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  • 1,378PODCASTS
  • 3,943EPISODES
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  • Oct 25, 2021LATEST
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Latest podcast episodes about telegraph

Millionaire Mindcast
The 3 Pillars Of Unlocking Your Ultimate Peak Performance | Eric Partaker | Replay

Millionaire Mindcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 32:04


In this episode of the Millionaire Mindcast, we have a world-class guest, Eric Partaker who shares insights on holding accountability, how to reach the full potential in health, wealth, and relationship, and how to have constant success without sacrificing your health and your family! Eric is a certified high-performance coach, award-winning entrepreneur, motivational speaker, author of the book The 3 Alarms, peak performer CEO, and co-founder of Chilango. He has been working with high net worth individuals, entrepreneurs, business owners from all around the world to perform at their best and reach the top of their game in both their businesses and lives. He has been named "CEO of the Year" at the 2019 Business Excellence Awards, one of the "Top 30 Entrepreneurs in the UK" by Startups Magazine, and among "Britain's 27 Most Disruptive Entrepreneurs" by The Telegraph. Eric has worked with and led high-performing teams at McKinsey & Company, Skype, and Chilango. He is one of 300 people worldwide certified as a “High-Performance Coach”, by the High Performance Institute. This man was spending all his time at work and compromising his health. Then, something came up that made him realize the importance of being physically fit and healthy to reach his full potential and ultimate goals. Now, Eric has been obsessed with peak performance for 20 years. Eric wanted to perform at a peak level without sacrificing his health, and relationships with his family. He has proven that anybody can reach their full potential in health, wealth, and relationships and have it at the same time without breaking down. Some Questions I Ask: How did you fall into this space of working with high net worth individuals from all around the world? (00:52) What did your business, your routine, & what was your line of thinking at that time? (03:00) What are some of the things that you've seen that most everyone struggled with and how they might be able to deal with it?  (07:01) What are some of the things that you've seen have worked well for those who need to have some pivots and some small changes in how they're approaching what they wanted a life to look like? (10:40) How intentional should somebody have accountability and be looking at their environment and who they're spending their time with? (22:28)  In This Episode, You Will Learn: 3 things in life that need to be constantly in balance (04:57) Glimpse on The 3 Alarms book (11:18) The framework to reach your full potential (12:08) Why you need to change your identity piece to create a better future (12:22) Why you need to focus on productivity piece (14:20) Anti-fragility: Turning chaos into strength (14:46) Understanding the Pro VS. Amateur Mindset & how to turn pro in life (17:44)  Quotes                                                            “Everyone is typically quite successful but it just comes with a lot of pain.”  “Performing at a peak level not perfectly but at our best is a path to get in there.” “Behavior follows identity.” “Knowledge is no longer power, it's action.” “The more shock that I take, the stronger I become.” “Your potential becomes literally limitless.” “What gets measured gets done.”    Connect with Eric Partaker on: The 3 Alarms book by Eric Partaker Website Peak Performance Insights Email: @ericpartaker.com Facebook Instagram YouTube 

Football Daily
The Manchester United inquest

Football Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 46:47


Ben Haines is joined by the former Manchester United defender Danny Higginbotham, former Leyton Orient midfielder Jobi McAnuff and Luke Edwards from the Telegraph to react to Manchester United's extraordinary 5-0 defeat to Liverpool in the Premier League. The team discuss Manchester United's tactical approach to the match, how damaging the defeat is for Ole Gunnar Solskjaer and if his time as Manchester United manager is running out. Joe Smith from the Stretford Paddock Youtube channel joins the pod to give his reaction as a Manchester United fan and gives his thoughts on how Solskjaer handled the tough questions being asked in his post-match interviews. And after sweeping Manchester United aside, the panel debate whether Liverpool are now favourites in the Premier League title race. Topics 2'50” – How damaging is this result for Ole Gunnar Solskjaer? 3'30” – Did Manchester United use the wrong tactical approach by trying to press against Liverpool? 10'00” - Is there a lack of leaders on the pitch at Manchester United? 13'00” – Interview with Ole Gunnar Solskjaer 15'30” – Reaction from Manchester United fan Joe Smith 18'20” – Jobi on how as a manager he handled a bad result in media interviews 22'00 – Should Manchester United have signed a new central midfielder in the summer? 25'30” – Danny on speaking to Solskjaer when he first got the Manchester United manager's job 27'40” – Is this the beginning of the end for Solskjaer? 30'49” – The big tactical decisions made by Klopp in the match 33'20” – Interview with Jurgen Klopp 36'00” – Are Liverpool now favourites in the title race? 40'00” – Does Roberto Firmino get enough credit for what he does in that Liverpool side? 43'20” – Round-up of the rest of Sunday's Premier League action

Afternoon Drive with John Maytham
T20 World Cup 2021 South Africa v Australia

Afternoon Drive with John Maytham

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 7:59


Guest: Neil Manthorpe | Cricket Correspondent at Mwp John is joined by Neil Manthorpe to discuss the South Africa v Australia Super 12 Round to be played on Saturday.  Neil Manthorp is a British-born South African writer. Based in Cape Town, he is best known internationally for his coverage of cricket. He writes for the Telegraph and the Daily Mail. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Off Script
Janet Daley

Off Script

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 56:21


In 1776 the American colonies declared their independence from England, however the two countries' histories and cultures have remained intertwined. They share the same language, watch the same films and listen to the same music. With the rise of the "woke" movement in America, Sunday Telegraph columnist Janet Daley joins Steven Edginton to discuss fears Britain is heading down the same path. Watch Janet Daley's interview: https://youtu.be/jUlbpfkm7n0 |Read more from The Telegraph's award-winning comment team: www.telegraph.co.uk/opinion/ |For 30 days' free access to The Telegraph: www.telegraph.co.uk/audio |See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Chopper's Politics
More in common

Chopper's Politics

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 41:15


The death of Sir David Amess cast a shadow over Westminster this week, and in the wake of such a shocking loss comes renewed discussions around MPs' safety.Former Environment and Northern Ireland Secretary Theresa Villiers opens up about the threats she's received, cautions against disrupting constituents' access to their MP and tells Chopper why comments about "Tory scum" just aren't helpful.Also on the podcast: Andrew Mitchell MP gives us a glimpse behind the fringe in his new memoir and shares a touching memory of his friend Sir David, and former Health Secretary under New Labour Alan Milburn has some words of caution for the government as they embark on pumping money into an ailing NHS (sound familiar?)Sign up for the Chopper's Politics newsletter: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/newsletters |For 30 days' free access to The Telegraph: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/chopper |Email: chopperspolitics@telegraph.co.uk |See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Bryony Gordon's Mad World
Professor Dame Carol Black

Bryony Gordon's Mad World

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 39:08


Today's guest is on a mission to transform the way we view people addicted to drugs. This year, Professor Dame Carol Black led a government review into the way we handle drug addiction in this country - be that treatment and recovery, or even prevention. She called for a more health-based approach and more than £500 million investment over five years.This Addiction Awareness Week, Bryony has teamed up with Action on Addiction and the Forward Trust to bring you a conversation each day tackling a different element of addiction. Because even though we are slowly breaking down the stigma around discussing mental health, addiction - sadly - remains a taboo, even though we will all know someone touched by it.Dame Carol tells Bryony why alcohol is "just as dangerous" as other drugs, why she feels addiction should be treated as a chronic health condition, and explains why the current system is "broken".You can read Professor Dame Carol Black's review here: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/independent-review-of-drugs-by-professor-dame-carol-black |Action on Addiction is a UK charity providing support to people who need rehab, as well as a wealth of resources for those battling addiction issues: https://www.actiononaddiction.org.uk |You can find more information about organisations that offer free and confidential support at the end of this episode.Read Bryony's columns: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/authors/bryony-gordon/ |For 30 days' free access to The Telegraph: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/madworld |Follow Bryony on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/bryonygordon/ |See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Bryony Gordon's Mad World

Arsenal and England legend Tony Adams has done as much in his career to challenge the stigma around addiction as he has to make footballing history. From becoming sober very publicly back in the 90s, to setting up Sporting Chance, a charity that provides mental health support to current and former professional athletes, he's made it his mission to help others by sharing his story. This Addiction Awareness Week, Bryony has teamed up with Action on Addiction and the Forward Trust to bring you a conversation each day tackling a different element of addiction. Because even though we are slowly breaking down the stigma around discussing mental health, addiction - sadly - remains a taboo, even though we will all know someone touched by it.Tony tells Bryony how following a 12-step programme changed his life, how the new generation of footballers is battling a very different addiction, and why he's heading back to Chelmsford prison, three decades after serving time there.Action on Addiction is a UK charity providing support to people who need rehab, as well as a wealth of resources for those battling addiction issues: https://www.actiononaddiction.org.uk |Tony's charity, Sporting Chance, can be found here: https://www.sportingchanceclinic.com/ |You can find more information about organisations that offer free and confidential support at the end of this episode.Read Bryony's columns: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/authors/bryony-gordon/ |For 30 days' free access to The Telegraph: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/madworld |Follow Bryony on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/bryonygordon/ |See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Planet Normal
He was everyone's equal

Planet Normal

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 59:52


Mark Francois and Andrew Rosindell pay tribute to their fellow Conservative MP and much-loved friend, Sir David Amess, following his tragic death. But should MPs' security be ramped up? Mr Francois tells our podcast co-hosts, Allison Pearson and Liam Halligan why overly zealous measures risk "letting the bad guys win", while Mr Rosindell asks why his friend never held ministerial office.Also on the podcast: with COP26 on the horizon, cold showers are in and they get an even colder response from Ms Pearson. The irony of holding a climate change summit held amid a global energy crisis isn't lost on our co-pilot as Allison declares the Prime Minister's latest energy plans an act of virtue signalling, while Liam encourages a smarter approach to renewable energy.And there's a revelatory update from our NHS insider, George in the light of the recent spike in Covid infections.Allison will be replying to comments beneath this article on Thursday 21st of October 11am-12pm: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/politics/2021/10/20/best-us-paying-tribute-sir-david-amess/ |Read more from Allison: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/authors/allison-pearson/ |Read more from Liam: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/authors/liam-halligan/ |Listen to Bed of Lies: www.playpodca.st/bedoflies |Need help subscribing or reviewing? Read more about podcasts here: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/radio/podcasts/podcast-can-find-best-ones-listen/ |Email: planetnormal@telegraph.co.uk |For 30 days' free access to The Telegraph: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/normal |See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Arsenal Beat
The Wilshere & Willock Pivot

The Arsenal Beat

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 27:06


Simon is driving the discussion and is joined by the Telegraph's Sam Dean and senior football writer for ESPN James Olley. As the podcast rose between two thorny Premier League fixtures, the trio debate where Mikel Arteta is taking the team tactically, the Vieira effect, Partey's shooting practice and can Lacazette be an asset even with his future unclear? Ahead of the visit of Aston Villa the discussion turns to the defeat in the corresponding fixture last season, what is needed to address that this time around and Sam asks the big question - Watkins or Aubameyang?

Motoring Podcast - News Show
Slippery When Wet - 19 October 2021

Motoring Podcast - News Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 43:35


FOLLOW UP: VOLVO P1800 GASSER IS UK'S HOT WHEELSThe judging of the UK's Hot Wheels candidate took place last weekend. A Volvo P1800 gasser was chosen to represent the UK in the Hot Wheels Legends Tour. To watch the Car Throttle stream of the event, click the link here. To read more about the result, click the Elan PR article here. FORD INVESTS IN HALEWOOD PLANTFord is investing £200 million in converting their Halewood transmission plant to an EV focuised production line. This will safeguard 500 jobs at the plant and is a real boost to UK car manufacturing. The Government is part funding the investment. To find out more, click The Telegraph article here. TOYOTA SUED BY STEEL SUPPLIER In an incredibly rare more a Japanese supplier has sued Toyota and Chinese supplier over their use of steel technology, which Nippon Steel argues is their patent. The claim is for $177 million and for a ban on Toyota selling any cars that use the disputed technology from any other supplier buy Nippon Steel. To read more, click here for the AP News article. NISSAN ORDERED TO PAY JOIN-VENTURE PARTNER IN UAENissan's joint-venture partner, Al Dahana FZCO, won their case that Nissan had not fulfilled it's part of their agreement for the distribution of vehicles in the region. The Japanese company has been ordered to pay $345 million in compensation. To find out more, click the Arabian Business News article here. CASTBOX PODCAST APP ON MORE OEM APP STORESCastbox, an iOS and Android, podcasting app has partnered with Faurecia Aptoide Automotive, who power most of the car manufacturers own infotainment systems and app stores, thus making it available on the car's own app store. This could help those who don't use CarPlay and Auto to power their infotainment needs but who still want to listen to podcasts. To find out more, click the Faurecia Aptoide article here. ——————————————————————————-If you like what we do, on this show, and think it is worth a £1.00, please consider supporting us via Patreon. Here is the link to that CLICK HERE TO SUPPORT THE PODCAST——————————————————————————-NEW NEW CAR NEWSFord Focus A mid-life refresh is happening to the Focus range, with an improvement in technology, connectivity and changes to the drive-train options. The suspicion was that the diesel engine would get canned, in line with recent changes to the Ford range, but it stays. However, hybrid power trains are more available, including a 48v version being mated to the 1.0 EcoBoost to give nearly 52mpg. Ford have gone for the massive screen, as part of the improvements to the interior. But heating controls have gone button-less, now being accessible only via the touchscreen. To find out more, click the Motoring Research article here. Nissan LeafNissan has revealed very early sketches of the third generation Leaf, which will be a SUV, ditching the small hatchback that the first and current models have been. In the announcement they also confirmed they will not be pursuing a hydrogen strategy, sticking solely with electric. To find out more, click the Autocar article here. FoxxconnFoxconnn are the Taiwanese supplier to the likes of Apple and they have revealed a couple of EV models in a push to become a global car maker. The SUV and saloon were revealed via a livestream event earlier this week. To find out more, click here for the Autocar article. WRC: RALLY SPAINThe fabulous Rally Spain took place over the weekend, with Hyundai on the top step, thanks to Neuville's brilliance on the tarmac. Sordo was in third for Hyundai, making it a very good weekend for the Korean team and Evans in second chipping more points from Ogier, who was fourth. You can read more about what happened, by clicking this DirtFish article here. It is all to play for at Monza!Talking of Ogier, he was fined, again, this time for a road traffic violation, by overtaking on the hard shoulder between stages. Another silly penalty. To read more about that, click here for the DirtFish article. For Colin Clark's What We Learned article, click the DirtFish link here. WRC TO USE AI DETECTION FOR STAGE SAFETYFollowing a FIA initiative in using cameras and AI detection software, from 2022 WRC cars will be fitted with a system that will scan the roads ahead for possible spectator intrusion, allowing the organisers to quickly address any potential safety risks for drivers and those watching. To find out more, click the Jalopnik article here. GOODWOOD ANNOUNCES 2022 CALENDAR OF EVENTSGoodwood Road and Racing has announced their 2022 calendar of events for the Member's Meeting, Festival of Speed and Revival. The big news is the FoS will be moving to 23 - 26 June. To find out more and possible buy tickets, click the Goodwood link here. LUNCHTIME READ: THE MISGUIDED WAR OF ELEMENTSGill Pratt, who is the CEO of the Toyota Research Institute has written a very interesting piece on why the arguments of electric over hydrogen, and vice versa, are pointless. This echoes what we on the Show often say, there is much more nuance and detail to this than 240 characters in all caps can deal with. To read this fascinating article, click the Medium link here. LIST OF THE WEEK: LUXURY CARS WE FORGOT ALL ABOUTThere are a large number of cars to peruse, in this List of the Week. You will see why we have forgotten some of these but others deserve some time in the limelight again. To run through the list yourself, click the Autocar link here. Don't forget to tell the chaps which one you would have! AND FINALLY: UK'S FIRST HYDROGEN POWERED RC CARA trio of companies have got together to procude the UK's first hydrogen powered radio-controlled car. Tamiya, Bramble Energy and Toyota have created a 1/10th scale Mirai. To find out more about this cool project, click the Toyota Press Release here.

They Walk Among Us - UK True Crime
Season 6 - Episode 18

They Walk Among Us - UK True Crime

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 61:31


"The blood is the life, I have drunk the blood, and it shall be mine, for I have seen horror” — This handwritten passage, penned by Allan Menzies, was found among his things when Lothian and Borders Police searched his home.*** LISTENER CAUTION IS ADVISED *** Listen to our new podcast ‘They Walk Among America' here: https://play.acast.com/s/they-walk-among-americaBecome a ‘Patreon Producer' and get exclusive access to Season 1, early ad-free access to episodes, and your name in the podcasts credits. Find out more here: https://www.patreon.com/TheyWalkAmongUsOrder our book ‘They Walk Among Us' here: https://theywalkamonguspodcast.com/merchandiseCourt documents and information from the following news organisations were referenced in this episode: INDEPENDENT, THE GUARDIAN, THE OBSERVER, IRISH INDEPENDENT, SUNDAY WORLD, SUNDAY TRIBUNE, BBC NEWS, DAILY RECORD, THE TIMES, TELEGRAPH, SCOTSMAN, HERALD SCOTLAND, DAILY MAIL and EVENING STANDARD. More information and episode references can be found on our website https://theywalkamonguspodcast.comMUSIC: Liminal by Chelsea McGoughOnward by Chelsea McGoughEnigma by HillStygian by HillHeadwind by Wild WonderA Future With No Names by Stephen KeechNuclear Conception by Alice In Winter Mystery by Third AgeIn Fog by GLASWING Bio by Lincoln Davis Lucid Dreaming by Chelsea McGoughUnfolding by Alice In Winter Dilution Of Distress by HillThey Walk Among Us is part of the Acast Creator Network - https://www.acast.com/theywalkamongusSOCIAL MEDIA: Twitter - https://twitter.com/TWAU_PodcastFacebook - https://www.facebook.com/theywalkamonguspodcastInstagram - https://www.instagram.com/theywalkamonguspodcast Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/theywalkamongus. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Bryony Gordon's Mad World
Davinia Taylor

Bryony Gordon's Mad World

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 28:56


In the 90s there was rarely a week where Davinia Taylor wasn't on the television or in the newspapers, as an actor, presenter and well-known member of the so-called "Primrose Hill set". But behind the seemingly glamorous partying was a person in the grips of addiction.This Addiction Awareness Week, Bryony has teamed up with Action on Addiction and the Forward Trust to bring you a conversation each day tackling a different element of addiction. Because even though we are slowly breaking down the stigma around discussing mental health, addiction - sadly - remains a taboo, even though we will all know someone touched by it.Davinia tells Bryony about the alcoholic seizures she experienced trying to go cold turkey, opens up about her quest to find out why she drank, and bemoans the fact that addiction treatment doesn't often join up mental and physical well-being. Action on Addiction is a UK charity providing support to people who need rehab, as well as a wealth of resources for those battling addiction issues: https://www.actiononaddiction.org.uk |You can find more information about organisations that offer free and confidential support at the end of this episode.Read Bryony's columns: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/authors/bryony-gordon/ |For 30 days' free access to The Telegraph: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/madworld |Follow Bryony on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/bryonygordon/ |See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Bryony Gordon's Mad World

