services that we've created is something called Bird note plus, where you can subscribe at a different level of monthly giving to get ad free podcasts and get access to special events and get early access to shows and so if there any podcast fans or bird lovers out there that want to check out bird note plus, I would encourage them to do that.   Michael Hingson  58:19 I would as well. It it sounds like a lot of fun. I have not I guess either been up at the right time or whatever have not heard bird no daily here so I'm going to have to go set up a reminder to go listen on the website, I guess every   Nick Bayard  58:34 day. Please do. Yes, you can subscribe anywhere you can podcasts, you can subscribe to the sempurna daily, something that's really exciting as we just launched burnout en Espanol. So it's our first dual language production. So there's a new podcast feed for burnout and Espanyol where it's it's the same experience of the English burden on daily but in Spanish and speaking with folks in and in it throughout the Americas that are doing conservation work. In conversation in Spanish, it's, I think a really great opportunity for us to broaden our audience throughout the Americas. And then our our long form podcasts you can also find anywhere you get podcasts or bring birds back is is I think there's just a really special program that's hosted by a woman named Tanisha Hamilton who models her entry into birding and you just feel the enthusiasm and excitement as she gets into this and talks about things like what it's like to be a black woman birder what it's like to find your own community and birding. You know, how do people with disabilities? What are some of the technologies that they can use to get out and look at birds there and then there are different sort of species specific Two episodes, one of the really popular ones is about the purple Martin, which, which has an amazing history of interplay with with Native American communities and, and carried forward today where people will become what they call purple Martin landlords and create houses for them and just it's just a great story. Great, great program. And then our we have a field based long form podcast called threatened, which is hosted by already Daniel who's on NPR science desk now, and that's about going to the place they're doing in depth work to understand the conservation challenges birds are facing. And so that that podcast is coming out with new episodes in January, focused on Puerto Rico and island habitats. We just wrapped up the season on Hawaii, which was, which was really fascinating.   Michael Hingson  1:00:57 Well, I, I'm gonna go listen, I It will be fun to go do that. Well, if people want to reach out and learn more about you and burden on I assume they can go to bird node.org. But how can they contact you and learn more?   Nick Bayard  1:01:11 Sure they can. They can email me directly at Nick B. At bird note dot org. Always happy to chat. If it's a general bird note inquiry, you can email info at bird note.org We get a lot of people writing in with bird questions. You know, how do we get burned out on our local radio station, that kind of thing. We love to hear those kinds of questions because it helps us connect with new audiences and new radio stations. And, you know, I'm hopeful that we can grow the broadcasts range of Berto because right now we brought about 250 radio stations. But if if we were to, you know, get broadcasts on some of the bigger stations, we could double or triple our audience overnight, which would be, which would be amazing. And it's just a minute 45 seconds. So it's not exactly like a huge investment. I understand that, that time is a finite resource on radio, but I just I don't think there's any good reason why every radio station shouldn't play Burnin Up   Michael Hingson  1:02:18 is short Is it is it makes perfect sense to do. Well, I, I find it fascinating and I hope everyone listening to us today will find it fascinating as well. And that they will reach out to you I think it will be beneficial. And as I said, I'm gonna go make it a habit, I think I can easily do that minute and 45 seconds is just not that long. It's not a big ask just and it's such a such a joyful   Nick Bayard  1:02:47 show. You know, I came into this job as a huge fan, and just have become an even bigger fan, just, you know, getting under the hood and understanding everything that goes into developing creating and producing these shows. So I just feel really lucky to be doing what I do and lucky to have the chance to try to share it with as many people as I can and lucky to ask people to write us check some of sign up to God because that's that's what, that's what keeps us producing the stories and what what allows us to keep growing?   Michael Hingson  1:03:27 Well, I'm gonna go check out bird note.org. And a little bit more detail. Do you know if the website designer paid any attention to or spend any time making sure that it's accessible and put an accessibility kinds of elements to the site? And or do you know if they've done that?   Nick Bayard  1:03:42 We've done a, we our web developer ran an accessibility audit. I need to dig into the details around which aspects are good and which are bad. They told us we got a 91% score.   Michael Hingson  1:03:58 That's pretty good.   Nick Bayard  1:03:59 I think yeah, I think it's pretty good. That's you know, there's always, always room for improvement. One of the things that we were early early adopters of is the the transcripts of every episode on how to be really descriptive in those but I know that we've got got work to do and would welcome any, any feedback you have for sure when you when you go and check it out.   Michael Hingson  1:04:26 We'll do it. And I will definitely communicate either way. Well, Nick, thanks again for being with us. This has been fun and fascinating. I hope you've enjoyed it and and we really appreciate you coming on and we hope you'll be back and update us as burnout progresses.   Nick Bayard  1:04:44 Well, thanks so much, Michael. And I just want to say I'm really inspired by you and your story and I was just thrilled to hear from you and get the invitation to talk. So it's been just a really wonderful Expo. grandson a great honor to be able to chat with you today.   Michael Hingson  1:05:03 Well, my pleasure as well. And for all of you out there listening, please reach out to Nick, please learn more about bird note. And we hope that you'll give us a five star rating wherever you're listening to the podcast. We really appreciate you doing that. I'd love to hear your comments, please feel free to email me at Michaelhi at accessibe.com A C C E S S I B E, or go to our podcast page, Michael hingson.com/podcast. But either way, I would appreciate your five star review would appreciate your comments. And Nick, for you and for everyone listening if you know of anyone else who you think ought to be a guest on unstoppable mindset. We'd love to hear from you about that as well. So thanks for listening. And Nick once more. Thank you very much for being a part of us today and our podcast. Thanks so much.   Michael Hingson  1:05:55 You have been listening to the Unstoppable Mindset podcast. Thanks for dropping by. I hope that you'll join us again next week, and in future weeks for upcoming episodes. To subscribe to our podcast and to learn about upcoming episodes, please visit www dot Michael hingson.com slash podcast. Michael Hingson is spelled m i c h a e l h i n g s o n. While you're on the site., please use the form there to recommend people who we ought to interview in upcoming editions of the show. And also, we ask you and urge you to invite your friends to join us in the future. If you know of any one or any organization needing a speaker for an event, please email me at speaker at Michael hingson.com. I appreciate it very much. To learn more about the concept of blinded by fear, please visit www dot Michael hingson.com forward slash blinded by fear and while you're there, feel free to pick up a copy of my free eBook entitled blinded by fear. The unstoppable mindset podcast is provided by access cast an initiative of accessiBe and is sponsored by accessiBe. Please visit www.accessibe.com. accessiBe is spelled a c c e s s i b e. There you can learn all about how you can make your website inclusive for all persons with disabilities and how you can help make the internet fully inclusive by 2025. Thanks again for listening. Please come back and visit us again next week.

