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Intelligence Squared is the world’s leading forum for debate and intelligent discussion. Live and online we take you to the heart of the issues that matter, in the company of some of the world’s sharpest minds and most exciting orators. Join the debate at www.intelligencesquared.com and download our…

Intelligence Squared


    • Nov 28, 2021 LATEST EPISODE
    • weekdays NEW EPISODES
    • 57m AVG DURATION
    • 604 EPISODES

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    Latest episodes from Intelligence Squared

    COP26: Success or Failure for the World?

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 62:36

    What now for the world? Governments have reached a climate deal which gets us closer to holding temperatures rises to 1.5C. But a last-ditch effort from India and China to water down pledges to phase out coal has led some to consider COP26 a failure. Yes, COP26 could have achieved more but is this agreement one that could potentially be seen as a strong foundation on which the world can build for the future? To debate the motion we heard from Bim Afolami, MP for Hitchin and Harpenden and Chair of the All-Party Parliamentary Group on Renewable and Sustainable Energy; Clover Hogan, climate activist, researcher on eco-anxiety and the founding Executive Director of Force of Nature; Caroline Lucas, former leader of the Green Party and MP for Brighton Pavilion; and Adair Turner, Chair of the Energy Transitions Commission. Chair for this week's debate was Helen Czerski, one of the UK's most popular science presenters.

    Huma Abedin on Hillary Clinton, Anthony Weiner and a Life in Politics

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 58:27


    Huma Abedin was Hillary Clinton's most trusted aide and adviser for many years. Her recently published book, Both/And, reveals the details of that relationship as well as reflecting on the very public breakdown of her marriage to disgraced former congressman and convicted sex offender Anthony Weiner. She speaks to journalist Razia Iqbal about her life in politics and why she believes that during this current polarising moment in which we are often told to choose between either/or, she believes we can be both/and.


    The Sweet Spot: why pain can be a pleasure

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 52:00

    We go to movies that make us cry, scream or gag we poke at sores, eat spicy foods and run marathons. Some of us even seek out discomfort and humiliation for sexual gratification. Most of these activities are painful yet many of us find pleasure within them and Professor Paul Bloom of Yale University's recent book, The Sweet Spot, seeks to suss out why. Bloom joins writer and broadcaster Linda Yueh to discuss how pain can be a compelling draw for some and so repellent for many others. Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/intelligencesquared. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Business Weekly: How To Lead A Sustainable Business – COP26 special with Alannah Weston and Henry Dimbleby

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 22:22

    Today's episode comes from the How To Lead a Sustainable Business podcast, brought to you by Selfridges Group and Intelligence Squared. In the podcast, Alannah Weston, Chairman of Selfridges Group, speaks to inspiring leaders at the forefront of sustainability and business to find out what it takes to lead change and how businesses can put sustainability at their core. In this COP26 Special, Alannah is joined by Henry Dimbleby. Henry spent time as a journalist, cook and management consultant, before co-founding the healthy fast-food restaurant chain, Leon. He created the Sustainable Restaurants Association and London Union, a network of some of London's largest street food markets. His philanthropic work includes campaigning tirelessly for healthy meals for school children, and he set up the Hackney School of Food. Most recently Henry was appointed lead non-executive board member at the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA), where he has led the National Food Strategy, publishing a ground-breaking review of the UK food system in 2020. Together they reflect on the Glasgow summit and discuss the role of government in combating the climate crisis. How To Lead a Sustainable Business is brought to you by Selfridges Group and Intelligence Squared. If you enjoyed this episode please take a moment to rate and review us on Apple Podcasts.  Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/intelligencesquared.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Will electric vehicles make our roads green and clean?

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 58:37

    Transport emissions account for almost a third of global carbon dioxide emissions – and while other sectors such as the energy industry have reduced their emissions over the past three decades, transport emissions are growing. It is the EU's second most polluting sector and the United Kingdom's biggest single producer of carbon dioxide, with cars and vans making up the vast majority of these emissions. If we are to meet our net zero targets by 2050, as over 130 countries have committed to do, then something needs to be done about these gas-guzzling monsters. Enter electric vehicles. Right now they make up a minority of vehicles on the road but by 2030 cars and vans powered by fossil fuels will be banned, and five years after that so will hybrid vehicles. Electric cars are far more energy efficient, and are quieter and cheaper than cars that run on fossil fuels. So surely we should all encourage drivers to purchase electric vehicles and quickly render other vehicles obsolete. But hold on a second, some experts caution: electric vehicles are not a cure-all for our environmental problems, they say. Emissions from EV production are in fact on average higher than emissions produced during the traditional car manufacturing process, due to the production of the large lithium-ion batteries needed to power EVs. Furthermore, electric vehicles are only as green as the power used to charge their batteries. Renewables are a growing source of energy in the UK but we are still burning coal and gas to make most of our electricity. Should we be focusing on hydrogen fuel cells instead of electricity? Producing them causes less environmental damage than the production of lithium batteries. They provide a quicker charging time – and hydrogen is the most abundant element in the universe. Or is improving cars the wrong solution to an enormous problem? Should we be encouraging people to get rid of their cars and use public transport? We were joined by Iberdrola's Head of New Initiatives, Innovation & Sustainability Division Enrique Meroño and award-winning transport expert Christian Wolmar to debate whether electric vehicles will solve our transport and emissions problems or whether they are simply a false start in the journey towards green roads. Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/intelligencesquared. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Constitutional Rights and Wrongs, with Linda Colley