When today's Mad World guest first sought help, she didn't even realise she was a gambling addict. But within a few years Hayley had lost her job, her home, and she had arrived at a rehab centre with a small suitcase containing all of her possessions. This Addiction Awareness Week, Bryony has teamed up with Action on Addiction and the Forward Trust to bring you a conversation each day tackling a different element of addiction. Because even though we are slowly breaking down the stigma around discussing mental health, addiction - sadly - remains a taboo, even though we will all know someone touched by it.Hayley tells Bryony how betting was actually a substitute for alcohol, describes the relief of speaking to others dealing with the illness, and lays bare the hurdles she had to clear to even get help.Action on Addiction is a UK charity providing support to people who need rehab, as well as a wealth of resources for those battling addiction issues: https://www.actiononaddiction.org.uk |You can find more information about organisations that offer free and confidential support at the end of this episode.Read Bryony's columns: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/authors/bryony-gordon/ |For 30 days' free access to The Telegraph: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/madworld |Follow Bryony on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/bryonygordon/ |See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Langsam gesprochene Nachrichten | Deutsch lernen | Deutsche Welle
18.10.2021 – Langsam gesprochene Nachrichten

Langsam gesprochene Nachrichten | Deutsch lernen | Deutsche Welle

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 8:27


Trainiere dein Hörverstehen mit den Nachrichten der Deutschen Welle von Montag – als Text und als verständlich gesprochene Audio-Datei.Regime kündigt Amnestie an Myanmar will 5600 politische Gefangene freilassen. Sie hatten an Protesten gegen den Putsch teilgenommen und waren von der Militärjunta festgenommen worden. Die Amnestie habe humanitäre Hintergründe, hieß es im staatlichen Fernsehen. General Min Aung Hlaing, der das Land seit dem Putsch am 1. Februar führt, hatte zuvor in einer Ansprache erklärt, die Militärregierung wolle die Ordnung wiederherstellen. Seit der Absetzung der demokratisch gewählten Regierung kommt es immer wieder zu Protesten, bei denen nach UN-Schätzung mehr als 1100 Menschen von Sicherheitskräften getötet wurden. Unmut wegen Bitcoin-Einführung In El Salvador sind Tausende gegen die Regierung von Präsident Nayib Bukele auf die Straße gegangen. Der Protest in der Hauptstadt San Salvador richtete sich unter anderem gegen die Einführung des Bitcoins als offizielle Währung neben dem Dollar. Auf Protestplakaten waren Aufschriften zu lesen wie "Nein zur Diktatur" und "Bitcoin ist Betrug". El Salvador hatte Anfang September als erstes Land der Welt die Kryptowährung als offizielles Zahlungsmittel eingeführt und 200 Wechselautomaten im Land aufgestellt. In der Bevölkerung des mittelamerikanischen Landes wird dies mit großer Skepsis gesehen. Bande entführt US-Missionare Im Karibikstaat Haiti laufen die Bemühungen, 16 US-Bürger und einen Kanadier aus der Gewalt von Kidnappern zu befreien. Es handelt sich um christliche Missionare und deren Kinder. Nach Angaben aus haitianischen Sicherheitskreisen hatte eine Bande namens "400 Mawozo" die 17-köpfige Gruppe am Samstag in der Nähe von Port-au-Prince in ihre Gewalt gebracht. Haiti ist seit Jahren von politischem Chaos und krimineller Gewalt geplagt. Die Zahl der Entführungen ist umgerechnet auf die Einwohnerzahl die höchste der Welt. Parteiloser fordert Orban heraus Bei der Parlamentswahl 2022 in Ungarn soll Peter Marki-Zay als Spitzenkandidat der Opposition gegen Ministerpräsident Viktor Orban antreten. Der parteilose 49-Jährige entschied die Vorwahlen der Opposition mit 57 Prozent der Stimmen für sich. Sechs bisher zerstrittene Parteien sollen Marki-Zay im Wahlkampf gegen Orban unterstützen. Eine derartige Vorwahl fand in Ungarn jetzt zum ersten Mal statt. Marki-Zay war erst 2018 in die Politik eingestiegen. Damals gewann er die Bürgermeisterwahl in einer Stadt, die als Hochburg der Orban-Partei Fidesz galt. Facebook setzt auf Standort Europa Der Social-Media-Anbieter Facebook will binnen fünf Jahren in der Europäischen Union 10.000 hochqualifizierte Arbeitsplätze schaffen, um die virtuelle Welt "Metaverse" zu bauen. Das kündigte Topmanager Nick Clegg in einem Blogeintrag an. Dies sei "ein Vertrauensbeweis in die Stärke der europäischen Tech-Industrie und das Potenzial europäischer Tech-Talente", schrieb Clegg. Mit "Metaverse" will der US-Konzern eine virtuelle Online-Welt erschaffen, in der Nutzer sich treffen, Geld ausgeben, Medien konsumieren und möglicherweise sogar arbeiten können. Großbritannien setzt auf Kernkraft Die britische Regierung setzt einem Zeitungsbericht zufolge auf Atomenergie, um ihre Klimaziele zu erreichen. Noch vor den Wahlen im Jahr 2024 solle die Finanzierung eines neuen Kernkraftwerks erfolgen, berichtet der "Telegraph". Man versuche, "in den nächsten Jahren mindestens ein weiteres großes Atomprojekt zu genehmigen, um die Energiesicherheit zu stärken und Tausende von Arbeitsplätzen zu schaffen", sagte ein Regierungssprecher der Nachrichtenagentur Reuters. Als möglicher Standort gilt ein bestehendes Reaktor-Areal in der südost­-englischen Grafschaft Suffolk. München geht in Führung Im Topspiel der Fußball-Bundesliga hat der FC Bayern München am Sonntag mit 5 zu 1 gegen Bayer Leverkusen gewonnen. Durch den Sieg haben die Münchener wieder die Tabellenführung übernommen. Im zweiten Sonntagsspiel trennten sich Augsburg und Bielefeld 1 zu 1. Die Bielefelder warten damit weiter auf ihren ersten Sieg in der laufenden Fußball-Bundesliga-Saison.

Bryony Gordon's Mad World
Camilla Tominey

Bryony Gordon's Mad World

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 44:45


When Camilla Tominey isn't writing in the Telegraph, she's the patron of Nacoa, The National Association for Children of Alcoholics, a charity that provides a space for people, young and old, to discuss the effect parental drinking has had on their life. This Addiction Awareness Week, Bryony has teamed up with Action on Addiction and the Forward Trust to bring you a conversation each day tackling a different element of addiction. Because even though we are slowly breaking down the stigma around discussing mental health, addiction - sadly - remains a taboo, even though we will all know someone touched by it.Camilla tells Bryony about the slow realisation that her childhood wasn't normal, why she's keen to paint a picture of her mum beyond her alcoholism, and how she wishes she didn't have to explain why she doesn't drink.Action on Addiction is a UK charity providing support to people who need rehab, as well as a wealth of resources for those battling addiction issues: https://www.actiononaddiction.org.uk |If you are a child of an alcoholic you can get advice and support from Nacoa for free on 0800 358 3456 |You can find more information about organisations that offer free and confidential support at the end of this episode. Read more from Camilla Tominey: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/authors/c/ca-ce/camilla-tominey/ |Read Bryony's columns: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/authors/bryony-gordon/ |For 30 days' free access to The Telegraph: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/madworld |Follow Bryony on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/bryonygordon/ |See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Football Daily
Mo or Messi, ‘sloppy' Man Utd & does Bruce deserve better?

Football Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 47:48


Ben Haines is joined by former Hull City and Macclesfield midfielder Alex Bruce and The Telegraph's North East Correspondent Luke Edwards to look at Saturday's action, which included a stunning Mo Salah performance and a big win for Leicester City, who in the process ended Manchester United's unbeaten away record. Hear from Jurgen Klopp and Ole Gunnar Solskjaer. And as Steve Bruce approaches his 1000th managerial match, we ask whether he deserves a chance the be at the helm as Newcastle enter a new era, post the Saudi takeover. Alex gives us an insight into how the week has been for his dad, the media speculation on his future and how it has impacted the whole family. Plus, hear what Alan Shearer makes of the takeover, what he thinks the fans really want and why he told Steve Bruce to never take the Newcastle job. TOPICS: 1'00 Goal of the day 3'10 Jurgen Klopp interview 4'20 Mo Salah's Liverpool contract 9'30 Ole Gunnar Solskjaer interview 11'30 'Sloppy' Manchester United and the mounting pressure 17'30 Praise for Brendan Rodgers 18'30 Saturday's other scores 19'20 The latest supercomputer predictor 22'00 Alan Shearer interview 30'00 Alex Bruce on his Dad - Steve Bruce

Bryony Gordon's Mad World
Nile Rodgers

Bryony Gordon's Mad World

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 54:05


Legendary musician and producer Nile Rodgers joins Bryony for the first episode of this special series of Mad World.This Addiction Awareness Week, Bryony has teamed up with Action on Addiction and the Forward Trust to bring you a conversation each day tackling a different element of addiction. Because even though we are slowly breaking down the stigma around discussing mental health, addiction - sadly - remains a taboo, even though we will all know someone touched by it.Listen as Nile tells Bryony how he grew up surrounded by the illness, describes the euphoria of his first gig playing sober, and shares how Keith Richards was the unlikely inspiration for his sobriety.Action on Addiction is a UK charity providing support to people who need rehab, as well as a wealth of resources for those battling addiction issues: https://www.actiononaddiction.org.uk |You can find more information about organisations that offer free and confidential support at the end of this episode. Read Bryony's columns: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/authors/bryony-gordon/ |For 30 days' free access to The Telegraph: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/madworld |Follow Bryony on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/bryonygordon/ |See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Craig Peterson's Tech Talk
How Many Times Per Week Are You Being Cyber Attacked? From Where? How? Why?