Guarani Vision
Guarani Vision Episode 81: Apertura 2023 Preview & Paraguay U20 Recap

Guarani Vision

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2023 41:36


Welcome to the 81st episode of Guarani Vision, the first-ever podcast dedicated to Paraguayan football in English! With Roberto Rojas, he is joined by Fede Perez, Maria Britos & Ralph Hannah as his trustworthy co-hosts. In this episode, we preview the start of the 2023 Apertura season by giving our predictions as well mention how the Paraguay U20 side has been doing so far in the South American Youth Championship. Be sure to like, comment, and subscribe! Twitter Accounts: Roberto Rojas- https://twitter.com/RobertoRojas97 Federico Perez- https://twitter.com/FedeGolPerez Maria Britos- https://twitter.com/CeciiBritos Ralph Hannah- https://twitter.com/paraguayralph

Guarani Vision
Guarani Vision Episode 80: First Episode of 2023

Guarani Vision

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2023 35:48


Welcome to the 80th episode of Guarani Vision, the first-ever podcast dedicated to Paraguayan football in English! With Roberto Rojas, he is joined by Maria Britos & Ralph Hannah as his trustworthy co-hosts. In this episode, we open 2023 talking about the transfers being made for the new Apertura season and preview the South American Youth Championship and Paraguay's chances to qualify for the FIFA U20 World Cup. Be sure to like, comment, and subscribe! Twitter Accounts: Roberto Rojas- https://twitter.com/RobertoRojas97 Federico Perez- https://twitter.com/FedeGolPerez Maria Britos- https://twitter.com/CeciiBritos Ralph Hannah- https://twitter.com/paraguayralph

Podcast 45 Minutos
ESTADUAIS – STA 3 X 3 NAU | GJU 0 X 5 CEA | VIT 1 X 4 ITA | JAC 0 X 1 BAH – 45 MINUTOS

Podcast 45 Minutos

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2023 209:56


Os campeonatos estaduais do Nordeste estão a todo vapor! No Campeonato Pernambucano, Santa Cruz e Náutico fizeram um Clássico das Emoções recheado de gols. No “Manjadinho”, o Ceará goleou o Guarani de Juazeiro por 5 a 0. E no Campeonato Baiano, enquanto o Vitória segue sem vencer — perdendo por 4 a 1 contra o […]

Rádio Terra FM
COMENTÁRIO: O silêncio do Guarani em anunciar comissão técnica e jogadores para a temporada é tema de comentário de Carlão

Rádio Terra FM

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2023 3:45


"Vamos para a segunda semana do mês de janeiro sem a confirmação ou não da continuidade da parceria do Guarani com a CSR Sports e muito menos se existem tratativas com um novo parceiro", destaca em comentário semanal o jornalista e narrador esportivo, Carlos Roberto de Oliveira, durante participação ao programa Folha 105, da Terra FM. Carlão, como é mais conhecido, acrescenta: "as indefinições e a ausência de uma manifestação oficial do clube dando conta dos objetivos futuros do futebol rubronegro atrapalham. São ruins para o torcedor que começa o ano distante de tudo". Ele ressalta ainda a preparação da nova temporada da Assoeva e cita os reforços já confirmados. Ainda ressalta o campeonato veterano chancelado pela Assoeva com times provenientes de diversas cidades do estado.

Giro no Esporte
Resenha Esportiva preparação do Mundial e Atlético Cruzeiro e Guarani se prepara para jornada 2023

Giro no Esporte

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 11:41


O post Resenha Esportiva preparação do Mundial e Atlético Cruzeiro e Guarani se prepara para jornada 2023 apareceu primeiro em Portal MPA.

Rádio Terra FM
COMENTÁRIO: Na espera pelo anúncio de reforços na Assoeva e Guarani; acompanhe comentário de Carlão

Rádio Terra FM

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 3:29


Na espera pelo anúncio de reforços na Assoeva e no Guarani é tônica de comentário do jornalista e narrador esportivo Carlos Roberto de Oliveira, mais conhecido por Carlão. Ele comenta também o grande campeonato veterano que será realizado em janeiro e fevereiro pela Assoeva envolvendo 15 cidades.

Rádio Cruz de Malta FM 89,9
Corredor Ecológico criado para proteger nascentes de rios abrange território de Lauro Müller

Rádio Cruz de Malta FM 89,9

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2022 9:59


Com intuito de proteger as nascentes, conservar a biodiversidade e recuperar as áreas degradadas, o Governo de Santa Catarina instituiu o Corredor Ecológico Caminho das Nascentes. O Decreto 2.367, assinado pelo Governador Carlos Moisés, foi publicado no Diário Oficial do último dia 22. O Corredor Ecológico Caminho das Nascentes possui 1.519 km de extensão e ocupa uma área de 1.716 km², contemplando 46 municípios, composto predominantemente por Áreas de Preservação Permanente. O Corredor Ecológico Caminho das Nascentes foi dividido em 5 (cinco) setores para a finalidade de gestão. O Setor Aquífero Guarani abrange parte do território do Município de Lauro Müller e conecta as Unidades de Conservação Parque Nacional (PARNA) de São Joaquim, PARNA de Aparados da Serra, REBIO Estadual do Aguaí e o Parque Estadual da Serra Furada. Durante entrevista ao Cruz de Malta Notícias desta terça-feira (27), o Secretário Executivo do Meio Ambiente de Santa Catarina, Leonardo Porto Ferreira, explica que o Decreto é um mecanismo de promoção da melhoria da qualidade ambiental e tem o objetivo, também, de orientar os proprietários rurais sobre a preservação, conservação e regularização das áreas de preservação ambiental nas propriedades. Desapropriar terras privadas abrangidas pela faixa ecológica não faz parte dos objetivos do projeto. Ouça abaixo a íntegra da entrevista:

Rádio Terra FM
COMENTÁRIO: Ex-atleta será diretor de futebol do Guarani; acompanhe comentário de Carlão

Rádio Terra FM

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2022 3:09


O narrador esportivo e jornalista Carlos Roberto de Oliveira ressalta em seu comentário semanal que ex-atleta será o diretor de futebol do Esporte Clube Guarani, de Venâncio Aires. Ele cita que o profissional terá a missão de ser um facilitador entre o clube e parceiros, além de avaliar atletas. Acompanhe, no áudio, a análise completa de Carlão. Acompanhe, em áudio, a análise completa. Carlão fala toda segunda-feira dentro do programa Folha 105, que é apresentado de segunda a sexta-feira, das 18h às 19h. Acompanhe o comentário completo, em áudio.

Big Blend Radio
Author Heloisa Prieto - The Musician

Big Blend Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 58:00


This episode of Big Blend Radio features award-winning Brazilian author Heloisa Prieto who discusses her new novel, "The Musician." With over 2 million books sold in Brazil, Prieto is already a household name. But her long-standing success hasn't stopped her from dazzling her readers with lyrical prose and spell-binding stories. With "The Musician," she debuts her first English-written story within the US, uniting Brazilian mythology and the Guarani culture in a magical setting. "The Musician" is out now through Koehler Books. More: https://www.themusician.info/ 

A Toast to the Arts
Author Heloisa Prieto - The Musician

A Toast to the Arts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 57:33


This episode of Big Blend Radio features award-winning Brazilian author Heloisa Prieto who discusses her new novel, "The Musician." With over 2 million books sold in Brazil, Prieto is already a household name. But her long-standing success hasn't stopped her from dazzling her readers with lyrical prose and spell-binding stories. With "The Musician," she debuts her first English-written story within the US, uniting Brazilian mythology and the Guarani culture in a magical setting."The Musician" is out now through Koehler Books. More: https://www.themusician.info/

Big Blend Radio Shows
Author Heloisa Prieto - The Musician

Big Blend Radio Shows

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 57:32


This episode of Big Blend Radio features award-winning Brazilian author Heloisa Prieto who discusses her new novel, "The Musician." With over 2 million books sold in Brazil, Prieto is already a household name. But her long-standing success hasn't stopped her from dazzling her readers with lyrical prose and spell-binding stories. With "The Musician," she debuts her first English-written story within the US, uniting Brazilian mythology and the Guarani culture in a magical setting. "The Musician" is out now through Koehler Books. More: https://www.themusician.info/ 

Rádio Terra FM
COMENTÁRIO: Futebol Solidário foi sucesso no Guarani; acompanhe comentário de Carlão

Rádio Terra FM

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2022 3:41


A partida de futebol solidária para arrecadações de alimentos foi sucesso em Venâncio Aires, comenta, em áudio, o jornalista e narrador esportivo Carlos Roberto de Oliveira, mais conhecido por Carlão. O evento foi desenvolvido no gramado do Edmundo Feix. Uma das atrações do Futebol Solidário foi o atacante Pedro Henrique Konzen, o Kiko, que retornou ao Brasil neste ano para defender o Internacional. Bolívar, com passagem no Guarani e multicampeão no Inter, Gabriel Davis (Paysandu), o goleiro Marcelo Boeck (Fortaleza), Diguinho (Fluminense-RJ) são alguns dos jogadores que estiveram presentes.

Guarani Vision
Guarani Vision's Interview with Gabriel Perrotta

Guarani Vision

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2022 16:41


Welcome to this special episode of Guarani Vision, the first-ever podcast dedicated to Paraguayan football in English! With Roberto Rojas, he is joined by Fede Perez & Ralph Hannah as his trustworthy co-hosts to speak to Gabriel Perrotta, a goalkeeper for UNC Wilmington. During this episode, we talk about his time playing in Paraguay and the United States as both a professional player and collegiate player, as well as talk about the current state of Paraguayan football. Be sure to like, comment, and subscribe! Twitter Accounts: Roberto Rojas- https://twitter.com/RobertoRojas97 Federico Perez- https://twitter.com/FedeGolPerez Maria Britos- https://twitter.com/CeciiBritos Ralph Hannah- https://twitter.com/paraguayralph

Guarani Vision
Guarani Vision's Final Episode of 2022

Guarani Vision

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2022 45:52


Welcome to the final episode in 2022 of Guarani Vision, the first-ever podcast dedicated to Paraguayan football in English!

Los cuentos de Bob
Ali Baba ha umi cuarenta mondaha (guarani)

Los cuentos de Bob

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 26:09


PayPal: sunfly61@hotmail.es Ali Baba ha umi cuarenta mondaha . Ali Baba ha'e peteî maderero peteî ára ojuhúva peteî cueva henyhêva tesoro-gui, ha'éva bandido mba'e oipe'a haguã cueva oreko ñe'ê mágico.