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 48:55

    Linda Colley is the Shelby MC Davis 1958 professor of history at Princeton University and one of the most acclaimed historians of her generation. Her latest book is The Gun, the Ship, and the Pen, which tells the stories of how constitutions around the world were shaped by forces such as warfare, geopolitical upheaval and academic rigour. She speaks with fellow historian and screenwriter Alex von Tunzelmann about the book. Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/intelligencesquared. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Black British Lives Matter, with Marcus Ryder MBE

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 47:39

    Black British Lives Matter is a new anthology of writing and conversations collecting the experiences of thought leaders in the UK including novelist Kit de Waal, architect Sir David Adjaye, politician Dawn Butler and many more. The book's co-editor, journalist and Chair of the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art, Marcus Ryder MBE, discusses its themes and the importance of ensuring that diversity is championed in all walks of life with Manveen Rana. Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/intelligencesquared. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Business Weekly: Nudge Theory and How to Change Behaviours with Richard Thaler

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 46:27

    Since the original publication of Nudge more than a decade ago, the word that served as the title of the ground-breaking book has entered the vocabulary of businesspeople, policy makers, economists, engaged citizens and consumers everywhere. It has given rise to more than 400 nudge units in governments around the world and has influenced countless groups of behavioural scientists in every part of the economy. In October 2021 Richard Thaler, one of the co-authors of the book and winner of the 2017 Nobel Prize for economics, came to Intelligence Squared to talk with journalist and author Kamal Ahmed about Nudge: The Final Edition, a cover-to-cover refresh of the original publication. Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/intelligencesquared. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    The Sunday Debate: It's Time to Treat China Like an Adversary not a Partner

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 62:06

    We are in a second Cold War with China. That's the conclusion many experts have come to as they observe China's increasingly aggressive behaviour beyond its borders – its suppression of democracy in Hong Kong, its sabre-rattling towards Taiwan, the vast espionage offensive against the West's technology, not to mention the confrontational tone of its new ‘wolf warrior' diplomacy. That's the argument of the China hawks, but not everyone agrees. Some believe that coexistence with China, not confrontation, should be the West's goal. After all, allowing tensions to escalate to an actual war is too horrific to contemplate. We should put our faith in diplomacy and work to persuade the Chinese leadership that it is in their best interests to cooperate within the existing world order, instead of trying to dominate it. So how should the West respond?Arguing for the motion were Nathan Law, Hong Kong activist and former legislator, currently in exile; and Alan Mendoza, Co-Founder and Executive Director of The Henry Jackson Society.Arguing against the motion were Shirley Yu, Professor and Director of the China-Africa Initiative at the London School of Economics; and Vince Cable, former Leader of the Liberal Democrats and author of The China Conundrum.The debate was chaired by Manveen Rana, Senior investigative journalist and host of The Times and Sunday Times flagship podcast Stories of Our Times. Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/intelligencesquared. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    COP26: What is Ecocide?

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 30:35

    In summer 2021, a global panel of legal scholars and activists drew up a new definition of ecocide: unlawful or wanton acts that could cause widespread or long-term damage to the environment. The aim is that it will one day be ratified by the International Criminal Court. As COP26 draws to a close, researcher and author Carl Miller speaks with Jojo Mehta, chair and co-founder of the Stop Ecocide Foundation and Dan Gretton, campaigner and author of I You We Them, to learn more about this emerging field and also the complex history of alleged crimes committed by corporations and governments. Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/intelligencesquared. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    How Power Changes Us, with Brian Klaas

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 47:51


    Does power corrupt, or are corrupt people drawn to power? It's a question that runs through the heart of the work of Brian Klaas, professor of global politics at University College London and Washington Post columnist. His latest book is 'Corruptible: Who Gets Power and How It Changes Us', which looks at the psychology behind those who seek power. Pulitzer-prize winning historian and journalist Anne Applebaum speaks with Brian about what the book reveals. Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/intelligencesquared. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.


    Business Weekly: Energy, Inflation and the Markets with Joshua Mahony

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 28:48

    In this special bonus episode, brought to you in partnership with online trading platform IG, Joshua Mahony, Senior Markets analyst at IG, speaks again to Linda Yueh about how the markets are coping as societies begin to open up and lift Covid-19 restrictions. They also discuss the energy markets and what investors need to know to develop a forward looking portfolio. To find out more about IG visit: https://www.ig.com/uk Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/intelligencesquared. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    The Sunday Debate: Is Labour Unelectable?