Craig Peterson's Tech Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 84:46


How Many Times Per Week Are You Being Cyber Attacked? From Where? How? Why? We've got a new study out showing that North American organizations, businesses, and others, are being hit with an average of 497 cyber attacks per week, right here in the good old USA. [Following is an automated transcript] This is a study by checkpoint software technologies. Checkpoint, I used, oh my gosh. It would have been back in the nineties back then. They were one of the very first genuine firewall companies. And it was a system that I was putting in place for my friends over at troopers. I think it was New England telephone. It might've been Verizon by then. I can't even remember, man. [00:00:41] It's been a little while, but it was, a system we were using in front of this massive system that I designed, I made the largest internet property in the world. At that time called big yellow. It morphed into super pages. It might be familiar with. But it was me and my team that did everything. We built the data center out. [00:01:05] We wrote all of the software. Of course they provided all of the yellow pages type listing so we can put it all in. And we brought it up online and we were concerned. Well, first of all, You know, I've been doing cyber security now for over 30 years. And at this point in time, they wanted something a little more than my home grown firewall. [00:01:29] Cause I had designed and written one in order to protect this huge asset that was bringing in tens of millions of dollars a year to the phone company. So they said, Hey, listen, let's go ahead and we'll use checkpoint and get things going. We did, it was on a little, I remember it was a sun workstation. If you remember those back in the. [00:01:52] And it worked pretty well. I learned how to use it and played with it. And that was my first foray into kind of what the rest of the world had started doing, this checkpoint software, but they've continued on, they make some great firewalls and other intrusions type stuff, detection and blocking, you know, already that I am a big fan, at least on the bigger end. [00:02:17] You know, today in this day and age, I would absolutely use. The Cisco stuff and the higher end Cisco stuff that all ties together. It doesn't just have the fire power firewall, but it has everything in behind, because in this day and age, you've got to look at everything that's happening, even if you're a home user. [00:02:37] And this number really gets everybody concerned. Home users and business users is. Businesses are definitely under bigger attacks than home users are. And particularly when we're talking about businesses, particularly the bigger businesses, the ones that have a huge budget that are going to be able to go out and pay up, you know, a million, $10 million ransom. [00:03:05] Those are the ones that they're after and this analysis. Point software who does see some of those attacks coming in, showed some very disturbing changes. First of all, huge increases in the number of cyber attacks and the number of successful ransoms that have been going on. And we're going to talk a little bit later, too, about where some of those attacks are coming from, and the reason behind those attack. [00:03:36] According to them right now, the average number of weekly attacks on organizations globally. So far, this year is 40% higher than the average before March, 2020. And of course that's when the first lockdowns went into effect and people started working from home in the U S the. Increase in the number of attacks on an organizations is even higher at 53%. [00:04:07] Now you might ask yourself why, why would the U S be attacked more? I know you guys are the best and brightest, and I bet it, I don't even need to say this because you can figure this out yourself, but the us is where the money is. And so that's why they're doing it. And we had president Biden come out and say, Hey, don't attack the. [00:04:27] well, some of those sectors are under khaki for more after he said that then before, right. It's like giving a list to a bad guy. Yeah. I'm going to be gone for a month in June and yeah, there won't be anybody there. And the here's the code to my alarm. Right. You're you're just inviting disaster checkpoints. [00:04:49] Also showing that there were more. Average weekly attacks in September 21. That's this September than any time since January, 2020. In fact, they're saying 870 attacks per organization globally per week. The checkpoint counted in September was double the average in March, 2020. It's kind of funny, right? [00:05:14] It's kind of like a before COVID after COVID or before the Wu Han virus and after the Wu Han virus, however, we might want to know. So there are a lot of attacks going on. Volume is pretty high in a lot of different countries. You've heard me say before some of my clients I've seen attack multiple times a second, so let's take a second and define the attack because being scanned. [00:05:40] I kind of an attack, the looking to see, oh, where is there a device? Oh, okay. Here's a device. So there might be a home router. It might be your firewall or your router at the business. And then what it'll do is, okay, I've got an address now I know is responding, which by the way is a reason. The, we always configure these devices to not respond to these types of things. [00:06:04] And then what they'll do is they will try and identify it. So they'll try and go into the control page, which is why you should never have when. Configuration enabled on any of your routers or firewalls, because they're going to come in and identify you just on that because all of a sudden them brag about what version of the software you're running. [00:06:26] And then if it's responding to that, they will try and use a password. That is known to be the default for that device. So in a lot of these devices, the username is admin and the password is admin. So they try it and now off they go, they're running. Some of these guys will even go the next step and we'll replace the software. [00:06:52] In your router or firewall, they will replace it so that it now directs you through them, everything you are doing through them. So they can start to gather information. And that's why you want to make sure that the SSL slash TLS. That encryption is in place on the website. You're going to, so if you go to Craig peterson.com right now, my website, I'm going to go there myself. [00:07:22] So if you go to Craig peterson.com, you're going to notice that first of all, it's going to redirect you to my secure site and it doesn't really matter. You won't see it. Okay. But you are there because if he. Typically at the left side of that URL bar where it says, Craig peterson.com. You'll see, there's a little lock. [00:07:44] So if you click that lock, it says connection is secure. Now there's a lot more we could go into here. But the main idea is even if your data is being routed through China or. Both of which have happened before many tens of thousands, hundreds of thousands of time times. I'm not even sure of the number now. [00:08:06] It's huge. Even if your data is being routed through them, the odds are, they're not going to see anything. That you are doing on the Craig Peterson site. Now, of course you go into my site, you're going to be reading up on some of the cybersecurity stuff you can do. Right. The outages what's happened in the news. [00:08:27] You can do all of that sort of thing on my side, kind of, who cares, right? Um, but really what you care about is the bank, but it's the same thing with the bank. And I knew mine was going to be up there. And when everybody just check it out anyway, so. So the bad guys, then do this scan. They find a web page log in. [00:08:47] They try the default log in. If it works, the Le the least they will do is change. What are called your DNS settings. That's bad because changing your DNS settings now opens you up to another type of attack, which is they can go ahead. And when your browser says, I want to go to bank of america.com. It is in fact, going to go out to the internet, say is bank of America, the bad guys. [00:09:18] Did, and they will give you their bank of America site that looks like bank of America feels like bank of America. And all they're doing is waiting for you to type into your bank of America, username and password, and then they might redirect you to the. But at that point, they've got you. So there are some solutions to that one as well, and Firefox has some good solutions. [00:09:44] There are others out there and you had to have those that are in the works, but this is just an incredible number. So here's what I'm doing, right. I have been working for weeks on trying to figure out how can I help the most people. And obviously I needed to keep the lights on, right? I've got to pay for my food and gas and stuff, but what I'm planning on doing and what we've sketched out. [00:10:10] In fact, just this week, we got kind of our final sketch out of it is we're going to go ahead and have a success path for cyber security. All of the basic steps on that success path will be. Okay. So it will be training that is absolutely 100% free. And I'll do a deeper dive into some of these things that I'm doing that I'm doing right now here on the radio, because you can't see my desktop. [00:10:40] It's hard to do a deep dive and it's open to anybody, right? If you're a home user or if you're a business user, all of the stuff on that free. Is going to help you out dramatically. And then after that, then there'll be some paid stuff like a membership site. And then obviously done for you. If the cybersecurity stuff is just stuff that you don't want to deal with, you don't have the time to deal with. [00:11:05] You don't want to learn, because believe me, this is something that's taken me decades to learn and it's changing almost every day. So I understand if you don't want to learn it to. That is the other option. I'll give you, which is done for you, which we've been doing now for over 20, 30 years. Stick around. [00:11:25] We'll [00:11:25] So which sectors are economy are being hacked? I mentioned that in the last segment, but yeah, there are some problems and the sectors that president Biden lined out laid out are, are the ones that are under, even more attack after his message. [00:11:42] 497 cyber attacks per week. On average here in the US, that is a lot of attacks. And we started explaining what that meant so that we talked about the scan attacks that are automated and some person may get involved at some point, but the automated attacks can be pretty darn automated. Many of them are just trying to figure out who you are. [00:12:09] So, if it shows up, when they do that little scan that you're using a router that was provided by your ISP, that's a big hint that you are just a small guy of some sort, although I'm shocked at how many bigger businesses that should have their own router, a good router, right. A good Cisco router and a really good next generation firewall. [00:12:34] I'm shocked at how many don't have those things in place, but when they do this, That's the first cut. So if you're a little guy, they'll probably just try and reflash your router. In other words, reprogram it and change it so that they can start monitoring what you're doing and maybe grab some information from. [00:12:56] Pretty simple. If you are someone that looks like you're more of a target, so they connect to your router and let's say, it's a great one. Let's say it's a Cisco router firewall or Palo Alto, or one of those other big companies out there that have some really good products. Uh, at that point, they're going to look at it and say, oh, well, okay. [00:13:18] So this might be a good organization, but when they get. To it again, if when access has turned on wide area, access has turned down, that router is likely to say, this is the property of, uh, Covina hospital or whatever it might be, you know? And any access is disallowed authorized access only. Well, now they know. [00:13:42] Who it is. And it's easy enough just to do a reverse lookup on that address. Give me an address anywhere on the internet. And I can tell you pretty much where it is, whose it is and what it's being used for. So if that's what they do say they have these automated systems looking for this stuff it's found. [00:14:02] So now they'll try a few things. One of the first things they try nowadays is what's called an RDP attack. This is a remote attack. Are you using RDP to connect to your business? Right? A lot of people are, especially after the lockdown, this Microsoft. Desktop protocol has some serious bugs that have been known for years. [00:14:25] Surprisingly to me, some 60% of businesses have not applied those patches that have been available for going on two years. So what then button bad guys will do next. They say, oh, is there a remote desktop access? Cause there probably is most smaller businesses particularly use that the big businesses have a little bit more expensive, not really much more expensive, but much better stuff. [00:14:51] You know, like the Cisco AnyConnect or there's a few other good products out there. So they're going to say, oh, well, okay. Let's try and hack in again. Automate. It's automated. No one has to do anything. So it says, okay, let's see if they patch, let's try and break in a ha I can get in and I can get into this particular machine. [00:15:14] Now there's another way that they can get into their moat desktop. And this apparently has been used for some of the bigger hacks you've heard about recently. So the other way they get in is through credential stuff. What that is is Hey, uh, there are right now some 10 billion records out on the dark web of people's names, email addresses, passwords, and other information. [00:15:43] So, what they'll do is they'll say, oh, well this is Covina hospital and it looks it up backwards and it says, okay, so that's Covina hospital.org. I have no idea if there even is a Gavino hospital, by the way, and will come back and say, okay, great. So now let's look at our database of hacked accounts. Oh, okay. [00:16:04] I see this Covina hospital.org email address with a password. So at that point they just try and stuff. Can we get in using that username and password that we stole off of another website. So you see why it's so important to be using something like one password, a password generator, different passwords on every site, different usernames on every site, et cetera, et cetera. [00:16:29] Right. It gets pretty important per te darn quickly. So now that they're in, they're going to start going sideways and we call that east west in the biz. And so they're on a machine. They will see what they can find on that machine. This is where usually a person gets some. And it depends in historically it's been about six days on average that they spend looking around inside your network. [00:17:00] So they look around and they find, oh yeah, great. Here we go. Yep. Uh, we found this, we found that. Oh, and there's these file server mounts. Yeah. These SMB shares the, you know, the Y drive the G drive, whatever you might call it. So they start gaining through those and then they start looking for our other machines on the network that are compromised. [00:17:23] It gets to be really bad, very, very fast. And then they'll often leave behind some form of ransomware and also extortion, where that extort you additionally, for the threat of releasing your data. So there, there are many other ways they're not going to get into them all today, but that's what we're talking about. [00:17:43] Mirman, we're talking about the 500 cyber attacks per week against the average. North American company. So we have seen some industry sectors that are more heavily targeted than others. Education and research saw an 60% increase in attacks. So their education and I've tried to help out some of the schools, but because of the way the budgets work and the lowest bidder and everything else, they, they end up with equipment. [00:18:17] That's just totally misconfigured. It's just shocking to me. Right. They buy them from one of these big box online places. Yeah. I need a, a Cisco 10, 10. And I need some help in configuring it and all, yeah, no problems or we'll help you. And then they sell it to the school, the school installs it, and it is so misconfigured. [00:18:38] It provides zero protection, uh, almost zero, right. It provides almost no protection at all. And doesn't even use the advanced features that they paid for. Right. That's why, again, don't buy from these big box. Guys just don't do it. You need more value than they can possibly provide you with. So schools, 1500 attacks per week research companies, again, 1500 attacks per week, government and military. [00:19:10] Entities about 1100 weekly attacks. Okay. That's the next, most highest attacked. Okay. Uh, health care organizations, 752 attacks per week on average. Or in this case, it's a 55% increase from last year. So it isn't just checkpoints data that I've been quoting here. That, that gives us that picture. There are a lot of others out there IBM's has Verizon's has all of these main guys, and of course in the end, They've got these huge ransoms to deal with. [00:19:50] Hey, in New Hampshire, one of the small towns just got nailed. They had millions of dollars stolen, and that was just through an email trick that they played in. K again. I T people, um, I I've been thinking about maybe I should put together some sort of coaching for them and coaching for the cybersecurity people, even because there's so much more that you need to know, then you might know, anyways, if you're interested in any of this. [00:20:22] Visit me online. Craig peterson.com/subscribe. You will get my weekly newsletter, all of my show notes, and you'll find out about these various trainings and I keep holding. In fact, there's one in most of the newsletters. Craig peterson.com. Craig Peterson, S O n.com. Stick around. [00:20:43] We've been talking about the types of attacks that are coming against us. Most organizations here in north America are seeing 500 cyber attacks a week, some as many as 1500. Now, where are they coming from? [00:21:00] Whether they're scanning attacks, whether they're going deeper into our networks and into our systems who are the bad guys and what are they doing? Microsoft also has a report that they've been generating, looking at what they consider to be the source of the attacks. Now we know a lot of the reasons I'm going to talk about that too, but the source is an interesting way to look at. [00:21:29] Because the source can also help you understand the reason for the attacks. So according to dark reading, this is kind of an insider, a website you're welcome to go to, but it gets pretty darn deep sometimes, but they are showing this stats from Microsoft, which you can find online that in the last year rush. [00:21:53] Has been the source of 58% of the cyber cat tax. Isn't that amazing now it's not just the cyber attacks. I, I need to clarify this. It's the nation state cyber tech. So what's a nature's nation state cyber attack versus I don't know, a regular cyber attack. Well, the bottom line is a nation state cyber attack is an attack that's occurring and is actually coordinated and run by and on behalf of a nation state. [00:22:31] Uh, So Russia at 58% of all nation state attacks is followed by North Korea, 23% Iran, 11% China, 8%. Now you probably would have thought that China would be. Right up there on that list, but Russia has 50% more of the nation state cyber attacks coming from them than from China. And then after China is south Vietnam, Viet, or I should say South Korea, Vietnam, and Turkey, and they all have less than 1%. [00:23:14] Now, this is this new pool of data that Microsoft has been analyzing. And it's part of this year's Microsoft digital defense report, and they're highlighting the trends in the nation state threat cyber activity hybrid workforce security. Disinformation and your internet of things, operational technology and supply chain security. [00:23:35] In other words, the whole gambit before, before all of this, now the data is also showing that the Russian nation state attacks are increasingly effective, calming from about a 21% successful compromise rate last year to 32%. So basically 50% better this year at effectiveness there, Russians are also targeting more government agencies for intelligence gathering. [00:24:10] So that jumped from 3% of their victims last year to 53%. This. And the Russian nation state actors are primarily targeting guests who us, right? The United States, Ukraine and the United Kingdom. Now this is all according to the Microsoft data. So why has Russia been attacking us? Why is China been attacking us and why the change this. [00:24:38] Well, Russia has been attacking us primarily to rent some us it's a cash cow for them just like oil and gas. They are making crazy money. Now that president Biden has made us dependent on foreign oil supplies. It's just insanity and even dependent on. Gas coming from other places. Well guess where the number one source of gases now for Europe and oil it's Russia. [00:25:08] So we are no longer going to be selling to Europe. Russia is so they're going to be making a lot of money off of. But before then they were actually counted on ransomware to help fund the Russian federal government, as well as of course, these Russian oligarchs, these people who are incredibly rich that have a substantial influence on the government. [00:25:33] Don't if you're wondering who they might be, just think of people like, oh, I don't know. Bill gates and, uh, w who are on the, some of the other big guys, you know, Tim cook, uh, Amazon's Jeff bayzos Elon Musk, right? Those are by my definition and looking it up in the dictionary, they are all a. They get exemptions to laws. [00:25:58] They get laws passed that, protect them. In fact, most of regulations actually protect these big companies and hurt small companies. So I would call them oligarchs and that's the same sort of thing in Russia in Russia. Okay. They probably have a little bit more underhanded stuff than these guys here do, but that's what Russia has been. [00:26:21] China has been continually going after our national secrets, national defense, the largest database of DNA of Americans DNA, of course, is that unique key. If you will building block for all of us, that's what DNA is. And the largest database of all of that uniquely identifying information is in. China stole from the office of personnel management records of a federal employees, their secret clearance, all of their background check information who was spoken with, what did they have to say? [00:27:03] And on and on. So China has been interested in infiltrating our businesses that provide things to the military and the military themselves and the federal state, and even the local governments that's who they've been targeting. And that's why there's 8% number might seem small. Although, as I just mentioned this year, Russia moved, moved dramatically. [00:27:30] They used to be about 3% of their attacks or against the government agencies. And now it's 53%. So Russia. And China are going after our national secrets and they can use them in a cold war, which as I've said, I think the first shots of the third world war have been fired. And frankly, they're all cyber, it's all online and Russia. [00:27:57] Isn't the only nation state actor who's changing its approaches here as espionage is the most common goal amongst all nation state groups as of this year. Tivity of hackers reveals different motivations in Iran, which quadrupled its targeting of Israel. Surprise, surprise. Over the last year. And Iran has been launching destructive attacks, things that will destroy power, power plants, et cetera, and North Korea, which is targeting cryptocurrency companies for profit. [00:28:29] So they're stealing these various crypto coins again, funding their government. So it's, it's a problem. Absolute problem. Government sectors are some of the most targeted 48%. These NGOs non-government organizations that act kind of a quasi government functions and think tanks are 31%. Uh, and Microsoft, by the way, has been alerting customers of nation, state attack, attack attempts. [00:29:01] Guess how many this year that they had to warn about 20,500 times in the past three years. So that's a lot and Microsoft is not a company that's been out there at the front lines. It never has been it's in behind. So to have them come out and say, this is. And okay, by the way, your stolen username and password run for a buck per thousand, and it's only gonna take you hundreds of hours to get it all cleared up. [00:29:32] Isn't that nice spear fishing for a hire can cost a hundred to a thousand dollars per successful account takeover and denial of service attacks are cheap from protected sites, roughly $300. Per month. And if you want to be ransomware king, it's only going to cost you 66 bucks upfront 30% of the profit. [00:29:54] Okay. Craziness. Hey, visit me online. Sign up Craig, peter.com/subscribe. [00:30:03] I had an interesting mastermind meeting this week. There's six of us. We're all business owners and it opened my eyes pretty dramatically because one of the members got hacked, but that's not what I really want to emphasize. [00:30:20] This whole cybersecurity thing gets pretty complicated, pretty quickly. And a friend of mine who is in one of my mastermind groups had a real problem. And the here's here's what went on. We'll call him Walt for back of a letter, lack of a better name since that is his name. [00:30:40] And he doesn't mind me sharing this with you. Walt has a very small business that he and his wife run, and they have a couple of contractors that help out with some things, but his business is very reliant on advertising and primarily what he does is Facebook advertising. Now I've been talking for two years, I think in this mastermind group about cyber security and the fact that everyone needs good cyber security. [00:31:13] And he always just kind of pole hum to, uh, wow. You know, and it's just too complicated for me. I got to thinking for a, you know, a bit, really a few weeks, what does he mean to complicated? Cause there's some basic things you can do. So this week on Tuesday, I was on our mastermind groups meeting and I explained, okay, so here's what happened to Walt. [00:31:42] He had $40,000 stolen, which by the way, it's a lot of money for a teeny tiny husband wife company. And. Uh, well, here's what we did. He, we helped them. We got the FBI involved and, you know, with our direct ties, cause we work with them on certain types of cases and he got back every dime, which is just totally unheard of. [00:32:06] But um, without going into all of the details there, I spent a problem. 1520 minutes with the whole group and the mastermind explaining the basics of cyber security. And that really kind of woke me up, frankly, because of their responses. Now these are all small business owners and so they're making pretty decent money. [00:32:31] In fact, every one of them and they all have some contractors and some employees all except for Walt and his wife, they had just have contractors and. I had two completely different responses from two members of this group that no. Let me tell you this was really eye opening for me. And this is why you might've heard me in the first segment talking about this, but this is why I have really changed my view of this stuff, this cybersecurity stuff, because I explained. [00:33:08] If you're using things like Norton antivirus or McAfee, antivirus, or really any of them, even the built-in Microsoft defender this year, those standard antivirus system. I have only been able to catch about 30% of the malware out there, 30%, you know, that's like having a house and you've got a security guard posted out front. [00:33:39] He's armed, he's ready to fight. And yet all of your windows are open and all of your doors are unlocked. And all someone has to do is crawl in the side window because that guy that's posted up front, he's not going to be able to stop. So 30% effectiveness. And of course, Walt had all of the basic stuff. [00:33:59] He thought he was good enough. It's not worth spending time or money doing any of this. And of course it turned out to be well worth the time and money if he had done it. But he has a friend who has contacts and, and made things happen for him. So I guess he's kind of, kind of lucky in that regard, but I explained that and I said, do you know the, the way you. [00:34:21] To go. If you're a small business, it's about $997 a month for a small business, with a handful of employees to get the type of security you really need. There's going to catch. 