Podcasts about depending

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Share on LinkedIn
Copy link to clipboard
  • 4,977PODCASTS
  • 7,487EPISODES
  • 32mAVG DURATION
  • 3DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Jun 24, 2022LATEST

POPULARITY

20122013201420152016201720182019202020212022


Best podcasts about depending

Show all podcasts related to depending

Latest podcast episodes about depending

Guide to the Unknown « TalkBomb
241: Skull and Bones

Guide to the Unknown « TalkBomb

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 64:37


Skull & Bones is an Ivy League secret society for muckety mucks...and there aren't a lot of chuckles or yuckety yucks going on there. More like social climbing and...self-celebration IRL, and MURDER in the early 2000s movie The Skulls based on it. Wanna join?? VIDEO VERSION HERE For full sources and links, visit http://www.gttupod.com/home/gttu241 Support GTTU on Patreon! Depending on the tier you choose, you get one, two, or FOUR full bonus episodes per month, a private Discord, and more at patreon.com/gttupod. Thank you so much! See everything GTTU-related at gttupod.com. Watch videos of all of our episodes at youtube.com/gttupod Follow us online: https://www.instagram.com/gttupod https://www.facebook.com/gttupod https://www.twitter.com/gttupod Join our private Facebook group at facebook.com/groups/gttupod

The Simple Sophisticate - Intelligent Living Paired with Signature Style
The French Way: How to Create a Luxurious Everyday Life

The Simple Sophisticate - Intelligent Living Paired with Signature Style

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 37:58


"He who comes home with the most money doesn't win. He who comes home with the most experiences wins." - Steve Smith, contributor with Rick Steves in Rick Steves France 2015 The Simple Sophisticate, episode #23 One of the most exquisite pleasures in my experience has always been having time at home without a to-do list. To enjoy my sanctuary that comforts me, rejuvenates me and allows me to dream so that when I do step outside into the world I can do, seek and produce, is one of the things I most treasure about living simply luxuriously. And so it began when I was a child, no doubt, as my mother always cultivated a warm home, but as I grew up and became responsible for establishing my own abode, it took much exploration, dead-ins from time to time and investment to create a space that allowed the everyday to be just as stimulating as new experiences brought about by travel. And in so doing, paying attention to my home environment, I began to pay attention to how I spend my days. Was I exhausted and unfilled at the end or exhausted and feeling productive? Did I have time in my day to spend it with those I loved, converse with those who engaged in creative, uplifting and thought-provoking conversation or care for myself in such a way that respected my overall health? And depending upon my answer, I would tweak, eliminate, maximize or designate more or less time to those activities that improved the quality of living. "He has achieved success who has lived well, laughed often and loved much." -Bessie A. Stanley As the quote reminds us, living well is truly about prioritizing how we spend our days. Did we make time to enjoy the day, spend it with those we hold dear, take time to respect what our minds and bodies need or did we cram everything into our waking hours in order to fit a mold that we weren't asked for input regarding its creation? Everyone's path to living well will be different, but the key is to know what you want - more loosely rather than specifically. Because as we know, our lives intermingle with the rest of the world, but if we bring our best selves, have good intentions and are willing to be true selves, success is possible when it comes to living well. Recently, I was watching the travel guru Rick Steves discuss on PBS his explorations through the countryside of France. While staying at Chateau de Pray and dining on their outdoor terrace, his dining companion shared the quote listed at the beginning of today's post. And I couldn't agree more especially when it comes to travel, but why not bring a similar way of living into our everyday? Why not . . . live well each and every day? Why not use the nice china in the middle of the week? Why not treat ourselves regularly to dinner or lunch with a dear friend at a restaurant that piques our interest or tantalizes our taste buds? Why not sleep on silk pillowcases each night? Many may quickly scoff at such ideas as being too indulgent, thus deflating the exhilaration that is felt when they are only experiences from time to time, but what I hope to bring to your attention today is that with patience and careful planning, everyday life can indeed be lived luxuriously and can actually enhance the quality of our lives. Below are 20 ways to foster a simply luxurious way of living, but these are just a taste. If you would like the full list inspired by the French way of living, check out chapter 10 "Indulging Your Inner Francophile" in Choosing The Simply Luxurious Life: A Modern Woman's Guide. 1. Cook at home. Find simple, yet delicious recipes and discover the pleasures of cooking on your own schedule for your own dietary needs and preferences. (View TSLL recipes here.) 2. Indulge in café time. Once, twice or three times a week depending up on your schedule and enjoyment, select a favorite local café and stop in for some reading time, moseying through magazine time, or chats with friends. Indulge in one of the patisseries delicious sweet treats and lose track of time. ~Les Deux Garcons cafe in Aix-en-Provence, cours Mirabeau~ 3. Wear luxurious lingerie everyday. As I talk about in my book, lingerie is a necessity for the woman who wears it, not for those who might see her in it. Why? Because simply knowing we are wearing beautiful, comfortable, luxurious lingerie feels good. And everything begins with our thoughts. If we feel good, we smile more readily, we are more open to new experiences and our attitude is lifted. 4. Let go of busy. A powerful decision that will change your day-to-day living drastically for the better. Busy doesn't mean better or more productive, it simply reveals a life that perhaps could be managed better. After all, living well means living a life of quality. A life that focuses on what is necessary and lets go of the rest. And when you let go of busy, you have more time for moments of simple leisure and luxury that cultivate an everyday life to savor. (Click here to dive into this topic.) 5. Cultivate a capsule wardrobe for each season. Knowing you have in your closet clothes that will make you look and feel your best is a very powerful tool to possess as you begin your day. While this takes time and never really ends due to lives and bodies changing, it is worth our attention. (Click here to learn more about building a capsule wardrobe.) 6. Follow your own schedule. Perhaps it's Friday or even Saturday night, everyone must be out doing something, staying up late, right? Wrong. Your daily schedule is one that works for you and those you spend your time with. Perhaps you prefer Wednesday evenings out because Thursdays are lighter days at work and you enjoy spending your weekends waking up early and getting things done. Whatever schedule works for your goals, intentions, health, family, etc - adhere to it and don't apologize. After all, our lives, needs and desires change, listen to what is nudging you, calling your name and that is where you will find the unexpected beauty. 7. Discover a personal scent. Similar to knowing you are wearing luxurious lingerie is the choice of scent you layer upon your skin before stepping out the door for work or for play. A luxurious decision and investment, but one that will reveal your attention to detail. 8. Subscribe to daily/weekly/monthly periodicals. Running throughout the philosophy of living simply luxuriously is being well-read. Depending upon your lifestyle, curiosities, locale and interests, you will select reading material that interests you. Most importantly, gather knowledge, choose to learn something new each day, read a review of a new play or restaurant and be encouraged to give it a try. Become in the know of current events in order to strike up a conversation with anyone. Reading in truth, is a way of tickling your brain and refusing to live each day the same even if the events may be routine. 9. Save time and don't wash your hair everyday. Purchase a dry shampoo and have on hand for the days you don't lather up. Shampoo less often, thereby saving yourself more time in the morning, and believe it or not, improve the condition of your tresses. (Klorane Gentle Dry Shampoo with Oat Milk) 10. Invest in quality skincare products. In episode #13 of the podcast, specifics are shared on how to create glowing skin, and by investing in quality skincare products, your most beautiful skin will shine. The power of prevention is real, and while it takes time and a bit of investment, the pay-offs are tremendous. 11. Design a workout regimen to look forward to. Whether you enjoy exercising outdoors in Mother Nature or attending classes lead by instructors that inspire you and classmates that boost your mood, explore your interests and community to see what is available and what captures your needs and proclivities. Most people after having exercise will tell you that they feel better, energized and less stress, and if you can bring that into your everyday life, everything will be affected in a very positive way. (Revolver Yoga Studio, Walla Walla) 12. Find time to treasure hunt. Even if you are not necessarily going to buy, poke around in local consignment shops, yard sales, second-hand shops, antique boutiques and even boutiques that catch your eye. If nothing else, you will walk away with ideas on how to design, style and mix and match what you already have. 13. Be sincere, yet kind. While everyone has days that you are simply grumpy for any list of reasons, taking it out on others is something you will most likely regret. And even if you have to deliver news that isn't favorable, there is always a way to do so with kindness. Being conscious of how we treat people and our delivery will almost always be appreciated, and even if it is taken for granted, at least we can go home at night and feel good about the energy we put out into the world. 14. Shop at local vendors and boutiques. Perhaps you live in a town that you hand-selected for the community it offers, but what if you didn't? Either way, supporting local vendors when it comes to food or local boutiques when it comes to shopping for gifts, necessities and products not only builds good-will, but strengthens the economy of the local community. And additionally, when it comes to buying food locally, you benefit your overall health as most foods are free from pesticides and hold more nutritional value that your body craves. 15. Eat real food. Full of flavor that will satiate, real food is a choice your body will thank you for. Processed food may be more convenient and help you reduce the shopping trips to the grocery store, but in the long term, it is a bad investment. Returning home after a long day knowing the food you will be incorporating into your meal will be satisfying and nutritious will remove guilt and properly fuel your body for whatever it may be asked to do next. 16. Elevate the conversation. Easier said than done when we are exhausted, stressed and frustrated, but when you do your best to refrain from complaining and gossiping, you are less likely to go home in the evening regretting or feeling guilty about partaking. In fact, when conversations are full of curious information - books, local events, news, etc - you can walk away inspired, motivated and eager to do something new. Why not bring such a conversation to those in your world? 17. Create an evening routine to look forward to. At the end of the day, your body and mind may be entirely taxed which is why making time (even 15 minutes) for unwinding with a favorite pastime is crucial. Being able to look forward to this simple routine can be the silver lining no matter what your day has unearthed. 18. Schedule regular spa appointments for beauty and health maintenance. Much like exercise, caring for our bodies is a means to caring for our health, overall beauty and mind. So be sure to schedule your facial, massage, hair cut/color, waxing and any other must-dos before you walk out the door from your last appointment. They can often be the respite in a busy week and will no doubt leave you feeling rejuvenated. 19. Stock a bar cart for spur-of-the-moment entertaining. Whether you drink alcoholic beverages or not, stock a bar cart that has drinks and nibbles at the ready for last-minute guests. Even for one or two guests, having a bar with wine, beer or if it's morning - croissants and hot tea keeps the food with the conversation in the living room or sitting room. Luxurious and ready for any everyday occasion. (A glimpse of my 20. Fill your home with inspired music. For techies or retro audiophiles, have your turntable or playlists ready for any occasion. From leisurely jazz tunes when you return from work and wish to read the daily news to beautiful Bach in the morning as you get ready for work, set up your music station, turn off the television and forget about time, even if for a moment. Whatever inspires you in your travels or remains memorable to you from your past, why not bring it into your everyday life if at all possible? Cultivate an everyday life that perhaps no one would believe is possible, but rest assured it is. After all, as Annie Dillard reminds us, how we spend our days is how we spend our lives. Why not spend your life living well each and everyday? ~SIMILAR POSTS FROM THE ARCHIVES YOU MIGHT ENJOY: ~Episode #32: The Francophile's Style Guide: The 14 Essentials ~10 Gifts of Mastering the French Mystique ~Why Not . . . Indulge Your Inner Francophile? ~Why Not . . . Find Your Je Ne Sais Quoi? ~10 Ways to Unearth Your Inner Francophile (episode #4) ~French-Inspired Living: Books to Enjoy Petit Plaisir: Befriend a local wine shop to ensure great wines no matter what the occasion. ~Liner & Elsen "One of America's six great main street wine shops." -Bon Appetit 2222 NW Quimby St. (off 22nd Ave.) Portland, OR 97210 They can ship the wine to you! Staff who've helped me in the past: Neil Thompson and Kevin Geller ~Chateau Du Grand Bos (2005) Bordeaux, France (wine enjoyed in the photo to the right). ~Images: (1) a cafe in Paris in Montmartre captured by TSLL

Talking With Tech AAC Podcast
Bilingüe AAC (Part 1): Conducting Bilingual Family-Based AAC Assessments

Talking With Tech AAC Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 43:18


This week, Rachel interviews Alma Partida (@aacforyouandme on Insta), Sarah Lee (@aac_together), Melissa Tapia (@hablame_de_language), and Maria De Leon (@code.switch.slp) about Bilingüe AAC (https://www.bilingueaac.com/home), a platform that supports evidence-based, culturally affirming Spanish AAC. They discuss many aspects of bilingualism and AAC, including core word considerations and strategies for family-based AAC assessment.   Before the interview, Chris and Rachel talk about the difference between “progress” and “success” when we are talking about an AAC user's communication journey. For some, making progress with using AAC demonstrates success. However, if we are not making progress fast enough or are using a tool that doesn't promote language development (e.g. a 4 icon core board) then we aren't really working towards true success, which includes independent, spontaneous communication.  

Matt Waldman's RSP Cast
Matt Waldman’s RSP Cast: Intriguing NFL Player-Team Scenarios This Summer

Matt Waldman's RSP Cast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022


Matt Waldman's RSP Cast continues the preseason watchlist conversation with the players and situations that Matt is most interested in monitoring during training camp. This week, we're continuing the preseason watchlist conversation with the players and situations that I'm most interested in monitoring during training camp. Players and scenarios I discuss include: Can Marquise Brown and/or Rondale Moore replace the qualities of DeAndre Hopkins' game that made Hopkins a receiving juggernaut? Do the Ravens see Lamar Jackson for what he really is or are they itching to make him what he isn't? Depending on the answer to the previous question, Devin Duvernay could become a significant offensive factor. Who will be the third option in the Bears' receiving corps? Depending on the answer, that option could wind up the second-most productive player or an afterthought. Green Bay's passing game has a vacuum to fill and there are a lot of potential outcomes that are reasonable to project this year. That said, the potential for a receiver to assume Davante Adams' production is likely limited to one candidate or bust. There is also potential to see the reemergence of a Randall Cobb role, but not with the guy named Randall Cobb. The Travis Etienne hype could develop into something real, but the language of the report reveals a lack of substance at this point. I explain why. Is there the potential for a hidden gem in the Raiders offense? Why there's potential that any Pierre Strong buzz in June is putting the cart before the horse. Tampa Bay's running back stable. How stable is it? Who could sneak his way into more touches? Of course, it is easy to monitor news about players in training camps. Discerning what is actionable information from that news is a different matter entirely. This is something I'm covering in the 2022 RSP Pre-Draft/Post-Draft Service's June newsletter: A 10-point primer on putting training camp news in perspective—especially with regard to rookies, second-year players, and low-cost vets and journeymen. If you want to know about the rookies from this draft class, you will find the most in-depth analysis of offensive skill players available (QB, RB, WR, and TE), with the 2022 Rookie Scouting Portfolio for $21.95.  Matt's new RSP Dynasty Rankings and Two-Year Projections Package is available for $24.95 If you're a fantasy owner and interested in purchasing past publications for $9.95 each, the 2012-2020 RSPs also have a Post-Draft Add-on that's included at no additional charge.   If you're a fantasy owner and interested in purchasing past publications for $9.95 each, the 2012-2020 RSPs also have a Post-Draft Add-on that's included at no additional charge.   Best yet, proceeds from sales are set aside for a year-end donation to Darkness to Light to combat sexual abuse.

The Tom Barnard Show
Harlan Ullman - #2185-2

The Tom Barnard Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 49:57


Depending on your age, MAD could mean a few different things.  In the 50s, it was a magazine.  In the 60s and 70s, it was Mutual Assured Destruction.  Now there's a new acronym in town: Massive Attacks of Disruption.  We've seen a few just in the past few years.  Pandemics, riots, and the chip shortage have caused some of the biggest disruptions in the history of humanity, and they all happened in just the past two years.  If these become more frequent or more intense, you may be pining for the days of duck and cover.  Hey, at least it came with a cute duck mascot back then. The Fifth Horseman and the New MAD: How Massive Attacks of Disruption Became the Looming Existential Danger to a Divided Nation and the World at Large  -amzn.to/3N9Z1sO See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Locked On Canadiens - Daily Podcast on the Montreal Canadiens
Episode 642 - Montreal Canadiens NHL Draft 2022: what should the Habs do with the 26th overall pick, depending on whether they pick Shane Wright or Juraj Slafkovsky?

Locked On Canadiens - Daily Podcast on the Montreal Canadiens

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 31:46


Inside today's Locked on Canadiens: With all eyes intently focused on the first overall pick, the Canadiens do also hold another first round pick at 26th overall. If Montreal does go the expected route, and selects Shane Wright first overall, what should they do with their other first round pick? Scott and Laura debate the merits of selecting another centre like Owen Beck or Noah Ostlund to further improve the depth at that position. However, what if they decide to take a winger at 26th overall, such as Filip Mesar or Ivan Miroshnichenko? However, if the Canadiens do decide to take a risk and draft Juraj Slafkovsky, Scott believes drafting a centre at 26th overall is the only way forward, namely someone like the aforementioned Owen Beck. Given Montreal's needs, not grabbing a centre in the first round feels like a gigantic misstep from the Habs front office. The final hypothetical, what if the Canadiens pull off a Josh Anderson trade and move up into the top 15 of the draft? The hosts discuss the merits of drafting a high-end defensive piece and if it's needed considering the current prospect pool. Or is taking a chance on a player like Brad Lambert worth the cost of moving in the first round? Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKED15,” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline BetOnline.net has you covered this season with more props, odds and lines than ever before. BetOnline – Where The Game Starts! Rock Auto Amazing selection. Reliably low prices. All the parts your car will ever need. Visit RockAuto.com and tell them Locked On sent you. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Live Yes! with Arthritis
Newly Diagnosed: Control the Physical Toll

Live Yes! with Arthritis

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 33:42


While joint pain and inflammation are the hallmark symptoms of arthritis, the physical toll it takes on your body can vary. Depending on what type of arthritis you have, and whether it's an autoimmune inflammatory condition, the physical symptoms can affect many parts of your body — beyond your joints — including your skin and eyes or your heart and kidneys. Learn more in this episode of the Newly Diagnosed With Arthritis series of the Live Yes! With Arthritis Podcast. Visit the Live Yes! With Arthritis Podcast site to get show notes and a full transcript: https://arthritis.org/liveyes/podcast We want to hear from you. Tell us what you think about the Live Yes! With Arthritis Podcast. Get started by emailing podcast@arthritis.org. Special Guest: Dr. Liana Fraenkel.

Illuminated with Jennifer Wallace
ACE scores and your health across your lifetime

Illuminated with Jennifer Wallace

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 48:00


Did you know you can measure your life expectancy by taking a short quiz about childhood experiences? Depending on the score, your lifespan either increases or decreases by 20 years!  Advances in science have found a link between Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE), and poor physical and mental health later in life. This distinction has been difficult to prove, but thanks to Dr. Vincent Filetti's dedication to studying this phenomenon, we can make a correlation between traumatic events from our past and chronic illnesses that manifest in adulthood.  In this episode, Neurosomatic Intelligence Coach, Jennifer Wallace, and Elisabeth Kristoff from Brain Based Wellness, discuss the link between childhood trauma and illness later in life in hopes of shedding light on how trauma stored in the body can cause, sometimes fatal, health issues. In this conversation, Jennifer and Elisabeth recount their own ACE scores and how it has affected their health and lives as a whole, as well as tools based in applied neurology to allow for self-regulation to help heal trauma stored in the body.   These adverse childhood experiences change the physiology of the body and mind which lead to higher risk of obesity, addiction, and other harmful maladaptive behaviors that are bad for overall health, and lower life expectancy.   When we understand the root causes of our health issues, we are more equipped in finding solutions and tools to help heal ourselves once and for all. Tools that are discussed in this episode have been proven to help not only Jennifer and Elisaeth in their healing, but many others who have used applied neurology for their benefit. Listen in for more information! .     Topics discussed in this episode:   What are ACE test scores Obesity study by Dr. Vincet Filetti Pinpoint maladaptive behaviors related to past traumas Bridging the gap between trauma and illness What a dysregulated nervous system looks like Learning tools on how to regulate to reduce chronic stress Basics on applied neurology to help heal once and for all!   Go here to get your free videos now:    https://brainbased-wellness.com/register/free-subscription/ Work with Jennifer:    https://linktr.ee/traumarewired   Get 25% Off a Private Coaching Session with me FREE 1 Year Supply of Vitamin D + 5 Travel Packs from Athletic Greens when you use   My exclusive offer: AthleticGreens.com/Rewired   Work with Elisabeth:   Get in on Elisabeth's exclusive Free Video Training - her proven step-by-step system to ZAP stress, RESOLVE anxiety, STOP pain, DROP unwanted behaviors and MAGNIFY clarity and focus.    It's easier than you think. If you can watch a video, you can heal your nervous system.    Go here to get your free videos now:    https://brainbased-wellness.com/register/free-subscription/   Connect with Jennifer:   Instagram   Connect with Elisabeth:   Website   Instagram   Facebook

The Ezra Klein Show
What We Do — and, Frustratingly, Don't — Know About Long Covid

The Ezra Klein Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 57:17


Depending on the data you look at, between 10 and 40 percent of people who get Covid will still have symptoms months later. For some, those symptoms will be modest. A cough, some fatigue. For others, they'll be life-altering: Debilitating brain fog. Exhaustion. Cardiovascular problems. Blood clotting.This is what we call long Covid. It's one term for a vast range of experiences, symptoms, outcomes. It's one term that may be hiding a vast range of maladies and causes. So what do we actually know about long Covid? What don't we know? And why don't we know more than we do?Dr. Lekshmi Santhosh is an assistant professor at UCSF Medical Center, and the founder and medical director of UCSF's long Covid and post-ICU clinic. Her clinic opened in May 2020 and was one of the first to focus on treating long Covid patients specifically. We discuss the wildly broad range of symptoms that can qualify as long Covid; the confusing overlaps between Covid symptoms and other diseases; whether age, race, sex and pre-existing conditions affect a person's chances of contracting long Covid; why it's so difficult to answer a seemingly simple question like, “How many people have gotten long Covid?”; what to make of a recent study that seemingly undermines the biological existence of long Covid; how worried we should be about correlations between Covid and medical disasters like heart attacks, strokes and abnormal blood clotting; and more.Mentioned:“Post–COVID Conditions Among Adult COVID-19 Survivors Aged 18–64 and ≥65 Years — United States, March 2020–November 2021” by Lara Bull-Otterson, Sarah Baca1, Sharon Saydah, Tegan K. Boehmer, Stacey Adjei, Simone Gray and Aaron M. Harris“Long COVID after breakthrough SARS-CoV-2 infection” by Ziyad Al-Aly, Benjamin Bowe and Yan Xie“A Longitudinal Study of COVID-19 Sequelae and Immunity: Baseline Findings” by Michael C. Sneller, C. Jason Liang, Adriana R. Marques, et al.“Positive Epstein–Barr virus detection in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients” by Ting Chen, Jiayi Song, Hongli Liu, Hongmei Zheng and Changzheng Chen“Risk factors and disease profile of post-vaccination SARS-CoV-2 infection in UK users of the COVID Symptom Study app” by Michela Antonelli, Rose S. Penfold, Jordi Merino, Carole H. Sudre, Erika Molteni, Sarah Berry, et al.“Understanding and Improving Recovery From COVID-19” by Aluko A. Hope“Markers of Immune Activation and Inflammation in Individuals With Postacute Sequelae of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 Infection” by Michael J. Peluso, Scott Lu, Alex F. Tang, Matthew S. Durstenfeld, et al.Book Recommendations:In Shock by Dr. Rana AwdishEvery Deep-Drawn Breath by Wes ElyMountains Beyond Mountains by Tracy KidderWe're hiring a researcher! You can apply here or by visiting nytimes.wd5.myworkdayjobs.com/NewsThoughts? Guest suggestions? Email us at ezrakleinshow@nytimes.com.You can find transcripts (posted midday) and more episodes of “The Ezra Klein Show” at nytimes.com/ezra-klein-podcast, and you can find Ezra on Twitter @ezraklein. Book recommendations from all our guests are listed at https://www.nytimes.com/article/ezra-klein-show-book-recs.“The Ezra Klein Show” is produced by Annie Galvin, Jeff Geld and Rogé Karma; fact-checking by Haylee Millikan and Michelle Harris; original music by Isaac Jones; mixing by Jeff Geld; audience strategy by Shannon Busta. Our executive producer is Irene Noguchi. Special thanks to Kristin Lin, Kristina Samulewski, Dr. Ziyad Al-Aly and Lauren Nichols.