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 61:14

    The Labour Party has been out of power for over a decade. And after a historic electoral defeat in the 2019 general election, the party looks to be in real trouble. Sir Keir Starmer became leader in April 2020 replacing self described socialist Jeremy Corbyn and tried to steer the party towards a less radical, more outwardly patriotic brand of politics than his predecessor. But the loss of the Hartlepool by-election as well as many other local elections across the country has led some to believe that Labour's decline is terminal. And the Party has lost touch with its base outside a 'woke' London elite.But are the Labour bashers declaring victory too soon? The Conservative Party may be ahead in the polls, but they are still benefiting from excitement around Brexit and a successful vaccine campaign, things which will inevitably wane as the pandemic eases and economic realities start to bite. And let's not forget that demographics are in Labour's favour. Most 18 to 24-year-olds supported Labour in the last general election. Over time, this cohort of university-educated, progressively minded renters will expand. The task may not be easy, but if Labour can articulate a forward looking vision for the United Kingdom, surely it can win again? Speakers: Matthew Goodwin, Anand Menon, Ella Whelan and Jess Phillips MP.Chair: Lewis Goodall Find out about more upcoming events here: https://intelligencesquared.com/attend/ Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/intelligencesquared. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    COP26: How Women Can Save the Planet, with Anne Karpf

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 38:57

    As the COP26 global climate summit takes place, many are asking who is really responsible for the climate emergency and who might be able to prevent it? Dr Anne Karpf is a writer and sociologist whose recent book, How Women Can Save the Planet, looks to analyse some of these questions in more granular detail. The BBC's South Asia correspondent Rajini Vaidyanathan speaks with Anne to learn more about the book. Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/intelligencesquared. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    How to fix a country, with James Plunkett

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 49:16


    James Plunkett's new book, End State: 9 Ways Society is Broken, draws on his years working in both public policy and at the top tiers of government. A former advisor to UK prime minister Gordon Brown, his book looks at how to reboot some key ideas ranging from commerce to healthcare for a nation such as the UK in order to provide better quality of life for larger sections of society. James joins urbanist, transport and tech specialist Kat Hanna to talk about the book. Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/intelligencesquared. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.


    Business Weekly: Scary Smart with Mo Gawdat

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 56:09

    Mo Gawdat was Chief Business Officer of Google X, the experimental development arm of internet behemoth. He's since written books on how to find happiness and his new one, Scary Smart, warns of the potential dangers posed to the world by super-smart artificial intelligence. Media correspondent for the Sunday Times, Rosamund Urwin, speaks with Mo about the new book, the future of AI, and how business works at the top level of a Silicon Valley tech titan. Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/intelligencesquared. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    The Sunday Debate: Is COP26 a turning point for the planet?

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 42:10

    This debate, recorded on Thursday 28th October 2021, was part of Energised, a debate series from Intelligence Squared in partnership with Iberdrola, a leading company in the field of renewable energy.It's make or break time for the planet. That's the warning issued by the UN ahead of COP26 in Glasgow this November, when leaders and heads of state from all over the world will meet to agree on global action to fight climate change. The main goal will be for them to commit to reaching net-zero carbon emissions by the middle of the century with interim targets by 2030. If they don't achieve this, many scientists warn, the effects of rising global temperatures – extreme weather, rising sea levels and warming oceans – may become irreversible. But what are the chances of success? Very little, if previous summits are anything to go by. Despite a COP having taken place every year since 1995 (with the exception of last year due to the pandemic), and all the buzz around the Kyoto Protocol of 2011 and the Paris Agreement of 2015, concentrations of greenhouse gas in the atmosphere have continued to rise steadily, even during the lockdowns of 2020. But this year there is an unprecedented urgency in the run up to the conference. Can the biggest emitters – China, the US, India, Russia and Japan – be persuaded to sign up to legally binding agreements on emissions? Will the voices of people from the Global South, where the effects of the climate crisis are already being felt, be heard? And is the UN's top-down approach really the best way to tackle the most pressing existential threat facing the world today?We were joined by ScottishPower CEO Keith Anderson and Professor of Energy Policy and Official Fellow in Economics Dieter Helm to debate whether COP26 will make any serious contribution in the fight against climate change. The debate was chaired by Kamal Ahmed. Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/intelligencesquared. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    COP26: Everything you need to know

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 32:12

    With the devastating effects of the climate emergency becoming more urgent by the day, the COP26 summit in Glasgow now represents a pivotal moment in global cooperation on the issue. Can anything meaningful be achieved without collaboration from the big players such as China, the US and the EU? Economist Linda Yueh is joined by journalist and environment specialist Isabel Hilton of China Dialogue plus Bloomberg News climate and energy reporter Akshat Rathi to answer this and get a primer on the big debates ahead. Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/intelligencesquared. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Mary Beard on Images of Power from the Ancient to the Modern World

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 57:16


    What does the face of power look like? Who gets commemorated in art and why? And how do we react to statues of figures we deplore? In October 2021 Mary Beard, Britain's best known classicist, came to Intelligence Squared to talk about the ideas in her new book Twelve Caesars: Images of Power from the Ancient World to the Modern.To follow along with the images referenced in the podcast visit: https://intelligencesquared.com/slides/ Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/intelligencesquared. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.