TheMummichogBlog - Malta In Italiano
"Peru vs. Paraguay: how much do bookmakers pay for the international friendly match? Juan Reynoso's Peruvian team will face a friendly match against La Albirroja. Find out the betting forecast for

TheMummichogBlog - Malta In Italiano

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 4:59


"Peru vs. Paraguay: how much do bookmakers pay for the international friendly match? Juan Reynoso's Peruvian team will face a friendly match against La Albirroja. Find out the betting forecast for the clash at the Monumental Stadium. The international friendly match between Peru vs. Paraguay will be" "--START AD- #TheMummichogblogOfMalta Amazon Top and Flash Deals(Affiliate Link - You will support our translations if you purchase through the following link) - https://amzn.to/3CqsdJH Compare all the top travel sites in just one search to find the best hotel deals at HotelsCombined - awarded world's best hotel price comparison site. (Affiliate Link - You will support our translations if you purchase through the following link) - https://www.hotelscombined.com/?a_aid=20558 “So whatever you wish that others would do to you, do also to them, for this is the Law and the Prophets."" #Jesus #Catholic. END AD---" " played this Wednesday the 16th. The team led by Juan Reynoso will have a new challenge, after having faced Mexico and El Salvador on the last FIFA date, but this time they will face a team from South America, with whom they will meet in the qualifiers for the 2026 World Cup. La Blanquirroja will not be able to count on two of its main figures: André Carrillo and Gianluca Lapadula , but they will have their other references, Christian Cueva and Pedro Gallese, in their ranks. On the other hand, the Guarani team will have its current top star: Miguel Almirón , who has been breaking it at Newcastle in the Premier League. Perú vs. Paraguay: el último partido entre ambas selecciones fue una victoria para la Blanquirroja por 2-0 por las eliminatorias a Qatar 2022. Foto: EFE Peru vs. Paraguay: the last match between the two teams was a 2-0 victory for the Blanquirroja for the Qatar 2022 qualifiers. Photo: EFE YOU CAN SEE: What are the most valuable teams in the Qatar 2022 World Cup? In the last duels they played, two were in playoffs: Bicolor drew 2-2 on the road and won 2-0 at home. Regarding the match for Copa América 2021, the teams met in the quarterfinals and tied 3-3, but the national team advanced to the semifinals after winning 4-3 in the penalty shootout. How much does Peru pay vs. Paraguay in the bets? Betting house Peru Tie Paraguayan Chaskibet 2.05 3.00 3.50 Betsson 2.10 3.10 3.75 I bet you 2.17 3.10 3.70 doradobet 2.08 3.05 3.60 Inkabet 2.10 3.10 3.60 YOU CAN SEE: A complete team! Alianza Lima would not renew 11 players for the 2023 Liga 1 season Peru vs. Paraguay: when do they play? The friendly match between the Bicolor and the Albirroja will be played this Wednesday, November 16 at the Monumental Stadium at 8:00 pm (Peruvian time). This will be the third duel directed by Juan Reynoso, facing the next South American qualifiers for the 2026 World Cup. https://larepublica.pe/deportes/2022/11/15/apuestas-peru-vs-paraguay-cuanto-pagan-las-casas-de-apuestas-por-el-partido-amistoso-internacional-de-hoy/ "

PRI: Science, Tech & Environment
At COP27, Lula promises to resume Brazil's ‘leading role' as a climate defender

PRI: Science, Tech & Environment

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022


Before catching his flight on Monday to Egypt for the COP27 climate conference, Brazil's President-elect Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva sent out a tweet: “We are returning to the world,” he wrote. The tweet was accompanied by a video in which world leaders were seen congratulating Lula on his electoral victory, and in which Lula said he's going to protect the environment.“You all know that we are going to undertake a big fight against deforestation,” Lula told world leaders in a speech on Wednesday.“Brazil can't remain isolated like it was these last four years. [Officials from Brazil] didn't travel to any other countries, and no other countries traveled to Brazil." Amazon deforestation can be seen here on Indigenous territory in the state of Rondônia. Credit: Michael Fox/The World Under current President Jair Bolsonaro, Brazil went from being a leader in the international battle against climate change, to a pariah. Lula said on election night that “it's time to turn the page.”"Brazil is ready to resume its leading role in the fight against the climate crisis, protecting all of our biomes, especially the Amazon rainforest. Brazil and the planet need a living Amazon,” he said."A tree standing is worth more than a ton of illegally harvested timber by those who think only of easy profit."That was music to the ears of the members of Brazil's environmental communities, including Juliana Kerexu — a Guarani leader who is representing Brazil's Indigenous peoples at COP27."The Bolsonaro government had no dialogue with the Indigenous peoples of the country,” Kerexu said, during a press conference at the summit this week."In this moment of transition, we are hopeful for more democratic days.” Small boats move in front of an island where trees have fallen in the Bailique archipelago district of Macapá, in the state of Amapa, in northern Brazil, Sept. 12, 2022. Credit: Eraldo Peres/AP At COP27 on Nov. 15, Lula met with US Climate Envoy John Kerry, who said he was glad Lula was pushing for "once-and-for-all getting it right, pulling people together in order to preserve the Amazon.”Indigenous communities and environmental advocates say Bolsonaro's government has been a disaster. State agencies were gutted and defunded.The country's emissions of greenhouse gasses are at a nearly two-decade high, largely due to out-of-control fires and deforestation. The week following Lula's electoral win, there were more than 1,300 blazes in just the Amazonian state of Rondônia, a 10-fold increase over last year.Federal University of Amazonas ecology professor Henrique Pereira said Bolsonaro set the country back 50 years in terms of environmental protection, and it could take Lula some time to turn the tide.But he will have help. Back when he was president of Brazil in the mid-2000s, Lula's chief environmental ally was his then-environment minister Marina Silva — a former union leader of Amazonian rubber tappers. She later broke with Lula's government over political differences. Now, she's back.“That really has brought me a lot of hope," said Suely Araujo, the former head of Brazil's environment agency and senior specialist at the Climate Observatory, a Brazilian nongovernmental organization."That really touched me when I saw Marina joining Lula's campaign.” Marina Silva poses for a photo with a Lula supporter in São Paulo, Brazil. Credit: Michael Fox/The World Following a Lula rally last month, Marina Silva said she had already given Lula a series of documents with clear proposals about how to get to zero deforestation. "We are going to recuperate our environmental agencies that were destroyed and we are going to create a national agency against climate change," she said. Lula is not starting anew. When he came to power 20 years ago, deforestation rates in the Amazon were even worse than today. Lula enacted a series of landmark measures. They cut deforestation rates in half within two years. And Brazil hit its 2020 goal of reducing greenhouse gas emissions from deforestation ahead of schedule."It was proven that Brazil can produce food and also conserve forests and its people. So, we know how to do it,” said Ane Alencar, science director at the Amazon Environmental Research Institute. "However, I think it's going to be difficult to do it again."That's because there are new complicated challenges. Above all, the complete lawlessness in the Amazon under Bolsonaro has empowered illegal loggers, miners and land grabbers.In many areas, they've joined forces with powerful narco-trafficking groups, who are likely to push back on government measures to protect the forest.But Lula says he's ready.Former environment agency director Suely Araujo said Lula's participation in COP27 is a sign that Brazil is once again going to become a world leader in the fight against climate change. "Lula is going to lift Brazil into a key role in the climate negotiations,” she said, and become “a leader in decreasing climate emissions and greenhouse gasses."Lula is not even president yet, and at COP27, he has received invitations to 10 bilateral meetings. Unlike his predecessor, who outright rejected international support in Amazon protection, Lula has welcomed the world's help in protecting Brazil's forests.At COP27, he called for the 2025 climate conference to be held in the Amazon, saying it was time for “people who defend the Amazon and defend the climate to get to know the region, close-up.”