Check Your Thread
#47: Introduction to Patching

Check Your Thread

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022


This episode is something of a love letter to my favourite mending technique: patching! Mending with patches is a beginner friendly option for giving most types of clothing and fabrics a longer life. Depending on your choice of patching fabric, it can be a bold statement, or a subtle repair. It offers plenty of opportunities for creativity, it can be achieved without a sewing machine AND can be deployed when other mending options fail you. Expanding on the patching sections from my book, ‘Mend it, Wear it, Love it!', in this solo episode I offer up ideas for creative patching and share practical advice on achieving a successful repair. Plus I talk through the steps for two different approaches to patching for those who are new to garment mending. Support the podcast over on Patreon! The step by step techniques outlined in this episode are adapted from my book ‘Mend it, Wear it, Love it!' which you can find HERE. List of materials and equipment you'll need for basic patching: Fabric to make patch Fabric scissors Iron Tape measure Fabric marking tool Hand sewing needle Thread (colour to match or contrast with your patch) Safety pins (use regular pins if your fabric is likely to be damaged by safety pins) Thread snips or small scissors A basic running stitch technique is shown in THIS VIDEO. A basic whip stitch technique is shown in THIS VIDEO. Examples of Sashiko-style stitching that I have previously attempted:

The Stock Trading Reality Podcast
Trading to Lessen the Stress | STR 378

The Stock Trading Reality Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 73:47


Depending on where you currently reside in your trading journey, the title of this episode may seem a bit ironic. Perhaps when you take a trade using real money (opposed to trading in a simulator) you experience of surge of emotions and physical stress. I understand and anyone who has traded understands! Here's the thing, these emotions and stressed can be extremely diminished. There will always be emotions due to the fact we're emotional creates; however, that does not mean they need to dominate our trade plans or experiences. My guest, Greg (”G-Mac” in the chatroom), is a great example of this. He has a very successful job and is very good at what he does. With that being said, with the types of responsibilities he has within his job, it creates a good amount of constant stress. Throw in the fact he's a father of five kids (like myself!) and I don't blame him one bit for pursuing something that can become less stressful than his current situation. Greg's ambition come from a place of wanting to be a good father and I respect that in huge ways. He's also being extremely smart in the way he goes about it; however, like all of us, he's played with stupid along the way. Let's hear about Greg and his journey!

Simon Calder's Independent Travel Podcast
June 20th - Is Brexit at all responsible for our air travel misery?

Simon Calder's Independent Travel Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 7:18


Depending on who you speak with, Brexit is either the sole reason for our current air travel chaos as airlines and airports struggle to fill the gaps in employment numbers or, according to some government ministers, not an issue at all. I think it's somewhere in between - and here's my reasoning why. While air travel is struggling to cope with demand across the world as we've hurried back to international travel, it is also true that Britain is experiencing some more stresses than other countries in airports and with air fleets based here. So, although not all the problems can be squared on Brexit, the government's attempt to make it happen aren't helping matters.Of course, this podcast is free, as is my weekly newsletter, which you can find at http://www.independent.co.uk/newsletters See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

She's INVINCIBLE
Ann Peck - The Adoptee Journey

She's INVINCIBLE

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 85:56


Here are the things to expect in the episode:How do adoptees feel about their birth parents?Why is it important for adoptees to know their birth parents?What are the possible long-term effects of adoption on adoptees?How does it feel to be an adopted child?And much more! About Ann:Ann Peck is an award-winning author, independent journalist, and an adoptee. Her bylines include Entrepreneur Magazine—Business Insider—Greenwich Time—Stamford Advocate— Connecticut Post— and many more.She is the creator and instructor at the Adoptee Writer's Experience, where she works with adoptees interested in writing their adoption stories, either for themselves or publication. She offers online and in-person writing intensives, classes, individual coaching, and a membership community for female-identifying adoptees.Ann is the author of three books, including the best-selling, Smiling on the Outside: Secrets, Sex, Shame and the Search for Self-Love, which won six national and international awards in relationships, women's issues, and sexuality and was reviewed by Publishers Weekly.Ann is a member of the Society of Professional Journalists, the Women's National Book Association, and is a member and an ambassador for the National Society of Newspaper Columnists. When she's not traveling, Ann enjoys her time at home on the shores of a lake in Minnesota. Business or marketing topic to give actionable strategies/tips for listeners: Seriously no idea what to call it (yet), but I can have it firmed up by the time we connect. ... something along the lines of finding a problem and solving it... the problem I saw was this: The adoptee's voice and experiences are often missing, exploited, or inaccurately portrayed by the media.I wanted to change that, so here are the steps I took: (I will have the steps I outlined and strategies I implemented and I will be able to present it in a way that others can adapt for their own business) I want to promote Adoptee Writer's Experience in all it's forms: the membership community, classes, and my research on the topic. Depending on when you'll be airing this episode, I may be able to offer a special to your listeners — we can discuss timing and availability.Connect with Ann Peck!Website: https://annpeck.com/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/adopteewritersInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/iamannpeck/Connect with Kamie Lehmann!Website: https://www.kamielehmann.com/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/kamie.lehmann.1LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/kamie-lehmann-04683473Learn more about how to minimize the emotional side effects of cancer: https://adventurefound.org/

Side Hustle Teachers
11 Ways to Boost Your Blog Post SEO

Side Hustle Teachers

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2022 0:02


SEO, when implemented properly over time, can provide a major boost to your blog traffic and your overall income. For each blog post you write, you need to have a clear, repeatable, SEO process to make certain that you're maximizing search engines. Follow the steps below to fully optimize every blog post you create. Strategies for improving every post's SEO 1. Write for Your Target Audience It's tempting to try to write posts that appeal to a broad audience - because you don't want to limit the number of people you reach - but focusing on your target audience is key to building strong SEO. Knowing who you're writing for, as specifically as possible, will allow you to craft content that addresses their needs, uses their language, and meets their expectations. 2. Do Keyword Research Find out what your ideal audience is searching for so that you can provide content that answers their questions, and include the search terms strategically in your post. (more on this below). An easy way to do this is to enter a search term into Google and look in 3 places.  Search Autofill. When you start typing your search term, Google will provide options to complete your search. These options are based on your own search history, but also common searches done by others. People Also Ask. Below the first couple of search results you'll find 3-5 other questions that other people with your inquiry have asked.  Related Searches. At the bottom of each page Google provides additional searches that others have done that are similar to what you've searched for. I also recommend that you install a free Chrome extension called Keywords Everywhere. It will provide additional insights on keywords, including long-tail keywords.  A long-tail keyword looks more like a sentence than a typical 1-2 word keyword. For example, if the keyword is “pool cleaning” the long-tail keyword might be “how to start a pool cleaning business.” 3. Add Images Images themselves don't have a direct impact on SEO, they do increase the likelihood that your post will be clicked on, which increases SEO. Be sure to use or create images for your posts that are related to the content in every post. 4. Craft a Great Title Post titles, sometimes called headlines, not only impact your SEO, but they're also a massive factor in whether or not potential readers click on your post. A great post title clearly states what the post is about, asks a question, and/ or creates curiosity in the reader. As I mentioned in the previous post, I recommend using a free tool called Headline Analyzer to create the best possible title. 5. Include Internal Links When ranking content, Google weighs the trustworthiness of websites and individual blog posts. One factor in this measure is how many other pages link to your content as a source. While links from other sites are considered to be more beneficial, links from your own posts also help.  When appropriate, link to other posts you've written. 6. Use Keywords Strategically For each post you're going to determine a primary keyword. This keyword (or short phrase) should be used in specific places and ways to maximize your SEO return. Title. Your keyword should be included in the title of your post, preferably phrased the same way, but there is some flexibility. URL. Like the title, you want to format your url to include your keyword. Meta Description. If you installed the Yoast plugin I recommended last week, there is a space for you to create a meta description. This is the 160 character description that appears in search engine results. Headers. Not only do headers help organize your content and make it easier to read, they're read by Google differently than the body of your post. Headings are assumed to be an outline of your ideas or key points. The largest header, known as H1, should include the post keyword. Typically WordPress sets your post title as H1, so if you've included the keyword in the title, that's set. You can use the keyword in lower level headers as well. In content. Within the blog posts that you create, it's beneficial for your blog post SEO to use your keyword. You can also use variations on that keyword - like those you'd find in a related search - and 1-2 long-tail keywords you discovered during your research. Image Names. When you upload images to WordPress, give each image a title that includes the keyword. This not only boosts SEO, it also makes finding images easier.  Additionally, when you insert an image into a post, be sure to include the keyword in the alt-tag (also called alt-text). 7. Stick to Your Niche Google doesn't like to be confused. If the posts that you publish each week aren't related to the niche you've chosen, it will negatively impact your SEO. When you stay on topic it serves to strengthen your authority with search engines. 8. Build Backlinks As your reach grows and you build relationships with other bloggers you will find your own blog posts being cited as a source for others. This builds your authority with search engines and helps them see you as a trusted source.  Even if others aren't linking to you within their content, you can earn backlinks by guest posting or being featured on other websites.  Search engines also place higher value on backlinks from highly trusted sources, so choose your collaborators wisely. Strategies for improving your site's SEO Try these tricks for getting more bang for your SEO buck site-wide. 9. Update Old Content If you've got content on your site that's more than a year old, review it to see if any data needs to be updated, or if the content is still accurate. Depending on your niche, things can change quickly. You'll also want to check for broken links or other links that don't go where you want them to anymore. Use a free tool like this one to run a site-wide check. 10. Focus on Page Speed Search engines factor in your page's speed when ranking your posts, but that's not the only way speed can impact your SEO. Your bounce rate and the average length of time people spend on your page are also part of the algorithm, and they're affected by page speed as well. Check out this post from HubSpot on how to improve your site speed.  11. Make Your Posts Mobile Friendly With society being increasingly dependent on our phones, is it any wonder that making every aspect of your site mobile-friendly is a necessity. If you have the Divi Theme on your website, be sure to use the tool that allows you to check what each page looks like on mobile devices. Remember that SEO takes time to have a measurable impact on your blog. If you put consistent effort in and focus on Rule #1 (provide value first), your audience, following, and income will grow! If you want to know how to build, grow, and start making money from your blog, check out Teacher Blog Academy. The only program created specifically for teachers, by a teacher, that will show you how to create a profitable blog! Learn more at teacherblogacademy.com

The Empowered Spirit Show
Summer Teachings from the Medicine Wheel

The Empowered Spirit Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 30:02


This episode is being brought to you by Forecast located in Homewood Alabama. Forecast is a hair salon on a mission to shape a movement in the beauty industry focusing on education, fashion and creativity. Forecast strives to train stylists with the latest in education to provide their guests with the latest trends. Follow them on instagram @forecastsalon or find them online at https://www.forecastsalon.com/ As this podcast goes to air, we have just gone through the last full moon of Spring.  It is definitely time to move forward and into Summer which official begins on Tuesday, June 21 as we move into the sun sign of Cancer.  Cancer is about the inner feelings… your emotions.. your intuition and learning how to lead with your innate ability to know… and see and hear and feel. Summer is a time to work on yourself and your ability to be the light. It's a time to slow down and nurture yourself as you find meaning in your journey. Summer is a time to have patience, both with the seeds you planted in the spring and with yourself. It's a time to understand that uncertainty always exists and sometimes you need to sit in the space of the unknown to grow. As we continue to move around the wheel of life, feel the energy shift around you as you prepare for the next three months and the next three Sun seasons: Cancer, Leo, and Virgo. Feel the subtle changes as the energy begins to settle for spring. Slow down and ask yourself what you need to restore your Spirit as you hold space for yourself to come into full bloom. Knowing  your energy ... your truth … your voice.. your Spirit is so valuable at this time. And that's where the RITES come in to help you move through all this stuff! Rites being Reiki.. intuition.. tarot.. eft and stones and crystals. Finding way to tend to the struggles of your life with these tools can add inspiration, amusement and joy. Energy Focus for the Week – live on Sunday nights on Instagram and FB. We talk about what's going on, we align our energy, set intentions  for the week and I pull the Tarot cards for guidance. Join us or catch the replay! As we move through these comic transitions, now is the time to clean up your energy with an Energy Clearing session.  Schedule one now... in person or online. When you work with the energy body, it helps to release the old patterns and all that old stuff you carry around.  Empowered Spirit Private Mentoring Program. Schedule a Spiritual Upgrade Breakthrough call with me and let's talk about how my programs can help you. In today's episode and before I jump into an awesome summer lineup of guest that I am so excited to bring to you,  I wanted to offer a teaching from the Medicine Wheel about the Summer Energy with a guided walk around this great Wheel of Life. The circular shape of the medicine wheel represents the idea that life continues on in an unending circle where time has no true beginning or end. Similarly, we believe that our spirits have always existed here in some form or another, and will continue to exist once we are gone. Depending on whose Medicine Wheel you are seeing, what culture they are from, and what they were taught regarding the importance of the Wheel, the finer details of the Wheel may differ slightly. What is important is to understand the fundamentals of the Wheel and to find lessons from it that help you to live a better, happier life.  I offer you my understanding and experience with these teaching. The powers of the South and the season of Summer are manifestation, growth and understanding. This journey through the season teaches you to focus your thoughts and dreams and bring them into reality.  To find patience with yourself. To allow for the growth..   Allow these teachings to help you understand your connection to Creator, to Source, as you open your heart to the vibrations of Summer. As you connect your Spirit with Creator, Source, Light .. I offer this blessing… May this summer season offer you a chance to open your heart… to allow yourself to be nurtured and guided with the energies of this powerful direction. May you learn how to manifest and co-create your life in ways that will make your dreams come true in the physical world. May you find peace and joy in the splashing of water. May you find passion in the heat of the longs nights. May you walk with grace as you allow for your courage and strength to make your dreams a physical reality. May you feel the wildness of your Spirit this season. Thanks again for listening. Many blessings for the Summer season! To your Spirit, Terri PS.....Come learn how to apply these teachings in the Energy Mastery App. Sign up now for the 21 Day Radiant Light Challenge which begins on the Summer Solstice! Get the Energy Mastery App.  A few minutes of Energy Medicine everyday can create a change in your life.    

Church Historia
Reverse, Reverse: The Byzantine Debate Over Icons

Church Historia

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 38:46


The path to orthodoxy was never a clear one for Christianity and one of the great debates, especially in the Byzantine Empire, was over the use of icons in worship. Depending on who you talked to and when, icons were either tools for devotion or idols of the most vile kind. In the 8th and 9th centuries, the Byzantine empire changed its stance on iconography several times, and each time, the new position was declared orthodox by church leadership and the imperial throne. The story of iconoclasm, and its reversal, makes us ask ourselves how much majority rule plays in establishing the norms of the church. It challenges us to think critically about the “why” behind what we believe and to contemplate the diversity of church and its many threads.

Podcast Domination Show: Podcasting Growth & Monetization Tips to Dominate
5 Things You Need Start A Successful & Profitable Podcast

Podcast Domination Show: Podcasting Growth & Monetization Tips to Dominate

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 31:32


http://riverside.fm/ (Riverside.fm), the leading tool for podcast and video recordings. Visit http://riverside.fm/ (riverside.fm) and use code LUIS to get 15% off a membership plan. Today I'm going to talk about exactly what you need to launch your podcast. Depending on who you ask, people either say it's easy or it's very difficult to start a podcast. In this episode, I will share five key things you need to nail down to start a successful and profitable podcast. So make sure you stick around and take some notes. In this episode:  [3:54] Nailing down the concept and hook [8:27] Packaging (artwork) and naming your podcast so it stands out [14:12] Launching with the right category (ideally you can choose 6 categories) [16:31] The best ways to drive traffic to your podcast [20:41] Are your listeners staying or do they leave after the first minute?

Guide to the Unknown « TalkBomb

[VIDEO VERSION HERE] The Ring is an American horror classic based on a Japanese horror classic based on a series of books. And we're giving an overview of it all! Listen and learn about the movies, the books...and another one of the author's books printed on a roll of toilet paper. RINGU indeed! For full sources and links, visit http://www.gttupod.com/home/gttu240 Support GTTU on Patreon! Depending on the tier you choose, you get one, two, our FOUR full bonus episodes per month, a private Discord, and more at patreon.com/gttupod. Thank you so much! See everything GTTU-related at gttupod.com. Watch videos of all of our episodes at youtube.com/gttupod Follow us online: https://www.instagram.com/gttupod https://www.facebook.com/gttupod https://www.twitter.com/gttupod Join our private Facebook group at facebook.com/groups/gttupod

The Blade and Chalice Podcast - Get Aligned during Turbulent Times!
Episode 057 - Astrogeography: The Astrology of Place (with Sarah Robinson)

The Blade and Chalice Podcast - Get Aligned during Turbulent Times!

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 56:04


Ever wondered why 2 people experience the same place completely differently?  There's a reason for this and it just might lie in the stars.Astrology is a best-kept secret of royalty and billionaires. Astrology is a tool that can be used by anybody to strategise for fair or foul. Did you know that astrology can show us how different places impact us personally?One's astrogeography map offers insight, clarity and inspiration on where in the world is supportive or challenging for us. Some people realise they are best-suited to where they are born, others see that they'll find their stride across the seas.Depending on what our current focus is, for example broadcasting a message/focusing on romance etc, we can use astrogeography to steer our ship to the most supportive location to visit, reside or bring in remotely; often bringing in that coordinate through something like music is enough to completely shift the game.Follow Octave Leap on our Social Platforms:IG:  https://www.instagram.com/octaveleap/Telegram: https://t.me/octaveleapWebsite: https://www.octaveleap.comTwitter: https://twitter.com/Dk_octaveleap

Bright Side
Science Explains How Much Sleep You Need Depending on Your Age

Bright Side

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 11:56


How to Get Enough Sleep for Your Age. People usually think that 7–8 hours of sleep is enough, but that's not always the case. In fact, the number of hours you need to enjoy proper sleep depends and stay healthy depends on your age. Follow some simple rules to restore energy and get the most out of your recharge time. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Selling With Social Sales Podcast
Email Marketing Strategies & Best Practices with William Ballance, #209

Selling With Social Sales Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 43:38


The B2B sales landscape has shifted from the phone to the email inbox. With the average consumer being bombarded with over 5,000 sales and marketing messages every day – knowing how to stand out in the inbox is what most sellers are struggling with. But, the key to getting your cold outreach messages read and responded to comes down to nailing a few important email strategies. And, those specific (and winning) email marketing strategies are exactly the topic of discussion in this episode of the Modern Selling Podcast. My guest, William Ballance is not just the expert in everything email marketing, but his company is leading the way in how B2B sellers are crafting sales messages and engaging with prospects in new and innovative ways. William Ballance is the CEO of Lavender.ai, a psychology-driven tool designed to help sellers write better emails faster by leveraging cutting-edge AI insights on individuals' personalities. So, if you've ever wondered how to get in the inbox and stay there – this is the episode to download and listen to all the way to the end! In our in-depth discussion we dive deep into what's working now to draw in the distracted, post-pandemic buyer, what sales teams should be saying in their email outreach, and the “sales formula” to get a response – every time! Be sure you download this episode and pay particular attention to what William says is really driving response rates! How has email marketing changed since the pandemic? The B2B selling environment today is very different than it was three years ago. I wanted to pick William's brain and get a better understanding of what he's seeing in the market and why it's becoming harder to get sales meetings via email. What he shares gave me a whole new perspective on the topic, “Many sales teams did a lot of selling by phone. But with COVID and the world immediately going online or working remotely, office numbers suddenly didn't work. So, if you didn't have mobile numbers, you had no choice but to shift to email. Data shows that there has been a 16% immediate increase in outbound sales emails and an 8% decline in response rates. Why? Because overnight there was immediately more noise.” This is spot-on as researchers have found that the number of emails being sent is at an all-time high. Microsoft found that between 2021 and 2022, some 40 billion more emails have been sent.  With this astronomical increase in what I call “digital pollution” there's no wonder that so many sales outreach messages go unread. Listen to the full conversation to hear what William suggests sales teams do to break through the email noise and land in front of prospects at the right time with the right messages. Should B2B sellers send more emails to get more responses? This is a common question we hear a lot in B2B sales circles. Does sending more email outreach messages actually equate to better response rates? I wanted to see what William's data shows, “Even though we're using email more, it's not necessarily increasing our results. Where it normally took 8 to 12 touches to get a response. It's now taking anywhere between 12 to 16 touches to get a response by a buyer. So, we are sending more emails but with fewer results. Why not shift how we do things and send the right messages that get immediate responses?” This sales mindset shift is exactly what we teach at Vengreso in our PVC Methodology. The goal is not to arbitrarily send emails to eventually get a response, but, instead to send messages that are hyper-personalized and designed to pull prospects in – even with the first outreach. When B2B buyers get hundreds, if not thousands of sales messages every week, it's easy to get lost in the flood of emails in their inbox. What modern sellers do well is they know how to draw prospects in with their subject lines, what to say in the email opener, and how to make their messages so succinct and compelling that prospects want to read them and take action. I ask William to explain the process he teaches sales teams to take to craft winning and (highly readable) emails. His approach involves what he calls a “one scroll” method. That is you want to include your entire outreach message in no more than one scroll so that prospects get the information they need without having to read for more than 15 seconds. To hear other must-dos when it comes to your email marketing, listen to the entire episode and pay close attention to the “new” word count William suggests you hit with every email. What are B2B sales emails best practices? Depending on who you ask, this could be a loaded question. The important thing to note when crafting a sales email is to think first about who you're sending it to. I find that so often sales professionals send generic, copy-and-paste sales emails that lack personality or any form of personalization. This makes it easy for them to go unread because they're like the hundreds of other emails vying for attention in your buyers' inbox. I wanted to see what unique strategies or best practices William uses and sees that work thanks to his innovative email AI technology. He highly recommends that B2B sellers do the following: Go with short emails. And when William says short, he means no more than 50-75 words short. In his research, he's found that the average reading attention span is now 15-30 seconds max. Don't overcomplicate your email. Many times sellers include everything under the sun in their emails. Williams suggests making your email short and easy enough to read that a fifth grader would understand it. Make your email highly relevant. Personalization is important, but make sure how you personalize your email is relevant to the reader. Mentioning that you share an alma mater or have a similar interest can miss the mark if it has nothing to do with why you are reaching out. William shares even more tips and tricks that are moving the sales email needle in the episode. Download the full conversation to get all of his psychology-based principles and proven email strategies. Should you include your Calendly link in your sales emails? Listen in to find out what it could really be doing to your response rate!

