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Country in Northwestern Africa

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Best podcasts about Morocco

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Latest podcast episodes about Morocco

Outlook
How I fell in love with blindness

Outlook

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 37:24


Itto Outini lost her sight but gained her freedom Itto had been born poor in Morocco's Atlas mountains, and after her parents died, she was shunted between extended family members. She wasn't always welcome, and says she suffered frequent violence. This heightened when Itto was 17, when she describes a relative throwing a sharp object at her, taking her sight. Abandoned, Itto had to adapt to life as a blind person on the steets of a Moroccan city. Things were initially tough and disorientating, but she soon taught herself braille and found huge comfort in books and learning. Despite sleeping rough, Itto fought for the education that had been denied her when she was sighted. Itto has a memoir coming out in Autumn called "Blindness is the light of my life" Presenter: Jo Fidgen Producer: Harry Graham

LSE Middle East Centre Podcasts
Keynote 1: Patrizia Manduchi on Antonio Gramsci, from Sardinia to the Arab World

LSE Middle East Centre Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 39:13


This keynote lecture took place at the Gramsci in the Middle East & North Africa Conference organised by the LSE Middle East Centre in cooperation with Ghent University from 9-10 May, 2022. The conference explored, through empirically-grounded research, how Gramsci's work can help us make sense of our contemporary moment in the region marked by a significant expansion in resistance and uprising. Patrizia Manduchi is Director of the GramsciLab and Associate Professor of History of the Contemporary Arab World at the Department of Political and Social Sciences of the University of Cagliari. She has published numerous works on the topic of Islamic radicalism, such as: 'The fury of Allah' (Quaderni di Orientalia Karalitana); 'From pen to mouse: Dissemination tools of the concept of jihad' (curated by Franco Angeli); 'This world is not a place for rewards: Life and works of Sayyid Qutb, martyr of the Muslim Brothers' (Aracne) and 'Voices of dissent: Student movements, opposition politics and democratic transition in Asia and Africa' (Aracne). Brecht De Smet is a senior postdoctoral researcher at the Middle East and North Africa Research Group at Ghent University, where in 2012 he completed his PhD. Brecht's research interests entail prefigurative and hegemonic class politics, marginalization, and political economy in Egypt, the MENA region, and beyond. He has published articles, opinion pieces, and two books on the politics of revolution and counter-revolution in Egypt (2016). He is now working on the 'Understanding political change from the Margins: Social and Environmental Justice in Morocco and Tunisia' project sponsored by the Belgian Fund for Scientific Research. This conference was supported by the Departments of Government, Sociology, and the Atlantic Fellows for Social and Economic Equity programme based at the International Inequalities Institute, LSE.

Unpacking Israeli History
From Casabalanca, With Love

Unpacking Israeli History

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 39:53 Very Popular


Alain Checroun has a story to tell. His birthplace, Morocco, was once home to nearly 300,000 Jews. But after the creation of the state of Israel, hundreds of thousands of Moroccan Jews made their way to the world's only Jewish state. Like all immigration stories, Alain's is a story of resilience. Of challenges. Of triumphs. And ultimately, it's about the joys of coming home. ~~~~  For more information on Mizrahi Jewry in general and Moroccan Jewry in specific, see the following sources: The Jews of Morocco from the Jewish Virtual Library: https://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jews-of-morocco Jews Under Moroccan Skies: https://www.amazon.com/Jews-Under-Moroccan-Skies-Thousand/dp/1935604244 Inside Jewish Morocco (A JDC Video): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1ti-e2bY0mE Moroccan Jews Celebrating Normalization Deal: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZOXwF5IAurk The Story of Israel's Black Panthers: https://jewishunpacked.com/the-story-of-israels-black-panthers/ Valley of Tears: https://www.hbomax.com/series/urn:hbo:series:GX6rsqgAIJMPCwgEAAACB On the Wadi Salib Riots: https://www.haaretz.com/jewish/2013-06-16/ty-article/july-9-1959-wadi-salib-riots/0000017f-f7b1-d044-adff-f7f9dbb80000 and https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt21h4xqw.9?seq=1#metadata_info_tab_contents Mizrahi Jews: https://unpacked.education/video/mizrahi-jews-the-jews-of-the-middle-east-and-north-africa/ Mizrahi Music: https://jewishunpacked.com/how-mizrahi-music-took-over-israeli-pop/ ~~~~  This show was made possible by support from the Koum Family Foundation, the Crain-Maling Foundation, the Adam and Gila Milstein Family Foundation, and the Skolnick Family Charitable Trust.

Focus on Europe | Video Podcast | Deutsche Welle
Spain/Morocco: Migrants die at Europe's external borders

Focus on Europe | Video Podcast | Deutsche Welle

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 5:03


There have been more dead migrants at the Moroccan-Spanish border this year than ever before. Human rights activists are calling the Moroccan border guards criminals.

Unpacking Israeli History
Introducing... Homeland: Ten Stories, One Israel

Unpacking Israeli History

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 4:27 Very Popular


When a bus breaks down off an Israeli highway and leaves its passengers stranded, Emily, American journalism student, decides to put her skills to the test...much to the chagrin of her fellow travelers. As she eventually coaxes each person to share their story, Emily uncovers the rich and complex history that every Israeli holds. Each episode is a deep dive into a new character's world; from Morocco to Russia, all paths lead to Israel in this narrative style pod. ~~~~~~~~~~~~ Thank you to our generous sponsors: Koum Family Foundation Crain-Maling Foundation Adam and Gila Milstein Family Foundation Skolnick Family Charitable Trust

The Cinematography Podcast
Jules O’Loughlin ASC, ACS on shooting the FX series The Old Man and Disney+ series Ms. Marvel

The Cinematography Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 50:27


Australian cinematographer Jules O'Loughlin's path to movie making was a long journey. After graduating from the prestigious AFTRS- Australian Film Television and Radio School- he worked steadily and shot a wide range of films and TV shows including the action movie The Hitman's Bodyguard, the series Black Sails, the horror movie Krampus and the children's film Come Away. His recent work on two series, The Old Man and Ms. Marvel, show off his ability to visually transport audiences to other worlds. The FX action spy series The Old Man began shooting in the fall of 2019. Jeff Bridges plays Dan Chase, a retired CIA agent whose old enemies are still hunting him. The series is very well acted, with great dialog scenes between Bridges and John Lithgow. Jules believes that as a cinematographer, it's important to tread softly, be respectful and give the actors space to work without technical distractions. Jules shot two episodes of the series, with a planned location shoot in Morocco which was standing in for Afghanistan. But in March of 2020 the entire production shut down because of the pandemic. After a few months, production resumed and the desert around Santa Clarita, CA became the Afghanistan location. Unfortunately, shortly after that, Jeff Bridges, who actually did a lot of the fight scenes himself, was diagnosed with lymphoma. Bridges' stunt double stepped in and the VFX team used some digital face replacement for certain parts while he was undergoing treatment. Despite all the setbacks, The Old Man has been a hit and is coming back for a second season. The Disney+ series Ms. Marvel is about young Pakistani-American teen Kamala Khan, who discovers she has super powers after putting on a magic bracelet. The show is energetic, vibrant and colorful, reflecting Kamala's personality and South Asian culture. Jules and director Sharmeen Obaid-Chinoy knew they could create a slightly different look for episodes four and five, since they take place in the Pakistan city of Karachi. Obaid-Chinoy is an Oscar-winning documentary filmmaker, and she and Jules chose to use more handheld cameras to explore the story's historic narrative as Kamala travels through time to learn more about her family's past. Ms. Marvel has brought an enthusiastic younger audience who are responding to Kamala's cultural identity. In Pakistan. Ms. Marvel is showing in movie theaters, since Disney+ is not available. Jules is currently working on Percy Jackson and the Olympians for Disney+, which involves some new challenges using LED screens on the soundstage. Find Jules O'Loughlin: https://www.julesoloughlin.com/ Instagram: @jules.oloughlin The Old Man is on Hulu and Ms. Marvel is available on Disney+. Both shows are currently streaming all episodes. Find out even more about this episode, with extensive show notes and links: http://camnoir.com/ep177/ Sponsored by Hot Rod Cameras: www.hotrodcameras.com Sponsored by Aputure: https://www.aputure.com/ The Cinematography Podcast website: www.camnoir.com YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TheCinematographyPodcast Facebook: @cinepod Instagram: @thecinepod Twitter: @ShortEndz