Guarani Vision
Guarani Vision Episode 79: Olimpia Win Clausura & Paraguay Friendlies Preview

Guarani Vision

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 41:08


Welcome to the 79th episode of Guarani Vision, the first-ever podcast dedicated to Paraguayan football in English!

Guarani Vision
Guarani Vision Episode 78: The Penultimate Week Of The 2022 Clausura Race

Guarani Vision

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 32:34


Welcome to the 78th episode of Guarani Vision, the first-ever podcast dedicated to Paraguayan football in English!

Abundate: Learning a language is not what you think
Language learner personalities with Lindsay Williams | Ep. #18

Abundate: Learning a language is not what you think

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 47:35


Lindsay Williams from “Lindsay Does Languages” brings her 10+ years of experience helping language learners better understand themselves so they can learn more effectively. We speak about the many different kinds of language learners and learner personality types she's worked with over the years, where to start when you're interested in learning a new language, overcoming procrastination, and learning Guarani.For the full show notes including more guest information and links, visit podcast.abundate.org/18.Apply now for the Speak With Abundance programme starting in January 2023. I'll only admit people who I know will see real results, so get all the details and apply by visiting abundate.org/SWA.

Pelada na Net
Pelada na Net #584 - Brilhou A Estrela

Pelada na Net

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 68:22


Bem amigos do Pelada na Net, chegamos em definitivo para o programa 584! E hoje temos o Príncipe Vidane, Maidana e Vitinho da Comédia fazendo o L! E no programa de hoje celebramos a eleição de Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva como presidente do Brasil! Também comentamos o Flamengo campeão da Libertadores em cima do Athletico-PR, o Palmeiras campeão brasileiro e da Libertadores feminina, a situação dramática do Vasco na Série B, o fim da fase de grupos da Champions League, pornografia no estádio e muito mais! E não se esqueça de usar as Hashtags: #CIROGALO #GALOGOMES Siga nosso Twitter! @PeladaNETSiga nosso Instagram! @PeladaNaNetCurta a nossa página do Facebook! www.facebook.com/PodcastPeladaNaNetEntre no grupo do Facebook! www.facebook.com/groups/PeladaNaNetParticipe do nosso grupo no TELEGRAM! https://t.me/padegostosodemaisSiga a Twitch do Vidane! twitch.tv/principevidane Participantes: Fernando Maidana (@MaidanaLH) – Rapaz que hipnotiza os amigos e gosta de uns filminhos do Batman, da Legião dos Heróis!Victor Raphael (@showdovitinho) – Vitinho da comédia, futura estrela do TikTok brasileiro.Vitor “Vidane” Faglioni Rossi (@principevidane) – Príncipe Lindo do Futebol Moleque, Versão Brasihueira. Links: www.radiofobia.com.brPauta Livre NewsFrango FinoCanal do Versão Brasihueira no YouTubeCanal do Mau JogadorThe Magic BoxThe Dark One – PodtrashPapo DelasLegião dos HeróisGrupo do Pelada na Net no SteamCoruja Sábia – SiteCoruja Sábia – InstagramVai Passar – Desabafos na QuarentenaMotocaGODCanal do Victinho no Youtube Links comentados: Fato Bizarro da Semana: Atriz Pornô no Guarani!Fato Bizarro da Semana: Kakaroto do Pará Contribua com o Peladinha através do Padrim, PicPay ou Patreon! Compre as canecas do Pelada na Net! Colaboradores de Outubro/2022! Fica aqui o nosso agradecimento pelo carinho, dedicação e investimento aos queridos: Adriana Cristina Alves Pinto Gioielli, Alex Rodrigues,Bruno Burkart, Bruno Gouvea Santos,Carlos Augusto Francisco Martins, Carlos Mucury, Cesar Mashima,Cleiton Lima Da Silva, Eraldo Cunha De Paula Machado,Everton Candido Dos Santos, Fernando Costa Campos, Gabriel Cano,Gabriel Machado De Freitas, Gabriel Nogueira Morais,Gabriel Oliveira De Andrade E Silva, George Alfradique,Guilherme José De Araújo, Icaro Nascimento, Igor Trusz,Izael Araujo, João Victor Batista Lopes, Josué Solano De Barros,Lucas Badaró, Lucas França, Lucas Oliveira,Marcio Augusto Pereira Pellegrino, Mendelson Tavares,Rafael De Moraes Gomes Dos Santos, Shigeo Yamada, Tiago Fonseca,Tomaz Goiana, Vinicius Policarpo Silva, João Cárcio Silva,Adelita Vanessa Rodrigues Da Silva, Adriano Nazário,Alcides Vasconcelos, Aline Aparecida Matias, Allan Dias,Anderson, O Carteiro Gato, André Schlemper, André Stábile,Bheatriz Rocha, Brando Silva Mota, Bruno Gunter Fricke,Bruno Kellton, Bruno Soares De Moura, Caio Mandolesi,Charles Sousa Lima Miller, Claudia Bigoto, Concílio Silva,Danilo Rodrigues De Padua, Diego Santos, Edcarlos Santana,Eduardo Coutinho, Eduardo Pinto, Eduardo Vasconcelos,Elisnei Menezes De Oliveira, Evilasio Junior, Fernando Kost Neves,Flávio Vieira Sonalio, Frederico Jafelicci, Guilherme Clementi,Guilherme Macedo, Guilherme Oza, Hugo Souza,Ilidio Júnior “Porthugga”, Israel Peichim, Jose Luiz Tafarel,Julio Macoggi, Karina Lopes, Leonardo Favero Bocardi,Leonardo Lachi Manetti, Leonardo Sousa, Leticia Holl Bertoni,Lucas Andrade, Lucas De Freitas Alves, Lucas Marciano,Luiz Nascimento, Marcelo Cabral, Marcos Da Futuro Importados,Marcos Lima, Matheus Berlandi, Maurílio Resende,Natalia Kuchar Lohn, Pedro Bonifácio, Pedro Lauria, Pedro Machado,Pedro Parreira Arantes, Rafael Arantes, Rafael Azevedo,Raphael Bubinick, Reginaldo Antonio Pinto, Renan Carvalho,Renan Pessoa, Robson Duarte, Rodrigo Dias Garcia,Sidnei Francisco Inocêncio Junior,Thiago Oliveira Martins Costa Luz, Vander Alvas, Vander Vilanova,Victor Alves Moura, Victor Sandrin Biliatto,Vinicius De Oliveira Souza, Vinicius Dourado,Vinicius Renan Lauermann Moreira, Vitor Augusto Gaver,Vitor Madureira, Vitor Motta Vigerelli, Wanilon Rodrigues Da Silva,Wesley Souza, William Rogério Da Silva, Leandro Borges, Thiago Lins,Bruno Monteiro, Bruno Macedo, Arthur Azevedo,Bruno De Melo Cavalcanti, Bruno Henrique Domingues,Felipe Artemio Schoulten, Gabriel Conti, Gerson Alves De Souza,Leandro Lopes, Lucas Penetra, Rafael Camargo Kuniyoshi Da Silva,Rodrigo Oliveira Porto, Thiago Glissoi Lopes,Marco Antônio Rodrigues Júnior (Marcão), Lenon Estrella,Daniel Moreira, Rafael Ramalli Da Silva, Sharon Ruiz,Thiago Goncales, Vinicius Cunha Da Silveira e Gabriel Garcia Chaves! Obrigado por acreditarem em nós! Comente! Envie sua cartinha via e-mail para podcast@peladananet.com.br, ou comente no post.