My Smart Retirement
Ep 358: Mailbag – Should I Wait to Get Back into the Market?

My Smart Retirement

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 18:23


Let's open up the mailbag and answer some of our listener's questions about retirement, market volatility, and more. Wanda says, “With my 6 siblings I inherited a 70-acre farm. 4 of my siblings want to sell and the rest of us want to keep it. Is it worth trying to buy out the rest of the farm? Or should we argue until we get to keep it all?” We definitely don't recommend arguing it out with your siblings. The four that want to sell it are in the majority so you'd probably lose out on that. We've seen too many family members fight during an estate settlement. If it's possible to buy out the rest of the farm, that's probably your best approach. Certainly, have a unified plan with your siblings that want to keep it. Marty has been out of the market for several years. He's missed out on a lot of growth. Should he wait to jump back in if there is a market crash? There are no right answers in the market. We can't predict whether there will be a crash or not. We suggest developing a long-term investment strategy. Depending on how far away you are from retirement determines how much risk you can take on. Investing does involve a degree of volatility. Sometimes staying the course can be a bit intimidating, but preparing your plan to withstand volatility is your best approach. Check out the full episode or use the timestamps below to hear a specific segment. 1:27 – Have you seen Top Gun? 2:55 – “Is it worth buying out the farm my siblings and I inherited? 7:52 – “Should I stay out of the market in case there is a crash?” 10:08 – Breaking down volatility 16:15 – You are doing this for the long term   For more, visit us online at http://flemingfinancialservices.com 

Sustainable Winegrowing with Vineyard Team
137: The Pierce's Disease and Glassy-winged Sharpshooter Board

Sustainable Winegrowing with Vineyard Team

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 22:58


Invasive pests and diseases are a challenge for all grape growers. Research is vital to develop new strategies and solutions. The Pierce's Disease/Glassy-Winged Sharpshooter Board was established nearly two decades ago to allocate funding to the most promising research projects. Kristin Lowe, Research Coordinator at the Pierce's Disease and Glassy-Winged Sharpshooter Board and President of Vine Balance Consulting shares how projects are funded through a rigorous scientific review and screening panel. Also, learn about some of the most exciting projects including “pathogen confusion” to control Pierce's Disease from Dr. Steve Lindow and a gene editing technology for grapevines using plant protoplasts Dr David Tricoli. References: 89: New Pierce's Disease Vaccine (podcast) 2021 Pierce's Disease Research Projects at a Glance 2021 Pierce's Disease Research Symposium Proceedings 2021 Pierce's Disease Research Symposium session recordings 2022-07-16 Night Harvest Lighting & SWEEP Grants Tailgate About the PD/GWSS Board Biological Control of Pierce's Disease of Grape by an Endophytic Bacterium CDFA Pierce's Disease Research Symposium SIP Certified Sustainable Ag Expo November 14-16, 2022 Vine Balance Consulting Get More Subscribe wherever you listen so you never miss an episode on the latest science and research with the Sustainable Winegrowing Podcast. Since 1994, Vineyard Team has been your resource for workshops and field demonstrations, research, and events dedicated to the stewardship of our natural resources. Learn more at www.vineyardteam.org. Transcript Craig Macmillan  0:00  I'm your host Craig Mcmillan. And with me today is Kristin Lowe, president of Vine Balance Consulting, and research coordinator for the Pierce's Disease Glassy-Winged Sharpshooter Board. Welcome, Kristin.   Kristin Lowe  0:12  Thank you so much for having me.   Craig Macmillan  0:13  First off, can you tell us what is the Pierce's Disease and Glassy-Winged Sharpshooter Board or the PDGWSS? As I want to call it from now on?   Kristin Lowe  0:21  Absolutely. So the PDGWSS Board is a group of California growers or grower producers. There's 14 board members and also one public member. And their primary goal is to make sure that all of the assessment funds that are received to the board go to the most promising research for our most challenging pests and diseases today. Those that are designated as important problems.   Craig Macmillan  0:48  And so the funding comes from an assessment.   Kristin Lowe  0:50  That is correct. So the assessment, I believe, on average is about $1.50 per $1,000 of grapes in terms of value .The most, the cap is at $3 per 1000 grapes in value. But yes, that's collected every year and has been so since the board started back in 2001.   Craig Macmillan  1:13  What led to the creation of the board?   Kristin Lowe  1:15  Pierce's Disease. So. Well, I think anyone who's looked into the history of Pierce's Disease, so this is a bacterial disease, endemic to California, not not necessarily new to California, right. But what was new to California was not only the establishment, but the fact that the Glassy-Winged Sharpshooter started thriving down in Southern California. That is the vector for Pierce's Disease. That insect exists in parts of Mexico and also parts of Florida and the Southeast US. But it got to California, and it started doing really well to the point that Pierce's disease started taking off. This led to a lot of sad looking pictures of dead vines, lots of concern over lost acreage, and this would be during the late 1990s or so. And in response to this, industry leaders from all different groups came together. A combination of industry USDA, UC California researchers, CDFA, to create the Pierce's Disease Control Program. And that's got many facets, but one of it is the PDGWSS Board, which whose mission is to fund the most important research to combat Pierce's Disease, Glassy-Winged Sharpshooter and all the other pests that they've designated in their RFP.   Craig Macmillan  2:31  Yeah. And so the the mission is expanded now beyond just Glassy-Wing to a number of other invasive pests that correct?   Kristin Lowe  2:37  Yeah, it has it has. And there's, there's a clear path for that. And I think what really blew that open was the European Grapevine Moth. So another invasive pest species that showed up, oh, gosh, and I think that was somewhere around 2011 or so maybe a little bit before, but agriculture always has a new bad guy. And so we needed a way for the for the PDGWSS board to, you know, expand what it was going to fund in terms of research to deal with new problems and, and continuing ones that keep coming back.   Craig Macmillan  3:08  So what exactly is your role with the board?   Kristin Lowe  3:11  Sure. So, they put out a call for proposals for a research coordinator last year, and I got the job, very excited. And so my goal is to kind of basically help guide the program to make sure that what we're funding is really on point to, to our goal, on point to making sure that the research is heading in the right direction, it's we get continual progress, and is also able to collaborate with, you know, get foster collaboration with other agencies, we have this general sense that we've been going since 2001. And there's been a lot of really great research going on for Pierce's Disease. These days, our problems might be different. And so the RFP expanded, also to include grapevine viruses. And those seem to be a real multi headed monster, for the industry for many levels. So I think that while my overall goal is just to make sure that the research funding program is focused and relevant, we're starting to look a lot more closely at visruses.   Craig Macmillan  4:20  And RFPs  is Request for Proposals?   Kristin Lowe  4:22  Correct RFP is the request for proposals.   Craig Macmillan  4:25  Okay, so academics, scientists, will write up a proposal of what they want to do research wise, and they bring it to the board, and the board, evaluates them and decides, hey, would give some money to this, we'll give some money to that.   Kristin Lowe  4:39  Yes, absolutely. So we coordinate with other funding agencies and for the wine industry and actually for the whole wine and grape industry, not just in California, but in Oregon as well. And we all put out a request for proposals on the same date, December 1. And that after a couple months that closes and we look atthe proposals and they go through the PDGWSS Board, they go through scientific review, pretty stringent scientific review, and then also our research screening panel process. And ultimately, the Board makes the final decision on what gets funded within that year.   Craig Macmillan  5:14  Cool. So tell us about some of these projects. I mean, it's been 20 years. What's happened? What are some of the ones that you are excited about? Or remember are really proud of?   Kristin Lowe  5:23  Yeah, oh, there's so many. And I am I am so nervous about like glossing over things or missing details that I'm going to take this opportunity to tell everybody that there's some great resources on our website that you can, that you can look at to get more details. And that is cdfa.ca.gov/PDCP/research. And on there you can look at, there's a document that says projects at a glance, just great layman's layman person summaries of all of the research has been going on. There's our entire research symposium proceedings, and some recordings as well of   Craig Macmillan  6:05  Yes,   Kristin Lowe  6:06  ... recent one. So, you know, because this is public assessment money, this information should be available to everyone in the industry. So we work really hard to keep that website updated.   Craig Macmillan  6:16  And we will have links to all of those on the page.   Kristin Lowe  6:19  Okay, cool. Cool. Cool. Okay, so some science.   Craig Macmillan  6:23  Yes!   Kristin Lowe  6:23  Have you heard Dr. Steve Lindow talk about his work on Paraburkholderia?   Craig Macmillan  6:29  No, I haven't.   Kristin Lowe  6:31  You haven't? I thought he I thought he presented at this Sustainable Ag Expo a few years ago, but maybe I'm mistaken.   Craig Macmillan  6:37  No, he may have been I may not have been there.   Kristin Lowe  6:40  Yeah, yeah. So Dr. Steve Lindow, is at UC Davis. And he made a crazy exciting discovery, there is a endophytic bacteria called Paraburkholderia phytofirmans, I'll just call it like, Paraburkholderia. That's enough of a mouthful.   Craig Macmillan  6:57  That's enough, yeah.   Kristin Lowe  6:58  And it inhibits the movement of xylella fastidiosa. So of the Pierce's Disease controlling or the organism responsible for Pierce's Disease, within the vine. So this endophytic bacteria, if you put it in the vine, at the same time, that's Xylella, in there, it not only moves throughout the vine, so it becomes systemic, but it inhibits the movement of the pathogen. So this is kind of huge. This species has been looked at before for for other reasons. But what this basically is, we're hoping that it leads to, is an infield treatment with an endophytic bacteria. So his work has involved figuring out, first of all the mechanism. But second of all, the practical aspect of this, which is what I love about it. It seems to work best when the two organisms are there together. So there's a timing of you know, do we pre inoculate with endophytic bacteria, and then it gets Xylella. That works. Or if a vine has been infected with Xylella, and then you are able to treat it with a Paraburkholderia. It also helps to not only the reduce the Xylella count, but reduce symptoms.   Craig Macmillan  8:14  How do you introduce it this thing into the vine?   Kristin Lowe  8:18  Oh, right. Yeah, first of all, with a pinprick basically. So an inoculation, I don't think everyone out there is going to want to go through and inoculate every vine. So they are working on a sprayable formulation. And to be able to actually get that into the vine, as well. And it seems to work with certain types of surfactants. So that's kind of where that technology is at is, you know, how do we create, you know, how do we create a usable product with it? What's going to work the best in the field? What's, what's the most practical in terms of rate, and timing? And in getting the endophytic bacteria into the vines?   Craig Macmillan  8:54  That's, that's amazing. That's definitely amazing. Endophytic bacteria is something that lives inside the plant.   Kristin Lowe  9:00  Yes, it is naturally there, there are 1000s of them and 1000s have been tried to see if they first of all actually move throughout the plant rather than in just the place that you found them. And second, if they are going to work against any sort of pathogens. Yeah, an amazing discovery and work that's been going on for for years and is I believe, is finally in the stages of getting to field trials and seeing how it would work. But imagine if you could go out to your block that you know is going to get pressure every year and think that you could decrease that pressure with with a spray. Never, I mean PD kills vines, that's huge. And in areas with constant pressure, it kills just more and more every year. So to have that sort of infield treatment is pretty exciting.   Craig Macmillan  9:45  Is this the kind of project that would receive funding over many years or multiple years from the board?   Kristin Lowe  9:49  Absolutely. And I don't remember when it first started. Definitely preceded my time there, but I think I've been following it since at least 2016.   Craig Macmillan  9:52  Oh, wow. Okay.   Kristin Lowe  9:52  No, it takes time from you know, discovery not only to making sure it's going to work, and then and then there's all this stuff after to get it actually implemented. But most of these projects that are going to result in a long term sustainable solution, or long term projects, you need years of data to make sure that they're gonna work.   Craig Macmillan  10:17  Science takes time.   Kristin Lowe  10:19  It takes time. I know, we're always impatient about that. But it does definitely take time.   Craig Macmillan  10:25  And support.   Kristin Lowe  10:26  Yeah, yeah.   Craig Macmillan  10:27  What's, what's something else that you're excited about?   Kristin Lowe  10:30  Okay, another one that's pretty exciting and groundbreaking is work by Dr. David Tricoli. And he's at the UC Davis Plant Transformation Facility. Have you heard of him at all?   Craig Macmillan  10:42  No, no.   Kristin Lowe  10:43  Okay. So he's doing has done something that might sound simple, but it opens up a wealth of options for future research. He's developed a cell culture method for regenerating a grapevine from a cell Protoplast. So you might remember back from biology, major differences between animals and plants. Plants are surrounded by a cell wall, animal cells, plant cells. Animal cells are not. When some of the like gene editing technology is coming out that's happening in animal cells, it's a lot easier to do, because they don't have the cell wall. Previous to this work, no one's been able to regenerate a grapevine from just a Protoplast. Without a cell wall. What this work has done is enabled there to be a platform of getting a group of grape cells together, just their protoplasts without the cell wall, onto which you could potentially do CRISPR Cas9, or some of the other fast developing gene editing techniques that are out there.   Craig Macmillan  11:45  This this is a technology I've heard repeatedly, and I'm I have no idea what the acronym stands for. And I'm not really sure I understand what it does. So what is CRISPR? Yeah,   Kristin Lowe  11:55  and I'm not going to tell you exactly what the acronym stands for either. To me, but so Cas9 is is a gene editing technology that allows for very, very precise small changes in a gene or in a genome. Ultimately, when done for plants by multiple steps later, it can result in a plant that's retained this small edit, but has absolutely no foreign DNA. And unlike a traditional GMO, that would have external DNA from a plasmid or from some other plant, this one is I can kind of think of it as like a lucky or benevolent mutation occurred. And you can't tell but it was purposeful. And and the result is a different phenotype that, that you can see. CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing is it's been out there for a number of years now. But it's taken time for everyone to develop different platforms for which it could work. For plants, especially for plants that are always regenerated by cuttings. So we don't do crosses to get new grapes, we take cuttings, we need a platform to possibly be able to do this. What this work has done is developed that platform. Where it could go it completely depends you need to you need to know which you know which genes to edit, which ones are going to reduce, are going to result in a phenotype. Obviously, what's fascinating, or what's most interesting to me is disease resistance that's usually complex multigenic. So we're still a ways down there from coming up with a with a solution. But the fact that the platform was developed, was actually a major breakthrough.   Craig Macmillan  13:35  That's phenomenal. So that's research that was done. It's gonna open the door for new research?   Kristin Lowe  13:40  Potentially, exactly. I mean, you can hear about CRISPR-Cas9 and the news happening to everything else, but but not the crop you're interested in until someone figures out that they're all different. Right?   Craig Macmillan  13:52  Right, right. What, is their other pests that have come into the catalogue that you think are interesting in that people are doing interesting work on?   Kristin Lowe  13:59  Our most recent designated past is the Spotted Lantern Fly, we do not have that one yet. Depending on who you ask it seems inevitable that's making its way steadily west from Pennsylvania. And so that's one that the Board and has its eye on for for sure. But we don't have it yet, but we're accepting proposals for it. Because we're trying to be ready. It's actually pretty rare that you can eradicate a, an invasive pest. The fact that California did it with a European Grapevine Moth is it is an amazing example. What's next right? Yeah, so Spotted Lantern Fly is probably next on our horizon is being something that would certainly be problematic if it got here, and you know, trying to stay ahead about research to understand how it would and could be controlled.   Craig Macmillan  14:52  Does the does the board fund research in states other than Oregon and California?    Kristin Lowe  14:56  The board funds researchers. So we do have PIs from from out of state and from not from the West Coast. Absolutely. The Board funds projects, obviously, they have to have some applicability to what we're, what our problems are and what we're concerned with. But yeah, there's no real state, state by state guideline.   Craig Macmillan  15:16  Right. Right. Right. Well, you know, you mentioned the review process. I just want to shift gears to that. What are the boxes that need to be checked or the hurdles that need to be cleared to get a project funded? What are the what are the criteria that the board and the written in the reviewers are looking for?   Kristin Lowe  15:31  Oh, sure. Well, I believe it's even just out there when we send up the call for proposals. But it just basically has to be really good science. It needs to be well, you know, well justified that there's either preliminary data or an excellent premise from a different crop. Or another reason why this idea would work. There have to be sound and detailed materials and methods that are laid out there has to be good experimental design, especially when you get to the field level, right, proper controls, proper replication, the stats will have to work, right, all of those things, the budget needs to be reasonable, all those sorts of things for sure.   Craig Macmillan  16:09  Which reminds me how much money is available each year?   Kristin Lowe  16:12  It varies. So it will it will depend on on the assessment. And I'm not the numbers person, I'm more the idea person. But I yeah, I have something that could find a figure for you for later. But I think over the 20 years, I believe I read that we have had up to somewhere between 60 and 70 million. But that's not all straight for research. It also goes to the Person's Disease control program treatments for battling Glassy-Winged Sharpshooter outbreaks and some of those control.   Craig Macmillan  16:44  So what is the one thing related to this that you would recommend to our listeners? How can we how can we help?   Kristin Lowe  16:51  Oh, that's a great question. How can you help. Well, stay stay engaged. Make sure that everyone all the way up the chain knows what your problems are. And and what, you know what what you really need. This is grower money, that for this particular funding program, there are other agencies out there that are simply donation only, not for profit. But I would say, so this is assessment money so it's a little bit unique. But I would say in general, your problems are not unique. And, I mean, we all we're all dealing with some of the same problems. And we have to come together as an industry to, you know, industry to help solve them. A, stay informed, work with researchers. One of the hardest things is for researchers to find field trials or fields that will let them come do some experimentation. They're always looking for industry partners, as sources of sick vines, helping to track patterns, helping to try new technology, just to collect data. Collaborators like that are always needed.   Craig Macmillan  17:57   I think that's some great encouragement. I think that's a great message. Don't be afraid to be a collaborator.   Kristin Lowe  18:01  Yeah, yeah, absolutely. It gives you kind of a seat at the table. And researchers aren't growers. And so we need to have this kind of constant communication for there to be good outreach of what they found, to make sure it's applicable and that everyone understands it and and will adopt it too. The most frustrating thing is if something comes out, and people are slow to adopt it, even though it works. So staying informed about what's current, and what are what are new, good ideas.   Craig Macmillan  18:27  I think that's important. So pay attention.   Kristin Lowe  18:30  Yeah, get out there to grow our meetings and and industry meetings. And, yeah, a lot of these researchers do try very hard to do outreach. They hear you if you're if you're there and are showing up for the conversation.   Craig Macmillan  18:43  If I wanted to be a collaborator, how can I make myself available?   Kristin Lowe  18:46  Oh, gosh, that's a good question. Well, first of all, you would need to know what was going on. So you would need to need to, you know, go to meetings, listen to these people talk, you know, decide if you have similar problems. Almost all of them pass up their email and say, Look, yeah, I've got a place where I've got this, this issue going on. I've you know, been dealing with virus or I've been near dealing with Pierce's Disease. And do you need a field? You know, do you need data set? Some sort of field data or collaboration or a field site? Yeah.   Craig Macmillan  19:16  Well, that's fantastic. That's great advice. Where can people find out more about you?   Kristin Lowe  19:21  Oh, me personally? Okay, well, sure. I've been I started a consulting company almost 10 years ago, and my website is vinebalancedconsulting.com. I am largely based out of the Napa-Sonoma area, and keep in my toe in the research world because it's exciting. And viticulture is a science. That's one reason why I love it.   Craig Macmillan  19:44  It's nice to talk somebody loves science. Yeah. I love talking about science. It's so much fun. Well, I think it's time today I want to thank Kristin Lowe, who is the Research Coordinator for the Pierces Disease/Glassy-Winged Sharpshooter Board and President of Vine Balance Consulting. Check out the website we'll have links and notes of where to go and we look forward to talking to you again.   Kristin Lowe  20:08  You're most welcome. Thank you for the opportunity. Have a great growing season.   Transcribed by https://otter.ai

The Wait For It Podcast
Up High, Down Low! - Hamilton

The Wait For It Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 28:33


@PhilTheFilipino & @MrEricAlmighty return for our newest series called Up High Down Low, where we take a topic, and come up with a best/worst ranking list!  For this episode, we rank our 3 most played and 3 least played songs from Hamilton, setting ourselves up to be judged forever. Let us know if you enjoy this series on our social media pages and what you would like us to do next! Looking for bonus content to binge? Make sure to also check out The Wait For It Podcast YouTube Page!

Wellspring of Life Church
How Is Your Vision?