90 something 98%. Maybe if, if things go well of the stuff going on, in other words, you don't just have an armed guard at the front door. [00:34:46] You've got all the windows closed and blocked and the doors closed and locked as well. So yeah, somebody can still get in, but they got to really want to get in and risk getting caught. So that's kind of the analogy that I used now. One of the members of my. Of my mastermind thought, well, okay. Cause you're just being Frank with me. [00:35:09] Right? We're all friends. She said, well, initially I thought, oh Craig, I'm going to have to have you help out with stuff here. Cause my, you know, I'm concerned about my security. I make some good money. Uh, she's the one that has employee. She has a million dollar plus a year business and she wants to keep it safe. [00:35:26] But then she. Uh, you know, but, but you know, you were talking about all of this Norton and stuff and that it doesn't work. So I, I just, I don't have any hope. And that's when the another member jumped in and this other member said, well, Uh, oh, that's not what I got at all. I got the, the normal off the shelf stuff that you buy that you're going to get from Amazon, or you're going to get from PC connection or wherever that stuff is not going to work, but there is stuff that does, but it's only professional stuff. [00:36:02] You can only get it from professionals that are trained in certified. Which is the right message. Right. That was the message I was trying to relay. Yeah. Don't try and do it yourself because you can't even get the right tools that you need. That is frankly a problem. So that really got me to think. In, in a very big way, because here are two people that have heard me talk about cybersecurity and their eyes probably glazed over, but now their eyes, I know at least one of these ladies definitely glazed over. [00:36:36] So I've come to the realization that sometimes I. A little too deep into things. And although I can explain it quite well to many people, sometimes people glaze over and I get emails from you guys saying kind of the same thing. I really appreciate it. I don't understand a lot of what you're saying, Craig, but thanks for being there. [00:36:59] Listen to you every week here on the radio. Uh, then that's good. That's reassuring, but now I've come to realize a few things. One is. The I've got to be a lot clearer in my messaging, because even when talking to my friends, it is a little bit overwhelming for them sometimes. Right. And then the next thing is everybody needs help because you're being lied to. [00:37:29] Right. How are people getting ransomware? If the stuff that they're buying work. Maybe it's just me, but I think there's a disconnect there. So a lot of you guys have gone out and you've hired people and I want to spend just a few minutes right now, going through some red flags that you need to be looking out for in vendor security assessment. [00:37:56] Now I'm putting one together. As well, right yet another one. Uh, and what I'm trying to do is help you out, right? This is not as sales tool. It is trying to help you figure out where you're at. I'm putting together a webinar that I'm going to be holding these what I'm calling bootcamps, where I go through and show you exactly how to do the basic steps that you need to do in order to be safe on. [00:38:25] Okay. If an online, all that means is your, is plugged in, right. Okay. It doesn't mean you're going out and doing a lot of stuff out there on the internet just means it's connected. So those are going to be coming out. I will send an email out as soon as all of that. Stuff's ready. Cause. Absolutely free. And these assessments, I have the basic one that you can do yourself. [00:38:47] It's a self-assessment. And then I have the more advanced ones that I do that are five grand. Okay. So you've got to be a decent sized business for this to make sense where we look for all of the security problem. On all of your computers and your networks, and then give you a list of things you need to do and how to do them. [00:39:10] Okay. So it's well worth it for them, but if you're a very small company and you're trying to do some of this yourself, I want to help you. So that's what these boot camps are going to be all over. And also what the scorecard is going to be all about. So that's coming up, but here are some good red flags and an assessment. [00:39:30] I found this again on dark reading. This is kind of an insider website for those of us in the cybersecurity business, but, um, How can you verify the information that vendors are giving you about their own cybersecurity posture? We've heard in the news and I've talked about them all year, this year, and for years past. [00:39:56] That are we're vendors can be our worst nightmare because some of these hacks come in through our vendors. So you've got yourself, a cybersecurity company. How do you know if they are really telling you the truth? And man, is that hard for you to know? Right. You're going to ask him questions and the salesmen are going to say, oh yeah, yeah, yeah. [00:40:21] That's why we don't have salesmen. Right. We have engineers. You talk to me, you might talk to my son or my daughter, people who have been doing this with me, who I have trained and helped out. So this guy who wrote the article and there's this on attributed, I don't see an attribution on here on this page. [00:40:41] I definitely want to give him, probably I heard is John Babinec wrote this thing and he is a principle threat hunters. What he calls himself over at net and rich. So he says, here's what you got to do. And if you're trying to be cost-effective, he puts it in. What I call an ed month clause. And one of these days I'll tell you that story, but he calls it a validity check question so that an honest vendor would tell you, no, they don't do X and give you a good reason why they don't like it's not cost effective. [00:41:17] It's outside of a reasonable risk model. Does that make sense to you? So when you're trying to evaluate a vendor, who's going to be doing your cyber security put in one of these validity checks put in one of these questions. It doesn't really matter to you, but it's something that would be very hard for one of these cybersecurity companies to do. [00:41:42] And maybe it doesn't fit the risk model that you have. I think it's just absolutely brilliant. Probably one of the better ways when you're trying to evaluate an MSSP as cybersecurity managed or otherwise provider stick in something like that. So you have a red flag that just stands out for you. All right. [00:42:04] Make sure you are registered online. Craig Peter sohn.com/subscribe. So you can find out about all of these trainings coming up. [00:42:17] If you've never heard of the Carrington event, I really hope, frankly, I really, really do hope we never have to live through one of these. Again, there is a warning out there right now about an internet apocalypse that could happen because of the Sun. [00:42:34] Solar storms are something that happens really kind of all of the time. The sun goes through solar cycles. About every seven years, there are longer cycles as well. You might know. I have an advanced class amateur radio license I've had for a long time, and we rely a lot when we're dealing with short wave on the solar cycle. [00:42:59] You see what happens is that the sun charges, the atmosphere. You see that if you've ever seen the Northern light, that is. Part of the Sunzi missions, hitting our magnetic field and kind of getting sucked into the core of the earth, if you will, as they get caught in that field. And the more charged the atmosphere is, the more bounce you get. [00:43:24] That's what we call it bounce. And the reason us hams have all these different frequencies to use is because of the battle. We can go different frequencies with different distances, I should say, using different frequencies. So think about it right now. You've got the earth and I want to talk from Boston to Chicago. [00:43:47] For instance, I know about how many miles it is, and I have to figure out in the ionosphere up in the higher levels of the atmosphere, what frequency. To use in order to go up into the atmosphere, bounce back, and then hit Chicago. That's the idea. It's not quite as simple or as complex in some ways, as it sounds, a lot of people just try different frequencies and a lot of hams just sit there, waiting for anybody anywhere to talk to, particularly if they are. [00:44:20] It's really quite fun. Now what we're worried about, isn't so much just the regular solar activity. We get worried when the sun spots increase. Now, the solar cycle is what has primary image. On the temperature on earth. So no matter what, you might've heard that isn't your gas, guzzling car or a diesel truck that causes the Earth's temperature to change. [00:44:49] Remember the only constant when it comes to the Earth's temperature has been changed over the millions of years. We had periods where the earth was much warmer than it is now had more common that carbon dioxide in the atmosphere than it does now had less. In fact, right now we are at one of the lowest levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere in earth, long, long. [00:45:15] So the sun, if you might remember, comes up in the morning, warms things up, right? And then it cools down. When the sun disappears at nighttime, it has a huge impact. It's almost exclusively the impact for our temperatures. If there's other things too, for instance, eruption can spew all to hold a lot of carbon dioxide. [00:45:40] In fact, just one, just Mount St. Helens wanted erupted, put more carbon dioxide into the atmosphere than man has throughout our entire existence. Just to give you an idea, right? So these alarms that are out there, uh, you know, come on, people. Really, and now we're seeing that in, uh, this last year we had a 30% increase in the ice cap up in the, in, up in the north, up in Northern Canada, around the polls. [00:46:12] Uh, we also had some of these glaciers growing. It was so funny. I saw an article this year, or excuse me, this week that was showing a sign that was at one of our national parks. And it said this glacier will have disappeared by 2020. Of course it hasn't disappeared. In fact, it has grown now and it's past 2020. [00:46:34] Anyhow, the sun has a huge impact on us in so many ways. And one of the ways is. Well, something called a coronal mass ejection. This is seriously charged particles. That tend to be very, very directional. So when, when it happens, when there's one of these CMS coronal, mass ejections, it's not just sending it out all the way around the sun everywhere. [00:47:02] It's really rather concentrated in one. One particular spot. Now we just missed one not too long ago. And let me see if I can find it here. Just mast, a cm E near miss. Here we go. There a solar super storm in July, 2012, and it was a very, very close shave that we had most newspapers didn't mention it, but this could have been. [00:47:33] AB absolutely incredible. We'd be picking up the pieces for the next 50 years. Yeah. Five, zero years from this one particular storm. And what happens is these, these solar flares, if you will, are very, very extreme, they CME. You're talking about x-rays extreme UV, ultraviolet radiation, reaching the earth at the speed of light ionizes, the upper layers of atmosphere. [00:48:02] When that happens, by the way, it hurts our communications, but it can also have these massive effects where it burns out saddle. And then causes radio blackouts, GPS, navigation problems. Think about what happened up in Quebec. So let me just look at this call back, uh, hit with an E and yeah, here we go. And March 13th, 1989. [00:48:33] Here we go. Here's another one. Now I remembered. And this is where Quill back got nailed. I'm looking at a picture here, which is, uh, looking at the United States and Canada from the sky and where the light is. And you can see Quebec is just completely black, but they have this massive electrical blackout and it's becomes. [00:48:57] Of this solar storm. Now they, these storms that I said are quite directional, depending on where it hits and when it hits things can get very, very bad. This particular storm back in 1989 was so strong. We got to see their Rora Borealis, the Northern lights as far south, as Florida and cue. Isn't that something, when we go back further in time to this Carrington event that I mentioned, you could see the Northern lights at the equals. [00:49:35] Absolutely amazing. Now the problem with all of this is we've never really had an internet up online. Like we have today when we had one of the storms hit. And guess what we're about to go into right now, we're going into an area or a time where the sun's going to be more active, certainly on this, this 11 year cycle and possibly another bigger cycle too, that we don't really know much about. [00:50:07] But when this hit us back in the 1850s, what we saw was a, uh, a. Telegraph system that was brought to its knees. Our telegraphs were burned out. Some of the Telegraph buildings were lit. They caught on fire because of the charges coming in, people who were working the telegraphs, who are near them at the time, got electric shocks or worse than that. [00:50:34] Okay. 1859 massive Carrington event compass needles were swinging wildly. The Aurora Borealis was visible in Columbia. It's just amazing. So that was a severe storm. A moderate severity storm was the one that hit in Quebec here, knocked out Quebec, uh, electric. Nine hour blackout on Northeast Canada. What we think would happen if we had another Carrington event, something that happened to 150 years ago is that we would lose power on a massive scale. [00:51:13] So that's one thing that would happen. And these massive transformers that would likely get burned out are only made in China and they're made on demand. Nobody has an inventory. So it would be at least six months before most of the country would get power back. Can you believe that that would be just terrible and we would also lose internet connectivity. [00:51:39] In fact, the thinking that we could lose internet connectivity with something much less than a severe storm, maybe if the Quebec power grid solar, a massive objection here. Maybe if that had happened, when. The internet was up. They might have burned out internet in the area and maybe further. So what we're worried about is if it hits us, we're going to lose power. [00:52:07] We're going to lose transformers on the transmission lines and other places we're going to lose satellites and that's going to affect our GPS communication. We're going to lose radio communication, and even the undersea cables, even though they're now no longer. Regular copper cables. It's now being carried of course, by light in pieces of glass. [00:52:32] The, those cables need to have repeaters about every 15 miles or so under underwater. So the power is provided by. Copper cables or maybe some other sort of power. So these undersea cables, they're only grounded at extensive intervals, like hundreds or thousands of kilometers apart. So there's going to be a lot of vulnerable components. [00:52:59] This is all a major problem. We don't know when the next massive. Solar storm is going to happen. These coronal mass ejections. We do know they do happen from time to time. And we do know it's the luck of the draw and we are starting to enter another solar cycle. So be prepared, everything. Of course, you're listening to Craig Peterson, cybersecurity strategist. [00:53:28] If you'd like to find out more and what you can do, just visit Craig peterson.com and subscribe to my weekly show notes. [00:53:39] Google's got a new admission and Forbes magazine has an article by Zach Dorfman about it. And he's saying you should delete Google Chrome now after Google's newest tracking admission. So here we go. [00:53:55] Google's web browser. Right? It's been the thing for people to use Google Chrome for many years, it's been the fastest. Yeah, not always people kind of leapfrog it every once in a while, but it has become quite a standard. Initially Microsoft is trying to be the standard with their terrible browser and yeah, I to Exploder, which was really, really bad and they have finally completely and totally shot it in the head. [00:54:29] Good move there on their part. In fact, they even got rid of their own browser, Microsoft edge. They shot that one in. They had to, I know I can hear you right now saying, oh, Craig, I don't know. I just use edge browser earlier today. Yeah. But guess what? It isn't edge browser. It's actually Google Chrome. The Microsoft has rebranded. [00:54:52] You see the guts to Google Chrome are available as what's called an open source project. It's called chromium. And that allows you to take it and then build whatever you want on top of. No, that's really great. And by the way, Apple's web kit, Kat is another thing that many people build browsers on top of and is part of many of these browsers we're talking about right now, the biggest problem with the Google Chrome. [00:55:22] Is they released it so they could track you, how does Google make its money? Well, it makes us money through selling advertising primarily. And how does it sell advertising if it doesn't know much or anything about you? So they came out with the Google Chrome browser is kind of a standard browser, which is a great. [00:55:43] Because Microsoft, of course, is very well known for not bothering to follow standards and say what they have is the actual standard and ignoring everybody else. Yeah. Yeah. I'm picking on Microsoft. They definitely deserve it. Well, there is what is being called here in Forbes magazine, a shocking new tracking admission from. [00:56:05] One that has not yet made headlines. And there are about what 2.6 billion users of Google's Chrome worldwide. And this is probably going to surprise you and it's frankly, Pretty nasty and it's, I think a genuine reason to stop using it. Now, as you probably know, I have stopped using Chrome almost entirely. [00:56:31] I use it when I have to train people on Chrome. I use it when I'm testing software. There's a number of times I use it, but I don't use. The reality is the Chrome is an absolute terror. When it comes to privacy and security, it has fallen way behind its rivals in doing that. If you have an iPhone or an iPad or a Mac, and you're using safari, apple has gone a long ways to help secure your. [00:57:09] Well, that's not true with Chrome. In fact, it's not protecting you from tracking and Dave up data harvesting. And what Google has done is they've said, okay, well, we're going to get these nasty third party cookies out of the whole equation. We're not going to do that anymore. And what they were planning on doing is instead of knowing everything specifically. [00:57:34] You they'd be able to put you in a bucket. So they'd say, okay, well you are a 40 year old female and you are like driving fast cars and you have some kids with a grandkid on the way, and you like dogs, not cats, right? So that's a bucket of people that may be a few hundred or maybe up to a thousand. As opposed to right now where they can tell everything about you. [00:58:04] And so they were selling that as a real advantage because they're not tracking you individually anymore. No, we're putting you in a bucket. Well, it's the same thing. Right. And in fact, it's easier for Google to put you in a bucket then to track everything about you and try and make assumptions. And it's easier for people who are trying to buy ads to place in front of you. [00:58:28] It's easier for them to not have to kind of reverse engineer all of the data the Google has gathered in instead of. To send this ad to people that are in this bucket and then that bucket. Okay. It makes sense to you, but I, as it turns out here, Google has even postponed of that. All right. They really have, they're the Google's kind of hiding. [00:58:54] It's really what's going on out there. Uh, they are trying to figure out what they should do, why they should do it, how they should do it, but it's, it's going to be a problem. This is a bad habit. The Google has to break and just like any, anybody that's been addicted to something it's going to take a long time. [00:59:16] They're going to go through some serious jitters. So Firefox is one of the alternatives and to Google Chrome. And it's actually a very good one. It is a browser that I use. I don't agree with some of the stuff that Mozilla and Firefox does, but again, right. Nobody agrees on everything. Here's a quote from them. [00:59:38] Ubiquitous surveillance harms individually. And society Chrome is the only major browser that does not offer meaningful protection against cross cross site tracking and Chrome will continue to leave users unprotected. And then it goes on here because. Uh, Google response to that. And they admit that this massive web tracking out of hand and it's resulted in, this is a quote from Google and erosion of trust, where 72% of people feel that almost all of what they do online is being. [01:00:19] By advertisers, technology firms or others, 81% say the potential risks from data collection outweigh the benefit by the way, the people are wrong. 72% that feel almost all of what they do on online is being tracked. No, no. The answer is 100% of what you do is probably being tracked in some way online. [01:00:41] Even these VPN servers and systems that say that they don't do log. Do track you take a look at proton mail just last week. Proton mail it's in Switzerland. Their servers are in Switzerland. A whole claim to fame is, Hey, it's all encrypted. We keep it safe. We don't do logging. We don't do tracking, uh, guess what they handed over the IP addresses of some of the users to a foreign government. [01:01:10] So how can you do that? If you're not logging, if you're not tracking. Yeah, right. They are. And the same thing is true for every paid VPN service I can think of. Right. So how can Google openly admit that their tracking is in place tracking everything they can, and also admit that it's undermining our privacy and. [01:01:38] Their flagship browser is totally into it. Right? Well, it's really, it's gotta be the money. And Google does not have a plan B this anonymized tracking thing that they've been talking about, you know, the buckets that I mentioned, isn't realistic, frankly. Uh, Google's privacy sandbox is supposed to Fitbit fix it. [01:02:00] I should say. The, the whole idea and the way it's being implemented and the way they've talked about it, the advertisers on happy. So Google's not happy. The users are unhappy. So there you go. That's the bottom line here from the Forbes article by Zach Dorfman, delete Google Chrome. And I said that for a long time, I do use some others. [01:02:27] I do use Firefox and I use. Which is a fast web browser, that some pretty good shape. Hey, if you sign up for my show's weekly newsletter, not only will you get all of my weekly tips that I send to the radio hosts, but you will get some of my special reports that go into detail on things like which browser you shouldn't be using. [01:02:52] Sign up right now. Craig peterson.com. [01:02:57] Many businesses have gone to the cloud, but the cloud is just another word for someone else's computer. And many of the benefits of the cloud just haven't materialized. A lot of businesses have pulled back and are building data centers again. [01:03:14] The reason I mentioned this thing about Microsoft again, and the cloud is Microsoft has a cloud offering. [01:03:23] It's called Microsoft Azure. Many people, many businesses use it. We have used it with some of our clients in the past. Now we have some special software that sits in front of it that helps to secure. And we do the same thing for Amazon web services. I think it's important to do that. And we also use IBM's cloud services, but Microsoft is been pitching for a long time. [01:03:51] Come use our cloud services and we're expecting here probably within the next month, a big announcement from Microsoft. They're planning on making it so that you can have your desktop reside in Microsoft's cloud, in the Azure cloud. And they're selling really the feature of it doesn't matter where you are. [01:04:17] You have your desktop and it doesn't matter what kind of computer you're on. As long as you can connect to your desktop, using some just reasonable software, you will be able to be just like you're in front of a computer. So if you have a Chromebook or a Mac, Or a windows or tablet, whatever, and you're at the grocery store or the coffee shop or the office, you'll be able to get it, everything, all of your programs, all your files. [01:04:47] And we, Microsoft will keep the operating system up to date for you automatically a lot of great selling points. And we're actually looking into that. Not too heavily yet. We'll give them a year before we really delve into it at all. Cause it takes them a while to get things right. And Microsoft has always been one that adds all kinds of features, but most of the time, most of them don't work and we can, we can document that pretty easily, even in things like Microsoft. [01:05:18] Well, the verge is now reporting that Microsoft has warned users of its as your cloud computing service, that their data has been exposed online for the last two years. Yeah, let me repeat that in case you missed it, you, uh, yeah. I'm I'm I might've misspoken. Right. Uh, let me see, what does it say? It says, um, users of Azure cloud competing service. [01:05:48] So that's their cloud. Microsoft's big cloud. Okay. Um, their data has been. Exposed online. Okay. So that means that people could get the data, maybe manipulate the data that sort of exposed means for the last two years. Are you kidding me? Microsoft is again, the verge. Microsoft recently revealed that an error in its Azure cosmos database product left more than 3,300 as your customers data. [01:06:24] Completely exposed. Okay guys. So this, this, this is not a big thing, right? It can't possibly be big thing because you know who uses Azure, right. Nobody uses a zer and nobody uses hosted databases. Come on, give me a break. Let me see, what else does this have to say? Oh, okay. It says that the vulnerability was reported, reportedly introduced into Microsoft systems in 2019, when the company added a data visualization feature called Jupiter notebook to cosmos DB. [01:06:59] Okay. Well, I'm actually familiar with that one and let's see what small companies let's see here. Um, some Azure cosmos DB clients include Coca Cola. Liberty mutual insurance, Exxon mobile Walgreens. Hmm. Let me see. Could any of these people like maybe, maybe Liberty mutual insurance and Walgreens, maybe they'd have information about us, right. [01:07:26] About our health and social security numbers and account numbers and credit cards. Names addresses. Right, right. That's again, why I got so upset when these places absolutely insist on taking my social security number, right? It, it, first of all, when it was put in place, the federal government guaranteed, it would never be used for anything other than social security. [01:07:53] And the law even said it could not be used for anything other than social security. And then the government started expanding it. Right. And the IRS started using it. To track all of our income and you know, that's one thing right there, the government computers, they gotta be secure. Right. All of these breaches we hear about that. [01:08:12] Can't be true. Uh, so how about when the insurance company wants your personal information? Like your social security number? What business is it of? There's really no. Why do they have to have my social security number? It's a social security number. It's not some number that's tattooed on my forehead. [01:08:36] That's being used to track me. Is it this isn't a socialist country like China is, or the Soviet union was right. It's not socially. So why are they tracking us like that? Walgreens? Why do they need some of that information? Why does the doctor that you go to that made the prescription for Walgreens? Why do they need that information? [01:09:00] And I've been all over this because they don't. Really need it. They want, it makes their life easier, but they don't really need it. However, it exposes us. Now, if you missed the email, I sent out a week ago, two weeks ago now, I guess. You missed something big because I, in my weekly newsletter went through and described exactly what you could do in order to keep your information private. [01:09:35] So in those cases where websites asking for information that they don't really need, right? You don't want to lie, but if they don't really need your real name, why you're giving them your real name? Why do you use a single email address? Why don't you have multiple addresses? Does that start make sense to you guys? [01:09:54] And now we find out that Microsoft Azure, their cloud services, where they're selling cloud services, including a database that can be used online, a big database, uh, 3,300 customers looks like some of them are actually kind of big. I don't know. ExxonMobil pretty big. Yeah. I think so. Walgreens, you think that that might be yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah. [01:10:22] Y. Why are we trusting these companies? You know it, if you have a lot of data, a lot of customers, you are going to be a major target of nation states to hack you and bat just general hackers, bad guys. But you're also, if, if you've got all this information, you've also got to have a much higher level of security than somebody that doesn't have all of that information. [01:10:52] Does that make sense too? Did I say that right? You don't need the information and, and I've got to warn anybody that's in a business, whether you're a business owner or you're an employee, do not keep more data than you need the new absolutely need to run your company. And that includes data about your customers. [01:11:16] And maybe, maybe it's even more specifically data about your customer. Because what can happen is that data can be stolen and we just found. That? Yes, indeed. It could have been, it was exposed Microsoft the same. We don't know how much it was stolen. If anything was stolen. Um, yeah, Walgreens. Hey, I wonder if anyone's going to try and get some pain pills illegally through, uh, this database hack or a vulnerability anyways. [01:11:47] All right, everyone. Stick around. We'll be back. Of course, you listening to Craig Peterson. I am a cybersecurity strategist for business, and I'm here to help you as well. You can ask any question any time, uh, consumers are the people I help the most, you know, I wish I got a dime for every time I answered a question. [01:12:09] Just email me@craigpeterson.com me@craigpeterson.com and stick around. [01:12:18] Whether or not, you agree with the lockdown orders that were put in place over this COVID pandemic that we had. Uh, there are some other parts of the world that are doing a lot more. [01:12:34] Australia has, I don't know. I think that they went over the deep end. The much, the same thing is true right next door to them. [01:12:45] And I am looking at a report of what they are doing with this new app. Uh, you might be aware that both apple and Google came out with an application programming interface. That could be used for contract tack tracking, contact tracking. There you go. Uh, it wasn't terribly successful. Some states put some things in place. [01:13:13] Of course you get countries like China. I love the idea because heaven forbid you get people getting together to talk about a Tannen square remembrance. Now you want to know who all of those people were, who were in close proximity, right? So, you know, good for China a while, as it turns out, Australia is putting something in place they have yet another COVID lockdown. [01:13:39] They have COVID quarantine orders. Now I think if you are sick, you should stay on. I've always felt that I, you know, I had 50 employees at one point and I would say, Hey, if you're sick, just stay home. Never required a doctor's note or any of that other silliness, come on. People. If someone's sick, they're sick and let them stay home. [01:14:04] You don't want to get everybody else in the office, sick and spread things around. Right. Doesn't that just kind of make sense. Well, they now in Australia, don't trust people to stay home, to get moving. Remember China, they were, they were taking welders and we're going into apartments in anybody that tested positive. [01:14:22] They were welding them into their apartment for minimum of two weeks. And so hopefully they had food in there and they had a way to get fresh water. Australia is not going quite that far, but some of the states down under. Using facial recognition and geolocation in order to enforce quarantine orders and Canada. [01:14:47] One of the things they've been doing for very long time is if you come into the country from out of the country, even if you're a Canadian citizen, you have to quarantine and they'll send people by your house or you have to pay to stay for 10 days in a quarantine hope. So you're paying the course now inflated prices for the hotel, because they're a special quarantine hotel. [01:15:14] You have to pay inflated prices to have food delivered outside your door. And that you're stuck there for the 10 days, or if you're at home though, they, you know, you're stuck there and they'll send people by to check up on you. They'll make phone calls to check up on you and. They have pretty hefty find. [01:15:36] Well, what Australia has decided to do is in Australia is Charlene's even going from one state to another state are required to prove that they're obeying a 14 day quarantine. And what they have to do is have this little app on their phone and they, the app will ping them saying, prove it. And then they have to take a photo of themselves with geo location tag on it and send it up via the app to prove their location. [01:16:15] And they have to do all of that within 15 minutes of getting the notification. Now the premier of the state of south Australia, Steven Marshall said we don't tell them how often or when on a random basis, they have to reply within 15 minutes. And if you don't then a police, officer's going to show up at the address you're supposed to be at to conduct an in-person check. [01:16:43] Very very intrusive. Okay. Here's another one. This is a, an unnamed government spokesperson who was apparently speaking with Fox news quote. The home quarantine app is for a selected cohort of returning self Australians who have applied to be part of a trial. If successful, it will help safely ease the burden of travel restrictions associated with the pandemic. [01:17:10] So there you go. People nothing to worry about. It's just a trial. Uh, it will go away. Uh, just like, uh, for instance, income tax, as soon as rule, number one is over, it will be removed and it will never be more than 3% and it will only apply to the top 1% of wage-earners. So there you go. Right. And we all know that world war one isn't over yet. [01:17:34] Right. So that's why they still have it in somehow. Yeah, some of the middle class pays the most income tax. I don't know. Interesting. Interesting. So there you go. Little news from down under, we'll see if that ends up happening up here. News from China, China has, uh, China and Russia have some interesting things going on. [01:17:55] First of all, Russia is no longer saw. Country, they kind of are. They kind of aren't, they are a lot freer in many ways than we are here in the United States. Of course, China, very heavily socialist. In fact, they're so socialists, they are communist and China. And Russia both want their kids to have a very good education in science, engineering, and mathematics. [01:18:23] Not so much on history, not so much on, on politics. Right. But definitely heavy on the, on the sciences, which I can see that makes all the sense. I think everybody should be pretty heavily on the science. Well, according to the wall street journal this week, gamers under the age of 18 will not be allowed to play online games between 8:00 PM and 9:00 PM on Friday, Saturdays and Sundays. [01:1