Disruptive CEO Nation
Episode 156 Vanessa Karel

Disruptive CEO Nation

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 20:48


Vanessa Karel Show Notes Disruptive CEO Nation Podcast with Allison K. Summers Episode 156 Vanessa Karel, is a second-time Founder, Serial Entrepreneur, Storyteller, and Creative Producer. She was recently named as one of the 100 rising Latinx Startup founders to watch through her work founding Greether; a travel startup that helps women travel safer. Vanessa is also currently leading Girls in Tech, San Francisco as their Manager Director.  Born in the USA, raised in Mexico City. Growing up constantly traveling, Vanessa always found an interest in exploring different cultures and expanding horizons.  In 2020, she finally realized what had been lacking throughout her solo journeys, while traveling alone being stranded in Morocco in the middle of the pandemic. Which led to her founding a safety platform for female travelers around the world named Greether.  The platform targets some of the most important SDGs and sustainable UN development goals, which are to reduce safety risks for women and to increase income opportunities for them through sustainable tourism. Having only worked on Greether for a year, the web application has organically grown users in over 80 countries and 300 cities around the world. In our conversation, Vanessa Karel explains: Vanessa's travel experiences in other countries and why she created Greether to keep travelers safe in unknown countries.  Vanessa's journey into Silicon Valley and the other various tech startups she has managed.  Increasing job opportunities for women.  Be sure to check out Vanessa's links listed below.  Enjoy the show! Connect with Vanessa Website- https://www.greether.com/vanessakarel LinkedIn- https://www.linkedin.com/in/vanessa-karel/ Instagram- https://www.instagram.com/greet.her/ Connect with Allison: Website: allisonksummers.com  #tech #SAAS # business #designthinking #AI #creativesociety #teambuilding #CEO #startup #startupstory #founder #futureofwork  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Madigan's Pubcast
Episode 99: Confirming the Loch Ness Monster, Suing Skittles, & The Invention of Buffalo Wings

Madigan's Pubcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 90:16 Very Popular


Kathleen opens the show drinking a Mich Ultra Citrus Seltzer, celebrating Episode 99 of the Pubcast talking about German pop singer Nena and her iconic song “99 Red Balloons.” She then moves on to share details of her fun night in Nashville watching her fellow Last Comic Standing alum Corey Holcomb perform. “GOOD BAD FOOD”: In her quest for new and delicious not-so-nutritious junk food AND in continuing her search for the best Ranch, Kathleen samples Original Bitchin' Sauce, Legal Sea Foods Malt Vinegar Aioli from Stonewall Kitchen, and Snyder's Hot Buffalo Pretzels. THE QUEEN'S COURT: Kathleen gives updates on the Queens: Queen Stevie Nicks has released her Fall 2022 Tour dates, and Queen Tanya is releasing her new documentary “The Return of Tanya Tucker.”UPDATES: Kathleen gives updates on Zuckerberg's distain of his unproductive workers & JetBlue finally buys Spirit Airlines.“HOLY SHIT THEY FOUND IT”: Kathleen is amazed to read about the discovery of the massive 170-carat pink Lulo Rose diamond in Angola, Mormon founder Joseph Smith's photo is discovered, and a 100,000 year old dinosaur fossil is discovered outside of a restaurant in China. FRONT PAGE PUB NEWS: Kathleen shares articles on a 1,300 lb Norwegian walrus sinking harbor boats, KFC tests new chicken nuggets, a man loses $181M in Bitcoin in a dumpster, social media explodes when the Choco Taco is discontinued, the Loch Ness Monster's existence is validated when a fossil is found in Morocco, a man sues Skittles, the record heat wave of 1934, and Teressa Belissimo's invention of Buffalo Wings. WHAT TO WATCH THIS WEEK: Kathleen recommends watching “The First Lady” on Showtime, and “The Most Hated Man on the Internet” on Netflix. SEE KATHLEEN LIVE: See Kathleen live on her “Do You Have Any Ranch?” Tour. Tickets available at kathleenmadigan.com/tour See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

T-Bone & ChickBrew
1104 Guess who's back?

T-Bone & ChickBrew

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 59:31


In this weeks episode we discuss prison, COVID, pregnancy, Mexico, Morocco, doppelgangers, and RAWL. Celebrity name drops:  Jimmy J.J. WalkerQuestion of the Week:  What id your favorite MRE?In our magic mirror this week we see:  James, Barbara, Grandma, Roger, Bonnie, Jessie, Mike, Patrick, Brandi, Keith, Misty, Lauren, Dally, Jeanie, Matt, Kristi, Patry, Leticia, Damn, Tamara, Terrence, Joe, Crystal, Josh, and Tim!Enjoy!#thetboneandchickbrewshow #tboneandchickbrew