Wellspring of Life Church

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 40:03


Depending on your world view, determines how you make your decisions and choices. Hopefully you see with eyes of truth that come from a biblical world view, which will give you the ability to see life from God's perspective. By Marilyn Bartlett

Wealthy Wellthy Wise
Get Good Sleep w/Todd & Tara Youngblood

Wealthy Wellthy Wise

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 61:48


My guests this week are a Power Couple, and also serial entrepreneurs with a passion for bringing new products to market. With over $300M in revenue creation, current focus is on improving sleep with the Chilisleep and sleep.me platform. Please meet Todd and Tara Youngblood. Let's Chat... Are you an avid nap-taker? Depending on your body type, you might be! If you are, Todd + Tara share that it is best to take a nap after lunch because your chronotype is dropping your core body temperature, which is what is facilitating that.  There are different levels of rest… even different levels of napping! It is important to really examine your schedule and then manage your sleep to get what you need. You need 2 hours of REM sleep and then 2 hours of deep sleep. Be thoughtful with YOUR life!  Ask yourself: what's NOT working? Because then you can gain awareness, clarity, and therefore change. Let's overcome these obstacles! “Overcoming the next obstacle is what successful entrepreneurs do…” – Todd  "Pressure produces results." – Todd Topics Discussed in Episode: Entrepreneurship Raising outside capital Start up Positive impact of delayed gratification Links: Chilisleep Chilisleep Discount Link (WealthyWellthy20 is the code) Instagram LinkedIn

Things You Should Know
7 Benefits of Spending Time in Nature

Things You Should Know

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 49:57


Join Newsletter get Free Gift:https://mailchi.mp/5e4f8e9f90e7/untitled-pageSponsors contact us here: vkbennett@gmail.com**Book: A little book of self care BREATHWORKhttps://amzn.to/3OiGtYLeave us a VoiceMailhttps://www.speakpipe.com/thingsyoushouldknow**Support the Podcast**SuperCast: https://thingsyoushouldknow.supercast.comPatreon:  https://www.patreon.com/thingsyoushouldknowpodcast**Social Media***Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/879254746173653Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thing.syoushouldknow/**Fitness, Yoga and Mindfulness**Alo Moves: https://www.talkable.com/x/rSpBAv**Free 30 day trial / Yoga, Mindfulness and Meditation-------------------------------------------------------------7 Benefits of Spending Time in NatureBenefits of spending time in nature Increased feelings of calmnessIncreased endorphin levels and dopamine production (promotes happiness)Restored capacity for concentration and attentionReduced symptoms of anxiety and depressionReduced irritabilityLowered blood pressure and reduced cortisol (stress hormone)Reduced feelings of isolationGetting the most out of your time in natureStudies show that a minimum of 2 hours a week spent in nature, either at one time or over several visits, is needed to significantly increase your health and well being. Two hours may sound like a lot when you're balancing school, personal time, and potentially work – but your health is worth the investment!Ensure the place you choose to go feels safe. Time in nature is only a stress antidote if you are able to properly relax and embrace the experience.To maximize the health benefits of being in nature, try your best to be present. Take deep breaths and pause to listen to the sounds around you.While a walk in the woods will help combat stress, try moving your workout outdoors. When performed regularly, exercising in nature can reduce the risk of mental health problems by up to 50%.The Practice of Forest BathingThe term ‘Forest Bathing' references a physiological and psychological practice that first emerged in Japan in the 1980s. The exercise, also known as ‘Shinrin-yoku', was developed to achieve two goals; antidote tech burnout and inspire residents to connect with and protect the country's green spaces.  Forest Bathing is open ended in practice in the sense that there is no prescription of what an individual should experience. While guided experiences exist, forest bathing can be as simple as standing in nature and engaging with the smells, sounds, and sights the area provides you. Depending on where you are the experience will differ! For example, forest bathing in Hawaii often focuses on the location's abundance of aromatic flowers and the salty breeze of the ocean,Buzzsprout - Let's get your podcast launched! Start for FREEDisclaimer: This post contains affiliate links. If you make a purchase, I may receive a commission at no extra cost to you.Support the show

Bustle
What Happens To Your Body When You Eat Before Vs. After A Workout

Bustle

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 8:53


Ever wonder if you should eat before or after a workout? Depending on when you fuel up, it'll affect your body differently — here's what to know.

Dig Me Out - The 90's rock podcast
Face To Face - Ignorance Is Bliss | Album Review

Dig Me Out - The 90's rock podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 49:55


Face To Face had established themselves over their first three albums as a skate punk band with elements of Bad Religion and Hüsker Dü. But for 1999's Ignorance Is Bliss, they purposely showed the tempos and expanded the pallet to a much more alternative rock sound. That left some fans confused, others angry, but also welcomed new listeners into the fold. Depending on whether you're a punk purist or prefer creative detours, there is plenty to enjoy on the album, which sounds confident and catchy in a way that only veteran players with songwriting chops could pull off.   Songs In This Episode: Intro - Heart of Hearts 15:37 - The Devil You Know (God Is A Man) 22:33 - Prodigal 27:26 - (A)Pathetic 40:25 - I Know What You Are Outro - Overcome   Support the podcast, join the DMO UNION at Patreon. Listen to the episode archive at DigMeOutPodcast.com.

Financially Naked
It's Expensive Outside with Sara W & Yenny

Financially Naked

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 35:41


This episode of Financially Naked: Stories from The Financial Gym is about how to get the most from summer without blowing your budget. After two years of covid life, there is a lot of travel, weddings, and other events to plan for. We all want to go out (safely) when we can, but with inflation, it's expensive outside! Sara W and Yenny, two of our Certified Financial Trainers are here to talk about how we can plan to live our best lives this summer while staying financially healthy.    Podcast Notes Start with the basics:  The first step of knowing how much money you're able to spend this summer is knowing where you are financially right now. From there you can make a plan to budget for the things you want to do! It's not easy to make a plan if you're not sure how much money you're working with.  Sara tells us that we can have anything we want, but not everything. Depending on what you want to do this summer, trade offs might have to be made. What things are you excited to do and spend money on? Once you know that, you can really focus and start planning for those things.  When making your budget, ensure there is a reasonable allowance for variable expenses and the fun things you want to do!  Think about where you can adjust spending, or how to increase your income.  How to prepare for big-ticket items this summer:  With things opening up, travel is top of mind for people this summer and many of the weddings planned for the last few years are happening now.  The best way to start saving for these expenses is by setting up a sinking fund. This is a savings account, separate from your emergency fund, where you set aside money for your goals or fun plans.  Check on any travel credits from 2020 and make sure to redeem those before they expire.  If you want more specific tips about traveling on a budget, check out these two episodes of Financially Naked: Travel Hacking & Traveling on a Budget  When thinking about weddings, in addition to travel and accommodations, make sure to plan for the other expenses such as the gift or going out with friends when you're all together.  If you're attending a few weddings this summer, use the same outfit styled different ways instead of purchasing a whole new outfit for each one.  People are more understanding now than ever, if you can't afford a big gift, that's okay! Your friends and family are happy to see you and your presence is a great present.  Tips for managing everyday expenses while enjoying the summer:  This is where the trade-offs start to come in. Go through the list of fixed expenses and scrutinize every charge. Are there things you can pause like gym memberships or streaming subscriptions that will get less use while you spend time outside?  Can you call and negotiate any insurance or interest rates? It's good to shop around and see what options are out there.  Eliminate unnecessary fees where possible, such as late fees or overdraft charges.  Are there convenience fees that can be cut? Think about picking up your dinner instead of ordering delivery. This is a great option when the weather is nice, will save you on delivery charges, and directly supports the restaurant.   Use coupon codes and rewards as much as you can. Some common examples are browser extensions like Honey or a rewards system like Rakuten.  When it feels like the spending is “out of control” Focus on a few categories. The first step is being aware of which ones impact your budget the most. Drill down on that category and see where the opportunities are.  Pay yourself first by making savings automatic. This ensures your savings goals are being met, and you can feel great about the money left over to spend on the variables.  Be intentional with your money. We work hard to make money, so it's important to think about that when we're spending it. Get creative with your plans: Make a summer bucket list of events and places you want to go. Think about all of the great ways there are to have fun for cheap or free. There are so many options out there in the summer.  Check out your city's calendar of events and see what is being offered. There are always events like parades, fairs, or fireworks shows. Going to the library is always free, and there are usually special events throughout the summer.  Spend time outdoors while the weather is nice. Take walks around the neighborhood and find parks in your neighborhood.  Picnics are a great, affordable, cheap outdoor option.  FOMO is real! How do you plan for everything you want to do and see everyone you want to see while managing the budget?  Practice boundaries and communication skills with yourself and others. If you're unable to afford certain activities with your group, suggest something else.  If you've already assessed the budget and cut in all of the areas you can, what are the other options? Is it time to talk to management about a raise, or if you're a business owner, raising your prices?  Take a look at your own life, and seek out the positive changes that can be made.    Random Three Questions What is your favorite summer activity?  What is your favorite thing to do for free?  What is your favorite summer treat?    Meet The Trainers Meet Sara W, Level 2 Certified Financial Trainer Meet Yenny , Level 2 Certified Financial Trainer

Kinky Introverts - BDSM at Home
96. Kinky 20 Questions (Brown Eyes)

Kinky Introverts - BDSM at Home

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 79:58


**WARNING: YOU MUST BE 18 YEARS OF AGE OR OLDER TO ENJOY THIS CONTENT**On today's episode, Brown Eyes asks me 20 Questions.  Initially, the plan was that I'd probably answer wrong and get hit with a bug zapping swatter but the ables quickly turned because I know my man and his balls paid the price!And remember, Patrons get Perks!  Patreon is automatically sending out merch!  Depending on which tier you select, you could get stickers, small prints, a coffee mug, or a t-shirt.  Also, if patron donations are used to fund any of the products on our Etsy page, patrons at the $5+ tiers will receive that product for free after up to 1 year of patronage (sooner, depending on production costs).·         Check out our website at kinkyintroverts.com  ·         You can also find us on Spotify, Stitcher, iTunes, Castbox, Google Podcasts, iHeartRadio, Podbay, Listen Notes, and more.  ·         Primary podcast: Kinky Introverts - BDSM at Home  ·         Vanilla podcast: Wanderlust (Travel Podcast)  ·         Email us at kinkyintroverts@gmail.com  ·         Or leave us a voicemail at *67-203-807-KINK (5465)  ·         Our socials are FetLife, Twitter, Instagram, and Reddit  ·         Creative Commons Music by Jason Shaw on Audionautix.comSupport the show

The Wait For It Podcast
Jurassic World: Dominion Review

The Wait For It Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 62:45


It's finally time for @PhilTheFilipino & @MrEricAlmighty to talk about seeing Jurassic World: Dominion on opening night. Was this a bittersweet send-off for the Jurassic franchise? Or are all the negative reviews actually true? We cover our thoughts in a spoiler free session to start the episode before deep diving into full spoilers of the movie!Shout-out to all of the content creators and Jurassic fans that sent in clips of their thoughts/score on this episode! Consider checking out their content and previous episodes we've done with them:Clever Fangirl is one of the biggest Jurassic content creators we know! You can find her on YouTube / Instagram, and check out our previous episode when we had A Jurassic Discussion with Clever Fangirl!Nicole is one of the co-hosts for TWSS Podcast. Check out our previous episode together discussing Disney+ MCU Shows on our series Tirades and Hot Takes!Tom is the host of The Jurassic Park Podcast! Check out our previous episode together discussing Jurassic World Evolution on our series The Game Room Where It Happens!Want even MORE Jurassic content? You may have missed our past episodes of Up High Down Low -OR- when we talked Jurassic Parks & Recreation with Kelly Washington! Looking for bonus content to binge? Make sure to also check out The Wait For It Podcast YouTube Page!