Off Script
Suzanne Moore

Off Script

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 52:07


“Keir Starmer's Labour Party has become the metropolitan elite it was always accused of being.” Journalist Suzanne Moore joins Steven Edginton to dissect why Labour seems so far from power, why language around the trans debate matters and her take on “Tory scum”.Read more from The Telegraph's award-winning comment team: www.telegraph.co.uk/opinion/ |For 30 days' free access to The Telegraph: www.telegraph.co.uk/audio |See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Chopper's Politics
The B word is back

Chopper's Politics

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 40:57


The EU Ambassador to the UK, João Vale de Almeida, joins Christopher Hope on Chopper's Politics as this week Brussels has moved to bend and break their own rules with new proposals to cool tensions over the implementation of Northern Ireland Protocol. He insists the EU isn't a 'punisher', and argues that the European Court of Justice is a necessary referee in football match of the single market. The Telegraph's Europe Editor James Crisp and the Whitehall Editor Harry Yorke react to the Ambassador's words, with James' prediction of a future Brexit as a "damp, flaccid, squib" - oh dear... Plus co-Chair of The Conservative Steel Caucus Miriam Cates MP makes the case for the importance of steel in the push towards net zero, and also weighs into the row on biological sex versus gender. Read more from James Crisp: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/authors/j/ja-je/james-crisp/ |Read more from Harry Yorke: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/authors/h/ha-he/harry-yorke/ |The cancellation of women is bigger than a 'culture war', by Miriam Cates: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2021/10/11/cancellation-women-bigger-culture-war/ | Sign up for the Chopper's Politics newsletter: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/newsletters |For 30 days' free access to The Telegraph: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/chopper |Email: chopperspolitics@telegraph.co.uk |See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Tha Boxing Voice
☎️OH OH

Tha Boxing Voice

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 78:35


WBC heavyweight champion Tyson Fury admits that he doesn't know what the future holds for his boxing career.“I don't know what's going to happen," Fury told The Telegraph. “I've got one fight left on my contract with Top Rank and ESPN and we'll see what that is.“But I'm not thinking about boxing right now. I don't know how many fights I've got left. I don't know if I need to fight anymore. I don't know what the future holds.“I am motivated to get up in the morning, do a little bit of training, and enjoy my day. I don't have any goals in boxing, I have done everything and won everything, the only one to do it in my era.“I will always have been the WBC, WBA, WBO, IBF, Ring magazine champion, that will not evaporate in history, but once it is done, it is done and you cannot get it back. Once you are done, it doesn't matter how many belts you have, who you beat, what your record is. You are just another bare bum in the shower and I have always had that opinion."Join this channel to get access to perks:https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCcKT39KR_e3ZliHe4cyC06A/joinOne Free Month of Dazn On TBV http://bit.ly/ThaBoxingVoicexDAZNhttps://www.patreon.com/ThaboxingvoiceBUY THA BOXING VOICE T-SHIRT HERE http://thaboxingvoice.com/storePLEASE SUPPORT!!! SUBSCRIBE, SHARE & LIKEPlease check out our Facebook page and hit the like button. https://www.facebook.com/Thaboxingvoiceradio GOOGLE PLUS https://plus.google.com/107960664507143008932/posts?tab=XXiWeb Sitehttp://thaboxingvoice.com/Radio show: http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thaboxingvoiceradioTwitter: @Thaboxingvoicehttps://twitter.com/thaboxingvoiceAudio only Podcast subscribe herehttps://itun.es/us/oY7JJ.cMUSIC CREDITCASH APP $Dolla Dibiase https://www.instagram.com/dolla_dibiase/?hl=en#DeontayWilder #FuryWilder #TysonFury

Planet Normal
That Covid report

Planet Normal

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 59:57


MPs' report into the UK's early pandemic response is out – and it's given Allison Pearson and Liam Halligan 144 pages of pause for thought. They tell listeners why it's simply not balanced on the collateral damage caused by lockdowns, and query the intentions of one of the document's authors. Elsewhere, Allison has actually read Liam's column in order to understand what's really going on with the energy crisis, Liam dreams of a return to the seventies and the Planet Normal rocket makes a stopover at the cinema as our co-pilots review the latest Bond film.And joining our Planet Normal rocket this week is Luke Murfitt, founder and CEO of Integrity Cleaning, who tells Liam how a diagnosis with Parkinson's aged just 34 has sped his life up rather than slowing it down, and how his business managed to double its turnover over lockdown.Allison will be replying to comments beneath this article on Thursday 14th October 11am-12pm: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/opinion/2021/10/13/planet-normal-will-people-screaming-lockdowns-going-forward/ |Read more from Allison Pearson: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/authors/allison-pearson/ |Read more from Liam Halligan: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/authors/liam-halligan/ |Listen to Bed of Lies: www.playpodca.st/bedoflies |Need help subscribing or reviewing? Read more about podcasts here: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/radio/podcasts/podcast-can-find-best-ones-listen/ |Email: planetnormal@telegraph.co.uk |For 30 days' free access to The Telegraph: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/normal |See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Passionistas Project Podcast
Kylee Stone: Using the Power of Personal Stories to Create Meaningful Connections

The Passionistas Project Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 44:03