AJC Passport
The Forgotten Exodus: Iraq

AJC Passport

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 21:09 Very Popular


Listen to the premiere episode of a new limited narrative series from American Jewish Committee (AJC): The Forgotten Exodus. Each Monday, for the next six weeks, AJC will release a new episode of The Forgotten Exodus, the first-ever narrative podcast series to focus exclusively on Mizrahi and Sephardic Jews. This week's episode focuses on Jews from Iraq. If you like what you hear, use the link below to subscribe before the next episode drops on August 8. Who are the Jews of Iraq? Why did they leave? And why do so many Iraqi Jews, even those born elsewhere, still consider Iraq their home?  Join us to uncover the answers to these questions through the inspiring story of Mizrahi Jewish cartoonist Carol Isaacs' family. Feeling alienated growing up as the only Jew in school from an Arab-majority country, Carol turned her longing for Iraq and the life her family left behind into a gripping graphic memoir, The Wolf of Baghdad.  Meanwhile, Zvi Ben-Dor Benite, professor of History and Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies at New York University, delves into the fascinating, yet the little-known history of Iraqi Jewry, from its roots in the region 2,600 years ago, to the antisemitic riots that led them to seek refuge in Israel, England, and the U.S. ____ Show Notes: Sign up to receive podcast updates here. Learn more about The Forgotten Exodus here.  Song credits: Thanks to Carol Isaacs and her band 3yin for permission to use The Wolf of Bagdad soundtrack. Portions of the following tracks can be heard throughout the episode:  01 Dhikrayyat (al Qasabji)  02 Muqaddima Hijaz (trad)  03 Che Mali Wali (pt 1) (trad) 05 Fog el Nakhal (trad)  11 Balini-b Balwa (trad)  12 Al Effendi (al Kuwaiti)  14 Dililol (trad)  15 Che Mail Wali (pt 2) (trad)  Pond5: “Desert Caravans”: Publisher: Pond5 Publishing Beta (BMI), Composer: Tiemur Zarobov (BMI), IPI#1098108837; “Sentimental Oud Middle Eastern”: Publisher: Pond5 Publishing Beta (BMI), Composer: Sotirios Bakas (BMI), IPI#797324989. ____ Episode Transcript: CAROL ISAACS: A lot of businesses were trashed, houses were burnt. It was an awful time. And that was a kind of time when the Jews of Iraq had started to think, ‘Well, maybe this isn't our homeland after all.' MANYA BRACHEAR PASHMAN: Welcome to the premiere of the first ever podcast series devoted exclusively to an overlooked episode in modern history: the 800,000 Jews who left or were driven from their homes in Arab nations and Iran in the mid-20th century. Some fled antisemitism, mistreatment, and pogroms that sparked a refugee crisis like no other, as persecuted Jewish communities poured from numerous directions.  Others sought opportunities for their families or followed the calling to help create a Jewish state. In Israel, America, Italy, wherever they landed, these Jews forged new lives for themselves and future generations. This series explores that pivotal moment in Jewish history and the rich Jewish heritage of Iran and Arab nations as some begin to build relations with Israel. Each week, we will share the history of one Jewish family with roots in the Arab world. Each account is personal and different. Some include painful memories or elegies for what could've been. Others pay homage to the conviction of their ancestors to seek a life where they were wanted. To ground each episode, we rely on a scholar to untangle the complexities. Some of these stories have never been told because they wished to leave the past in the past. For those of you who, like me, before this project began, never read this chapter in Jewish history, we hope you find this series enlightening. And for those who felt ignored for so many decades, we hope these stories honor your families' legacies. Join us as we explore stories of courage, perseverance, and resilience.  I'm your host, Manya Brachear Pashman, and this is The Forgotten Exodus.   Today's episode: Leaving Iraq.   CAROL: All my life, I've lived in two worlds – one inside the family home, which is a very Jewish world, obviously, but also tinged with Iraqi customs like Iraqi food, a language we spoke—Judeo Arabic. So, I've always known that I'm not just British. I've lived in these two worlds, the one at home, and then the one at school. And then later on at work, which was very English. I went to a terribly English school, for example, there were about a thousand girls. Of those thousand girls, 30 were Jewish, and I was the only Mizrahi, the only non-European Jew. So, there's always been that knowing that I'm not quite fitting into boxes. Do you know what I mean? But I never quite knew which box I fit into. MANYA: Carol Isaacs makes her living illustrating the zeitgeists of our time, poking fun at the irony all around us, reminding us of our common quirks. And she fits it all into a tiny box. You might not know Carol by her given name, but you've probably seen her pen name, scrawled in the corner of her cartoons published by The New Yorker and Spectator magazines: TS McCoy, or The Surreal McCoy.  Carol is homesick for a home she never knew. Born and raised Jewish in London, she grew up hearing stories of her parents' life in Baghdad. How her family members learned to swim in the Tigris River using the bark of palm trees as life preservers, how they shopped in the city sooks for dates to bake b'ab'e b'tamer.  Millions of Jews have called Iraq home for more than 2,600 years, including many of their children and grandchildren who have never been there, but long to go. Like Carol, they were raised with indelible stories of daily life in Mosul, Basra, Baghdad – Jewish life that ceased to exist because it ceased to be safe. CAROL: My mother remembered sitting with her mother and her grandmother and all the family in the cellar, going through every single grain of rice for chometz. Now, if you imagine that there were eight days of Passover, I don't know 10, 12 people in the household, plus guests, they ate rice at least twice a day. You can imagine how much rice you'd have to go through. So little things like that, you know, that would give you a window into another world completely, that they remembered with so much fondness.  And it's been like that all my life. I've had this nostalgia for this, this place that my parents used to . . . now and again they'd talk about it, this place that I've never visited and I've never known. But it would be wonderful to go and just smell the same air that my ancestors smelled, you know, walk around the same streets in the Jewish Quarter. The houses are still there, the old Jewish Quarter. They're a bit run down. Well, very run down. MANYA: Carol turned her longing for Iraq and the life her family left behind into a graphic memoir and animated film called The Wolf of Baghdad. Think Art Spiegelman's Maus, the graphic novel about the Holocaust, but for Jews in Iraq who on the holiday of Shavuot in 1941 suffered through a brutal pogrom known as the Farhud, followed by decades of persecution, and ultimately, expulsion. Her research for the book involved conversations with family members who had never spoken about the violence and hatred they witnessed. They had left it in the past and now looked toward the future. There's no dialogue in the book either. The story arc simply follows the memories. CAROL: They wanted to look forward. So, it was really gratifying that they did tell me these things. ‘Cause when my parents came, for example, they came to the UK, it was very much ‘Look forward. We are British now.' My father was the quintessential city gent. He'd go to the office every day in the city of London with his pinstriped suit, and a rose plucked from the front garden, you know, a copy of The Guardian newspaper under his arm. He was British. We listened to classical music. We didn't listen to the music of my heritage. It was all Western music in the house. MANYA: But her father's Muslim and Christian business associates in Iraq visited regularly, as long as they could safely travel.    CAROL: On a Sunday, every month, our house would turn into little Baghdad. They would come and my mother would feed them these delicacies that she spent all week making and they'd sit and they'd talk. MANYA: As Carol said, she had heard only fond memories throughout her childhood because for millennia, Jews in Iraq lived in harmony with their Muslim and Christian neighbors.  CAROL: Jews have always lived in Mesopotamia, lived generally quite well. There was always the dimmi status, which is a status given to minorities. For example, they had to pay a certain tax, had to wear certain clothing. Sometimes, they weren't allowed to build houses higher than their neighbor, because they weren't allowed to be above their neighbor. They couldn't ride a horse, for example, Jews. I mean, small little rules, that you were never quite accorded full status. But then when the Brits arrived in 1917, things became a bit easier. MANYA: But 20-some years later, life for Jews took a turn for the worse. That sudden and dramatic turning point in 1941 was called The Farhud. ZVI BEN-DOR BENITE: Jews have been living in Iraq for thousands of years. If we start with the Farhud, we are starting in the middle of the story, in fact, in the middle of the end.” MANYA: That's Zvi Ben-Dor Benite, a professor of history and Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies at New York University. The son of Iraqi Jewish parents who migrated to Israel in the early 1950s, he carries in his imagination maps of old Jewish neighborhoods in Mosul and Baghdad, etched by his parents' stories of life in the old country. He shares Carol's longing to walk those same streets one day.  ZVI: Iraqis, even those who were born in Israel, still self-identify as Iraqis and still consider that home to a certain extent – an imaginary home, but home. And you can say the same thing, and even more so, for people who were born there and lived there at the time. So here's the thing: if I go there, I would be considering myself a returnee. But it would be my first time. MANYA: As a Jew, Zvi knows the chances of his returning are slim. To this day, Iraq remains the only Arab country that has never signed a ceasefire with Israel since Arab nations declared war on the Jewish state upon its creation in 1948. Jews are not safe there. Really, no one has been for a while. The dictatorship of Saddam Hussein, ISIS, and general civil unrest have made modern-day Iraq dangerous for decades. The region is simply unstable. The centuries leading up to the Farhud in 1941 were no different. The territory originally known as Mesopotamia flipped from empire to empire, including Babylonian, Mongol, Safavids, Ottoman, British. Just to name a few. But during those centuries, Iraq was historically diverse – home to Muslims, Jews, Assyrian Christians. Yes, Jews were a minority and faced some limitations. But that didn't change the fact that they loved the place they called home.  