Two Ewes Fiber Adventures
Go Go Boots and Vinyl Pants

Two Ewes Fiber Adventures

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 12, 2022 73:13


We have winners for the Stash Busting Blanket Along! Plus project updates, camping in the Club Car and some clothing memories. Full notes with photos, links, and transcript can be found in the podcast section of our shop website: TwoEwesFiberAdventures.com Subscribe on Apple Podcasts or Subscribe on Android or Subscribe on Google Podcasts Jul Designs coupon code: 15% off with code TWOEWES. Laura Bellows Blog post series on wearing a Balinese sarong. Thank you to our patrons. To become a patron visit Patreon Page. Marsha's Projects:  Unpattern Top Down Raglan Pullover by Karen Alfke. Ben tried on the sweater and it is too big. Designers instructions were misleading so I ended up with too many stitches for the body. Need to rip back to correct number of stitches because the sweater is too big and I don't think I will have enough yarn to finish. Very frustrating. This project need to be set aside for awhile Troyggja við Mynstur (Sweater with Round Pattern) by Tora Joensen (translated by Kate Gagnon Osborne: I have finished the body and the first sleeve. Washed and blocked the sleeve to be sure the size is correct because it felt tight unwashed.  I'm spinning a 2lb bag of Manx Loaghton in my stash. This is a protected breed from the Isle of Man. I am using a woolen spun technique and have spun 5 skeins or approximately 400 yards. Spun three more bobbins that are ready to be plied. Happiness by Kyle Kunnecke using Yarn Snob Power Ball. The skein is massive, weighing 500 grams and 2,187 yards. I wound into three cakes and labeled yarn ends 1-6 so I can keep color order. In order to pull from the outside of cake, which I prefer, I am starting with #6 and working backwards. Kelly's Projects: I'm a little more than halfway done with the shortie socks out of Tomato and Mink Falkland handspun yarn. It's a 3-ply chain plied yarn. I can really see the variations in thickness since chain ply has a tendency to exaggerate the differences. I also have an overplied and unbalanced yarn. This is good for durability in socks, but is also something that can happen in a chain ply. While your fingers are doing the chaining, sometimes your feet don't slow down.  I also have a new spinning project with the remainder of the Columbia fleece. I blended this with tussah silk top that I had in my stash. It is spinning up thin so I think I'll make a 3-ply with this.  Stash-Busting Blanket Along Listen to the episode to hear the winners. Summer Spin-In  Started June 1 and goes until September 5. (US Labor Day) If you are on Instagram use #summerspinin2022. Black Sheep Gathering June 24-26 Albany, Oregon Saturday June 25 meet-up starting about 4-4:30. We will supply snacks and beverages. We can't wait to meet you! We Want to Hear You! Give us a call and tell us about your favorite LYS!  Go to speakpipe.com/twoewes and leave a message. It will take 90 seconds or less. Or you can use the voice memo app on your phone and email us the audio file. We'll put your voice feedback on the show!   Show Transcript Marsha  0:03   Hi, this is Marsha  Kelly  0:04   and this is Kelly.  Marsha  0:05   We are the Two Ewes of Two Ewes Fiber Adventures. Thanks for stopping by. Kelly  0:10   You'll hear about knitting, spinning, dyeing, crocheting, and just about anything else we can think of as a way to play with string. Marsha  0:17   We blog and post show notes at Two Ewes Fiber Adventures dot com. Kelly  0:22   And we invite you to join our Two Ewes Fiber Adventures group on Ravelry. I'm 1hundredprojects, and I am betterinmotion. We are both on Instagram and Ravelry. And we look forward to meeting you there. Both  0:36   Enjoy the Episode  Marsha  0:43   Good morning, Kelly. Kelly  0:44   Hi, Marsha. How are you? Marsha  0:46   I'm doing well. Kelly  0:47   Good. Marsha  0:48   Well, not really, though. Not really.  Kelly  0:50   Oh, really?  Marsha  0:51   Well, I'll talk about it when I get... oh, that's my teaser. But anyway, I want to hear how you're doing. Because I know you went on a camping trip. The first real camping trip in the trailer, not the show but a real camping trip. And I want to hear about it. Kelly  1:10   Oh, okay. Well, we got home yesterday. It was a short trip. Because by the time I made the reservations there weren't a lot of sites. You know, the sites that we liked, that we know we liked, that we were familiar with, because we wanted to make sure that it was an easy trip. The sites that we were familiar with were only available until Friday. So we left Tuesday, spent Tuesday night and Wednesday night and then came back yesterday. So it was a fun, quick trip. The weather was gorgeous, gorgeous weather. The campground that we like to go to is called Mount Madonna. And it's on what I think is called Hecker pass, it's a mountain pass through the Santa Cruz Mountains. The the far southern end, I would say, of the Santa Cruz Mountains between Watsonville and Gilroy.  Marsha  2:08   Okay.  Kelly  2:09   And, and I... the reason I'm making the point about where it is is because I have an idea to to float that we'll probably talk about later on in the podcast. But anyway, the trip was great. The, you know, getting in and out of our driveway part of it was successful, then we stopped at his work to let people take a look at it. And the guys that he works with were really, you know, I mean, it's it's kind of like the .... I don't, I kind of don't get it the same way. Because to me, it's about the camping experience. I mean, I think the trailer is beautiful. But I don't have like, you know how when, when men, and probably some women too... But a lot of times you'll see a classic car. And then there's all these men gathered around the classic car looking at things that I've no idea what they're looking at. Like, that's kind of the way people are when they look at the trailer. And so, you know, going to his work when he got a chance to show it off to the people that he used to work with. And they were super impressed. They'd heard a lot about it, you know, because it's been being worked on... it had been being worked on since well... We got it in December 2020. So you know, it's been a long time coming.  Marsha  3:27   Yeah. Kelly  3:27   They'd heard a lot about it and seen pictures and stuff. So they wanted to see the finished trailer. So we stopped there on our way up to to mount Madonna. And the second day, the you know, the only full day that we were there, my mom and Dennis arrived with snacks to christen the trailer and, you know, visit with us because they like camping up there too. But they weren't able to camp that particular weekend because their trailer needs to go in for some work. But they did come up and visit. And I took the dogs on lots of trails and sat and spun. I basically brought my spinning project that I'll talk about and sat in the sun and did some spinning and we ate cheese and crackers when we arrived so we ended up not having dinner that night. And then my mom and Dennis they came with snacks the second day. So we had snacks and didn't have dinner the second day. There was very little cooking we didn't have to do any. Oh, I made tuna sandwiches because I had made some tuna you know some tuna salad was already prepared for the first night and we didn't eat it. So the second night when we were supposed to have barbecued hamburgers. After my mom and Dennis left a little while later we were kind of hungry. So we had tuna sandwiches and so it was easy in terms of, you know, we didn't do the eggs and potatoes or pancakes for breakfast we didn't do barbeque for dinner. There was not a whole lot of cleanup because it was mostly cheese and crackers and chips and salsa and yogurt for breakfast. And so there was lots of time to just sit around and spin and take the dogs for walks. And they did really well. It was Beary's first real camping trip. And he did great. So yeah, it was really fun. Marsha  5:32   So and then where you camp at Mount Madonna. Is it...Do you plug into services or? Kelly  5:39   Yeah Marsha  5:40   Did you have to bring your own water? Okay, so you have water and electricity.  Kelly  5:43   Right.  Marsha  5:43   Well,okay.  Kelly  5:43   Yeah, they have hookups. They call them partial hookups, it doesn't have sewer hookup. You dump the sewer, and gray water, black water and gray water tanks. When you leave, there's a dump station where you do that. So we got to do that for the first time. Because we didn't have that in our old trailer. You know, our gray water just went into a five gallon you know, a five gallon... It wasn't a bucket, it was like a jug. You know, grey water went into a five gallon jug and we didn't have a bathroom. So there was no black water tank. So but yeah, we had electrical hookup. And we had water hookup. City water, they call it. So yeah, we had all the all the hook up stuff that we needed. Today I'm sitting in the trailer to record. I don't, I probably won't do this a lot, because we did get a cover for it. So he's going to keep it covered. But I thought oh, I'll record in the trailer today. It's beautiful outside. It's actually a little warm in the trailer because Robert had some of the windows closed but it's going to be in the 80s today, maybe it already is.  So anyway, I'm sitting at the trailer table and and I'm testing out the inverter because I've got my phone plugged in and I've got my computer. It's the first time I've plugged in something more than a phone, which you can charge off of the 12 volt system battery. So right now I'm running my computer, it's it's plugged in and it's being you know, being powered by the solar.  Marsha  7:31   Okay, pretty cool.  Kelly  7:33   Robert's got a small solar power panel that he uses for what he calls trickle charging when it's just sitting in our driveway. So the batteries don't get overused but they also don't go dead. And then we have the larger solar panel that we haven't used in a camping trip yet. We didn't need them because we had power hookup at Mount Madonna. But Mount Madonna also has tent campsites and we went around and scoped out the sites with no services. I mean they have they have bathrooms, obviously, and they have water but you have to go to the place where the faucet is and fill up and bring it back. And we went and scoped out those areas to find some of the sites. We marked down some of the sites that are long enough for, you know, for our trailer and the truck to both be off the road, off the main road. So those campsites there were a few that we're going to probably try out if, you know, the main area is full or if we just want to get into a more quiet area or just to try it because we haven't  Marsha  8:49   yeah you can go off grid you're self contained so to speak. Kelly  8:55   Yeah we don't need the electricity or the water so yeah, yeah, it should be really fun. Marsha  9:04   Well I thought it was really cool, too, that, you know, the one thing that you have not finished for the trailer is the curtains that are gonna go at the windows.  That's down the line but the... your sort of... your stop gap measure is you put up all your vintage linens like tablecloths and stuff as sort of temporary curtains. I thought they were so cute. Kelly  9:27   Yeah, in fact  I have the one sitting here. I'm gonna have to prevail on my more experienced weaver friends and some of the people who do more technical work because (and I'll put a picture in the show notes, in fact I'll text it to you while we're talking maybe). So this one tablecloth and I think this is one that came from the batch that you gave me when you were going through all of your all of your stuff.  Marsha  9:56   Oh, right.  Kelly  9:57   It's so... it's it's linen. It's a small tablecloth, a small table tablecloth, but every corner has this really interesting detail. And some of it is actual like cut out and and then bound. Or I guess it's possible that it's not cut out. That just the warp and weft threads are just bound to make pretty good sized, like quarter inch square, holes. And then some of it is just in the hemstitch, which I haven't ever done. But I'd like to try. I think that it's not that difficult. And I know I can find instructions for it. And then there's also this other mesh detail that is... I've done some woven lace, but this is actually with thread you come back after the fact. And you use threads to wrap the warp threads and the weft threads so that you've got these holes. Like it pinches in.  Marsha  11:07   Yeah. Kelly  11:08   It pinches in the warp threads and it pinches in weft threads and then you get these little holes. So anyways, very interesting construction. And I'd really... there's not enough. I used this one tablecloth in one of the windows, like folded over. But there's not enough even for that one window. Well, I guess... I guess there would be for that one window. But I would like for the two windows that are across from each other in the bedroom to be at least similar.  Marsha  11:43   Yeah, yeah.  Kelly  11:44   So and I don't think I want to cut this one up, because it's just pretty. But anyway, I'd like to reconstruct this fabric or do some kind of facsimile of this, of this sort of fussy, fussy work. Weave something and then try that. I think it would be really kind of a fun challenge for those two bedroom windows. And then the kitchen window--and I'm not sure where it came from, it might have been a piece that I bought somewhere else. It's like a table runner, but it only has lace on one lengthwise edge. And so I don't know maybe like a buffet? You know, something that was against the wall, you would put it on that and it would hang with the lace part hanging over the front. And I just sewed a little sleeve for the for the curtain rod and used it as a kitchen curtain. The kitchen window has two crocheted lace panels that are sewn between linen fabric. And it's really cute, it's a bit too long. And I think when I'm going to do... I didn't... All I did was put a sleeve in the top of it for the rod. So it's just one panel, one piece going across the whole window. And I think... I can't decide whether I want to do it as a valance and just have one piece going across the top of the window as a valance or if I want to cut it down the center and be able to split them for the kitchen window. But I think that one will stay. I think that one in some form. Not the form is in now, but in some form that one is going to stay Marsha  13:26    okay  Kelly  13:27   in that kitchen window because it is really cute. And  it's the perfect size whether I make it into a valance or split it down the middle. It's it's really the perfect size. So that one will stay and then the other one that I thought was really funny is there's a dresser scarf and I think the dresser scarf also came from the stuff that you gave me.  Marsha  13:51   Okay. Kelly  13:52   And one edge of it has crocheted lace that says Mother and so I hung it up in the window with  the side that said Mother facing into the  bedroom and my mom was laughing. She's like, I'm not sure you want your mother in the bedroom. [laughing] Marsha  14:14   Yeah, really. But you can't get into too much trouble on that bed, Kelly! [laughing] Kelly  14:23   With the word mother right over your head. [laughing]  Marsha  14:26   Yeah, really.  Kelly  14:29   It was really... it was... it's a really cute piece and it has plain lace on the other side. So the outside of the window had the plain lace showing. The inside of the window had the lace that had the word mother on it. So very fun. And then I used one of my I... wanted to cover the front window. Well really I wanted to keep the curtain rod from falling out. And so I put another vintage tablecloth in. I had one with flowers on it in the front window hanging up, and you know, a floral one, and then we just used that one on the table while we were, you know, while we were there. So yeah, yeah, we had a really a really good time. So the thing...Oh, Bailey's barking in the background because the mailman just came.  The thing that I was thinking as we were there, because they do have the tent sites. And they also have yurts for people who didn't typically do camping, but I was thinking it would be fun to have a little camping meet up.  Marsha  15:39   Oh, yeah. Kelly  15:40    And, and we could provide, again, for people who didn't necessarily do camping or have camping equipment. You know, we could do you know, here at the, at the trailer, we do coffee in the morning. And so people have their coffee, and then we could do dinners. You know, barbecue dinners, and some people would, who didn't camp typically could, you know, still eat. [laughing] We wouldn't need to worry about you know, about bringing a camp stove or, or that kind of stuff. You could get by with minimal equipment. You know. Marsha  16:16   Yeah, yeah. Kelly  16:16   That's what I was thinking. If you wanted to you could rent one of the yurts, or get one of the tent sites, or if you have an RV, bring an RV. So, you know, I don't know how many people that would actually turn out to be. Probably not very many. But I thought that might be kind of a fun thing to look into. Marsha  16:33   So, yeah, we'll think about that.  Kelly  16:35   Yeah, yeah. I really enjoy that campground, because it's very close to our house. And, you know, it's in the woods. But it's not like the wilderness. And then on our way...I won't get off the camping thing! But on our way to Black Sheep gathering we're going to stay at a couple of Harvest Host sites. Kelli, that we met at Stitches, had recommended Harvest Host and I looked into it and decided to get a membership. So we're going to be staying at two places. One is a rice farm on the way up, and the other one is a winery. So I'll have to report back on how that  goes. But that should be fun. It'll be at first. I've never done that kind of camping, where you just pull up at somebody's business and park in their parking lot. So yeah,  Marsha  16:45   It'll be interesting.  Kelly  16:57   Yeah, yeah,  Marsha  17:07   How fun. Kelly  17:37    I'll definitely report back. Marsha  17:39   So yeah, well, I remember Kelli talking about it. She was really excited about it. She said it was just really, really fun. So Kelly  17:47   It's perfect for a trip where, you know, where you're on the go, because it's a one night experience. You don't stay there multiple nights. And that's not something that we've done a lot of either. You know, the trip up to Black sheep is probably the one of the those... that's one of the only types of trips where we've done the camp one night, then pack up and go kind of camping. We usually, wherever we're staying, we stay a little longer than that, even if we're moving on, you know?  Marsha  18:18   Yeah. Well, I'm excited because I will see it at the end of this month, just  two weeks, I think, or so I'll see it. Kelly  18:26    Yeah, yeah.  Marsha  18:27   Anyway. Okay, should we move on? I don't want to cut this off, because it's super interesting and fun, but I don't. Should we move on?  Move on to our next topic?  Kelly  18:39   Yes. Let's move on to our next topic. There was some fiber content in there though. I have to say because I did talk about lace curtains and possible weaving. [laughing] Marsha  18:47   Yeah, Yeah, it is. Well, I think the trailer is just, it's just fun. It is just super fun. So. Okay, so before we get to projects, we just want to mention that Jul Designs coupon code for 15% off any of their products is still available. It's still going on. And just go to Jul Designs website, there's a link in the show notes and just use the coupon code TWOEWES and that's all caps. And so check that out. Did you buy your... Kelly  19:24   No I have not yet. I keep thinking I need to go in there and do it and I haven't done it. But I was looking there today as I was putting my stuff in the show notes. And I found a couple of things that I like, so I'm going to do that before we-- before I put the computer away today. And then also I noticed that she has a blog post series. Laura Bellows who has Jul Designs. She's an anthropologist, I think, and anyway, she has this blog post series on wearing a Balinese sarong and I saw the title and I saw the pictures and I bookmarked it, because I want to go back in and read it. It looks like it's like three, three or four posts on the different aspects of of that and I thought, well that's very interesting. Because, again, fabric right?  Marsha  20:17   Fabric  Kelly  20:20   So, so yeah, take a look at her her blog posts and take a look at her-- all of her different shawl pins and shawl collars and different closures and, and such. And thank you to her for providing this coupon code for for our listeners. Well, and speaking of thanks, Marsha, we have another thank you to do.  Marsha  20:45   Yes  Kelly  20:45   Our patrons from Patreon. We just want to want to give them all a shout out because we're so appreciative. These patrons that provide the funding that supports the prizes, they support the podcast hosting, all of our community events, you know. The the Alongs that we do, we are able to have prizes, you know, in the abundance that we do because of the support of our patrons. So we wanted to thank them. And our most recent patrons are--so thank you to them--Christina Y, Kelly B, Laurie M, Francesca Q, and Shelly M. They've all joined Patreon and become patrons in 2022. And then we also have Pamela R, Connie L., Cheryl C., Jan H., Hetty C, Jane H,  Colleen G, and Mindy C. Thank you for your sponsorship of our podcast. Marsha  21:56   Okay, and we also have Eman, Amy L., Patti B. ,Joan B., Tammy S,  Kathy M., Natalie, Martha P.,  Melody W., Joanne Y., Greta. H. Kelly  22:17   Okay. And also thank you to Joylaine O., Barbara G., Rachel W., Joyce G, Angela D, Laurie L, Charlene, and Erica N. Marsha  22:34   And a thank you also to Debbie F., Erica J., Rachel S., Patricia E., Catherine K., Karen B., Jenn N., and Janet S. Thank you, everyone! Kelly  22:51   Yes, thank you! We really appreciate your support. And the other members of our community also appreciate your support. Because, again, it allows us to do the kind of the kind of events and alongs and prizes. Oh, and I see I just scrolled down to the next page. Ann Gi is also a patron. Thank you, Ann Gi!  She's been a patron for quite a while. And so sorry that she was missed! Marsha  23:20   Sorry. I didn't scroll down far enough. So sorry, Ann Gi. Kelly  23:24   All right. Well, with that said, What about your projects? Marsha? We'll go from up note to maybe a down note? Marsha  23:37   Oh, yes. So here's what I have to say about both my projects. The first one. So I'm going to talk first about the sweater I'm making for my son. And I'm using my hand spun. And have you ever heard Kelly of the law of attraction that you say, you tell, you say something out to the universe, and the universe gives it back to you. You have to be careful what you say because it can give you positive things, it can give you negative things. So I'm sort of laughing about this because one of the things I kept saying is how much I enjoy knitting with my handspun. But well, the universe has given me the gift of knitting the sweater for the third time. So I will just back up and just say So, bottom line, I'm taking this sweater and I'm setting it aside for a while. And I just did a note, too, about my brother's sweater. I'm kind of setting that aside for a little bit too. So the sweater I'm making for my brother, or excuse me for Ben. This is the... Do you remember? Not to rehash this whole thing but first I started making the phrancko.com sweater that didn't work out because of my gauge. So I now started doing the unpattern by Karen Alfke. And this is the raglan pullover from the top down, where you actually just take your measurements. And basically, it's the same idea of what Frank Jernigan is doing, or Amy Herzog used to do, where you, it's like, you know, the computer does the math. In this case, I'm doing the math. But we talked about this in the last episode, about the pattern. When you get to the part where you're, you're increasing for the sleeves and the body. There's an error in the pattern. I'm calling it an error. Somebody else may not say it's an error. But when you're figuring out how many stitches to have on the arm and have for the body, it says, you do your math, and times the gauge, you know, whatever it equals and then it says front or back goal stitches: 176.  Kelly  25:48   Yeah.  Marsha  25:49   And I kept knitting beyond I kept knitting. Because it said front and back.  Kelly  25:56   No, it said, front or back. Marsha  25:58   Right, it said, front or back. I read that as I needed 176 stitches on both the front and the back. Kelly  26:05   Each, right? 176 stitches each.  Marsha  26:08   Yes. Each. For the front, 176 stitches and for the back. What it really should be, instead of saying front or back goal stitches, it should say front and back, right. So I need a total for the whole body, front and back combined of 176. I have, because we caught this when I was down there for when I was down in California at your house going to Kelly  26:37   stitches or NoCKRs? Marsha  26:41   I believe it was NoCKRs. And you said, we decided, we added up my stitches, and I have 224. Kelly  26:49   Right. And we caught it because you were so far down. It was like you had... you still weren't ready to split for the split the arms off of the body. But you were far enough down that it looked like you should be splitting the arms off the body.  Marsha  27:07   If I continued to the point where I should split the arm holes I would be at the waist. Right?  Kelly  27:13   Almost.  Marsha  27:13   That's an exaggeration. But that was right. That was the-- that was our clue. Kelly  27:18   And then you said, wait a minute, if I keep going, this is going to be way too long. Right? And then we started looking at the pattern. Marsha  27:26   And right and you caught the the mistake and the pattern. So but we had that conversation, you know that moment? And you have this conversation? We convinced each other? Yes. So they should just stop and keep going. Right? Kelly  27:42    Because how many stitches did you have on each? Marsha  27:45   I had 224 total  for the body combined. And if I had continued What's two times 176? It's 252?  No, it's more than it's more than 300.  Yeah, that's right. And so, Kelly  28:07   So you said so you were supposed to have 176 all the way around, and you had 224 all the way. So you had essentially you had about 50 extra stitches. Yes. How did we can convince ourselves that was ok? Marsha  28:24   Well, and this is what I'm gonna... so this is what I'm gonna say. To finish it, we convinced... we have this conversation. You're like you said I think it's going to be okay, . Kelly  28:34   How far would you have to rip it back?,  Marsha  28:35   But it will be ok. Kelly  28:38    Oh, that's too far to rip back. That, you know, oh, that would be unpleasant number of rows to rip. So Marsha  28:46   So. Yes, I should have just ripped back then. Because I knit the entire body.  Kelly  28:52   Right.  Marsha  28:53   And half of the first sleeve by the time he came home. And I tried it on him.  Kelly  28:59   Yeah.  Marsha  28:59   And it's way too big. Kelly  29:03   Well, and to be fair to you, he gave you a sweater that he liked as a template. And holding the sweater you were knitting up to the sweater that he liked as a template, they looked about the same size.  Marsha  29:21   Yeah.  Kelly  29:21   But the sweater that he liked as a template is alpaca and drapey and thinner machine knit. And it's fine yarn--alpaca.  Marsha  29:31   And it's also that style where it's basically you know, the body is a square, and then the and then the arms just stick off and so here's my the moral of the story. When you have that feeling, and you know what you should do, you should just do it then. Kelly  29:49   Yes, when you have that feeling and you say, Oh, I Oh, gosh. ripping all of that out. I really don't want to do that. I think it'll be okay. That phrase, I think it'll be okay. Should be a trigger. It won't be okay. You need to rip it out.  Marsha  30:07   Yeah.  Kelly  30:08   I'm so sorry. Marsha  30:10   I know. So he tried it on. I don't know now, it was two weeks ago or so when he was here.  Kelly  30:17   Yeah, right after our last episode, I think. Marsha  30:19   Yeah, it was Memorial Day weekend, I think. You know what, I don't remember because I was so upset that I sort of had to go to bed. No, I'm kidding. But I did I have that feeling like-- that feeling like, I'm gonna cry. Yeah, I feel like I'm gonna cry. And I think I should go get in bed and cry. But no, I'm a I'm a, I'm a grown woman. And I'm going to now go out and take the dog for a walk or do something else. And I'm just gonna set it aside and not think about it for a while. And then I have to just, I was and I was very angry at Karen. And it's not her fault, because well, I don't know if it's... No, I can't blame her. But it's just the way the pattern is written. It's not-- it is not clear. It's a mistake in the pattern. And I didn't catch it. You know?  Yeah, you have to actually be thinking,  I mean, you have... Because I just couldn't figure out how you could have gone so wrong from the pattern. And then, so then I took the number of stitches that were supposed to be what I thought just the front and divided by your gauge to see how many inches that was supposed to be. And realized it was the 40 inch circumference that you needed. Yeah, like, Okay, well, if it's not an error, it's at least a place where things are unclear enough that it should be changed. Yeah, but So, Karen lives in the Pacific Northwest. And I know she's a friend of my friend Kim. And so if I ever see her, I promise I will be nice to her. [laughing] Kelly  31:55   Your mad won't last too long. Marsha  31:58   It won't last and honestly, the truth is, once I rip the sweater out, yeah. for the second time.  Kelly  32:05   Yeah.  Marsha  32:05   And reknit it for the third time... Kelly  32:07   Karen, if you're listening, Marsha will be okay. Marsha  32:10   I promise I'll be kind but... And as I say, once I rip it back and start over again I now it's really clear what my mistake is. Okay, I'm crossing my-- you can't see me but I'm crossing my fingers. Kelly. Hopefully I'll be okay. And I won't have to knit it again.  Kelly  32:28   Yeah. Knock on wood right now. So Marsha  32:32   yeah, knock on wood. Kelly  32:34   Everybody out there. Knock on wood for Marsha. Marsha  32:36   It's funny because I was reading the our posts in on Ravelry in the discussion thread, like when you posted the episode, and then people make comments, and I don't remember now who it was, I'm drawing a blank. Someone said, I'm so sorry that Marsha is having these problems that I talked about in the last episode with  my brother's sweater. And I was laughing. I thought, you don't know the half of it. I had been. Yeah. Anyway, I will have the joy of knitting with my handspun a third time. Kelly  33:08   It's a good thing you like that yarn. [laughing]  Marsha  33:10   Yeah, really? But I'm not going to say that anymore. Because it got me into big trouble. I think. So anyway. Okay, so now moving on to my other sweater that's a problem. And this is the sweater with round pattern. Or Kelly, how are you pronouncing it? Kelly  33:30   Well, we have a pronunciation audio from Cat. And it actually isn't sweater with round pattern. It's well, she'll, we'll play it. So we'll put the audio in right here.  Cat  33:42   Hi, Kelly. Hi, Marsha. I believe it's "Tro-cha vee min-stur" Trocha: sweater. Vee: with. Min-stur is pattern. And I looked it up in the Faroese dictionary and I'll send it to you. Mynstur means any pattern, not necessarily a round pattern. It could also mean a pattern for for weaving, for embroidery. Depending on the context. In this case, it would be a pattern for knitting. Marsha  34:12   Okay, so, Cat, thank you for that. Yes, that really helps us out. Okay. What's going on with that sweater? I have, as you know, now, this is the second time I've, I mean, I switched to this pattern. I've knit the body up. This is a bottom up. So I've knit up the body up to the armholes. I've set that aside and started the sleeves. Kelly  34:34   and you've blocked it. Washed it and blocked it and checked it out that it fits. Marsha  34:37   Yes. Yes. And so I did it halfway through so that's why the pictures of it in Ravelry there's this weird line. Okay, body set aside. I started the first sleeve. Didn't like it because I was... oh, let me back up. The sleeve you're supposed to cast on and knit the cuff. Then you do some color work, work in stockinette, right above the cuff, and then you knit  the main color up to the armhole, set that aside, do the same thing with the second sleeve, then attach the sleeves to the body and knit the yoke. My concern about that is, once that's done, you cannot adjust the length of the sleeves Kelly  35:18   without ripping everything out Marsha  35:20   without having to rip out the yoke. Yeah. So I what I decided to do is a provisional cast on with one row of the one of the contrast. The colorwork... the cuffs are supposed to be in the navy blue. So I decided to do one row of the navy blue and then start the colorwork. And that was a disaster because you're doing it, you know, magic loop. And the tension was terrible. It was all over the place. Kelly  35:51   And you have no base to hold on to while you're doing the colorwork. Yeah.  Marsha  35:55   Right. So I ripped that out. I cast on again, provisional cast on. I did three rows of stockinette in the blue, the navy blue, which is going to be the cuff color, because I thought, what will...  and then I knit the color work. And I did about an inch of the main color. And I realized, I don't like the color work because the everything is knit on size eight. But what I've decided to do with the yoke, is I'm going to knit that on nines, and I forgot to switch to nines for the color work sleeve. So I ripped it out back to the... it was not as horrible, but I had to rip it back out to the three rows of the Navy of the stockinette. And then I reknit the color work on nines. And then I switched back to eights and I've done most of the sleeve, I would say it's three quarters done. And I thought it feels a little tight. Kelly  36:57   Oh no. Marsha  36:59   I don't know what's gonna happen. But I decided I'm putting it on waste yarn, and I washed and blocked it. So I did that yesterday. So it's sitting there drying. And so I I just want to make sure. Kelly  37:12    Yeah. Marsha  37:13   I don't want to finish that sleeve and do the second sleeve and  have them too tight. So  Kelly  37:20   oh my gosh! Marsha  37:22   All I can say is, what the hell?  [laughing] I hate... I hate these projects. I hate these projects. So just to help myself I...So Ben's sweater's being set aside for a while. My brother's sweater is going to be set aside for a while. I just need to take a break from it. And anyway, I decided to cast on something else. So Kelly, guess what I cast on. Kelly  37:53   Something for you.  Marsha  37:55   Something for me! And just the name alone is gonna make me happy. It's called Happiness.  Kelly  38:00   Yes.  Marsha  38:00   And the designer is Kyle Kunnecke and I'm using the big giant baby that I bought at stitches, Yarn Snobs Powerball, and it has all these colors in it. It's so interesting. I will post pictures, too.  It weighs... this skein of yarn weighs 500 grams, it's 2187 yards and it was a bit of a challenge to get it onto the swift. And then I wound it into three cakes and what I did is because if you-- if you break it, well... First of all I have to say this is amazing yarn. I'm kind of curious how he's able to get 500 grams and over 2000 yards with not a single break and there's no knots at all and so it's a continuous piece of yarn. I don't know how he dyes it so beautifully given that it's so thick. I mean he's got the color goes all the way through. It's amazing how it's clearly when you open it up into the hank it's it's that's how it was dyed. it was not dyed in another form and then wound into that hank, you know. You can see it's been dyed in that hank. Yeah. Is that was not reskeined. No Yeah. Well anyway, so Kelly  39:23   Hard enough to skein it in the first place before you dye it! Marsha  39:28   So what I did is... I... but I wanted... It may not be important to keep the color order given the way this thing is sort of this very, very crazy, chaotic color, you know, it may not be necessary. Kelly  39:40   I think it's necessary.  Marsha  39:42   Well, I wanted to keep the color order. So what I did is I wound it into three balls, but I put a piece of tape like painters tape on the beginning of the yarn, but as I started taking it off the swift I put it in-- I labeled that end 1 and I put it in so the end 1 now is on the inside of my cake. And end 2 is on the outside of my cake. Right, so then I break that, and then I put a tape on the next the piece that's coming off of the swift, that's 3 that's now wound on that's on the inside of a cake, and 4 is on the outside of my cake. And then the third one, end 5 is on the inside. And end 6 is on the outside. I like to pull from the outside. So I can't pull from the outside of the first cake that is labeled one and two, because two is on the outside. So I'm starting at the very end. So I'm starting with the third cake, which is end starting with six, which then five will be in the center. Then I'll go to two, 4, which is on the outside. 3 is on the inside. And then the last cake 2 is on the outside and 1 is on the inside. Does that make sense? Kelly  41:06   Yeah. And that's I think going to be really important because the cakes of yarn actually look very different. Marsha  41:14   It's true. And the the first one I wound off and the last one I wound off look the most similar. The one that's right in the middle is darker, it has more black in it. So I think I think it is important to keep the order. Kelly  41:32   Yeah, because that way you don't have to alternate skeins, it'll just go along the patterning of the skein. And whatever the differences are, they will change naturally, the way the skein changeds as opposed to abruptly if you weren't going in that order. So I think that's a smart way to do it, Marsha.  Marsha  41:55   Yeah, so I already started knitting on it. I'm so much happier. It's on size four. So it's a nice, it's a smaller needle. Because the other thing I need to mention that I did finish my garter squish blanket over Memorial Day weekend, the deadline to finish it was May 31. And I believe I finished it on May 30 with a day to spare. But that was knit on 13s and that's like, it really feels you can't really get a rhythm knitting with those, because they're so big. So I'm very happy with this so far. And I've just knit. Let's see, I'm knitting on it now. And I have to do two inches of ribbing, and then I'll switch to stockinette. And so I...this is what I'm planning to bring to Black Sheep Gathering the end of the month. So I can just knit mindlessly on it and talk to people and not look at those other two sweaters. Kelly  42:52   I think that's a really good plan. And the thing about this one is that it's a nice kind of boxy sweater with a lot of positive ease. So that's a lot of stitches going around and around in stockinette. So it'll be it'll be perfect knitting for a long time.  Marsha  43:12   Yeah.  Kelly  43:14   And I think everybody probably has the size needle that they feel the most comfortable with. Or the range of needle size that they feel the most comfortable with. I really like my sock needles at the low end. And then I like threes. Like threes, fours. That's a twos threes, fours that's a really nice size for me. It feels they feel right in my hand. Where when I'm knitting with five fives or sixes for a hat, it's not that I don't enjoy it. But it's always nice to get back to my little needles. Marsha  43:49   Yeah, yeah. Kelly  43:51   So that's that'll be good, too. It's right in your your comfort knitting zone. Yeah, well, that's good. I'm excited about it. I think it'll be I think it'll be a good project for you. It sounds like you're excited about it. The colors are great. Marsha  44:07   And then I have been spinning on the Manx Loaghton. And I've been spinning on that and I'm planning on bringing my wheel and that to Black Sheep Gathering and mostly spinning, I think.  Kelly  44:21   Oh, good.  Marsha  44:22   That's it. And then as I say finished project, I finished my garter squish. That's my only finished project. Kelly  44:27   and it turned out nice. Marsha  44:29   Yeah. It's nice.  Kelly  44:30   How do you-- have you put it next to your other two? To like, see how it compares and what you like? Like, how do you like them compared to one another? Or are there like, this is the first one that you've done with flat colors? Marsha  44:47   No, it's the second. Kelly  44:48   Oh, the second one. That the first one you did was also was the Cascade.  Marsha  44:54   The first one was flat. The main color was like a blue like a I don't know what color blue you would call that one Kelly  45:00   Not quite navy-- kind of between the Navy and kind of a darker royal blue? Not so bright as a royal blue, but not so Navy. Marsha  45:10   And and then this one, it had brighter colors more. Not really natural colors. The contrasting one? And then the second one I did is when we dyed all the yarn so we had the gradient and then all the painted variegated.  And then the this one that I just completed the background was a brown, then all the colors are like sage and orange. And I don't know, it looks more like the first one.  Kelly  45:43   Yeah.  Marsha  45:44   And ironically, I what I really would like to do is I would like to do one where the the, the main color is just a cream or a natural color like yours. That's what I-- but I found that's what I wanted to do. But you know, I had all that yarn. The first one it was using the yarn from my dad's sweater. And then the one that I just finished, I had a lot of just undyed yarn, and I dyed it because I Kelly  46:16   because  the solid was the brown. Like you've always had a different solid. Marsha  46:21   Yes. But actually now I'm kind of thinking I could have. Well, no, that really wouldn't, because even the natural colored yarns were all slightly different. I didn't have a consistent... I was thinking what I could have done is just reversed it. And the one that yarn that was sort of the... No, I did it the right way, because the yarn that I dyed for the background was all kind of camel colored, right? It wasn't natural. Yeah, yeah. So anyway. Kelly  46:44   Well, you'll have to put a fourth one on your needles Marsha  46:49   I cannot do a fourth one, ugh! Kelly  46:50   No, you know what you should do? The next one you do, because I think there will be another one in your future at some point. Not in the near future. Yeah, I'm sure there'll be another one.  Do that one that is the, I think it's called the sediment throw. Where you go corner to corner? Marsha  47:07   Yes. Um, I was thinking about that. And then the other one I'm thinking of is, there's the one for my brother that he wants.   Kelly  47:19   You're not doing any projects for other people for a while. Marsha  47:22    No. Kelly  47:23   I'm gonna lay down that law for you, Marsha. [laughing] Marsha  47:25   I know. But the one I really want to make is... I'm sorry, I should have been... because I didn't know we were going to be talking about this in depth. Let me look at my patterns... Kelly  47:37   Well, a lot of people did the habitation throw.  Marsha  47:42   I'm looking for the one that I... because I've been pulling out yarn for it. Anyway, there's the one for my brother. And that's all with the Noro. And I don't really have I don't have any Noro. So I have to figure that one out. I was scrolling through my patterns. I can't find it. It but anyway, basically, it's like chevrons, kind of, you just use sock weight yarn that you and so that's when I was sort of thinking of using that. And I was actually thinking because I have so much sock weight yarn like scraps. But I also have a lot of sock weight yarn that I bought single skeins, that I don't really like them. I don't want a shawl out of them. I don't want to make socks. I was thinking I would put that all into the blanket, but I have, you're supposed to use about 500 grams. To make the blanket. Total to make the blanket. I was sort of thinking maybe what I would do is hold the sock weight yarns double and go up a needle size. And so I could use some of those one off skeins that I don't really like very much. So anyway, Kelly  48:52   I think it's a perfect solution.  Holding yarn double is a perfect solution to using the partials or well, partial skeins that are leftover but also full skeins of, of yarn that you bought that you don't need another pair of socks or you weren't in love with it anymore. Marsha  49:13   Yeah. I'm hoping I get my Juju back.  Kelly  49:15   Well, focus on your sweater first because that is, I think, that is just such a fun pattern. That sweater is cute. The yarn is great. It's comfortable knitting because you just start doing stockinette around and around until you're sick of it. Marsha  49:36   Yeah. So I think I have these you know, my brother's sweater and Ben sweater are sitting in my bedroom in their project bags. I think I'm gonna go put them in the closet.  Kelly  49:44   I think you should. Yes, put them away where you don't have to look at them and feel any kind of guilt or?  Marsha  49:49   Yeah. Anyway. So let's go into more positive things. We'll finish my projects and go into your projects.  Kelly  49:57   Okay, well, there's not much to say This will be short. I'm making a pair of shorty socks. And I'm using a hand spun yarn that I've that I've actually used before for socks. It's out of a fiber was Falkland, which, it's not as soft as I would expect Falkland to be. But there's not, you know, it's not horrible. Just when people talk about Falkland a lot of times they talk about how soft it is. But anyway, it's Tomato and Mink, or Mink and Tomato was the colorway. I don't now remember where I got it. But it was a number of years ago, maybe 2013 or 14, something like that. And I spun it up and last summer or the summer before I made a pair of regular socks out of it. And I had spun it for socks, I made a three ply, so it's long color repeats, it's a chain ply. One thing I will comment about chain ply because there was a little bit of discussion about it on the Ravelry group this morning. One thing about chain ply, it definitely magnifies your inconsistencies. So I have some places where this yarn is super, super thin, like a lace weight. It's a three ply, but super, super thin, because my fiber got thin. And then you're putting the three thin fibers together and you do the chain ply, so it's thin. And then in the thicker area, you know, because when you're chain plying, you're plying areas that are close together, I'm plying three, three thicker strands. And then I've got a thicker yarn, so it's more like a sport. So this yarn varies from a really thin lace weight to about to sport weight. Which is fine, it makes a nice sock. It's not you know, it's honestly this is one of the things I try to tell people is that those kinds of inconsistencies, you think they look big in the skein or in the yarn, but once you knit with them, even in stockinette, I'm really not seeing that kind of inconsistency in my knitting. So it doesn't show. The other thing about the chain ply is you have a tendency to over spin it. Because your feet... you need, you really need as your hands slow down if you get, you know, stuck or you miss the chain, or you just need a little extra time. And you don't also slow down your feet, you get it over spun over plied. And this yarn is pretty overplied. I mean, it's like kinking on itself as I'm trying to knit with it. And you know, it's been washed. And a lot of times when you wash an over plied yarn, it does relax quite a bit. But this I'm a lot of times having to, you know, pull out the kinks, as I'm knitting. The places where it's pigtailed onto itself. That's really good and I did it on purpose. Well, it's a it's a good feature to have for sock yarn, because it makes the sock yarn more durable. But it is a little bit annoying to knit with. And it is a feature of chain plying, if you're not really careful, you can get you know, you can get things over plied when you don't mean for them to be. But these are just a pair of shorty socks, and they're not going to match because they're with the leftover balls. And these are... so one of them has a gray cuff, the other one has a gray and orange striped cuff. And then half the foot is gray and other half the foot is orange. And this one I've got a gray cuff and an orange part of the foot. And then I have only gray left. So it'll only have one orange stripe or the other one has, I think two or three places on it that there's orange. So these are really long pattern repeats which again is another one of those features of chain ply is that you can get those long-- or not pattern repeats, color repeats, you know, long stretches of color. So they're self striping, but the stripes are about four inches in some places. Yeah. So that's my socks. And then I have a new spinning project. So I'm using up the remainder of the Columbia fleece. I had been using the Columbia and the Oxford. Spinning those up, I spun those all. I had spun those in the past two summers and then used them for my garter squish. And then I I'd used up all of the Oxford in the final part of my garter squish. And so then I started with the rest of the Columbia fleece and I carded it and I added in tussah silk. So I have this tussah silk top I had bought like a pound or eight ounces of it or something a long time ago. It was in my stash, I got it out and I just, you know, blended that in as I was carding, and it is nice. This  fiber's really nice. I have these batts. And you can see, like, I blended the silk, I tried to blend this out pretty well. But there are places where you've got like this strand of like silk fiber running through it. That's just super pretty and fun to spin. There's a lot of silk content, I tried to get 50/50. But I couldn't. I only wanted to do three passes through the carder, and I couldn't get 50% silk into the fiber in just three passes. So that's alright, it has enough silk in it. It's going to be really nice. And it's spinning up pretty thin. So I'm probably going to make it into a three ply, but I don't know, I might two ply it and use it for a shawl or something. I'm not sure how much I'll have when I get when I get done.  Marsha  56:04   Yeah.  Kelly  56:05   And I think in this case, I am going to spin all the singles first and then decide if I want to do I want a two ply. Or do I want a three ply? How much yarn? How much of this yarn do I want? And then I think I'll also dye it after the spinning is finished. Because that'll be interesting because the dye will take differently on the silk and the wool.  Marsha  56:26   yeah, interesting.  Kelly  56:28   And I cleaned up my wheel, took it all apart, washed it, oiled it-- well, washed it, polished it, put it back together, oiled it. It's spinning so nicely. Marsha  56:41   So I have a question. I don't see your mohair sweater on here. Kelly  56:45   No, that's put away for a little while. It's been kind of warm. I haven't knitted on it since I think I was knitting on it at the last episode when we recorded and it's still sitting up in the in the guest room vanity area from that day. I haven't touched it since then. I got really into the carding that was the main thing and then the socks are just something that I started at the Pismo rally trip to have something to knit in the car and then I brought them with me in the car to this, you know on this trip, but I haven't made a whole lot of progress on them. Marsha  57:23   Well, I have a comment about it. When I was walking Enzo and listening to the last episode, you were talking about the sweater and how you had had that sweater in the 60s. You-- the mohair sweater that you bought in the boys department.  Kelly  57:41   Yeah,  Marsha  57:41   And I was walking  along and I of a sudden I thought, why was that sweater in the boys department? I mean like because it was hairy right? It was like a hairy mohair sweater. Kelly  57:52   It was a vest. Marsha  57:52   A vest Yeah, I mean a vest but like it was in the boys department? Like what boy was wearing?  Was that a style to have those hairy vests or? I think that's what just struck me is like, what boy was going to be wearing that? Kelly  58:07   Yeah, I know. I don't know. Well, I told you it was unusual. I it was an unusual piece of clothing. Marsha  58:15   I know so you always think of the boys department having...You know when Ben was born and Iwould go to get him some clothes and and all these--so much variety and interesting things with for girls. And the boys it was all like Navy and brown. Like there was nothing fun really with boys clothes. And so that's why I'm like, What boy was going to be wearing that hairy vest? [laughing] Kelly  58:44   Well, and this was ...I wonder if I have any pictures with me wearing it? This was tan, kind of a tan brown color. And they had a... I don't think the whole vest was Argyle. I don't think the pattern was totally Argyle but it had a thin orange like thin orange diagonal striping like an argyle. I just remember the thin orange stripe. I don't really remember if the whole thing was Argyle. If it was, it was muted, you know, it was like a tan and a light brown or something. It wasn't wild colors. But yeah, it was... It wasn't, you know, totally hairy like my Sonny Bono jacket. You know, it wasn't like that. But it was definitely hairy.  Marsha  59:37   You know, I guess I'm out of touch. I'm out of touch with what boys were wearing in the 60s and this  Kelly  59:42   Well, let's see, when would it have been? Late sixties or early seventies.., depending on when I had it. I think I had it in like middle school. We don't have middle schools here but-- or we didn't have middle school where I was but it would have been like middle school age, maybe fifth sixth, seventh eighth somewhere in there. So it would have been the early 70s. Marsha  1:00:09    Yeah, yeah.  Kelly  1:00:10   No, I can picture it... I can kind of. Yeah, I think  it could have been like maybe something the Monkees wore maybe.  Marsha  1:00:20   Well, you know, I mean, I don't know. I, since we're on this topic, I remember it was very popular for girls when I was in middle school. Well, elementary school, but like late elementary, like, sixth grade or something, but those crocheted vests. All the girls wanted, like, crocheted vests and it was like those granny squares, right. And my my aunt made one for me, my great aunt made me one of those vests and then Kelly  1:00:55   It would be right in style now if you still have it. [laughing] Marsha  1:00:58   Yes. And then also do you remember Go Go boots?  Kelly  1:01:01   Oh, yeah.  Marsha  1:01:01   Did you have the white Go Go boots? Kelly  1:01:03   I didn't have them for regular life. Wehad white boots for my baton. My baton group. Marsha  1:01:11   Oh, I had gogo boots and white gogo boots that I wore to school because everybody wanted them and I my parents bought me a pair, probably at Sears. And they were like vinyl. Yeah. And my feet practically rotted off in those.  Kelly  1:01:30   Yeah.  Marsha  1:01:32   Well, between you know, nylon socks and plastic boots. I remember a my mother finally said you just can't wear them because my feet were I was getting like, like athlete's foot or something and just sitting in that moisture all day long. So she said you can't wear them. So I was only to wear them like once a week or something.  Kelly  1:01:51   That's funny. Yeah, we had them for baton, for parades and stuff. That was part of our parade uniform. And, and the other part of our parade uniform was vinyl. And it was like a cowboy vest with a suede. It was the beige cowboy vest with a suede star on it and suede like edging. Right. And then the bottom part of it was these vinyl bloomers.  Marsha  1:02:24   Bloomers? Kelly  1:02:25    Bloomers Marsha  1:02:25    Pants. Kelly  1:02:26   Like, bloomers! [laughing] Marsha  1:02:32   They wouldn't they have no drape or anything, right? I mean, they must have been... Kelly  1:02:37   there's no leg, right? So they're just bloomers. So they like they just, I mean, I maybe I'm not using the right word. They were like they're like the shape of underpants. [laughing] Marsha  1:02:51   Oh my gosh. [laughing] Kelly  1:02:54   And I, honestly this is terrible. This is maybe too much information. But I remember one parade thinking of the you know, the, the vinyl and the not breathing and the... But I remember one parade where the edge of the vinyl the unsewn seam edge. Because my mom made them, right. Somebody in the troop made them and most of the girl's parents or moms made them but then there were some moms that didn't sew. But my mom sewed so she made ours. But the seam allowance wasn't covered. And I had oh my god, the most painful, painful raw area Marsha  1:03:36   down there. Kelly  1:03:38   From marching with that seam edge of this vinyl rubbing on my leg. For the whole parade. It's like oh my god. When I think back on that. Yeah. And then we had the white, the white boots. And we had cowboy hats. Oh, it was cute. Marsha  1:03:58   But painful, but very painful. Kelly  1:04:01   Well after that one parade my mom did fix it. She... I don't know what--she covered the seam allowance in some way. But yeah. Oh my gosh, I should look for it. I should look for a picture.  Marsha  1:04:14   Yeah, yeah,  Kelly  1:04:14   To put in the show notes. I don't know if I have time to do that. But yes, funny, cute. They were cute. But when I think back... So that's the end of my projects, Marsha. That's why we're talking about so much random other stuff that's not knitting. [laughing] Marsha  1:04:35   I know. Well, hopefully things will start looking up for me and so that we'll have better things to talk about in terms of projects. But anyway, moving along. Let's talk about the Stashbusting blanket along because that is done. It ended on May 31. And we have winners. Kelly  1:04:55    yes.  Marsha  1:04:56   So so let's just say what the prize is going to be  Kelly  1:04:59   okay.  Marsha  1:04:59   We debated a long time about what the prize should be. Because we thought of yarn, getting people a-- but then this was all about stash busting right? You could look at this both ways. Oh, they didn't want any more yarn because they were working to get rid of yarn out of their stash. Or you could look at it as everybody got rid of the, the yarn in their stashes that all the stuff they used, it was really a Stashbusting. And they need some yarn. So we couldn't make up our minds. We finally decided to go in a completely different direction. And everybody who the winners will receive a pattern of their choice up to $10. So that's going to be the prize. And we have five winners. So Kelly, yes, so we'll list them. Let's say who it is. Kelly  1:05:44   Our first winner is michembry, Michelle, and she made the Habitation Throw. And I really liked that pattern. I'm gonna, I think I might at some point, make one of those because it turns-- a lot of people did them and they all turned out really, really nicely. So congratulations, Michelle. Marsha  1:06:04   Yes. And our second winner is cattitude. Cat. And she made the sunburst granny square throw. Kelly  1:06:14   Yeah, congratulations, Cat. She's our Faroese interpreter. Marsha  1:06:20   Yes, yes. Our foreign correspondent. Kelly  1:06:23   Our third winner is iheartbooks. And she also made a garter Squish, blanket. It turned out really nicely. I just have to say that is the best pattern. I really think that pattern is so versatile. So congratulations, iheartbooks, and I didn't say what her real name is. I don't remember if that's because it wasn't there. Or if I just forgot, but iheartbooks, Congratulations! And Laura Sue also made a garter squish. And Kelly, you have a note here accursed Romney?  Yes. She she made a post in one of the-- I think this one was from the discussion board. I drew from both the discussion, and the fo thread to get the winners. And she was using this what she called the accursed Romney that she was trying to get rid of. But she also knit this during the caregiving and loss of her mother, and talked about how soothing it was to, to knit, you know, that garter stitch pattern. And to just-- kind of like what you were talking about with the sweater you're doing. You can just knit and knit and knit and not have to really think too much about it. So yeah, she got she got rid of a Romney fleece that she'd had forever and had been probably she felt like it was multiplying in her stash because I have that feeling about some of my yarn. Like, wait a minute, I thought you were gone.  Marsha  1:07:55   Yeah.  Kelly  1:07:57   And then our last winner, also with the habitation throw is Starwood knitter. So congratulations to Starwood knitter Marsha  1:08:08   and to all the winners. It was a really fun along Kelly  1:08:12   Yeah, it was it was. Marsha  1:08:14   I would consider doing another Stashbusting blanket along next year. Yeah. Different pattern though. Kelly  1:08:23   That's good. Give  everyone some time to think Marsha  1:08:27   and  build up their stash. Kelly  1:08:28   Build up or go through their stash and get ideas. Get some creative ideas. Because honestly, when we started this, I didn't think I had the right... I knew I had stash. But I didn't think I had the right yarn to make one. And it wasn't until I put it all out. And looked at it for a couple of weeks with different ideas before I thought, Oh, I know what I could do. I could combine these and yeah, so. So yeah, well, so definitely have to do that again. It was really fun. Yeah, we'll need to have some time in between to do something other than blankets. Marsha  1:09:08   Yeah. So as I mentioned before, the prize is a pattern of your choice up to $10. And Kelly, we're gonna have people contact you.  Kelly  1:09:20   Yeah, through Ravelry or, two ewes at Two Ewes Fiber Adventures dot  com, the email address, Instagram, any of those ways, just get in touch with me. All I need is to know your Ravelry name and what pattern you want. And if you're not on Ravelry and there's a pattern you want that I can get to you some other way let me know that too, because I've been able to do that for some other people. Marsha  1:09:50   All right, and then the Summer Spin In is underway. It started June 1 And it goes until September 5 We've talked about what we were spinning Kelly  1:10:04   I put up the thread. So there's a thread on Ravelry and I have a hashtag summer spin in 2022.  Marsha  1:10:13   Okay,  Kelly  1:10:13   so if you want to post, if you have Instagram and you want to play, post on Instagram. Go ahead and use the hashtag summer spin in 2022. And there's no, I have no punctuation in that summer spin in, there's no dash or anything. It's just  three words summer spin in  and 2022. Marsha  1:10:34   And then the other thing Black Sheep gathering we've talked about mentioned it during this episode, but just the details: Black Sheep Gathering is taking place in Albany, Oregon on from June 24 through the 26th. And Saturday, June 25, we will have a meet up at the trailer starting around 4:00 or 4:30. And so we'll have some snacks and beverages and if you are at the black sheep gathering, stop by and say hi. Kelly  1:11:06   yeah.  Marsha  1:11:09   So I should say too, Kelly, I did sign up for a class. You will laugh about this one. I'm going to take a color work. Finally. So I'm actually excited about that. Hopefully, I'll learn some good tips and techniques. So and then our last order of business is we want to hear from you. So we've done this before where people have been sending us audio recordings about their favorite yarn shops. And so just go to speak pipe.com forward slash two ewes and you can le