    Business Weekly: Richard Branson on a Life of Entrepreneurship

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 41:10


    In this week's Business Weekly, Samira Ahmed speaks to business mogul Sir Richard Branson about becoming a serial entrepreneur developing the Virgin brand, signing some of the biggest names in music and the next frontiers of space travel.How I Found My Voice is an Intelligence Squared podcast that explores how some of the world's greatest artists and thinkers became such compelling – and unique – communicators. If you enjoy this podcast please tell your friends, subscribe, and leave us a review on Apple Podcasts.https://podcasts.apple.com/gb/podcast/how-i-found-my-voice/id1455089930 Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/intelligencesquared. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.


    The Sunday Debate: Should the West pay Reparations for Slavery?

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 63:10

    Should there be a broad programme of reparations – not just financial compensation, but acknowledgement of the crimes committed and the lasting damage caused by slavery? Or would this just worsen social tensions by reopening old wounds? That's the theme of this week's Sunday Debate. Arguing for the motion were Kehinde Andrews, Professor of Black Studies at Birmingham City University; and Esther Stanford-Xosei, reparations activist and lawyer.Arguing against the motion were Katharine Birbalsingh, headmistress and co-founder of Michaela Community School in London; and Tony Sewell, educational consultant and CEO of the charity Generating Genius.The debate was chaired by social historian and presenter Emma Dabiri. Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/intelligencesquared. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    The Untold Story of African Europeans, with Olivette Otele

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 56:23

    The history of Africans in Europe may seem recent – a result of migration in the 20th and 21st centuries – but in her new book, African Europeans, historian Olivette Otele tells a very different story – a story of African presence in Europe that stretches back centuries.The host is author and BBC Radio 4 presenter Kavita Puri.To buy African Europeans click here: https://www.primrosehillbooks.com/product/african-europeans-an-untold-history-olivette-otele/ Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/intelligencesquared. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Empire of Pain: Sacklers, Opioids and the Sickening of America

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 45:02


    How did one family become associated with an epidemic of drug addiction that has caused the death of almost half a million people?In this episode, award-winning writer and author of Empire of Pain, Patrick Radden Keefe speaks to Hannah Kuchler, the FT's global pharmaceutical correspondent about how he uncovered fresh material on the Sacklers and discovered a modern parable of greed, corruption and cynical philanthropy.To buy the book click here: https://www.primrosehillbooks.com/product/empire-of-pain-the-secret-history-of-the-sackler-dynasty-patrick-keefe-subscribers/ Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/intelligencesquared. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.


    Business Weekly: No Bullsh*t Leadership with Jimmy Wales

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 32:55

    Chris Hirst, Global CEO of advertising group Havas Creative, cuts through the bullshit and gets to the heart of modern leadership in this straight-talking podcast brought to you by Intelligence Squared.In this episode Chris Hirst speaks to the internet pioneer and Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales who is perhaps the most famous silicon-valley entrepreneur to not become a billionaire. Wikipedia has changed how knowledge is accessed across the world, with 1.5 billion devices accessing the site every month. Jimmy Wales is also founder of the Wikimedia Foundation and co-founder of Wikia, a privately owned free web hosting service he set up in 2004. In 2019 he founded WT.Social, a microblogging site pitched as a 'non-toxic social network...where advertisers don't call the shots'. The service contains no advertisements and runs off donations.To subscribe click here: https://pod.link/1533418365 Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/intelligencesquared. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    The Sunday Debate: China, friend or foe?

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 81:56

    Is China an enemy that needs to be reined in, or a potential partner with whom the West should engage? Hear the arguments and decide for yourself. Speakers: Martin Wolf, Keyu Jin, Sir Malcolm Rifkind.Chair: Carrie Gracie Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/intelligencesquared. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Covid by Numbers with David Spiegelhalter

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 42:41


    With data on the Covid-19 pandemic changing shape with every new outbreak and new mutation, it's a complex task to make sense of where the story of the virus will head next. David Spiegelhalter is chair of the Winton Centre for Risk and Evidence Communication at Cambridge University and an expert on crunching figures in order to understand successes and failures. His new book Covid by Numbers, co-written with Anthony Masters, seeks to shine a spotlight on the UK's handling of the pandemic. In this episode he speaks with the virologist and host of The Naked Scientist podcast Dr Chris Smith. Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/intelligencesquared. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.


    Can We Fix Capitalism? Yanis Varoufakis vs Gillian Tett

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 59:40


    Should capitalism be reformed or replaced? Former Greek Finance Minister and economist Yanis Varoufakis and Gillian Tett US editor at large at the Financial Times discuss and debate their visions for a post-COVID economy live in London. The moderator is Anne McElvoy senior editor at The Economist. For the Intelligence Squared discount on Gillian Tett's book click here: https://www.primrosehillbooks.com/product/anthro-vision-how-anthropology-can-explain-business-and-life-gillian-tett/For the Intelligence Squared discount on Yanis Varoufakis's book click here:https://www.primrosehillbooks.com/product/another-now-dispatches-from-an-alternative-present-yanis-varoufakis/ Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/intelligencesquared. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.