ZVI: We zoom in on the Farhud because it is a relatively unique event. Jews in Iraq were highly integrated, certainly those who lived in the big cities and certainly those who lived in Baghdad. Few reasons to talk about this integration. First of all, they spoke Arabic. Second of all, they participated in the Iraqi transition to modernity. In many ways, the Jewish community even spearheaded Iraqi society's transition into modernity. Of course, you know, being a minority, it means that not everything is rosy, and I'm not in any way trying to make it as a rosy situation. But if you compare it to the experiences of European Jews, certainly Europeans in the Pale of Settlement or in Eastern Europe, it's a much lovelier situation. Many Jews participate in Iraqi politics in different ways. Many Jews joined the Communist Party, in fact, lead the Communist Party to a certain extent. Others join different parties that highly identify in terms of Iraqi nationalism. MANYA: Very few Iraqi Jews identified with the modern Zionist movement, a Jewish nationalist movement to establish a state on the ancestral homeland of the Jews, then known as Palestine. Still, Iraqi Jews were not immune from Arab hostility toward the notion of Jewish self-determination. Adding to that tension: the Nazi propaganda that poured out of the German embassy in Baghdad.  CAROL: Mein Kampf was translated into Arabic and published in all the newspapers there. There were broadcasts coming from Radio Berlin, in Arabic, politicizing Islam and generally manipulating certain texts from the Quran, to show that Jews were the enemies of Islam. So, there was this constant drip, drip of antisemitism. ZVI: Another factor is, of course, the British. There is an anti-British government in Baghdad at the time, during the period of someone who went down in history as a Nazi collaborator, Rashid Ali. And Rashid Ali's been removed just before the British retake Iraq. We should remember that basically, even though Iraq is a kind of constitutional monarchy, the British run the show behind the scenes for a very, very long time. So, there is a little bit of a hiatus over several months with Rashid Ali, and then when he is removed, you know, people blame the Jews for that. MANYA: On the afternoon of June 1, 1941, Jews in Baghdad prepared to celebrate the traditional Jewish harvest festival of Shavuot. Violent mobs descended on the celebrants. CAROL: In those two days the mobs ran riot and took it all out on the Jews. We don't, to this day, we don't know how many Jews died. Conservative estimates say about 120. We think it was in the thousands. Certainly, a lot of businesses were trashed, houses were burnt, women raped, mutilated, babies killed. It was an awful time. And that was a kind of time when the Jews of Iraq had started to think, ‘Well, maybe this isn't our homeland after all.' MANYA: The mobs were a fraction of the Iraqi population. Many Muslim residents protected their Jewish neighbors.  CAROL: One of my relations said that during the Farhud, the pogrom, that her neighbors stood guard over their house, Muslim neighbors, and told the mobs that they wouldn't let them in that these people are our family, our friends. They wouldn't let them in. They looked after each other, they protected each other. MANYA: But the climate in Iraq was no longer one in which Jews could thrive. Now they just hoped to survive. In the mid-to-late 40s, Carol's father, who worked for the British army during World War II, left for the United Kingdom and, as the eldest son, began to bring his family out one by one. Then came 1948. Israel declared independence and five Arab nations declared war.  ZVI: So, Iraq sent soldiers to fight as part of the Arab effort in Palestine, and they began to come back in coffins. I mean, there's a sense of defeat. Three deserters, three Iraqi soldiers that deserted the war, and crossed the desert back to Iraq, and they landed up in Mosul on the Eve of Passover in 1949. And they knocked on the door of one of my uncles. And they said, they were hosted by this Jewish family. And they were telling the Jews, who were their hosts that evening, about the war in Palestine, and about what was going on and so on. This is just an isolated case, but the point is that you know, it raises the tension in the population, and it raises the tensions against Jews tenfold. But there's no massive movement of Iraqi Jews, even though the conditions are worsening. In other words, it becomes uneasy for someone to walk in the street as a Jew. There is a certain sense of fear that is going on. And then comes the legal action. MANYA: That legal action, transacted with the state of Israel and facilitated by Zionist operatives, set the most significant exodus in motion. In 1950, the Iraqi government gave its Jewish citizens a choice. Renounce their Iraqi citizenship, take only what fits in a suitcase, and board a flight to Israel, or stay and face an uncertain future. The offer expired in a year, meaning those who stayed would no longer be allowed to leave. ZVI: If you're a Jew in Iraq in 1950, you are plunged into a very, very cruel dilemma. First of all, you don't know what the future holds. You do know that the present, after 1948, suggests worsening conditions. There is a sense that, you know, all the Jews are sort of a fifth column. All of them are associated with Zionism, even though you know, the Zionist movement is actually very small. There are certain persecutions of Zionists and communists who are Jews as well. And, you know, there have been mass arrests of them, you know, particularly of the young, younger Jewish population, so you don't know. And then the state comes in and says, ‘Look, you get one year to stay or to leave. If you leave, you leave. If you stay, you're gonna get stuck here.' Now, just think about presenting someone with that dilemma after 1935 and the Nuremberg Laws, after what happened in Europe. MANYA: In all, 120,000 Iraqi Jews leave for Israel over nine months – 90% of Iraqi Jewry. For the ten percent who stayed, they became a weak and endangered minority. Many Iraqis, including the family on Carol's mother's side, eventually escaped to America and England.  CAROL: My mother and my father were separated by a generation. My father was much older, 23 years older than my mother. So, he had a different view of life in Baghdad. When he was around, it was generally very peaceful. The Jews were allowed to live quite, in peace with their neighbors. But with my mother's generation and younger, it was already the beginning – the rot had started to set in. So, she had a different view entirely. CAROL: My grandmother, maternal grandmother, was the last one to come out of our family, to come out of Iraq. She left in ‘63. And my dad managed to get her out. MANYA: After Israel defeated another Arab onslaught in 1967, thousands more fled. ZVI: This was a glorious community, a large community, which was part of the fabric of society for centuries, if not millennia. And then, in one dramatic day, in a very, very short period, it just basically evaporated. And what was left is maybe 10 percent, which may be elite, that decided to risk everything by staying. But even they, at the end, had to leave.  MANYA: Remember, Carol said she was one of 30 Jewish girls at her school, but the only Mizrahi Jew. The term Mizrahi, which means “Eastern” in Hebrew, refers to the diaspora of descendants of Jewish communities from Middle Eastern countries such as: Iraq, Iran, and Yemen, and North African countries such as: Egypt, Libya, and Morocco. CAROL: It's been interesting. A lot of people didn't even know that there were Jews living in Arab lands. I mean, for all my life, I've been told, ‘Oh, you're Jewish, you speak Yiddish, you come from Poland. You eat smoked salmon and bagels. You say ‘oy vey,' which is great if you do all those things and you do come from Eastern Europe, but I don't. Almost 1 million Jews of Arab lands, nobody knows about what happened to them, that they were ethnically cleansed, removed from their homes, and dispersed across the world. It's our truth. And it's our history and make of it what you will, just add it to other family histories that we know. MANYA: Carol has discovered that even Iraqis did not know of their country's rich Jewish past, nor the fate of its Jewish citizens. Since the animated version of The Wolf of Baghdad premiered at the Israeli and Iraqi embassies in London, accompanied by Carol's accordion and other musicians playing its Judeo-Arabic soundtrack, Iraqis in the audience have been moved to tears.  CAROL: At one Q&A, after we did a performance, one Iraqi gentleman stood up at the front. He was crying. He said, ‘I'm really sorry for what we did to you. I'm so sorry.' And that was immensely moving for me. It was like, well, you know what? We're talking now. It's wonderful. We can sit down together. We can talk in a shared language. We can talk about our shared culture, and we've got more that ties us together than separates us. We've got more in common, right? So, I'm always looking for that, that kind of positive, and so far it's come back to me, multiplied by a million, which has been brilliant. The truth is coming to light, that people know that the Jews of Iraq contributed so much, not just culturally but also socially, in the government too. So, it's this reaching out from Iraq to its lost Jews saying ‘Well where are you? What happened to you? Tell us your story. We want to see where you are. Come back even,' some of them are saying. MANYA: Carol has continued to give a voice to the Jewish refugees of Iraq. Most recently, she has been adapting The Wolf of Baghdad for younger, middle school-aged readers to better understand the story. And high schools in London and Canada have added The Wolf of Baghdad to their history curriculum.  CAROL: Leaving Iraq was called the silent exodus for a reason. We just left quietly and without fuss, and just went and made our lives elsewhere. I do know that life was difficult for them wherever they went, but they just got on with it, like refugees will do everywhere. MANYA: These Jews are just one of the many Jewish communities who, in the last century left Arab countries to forge new lives for themselves and future generations. Join us next week as we share another untold story of The Forgotten Exodus. Many thanks to Carol Isaacs for sharing her family's story and to her band 3yin for the music. Throughout this episode, you have been listening to pieces of the soundtrack from The Wolf of Baghdad motion comic performed by 3yin, a groundbreaking London based band that plays Jewish melodies from the Middle East and North Africa. The soundtrack is available at thesurrealmccoy.com. Atara Lakritz is our producer, CucHuong Do is our production manager. T.K. Broderick is our sound engineer. Special thanks to Jon Schweitzer, Sean Savage, Ian Kaplan, and so many of our colleagues, too many to name really, for making this series possible. And extra special thanks to David Harris, who has been a constant champion for making sure these stories do not remain untold. You can subscribe to The Forgotten Exodus on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or wherever you listen to podcasts, and you can learn more at AJC.org/forgottenexodus.  The views and opinions of our guests don't necessarily reflect the positions of AJC.  You can reach us at theforgottenexodus@ajc.org. If you've enjoyed this episode, please be sure to spread the word, and hop onto Apple Podcasts to rate us and write a review to help more listeners find us.