Sermons
Depending on God - Video

Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 12, 2022 36:22


Who or what do you depend on? Who you depend on could make the difference between constant stress and frustration, or peace and harmony in your life. Actually, the only One we can totally depend on 100% of the time is God. But how do you do that? As usual, God's word tells us how. (Music Intro: "I Sing Praises to Your Name by Kent Henry)

Sermons
Depending on God - Audio

Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 12, 2022 36:22


Who or what do you depend on? Who you depend on could make the difference between constant stress and frustration, or peace and harmony in your life. Actually, the only One we can totally depend on 100% of the time is God. But how do you do that? As usual, God's word tells us how. (Music Intro: "I Sing Praises to Your Name by Kent Henry)

The Science of Birds
Avian Flu

The Science of Birds

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 12, 2022 34:26


This episode—which is Number 53—is all about Avian Influenza. Or colloquially what we call the Avian Flu or Bird Flu.Depending on where you live, you might have noticed news headlines in recent months about the frightening spread of Avian Flu among both domestic and wild birds. I thought you might have some questions about this emerging disease, and so here we are with an entire podcast episode on the subject.~~ Leave me a review using Podchaser ~~Links of InterestCurrent U.S. Bird Flu Situation in HumansLink to this episode on the Science of Birds websiteSupport the show

Second Date Update On The :10s Podcasts
Second Date Update: (8:10) In Too Deep (Friday, 6/10)

Second Date Update On The :10s Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2022 7:46


Depending on your point of view she's either extremely romantic or super crazy.