Kylee Stone is a descendant of the Wakka Wakka and Kulluli First Nations with 25 years in the business of storytelling. She has an intrinsic talent in the power of personal stories to create meaningful connections. Certified in the neuroscience of resilience, Kylee's mission is to disrupt the status quo on the traditional view of leadership and enable people with the courage to take action in direct accordance with their vision, values, passion and purpose. Read more about Kylee. Learn more about The Passionistas Project. Full Transcript: Passionistas: Hi, and welcome to the Passionistas Project Podcast, where we talk with women who are following their passions to inspire you to do the same. We're Amy and Nancy Harrington and today we're talking with Kylee Stone, a descendant of the Wakka Wakka, and Kalali First Nations with 25 years in the business of storytelling and an intrinsic talent in the power of personal stories to create meaningful connections certified in the neuroscience of results. Kylee's mission is to disrupt the status quo on the traditional view of leadership and enable people with the courage to take action and direct accordance with their visions, values, passion, and purpose. So please welcome to the show Kylee Stone. Kylee: Thank you. So good to be here with the two of you. Passionistas: We're so happy to have you here. What are you most passionate about? Kylee: I am passionate about the relationship between design and storytelling — so the design of storytelling and its ability to influence the way that we lead specifically, and more importantly, women's ability to do that. And when I say that, because I do believe that as an indigenous person and I'll, and I'll reference that… our cultural background is fundamentally historic. And what we know about storytelling is very different from a cultural perspective to what we know in the world today. But when we do look at that, fundamentally, the whole purpose of that really is, if you imagine sitting around a fireplace, for example, which, you know, from an indigenous cultural point of view is more around fire, where you would have people. You know, there was no language for it as what we've created today, but certainly it was all about people connecting. It was just about the connection of people. And so when we look at that lens and we put that over the world today, you know, if we even dissect, I suppose, the entertainment industry — movies, you know, I love drama, right? I love a good story. But great drama is based on a great story. And when we look about our relationship to the story, I think there's always a real connection where, you know, if you go to a great film and you cry, there's definitely a great story in that. You know, there's an immediate connection with us as a human being. So for me, I like to be able to take that, in terms of its architecture, and apply it to. Each of us has an individual understanding how that works for us at the level of human being, and then how that influences our strength, our character, our courage, and fundamentally the way we communicate so that we have the experience of being able to pursue what it is that is important. And for me, what that means is being able for a woman to express and experience her own self-expression. In terms of leadership for me, that's very different from what I've been raised in. I say this whole thing about a new paradigm of leadership because in my generation, I was raised pretty much in a model where you've got companies that are designed basically out of the industrial revolution, right, where it's very much a command and control method. But I think for me, I'm not saying it's not about change, so I'm very clear, it's not about change now. I'm not here to change. I'm here to create something new. And when we create something new, we're not changing the old we're actually just at work on crafting a new future. And that for me is really designed around women leading the way on that because I do think women are natural nurturers. They're natural storytellers. And I think that's where we can get a real transformation. Passionistas: Let's take let's step back. Tell us about your heritage and particularly your grandmother and mother. Kylee: Well, I'll start with my grandmother. So. My grandmother was, uh, born and raised at a controlled country. So I'm a descendant of the, a couple of nations. One is the Wakka Wakka nations, which is where my grandmother was born and her mother. So my great grandmother was a tree, was originally from a place called Kalali, which is when we talk about our nations. It's really the air in the region as an Aboriginal person. And. Um, some, a descendant of what what's called the stolen generation, which was a group of indigenous people who, children who were removed from their family because they were considered half. So the Wakka Wakka area was, was where a lot of the indigenous. So when the British came, they moved all the indigenous people out of their, their, their communities. And they put them into, I'm not sure what the technical term that you would call it, but they'd put them into areas. And one of those areas was called Wakka Wakka. So Wakka Wakka was not an original nations. It was. Multiple nations. And so my grandmother was removed from Kalali and taken to Wakka Wakka when she was discovered to be pregnant. And she was pregnant to the men who she was on a farm with. So she was already moved originally to a place where she was at which at two years old. So at two years old, she was taken from her family, put into a, essentially with the local school teacher and his family. So, you know, whilst on the one hand, you know, we look from the view called, oh my goodness. She was, she was removed from her family, how awful she wasn't put into an environment where she was not taken care of from the other way. When we look, you know, she was with a school teacher and his wife and their family. So she was there till she was 20. In her late twenties and then fell pregnant. And we have paperwork that actually says she wrote a letter basically to the police department, letting them know that she had fallen pregnant to the, to the gentlemen who was the, the owner of the property. But of course he denied. So that was when she was moved. So then she was moved to Wakka Wakka and, you know, within, I think six months later, she had gave birth to my grandmother in the Wakka Wakka region. And then all the women who were single and had children, there were homes for them on this property. So there was a home where there was the kids, there was a home where there was the mothers. Children. And then there was the rest of the community. And so she might, my grandmother was born and then in this particular part of the village. And so when she was three that the government had come in with buses, from what school here, the salvation army and the buses came in to take all the children who were half cast. So if they looked like they were white, they were taken and removed. To a salvation army residence where they were believed to be being raised for a bit of a better education and a better future that will given that we're given education, basically. So again, you know, uh, my grandmother was three taken from her mother. So you know that there is trauma and there's, uh, you know, horrifying kind of, you never want your daughter to be taken from your mother, you know, and nor do to your right. And at the same time, you know, if we look from the other view, you know, she's, she was given education education and she was given these other opportunities. So that was, that was my grandmothers, my grandmother, and right. My grandmother's story. So my grandmother had married a British man and they had children. There was some dysfunction in that relationship, you know, as for whether I can speak the truth to that. I really, I can't, I can't because sadly my grandmother's no longer here, but my, it was my grandma. It was a situation where my grandmother felt like she needed to leave. So she left and left my grandfather with all the. So there was my mother, my mother's dead. My mother was five twin sisters. She had twin sisters who were two years old. They had a brother and an older brother, so there was four of them. So he moved them into a home salvation army home, bizarrely enough. So at five years old mum was taken from a family and put into there with her sisters. And she, she lived there till she was 15, basically. So for 10 years, from five to 15, She stayed there on this property and then came out and one year later, after coming out, she fell pregnant with, with me. And so technically, uh, when I, when I started to, uh, understand the story, I discovered, you know, it was in the seventies. So I discovered that actually I was technically the first woman out of four generations to not have been taken away from or removed from my mother and in some respects. So yeah, it's. Uh, I think in the wa you know, it made me question actually, because I think when I looked back at the timing of that, you know, the seventies where the, the, the, the civil rights movement, there was a big push around women's liberation. And, you know, my mother was only 16 at the time. And at that time, she was told that if she gave birth to. She would not be welcome home because any woman who had a child out of wedlock, they would take the children from them. Now they didn't go to take the children from her, but they said to her, if you have this child, you're not coming home, you know, it's like disown the family, which is very common, you know, it wasn't, it's like, you know, we look at that now. Oh my God, that's just atrocious. But it was very common back then for a lot of women. In fact, it was only until 2012 that the government here actually did a national apology to all the women who gave. To children in the seventies and had their children's take taken away from them. So there was a generation of children who are now my age, who were raised without their biological parents, because they were out of wedlock. So it's kind of serendipitous too, in terms of my mother, she just clearly decided to be some kind of rebel and decided, no, that's not, that's not how it's going to go. Passionistas: She must have been incredibly strong to make that decision in the midst of that. Kylee: I think to myself, imagine being 16 years old in a hospital by yourself, isolated, having your family say, we don't want to part of it. And now you're stuck here. They did. I was in a waiting room for four weeks. They'd actually filled out all the adoption papers and she'd had four weeks to make the decision. And it was, she said it was the last day. She said it got to the last day. And she said, I just could not, I couldn't do it. I just could not bring myself to think about what it would look like if I had to try and find you. Passionistas: So how, how did those experiences impact your childhood and did they impact your life to this day? Absolutely as a kid, I would say no way. You know, I, I, I, my nickname as a kid was Smiley Kylee. I was a joyful kid. You know, my mother was 16, so she had lots of great friends around her and her friend's parents actually. So she had a lot of support that way. So I none, the wiser, you know, you don't know what you don't know, you don't know. So as. I don't know, except definitely subconsciously The, there was a, like, one of the things that I'm now dealing with is the, you know, the there's the whole theory around attachment theory. And you know, one of the things that, you know, because I was not raised in a very stable, traditional household, I was moved around a lot. So I'm not very attached to people. And that has been really difficult. You know, I've, I've lost my grandfather just recently. And it was really challenging because it was the first time I'd had, you know, I've only ever really lost grandparents. I've not had the experience. Well, we've had close friends, very young to pass. It's just a very different experience. Cause it's a tragedy, but people relatively close to. You know, I, I, I had this experience called God. I felt like a real cold beach, you know, because I just, I wasn't emotional, you know, I wasn't this really torn upset person. And I really, it challenged me because I thought, oh my God, what is wrong with you? You know, that was my immediate, what is wrong with you? I spoke to some friends of mine. One of whom is just got a background psychology, and she's just an extraordinary human in terms of what she knows. And she said, you know, she explained the whole thing about grief and this attachment theory. And I went, God, that explains everything. You know, the, the way I was raised, the knot I learned to not be attached, I was the kid that you could stick in the middle of the room and she'd be happy with anybody, you know? And so if I look at it from that perspective, it was like, well, of course. She, she expects people. I gotta leave, you know, and it wasn't a problem for me as a kid. In fact, it's one of my greatest skills, even as an adult, you know, I've mobilized, you know, I'm my, my whole strength. In fact, it's very aligned even to my cultural background. I'm all about community. I'm all about others. I'm all about, you know, being of service to everybody else. And you know, I, you can stick me in the middle of anywhere and I'll blend with anybody. And I think I've always fought for that. I've always fought for, for diversity and equality and injustice and, you know, enhance why it's no accident. I'm fighting against some hierarchical view of leadership. Like what the heck are you serious? Like, just because you've got a title and you're sitting on some top pain, half a million bucks a year for your salary doesn't mean I need to treat you any different to the person who's cleaning the goddamn bathroom, you know, and I respect that you've got experience and talent. I listen and respect that because that's fundamental to who we are in our culture is all respect. You don't need a title, have respect. You just have respect period. So that, that definitely shaped, had a massive impact in who I've become in life and how I've surrounded myself with creating communities and building communities. And, and what I'm doing in the area of women is, you know, even five years ago, I started a women's group called team women, Australia, and it was all about story to. And I called a team for the purpose of team. I D I didn't want this hierarchical view. Of course, it's taken me seven years to mobilize the damn thing, because I was stuck in the existing paradigm myself and say how we were trying to build it was inside that paradigm. And all it was it's like, why is this not working? It was like, oh my God, why didn't you just stop doing it? I know, finally, here we are, you know, post pandemic and it's mobilizing, you know, we took the lid off and off the boundary itself and just went, you know, actually the whole purpose is team and collaboration and community and create, you know, it's not about having some organizational structure and I just want to, if I can implement it there in terms of how I see what's possible in the world, then I'll, I'll I'll know I've kind of achieved what I'm here to, which. Passionistas: We're Amy and Nancy Harrington and you're listening to the Passionistas Project podcast and our interview with Kylee Stone. To discover the power of storytelling to ignite your passion, grow your influence and amplify the impact you have in business leadership and life, visit ThePerformanceCode.co. If you're enjoying this interview and would like to help us continue creating inspiring costs, please consider becoming a patron by visiting ThePassionistasProject.com/podcast and clicking on the patron button. Even $1 a month can help us continue our mission of inspiring women to follow their passions. Now here's more of our interview with Kylee. You also had the straightforward traditional career, and that certainly has impacted where you are today and you're thinking about structure, so tell us about that career. Kylee: I've had such a great career. I feel so blessed, you know, I really do. And I feel blessed because I was in a time when media, in my opinion, feet here in Australia was really thriving. So I got to work with some really just extraordinary, extraordinary people. And in fact, whenever I reflect on any of the jobs I've had, I like there's been people that have stuck with me my entire life since then, you know? So it was actually an accident that I landed in media. I did not want to leave home when it came to university. And at the time I was living on the gold coast, which there was, there was no university on the gold coast, which meant for me, if I was going to go do a university, I would have had to travel away from. Of course I did not have enough. My prefrontal cortex wasn't developed enough to have enough emotional intelligence to know what was going on, so I didn't go beyond it. Right. So I didn't go straight to university, but what it meant was I ended up going to, uh, you know, uh, did a full-time intensive college. On the gold coast in business and marketing and advertising. And, and I excelled, I mean, I'm, I'm very smart. And I, I taught, you know, I think I did three first-class honors, uh, in business management, sales management, and marketing itself. And then over the college, they had different areas of industry worked within the unit within the college. And I had came through his class on, was over the entire college. So I so. And it was on the graduation evening that, you know, typical graduation, you have sponsors tables, etc. And as I was coming off the stage with the awards, the guy who was the marketing director at the time at the media company, pulled me over and gave him his business card and said, listen, I've got a job for you. Just give me a call on Monday. And I was like, you beauty, you know, graduated college. The last thing you want to do is try and find a job. So that was, that was literally how much my study. I rocked up on his doorstep. No kidding. On the Monday morning, without an appointment, not knowing, I mean, I had no idea how, what was protocol and best way to do that. And anyway, he was in meetings. So I sat there for half the time until he was ready to say me. And that was the beginning of my career. You know, he actually did not have a job to be honest. He was like, I just want this person in here and made a job for me. So of course, the first six months of my job, my career was born. Boring on one aspect from a technical point of view, because I was in this marketing and promotions team and I had to pay stuff. In those days, newspapers, you had to paste up the content inside the paper. So that was part of my job, needless to say it was also fun because we had the very first Indy grand Prix here on the gold coast. And we were, you know, we were the major sponsors. So, you know, we got to go to these big fabulous events and stuff like that. But I was invited by the head of the research, uh, team to come in and say easy. Do you know anything about computers? I had done a bit of. A bit of what do you call it? Uh, just data stuff in college. Like nothing really learning how to talk. I was like, yeah, sure. I know how to use computers. He so great. He said, but because at the time his department with the exception of editorial that had one was the only department that had a computer. So he sees a great, can you come in and do you want to help me just do some data crunching? And he asked me, yeah, sure. Next night, I'm home that night with the manuals, you know, the old Microsoft Excel, Microsoft, I would manually. Teaching myself how to use a camera, as I say, he's a computer, but I went back and, uh, anyway, I fell in love with it. I fell in love with the data we had. Basically our job was to interpret the data, to help the sales teams, you know, sell and commercialize the business and help the editorial teams understand the readers of the paper and blah, blah, blah. And that's what I did for the next 20 years. I, I just, I loved it. I, I loved the connection between the data and being able to convert that into. You know, sales presentations for the sales teams and when they would sell, they would sadly they'd get all the bonus. And I didn't, but I was paid pittance at that stage as a 19 year old, but, but that's, I just loved it. I loved what I did and I just kept doing that. I did that for four years and he was a real supporter of mine and just, he was like, you got to get to Sydney, you know, get, get, take the next level. And I went for a job. I didn't get it initially because I didn't have a degree and I'd only just started doing a part time. And, but three months later they rang me back. Oh, the person with the degree didn't work out. Can you take the job still? Yeah. So that got me the big. Um, I moved down to Sydney at the time and, uh, worked for, uh, you know, our, our major metropolitan papers here, the Australian and the Telegraph. And this is the main ones and that's kind of what set me off. I just, then I, I, it, and it really was a methodical journey from there. It really was. I worked hard. I loved what I did. I got a promotion and then I got a pay rise. And then, you know, there was a bit of dysfunction in that team. I went and looked at our trade press and went, oh, I want to go work in the Marie Claire, you know, they're going to launch Marie Claire, I'd love to do that. And I got the job and that's how it unfolded. It really was like, no kidding. It's like the traditional, here's a letter. Here's the steps you take to get to the top. Here's what you need to do that. And you work hard. You do a good job next year, you'll get a 2.5% pay increase or whatever the CPI rate is at the time. And if you do that well, then you'll move up and then you'll move up and then you'll move up. And so I did that until 2006. Uh, and, uh, and in that time I've got to do some extraordinary work, launching some incredible brands and was then the marketing and strategy director for News Corp, which I know being global. Everyone knows that. So it's easy to say that, but, uh, I did that for six years and I just loved it. You know, I really, really loved my job. I had a T I, you know, worked on the expansion of this team and. Transformed the way that we worked at just hi, my commitment to delivering great products was at the heart of everything. And having people really enjoy what they do. I just really loved it. Loved it, loved it, loved it. And then of course, three kids had got to really suck on my God, how do I do this? So it was, that was, that was really the first turning point of like, oh my gosh, how do I get to, how do I get to still make a difference and be a leader? Do what I really love now that I've got three kids in my kids. You know, this was when I, when I'd had the third one. So the first. I navigated, like I went back to work after three, you know, three months. Cause my child, God bless him would sleep 12 hours a night. So I'd be up during the day and I'm like, oh my God, I can't handle this. Child's just to alert. I need to go back to. So I'm sleeping 12 hours and night. I feel really quite, except you're just running around crazy. I can't cope with this. I went back to work. So I went back to work two times, you know, with the first child and the second child went back to work. Full-time on both occasions and on both occasions, just, I think this is a story I think is really important for women to hear, because not all the stories about. You know, I know we hear a lot of bad stories about women who return to work and they get treated badly and they, you know, like that. And sometimes I think we do do ourselves a disservice by not being able to hear stories that actually go really well because when we hear stories that go really well, we've got an access into what could I have done differently to, to do that. And on both occasions, I got the biggest pay rise I've ever had in my career. And I got the biggest promotion I've ever head whilst I was on maternity leave. So it was an extraordinary time for me. And it wasn't until the day I had my third child and I went back to work that I, that it all fell apart. I was like, okay, three kids in three years, Colleen, who the hell, even kidding, like really, you can't keep doing this. You're going to burn out. You're going to kill your family. You know, something's got to shift and that's when everything started to change. Really. So what happened. Uh, huh, I call it the, I call it the dirty dancing story. So I'm w I'm walking. Literally my third child is 10 months old Harrison, so it was 2010. And, uh, I'm walking back into the office, thinking to myself, I am so desperate just to get a hot cup of coffee and be able to go to the toilet and piece, you know, three kids under three. And it was like, oh, I need to, I want to go. I want to go back part time. And I wanted to go back into my job because I just come up the back of three years of working on this major rebranding project and strategy, and is keen to get back into that project with the team. So I'm walking into the office and literally as I'm walking through the corridor, I think to myself, You are crazy. You can't do this. You can't, you cannot go back know to a full-time job or a big job, or you've got three kids. And so I sat into the, uh, sat down with him and said, look, I want to come back. And so I immediately decided for myself, I need to ask for part-time, that's the only way to do that. So I said, you know, can I part time he didn't want me in the job? He wanted somebody in that particular role full-time and he said, and I, and so I negotiated to split it. So I had marketing and strategy director and I said, well, what if I take the strategy? Part of all that work and the guy that's doing my MetLife, you know, he can kick the operational aspect. So he agreed. So I came back and did three days a week just doing strategy and. Showing up. It was really grateful. I'm really grateful to just be able to get away from having three kids and really the stress of that coming into work. And I was in an office and so right outside. So where are my, so I've been put into an office that was in the executive area and I don't know, you know, Certainly in Australia, you know, traditional corporate stolen environments, usually executive suites are either on a particular floor or certainly NewsCorp all over the world. It's like this, right? Either it's the Taj Mahal, which is what we would call it that sits at the top. Or there's a floor, a dedicated floor. That's all for the executive suites and it's luxurious. Right? So I'm in the. Area. So when I was marketing director, I was in the marketing area with all the staff. And so now here I am in the executive area, in an office, outside the executive boardroom. By myself and, you know, I should be grateful because I've got my own office and it's peaceful and it's quiet and blah, blah, blah. I can do my own thing. Yeah. Great. But then all of a sudden there was a day when my old executive team, so we're in the boardroom. They start walking in the boardroom and I'm sitting there on the outside. There's a glass window on my side, outside the office. And I think to myself, what the heck. What the, this is not, this is not the picture I imagined. So, so, and I had this like all of a sudden for myself. Okay. So I've just climbed 20 years to get to this role now, just because I'm doing three days a week and I was actually in the executive team, but now I'm sitting here no longer part of the conversation or not, not only am I no longer part of the conversation, I don't have any staff anymore. So I'm alone and. I don't have any accountability. I'm not accountable for a budget line. I'm just on the sideline. And I kid you not. That's like, you know, you know, that scene in dirty dancing where baby Houseman sitting in the corner, waiting for Patrick Swayze to, you know, he walks in the door, my Patrick Swayze didn't walk in the door, sadly. I thought, no, this is not okay. I am not okay with this. And I just, at that moment decided I needed to do something about it. I I'm not, I just need to do something about it. So I decided to go back to true style, made tomb, to turn things around. Went and sorted out the fact that I had completed my undergrad degree, I decided at that then I had a conversation actually with one of the guys at work. And I said, look, I said, what what's next for me? And honestly, what immediately Curt is the only thing I could do is I, well, if I'm going to compete here, I need to go get myself an MBA. That was immediately what I thought. But really that's what I thought. I thought, if you're going to compete there to get what you need to get you going to have an MBA. So I got to the guy who was CFO at the time, I said, right, I'm going to have to. And he said, well, you do realize you don't need to given your experience. You actually don't need to complete your undergrad. You could actually make an application to have it authorized and you could go and do your postgrad. Guess what I did. I submitted through to the university. I got my undergrad approved and they approved me to go into post-grad studies so that I could start doing an MBA and, or specializing in change management. Right. All the meanwhile still doing three days at work, still juggling the three children. Oh. And let's just say added a coach in there into the mix as well, because it was just like, ah, I don't know what the heck I'm doing. Right. And so I just, everything. And so that was what I decided to do. I was like, you know what? I got to turn this around. This is I'm not going to get stuck because in marketing, one of the big problems in marketing is everybody in the company always thinks they know better as a marketer. Somehow that's just one of those. It was a, everybody can do. And I thought I'm not going to get stuck with this future. So when I did make the decision to change, that's when I changed direction and went, okay, what is the future for me? If I looked out there somewhere in the future, and rather than looking at a step change, I was like, what could I imagine for myself? And I, and that was when I got present to the opportunity of transformation and actually dealing more directly with people as opposed to customer. And that was why I chose to do the change management certification. And then of course I did two subjects of that. Very proud, got two high distinctions in both subjects, but was sitting down there while I was submitting my final paper. It was a school holiday period when we were on holidays with the kids and on aided to submit this piece of work. And I, as I sat there doing it, the kids were at my fate and I, and I hadn't had another one of those moments. I looked down at them and I thought, is this what you want your life to be about? Do you want your kids. To grow up thinking that you and you, that you're going to look back not having had these moments because you're too busy attending to what you technically think is getting ahead in your career. Let's just so at that point I quit. I quit the study. I said, this is not the right time. I spoke to my boss at the time at work and they were doing a lot of transformation work and I made a request. I said, I can do that job. And I know I can do that job. I don't need to get a piece of paper to tell you I can do that job. And quite frankly, I've seen people doing that job who had the paper and they're actually not delivering results. And so he pointed me the hate of change and strategy planning at the point at that time, that new school and was put on a project. What that adjust again? I just loved, I loved to work with the people and literally that was my last gig at new school, but I did that for a few years. And at the same time was, became so passionate about, you know, other women who were dealing with the same stuff. And I remember walking in the office one particular day and I've got to the coffee shop, which is clearly the first step for any mother, get to the coffee first. And I'm standing in line with the coffee, having coffee. And there was a lady who was, I'd worked with maybe four or five years previously. She was standing in the queue behind me. And you tapped me on the shoulder, says, Hey, don't worry. I say, most of the time when I get to the front of the coffee shop, I'm like, don't talk to me. I just want to not talk to anyone. Just, you know, just nod and say, yes, good. Except the turnaround. I saw who it was. And I just said saving really, but you really want to know and very pissed off. Oh my God. Well, And I told her, I said, listen, I just really fed up with this whole, I've spent all these years to get where I've gotten. And I said, I just seriously just feel like my, somehow my intelligence just seems to be dissipated. You know, it's not relevant anymore. Or I should just be part time. And because I'm doing part-time, I'm not contributing at the level. Even though I had this really great trainers role, there was a lot of the aspects of the role that it wasn't getting. And when she said me too, I was like, really. And I'll tell you at that point, I honestly did not see that it was more than just me and I want to aspects, I go, that's very insolent. Right. But, but I didn't get at that point, the degree to which, because I hadn't, you know, there hadn't really been a huge awareness at that point around the issues of working women in senior leadership positions and the challenge. It was very early days. But when she said that, I said, that's awful. And I said to her, what are you doing? She said, well, what came up. I was like, really? And that was, as you, you know, as I was saying, I had gone and started taking a number actions. I'd got myself into a UGA gig. And so I said that basically, people, listen, I'm happy to share with you, you know what I've done. And to kind of start to carve out a new future for yourself. And we went and had lunch at the pub, sat down and started sharing with her about what I was doing. She said some amazing. And I said, oh, you know what I said, well, here's a few things to get you started. I've got to start it. And. Long story short, next minute, I'm running a weekly mentoring. Well, I call it a mentoring, but it was really a weekly chat with a group of women that went for, went up to 55 women who were all technically dealing with similar staff attempting to really carve out a future for themselves as a leader. And it went outside of new school. So we had women in news Corp, but then women in news Corp had friends who were in other companies and it just kind of went from there. And then. That's what turned into team women, Australia. Like we just like, oh, we did this event. And then that went like that and it just kind of organically just took off. Passionistas: What is leadership transformation? Kylee: Leadership transformation is two things. To firstly acknowledge it. So transformation is a new view. So if you think about a butterfly that was a caterpillar, it's still the same animal. It's actually still the same, right? In many aspects, it comes from the same core. What once was a caterpillar, has a new view, becomes this butterfly. So transformation is a process of seeing a new view that opens up a new world. And so leadership transformation is about acknowledging what we already know about leadership and our own view. So one of the things too, to have a transformation in the area of leadership, you've first got to get out of the way. What do I already know? And how do I already relate to leadership that's constraining myself. So for me, it was really confronting, I have lived inside of this paradigm where leadership is something that you do and you progress to, and you get some academic qualifications along the way. And then when you get those qualifications, you get into a position. And once you've got that position and you're accountable for people, you're released. Right? So I first had to get that my behaviors and how I was showing up was conditional on that, that's design. And so when I got that, I noticed that actually I have to separate myself from that perspective and to acknowledge that I'm not a leader because of my credentials. I'm not a leader because I have the title. I'm not only a leader if I get into a position where I have accountability of people. I'm not that, not that, not that, not that. Okay. Well, if I'm not that, then where does it exist? Does my leadership in being a leader exist and that's this whole new world. That's the leadership transformation. It is the transformed view of who I am and what's possible as a leader in the world. And that's the part where I say, you know, using the storytelling stuff, it's really by design. It's by design. Who you are as a leader is by design. And I've interviewed hundreds of people in various leadership roles, not just in a I'm a CEO or I'm a founder, or I've spoken to people who are in leadership development. And I've spoken to people who've exuberated leadership as an athlete. And I can tell you, you ask them what their definition of a leader is and not one single person says the same thing. So, leadership transformation is about the individual acknowledgement of what's been constraining the view, and then by design designing what that looks like for you. And so the design piece then is the same as story, you know, when you craft a story about how that new future is very similar. To brand story. And you know, this kind of brought in all of my background in building brands and media and storytelling was there very simply two things at the beginning level. That is what is the future I see for myself. What is that vision? We call it a vision. And then what is the purpose for that vision? What is my why for doing that? And when you bring those two things together. Quite simply, if there is a universal view, it's someone who has a vision for a future and is out to fulfill on it with purpose and connects people with purpose. They're not connected on anything other than the fulfillment of a vision with purpose. And how you do that is up to you. That's by design because what you want in the future you're committed to is going to be very different to the person beside you. But when we do that individually and we do it collectively, it is very powerful. It mobilizes, it really aligns people on what's really at the heart of who we are, which is our purpose. Each one of us has a purpose. People mistake often that my why is about my why? Well now actually that's, it's your why, but your why speaks about others. So my purpose is to create meaningful connections. It's about what happens out there in the world. It's not what happens in here. So in that aspect, it's a leader in the sense that you, you are clearly here in the service of others. And yet your view of others is not independent of you. It includes you. So there is no you and me, there's just who I am and who I am is who you are. There's no me and you there's just you and me, me and you. Passionistas: Tell us a little bit about the Unchartered Leaders Podcast, why you started that and what you hope people take away from it Kylee: Starting a podcast was actually one of the, one of the most challenging things I've done actually to do the first one. I was really nervous, but I, the thing that got me off the ground was a commitment to one thing in particular. And this is right. Goes right to the heart of my concern and my passion for creating a new paradigm of leadership and leadership transformation in particular. And I, and I, and I, because when I look at what happens in an organization, so in the current structure, in a hierarchy, what tends to happen, and I did this myself, you know, when things are not going well in a company, right. We all blame the boss. We blame the company, you know, it's definitely the people sitting at the top who are not doing this, who are doing that and data day to day. Right. So except when things go really well, we don't say, oh, it's because of the box. Right. We go, oh, that's because of us. It's because of what we did. We're so fabulous. Oh, give me a pay rise. Oh. But the bosses want to pay themselves more money. We have, but what about us? And it's because of the team and what we did. So what what's really, if we're really Frank, there is no freedom inside of it inside of bank. As someone who actually eats in that seat while that's all going on, that leader has no freedom to thrive and be successful. That I, that is not okay for me. I'm like, that's not okay, because if we want to be a leader, what are we doing to our leaders? What, who, who are we that we are not embracing a leader's decision? You know? And so for me, the uncharted leader podcast was to, to achieve things. One, I want it to be able to tell the stories of those who are in leadership. So people could get an insight into actually what it's really like. That they are human beings with a commitment to make a difference. They were you, they were at some point climbing someplace to get somewhere and are now being courageous enough to step into a role where they know everyone else is going to shoot them down. Fundament. You know, now it happens more at Australia here. I think then what it does potentially in Australia, because in the, at least in the states, you know, you don't have this tall poppy thing where you want to, people are really great about being, being okay to be celebrated. Whereas here it's, it's less. So I wanted a chance for people to, I want it to deal with that illusion called those people. You know, they've got beautiful stories to be told, so that's the first thing. And then the second thing is in sharing their stories. I wanted people who were aspiring leaders to get that being a leader is a great, is great. It's a great opportunity. See, in, in, in the world that we live in today, being a leader is a bad idea. Being a leader is a really bad idea because it's, you, you're going to get shot down. And, you know, people are going to have a whole stack of opinions about you. It's exhausting. It's a burnout, it's hard work. And so I'm like, yeah, Yana. What if being a leader was a really great idea because being a leader has more to do with how you choose to show up yourself and to operate from being accountable, rather than judge someone else. You know, we sit in our lounge rooms, complaining about our political leaders. We all do. And yet we complain sitting on our couch, never having, ever set in a role as being a prime minister or a president ever. Uh, so we're very good at sitting back and judging others and, and, and, and I'm saying, no, the uncharted leader is someone who's saying, okay, I'm going to step back and take a look over here for me. What is, what is it for me to express myself as a leader and to embrace that and to chart out a future that is completely uncharted. It is uncharted, no matter where you're at really, it's the way we think all of a sudden, because it's a pandemic it's uncertain. Are you kidding me? The world is, it's never been certain. I mean, we live in like with some certainly, I'm sorry. You walk out the front door. You've got no clue about what's going to happen. You know, this is an uncharted life. Being a leader is uncharted and let's embrace that because actually everything that we need in order to be the best leader we can possibly be is all over here within us. Passionistas: Thanks for listening to The Passionistas Project Podcast in our interview with Kylee Stone. To discover the power of storytelling to a night, your passion grow your influence and amplify the impact you have in business leadership and life visit ThePerformanceCode.co. Please visit ThePassionistasProject.com to learn more about our podcast and subscription box filled with products made by women-owned businesses and female artisans to inspire you to follow your passions, get a free mystery box with a one-year subscription using the code FALLMYSTERY. And be sure to subscribe to The Passionistas Project Podcast so you don't miss any of our upcoming inspiring guests. Until next time, stay well and stay passionate.