The Forgotten Exodus
Iraq

The Forgotten Exodus

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 20:38 Very Popular


Who are the Jews of Iraq? Why did they leave? And why do so many Iraqi Jews, even those born elsewhere, still consider Iraq their home?  The premiere episode of a new limited narrative series from American Jewish Committee (AJC) uncovers the answers to these questions through the inspiring story of Mizrahi Jewish cartoonist Carol Isaacs' family. Feeling alienated growing up as the only Jew in school from an Arab-majority country, Carol turned her longing for Iraq and the life her family left behind into a gripping graphic memoir, The Wolf of Baghdad.  Meanwhile, Zvi Ben-Dor Benite, professor of History and Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies at New York University, delves into the fascinating, yet the little-known history of Iraqi Jewry, from its roots in the region 2,600 years ago, to the antisemitic riots that led them to seek refuge in Israel, England, and the U.S. _________ Show notes: Sign up to receive podcast updates here. Learn more about the series here. Song credits: Thanks to Carol Isaacs and her band 3yin for permission to use The Wolf of Bagdad soundtrack. Portions of the following tracks can be heard throughout the episode:  01 Dhikrayyat (al Qasabji)  02 Muqaddima Hijaz (trad)  03 Che Mali Wali (pt 1) (trad) 05 Fog el Nakhal (trad)  11 Balini-b Balwa (trad)  12 Al Effendi (al Kuwaiti)  14 Dililol (trad)  15 Che Mail Wali (pt 2) (trad)  Pond5: “Desert Caravans”: Publisher: Pond5 Publishing Beta (BMI), Composer: Tiemur Zarobov (BMI), IPI#1098108837; “Sentimental Oud Middle Eastern”: Publisher: Pond5 Publishing Beta (BMI), Composer: Sotirios Bakas (BMI), IPI#797324989. ______ Episode Transcript: CAROL ISAACS: A lot of businesses were trashed, houses were burnt. It was an awful time. And that was a kind of time when the Jews of Iraq had started to think, ‘Well, maybe this isn't our homeland after all.' MANYA BRACHEAR PASHMAN: Welcome to the premiere of the first ever podcast series devoted exclusively to an overlooked episode in modern history: the 800,000 Jews who left or were driven from their homes in Arab nations and Iran in the mid-20th century. Some fled antisemitism, mistreatment, and pogroms that sparked a refugee crisis like no other, as persecuted Jewish communities poured from numerous directions.  Others sought opportunities for their families or followed the calling to help create a Jewish state. In Israel, America, Italy, wherever they landed, these Jews forged new lives for themselves and future generations. This series explores that pivotal moment in Jewish history and the rich Jewish heritage of Iran and Arab nations as some begin to build relations with Israel. Each week, we will share the history of one Jewish family with roots in the Arab world. Each account is personal and different. Some include painful memories or elegies for what could've been. Others pay homage to the conviction of their ancestors to seek a life where they were wanted. To ground each episode, we rely on a scholar to untangle the complexities. Some of these stories have never been told because they wished to leave the past in the past. For those of you who, like me, before this project began, never read this chapter in Jewish history, we hope you find this series enlightening. And for those who felt ignored for so many decades, we hope these stories honor your families' legacies. Join us as we explore stories of courage, perseverance, and resilience.  I'm your host, Manya Brachear Pashman, and this is The Forgotten Exodus. Today's episode: Leaving Iraq. CAROL: All my life, I've lived in two worlds – one inside the family home, which is a very Jewish world, obviously, but also tinged with Iraqi customs like Iraqi food, a language we spoke—Judeo Arabic. So, I've always known that I'm not just British. I've lived in these two worlds, the one at home, and then the one at school. And then later on at work, which was very English. I went to a terribly English school, for example, there were about a thousand girls. Of those thousand girls, 30 were Jewish, and I was the only Mizrahi, the only non-European Jew. So, there's always been that knowing that I'm not quite fitting into boxes. Do you know what I mean? But I never quite knew which box I fit into. MANYA: Carol Isaacs makes her living illustrating the zeitgeists of our time, poking fun at the irony all around us, reminding us of our common quirks. And she fits it all into a tiny box. You might not know Carol by her given name, but you've probably seen her pen name, scrawled in the corner of her cartoons published by The New Yorker and Spectator magazines: TS McCoy, or The Surreal McCoy.  Carol is homesick for a home she never knew. Born and raised Jewish in London, she grew up hearing stories of her parents' life in Baghdad. How her family members learned to swim in the Tigris River using the bark of palm trees as life preservers, how they shopped in the city sooks for dates to bake b'ab'e b'tamer.  Millions of Jews have called Iraq home for more than 2,600 years, including many of their children and grandchildren who have never been there, but long to go. Like Carol, they were raised with indelible stories of daily life in Mosul, Basra, Baghdad – Jewish life that ceased to exist because it ceased to be safe. CAROL: My mother remembered sitting with her mother and her grandmother and all the family in the cellar, going through every single grain of rice for chometz. Now, if you imagine that there were eight days of Passover, I don't know 10, 12 people in the household, plus guests, they ate rice at least twice a day. You can imagine how much rice you'd have to go through. So little things like that, you know, that would give you a window into another world completely, that they remembered with so much fondness.  And it's been like that all my life. I've had this nostalgia for this, this place that my parents used to . . . now and again they'd talk about it, this place that I've never visited and I've never known. But it would be wonderful to go and just smell the same air that my ancestors smelled, you know, walk around the same streets in the Jewish Quarter. The houses are still there, the old Jewish Quarter. They're a bit run down. Well, very run down. MANYA: Carol turned her longing for Iraq and the life her family left behind into a graphic memoir and animated film called The Wolf of Baghdad. Think Art Spiegelman's Maus, the graphic novel about the Holocaust, but for Jews in Iraq who on the holiday of Shavuot in 1941 suffered through a brutal pogrom known as the Farhud, followed by decades of persecution, and ultimately, expulsion. Her research for the book involved conversations with family members who had never spoken about the violence and hatred they witnessed. They had left it in the past and now looked toward the future. There's no dialogue in the book either. The story arc simply follows the memories. CAROL: They wanted to look forward. So, it was really gratifying that they did tell me these things. ‘Cause when my parents came, for example, they came to the UK, it was very much ‘Look forward. We are British now.' My father was the quintessential city gent. He'd go to the office every day in the city of London with his pinstriped suit, and a rose plucked from the front garden, you know, a copy of The Guardian newspaper under his arm. He was British. We listened to classical music. We didn't listen to the music of my heritage. It was all Western music in the house. MANYA: But her father's Muslim and Christian business associates in Iraq visited regularly, as long as they could safely travel.    CAROL: On a Sunday, every month, our house would turn into little Baghdad. They would come and my mother would feed them these delicacies that she spent all week making and they'd sit and they'd talk. MANYA: As Carol said, she had heard only fond memories throughout her childhood because for millennia, Jews in Iraq lived in harmony with their Muslim and Christian neighbors.  CAROL: Jews have always lived in Mesopotamia, lived generally quite well. There was always the dimmi status, which is a status given to minorities. For example, they had to pay a certain tax, had to wear certain clothing. Sometimes, they weren't allowed to build houses higher than their neighbor, because they weren't allowed to be above their neighbor. They couldn't ride a horse, for example, Jews. I mean, small little rules, that you were never quite accorded full status. But then when the Brits arrived in 1917, things became a bit easier. MANYA: But 20-some years later, life for Jews took a turn for the worse. That sudden and dramatic turning point in 1941 was called The Farhud. ZVI BEN-DOR BENITE: Jews have been living in Iraq for thousands of years. If we start with the Farhud, we are starting in the middle of the story, in fact, in the middle of the end.” MANYA: That's Zvi Ben-Dor Benite, a professor of history and Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies at New York University. The son of Iraqi Jewish parents who migrated to Israel in the early 1950s, he carries in his imagination maps of old Jewish neighborhoods in Mosul and Baghdad, etched by his parents' stories of life in the old country. He shares Carol's longing to walk those same streets one day.  ZVI: Iraqis, even those who were born in Israel, still self-identify as Iraqis and still consider that home to a certain extent – an imaginary home, but home. And you can say the same thing, and even more so, for people who were born there and lived there at the time. So here's the thing: if I go there, I would be considering myself a returnee. But it would be my first time. MANYA: As a Jew, Zvi knows the chances of his returning are slim. To this day, Iraq remains the only Arab country that has never signed a ceasefire with Israel since Arab nations declared war on the Jewish state upon its creation in 1948. Jews are not safe there. Really, no one has been for a while. The dictatorship of Saddam Hussein, ISIS, and general civil unrest have made modern-day Iraq dangerous for decades. The region is simply unstable. The centuries leading up to the Farhud in 1941 were no different. The territory originally known as Mesopotamia flipped from empire to empire, including Babylonian, Mongol, Safavids, Ottoman, British. Just to name a few. But during those centuries, Iraq was historically diverse – home to Muslims, Jews, Assyrian Christians. Yes, Jews were a minority and faced some limitations. But that didn't change the fact that they loved the place they called home.  