Guarani Vision
Guarani Vision Episode 77: Clausura Race, Qualification & Copa Paraguay Final

Guarani Vision

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2022 38:12


Welcome to the 77th episode of Guarani Vision, the first-ever podcast dedicated to Paraguayan football in English!

Guarani Vision
Guarani Vision Episode 76: Olimpia Wins Superclasico, Miggy's on Fire & Paraguay Friendlies

Guarani Vision

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 31:25


Welcome to the 76th episode of Guarani Vision, the first-ever podcast dedicated to Paraguayan football in English!

GE Cruzeiro
GE Cruzeiro #220 - A temporada acabou?

GE Cruzeiro

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 26:07


O Cruzeiro perdeu para Guarani e chegou ao seu terceiro resultado negativo após a conquista do título da Série B. Laura Rezende, Gabriel Duarte, Leonardo Parela e Guilherme Macedo debatem o desempenho da equipe na partida, os fatores que pesaram na derrota - como as duas expulsões - e projetam como o time deve se comportar nas duas últimas rodadas do campeonato.

GE Cruzeiro
GE Cruzeiro #219 - Duas derrotas depois, agora é no Mineirão!

GE Cruzeiro

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 36:21


O Cruzeiro vai recuperar o domínio na série B contra o Guarani? Vale a invencibilidade em casa! Kaiki é a nova joia da base Celeste? Com Henrique Fernandes, Jaime Júnior, Guilherme Macedo e Fernanda Hermsdorff.

Guarani Vision
Guarani Vision Episode 75: Superclasico Preview, ODESUR & World Cup Playoffs

Guarani Vision

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 33:47


Welcome to the 75th episode of Guarani Vision, the first-ever podcast dedicated to Paraguayan football in English!

Guarani Vision
Guarani Vision Episode 74: ODESUR & Clausura Race Update

Guarani Vision

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2022 27:27


Welcome to the 74th episode of Guarani Vision, the first-ever podcast dedicated to Paraguayan football in English!

Guarani Vision
Guarani Vision Episode 73: Paraguay Go Unbeaten, Copa Paraguay & Clausura Race

Guarani Vision

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 49:05


Welcome to the 73rd episode of Guarani Vision, the first-ever podcast dedicated to Paraguayan football in English!

Había una vez...Un cuento, un mito y una leyenda
La yerba Mate (Leyenda Guaraní)