OTB Football
Luke Edwards | Newcastle takeover, chaos behind the scenes, Lampard as potential new manager

OTB Football

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 19:48


The Telegraph's Luke Edwards joined Ger Gilroy and Eoin Sheahan on Tuesday's OTB AM to discuss PIF's acquisition of Newcastle United. #OTBAM is live every morning with @Gillette UK  | #BestFaceForward You can subscribe to the OTB AM podcast wherever you get your podcasts across the OTB Podcast Network. via iTunes via Spotify via GoLoud

What's That Smell?
Once Upon a Framework Inflammation

What's That Smell?

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 40:03


We don't love making this a gendered conversation but sometimes we just can't help it. It turns out that women might just be able to smell fear. We don't love it, that we might keep doing stupid stuff because we can't smell the danger in it, and so we've decided that we all need to hang around more women in our lives. Sorry ladies. We promise we'll be quiet. We just need your nasal insights. Gross. Sorry. Dem Bones This whole show is really about bones. We didn't plan it that way… just happened. We start with Pete's hips. Oh, did you hear that? That little voice in your head? Listen carefully… it just said, “This podcast was inspired by Pete's hips…” You'll never hear THAT again. In any case, Pete dug into research that connects stress and anxiety to joint pain. It turns out, when your body is under constant emotional stress, it's also under chemical stress. And THAT's bad for your bones. Learn more from in Association of Stress-Related Disorders With Subsequent Autoimmune Disease. You can learn more from the kind specialists at University of Maryland Spine Center as they blog eloquently in: Why Does Stress and Anxiety Cause Joint Pain? We pivot from joint stress on the bones to what happens when Tommy tries to eat them. The bones, that is. He's a real meat-hound, but as it turns out, sucking the meat off of bones gives him real trouble, and he's not alone. The word is cartilogenophobia and rest assured, he's going to really bite into this one. Coober Pedy Coober Pedy is a small town that sits in the middle of South Australia, about an hour north of Adelaide. It's hot there — it can hit the 120s in the summer — and with climate change, it's only getting hotter. And still, 1,800 people consisting of over 50 nationalities call this slice of the Outback home. And of all the homes in Coober Pedy, more than 60% of them are underground. Here are a few fantastic vids and resources to check out: This is the town where people live underground - Coober Pedy Life against the odds in Australia's underground town Welcome to Coober Pedy, the world's strangest town • The Telegraph

Make My Day with Josh Gondelman
Make My Day Episode 78: Pineapple Telegraph with Anthony DeVito

Make My Day with Josh Gondelman

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 33:04


Anthony DeVito (The Late Show with Stephen Colbert) competes to cheer Josh up. During a game of Old Favorites, Anthony gives incredible answers about the best parts of aging. He then donates his winnings to Planned Parenthood. Plus, pep talks for babies and DJs. Donate to Planned Parenthood: https://www.plannedparenthood.org/ See Anthony live: http://www.anthonydevitocomedy.com/shows Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Tennis Podcast
Indian Wells - Murray magic; What next for Emma Raducanu?

The Tennis Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 59:44


With Indian Wells in full swing, Catherine, David and Matt talk about some of the biggest stories so far, including Andy Murray's fantastic three-set win over Carlos Alcaraz, Leylah Fernandez picking up where she left off in New York, and Iga Swiatek donating her prize money to a nonprofit mental health organisation. In the U.K. much of the coverage has been centred on Emma Raducanu's defeat to Aliaksandra Sasnovich. We discuss the match and why we're not going to read too much into the result before David speaks to Simon Briggs of The Telegraph about what it's been like at Indian Wells, the responsibility he feels when writing about Raducanu, and how her coaching situation might be resolved. The Tennis Podcast is presented by Catherine Whitaker and David Law, and features Matt Roberts. It is produced weekly year-round, and daily during the Grand Slam tournaments. It is crowdfunded by listeners each December.SUPPORT THE TENNIS PODCASTWe crowdfund The Tennis Podcast every December, with shout-outs, mascots and chances to take us on at predictions. For a reminder when the next campaign goes live, put your e-mail address in here - http://eepurl.com/gwWILXOr, if you don't want to wait and prefer to support us on Patreon - https://www.patreon.com/TheTennisPodcastNEWSLETTERSign up to get our news, offers, predictions and Matt's Stat - http://eepurl.com/gbmzRXSOCIAL MEDIA Twitter - https://twitter.com/TennisPodcastInstagram - https://www.instagram.com/thetennispodcast/ See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

BewilderBeasts
Ep 46: Housetraining Heiffers

BewilderBeasts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 17:30


Why scientists are looking to potty train 1 billion cows to combat a growing acid rain crisis. Resources on  The Moo Loo:USGS.govThe GuardianChick a Pig board gameNPRBeef Market CentralAnd if you want to watch a cow open a door, go pee - a LOT of pee, then get a treat, you can go to YouTube.com - the Telegraph has a great short video on the subject which you can also find on my Twitter feed for 10/5/2021Intro and outro music is Tiptoe out the Back by Dan Liebowicz and interstitial music is by MK2. All additional music within the podcast is from Pixelbay.com, and sound effects are from freesound.orgMore about Melissa McCue-McGrath, CPDT-KA, her book, "Considerations for the City Dog", dog training services can be found at https://melissamccuemcgrath.com, and all episodes of Bewilderbeasts can be found at https://bewilderbeastspod.com  bewilderbeastspod@gmail.com Tweet @bewilderedpodBewilderbeastsPod on Facebook @bewilderbeasts on InstagramSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/BewilderBeastsPod)

They Walk Among Us - UK True Crime

Ben John stood before a jury at Leicester Crown Court. The 21-year-old denied all seven of the charges he faced. John had been arrested around a year and a half earlier after the authorities had raided his flat in January 2020. Counter-Terrorism Policing East Midlands had been monitoring his online activity for some time. Although he was later released, an investigation by a Special Branch of Lincolnshire Police took most of the year with a team of forensic investigators trying to bring to light the dark secrets of Ben John's digital life… *** LISTENER CAUTION IS ADVISED *** Listen to our new podcast ‘They Walk Among America' here: https://play.acast.com/s/they-walk-among-americaBecome a ‘Patreon Producer' and get exclusive access to Season 1, early ad-free access to episodes, and your name in the podcasts credits. Find out more here: https://www.patreon.com/TheyWalkAmongUsOrder our book ‘They Walk Among Us' here: https://theywalkamonguspodcast.com/merchandiseCourt documents and information from the following news organisations were referenced in this episode: INEWS, INDEPENDENT, LEICESTER MERCURY, DAILY MAIL, TELEGRAPH, BBC NEWS, LINCOLN LITE, THE GUARDIAN, LINCOLNSHIRE LIVE, THE TIMES, ITV NEWS, MIRROR, METRO and DAILY RECORDMore information and episode references can be found on our website https://theywalkamonguspodcast.comMUSIC: Fleeting by Alice In WinterSt. Mary by Chelsea McGoughHeadwind by Wild WonderStay With Me by MomentsEndless Time by MomentsInto by HillSussex by Stephen KeechThey Walk Among Us is part of the Acast Creator Network - https://www.acast.com/theywalkamongusSOCIAL MEDIA: Twitter - https://twitter.com/TWAU_PodcastFacebook - https://www.facebook.com/theywalkamonguspodcastInstagram - https://www.instagram.com/theywalkamonguspodcast Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/theywalkamongus. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Keen On Democracy
Helen Russell on Having a Healthy Relationship with Sadness

Keen On Democracy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 36:05


In this episode of “Keen On”, Andrew is joined by Helen Russell, the author of “How To Be Sad: Everything I've Learned About Getting Happier by Being Sad”, to discuss why we need our sadness: it's a message. It can tell us what's wrong and what to do about it. Helen Russell is a bestselling author, journalist and speaker. She writes for magazines and newspapers globally, including The Times and The Sunday Times, the Telegraph, the Independent, National Geographic, Wall Street Journal, the Observer, Metro, Grazia, Stylist and Stella. She's spent the last eight years studying cultural approaches to emotions and now speaks about her work internationally. Visit our website: https://lithub.com/story-type/keen-on/ Email Andrew: a.keen@me.com Watch the show live on Twitter: https://twitter.com/ajkeen Watch the show live on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/ankeen/ Watch the show live on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/lithub Watch the show on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/LiteraryHub/videos Subscribe to Andrew's newsletter: https://andrew2ec.substack.com/ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Podcasts – The Mike O'Meara Show
#2768: Sleazy Cabbage

Podcasts – The Mike O'Meara Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 81:36


It's the thrilling return of "Who the F is it"... and it's the toughest one yet!  Oscar has an anniversary and we have a few questions for American Telephone and Telegraph.  Your grilled cheese will never be the same... and what is that mailman doing?

Uplifting Impact
Breaking the Mold: Social Conditioning and Its Effect on Leadership

Uplifting Impact

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 20:45


Hira Ali is a leadership trainer, career coach, and Founder of Advancing Your Potential. She is passionate about empowering women and ethnic minorities, closing the gender gap, and advocating diversity and inclusion in the workplace. Her work has been featured in Forbes, Telegraph, BBC, Harper's Bazaar, and Huff Post, and in 2019 she released her first book, Her Way To The Top: A Guide to Smashing the Glass Ceiling. Just recently she released her second companion book, Her Allies: A Practical Toolkit to Help Men Lead Through Advocacy. In this episode, Hira and Justin talk about the role of men as allies in gender equality, particularly in the work place, and specific ways in which men can be helpful. They discuss the qualities of a successful workshop and ways to leave a lasting impact as a speaker or workshop leader. Hira also details her background, how she started doing diversity, equity, and inclusion work, and her passion for coaching. To connect with Hira, find her on LinkedIn at: https://www.linkedin.com/in/hira-ali-5972b91b/ Topics In This Episode The importance of speaking and leading with authenticity Finding your passion Commonalities among women and minorities The social conditioning of men and women, and its effect on leadership Internal and external challenges facing women and minorities Good male ally-ship Connect LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/hira-ali-5972b91b/ Website: https://advancingyourpotential.com/about Social Media: @advancingyou Other Conversations We've Enjoyed Celebrate Diversity: How to Rethink Society So It's Inclusive Of All Be Impatient in your Fight Against Social Injustices Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Shock Your Potential
Promoting Women in Tech - Raj Goodman Anand

Shock Your Potential

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 21:36


“Let us try to give other people opportunities and chances to shine and to be the best version of themselves.” Raj Goodman Anand Often we get caught up in the endless pursuit of things and forget to look around for the opportunities to touch people's lives and make a difference. By being more thoughtful, we get to slow down and deliberately look out for ways in which we can contribute towards making life better for another person. This is according to our guest today, Raj Goodman Anand, whose realization of the need to make a difference led him to a passion of creating self and career development opportunities for women around the world. Raj Goodman Anand is the founder of Goodman Lantern, a team of native English content writing services that help businesses sell better and grow faster. An engineer by profession, he has founded three start-ups, raised capital, and taken one venture from zero to acquisition. He has not only had a flourishing career within start-ups but also with large and mid-sized organizations, working on launching start-ups or new products within them. Products he has built have made companies an income in excess of £45m. Raj has also won BusinessWeek's Europe's Young Entrepreneur (2007) and has been named one of Revolution Magazine's 50 Most Influential People in Digital (2009). He has spoken at various venues including the Foreign & Commonwealth Office, British Library, and several universities including LSE. Raj and his entrepreneurial ventures have had coverage in The Telegraph, Guardian, BusinessWeek, and Observer. In today's episode, Raj will talk about his journey and the events that led him to what he does today which is providing opportunities for women to grow and flourish and the freedom of working remotely. Listen in! Social media handles: https://www.linkedin.com/in/rajanand/    https://www.linkedin.com/in/rajanand/ I am a father and a husband and we love traveling as a family and I'm currently traveling from London and currently in Bangkok. [3:12] I talk about travel first was because in all my life, I worked pretty hard to get where I am and for a purpose which for me one is personal and another is to give back to the world. [3:58] I worked incredibly hard at university and got into engineering and then AI and later got into marketing. [4:10] After eight years of working really hard, I realized that I was taking 320 flights per year for the companies I was working for and it was just painful. [4:20] I thought that it will be really good to actually live in a way where I choose my terms and the thought about remote working came up. [4:43] I started a company eight years back now to kind of focus on helping people in business to content writing. [4:50] I challenged the world I live in and decided to set a company where I can work from anywhere in the world. [5:01] Goodman lantem, is my company has been remote from day one and all our team members are all remote and have the freedom to work on what they are good at. [5:09] It is about bringing team members who have the same passion as you do and I'm a big believer of having that sort of same passion and the same core values. [6:42] When I hire people, I hire them on basis off the values as much as I hire them on basis on their skills. [7:02] Before Goodman Lanten, I was all about making money but somewhere, I felt that I'm missing out the human element. [7:13] I started to do some soul searching and saying, what can I actually contribute to this world and to the community I belong to. [7:34] I have seen several times that women who much smarter than I am not make it to the top because they weren't given the right representation. [7:41] I thought that I should make it my mission to help women in a particular way and for the last seven, eight years we have hired a lot of women in a company in our departments. [8:18] This is an opportunity for them to work on awesome projects at their comfort and really be inspired to grow themselves and the family as well. [8:45] Some countries such as South Africa has the largest statistics on women-based violence in the world meaning it is not safe for women to go out. [9:22] We're trying to do what we can from outside to make them safe and earn a good living. [9:38] As company, we are really focused not only in what we bring to the world, but also to our clients so we only work for subscription-based customers. [10:12] Most of our customers are B2B and what we do for them is to create content to help them tell their story as well as rank higher on search engines. [10:38] The other side of story is we bring in women into our company and we train them in the space of software service so that they can then start working with these awesome companies. [10:59] We're growing really fast and we are getting a lot of new projects and so we need a lot of people on board. [13:11] Commercial break [13:39] Prior to writing content for an organization or individuals, there is a lot of effort, which goes behind it which includes thinking about the mission, the vision, the values and the tone. [15:48] Content is only good if it hits multiple points, which tick marks different things for you as a company, your audience, and the SEO part as well. [16:36] Planning is super important but people forget that planning step and jump right into execution. [16:46] Most customers today we target at least are ones who have a team and bringing in 10 to 500 million in revenues and so they know what they're doing but they need to scale up. [18:14] This is because scaling up is not easy and needs team members who have the right skills and who understand that the company's vision, mission and core values. [18:40] When we come in, we help our clients scale up their art in production in all areas. [18:54] It's important to build a business to earn income but let us try to focus on the greater good and give other people opportunities and chances to shine to be the best version of themselves. [20:03] It goes a long way not only from the point of view of making revenue, but also read karma as well. [20:30] …………………..….. TopDog Learning Group, LLC is a leadership, change management, and diversity and inclusion consulting firm based in Orlando, FL, USA but with “TopDoggers” (aka consultants) throughout North America and beyond. They focus on training programs (both virtual and face-to-face), keynotes and “lunch and learns,” group and 1:1 coaching, and off-the-shelf solutions. One such solution is their Masterclass on The Top 3 Strategies to be Resilient in Times of Change. This thoughtful self-paced online training will guide you through three tactics you can immediately use to—not just survive—but thrive when change comes at you. Use the code RESIL50OFF for 50% off the program! Just go to https://bit.ly/3a5mIS6 and enter the code RESIL50OFF, in all capitals, to redeem your 50% off coupon. The link and code will be available in our show notes for easy access.      

Planet Normal
The boat that didn't rock

Planet Normal

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 59:09


It's Tory Conference week and Liam Halligan is camped out in Manchester, surviving on stale sandwiches and a hotel minibar, to give Allison Pearson the inside track on the party's movers and shakers. The PM's speech may have brought the laughs but both our hosts were left wanting more: no policy announcements, barely a mention of the pandemic, and ‘gaping holes' in his arguments. Nul points from our co-pilots.Joining them aboard the rocket this week is fellow Telegraph columnist, Philip Johnston, who has been to not one, not two but forty Conservative conferences. He tells Allison why he thinks politicians aren't as talented as they once were, and ranks his favourite ever three MPs.Also on the show: Allison brings a revealing update from George, our NHS insider, and Liam answers the all-important question: what is stagflation?Allison will be replying to comments beneath this article on Thursday 7th October 11am-12pm: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/opinion/2021/10/06/planet-normal-boris-johnson-complete-denial-dire-place-country/ |Read more from Allison: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/authors/allison-pearson/ |Read more from Liam: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/authors/liam-halligan/ |Read more from Philip | https:/www.telegraph.co.uk/authors/philip-johnston/ |Listen to The Telegraph's Off Script podcast: https://www.playpodca.st/offscript |Need help subscribing or reviewing? Read more about podcasts here: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/radio/podcasts/podcast-can-find-best-ones-listen/ |Email: planetnormal@telegraph.co.uk |For 30 days' free access to The Telegraph: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/normal |See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Football Daily
Newcastle's takeover and vaccination in football

Football Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 43:27


Kelly Cates is joined by Senior Football Reporter Ian Dennis, Aston Villa defender Anita Asante and former Scotland midfielder Pat Nevin to discuss the big stories of the day. The panel start by debating the uptake of covid-19 vaccinations in football and how its making headlines in the England camp before reacting to interviews with Fikayo Tomori and Luke Shaw. Kelly is then joined by the Telegraph's Luke Edwards and Newcastle fan Taylor Payne for the latest on the Saudi Arabian takeover of Newcastle United. TOPICS: 02:00 – Vaccination in football 14:25 - Fikayo Tomori 23:34 – Luke Shaw 32:10 – Newcastle takeover

Cross Question with Iain Dale
Olivia Utley, Andrew Pierce, Miatta Fahnbulleh, Darren Rodwell

Cross Question with Iain Dale

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 46:19


Joining Iain Dale on Cross Question this evening are Telegraph journalist Olivia Utley, LBC presenter and Daily Mail Associate Editor Andrew Pierce, Chief Executive of the New Economics Foundation Miatta Fahnbulleh and Labour leader of Barking and Dagenham Council Darren Rodwell.