    Business Weekly: No Bullsh*t Leadership with Kwame Kwei-Armah

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 45:53

    Chris Hirst, Global CEO of advertising group Havas Creative, cuts through the bullshit and gets to the heart of modern leadership in this straight-talking podcast brought to you by Intelligence Squared.In this episode Chris speaks to Kwame Kwei-Armah, the Artistic Director of the Young Vic theatre in London. He is also an actor, playwright, singer and broadcaster. From 2011 to 2018 he was the Artistic Director of Baltimore Center Stage, and he was Artistic Director for the Festival of Black arts and Culture, Senegal, in 2010. His series of eight short films, Soon Gone: A Windrush Chronicle, was shown on BBC4 in 2019. He is a patron of Ballet Black and a visiting fellow of Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford University. If you enjoyed this podcast please let us know what you think by rating and reviewing No Bullsh*t Leadership on Apple Podcasts. Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/intelligencesquared. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    The Battle Over Free Speech: Are Trigger Warnings, Safe Spaces and No-Platforming Harming Young Minds?

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 59:44


    For this week's episode of The Sunday Debate, we revisit our event from 2018.Many would argue that these are the fundamental goals of a good education. So why has Cambridge University taken to warning its students that the sexual violence in Titus Andronicus might be traumatic for them? Why are other universities in America and increasingly in Britain introducing measures to protect students from speech and texts they might find harmful? Safe spaces, trigger warnings and no-platforming are now campus buzzwords – and they're all designed to limit free speech and the exchange of ideas. As celebrated social psychologist Jonathan Haidt argues in his book The Coddling of the American Mind, university students are increasingly retreating from ideas they fear may damage their mental health, and presenting themselves as fragile and in need of protection from any viewpoint that might make them feel unsafe.The culture of safety, as Haidt calls it, may be well intentioned, but it is hampering the development of young people and leaving them unprepared for adult life, with devastating consequences for them, for the companies that will soon hire them, and for society at large.That, Haidt's critics argue, is an infuriating misinterpretation of initiatives designed to help students. Far from wanting to shut down free speech and debate, what really concerns the advocates of these new measures is the equal right to speech in a public forum where the voices of the historically marginalised are given the same weight as those of more privileged groups. Warnings to students that what they're about to read or hear might be disturbing are not an attempt to censor classic literature, but a call for consideration and sensitivity. Safe spaces aren't cotton-wool wrapped echo chambers, but places where minority groups and people who have suffered trauma can share their experiences without fear of hostility.Joining Haidt on stage were the former chief rabbi Jonathan Sacks, who believes that educating young people through debate and argument helps foster robustness, author and activist Eleanor Penny, and sociologist Kehinde Andrews, one of the UK's leading thinkers on race and the history of racism. The event was chaired by Emily Maitlis. Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/intelligencesquared. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.


    The Pandora Paper trail with Jeffrey Sachs

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 53:34


    The recent publication of The Pandora Papers, a trove of 12 million financial documents obtained by the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists, has once again shone a spotlight on secret offshore accounts and tax loopholes. The papers contain the financial dealings and global influence of billionaires, world leaders and politicians, plus many more. They also highlight how ineffective governments can be in preventing manipulation of tax rules for the gains of the super rich. In order to understand how this imbalance occurs and how it fits into the global financial picture, journalist Razia Iqbal spoke with Jeffrey Sachs, one of the world's most foremost economists, to pick through the paper trail. Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/intelligencesquared. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.


    Connectivity and conflict, with Mark Leonard

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 29:26


    A more interconnected world was supposed to bring us closer together, but Mark Leonard, director of the European Council on Foreign Relations, says the opposite has occurred. He joins Carl Miller to discuss his new book The Age of Unpeace: How Connectivity Causes Conflict, which argues that technology and a lack of joined up thinking is affecting communication on every level. From standoffs between nation states to individuals hurling insults on social media, Mark identifies how connectivity is being mismanaged and exploited during an era in which defining narratives are ever more elusive to pin down.To find out more about the book click here: https://www.waterstones.com/book/the-age-of-unpeace/mark-leonard/9780552178273 Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/intelligencesquared. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.


    Business Weekly: Dame Vivian Hunt on Stakeholder Capitalism and the Value of a Diverse Workforce

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 29:49

    Today's episode comes from the How To Lead a Sustainable Business podcast, brought to you by Selfridges Group and Intelligence Squared. In the podcast, Alannah Weston, Chairman of Selfridges Group, speaks to inspiring leaders at the forefront of sustainability and business to find out what it takes to lead change and how businesses can put sustainability at their core. In this episode Alannah is joined by Dame Vivian Hunt, a senior partner at the global management consultancy firm McKinsey & Company. She served as managing partner of McKinsey's UK and Ireland offices from 2013-2020 and is a thought leader on productivity, leadership and diversity. She was previously named as one of the top ten “most influential black people in Britain” by the Powerlist Foundation, and The Financial Times identified her “one of the 30 most influential people in the City of London”. She speaks to Alannah about the importance of businesses being open to innovation, stakeholder capitalism and the value of a diverse workforce.How To Lead a Sustainable Business is brought to you by Selfridges Group and Intelligence Squared. If you enjoyed this episode, you can subscribe in Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or wherever your podcasts: https://bit.ly/howtoleadpod Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/intelligencesquared. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    The Sunday Debate: Let Them Eat Meat

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 60:08


    George Monbiot goes up against AA Gill to debate whether it is ethical to rear and kill animals for human consumption. The chair is Afua Hirsch. Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/intelligencesquared. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.