Había una vez...Un cuento, un mito y una leyenda

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 6:56


Había una vez en un mundo guaraní en lo que hoy conocemos como el sur de América del sur, una diosa luna llamada Yacy. La Diosa Yací desde lo alto del firmamento recorría las noches guaraníes y desde allí observaba a los hombres curiosa por conocer que eran esos seres que deambulaban bajo las estrellas y su luz clara. Además observaba como acompañando a estos seres habían ríos, cascadas, animales y plantas multicolores. limitada por la oscuridad de la noche solo alcanzaba ver sombras, pero no podía ver los detalles de lo que sucedía allí en la tierra. Curiosa  su interés por todo lo que sucedía en la tierra fue creciendo. Un día decidida fue a visitar a su hermano Kuaray, el dios sol, que iluminaba y daba brillo a la tierra durante el día. Cuando llego a donde el se ocultaba mientras ella viajaba por el firmamento, le dijo  Kuaray. Tu que iluminas brillantemente y puedes ver todo dimo como es la tierra y los seres humanos. Kuaray sonriendo le dijo. La tierra es maravillosa, las plantas son verdes, las flores multicolores, el agua es azul y los animales son rápidos y agiles. Los humanos por su parte pueden ser buenos y generosos. Pero otros pueden ser causantes de dolor y violencia. Con cada palabra de Kuaray más crecía el deseo de Yacy de conocer de primera mano las características de aquel mundo que solo veía entre oscuridad. Kuaray al notar el interés de su hermana le dijo. Yacy… Si quieres visitar la tierra yo puedo convertirte temporalmente en una mujer, y asi podras experimentar el mundo como lo ven los guaraníes. Podras visitar la tierra, caminar como un humano por entre las plantas y experimentar los sonidos y las texturas de la naturaleza. Pero como serás por un tiempo humana, estarás vulnerable a todo lo que puede suceder a ellos. Así que deberás ir acompañada. Acompañada y quien me puede acompañar.  Iras con Arai, la diosa de la lluvia, ella es posiblemente la que mejor conoce a los humanos y la tierra misma ya que permanentemente baja a darles el don del agua. Ella también será convertida en humana para que puedan recorrer juntas la tierra. Entonces, al día siguiente Kuaray convirtió a yacy y Arai en dos bella muchachas y las deposito en la superficie de la tierra. Ambas emocionadas comenzaron a recorrer el campo jugando con las plantas, disfrutando el sonido de los animales y especialmente el placer de los ríos y los lagos.Desafortunadamente, estas diosas no se dieron cuenta que un jaguar las acechaba mientras deambulaban por la pradera y cuando ellas estaban cerca a una laguna salto sobre ellas. Para su fortuna en ese preciso momento un hombre guarany estaba en aquella laguna recogiendo agua y observo como el jaguar se abalanzaba sobre las muchachas diosas. Ágil y rápido extendió su arco y una flecha cruzo el corazón del jaguar que cayó a los pies de las asustadas muchachas. El hombre se acercó a ellas y al verlas asustadas las invito a su casa, y junto a su mujer les prepararon una comida a las dos jóvenes diosas. Ellas comieron y pudieron pasar el resto del día con la familia guarani e igualmente pudieron conocer de cerca las costumbres de la tribu. Al caer la tarde ambas se despidieron y se marcharon para regresar a su lugar en el firmamento; Aquella noche Yacy brillo emocionada sobre las tierras guaraníes y se dice que nunca se había visto una luna llena más bella. Agradecida, Yacy, la luna, le pidió a su hermano Kuaray que la dejara de nuevo visitar la tribu para dejarles un regalo.  Quería darles un regalo que les ayudaría que también representaría su generosidad.de nuevo Yacy y Arai se acercaron a la aldea guaraní y frente a la familia del cazador que las salvo sembraron  una semilla de una planta verde de flores Blancas. Arai, rego suavemente la tierra donde estaba la semilla y esta inmediat

PlaybyPlay
9/19/2022 Guarani vs Olimpia Asuncion FREE Football Picks and Predictions on Paraguay Primera Division

PlaybyPlay

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 1:09


9/19/2022 Guarani vs Olimpia Asuncion FREE Football Picks and Predictions on Paraguay Primera Division by Paul Lagouretos.

Guarani Vision
Guarani Vision Episode 72: Clausura Race & Albirroja Friendlies

Guarani Vision

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 27:41


Welcome to the 72nd episode of Guarani Vision, the first-ever podcast dedicated to Paraguayan football in English!

Regenerative Revolution Podcast
Reforesting Our Minds & Decolonizing Our Relationship with Plant Medicine with Amanda Michele of Activated Living

Regenerative Revolution Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 58:45


Today Amanda Michele, a.k.a. @activatedliving shares with us her worldview as an indigenous Guarani sister, bridging our western world with indigenous thought and perspective. We discuss decolonizing our minds and worldviews, how important it is to decenter humanity as superior & how “earth is dying” rhetoric is a colonial construct. We also unpack the problems with the “permaculture” framework and how it doesn't acknowledge active & living ancestral/native land care practices, mental/philosophical history of colonization & the importance of reforesting our minds. She gives us a lens on the current craze of pathological application of psychedelic plant medicines outside their historical cultural context, how they're used in the Guarani culture, and how we can approach both plant medicine and our relationship with the planet in a better way. Amanda's Links: Guarani-Kaiowa Fund 1:1 Consultations The Activated Living Podcast Instagram Tik Tok My links: Support the podcast on Patreon here Follow the podcast on Instagram here Show Notes: Brazilian indigenous activist running for Congress who coined the term "reforesting our minds:" Sonia Guajajara “Earth is dying” is a colonial construct: climate destruction as a natural progression of what's happening. “Mother earth is dying” rhetoric - that idea and thought is a very colonial construct There is a vast diversity of indigenous views and that they all support the fact that we are part of nature, not separate from it. Permaculture as a framework is creating a bit of a problem - narrative of these ancestral/native land care practices as lost practices. This is completely wrong because they're still active and still alive, still actively being used re: land connection, farming, harvest. It's erasing the native, indigenous, first nation practices that are still here. Jennings coming to terms with having lived on colonized land her whole life & it barely having been mentioned or spoken about, or referred to. The point of colonization is to forget that there were original peoples of the land that actually had its own systems & in order for us to create something. Decolonizing seeps into all areas of our lives. Colonizers didn't have mindset of relationship with land - so seeing lush, beautiful spaces were seen as uninhabited rather than intelligently managed, which created a mindset for clearing of the land and the people there. Plant medicine now being utilized as a pathological way of healing, vs. reforesting our minds& decolonizing our minds before diving into plant medicines, native/indigenous gardening practives or things of that nature We got here from how we are thinking and how we view the world. Giving the mic to native/indigenous people, honoring those voices & perspectives is essential. & so much more!

Guarani Vision
Guarani Vision Episode 71: Paraguay Beat Mexico, Copa Paraguay Chaos & League Update

Guarani Vision

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 32:09


Welcome to the 71st episode of Guarani Vision, the first-ever podcast dedicated to Paraguayan football in English!

GE Vasco
GE Vasco #216 - A base pode levar o time ao acesso?