ZVI: We zoom in on the Farhud because it is a relatively unique event. Jews in Iraq were highly integrated, certainly those who lived in the big cities and certainly those who lived in Baghdad. Few reasons to talk about this integration. First of all, they spoke Arabic. Second of all, they participated in the Iraqi transition to modernity. In many ways, the Jewish community even spearheaded Iraqi society's transition into modernity. Of course, you know, being a minority, it means that not everything is rosy, and I'm not in any way trying to make it as a rosy situation. But if you compare it to the experiences of European Jews, certainly Europeans in the Pale of Settlement or in Eastern Europe, it's a much lovelier situation. Many Jews participate in Iraqi politics in different ways. Many Jews joined the Communist Party, in fact, lead the Communist Party to a certain extent. Others join different parties that highly identify in terms of Iraqi nationalism. MANYA: Very few Iraqi Jews identified with the modern Zionist movement, a Jewish nationalist movement to establish a state on the ancestral homeland of the Jews, then known as Palestine. Still, Iraqi Jews were not immune from Arab hostility toward the notion of Jewish self-determination. Adding to that tension: the Nazi propaganda that poured out of the German embassy in Baghdad.  CAROL: Mein Kampf was translated into Arabic and published in all the newspapers there. There were broadcasts coming from Radio Berlin, in Arabic, politicizing Islam and generally manipulating certain texts from the Quran, to show that Jews were the enemies of Islam. So, there was this constant drip, drip of antisemitism. ZVI: Another factor is, of course, the British. There is an anti-British government in Baghdad at the time, during the period of someone who went down in history as a Nazi collaborator, Rashid Ali. And Rashid Ali's been removed just before the British retake Iraq. We should remember that basically, even though Iraq is a kind of constitutional monarchy, the British run the show behind the scenes for a very, very long time. So, there is a little bit of a hiatus over several months with Rashid Ali, and then when he is removed, you know, people blame the Jews for that. MANYA: On the afternoon of June 1, 1941, Jews in Baghdad prepared to celebrate the traditional Jewish harvest festival of Shavuot. Violent mobs descended on the celebrants. CAROL: In those two days the mobs ran riot and took it all out on the Jews. We don't, to this day, we don't know how many Jews died. Conservative estimates say about 120. We think it was in the thousands. Certainly, a lot of businesses were trashed, houses were burnt, women raped, mutilated, babies killed. It was an awful time. And that was a kind of time when the Jews of Iraq had started to think, ‘Well, maybe this isn't our homeland after all.' MANYA: The mobs were a fraction of the Iraqi population. Many Muslim residents protected their Jewish neighbors.  CAROL: One of my relations said that during the Farhud, the pogrom, that her neighbors stood guard over their house, Muslim neighbors, and told the mobs that they wouldn't let them in that these people are our family, our friends. They wouldn't let them in. They looked after each other, they protected each other. MANYA: But the climate in Iraq was no longer one in which Jews could thrive. Now they just hoped to survive. In the mid-to-late 40s, Carol's father, who worked for the British army during World War II, left for the United Kingdom and, as the eldest son, began to bring his family out one by one. Then came 1948. Israel declared independence and five Arab nations declared war.  ZVI: So, Iraq sent soldiers to fight as part of the Arab effort in Palestine, and they began to come back in coffins. I mean, there's a sense of defeat. Three deserters, three Iraqi soldiers that deserted the war, and crossed the desert back to Iraq, and they landed up in Mosul on the Eve of Passover in 1949. And they knocked on the door of one of my uncles. And they said, they were hosted by this Jewish family. And they were telling the Jews, who were their hosts that evening, about the war in Palestine, and about what was going on and so on. This is just an isolated case, but the point is that you know, it raises the tension in the population, and it raises the tensions against Jews tenfold. But there's no massive movement of Iraqi Jews, even though the conditions are worsening. In other words, it becomes uneasy for someone to walk in the street as a Jew. There is a certain sense of fear that is going on. And then comes the legal action. MANYA: That legal action, transacted with the state of Israel and facilitated by Zionist operatives, set the most significant exodus in motion. In 1950, the Iraqi government gave its Jewish citizens a choice. Renounce their Iraqi citizenship, take only what fits in a suitcase, and board a flight to Israel, or stay and face an uncertain future. The offer expired in a year, meaning those who stayed would no longer be allowed to leave. ZVI: If you're a Jew in Iraq in 1950, you are plunged into a very, very cruel dilemma. First of all, you don't know what the future holds. You do know that the present, after 1948, suggests worsening conditions. There is a sense that, you know, all the Jews are sort of a fifth column. All of them are associated with Zionism, even though you know, the Zionist movement is actually very small. There are certain persecutions of Zionists and communists who are Jews as well. And, you know, there have been mass arrests of them, you know, particularly of the young, younger Jewish population, so you don't know. And then the state comes in and says, ‘Look, you get one year to stay or to leave. If you leave, you leave. If you stay, you're gonna get stuck here.' Now, just think about presenting someone with that dilemma after 1935 and the Nuremberg Laws, after what happened in Europe. MANYA: In all, 120,000 Iraqi Jews leave for Israel over nine months – 90% of Iraqi Jewry. For the ten percent who stayed, they became a weak and endangered minority. Many Iraqis, including the family on Carol's mother's side, eventually escaped to America and England.  CAROL: My mother and my father were separated by a generation. My father was much older, 23 years older than my mother. So, he had a different view of life in Baghdad. When he was around, it was generally very peaceful. The Jews were allowed to live quite, in peace with their neighbors. But with my mother's generation and younger, it was already the beginning – the rot had started to set in. So, she had a different view entirely. CAROL: My grandmother, maternal grandmother, was the last one to come out of our family, to come out of Iraq. She left in ‘63. And my dad managed to get her out. MANYA: After Israel defeated another Arab onslaught in 1967, thousands more fled. ZVI: This was a glorious community, a large community, which was part of the fabric of society for centuries, if not millennia. And then, in one dramatic day, in a very, very short period, it just basically evaporated. And what was left is maybe 10 percent, which may be elite, that decided to risk everything by staying. But even they, at the end, had to leave.  MANYA: Remember, Carol said she was one of 30 Jewish girls at her school, but the only Mizrahi Jew. The term Mizrahi, which means “Eastern” in Hebrew, refers to the diaspora of descendants of Jewish communities from Middle Eastern countries such as: Iraq, Iran, and Yemen, and North African countries such as: Egypt, Libya, and Morocco. CAROL: It's been interesting. A lot of people didn't even know that there were Jews living in Arab lands. I mean, for all my life, I've been told, ‘Oh, you're Jewish, you speak Yiddish, you come from Poland. You eat smoked salmon and bagels. You say ‘oy vey,' which is great if you do all those things and you do come from Eastern Europe, but I don't. Almost 1 million Jews of Arab lands, nobody knows about what happened to them, that they were ethnically cleansed, removed from their homes, and dispersed across the world. It's our truth. And it's our history and make of it what you will, just add it to other family histories that we know. MANYA: Carol has discovered that even Iraqis did not know of their country's rich Jewish past, nor the fate of its Jewish citizens. Since the animated version of The Wolf of Baghdad premiered at the Israeli and Iraqi embassies in London, accompanied by Carol's accordion and other musicians playing its Judeo-Arabic soundtrack, Iraqis in the audience have been moved to tears.  CAROL: At one Q&A, after we did a performance, one Iraqi gentleman stood up at the front. He was crying. He said, ‘I'm really sorry for what we did to you. I'm so sorry.' And that was immensely moving for me. It was like, well, you know what? We're talking now. It's wonderful. We can sit down together. We can talk in a shared language. We can talk about our shared culture, and we've got more that ties us together than separates us. We've got more in common, right? So, I'm always looking for that, that kind of positive, and so far it's come back to me, multiplied by a million, which has been brilliant. The truth is coming to light, that people know that the Jews of Iraq contributed so much, not just culturally but also socially, in the government too. So, it's this reaching out from Iraq to its lost Jews saying ‘Well where are you? What happened to you? Tell us your story. We want to see where you are. Come back even,' some of them are saying. MANYA: Carol has continued to give a voice to the Jewish refugees of Iraq. Most recently, she has been adapting The Wolf of Baghdad for younger, middle school-aged readers to better understand the story. And high schools in London and Canada have added The Wolf of Baghdad to their history curriculum.  CAROL: Leaving Iraq was called the silent exodus for a reason. We just left quietly and without fuss, and just went and made our lives elsewhere. I do know that life was difficult for them wherever they went, but they just got on with it, like refugees will do everywhere. MANYA: These Jews are just one of the many Jewish communities who, in the last century left Arab countries to forge new lives for themselves and future generations. Join us next week as we share another untold story of The Forgotten Exodus. Many thanks to Carol Isaacs for sharing her family's story and to her band 3yin for the music. Throughout this episode, you have been listening to pieces of the soundtrack from The Wolf of Baghdad motion comic performed by 3yin, a groundbreaking London based band that plays Jewish melodies from the Middle East and North Africa. The soundtrack is available at thesurrealmccoy.com. Atara Lakritz is our producer, CucHuong Do is our production manager. T.K. Broderick is our sound engineer. Special thanks to Jon Schweitzer, Sean Savage, Ian Kaplan, and so many of our colleagues, too many to name really, for making this series possible. And extra special thanks to David Harris, who has been a constant champion for making sure these stories do not remain untold. You can subscribe to The Forgotten Exodus on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or wherever you listen to podcasts, and you can learn more at AJC.org/forgottenexodus.  The views and opinions of our guests don't necessarily reflect the positions of AJC.  You can reach us at theforgottenexodus@ajc.org. If you've enjoyed this episode, please be sure to spread the word, and hop onto Apple Podcasts to rate us and write a review to help more listeners find us.  