Steve Deace Show
If You're Consenting to Coercion, You're the Problem | Guest: Daniel Horowitz | 10/6/21

Steve Deace Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 94:58


Steve explains how, if you've decided the vaccine isn't for you, but you're taking anyway to save your job, you're the problem. Then, the crew discusses a new piece from the Telegraph the shows prima facie evidence that the origin of coronavirus might actually have been scientific attempts at developing a vaccine. In Hour Two, the team plays Buy, Sell, or Hold on a number of topics including '90s sitcoms, college football, and election integrity. Finally, Daniel Horowitz of the Conservative Review podcast joins the show to talk about his theory about who or what is driving the continued coronavirus madness. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Trumpet Daily Radio Show
#1613: Going the Way of Rome

Trumpet Daily Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 54:48


[00:30] Tomorrow's News Today (10 minutes) Herbert W. Armstrong prophesied decades ago that America would go the way of Rome with its rampant decadence, upside-down families, contentious political division, and oppressive taxation. As he put it, the United States is riding to a great fall and we don't realize it. [10:30] U.S. Murder Rates Soar (18 minutes) The U.S. recorded its highest increase in the nation's homicide rate in modern history. This deadly rampage sprung from last year's summer of “peaceful riots” and the movement that followed to defund the police. [28:05] Creating a New Virus (9 minutes) The London Telegraph recently revealed that the Wuhan lab and mad scientist in the United States and the United Kingdom planned to create new coronaviruses. According to the Telegraph, the whistleblower “had struggled to raise the issue of a lab leak with other scientists and had been warned not to go on the record with his concerns.” [37:45] Bible Study: The Great White Throne Judgment (17 minutes) What hope is there for billions of human beings who have died without ever knowing the truth of God—or even the name of Jesus Christ? In this segment, we look at what the Bible says about the resurrection from the dead.

Chopper's Politics
Liz Truss on trade deals, the trans debate and the next James Bond

Chopper's Politics

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 40:46


New foreign secretary Liz Truss gives The Telegraph's Associate Editor, Camilla Tominey the inside line on her first few weeks in the role. Did the appointment come as a surprise? After the fall of Kabul, will she recognise The Taliban as the leaders of Afghanistan? And, in her second role as Women and Equalities Minister, does she still have faith in police chief Cressida Dick following the disturbing revelations surrounding Sarah Everard's death? All this and more, including Ms Truss' take on who should play the next James Bond and whether she secretly enjoyed upsetting the French in the recent submarine row.Read more from Christopher Hope: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/authors/c/cf-cj/christopher-hope/ |Sign up for the Chopper's Politics newsletter: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/newsletters |For 30 days' free access to The Telegraph: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/chopper |Email: chopperspolitics@telegraph.co.uk |See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Mountain Mantras: Wellness and Life Lessons
MMP112 - Follow Intuition and Choice for Health (The “Sleep Lady” Kim West)

Mountain Mantras: Wellness and Life Lessons

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 23:02


Have you ever been in a situation where you are the expert on something,  yet you are struggling with that very thing? Imagine the terror of being crowned “The Sleep Lady”, but then not being able to sleep! This is the amazing authentic story of my friend Kim West, who comes on the podcast to reveal seven mantras about how we must follow our own intuition and choice for optimal health. Kim West is a mother of two daughters and a Licensed Clinical Social Worker. Known as The Sleep Lady® by her clients, over the past twenty-five years she has personally helped over 20,000 tired parents all over the world get a good night's sleep without letting their children cry it out alone. Gentle Sleep Coach® Training and Certification program in 2010--the first and most comprehensive training program in the world. This program was the start of what is now a global industry- Baby and Child Sleep Consultants.  To date, the Gentle Sleep Coach Training and Certification program is available in 4 languages. Kim has appeared on Dr. Phil, Today Show, NBC Nightly News, Good Morning America, TLC's Bringing Home Baby, and CNN, and has been written about in a number of publications including The Wall Street Journal, Associated Press, Baby Talk,  Parenting, and many others. Mantras: Mantra #1: Everyone needs a different amount of sleep. Mantra #2:   Major medical episodes, such as surgeries, can turn sleep on its head and cause a ripple effect. Mantra #3:  Wellness (sleep included) is not an applied formula. Mantra #4:  Intuition is the key to decoding your own wellness formula. Mantra #5: “Taking a pill” can be done physically, energetically, or metaphorically. Mantra #6: Don't  let anyone stop you from digging deeper when it comes to learning more about your own health. Mantra #7: Share your struggles with the intention of  creating community and helping others More about Kim West Kim West is a mother of two daughters and a Licensed Clinical Social Worker or child and family therapist for 27 years. Known as The Sleep Lady® by her clients, over the past twenty-five years she has personally helped over 20,000 tired parents all over the world get a good night's sleep without letting their children cry it out alone. Kim has appeared on Dr. Phil, Today Show, NBC Nightly News, Good Morning America, TLC's Bringing Home Baby, and CNN, and has been written about in a number of publications including The Wall Street Journal, Associated Press, Baby Talk,  Parenting, The Baltimore Sun, USA Today, The Telegraph, The Irish Independent and the Washington Post. Kim is the author of three books: “The Sleep Lady's Good Night, Sleep Tight: Gentle Proven Solutions to Help Your Child Sleep Well and Wake Up Happy”, “ The Good Night, Sleep Tight Workbook” and “The Good Night, Sleep Tight Workbook for Children with Special Needs”. Her first book “The Sleep Lady's Good Night, Sleep Tight” is in its 3 edition and has sold over 140,000 paperback copies. Dedicated to providing tired parents with excellent sleep advice and coaching while knowing Kim could not help everyone herself, she started the Gentle Sleep Coach® Training and Certification program in 2010--the first and most comprehensive training program in the world. This program was the start of what is now a global industry- Baby and Child Sleep Consultants.  To date, the Gentle Sleep Coach Training and Certification program is available in 4 languages. What's fun for Kim Dancing!!! LINKS https://sleeplady.com/ http://gentlesleepcoach.com/ Follow her on: http://www.facebook.com/TheSleepLady http://www.pinterest.com/thesleeplady/ Instagram: @thesleeplady

Chopper's Politics
Oliver Dowden on levelling up, the next election and Labour's woke problem

Chopper's Politics

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 41:38


New Conservative party co-chair Oliver Dowden gives Christopher Hope the inside track on his appointment, including a rather curious instruction bestowed upon him by the PM. But how will he increase party support? Is the membership simply too old? And what will a new HQ in Leeds mean for the grassroots? All this and more, including an attack on the “middle-class outlook” he claims dominates Labour ranks, and a glimpse into the Dowden family dynamics, as the MP tells us why he still gets in trouble with his mum.Read more from Christopher Hope: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/authors/c/cf-cj/christopher-hope/ |Sign up for the Chopper's Politics newsletter: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/newsletters |For 30 days' free access to The Telegraph: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/chopper |Listen to Off Script: https://playpodca.st/offscript |Email: chopperspolitics@telegraph.co.uk |See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

60 Mindful Minutes
EP150: How to be Sad with Helen Russell

60 Mindful Minutes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 54:47


For episode homepage, resources and links, visit: https://kristenmanieri.com/episode150/    Description We think a lot about being happy and ways to achieve lasting happiness. In fact, research has found that we often see sadness as a weakness and that many of us are, in a way, afraid to be sad. But Helen Russell, author of How to Be Sad: Everything I've Learned About Getting Happier by Being Sad, sees value in sadness. Helen has researched sadness from the inside out for her entire life, discovering that the key to happiness is unhappiness. Turns out that when we allow ourselves to experience pain, we learn to truly appreciate and embrace joy.   Guest Bio Helen Russell is a bestselling author, journalist and speaker. Her first book, The Year of Living Danishly, became an international bestseller and has been optioned for television. She is the author of four other critically acclaimed books, translated into 21 languages. Helen also writes for magazines and newspapers globally, including The Times and The Sunday Times, the Telegraph, the Independent, National Geographic, Wall Street Journal, the Observer, Metro, Grazia, Stylist and Stella. She's spent the last eight years studying cultural approaches to emotions and now speaks about her work internationally. Learn more at helenrussell.co.uk.   Host Bio Kristen Manieri is the author of Better Daily Mindfulness Habits: Simples Changes with Lifelong Impact (July 2021: Rockridge Press). She's certified both as a habits coach and mindfulness teacher. She specializes in: stress reduction, energy management, mindset, resilience, focus, habit formation, rest rituals, and prioritizing personal well-being. As the host of the weekly 60 Mindful Minutes podcast, an Apple top 100 social science podcast, Kristen has interviewed over 140 authors and thought-leaders about what it means to live a more conscious, connected, intentional AND joyful life. Learn more at https://kristenmanieri.com/work-with-me/.   Mentioned in this Episode   Guest's book: How to Be Sad: Everything I've Learned About Getting Happier by Being Sad https://www.amazon.com/How-Be-Sad-Everything-Learned/dp/0063115352   Author's website: https://www.helenrussell.co.uk/   Maori Haka (All Blacks) dance: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yiKFYTFJ_kw Connect with the 60 Mindful Minutes podcast   Web: https://kristenmanieri.com Email: Kristen@kristenmanieri.com   Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/60MindfulMinutes Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/kristenmanieri_/ Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/kristenmanieri/    

TechStuff
The Transatlantic Telegraph Cable

TechStuff

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 64:03


It was an engineering feat to link England to France via subsea cables. Connecting Europe to America would require even greater innovation. From failed installations to engineering mistakes, we look at what it took to connect two continents separated by the Atlantic ocean. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Chopper's Politics
Nadine Dorries on snobbery, trolling and the future of the BBC

Chopper's Politics

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 45:14


New Culture Secretary Nadine Dorries joins Christopher Hope live at the Conservative Party Conference in her first broadcast interview in the role. The best-selling author and MP for Mid-Bedfordshire declares the days of tokenism at the BBC over, dismisses "snobbery" surrounding her appointment, and comes down hard on Angela Rayner's comments about "Tory scum".Plus: Ms Dorries reveals whether she would pay her TV license if it weren't compulsory and why, as the tenth Culture Secretary in as many years, she's the minister who will stick.Read more from Christopher Hope: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/authors/c/cf-cj/christopher-hope/ |Sign up for the Chopper's Politics newsletter: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/newsletters |For 30 days' free access to The Telegraph: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/chopper |Listen to Off Script: https://playpodca.st/offscript |Email: chopperspolitics@telegraph.co.uk |See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Un Mensaje a la Conciencia
Un parlanchín asombroso

Un Mensaje a la Conciencia

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 4:01


(Día Mundial de los Animales) Durante la madrugada del domingo 29 de abril de 2012, logró escaparse por la ventana de su domicilio al oeste de Tokio. Había estado muerto de las ganas de explorar el contorno, así que se dio el lujo de dar un largo «paseo». A pesar de que había vivido dos años en ese sector cerca de la capital japonesa, se perdió y se mantuvo vagando hasta el día siguiente, en busca de un hombro amigo donde recostar la cabeza o aunque fuera llorar. Gracias a Dios, lo encontró en la persona de un huésped que estaba alojado en un hotel cercano. El hombre lo llevó a la comisaría local y se lo entregó a unos agentes de la policía, no sin antes asegurarles que decía algo sobre el lugar donde vivía. No obstante, allí «bajo custodia» guardó silencio absoluto dos días, hasta la noche del martes, antes de rendir su primera declaración. ¡Cuál no sería la sorpresa de los policías cuando al fin «desembuchó», dando a conocer de un modo inteligible no sólo su nombre, Piko-chan, sino también los detalles de su dirección: ciudad Sagamihara, distrito Midori-ku, calle tal, número de casa tal y piso tal! ¡Es que se trataba nada más ni nada menos que de un perico! Así que el miércoles 2 de mayo los agentes se pusieron en contacto con los inquilinos de la casa que identificó el loro, y en cuestión de horas les devolvieron la pequeña mascota. Su dueña, Fumie Takahashi, una mujer de sesenta y cuatro años de edad, explicó que hacía años había tenido la experiencia de perder a un perico, «el antecesor» de Piko-chan, y que ése no había sabido cómo regresar a casa. Por eso cuando adquirió a Piko-chan, lo adiestró a que repitiera los datos de mayor importancia para él y no las tonterías insignificantes que suelen enseñarse a los loros.1 Según los ornitólogos, es decir, los biólogos que estudian las aves, no son frecuentes los casos en que esta especie de aves logra hablar de una manera tan inteligible.2 De modo que la capacidad que llegó a tener Piko-chan de comunicar en detalles tales datos lo destaca como un emplumado parlanchín por excelencia. En contraste con las aves, los casos en que los seres humanos logramos hablar con elocuencia sí son frecuentes, pero lamentablemente también lo son los casos en que no somos más que parlanchines. A eso se refería Jesucristo cuando les dijo a sus discípulos que, al orar, no hablaran sólo por hablar. En lugar de imaginarse que se les escucharía por sus muchas palabras, debían reconocer que el Padre celestial sabe lo que necesitamos antes de que se lo pidamos. Y luego les enseñó exactamente cómo orar, en las palabras del conocido Padrenuestro. Si oramos así, tal como enseñó Jesús, nuestras oraciones no consistirán en una larga lista de peticiones triviales, sino en pedirle lo más importante a nuestro Padre celestial: que se haga su voluntad, que nos provea el alimento necesario para cada día, que nos perdone tal como nosotros perdonamos a los demás, y que nos libre del mal.3 Y veremos que Él se complacerá en concedernos esas peticiones, ya que se las habremos hecho conforme a su voluntad.4 Carlos ReyUn Mensaje a la Concienciawww.conciencia.net 1 «Perico extraviado le dice a la policía su nombre y la dirección de su casa», Yumeki Magazine, Japan News [Noticias del Japón], 2 mayo 2012 En línea 9 enero 2013; «Perico perdido le dice a la policía el domicilio de su casa», Noticia VC, 4 mayo 2012 En línea 9 enero 2013; Julian Ryall, «Lost budgie taken home after it recites entire address», The Telegraph, 2 mayo 2012 En línea 11 mayo 2016. 2 «Perico perdido...», Noticia VC, 4 mayo 2012. 3 Mt 6:7-13 4 1Jn 5:14-15

The Arsenal Beat
10 Out of 12 Ain't Bad

The Arsenal Beat

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 26:42


Mark is hosting having smugly watched Saturday's 0-0 draw at Brighton from the comfort of his own sofa. Sam Dean from the Telegraph and the Guardian's Nick Ames were in attendance, getting soaked as they filed on a goalless draw - but was it a good point for Arsenal? Who played well? Who failed to shine? Who should stop shooting? As well as those questions, our Guess the Gooner quiz returns, with Mark offering up titbits of trivia for Sam and Nick to work out which former Arsenal player is being described. The race is on between Nick and Norwich for who can claim their first win of the season - but will Sam stand in his way this time around?

The Adam Jones Show
Arcand's Sunday Service: Arcand is Joined by Ted Johnson // Tom King of The Nashua Telegraph // Patriots season so far (Hour 2)

The Adam Jones Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 39:09


(0:00) What does a win for the PAtriots mean? A blowout loss?  (9:48) Tom King of The Nashua Telegraph joins the show.  (21:34) Looking at the strengths and weaknesses of the Patriots so far.  (31:40) The callers weigh in on all the guys have discussed.  

This Day in History Class
A snail-powered telegraph is demonstrated in France - October 2nd, 1851

This Day in History Class

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2021 12:10


On this day in 1851, a French occultist named Jacques Benoît gave the first -- and last -- demonstration of his new invention: a snail-powered telegraph. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

They Walk Among Us - UK True Crime
Season 6 - Episode 16

They Walk Among Us - UK True Crime

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 53:01


PLEASE LISTEN TO ‘SEASON 6 - EPISODE 15' FOR PART ONE OF THIS TWO-PART CASE. William and Patricia Wycherley had not been seen for a decade and a half. Family, friends, doctors and financial institutions all assumed they were alive, enjoying a new zest for life during their later years, taking in the fresh air and sightseeing at seaside towns across the country. But the couple, who rarely socialised with anyone else, were not living the life of Riley. Far from it… (Part 2 of 2).*** LISTENER CAUTION IS ADVISED *** Listen to our new podcast ‘They Walk Among America' here: https://play.acast.com/s/they-walk-among-americaBecome a ‘Patreon Producer' and get exclusive access to Season 1, early ad-free access to episodes, and your name in the podcasts credits. Find out more here: https://www.patreon.com/TheyWalkAmongUsOrder our book ‘They Walk Among Us' here: https://theywalkamonguspodcast.com/merchandiseCourt documents and information from the following news organisations were referenced in this episode: BBC NEWS, TELEGRAPH, THE GUARDIAN, NOTTINGHAM POST, DAILY MAIL, MANSFIELD CHAD, MIRROR, THE STANDARD, THE TIMES, SKY NEWS and ITV NEWS. More information and episode references can be found on our website https://theywalkamonguspodcast.comMUSIC: Arcadia by Cody Martin Scintillation by ElisionStay With Me by MomentsColony by Wicked CinemaMystery by Third AgeMoonchild by ElisionEndless Time by MomentsExclusion Zone by HillThe Part Where It Begins by Stephen KeechThe Changing Tides by Brent WoodThey Walk Among Us is part of the Acast Creator Network - https://www.acast.com/theywalkamongusSOCIAL MEDIA: Twitter - https://twitter.com/TWAU_PodcastFacebook - https://www.facebook.com/theywalkamonguspodcastInstagram - https://www.instagram.com/theywalkamonguspodcast Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/theywalkamongus. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

They Walk Among Us - UK True Crime
Season 6 - Episode 15

They Walk Among Us - UK True Crime

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 49:56


It was puzzling, to say the least. Following a tip-off, officers from the Nottinghamshire constabulary were dispatched to an address on Blenheim Close. Located in Forest Town, a former mining village in Mansfield, Nottinghamshire, the brick-built semi-detached two storey home sits on the corner of a quiet cul-de-sac close to public walkways and green grassland. On that autumn day in 2013, officers slowly filtered through the backdoor into the garden… (Part 1 of 2).*** LISTENER CAUTION IS ADVISED *** Listen to our new podcast ‘They Walk Among America' here: https://play.acast.com/s/they-walk-among-americaBecome a ‘Patreon Producer' and get exclusive access to Season 1, early ad-free access to episodes, and your name in the podcasts credits. Find out more here: https://www.patreon.com/TheyWalkAmongUsOrder our book ‘They Walk Among Us' here: https://theywalkamonguspodcast.com/merchandiseCourt documents and information from the following news organisations were referenced in this episode: BBC NEWS, TELEGRAPH, THE GUARDIAN, NOTTINGHAM POST, DAILY MAIL, MANSFIELD CHAD, MIRROR, THE STANDARD, THE TIMES, SKY NEWS and ITV NEWS. More information and episode references can be found on our website https://theywalkamonguspodcast.comMUSIC: Arcadia by Cody Martin Scintillation by ElisionExclusion Zone by HillStay With Me by MomentsColony by Wicked CinemaThe Changing Tides by Brent WoodMystery by Third AgeMoonchild by ElisionThe Part Where It Begins by Stephen Keech Endless Time by MomentsThey Walk Among Us is part of the Acast Creator Network - https://www.acast.com/theywalkamongusSOCIAL MEDIA: Twitter - https://twitter.com/TWAU_PodcastFacebook - https://www.facebook.com/theywalkamonguspodcastInstagram - https://www.instagram.com/theywalkamonguspodcast Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/theywalkamongus. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.