    How I Built This, with Guy Raz

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 41:18

    Great ideas often come from a simple spark: A soccer player on the New Zealand national team notices all the unused wool his country produces and figures out a way to turn them into shoes (Allbirds). A former Buddhist monk decides the very best way to spread his mindfulness teachings is by launching an app (Headspace). A sandwich cart vendor finds a way to reuse leftover pita bread and turns it into a multimillion-dollar business (Stacy's Pita Chips).In this week's episode award-winning journalist and NPR host Guy Raz speaks to Carl Miller about uncovering the stories of highly successful entrepreneurs.To find out more about Guy's book click here: https://www.amazon.co.uk/How-Built-This-Unexpected-Entrepreneurs/dp/0358216761 Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/intelligencesquared. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    How I Disrupted an Industry, with CEO of Starling Bank Anne Boden

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 38:23

    In this week's episode Anne Boden CEO of Starling Bank speaks to Linda Yueh about setting up her own bank.In her remarkable story Boden reveals how she broke through bureaucracy and successfully countered widespread suspicion to realise her vision for the future of consumer banking. She fulfilled that dream by founding Starling, the winner of Best British Bank at the British Bank Awards in 2018, 2019 and 2020, and in doing so has triggered a new movement that is revolutionising the entire banking industry.To find out more about the book click here: https://www.amazon.co.uk/BANKING-How-I-Disrupted-Industry/dp/0241453585 Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/intelligencesquared. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Business Weekly: Exponential, with Azeem Azhar

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 39:42

    We are entering the Exponential Age. Between faster computers, better software and bigger data, ours is the first era in human history in which technology is constantly accelerating.Azeem Azhar - writer, technologist, and creator of the acclaimed Exponential View newsletter - understands this shift better than anyone. Technology, he argues, is developing at an increasing, exponential rate. But human society - from our businesses to our political institutions - can only ever adapt at a slower, incremental pace. The result is an 'exponential gap', between the power of new technology and our ability to keep up. In this week's episode he speaks to Ros Urwin about this new era and what we we should do about it. To buy the book click here: https://amzn.to/3i8YieM Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/intelligencesquared. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    The Sunday Debate: Identity Politics is Tearing Society Apart

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2021 56:27


    Is identity politics tearing society apart or is it a call for social justice for everyone? That's the theme of this week's Sunday Debate. For the motion were journalist and author of 'We Need To Talk About Kevin', Lionel Shriver and Founding chair of the Equality and Human Rights Commission Trevor Phillips.Against the motion were Labour politician David Lammy and Guardian journalist, the late Dawn Foster.The chair was Kamal Ahmed former editorial director of the BBC. Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/intelligencesquared. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.


    AI 2041: Why the Future is Already Here, with Kai-Fu Lee

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 58:45

    Kai-Fu Lee is one of the world's leading AI experts and a bestselling author. He founded Microsoft Asia's research lab that has trained CTOs and AI heads at Baidu, Tencent, Alibaba and Huawei. As President of Google China he helped establish the company in the Chinese market. And now, as CEO of Sinovation Ventures, he is investing in China's high-tech sector, giving him a unique perspective on how AI is set to change our world over the next 20 years. On September 22 Lee came to Intelligence Squared to explain how AI is at an inflection point and urged us to wake up to its radiant possibilities as well as to the existential threats it poses to life as we know it. In conversation with Kamal Ahmed, former Editorial Director of the BBC, he discussed his new work of ‘scientific fiction', AI 2041, co-authored with the celebrated novelist Chen Qiufan. The book offers up eye-opening scenarios of our techno-future – from a teenage girl's rebellion when AI gets in the way of romance to a rogue quantum computer scientist's revenge plot that imperils the world. To buy his new book AI 2041 with the Intelligence Squared discount click here: https://www.primrosehillbooks.com/product/ai-2041-ten-visions-for-our-future-kai-fu-lee-chen-qiufan/ Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/intelligencesquared. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Should Black Americans Move to the South?