Habari za UN
Sheria ichukue mkondo wake kuepusha chuki baina ya walinda amani wa UN na raia DRC - Jean-Pierre Lacroix

Habari za UN

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 2:29


Viongozi wa Umoja wa mataifa pamoja na serikali ya Jamhuri ya Kidemoktrais ya Congo, DRC wametoa heshima zao za mwisho kwa walinda amani watano wa kwenye ujumbe wa Umoja wa Mataifa wa kulinda amani nchini humo MONUSCO waliokufa wakati wa maandamano na uvamizi wa vituo vya ujumbe huo huko Goma na Butembo jimboni Kivu Kaskazini. Walinda amani hao wanatoka Morocco na India ambapo Mwakilishi Maalum wa Katibu Mkuu wa Umoja wa Mataifa nchini humo Bintou Keita amesema MONUSCO iko tayari kwa mazungumzo ya amani ili kuendeleza na kudumisha amani nchini humo. Taarifa iliyoandaliwa na Mwandishi wetu wa DRC, Byobe Malenga inaeleza zaidi. Tukio la kuaga walinda amani hao wa Umoja wa Mataifa limefanyika mbele ya Mkuu wa operesheni za ulinzi wa amani za Umoja wa Mataifa Jean-Pierre Lacroix na Mwakilishi Maalum wa Katibu Mkuu wa Umoja wa Mataifa nchini DRC Bintou Keita.    Bwana Lacroix amesema walinda amani hao mashujaa waliokufa wakilinda sio tu Umoja wa Mataifa bali pia raia na kwamba sheria ichukue mkondo wake kuepusha chuki baina ya walinda amani wa UN na raia nchini humo.   “Kwa hivyo, ingawa tunasikitishwa na kuwapoteza mashujaa wetu hawa watano waliofariki dunia katika huduma ya kulinda amani, kumbukumbu inatuwajibisha sote kuwa na shukrani. Walitenda kazi kwa ushujaa kutulinda na kulinda watu licha ya maandamano kupita kiasi na hila zilizosababisha tukio hili baya. Haki lazima itolewe kwa wenzetu wote wa Umoja wa Mataifa ambao wamepoteza maisha, lakini bila shaka haki lazima itolewe kwa ndugu na dada zetu wote wa DRC ambao wanaendelea kuteseka na vitisho vya vita." Amesema Jean-Pierre Lacroix    Naye Bintou Keita ambaye pia ni Mkuu wa MONUSCO ameelezea mshikamano wake na rambirambi kwa familia zinazoomboleza na kuthibitisha utayari wa ujumbe huo kupokea ukosoaji na uwazi wake wa mazungumzo na pande zote DRC zinazotaka kuwasilisha malalamiko yao kwa amani akisema, “MONUSCO inakabiliwa na wimbi la maandamano na uhasama. Ningependa kuthibitisha uwazi wa Monusco na timu nzima ya Monusco kwa ukosoaji wowote na upatikanaji wake wa kufanya mazungumzo na wale wote wanaotaka kueleza malalamiko yao kwa njia ya amani ili kuchangia MONUSCO kuondoka kwa utaratibu na kuwajibika kwa ujumbe wetu.” 

Shift with CJ
Exploring Kangen water for health with Hind Afife

Shift with CJ

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 86:49


"I was completely new to the world of nutrition, I was not reading the side effects of the medications. I spent hours and hours learning, and I started applying it to my son." says Hind Afife. Our guest for today's podcast is from Morocco, she is a mom, she loves nutrition, a cook, and is studying water for the longest time. Join us as we discuss Hind's countless experiences on nutrition and how she ventured into a new country, bombarded with medical health problems and how she finally came into hacking water.

Israel Daily News Podcast
Israel Daily News Podcast; Mon. Aug 1, 2022

Israel Daily News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 12:29


Israel's Police Commissioner in Morocco; No more people to people cash trades over 6,000 NIS and have you ever had half meat half mushroom burgers? Social Media links, Newsletter sign-up &, Support the show $ here: https://linktr.ee/israeldailynews Music: Sugar; Life! The Musical. Exclusive to the IDNP. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/israeldailynews/support

MedicalMissions.com Podcast
Cultural Competency in Healthcare

MedicalMissions.com Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022


As we see an increasing number of culturally diverse patients in our practices, there is no doubt of the importance of cultural competency in medicine. Specific circumstances and miscommunications have been well documented. But how can we develop an eye to see where a patient’s values and worldview may differ from our own? We will review an approach to cultural competency highlighted by medical missions case studies.

united states canada australia china europe mental health france japan mexico germany russia africa research united kingdom ukraine italy ireland new zealand spain north america healthcare afghanistan south africa brazil nutrition turkey argentina vietnam iran sweden portugal medical muslims thailand colombia chile iraq cuba singapore netherlands nigeria urban indonesia switzerland greece venezuela reunions philippines kenya poland peru south america norway denmark taiwan syria finland south korea costa rica public health belgium haiti austria pakistan jamaica saudi arabia north korea iceland ghana buddhist uganda guatemala ecuador malaysia counseling lebanon nepal ethiopia sri lanka qatar rural romania nursing congo panama hungary bahamas el salvador zimbabwe dentists bolivia honduras morocco psychiatry bangladesh rwanda dominican republic nicaragua tanzania cambodia uruguay hindu malta croatia monaco pharmacy sudan mali belarus bulgaria czech republic physical therapy yemen serbia tribal chiropractic pediatrics senegal dental libya somalia estonia greenland madagascar infectious diseases cyprus fiji neurology barbados kazakhstan zambia mongolia paraguay kuwait lithuania angola armenia macedonia bahrain allergy luxembourg belize slovenia namibia oman slovakia sierra leone liberia mozambique united arab emirates tunisia plastic surgery internal medicine malawi cameroon botswana laos latvia oncology south pacific papua new guinea emergency medicine surgical albania midwife burkina faso tonga azerbaijan togo guyana niger algeria guinea cardiology family medicine south sudan moldova bhutan maldives mauritius dermatology burundi andorra uzbekistan dieticians eritrea naturopathic gambia benin radiology social services grenada occupational therapy anesthesia vanuatu gabon kyrgyzstan endocrinology san marino suriname ophthalmology gastroenterology palau health education physician assistants solomon islands brunei environmental health liechtenstein athletic trainers turkmenistan lesotho seychelles tajikistan swaziland djibouti optometry rheumatology mauritania timor leste hematology central african republic nauru marshall islands nephrology kiribati cape verde general surgery healthcare administration preventative medicine new caledonia french polynesia short term missions guinea bissau international health speech pathology orthopaedic surgery tuvalu dental hygienists allied health osteopathic cultural competency equatorial guinea saint lucia trinidad and tobago cardiac surgery french guiana comoros pulmonology dental assistants bosnia and herzegovina western samoa democratic republic of the congo surgical tech lab medicine laboratory technician domestic missions epidemology
Below the Line
S13 - Ep 2 - Black Hawk Down, Part II

Below the Line

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2022 22:54


For the second half of our look at Ridley Scott's “Black Hawk Down”, Harry Humpries (Senior Military Advisor) and Kimberley Ann Berdy (LA Production Coordinator) dive deep into the challenges of filming those epic battle scenes in Morocco. Plus, Kim joined the crew in country for what sounds like a pretty epic wrap party. 