Bright Side
I Ate Once a Day for a Month, See What Happened to Me

Bright Side

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2022 11:44


Can you eat just one meal a day? The human body can survive without a bite of food for up to 3 weeks. Of course, it's a different story with water; you wouldn't last more than 3 or 4 days without it! You and I both know that people are expected to eat 3 full meals a day: breakfast, lunch, and dinner. Depending on how filling those meals are, you may squeeze in a few snacks here and there. It usually takes about 4 hours after each meal for your belly to start making those too-often-than-not embarrassingly monstrous growls, reminding you that it's time for your next meal! But with different diets and fasting gaining popularity, I couldn't help but wonder what would happen to my body if I ate just one meal every day for 30 days. I did it, and here's what I got out of it! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Guide to the Unknown « TalkBomb

When you can see through to the other side and you know exactly what's going on in there, sure, fine, you love a tunnel. But what about hauntings and growling and secret people? Then you've got a little tunnel trouble on your hands. A HUGE thank you to writers InferiousX and Rick_the_Intern, whose awesome Reddit stories are featured in this episode! The Tunnel: https://www.reddit.com/r/nosleep/comments/ogft1/the_tunnel/ In an old railway tunnel in the south, there are people that live upside down.: https://www.reddit.com/r/nosleep/comments/oel0je/in_an_old_railway_tunnel_in_the_south_there_are/ For full sources and links, visit http://www.gttupod.com/home/gttu239 Support GTTU on Patreon! Depending on the tier you choose, you get one, two, our FOUR full bonus episodes per month, a private Discord, and more at patreon.com/gttupod. Thank you so much! See everything GTTU-related at gttupod.com. Watch videos of all of our episodes at youtube.com/gttupod Follow us online: https://www.instagram.com/gttupod https://www.facebook.com/gttupod https://www.twitter.com/gttupod Join our private Facebook group at facebook.com/groups/gttupod  

Small Biz FL
Ep. 86 | What is the Employer of Choice Program by Florida Makes | Marcelo Dossantos Director of Talent Development + Susan Haggard Talent Development & Engagement Manager

Small Biz FL

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 24:47


This episode is a special segment recorded at the Small Business Development Center at Indian River State College. In this segment, we featured two standout guests representing the FloridaMakes network. FloridaMakes focuses on results for small to medium-sized manufacturing companies. Their services are designed to help further the goals for profitability and productivity for these businesses. Depending on the needs and goals of the organization, which can include helping solve a specific manufacturing problem, increasing productivity, adopting best practices, determining how core capabilities might be used to enter a new market, or enhancing processes through appropriate advanced technology or training. Both Marcelo and Susan work in the Talent Development division which means that part of their job is to find solutions for workforce and talent problems facing manufacturers on the Treasure Coast and all throughout Florida. On this episode host Tom Kindred discusses the Employer of Choice program with Marcelo and Susan. As an employer you need to promote your organization as a desirable place to work – after all, recruiting and retaining talent is essential for growing your organization! The Manufacturing Employer of Choice program is conducted by a third-party consulting firm via a "no-cost” 40 question survey to determine how your company ranks among peer groups within the industry, in providing the elements necessary to be a great place to work. The survey instrument is completed by your company's Human Resources Department or Management Team that handles talent recruitment & selection, compensation & benefits and training & development functions. All participating manufacturers will receive a valuable benchmarking analytics report based on survey results. This year's winners will be recognized at the 2022 statewide MakeMore Manufacturing Summit on October 13 taking place in The GuideWell Innovation Center in Orlando. Become a part of this program and reap the benefits. It only takes 25-30 minutes of your time to apply! Apply Here: https://www.floridamakes.com/service-offerings/workforce-development/eoc     

The Stop Down Photography Podcast
What Pink Floyd Taught Me About Photography f/100

The Stop Down Photography Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 10:40


Episode 100! This is certainly a milestone for this podcast. Like our photo journey, the road to this milestone has been one step at a time, the result of continued, sustained effort. Looking back at the past 99 episodes of The Stop Down Photography Podcast, the most popular ones are the “Taught Me” episodes. In my daily life, I very often connect the philosophies of other people and ideas - photographers, artists, or otherwise - to my photography. I thought for Episode 100 it would be a good to do another of those. And it so happened I had another of my mini-epiphanies connecting music to photography.Join me for a story of an odd pairing … the pyschedelic melodies of Pink Floyd as a source of motivation. Have a listen - I think you'll get motivated to take another step forward on your journey as a visual artist.Subscribe to my mailing list and be among the first to hear about my 2023 photography workshops.Past episodes referred to in this podcast:What Marcus Aurelius Taught Me About Photography f/46What Bruce Lee Taught Me About Photography f/13What George Harrison Thought Me About Photography f/4Ignite Your Creativity With A Photo Workshop f/3Rate & ReviewIf you enjoyed this episode, please rate and review it on Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, or Podchaser.com. Fresh, current ratings help other photographers find out about the show.Supporters Of The Show - Thank You!Thanks to everyone that supports this show, through comments, reviews, and shares. Sharing this podcast with your photo friends and camera clubs is one of the many zero-cost ways you can support the show. If you wish to support the show financially, you can also make a one-time donation.Affiliate LinksProduct links in this post may contain affiliate tags. Depending on the purchase, The Stop Down Photography Podcast may receive compensation if you purchase a product via one of those links. There is no additional cost to you. The use of affiliate links never influences the content or opinions of the episodes.Support the show

Screaming in the Cloud
Connecting Cybersecurity to the Whole Organization with Alyssa Miller

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 35:27


About AlyssaAlyssa Miller, Business Information Security Officer (BISO) for S&P Global, is the global executive leader for cyber security across the Ratings division, connecting corporate security objectives to business initiatives. She blends a unique mix of technical expertise and executive presence to bridge the gap that can often form between security practitioners and business leaders. Her goal is to change how security professionals of all levels work with our non-security partners throughout the business.A life-long hacker, Alyssa has a passion for technology and security. She bought her first computer herself at age 12 and quickly learned techniques for hacking modem communications and software. Her serendipitous career journey began as a software developer which enabled her to pivot into security roles. Beginning as a penetration tester, her last 16 years have seen her grow as a security leader with experience across a variety of organizations. She regularly advocates for improved security practices and shares her research with business leaders and industry audiences through her international public speaking engagements, online content, and other media appearances.Links Referenced: Cybersecurity Career Guide: https://alyssa.link/book A-L-Y-S-S-A dot link—L-I-N-K slash book: https://alyssa.link/book Twitter: https://twitter.com/AlyssaM_InfoSec alyssasec.com: https://alyssasec.com TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Vultr. Optimized cloud compute plans have landed at Vultr to deliver lightning-fast processing power, courtesy of third-gen AMD EPYC processors without the IO or hardware limitations of a traditional multi-tenant cloud server. Starting at just 28 bucks a month, users can deploy general-purpose, CPU, memory, or storage optimized cloud instances in more than 20 locations across five continents. Without looking, I know that once again, Antarctica has gotten the short end of the stick. Launch your Vultr optimized compute instance in 60 seconds or less on your choice of included operating systems, or bring your own. It's time to ditch convoluted and unpredictable giant tech company billing practices and say goodbye to noisy neighbors and egregious egress forever. Vultr delivers the power of the cloud with none of the bloat. Screaming in the Cloud listeners can try Vultr for free today with a $150 in credit when they visit getvultr.com/screaming. That's G-E-T-V-U-L-T-R dot com slash screaming. My thanks to them for sponsoring this ridiculous podcast.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by Honeycomb. When production is running slow, it's hard to know where problems originate. Is it your application code, users, or the underlying systems? I've got five bucks on DNS, personally. Why scroll through endless dashboards while dealing with alert floods, going from tool to tool to tool that you employ, guessing at which puzzle pieces matter? Context switching and tool sprawl are slowly killing both your team and your business. You should care more about one of those than the other; which one is up to you. Drop the separate pillars and enter a world of getting one unified understanding of the one thing driving your business: production. With Honeycomb, you guess less and know more. Try it for free at honeycomb.io/screaminginthecloud. Observability: it's more than just hipster monitoring.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. One of the problems that many folks experience in the course of their career, regardless of what direction they're in, is the curse of high expectations. And there's no escaping for that. Think about CISOs for example, the C-I-S-O, the Chief Information Security Officer.It's generally a C-level role. Well, what's better than a C in the academic world? That's right, a B. My guest today is breaking that mold. Alyssa Miller is the BISO—B-I-S-O—at S&P Global. Alyssa, thank you for joining me to suffer my slings and arrows—Alyssa: [laugh].Corey: —as we go through a conversation that is certain to be no less ridiculous than it has begun to be already.Alyssa: I mean, I'm good with ridiculous, but thanks for having me on. This is awesome. I'm really excited to be here.Corey: Great. What the heck's BISO?Alyssa: [laugh]. I never get that question. So, this is—Corey: “No one's ever asked me that before.” [crosstalk 00:03:38]—Alyssa: Right?Corey: —the same thing as, “Do you know you're really tall?” “No, you're kidding.” Same type of story. But I wasn't clear. That means I'm really the only person left wondering.Alyssa: Exactly. I mean, I wrote a whole blog on it the day I got the job, right? So, Business Information Security Officer, Basically what it means is I am like the CISO but for my division, the Ratings Division at S&P Global. So, I lead our cyber security efforts within that division, work closely with our information security teams, our corporate IT teams, whatever, but I don't report to them; I report into the business line.I'm in the divisional CTO's org structure. And so, I'm the one bridging that gap between that business side where hey, we make all the money and that corporate InfoSec side where hey, we're trying to protect all the things, and there's usually that little bit of a gap where they don't always connect. That's me building the bridge across that.Corey: Someone who speaks both security and business is honestly in a bit of rare supply these days. I mean, when I started my Thursday newsletter podcast nonsense Last Week in AWS: Security, the problem I kept smacking into was everything I saw was on one side of that divide or the other. There was the folks who have the word security in their job title, and there tends to be this hidden language of corporate speak. It's a dialect I don't fully understand. And then you have the community side of actual security practitioners who are doing amazing work, but also have a cultural problem that more or less distills down to being an awful lot of shitheads in them there waters.And I wanted something that was neither of those and also wasn't vendor captured, which is why I decided to start storytelling in that space. But increasingly, I'm seeing that there's a significant problem with people who are able to contextualize security in the context of business. Because if you're secure enough, you can stop all work from ever happening, whereas if you're pure business side and only care about feature velocity and the rest, like, “Well, what happens if we get breached?” It's, “Oh, don't worry, I have my resume up to date.” Not the most reassuring answer to give people. You have to be able to figure out where that line lies. And it seems like that figuring out where that line is, is more or less your entire stock-in-trade.Alyssa: Oh absolutely, yeah. I mean, I can remember my earliest days as a developer, my cynical attitude towards security myself was, you know, their Utopia would be an impenetrable room full of servers that have no connections to anything, right? Like that would be wildly secure, yet completely useless. And so yeah, then I got into security and now I was one of them. And, you know, it's one of those things, you sit in, say a board meeting sometime and you listen to a CISO, a typical CISO talk to the board, and they just don't get it.Like, there's so much, “Hey, we're implementing this technology and we're doing this thing, and here's our vulnerability counts, and here's how many are overdue.” And none of that means anything. I mean, I actually had a board member ask me once, “What is a CISO?” I kid you not. Like, that's where they're at.Like, so don't tell them what you're doing, but tell them why connected back to, like, “Hey, the business needs this and this, and in order to do it, we've got to make sure it's secure, so we're going to implement these couple of things. And here's the roadmap of how we get from where we are right now to where we need to be so they can launch that new service or product,” or whatever the hell it is that they're going to do.Corey: It feels like security is right up there with accounting, in the sense of fields of endeavor where you don't want someone with too much personality involved. Because if the CISO's sitting there talking to the board, it's like, “So, what do you do here, exactly?” And the answer is the honest, “Hey, remember last month how we were in The New York Times for that giant data breach?” And they do a split take, “No, no, I don't.” “Exactly. You're welcome.” On some level, it is kind of honest, but it also does not instill confidence when you're that cavalier with the description of what it is you do here.Alyssa: Oh there's—Corey: At least there's some corners. I prefer—Alyssa: —there's so much—Corey: —places where that goes over well, but that's me.Alyssa: Yeah. But there's so much of that too, right? Like, here's the one I love. “Well, you know, it's not if you get breached, it's when. Oh, by the way, give me millions and millions of dollars, so I can make sure we don't get breached.”But wait, you just told me we're going to get breached no matter what we do. [laugh]. We do that in security. Like, and then you wonder why they don't give you funding for the initiative. Like, “Hello?” You know?And that's the thing that gets me it's like, can we just sit back and understand, like, how do you message to these people? Yeah I mean, you bring up the accounting thing; the funny thing is, at least all of them understand some level of accounting because most of them have MBAs and business degrees where they had to do some accounting. They didn't go through cyber security in their MBA program.So, one of my favorite questions on Twitter once was somebody asked me, you know, if I want to get into cyber security leadership, what is the one thing that I should focus on or what skills should I study? I said, “Go study MBA concepts.” Like, forget all the cyber security stuff. You probably have plenty of that technolog—go understand what they learn in MBA programs. And if you can start to speak that language, that's going to pay dividends for bridging that gap.Corey: So, you don't look like the traditional slovenly computer geek showing up at those meetings who does not know how to sound as if they belong in the room. Like, it's unfair, on some level, and I used to have bitter angst about that. Like, “Why should how I dress matter how people perceive me?” Yeah, in an absolute sense you're absolutely right, however, I can talk about the way the world is or the way I wish it were and there has to be a bit of a divide there.Alyssa: Oh, for sure. Yeah. I mean, you can't deny that you have to be prepared for the audience you're walking into. Now, I work in big conservative financial services on Wall Street. You know, and I had this conversation with a prominent member of our community when I started the job.I'm like, “Boy, I guess I can't really put stickers on my laptop. I'm going to have to get, you know, a protector or something to put stickers on.” Because the last thing I want to do is go into a boardroom with my laptop and whip out a bunch of hacker stickers on the backside of my laptop. Like, in a lot of spaces that will work, but you can't really do that when you're, you know, at, you know, the executive level and you're in a conservative, financial [unintelligible 00:10:16]. It just, I would love to say they should deal with that, I should be able to have pink hair, and you know, face tattoos and everything else, but the reality is, yeah, I can do all that, but these are still human beings who are going to react to that.And it's the same when talking about cyber security, then. Like, I have to understand as a security practitioner that all they know about cyber security is it's big and scary. It's the thing that keeps them up at night. I've had board members tell me exactly that. And so, how do I make it a little less scary, or at least get them to have some confidence in me that I'll, like, carry the shield in front of them and protect them. Like, that's my job. That's why I'm there.Corey: When I was starting my consultancy five years ago, I was trying to make a choice between something in the security cloud direction or the cost cloud direction. And one of the things that absolutely tipped the balance for me was the fact that the AWS bill is very much a business-hours-only problem. No one calls me at two in the morning screaming their head off. Usually. But there's a lot of alignment between those two directions in that you can spend all your time and energy fixing security issues and/or reducing the bill, but past a certain point, knock it off and go do the thing that your company is actually there to do.And you want to be responsible to a point on those things, but you don't want it to be the end-all-be-all because the logical outcome of all of that, if you keep going, is your company runs out of money and dies because you're not going to either cost optimize or security optimize your business to its next milestone. And weighing those things is challenging. Now, too many people hear that and think, “See, I don't have to worry about those things at all.” It's, “Oh, you will sooner or later. I promise.”Alyssa: So, here's the fallacy in that. There is this assumption that everything we do in security is going to hamper the business in some way and so we have to temper that, right? Like, you're not wrong. And we talked about before, right? You know, security in a traditional sense, like, we could do all of the puristic things and end up just, like, screeching the world to a halt.But the reality is, we can do security in a way that actually grows the business, that actually creates revenue, or I should say enables the creation of revenue in that, you know, we can empower the business to do more things and to be more innovative by how we approach security in the organization. And that's the big thing that we miss in security is, like, look, yes, we will always be a quote-unquote, “Cost center,” right? I mean, we in security don't—unless you work for a security organization—we're not getting revenue attributed to us, we're not creating revenue. But we are enabling those people who can if we approach it right.Corey: Well, the Red Team might if they go a little off-script, but that's neither here nor there.Alyssa: I—yeah, I mean, I've had that question. “Like, couldn't we just sell resell our Red Team services?” No. No. That's not our core [crosstalk 00:13:14]Corey: Oh, I was going the other direction. Like, oh, we're just going to start extorting other businesses because we got bored this week. I'm kidding. I'm kidding. Please don't do an investigation, any law enforcement—Alyssa: I was going to say, I think my [crosstalk 00:13:22]—Corey: —folks that happen to be listening to this.Alyssa: [crosstalk 00:13:24] is calling me right now. They're want to know what I'm [laugh] talking about. But no—Corey: They have some inquiries they would like you to assist them with and they're not really asking.Alyssa: Yeah, yeah, they're good at that. No, I love them, though. They're great. [laugh]. But no, seriously, like, I mean, we always think about it that way because—and then we wonder why do we have the reputation of, you know, the Department of No.Well, because we kind of look at it that way ourselves; we don't really look at, like how can we be a part of the answer? Like, when we look at, like, DevSecOps, for instance. Okay, I want to bring security into my pipeline. So, what do we say? “Oh, shared responsibility. That's a DevOps thing.” So, that means security is everybody's responsibility. Full stop.Corey: Right. It's a—Alyssa: Well—Corey: And there, I agree with you wholeheartedly. Cost is—Alyssa: But—Corey: —aligned with this. It has to be easier to do it the right way than to just go off half-baked and do it yourself off the blessed path. And that—Alyssa: So there—Corey: —means there's that you cannot make it harder to do the right thing; you have to make it easier because you will not win against human psychology. Depending on someone when they're done with an experiment to manually go in and turn things off. It will not happen. And my argument has been that security and cost are aligned constantly because the best way to secure something and save money on at the same time is to turn that shit off. You wouldn't think it would be that simple, but yet here we are.Alyssa: But see, here's the thing. This is what kills me. It's so arrogant of security people to look at it and say that right? Because shared responsibility means shared. Okay, that means we have responsibilities we're going to share. Everybody is responsible for security, yes.Our developers have responsibilities now that we have to take a share in as well, which is get that shit to production fast. Period. That is their goal. How fast can I pop user stories off the backlog and get them to deployment? My SRE is on the ops side. They're, like, “We just got to keep that stuff running. That's all we that's our primary focus.”So, the whole point of DevOps and DevSecOps was everybody's responsible for every part of that, so if I'm bringing security into that message, I, as security, have to be responsible for site's stability; I, in security, have to be responsible for efficient deployment and the speed of that pipeline. And that's the part that we miss.Corey: This episode is sponsored in parts by our friend EnterpriseDB. EnterpriseDB has been powering enterprise applications with PostgreSQL for 15 years. And now EnterpriseDB has you covered wherever you deploy PostgreSQL on-premises, private cloud, and they just announced a fully-managed service on AWS and Azure called BigAnimal, all one word. Don't leave managing your database to your cloud vendor because they're too busy launching another half-dozen managed databases to focus on any one of them that they didn't build themselves. Instead, work with the experts over at EnterpriseDB. They can save you time and money, they can even help you migrate legacy applications—including Oracle—to the cloud. To learn more, try BigAnimal for free. Go to biganimal.com/snark, and tell them Corey sent you.Corey: I think you might be the first person I've ever spoken to that has that particular take on the shared responsibility model. Normally, when I hear it, it's on stage from an AWS employee doing a 45-minute song-and-dance about what the secured responsibility model is, and generally, that is interpreted as, “If you get breached, it's your fault, not ours.”Alyssa: [laugh].Corey: Now, you can't necessarily say it that directly to someone who has just suffered a security incident, which is why it takes 45 minutes and slides and diagrams and excel sheets and the rest. But that is what it fundamentally distills down to, and then you wind up pointing out security things that they've had that [unintelligible 00:17:11] security researchers have pointed out and they are very tight-lipped about those things. And it's, “Oh, it's not that you're otherworldly good at security; it's that you're great at getting people to shut up.” You know, not me, for whatever reason because I'm noisy and obnoxious, but most people who actually care about not getting fired from their jobs, generally don't want to go out there making big cloud companies look bad. Meanwhile, that's kind of my entire brand.Alyssa: I mean, it's all about lines of liability, right?Corey: Oh yeah.Alyssa: I mean, where am I liable, where am I not? And yeah, well, if I tell you you're responsible for security on all these things, and I can point to any part of that was part of the breach, well, hey, then it's out of my hands. I'm not liable. I did what I said I would; you didn't secure your stuff. Yeah, it's—and I mean, and some of that is to be fair.Like, I mean, okay, I'm going to host my stuff on your computer—the whole cloud is just somebody else's computer model is still ultimately true—but, yeah, I mean, I'm expecting you to provide me a stable and secure environment and then I'm going to deploy stuff on it, and you are expecting me to deploy things that are stable and secure as well. And so, when they say shared model or shared responsibility model, but it—really if you listen to that message, it's the exact opposite. They're telling you why it's a separate responsibility model. Here's our responsibilities; here's yours. Boom. It's not about shared; it's about separated.Corey: One of the most formative, I guess, contributors to my worldview was 13 years ago, I went on a date and met someone lovely. We got married. We've been together ever since, and she's an attorney. And it is been life-changing to understand a lot of that perspective, where it turns out when you're dealing with legal, they are not—and everyone says, “Oh, and the lawyers insisted on these things.”No, they didn't. A lawyer's entire role in a company is to identify risk, and then it is up to the business to make a decision around what is acceptable and what is not. If your lawyers ever insist on something, what that actually means in my experience is, you have said something profoundly ignorant that is one of those, like—that is—they're doing the legal equivalent of slapping the gun out of the toddler's hand of, “No, you cannot go and tweet that because you'll go to prison,” level of ridiculous nonsense where it is, “That will violate the law.” Everything else is different shades of the same answer: it depends. Here's what to consider.Alyssa: Yes.Corey: And then you choose—and the business chooses its own direction. So, when you have companies doing what appeared to be ridiculous things, like Oracle, for example, loves to begin every keynote with a disclaimer about how nothing they're about to say is true, the lawyers didn't insist on that—though they are the world's largest law firm, Kirkland Ellison. But instead, it's this entire story of given the risk and everything that we know about how we say things onstage and people gunning for us, yeah, we are going to [unintelligible 00:20:16] this disclaimer first. Most other tech companies do not do that exact thing, which I've got to say when you're sitting in the audience ready to see the new hotness that's about to get rolled out and it starts with a disclaimer, that is more or less corporate-speak for, “You are about to hear some bullshit,” in my experience.Alyssa: [laugh]. Yes. I mean and that's the thing, like, [clear throat], you know, we do deride legal teams a lot. And you know, I can find you plenty of security people who hate the fact that when you're breached, who's the first call you make? Well, it's your legal team.Why? Because they're the ones who are going to do everything in their power to limit the amount that you can get sued on the back-end for anything that got exposed, that you know, didn't meet service levels, whatever the heck else. And that all starts with legal privilege.Corey: They're reporting responsibilities. Guess who keeps up on what those regulatory requirements are? Spoiler, it's probably not you, whoever's listening to this, unless you're an attorney because that is their entire job.Alyssa: Yes, exactly. And, you know, work in a highly regulated environment—like mine—and you realize just how critical that is. Like, how do I know—I mean, there are times there's this whole discussion of how do you determine if something is a material impact or not? I don't want to be the one making that, and I'm glad I don't have to make that decision. Like, I'll tell you all the information, but yes, you lawyers, you compliance people, I want you to make the decision of if it's a material impact or not because as much as I understand about the business, y'all know way more about that stuff than I do.I can't say. I can only say, “Look, this is what it impacted. This is the data that was impacted. These are the potential exposures that occurred here. Please take that information now and figure out what that means, and is there any materiality to that that now we have to report that to the street.”Corey: Right, right. You can take my guesses on this or you can get it take an attorney's. I am a loud, confident-sounding white guy. Attorneys are regulated professionals who carry malpractice insurance. If they give wrong advice that is wrong enough in these scenarios, they can be sanctioned for it; they can lose their license to practice law.And there are challenges with the legal profession and how much of a gatekeeper the Bar Association is and the rest, but this is what it is [done 00:22:49] for itself. That is a regulated industry where they have continuing education requirements they need to certify in a test that certain things are true when they say it, whereas it turns out that I don't usually get people even following up on a tweet that didn't come true very often. There's a different level of scrutiny, there's a different level of professional bar it raises to, and it turns out that if you're going to be legally held to account for things you say, yeah, turns out a lot of your answers to are going to be flavors of, “It depends.”Alyssa: [laugh].Corey: Imagine that.Alyssa: Don't we do that all the time? I mean, “How critical is this?” “Well, you know, it depends on what kind of data, it depends on who the attacker is. It depends.” Yeah, I mean, that's our favorite word because no one wants to commit to an absolute, and nor should we, I mean, if we're speaking in hyperbole and absolutes, boy, we're doing all the things wrong in cyber.We got to understand, like, hey, there is nuance here. That's how you run—no business runs on absolutes and hyperbole. Well, maybe marketing sometimes, but that's a whole other story.Corey: Depends on if it's done well or terribly.Alyssa: [laugh]. Right. Exactly. “Hey, you can be unhackable. You can be breached-proof.” Oh, God.Corey: Like, what's your market strategy? We're going to paint a big freaking target in the front of the building. Like, I still don't know how Target the company was ever surprised by a data breach that they had when they have a frickin' bullseye as their logo.Alyssa: “Come get us.”Corey: It's, like, talk about poking the bear. But there we are.Alyssa: [unintelligible 00:24:21] no. I mean, hey, [unintelligible 00:24:23] like that was so long ago.Corey: It still casts a shadow.Alyssa: I know.Corey: People point to that as a great example of, like, “Well, what's going to happen if we get breached?” It's like, well look at Target because they wound up—like, their stock price a year later was above where it had been before and it seemed to have no lasting impact. Yeah, but they effectively replaced all of the execs, so you know, let's have some self-interest going on here by named officers of the company. It's, “Yeah, the company will be fine. Would you like to still be here what it is?”Alyssa: And how many lawsuits do you think happened that you never heard about because they got settled before they were filed?Corey: Oh, yes. There's a whole world of that.Alyssa: That's what's really interesting when people talk about, like, the cost of breach and stuff, it's like, we don't even know. We can't know because there is so much of that. I mean, think about it, any organization that gets breached, the first thing they're trying to do is keep as much of it out of the news as they can, and that includes the lawsuits. And so, you know, it's like, all right, well, “Hey, let's settle this before you ever file.”Okay, good. No one will ever know about that. That will never show up anywhere. It is going to show up on a balance sheet anywhere, right? I mean, it's there, but it's buried in big categories of lots of other things, and how are you ever going to track that back without, you know, like, a full-on audit of all of their accounting for that year? Yeah, it's—so I always kind of laugh when people start talking about that and they want to know, what's the average cost of a breach. I'm like, “There's no way to measure that. There is none.”Corey: It's not cheap, and the reputational damage gets annoying. I still give companies grief for these things all the time because it's—again, the breach is often about information of mine that I did not consciously choose to give to you and the, “Oh, I'm going to blame a third-party process.” No, no, you can outsource work, but not responsibility. You can't share that one.Alyssa: Ah, third-party diligence, uh, that seems to be a thing. You know, I think we're supposed to make sure our third parties are trustworthy and doing the right things too, right? I mean, it's—Corey: Best example I ever saw that was an article in the Wall Street Journal about the Pokemon company where they didn't name the vendor, but they said they declined to do business with them in part based upon their lax security policy around S3 buckets. That is the first and so far only time I have had an S3 Bucket Responsibility Award engraved and sent to their security director. Usually, it's the ignoble prize of the S3 Bucket Negligence Award, and there are oh so many of those.Alyssa: Oh, and it's hard, right? Because you're standing—I mean, I'm in that position a lot, right? You know, you're looking at a vendor and you've got the business saying, “God, we want to use this vendor. All their product is great.” And I'm sitting there saying, but, “Oh, my God, look at what they're doing. It's a mess. It's horrible. How do I how do we get around this?”And that's where, you know, you just have to kind of—I wish I could say no more, but at the end of the day, I know what that does. That just—okay, well, we'll go file an exception and we'll use it anyway. So, maybe instead, we sit and work on how to do this, or maybe there is an alternative vendor, but let's sort it out together. So yeah, I mean, I do applaud them. Like that's great to, like, be able to look at a vendor and say, “No, we ain't touching you because what you're doing over there is nuts.” And I think we're learning more and more how important that is, with a lot of the supply chain attacks.Corey: Actually, I'm worried about having emailed you, you're going to leak my email address when your inbox inevitably gets popped. Come on. It's awful stuff.Alyssa: Yeah, exactly. So, I mean, it's we there's—but like everything, it's a balance again, right? Like, how can we keep that business going and also make sure that their vendors—so that's where it just comes down to, like, okay, let's talk contracts now. So, now we're back to legal.Corey: We are. And if you talk to a lawyer and say, “I'm thinking about going to law school,” the answer is always the same. “No… don't do it.” Making it clear that is apparently a terrible life and professional decision, which of course, brings us to your most recent terrible life and professional decision. As we record this, we are reportedly weeks away from you having a physical copy in your hands of a book.And the segue there is because no one wants to write a book. Everyone wants to have written a book, but apparently—unless you start doing dodgy things and ghost-writing and exploiting people in the rest—one is a necessary prerequisite for the other. So, you've written a book. Tell me about it.Alyssa: Oof, well, first of all, spot on. I mean, I think there are people who really do, like, enjoy the act of writing a book—Corey: Oh, I don't have the attention span to write a tweet. People say, “Oh, you should write a book, Corey,” which I think is code for them saying, “You should shut up and go away for 18 months.” Like, yeah, I wish.Alyssa: Writing a book has been the most eye-opening experience of my life. And yeah, I'm not a hundred percent sure it's one I'll ever—I've joked with people already, like, I'll probably—if I ever want another book, I'll probably hire a ghostwriter. But no, I do have a book coming out: Cybersecurity Career Guide. You know, I looked at this cyber skills gap, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, we hear about it, 4 million jobs are going to be left open.Whatever, great. Well, then how come none of these college grads can get hired? Why is there this glut of people who are trying to start careers in cyber security and we can't get them in?Corey: We don't have six months to train you, so we're going to spend nine months trying to fill the role with someone experienced?Alyssa: Exactly. So, 2020 I did a bunch of research into that because I'm like, I got to figure this out. Like, this is bizarre. How is this disconnect happening? I did some surveys. I did some interviews. I did some open-source research. Ended up doing a TED Talk based off of that—or TEDx Talk based off of that—and ultimately that led into this book. And so yeah, I mean, I just heard from the publisher yesterday, in fact that we're, like, in that last stage before they kick it out to the printers, and then it's like three weeks and I should have physical copies in my hands.Corey: I will be getting one when it finally comes out. I have an almost, I believe, perfect track record of having bought every book that a guest on this show has written.Alyssa: Well, I appreciate that.Corey: Although, God help me if I ever have someone, like, “So, what have you done?” “I've written 80 books.” Like, “Well, thank you, Stephen King. I'm about to go to have a big—you're going to see this number of the company revenue from orbit at this point with that many.” But yeah, it's impressive having written a book. It's—Alyssa: I mean, for me, it's the reward is already because there are a lot of people have—so my publisher does really cool thing they call it early acc—or electronic access program, and where there are people who bought the book almost a year ago now—which is kind of, I feel bad about that, but that's as much my publisher as it is me—but where they bought it a year ago and they've been able to read the draft copy of the book as I've been finishing the book. And I'm already hearing from them, like, you know, I'm hearing from people who really found some value from it and who, you know, have been recommending it other people who are trying to start careers and whatever. And it's like, that's where the reward is, right?Like, it was, it's hell writing a book. It was ten times worse during Covid. You know, my publisher even confirmed that for me that, like, look, yeah, you know, authors around the globe are having problems right now because this is not a good environment conducive to writing. But, yeah, I mean, it's rewarding to know that, like, all right, there's going to be this thing out there, that, you know, these pages that I wrote that are helping people get started in their careers, that are helping bring to light some of the real challenges of how we hire in cyber security and in tech in general. And so, that's the thing that's going to make it worthwhile. And so yeah, I'm super excited that it's looking like we're mere weeks now from this thing being shipped to people who have bought it.Corey: So, now it's racing, whether this gets published before the book does. So, we'll see. There is a bit of a production lag here because, you know, we have to make me look pretty and that takes a tremendous amount of effort.Alyssa: Oh, stop. Come on now. But it will be interesting to see. Like, that would actually be really cool if they came out at about the same time. Like, you know, I'm just saying.Corey: Yeah. We'll see how it goes. Where's the best place for people to find you if they want to learn more?Alyssa: About the book or in general?Corey: Both.Alyssa: So—Corey: Links will of course be in the [show notes 00:32:49]. Let's not kid ourselves here.Alyssa: The book is real easy. Go to Alyssa—A-L-Y-S-S-A, back here behind me for those of you seeing the video. Um—I can't point the right direction. There we go. That one. A-L-Y-S-S-A dot link—L-I-N-K slash book. It's that simple. It'll take you right to Manning's site, you can get in.Still in that early access program, so if you bought it today, you would still be able to start reading the draft versions of it. If you want to know more about me, honestly, the easiest way is to find me on Twitter. You can hear all the ridiculousness of flight school and barbecue and some security topics, too, once in a while. But at @alyssam_infosec. Or if you want to check out the website where I blog, every rare occasion, it's alyssasec.com.Corey: And all of that will be in the [show notes 00:33:41]. Thank you—Alyssa: There's a lot. [laugh].Corey: I'm looking forward to seeing it, too. Thank you so much for taking the time to deal with my nonsense today. I really appreciate it.Alyssa: Oh, that was nonsense? Are you kidding me? This was a great discussion. I really appreciate it.Corey: As have I. Thanks again for your time. It is always great to talk to people smarter than I am—which is, let's be clear, most people—Alyssa Miller, BISO at S&P Global. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice—or smash the like and subscribe button if this is on the YouTubes—whereas if you've hated the podcast, same thing, five-star review, platform of choice, smash both of the buttons, but also leave an angry comment, either on the YouTube video or on the podcast platform, saying that this was a waste of your time and what you didn't like about it because you don't need to read Alyssa's book; you're going to get a job the tried and true way, by printing out a copy of your resume and leaving it on the hiring manager's pillow in their home.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Brain Inspired
BI 138 Matthew Larkum: The Dendrite Hypothesis