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 53:31

    In this week's episode Charles Blow speaks to journalist Dele Olojede about the arguments in his new book The Devil You Know: A Black Power Manifesto. He argued that if enough African-Americans move south, the demographic balance in the Southern States will be tipped in favour of Black voters and politicians. His new home state of Georgia – he practises what he preaches and left Brooklyn for Atlanta – recently voted for a Democrat presidential candidate and two Democratic Senate candidates, one of whom became the first Black senator in the state's history. The growing African-American population in Georgia was pivotal in these votes, Blow believes.To find out more and buy the book click here: https://www.primrosehillbooks.com/product/the-devil-you-know-a-black-power-manifesto-charles-m-blow-subscribers/ Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/intelligencesquared. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Business Weekly: What is Economic Growth?

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 16:14


    In this week's episode we're featuring a podcast produced by Intelligence Squared called 'It's The Economy' in which host Nicola Walton breaks down the complex economic ideas we have all heard of but may not fully understand in under 15 minutes. In this episode Lord O'Donnell, a former Cabinet Secretary who headed the British Civil Service between 2005-2011 under Prime Ministers Tony Blair, Gordon Brown and David Cameron looks at economic growth, what counts as GDP and productivity, and whether national happiness and wellbeing are taken into account.Subscribe to It's The Economy at: https://pod.link/1577180549 Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/intelligencesquared. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.


    The Sunday Debate: Break Up The Tech Giants

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2021 60:34

    With so much data and power centralised in the hands of a few West Coast companies, the tech giants have become a serious threat to our basic freedoms and must be broken up. That's the argument that was made at this major Intelligence Squared debate by the FT's global business columnist Rana Foroohar and by businessman and former chairman of Channel 4 Luke Johnson.But others would argue that it's all too easy to make the tech giants a scapegoat for the inevitable upheavals caused by the digital revolution. The real winners of this revolution are not the tech companies but us, the users. Who could now imagine living without the services of Amazon, Apple, Google, Facebook and Microsoft? That's the case that was made in our debate by former head of Facebook's European politics and government division Elizabeth Linder and competition law expert Pinar Akman. Who's right and who's wrong? Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/intelligencesquared. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    The Status Game, with Will Storr

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 56:03

    Does owning a big house and supporting ‘correct' social causes not just make you feel good about yourself but actually make you healthier and live longer? The answer is yes. This is just one of the fascinating findings that bestselling writer Will Storr shared with Intelligence Squared on September 16 discussing the themes of his new book The Status Game. Storr argues that it is our irrepressible craving for status that ultimately defines who we are. As he puts it, ‘If you want to rule the world, save the world, buy the world or fuck the world, the best thing to pursue is status.' And research shows that without sufficient status, we suffer more illness and live shorter lives.To get the Intelligence Squared discount on the book click here: https://www.primrosehillbooks.com/product/the-status-game-on-social-position-and-how-we-use-it-will-storr-intel/ See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Salman Rushdie: Touchstones with Razia Iqbal

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 53:47


    Salman Rushdie, award-winning novelist and author of Midnight's Children and Quichotte, discusses his cultural touchstones, from James Joyce to Bob Dylan. Rushdie was in conversation with BBC journalist and broadcaster Razia Iqbal. Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/intelligencesquared. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.


    Business Weekly: Debate – Crypto Can Bank the Unbanked Debate

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 50:28

    On Monday September 7th El Salvador became the first country to accept Bitcoin as legal tender. Businesses in the country will be obliged where possible to accept the digital coins as payment and citizens will be expected to download the government's new digital wallet app which gives away $30 in Bitcoin to every citizen.Bitcoin fans have been jumping for joy and believe the adoption of cryptocurrency in low income countries like El Salvador will provide banking services to the two billion people in the world who are unbanked. In El Salvador, 70 per cent of citizens are unbanked and roughly one quarter of the working population lives in the United States, from where they send remittance payments to their families back home. In the future, these payments could be made using Bitcoin, which could dramatically reduce cross-border fees and allow families to send cryptocurrency straight to the mobile phone of loved ones.But some security experts have their doubts. ‘Banking the unbanked' may sound like a bright idea but it assumes that people who lack financial services primarily need a better and cheaper way to access them. A 2015 World Bank report found that 59 per cent of survey respondents cited lack of money as the main reason for not having a bank account. So, rather than luring people into the murky world of cryptocurrencies, where volatile prices such as the recent drop in Bitcoin can make the poor poorer, should we not instead be looking at real solutions to help unbanked people generate more income? Speakers: Peter McCormack, Yaya Fanusie Moderator: Anne McElvoyThis debate is part of Intelligence Squared Crypto our new debate series in partnership with EQONEX the Nasdaq listed digital asset advisory. To find out more about EQONEX click here: https://eqonex.com/ Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/intelligencesquared. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Debate: Michael Sandel vs Adrian Wooldridge on Meritocracy

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 59:04

    Meritocracy has long been an article of faith in the modern Western world. Get an education, work hard and the rewards of success will be yours, regardless of class, privilege or wealth. But recently meritocracy has come under attack, with the charge led by Michael Sandel, the Harvard philosopher whose public debates on how we define the common good have won him a global following.But not everyone agrees. Taking issue with much of Sandel's arguments is Adrian Wooldridge, the political editor at The Economist. In this week's debate they argue whether we need more or less meritocracy in society. The host is BBC broadcaster Ritula Shah.For Michael Sandel's new bool click here: https://www.primrosehillbooks.com/product/the-tyranny-of-merit-whats-become-of-the-common-good-michael-j-sandel-pb/For Adrian Wooldridge's new book click here: https://www.primrosehillbooks.com/product/the-aristocracy-of-talent-how-meritocracy-made-the-modern-world-adrian-wooldridge/ Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/intelligencesquared. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Negotiating Survival: Civilian Relations with the Taliban