Sports Goofs
The Handsomest Managers in Baseball 2022 | SPORTS GOOFS

Sports Goofs

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2022 31:41


On this special edition of SPORTS GOOFS presented by Mr. Tortilla: The Goofs take a hard look at every MLB manager in 2022 to see if they are sexy beasts of the diamond.Try the Famous 1-Carb Tortilla in Multigrain or Pico de Gallo!Listen to us on Podhero!Support the Goofs on Patreon.Sports Goofs' Social Media: Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Discord | TikTokFrancisco's Social Media: Twitter | YouTubeAndrew's Social Media: Twitter | TwitchCharles' Social Media: TwitterGoof States of America (40.5): California, Virginia, Florida, Washington, New Jersey, Oregon, Ohio, Texas, New York, Illinois, Arizona, Michigan, Indiana, Massachusetts, North Carolina, Georgia, Montana, Delaware, Alabama, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Kentucky, Rhode Island, Utah, Kansas, Maryland, Connecticut, New Hampshire, Iowa, Colorado, Louisiana, Mississippi, Tennessee, Missouri, Idaho, New Mexico, Hawaii, District of Columbia, OklahomaGoof World Order (57): USA, India, Canada, Ireland, Vietnam, Nepal, Singapore, Germany, France, United Kingdom, Italy, Israel, Finland, Pakistan, Brazil, Malaysia, Thailand, Egypt, Croatia, Norway, Puerto Rico, Belize, Oman, Japan, Kyrgyzstan, South Africa, Algeria, Australia, Bangladesh, Switzerland, Iran, Iraq, Sri Lanka, Morocco, Portugal, Nicaragua, Bahrain, Netherlands, New Zealand, Philippines, Bulgaria, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, China, Seychelles, Sweden, Spain, Serbia, Indonesia, Poland, Qatar, Lebanon, Czech Republic, South Korea, Russia, Taiwan, Tunisia#MLB #NBA #NHL #NFL #NCAA #WWE #AEW Get bonus content on Patreon See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Chasing Bandos Podcast
Urbex 88 - Exploring Paris Catacombs, abandoned metro stations, tunnels and photographing goats on the tree in Morocco with Max Boncina

Chasing Bandos Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2022 80:20


Max Boncina is an American urban explorer/photographer from New York who has been exploring abandoned places domestically and internationally. He is also a sonyalpha ambassador and in this episode he talks about exploring Catacombs and fully describing the whole experience of going into the underground of Paris. He shared what is like to experience exploring tunnels and metro stations and how unique it was. We discussed the nature of urban explorer - are you born one or can you become one? Max compared his exploring in Europe vs America  and he also talked about seeing goats on the tree in Morocco! Social media: Website: maxbonphotography.com Instagram: max.bon Link to the article with goats on the tree: here Chasing Bandos Podcast is available on chasingbandospodcast.com or your favourite podcasting app. Check out the pictures of our guest on Instagram at chasingbandospod.  You can get in contact by email: contact@gregabandoned.com  Why 'urbex explorers' don't share exact locations here: gregabandoned.com/urbex Intro song is Watcha Gon' Do is performed by Chris Shards [EPIDEMIC SOUND MUSIC LICENSE]. Rapid fire round background songs are: Greaser by TrackTribe and Bill Higley by Mini Vandals. Viewer discretion announcement at the beginning of the episode was done by Adrian Wunderler-Selby.

The Brownble Podcast
Ep 228: 9 Tips you Need to Know When Travelling as a Vegan with Brighde Reed of World Vegan Travel

The Brownble Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 78:12


The travel episode you've all been waiting for! Brighde Reed of World Vegan Travel is here to give us all the tips you'll ever need for fun, delicious vegan travel. Brighde is a passionate vegan and advocate for animals, and in today's episode, she comes with so many tips for vegan travel, resources, websites, apps, translating tips when travelling, and practical tips to help you navigate your adventures as a vegan with confidence. Who better, than the person behind organizing what are, at least to my knowledge, the most high end, spectacularly planned, luxury vegan travel tours and experiences out there, including exploring the beauty of Tuscany, Christmas markets in France, seeing mountain gorillas in Rwanda, going on safari in Botswana and more. She also talks about: Finding vegan friendly hotels, resorts and accommodations. How to talk about your vegan diet when ordering at restaurants and when booking hotels. How to find delicious vegan food while travelling and nearby vegan restaurants. How to use social media to find vegan food near you. Why travel guides aren't always the most up to date with vegan recommendations while travelling, and where to find these. How to get over the fear of advocating for yourself and asking for a vegan dish or vegan substitutions at restaurants and hotels. How you don't have to plan your trips alone and the options available to you so all you have to do is pack your bags. How to find vegan food city tours. Much more. Brighde spent her formative years in the UK and Australia before her desire to travel took over. The next five years were spent leading group tours for an Australian company around Southeast Asia, France and Morocco. She met fellow tour guide Seb in Marrakech, where they fell madly in love, and a couple of years later they discovered veganism together. She became passionate about promoting the vegan message as an activist. Widely travelled for both work and fun, one of her most important jobs at World Vegan Travel is ensuring the vegan food on their trips is second to none. She also makes sure everyone has enough treats throughout the day, and organizes the infamous trivia sessions during their final day's parties. You can connect with Brighde through Instagram, Facebook, Pinterest and Youtube (as World Vegan Travel on all platforms) and through her website. Don't forget to check out her wonderful weekly podcast The World Vegan Travel Podcast for even more tips and resources like the ones she gives in this episode, plus guests sharing about their trips around the world, the vegan restaurants they've tried while travelling, and much more. Our sponsor for today's show: Etsy shop Green and Experience: Natural and Reusable Vegan and Cruelty Free Hemp Dryer Balls - get 10% off your purchase by using promo code: BROWNBLE10 For all the other links mentioned in today's episode, click here.

Sports Goofs
SG Mini: CC Sabathia, HOFer? | SPORTS GOOFS

Sports Goofs

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 32:58


On this mini edition of SPORTS GOOFS presented by Mr. Tortilla: Francisco examines whether CC Sabathia has done enough to please the baseball writers and get him into the Hall of Fame.Try the Famous 1-Carb Tortilla in Multigrain or Pico de Gallo!Listen to us on Podhero!Support the Goofs on Patreon.Sports Goofs' Social Media: Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Discord | TikTokFrancisco's Social Media: Twitter | YouTubeAndrew's Social Media: Twitter | TwitchCharles' Social Media: TwitterGoof States of America (40.5): California, Virginia, Florida, Washington, New Jersey, Oregon, Ohio, Texas, New York, Illinois, Arizona, Michigan, Indiana, Massachusetts, North Carolina, Georgia, Montana, Delaware, Alabama, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Kentucky, Rhode Island, Utah, Kansas, Maryland, Connecticut, New Hampshire, Iowa, Colorado, Louisiana, Mississippi, Tennessee, Missouri, Idaho, New Mexico, Hawaii, District of Columbia, OklahomaGoof World Order (57): USA, India, Canada, Ireland, Vietnam, Nepal, Singapore, Germany, France, United Kingdom, Italy, Israel, Finland, Pakistan, Brazil, Malaysia, Thailand, Egypt, Croatia, Norway, Puerto Rico, Belize, Oman, Japan, Kyrgyzstan, South Africa, Algeria, Australia, Bangladesh, Switzerland, Iran, Iraq, Sri Lanka, Morocco, Portugal, Nicaragua, Bahrain, Netherlands, New Zealand, Philippines, Bulgaria, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, China, Seychelles, Sweden, Spain, Serbia, Indonesia, Poland, Qatar, Lebanon, Czech Republic, South Korea, Russia, Taiwan, Tunisia#MLB #NBA #NHL #NFL #NCAA #WWE #AEW Get bonus content on Patreon See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.