Brain Inspired

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 111:42


Check out my short video series about what's missing in AI and Neuroscience. Support the show to get full episodes and join the Discord community. Matthew Larkum runs his lab at Humboldt University of Berlin, where his group studies how dendrites contribute to computations within and across layers of the neocortex. Since the late 1990s, Matthew has continued to uncover key properties of the way pyramidal neurons stretch across layers of the cortex, their dendrites receiving inputs from those different layers - and thus different brain areas. For example, layer 5 pyramidal neurons have a set of basal dendrites near the cell body that receives feedforward-like input, and a set of apical dendrites all the way up in layer 1 that receives feedback--like input. Depending on which set of dendrites is receiving input, or neither or both, the neuron's output functions in different modes- silent, regular spiking, or burst spiking. Matthew realized the different sets of dendritic inputs could signal different operations, often pairing feedforward sensory--like signals and feedback context-like signals. His research has shown this kind of coincidence detection is important for cognitive functions like perception, memory, learning, and even wakefulness. We discuss many of his ideas and research findings, why dendrites have long been neglected in favor of neuron cell bodies, the possibility of learning about computations by studying implementation-level phenomena, and much more. Larkum Lab.Twitter: @mattlark.Related papersCellular Mechanisms of Conscious Processing.Perirhinal input to neocortical layer 1 controls learning. (bioRxiv link: https://www.biorxiv.org/content/10.1101/713883v1)Are dendrites conceptually useful?Memories off the top of your head.Do Action Potentials Cause Consciousness?Blake Richard's episode discussing back-propagation in the brain (based on Matthew's experiments) 0:00 - Intro 5:31 - Background: Dendrites 23:20 - Cortical neuron bodies vs. branches 25:47 - Theories of cortex 30:49 - Feedforward and feedback hierarchy 37:40 - Dendritic integration hypothesis 44:32 - DIT vs. other consciousness theories 51:30 - Mac Shine Q1 1:04:38 - Are dendrites conceptually useful? 1:09:15 - Insights from implementation level 1:24:44 - How detailed to model? 1:28:15 - Do action potentials cause consciousness? 1:40:33 - Mac Shine Q2

The Newsmax Daily with Rob Carson
Suffering Americans Need Change

The Newsmax Daily with Rob Carson

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 38:34


Rob Carson is back from vacation, and reveals the suffering he saw while driving across the lower southeast portion of the country. Depending on where you live, the pain in your wallet hurts even more. At some point, the Democrat establishment will step in and say they have the solution for the problem that they created. Will Americans buy it again? Or are we witnessing a mass awakening? Rob plays clips of Joe Biden and his administration denying that they are the cause… To call in and speak with Rob Carson live on the show, dial 1-800-922-6680 between the hours of 12 Noon and 3:00 pm Eastern Time Monday through Friday… E-mail Rob Carson at : RCarson@newsmax.com Looking for Newsmax caps, tees, mugs & more? Check out the Newsmax merchandise shop at : http://nws.mx/shop Download the free Newsmax app at www.newsmaxtv.com/app or go to www.NewsmaxTV.com to get the real news!  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Mindvalley Podcast with Vishen Lakhiani
God, Aliens, and Mental Health Breakdowns with Big Bang Star Mayim Bialik

The Mindvalley Podcast with Vishen Lakhiani

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 18:05


Depending on the decade of television you grew up in, you might know Mayim Bialik from the hit show “Blossom” in the early 1990s or maybe you're more familiar with her 9-year run on “The Big Bang Theory”, where she played Neuroscientist Dr. Amy Farrah Fowler. What many don't know is that Mayim left acting for twelve years to earn a BS in Neuroscience from UCLA in 2000 with a minor in Hebrew & Jewish Studies. This actress-neuroscientist-mom is a force to be reckoned with within Hollywood. With over 3.5 million followers on Instagram alone, Mayim continues to use her platforms to educate and open the door to conversations on mental health - such as her online community “Grok Nation” or her new podcast, “The Breakdown”, where she breaks down mental health issues. Don't miss this episode with Mayim Bialik and Vishen to meet the mind behind this powerhouse of a woman and go deep on the latest discoveries in mental health.     Listen out for: -  Why Mayim decided to leave acting for 12 years.  - What made Mayim return to acting. - Tips on dealing with mental health problems. - Mayim weighs in on the question ‘are we living in a simulation?' - Does Mayim think that aliens are real?    Bonus:                                                                          - Learn how to master your emotional states with cutting-edge hypnosis, NLP, and psychosensory techniques in this FREE Mindvalley masterclass with Paul McKenna.

The Simple Sophisticate - Intelligent Living Paired with Signature Style
331: How to Notice the Awesomeness in Your Life and the World

The Simple Sophisticate - Intelligent Living Paired with Signature Style

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 48:57


"Our life experience will equal what we have paid attention to, whether by choice or default." —William James To hold our attention on a singular point of focus exhibits a strength of being able to thwart the tugs of distraction. And to be able to thwart distraction takes conscious intention to notice, to choose to hold ourselves in the present and to be an observer. An observer, contrary to what many may at first liken it to being, is not a wallflower or someone who is shy or passive in how they engage in life. No, an observer demonstrates awareness of the world beyond their inner world, beyond their own thoughts, worries, past experiences and biases. An observer acknowledges that the moment in which they find themselves is far more awesome when we step away from the past and choose not to look past today into the future and instead hold ourselves and our attention in the present without expectation of what we 'must' see or find. There are many reasons for noticing of any sort - looking for the good, looking for the threat or simply observing - to become a honed, yet unconscious skill in our lives, and I will be addressing by the latter on this list of three can actually bring more awesomeness into your life. Depending upon our childhood or our relationship with any caretaker during our youth, or in a culture where and if we were perceived as inferior or the minority, if the day's events unfolded based on how we engaged, what we said or didn't say, did or didn't do, we may have become very skilled at noticing others' moods, behaviors and tone of voice. Such 'noticing' was for survival, for a 'better', less contentious environment. However, it wasn't a noticing of what all that surrounded us, but rather a noticing in order to avoid threats, pain or belittling most specifically and solely. If we were so fortunate to be raised and then as an adult live in an environment where joy was a regular and consistent feeling, good moments and peace-filled and happy feelings, even if different from those around us, were celebrated without judgment, then noticing the good is a muscle we have been toning and maybe didn't realize what a gift we were given. I recently read The Art of Noticing by Rob Walker, and his introduction shares that the environment in which many of us find ourselves, if we aren't exercising our 'noticing' muscles, can detract our attention and thus prevent us from living well or fulfilled. Walker includes a quote from philosopher Georg Simmel who in 1903 wrote, "The stimulation of modern life . . . wears down the senses, leaving us dull, indifferent, and unable to focus on what really matters." That was in 1903 which while I know many may say, well, it has only gotten worse, I would counter an understandable remark by saying, its a perennial issue, an issue of whether or not to choose to notice the awesomeness, to notice when we need to turn off the noise (if we perceive it to be noise) and live more presently rather than just let what comes and what happens happen. There is a reason stimulation of constant bombardment of noises - pings, quickly displayed images in movies, programming, advertisements and overlaying of music with films/shows/etc. - occur: to give you no space to think, and instead to tell you how to think. The only way such stimulation can work is if its creator knows where its audience is at the present moment. The advertiser, the media, the speaker has to meet the audience where it is, then they pull the audience (whose attention they now have) where they want them to go (or to think). If where they begin their messaging is too far removed from where we (the audience) are, their message or idea will not land and thus not be effective, so to this point, whether it is 1903 or 2023, the world around us will forever be trying to overstimulate us in order to wear us down to refrain from thinking and nudge us to just go along, letting us believe it was our idea. Our job is to be thinkers, critical thinkers, and choose to strengthen the skill of 'noticing' or as what is often described on TSLL blog, be fully present and thus mindful. So how exactly do we become better at noticing all that is around us and thus witness, observe and savor the awesomeness in our life and the world? How do we see all that is around us clearly without the veneer of societal biases and norms? I'd like to share with you a list ideas for doing just that - seeing clearly, seeing the awesomeness and thus discovering how quite sweet everyday life is exactly where you live, call home and make your life. 1.Slow down I can already see some readers/listeners' response to this first item on the list. The reasons for their inability to slow down are on the tip of their tongue.

The Keto Kamp Podcast With Ben Azadi
Dr Donald Vega | How to Fix Your Metabolism, Reverse Diabetes & Metabolic Syndrome, & Thrive! KKP: 418

The Keto Kamp Podcast With Ben Azadi

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2022 85:29


Today, I am blessed to have here with me Dr. Donald Vega. He is a registered dietitian, strength and conditioning specialist, and lifestyle mentor based in Costa Rica with more than 24 years of experience in health education. Dr. Vega, the founder of Kilosophy, was established with one vision: “reversing the metabolic disease through a fit, happy and healthy society.” They provide programs for overweight, diabetic, hypertensive, endurance and fitness patients.  Specializes in low carb, carnivore, and keto lifestyles and has been in nutritional ketosis since 2011. He has helped over 8,000 patients to improve their lives and lose over 176,000 pounds of extra fat through their interventions in the clinics. In this episode, Dr. Donald Vega talks about getting involved in the health and nutrition space. After helping his mom reverse her type 2 diabetes, Dr. Vega found a passion for helping others on their journey to health. Dr. Vega dives into his top ten keys to health: sunlight, sleep, EMFs, thoughts, hydration, breathing, exercise, stress, thermotherapy, and nutrition. At the show's end, Dr. Vega reveals his six steps for achieving success; you don't want to miss it!