GE Vasco

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 38:12


Episódio analisa a atuação vascaína na vitória sobre o Guarani, com mais uma boa atuação dos jovens. Com Andrey Santos já estabelecido entre os destaques do time, Marlon Gomes e Eguinaldo também são titulares absolutos? É necessário tirar Nenê ou Alex Teixeira do time? A diretoria vai procurar outro treinador imediatamente? O que diz Josh Wander, da 777, em sua passagem pelo Rio? Dá o play!

Guarani Vision
Guarani Vision Episode 70: Enciso & Almiron in England & Clausura Update

Guarani Vision

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 40:05


Welcome to the 70th episode of Guarani Vision, the first-ever podcast dedicated to Paraguayan football in English!

Guarani Vision
Guarani Vision Episode 69: Olimpia Win Superclasico & Paraguay NT Call-Ups

Guarani Vision

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2022 37:25


Welcome to the 69th episode of Guarani Vision, the first-ever podcast dedicated to Paraguayan football in English!

Podcast 45 Minutos
TELECAST – SPORT 4 X 0 CSA | GUARANI 1 X 0 NÁUTICO | CLASSIFICAÇÃO DO VITÓRIA NA SÉRIE C

Podcast 45 Minutos

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2022 156:19


Noite de Pauta cheia no nosso #Telecast. Começando pela goleada do Sport diante do CSA pela Série B. Jogando na Arena de Pernambuco, Leão se recupera na competição. Na sequência, a classificação do Vitória para a próxima fase na Série C. Rubro-negro Baiano entrou no G8 na última rodada da competição e garantiu vaga. E […]

Guarani Vision
Guarani Vision Episode 68: Copa Paraguay, Superclasico & Young Talents

Guarani Vision

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 39:02


Welcome to the 68th episode of Guarani Vision, the first-ever podcast dedicated to Paraguayan football in English!

Rádio Gaúcha
Villasanti - Guarani 0x1 Grêmio - 05/08/2022

Rádio Gaúcha

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2022 2:20


Villasanti - Guarani 0x1 Grêmio - 05/08/2022 by Rádio Gaúcha

Rádio Gaúcha
Biel - Guarani 0 X 2 Grêmio - 05/08/2022

Rádio Gaúcha

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2022 2:05


Biel - Guarani 0 X 2 Grêmio - 05/08/2022 by Rádio Gaúcha

Rádio Gaúcha
João Victor - Guarani 1 X 2 Grêmio - 05/08/2022

Rádio Gaúcha

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2022 1:29


João Victor - Guarani 1 X 2 Grêmio - 05/08/2022 by Rádio Gaúcha

Rádio Gaúcha
Morte de Jô Soares, coligações definidas para as eleições e mais destaques

Rádio Gaúcha

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 4:24


Morreu na madrugada de hoje o apresentador, escritor e humorista Jô Soares, aos 84 anos. Equipes da Polícia Civil e do Corpo de Bombeiros retomaram as buscas por Alessandra Dellatorre, advogada desaparecida há 20 dias em São Leopoldo, no Vale do Sinos. Hoje foi o fim do prazo para realização das convenções partidárias. A pizzaria Soul Pizza, da Zona Sul de Porto Alegre, vai concorrer no Campeonato Mundial da Pizza no ano que vem, em Parma, na Itália. O Grêmio enfrenta o Guarani no Estádio Brinco de Ouro da Princesa, em Campinas. No empate de 0 a 0 no confronto entre Inter e Melgar, em Arequipa, teve o goleiro colorado Daniel escolhido como o melhor da partida pela Conmebol. Mais notícias em gzh.com.br.

Rádio Gaúcha
Giro Gre-Nal #27: Grêmio tem time definido contra o Guarani e Inter é absolvido no STJD

Rádio Gaúcha

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 3:19


Giro Gre-Nal #27: Grêmio tem time definido contra o Guarani e Inter é absolvido no STJD by Rádio Gaúcha

Guarani Vision
Guarani Vision Episode 67: Copa America Femenina, League & Copa Paraguay

Guarani Vision

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 37:20


Welcome to the 67th episode of Guarani Vision, the first-ever podcast dedicated to Paraguayan football in English!

Podcast 45 Minutos
TELECAST – FORTALEZA 0 X 1 FLUMINENSE | SPORT 2 X 1 GUARANI

Podcast 45 Minutos

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 165:43


Telecast no ar! Derrota do Fortaleza pelo jogo de ida contra o Fluminense, pelas quartas de final da Copa do Brasil. 1 a 0 para o time carioca, num jogo que pesa para buscar a classificação fora de casa, mas também expõe ainda mais algumas das feridas do time tricolor. Do outro lado, o Sport […]

Podcast 45 Minutos
TELECAST – GUARANI 0 X 2 BAHIA | SANTA CRUZ 1 X 1 LAGARTO | CEARÁ 3 X 1 CORINTHIANS

Podcast 45 Minutos

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 231:36


MegaTelecast na área para falar de um sábado proveitoso para três nordestinos. O Bahia ganhou do Guarani, fora de casa, e segue firme no G-4 da Série B, com uma atuação bastante competente, onde algumas peças do setor defensivo se sobressaíram mesmo com a ausência de Luiz Otávio. Enquanto isso, o Santa Cruz, mesmo empatando […]

Guarani Vision
Guarani Vision Episode 66: Copa America Femenina & 2022 Clausura Preview

Guarani Vision

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 54:37


Welcome to the 66th episode of Guarani Vision, the first-ever podcast dedicated to Paraguayan football in English!

Guarani Vision
Guarani Vision Episode 65: Bad Week For Paraguayan Teams

Guarani Vision

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2022 46:58


Welcome to the 65th episode of Guarani Vision, the first-ever podcast dedicated to Paraguayan football in English!

Guarani Vision
Guarani Vision: Paraguay's Failure To Qualify For The 2022 FIFA World Cup

Guarani Vision

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 60:05


Welcome to this special episode of Guarani Vision, the first-ever podcast dedicated to Paraguayan football in English!