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 38:30

    While the Taliban have the power of violence on their side in Afghanistan, they nonetheless need civilians to comply with their authority. Both strategically and by necessity, civilians have leveraged this reliance on their obedience in order to influence Taliban behaviour.In this week's episode Ashley Jackson author or Negotiating Survival speaks to Rosamund Urwin about her new model for understanding how civilian agency can shape the conduct of insurgencies. They also discuss Taliban strategy and objectives, explaining how the organisation has so nearly triumphed on the battlefield and in peace talks. While Afghanistan's future is deeply unpredictable, there is one certainty: it is as critical as ever to understand the Taliban—and how civilians survive their rule.To find out more about the book and to order it click here: https://www.hurstpublishers.com/book/negotiating-survival/ Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/intelligencesquared. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Business Weekly: No Bullsh*t Leadership with Reckitt CEO Laxman Narasimhan

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 44:30

    In this episode Chris Hirst speaks to Laxman Narasimhan, CEO of Reckitt, about his approach to leadership and how to connect with staff in a global company. Reckitt is the global consumer goods giant behind household brands such as Dettol, Durex, Vanish, Neurofen and Strepsils. Before running Reckitt, Laxman held senior positions in PepsiCo and McKinsey.To subscribe to the No Bullsh*t Leadership podcast, made in partnership with Havas Creative, click here: https://pod.link/1533418365 Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/intelligencesquared. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    The Sunday Debate: Dickens vs Tolstoy

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2021 87:30

    In 2019 we lined up the best advocates to make the case for Dickens or Tolstoy in the battle of the great 19th century novelists. They called on a cast of star actors, including Tom Hiddleston, to bring their arguments to life with readings from the authors' finest works. Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/intelligencesquared. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    How to Lead a Sustainable Business and the Future of Fashion

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 21:01

    Today's episode comes from the How To Lead a Sustainable Business, brought to you by Selfridges Group and Intelligence Squared. In the podcast, Alannah Weston, Chairman of Selfridges Group, speaks to inspiring leaders at the forefront of sustainability and business to find out what it takes to lead change and how businesses can put sustainability at their core. In this episode, Alannah is joined by Victoria Prew, CEO of Hurr - the UK's first peer to peer fashion rental platform. Her business has been described as the ‘Airbnb of fashion' by Forbes magazine. They discuss the rental revolution, a guilt-free approach to shopping and how Victoria is disrupting the fashion system by bringing the circular economy to life for customers through tech innovation.How To Lead a Sustainable Business is brought to you by Selfridges Group and Intelligence Squared. If you enjoyed this episode, you can subscribe in Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or wherever your podcasts: https://bit.ly/howtoleadpod. Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/intelligencesquared. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Debate: Crypto vs The Environment

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 56:40


    Debate: Crypto vs The Environment It is estimated that the global Bitcoin network currently consumes about 133 terawatt-hours of electricity annually - roughly equal to what is consumed by the nation of Sweden. Crypto skeptics warn that the energy demands of the network are a threat to the environment and that further adoption of cryptocurrency will lead to a harmful rise in carbon emissions. However, crypto advocates say that the figures often used to denounce crypto can be misleading and when you examine the biggest contributing factors to climate change globally, Bitcoin is responsible for just 0.13% of annual carbon emissions. Furthermore, unlike the traditional financial system, they say, networks like Bitcoin continue to make strides in adopting renewable energy with initiatives like the Crypto Climate Accord committing producers to net-zero by 2040. So who's right or wrong?Speakers: Lyn Alden: Financial analyst and founder of Lyn Alden Investment Strategy where she provides tens of thousands of investors with the latest research, information, and tools to help them build wealth and manage digital assets. Subscribe to her newsletter at: https://www.lynalden.com/newsletter-archives/Alex De Vries: Founder of Digiconomist, a platform dedicated to exposing the unintended consequences of digital trends.The host is Anne McElvoy senior editor and head of podcasts at The Economist. This debate series is is partnership with EQONEX the Nasdaq listed digital asset advisory. Register free for our third debate 'Crypto can bank the unbanked' here: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/debate-crypto-can-bank-the-unbanked-registration-165732106191?aff=ebdsoporgprofile Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/intelligencesquared. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.


    The Sunday Debate: The West Should Cut Ties with Saudi Arabia

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2021 60:56

    In this week's episode of the Sunday debate we go back to 2019. In the aftermath of journalist Jamal Khashoggi's murder at the Saudi consulate in Istanbul we brought together leading experts to debate how the West should respond to the abrasive crown prince Mohammed Bin Salman. Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/intelligencesquared. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

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