Podcast appearances and mentions of Charlotte Smith

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Best podcasts about Charlotte Smith

Latest podcast episodes about Charlotte Smith

Farming Today
29/09/22 Bird Flu, On-shore wind, Wine tourism

Farming Today

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 13:05


More bird flu outbreaks and more restrictions. 64,000 turkeys are being culled in the latest outbreak, this time in Norfolk. The Government says it's going to relax planning laws about where on-shore wind farms can be built, but some rural councils are not sure they want them. All week we're looking at UK wine. Most is English, but there are about five vineyards in Scotland and thirty in Wales - that's according to the tourism organisation Visit Wales. Visitors are a growing part of the business model for producers in the Welsh wine regions. Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Beatrice Fenton.

Farming Today
20/09/22 Cost of living in rural areas; farmers still unable to export breeding animals to the EU.

Farming Today

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 13:34


We hear why, nearly two years after we left the EU, farmers still can't export breeding animals to Europe. And the cost of living is rising, wherever you live, but this week we're going to look at the impact of price rises in rural areas. Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Beatrice Fenton.

Farming Today
19/09/22 Farming Today marks the Queen's funeral from Windsor

Farming Today

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 11:32


Today we mark the Queen's funeral with a special programme from Windsor. We remember her deep connection to the countryside and farming, and her lifelong passions of cattle breeding, horse racing and dogs. Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Beatrice Fenton.

Farming Today
17/09/22 Farming Today This Week: Food Inflation, Organic Milk, Goats

Farming Today

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2022 24:48


This week Charlotte Smith looks into the pressures food producers are facing - despite the rapid rise in food prices. From pork and vegetables to organic dairy, farmers say the costs they are facing are outweighing the amount they are being paid. How much consumers should expect to pay for food was the topic for panellists of a digital conference organised this week by the The Rural Policy Group. It is a think tank set up to campaign for better representation of agriculture in politics. Speakers at the conference discussed what things reinforce consumers expectation of low-priced food, and how that could be changed in order to make pricing fairer for all. And we delve into the world of a still relatively niche farm animal - the goat. From a herd of 250 goats in the hills of Cumbria, and semi-wild goats being tracked in north Devon, to the pomp and pageantry of the King's Proclamation. Presented by Charlotte Smith Produced in Bristol by Natalie Donovan

Farming Today
12/09/2022 Rising Farm Costs and Goats

Farming Today

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 11:41


Rising costs are forcing farmers to reduce the amount of food they can produce. Charlotte Smith hears how feed prices are up by a half, while fertilizers cost up to three times as much as they did this time last year. The Government plans to cap energy prices but will it be enough to keep putting food on the supermarket shelves? Also, a farmer explains how diversifying into keeping goats for milk, meat and other products has saved his farm. Presenter: Charlotte Smith Producer: Natalie Donovan Editor: Dimitri Houtart

Farming Today
10/09/22 Farming Today This Week: Tribute to the Queen, 'a countrywoman at heart'; the role of insects in farming.

Farming Today

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2022 25:05


Farming Today looks back at the Queen's life, and in particular her passion for all things rural; as a landowner, farmer, accomplished racehorse owner and as a countrywoman. Throughout her life she took an active interest in agriculture, particularly her herds of native breed cattle. The Queen also lent her support to more than 600 charities and organisations in the UK and Northern Ireland, many of them involved with farming, livestock and conservation. We hear from some of them on her legacy. All week we've been taking a closer look at insects in farming: as pollinators, pests and potential protein. Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Beatrice Fenton.

Farming Today
03/09/22 Farming Today This Week: Right to roam, price of milk, small abattoir closes, bovine TB

Farming Today

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2022 25:04


We discuss TB in cattle and the efforts to control it. A new bill is proposed on the right to roam. How milk prices are on the rise: what does this mean for farmers? And another small abattoir closes. The owner blames bureaucracy and what he calls overzealous government vets. Presented by Charlotte Smith and producer by Beatrice Fenton.

Farming Today
30/08/22 - Sea lice, harvest robot, farming in peat, bovine TB

Farming Today

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 13:28


A new framework is to be introduced to protect wild salmon and sea trout in Scotland from sea lice. The Scottish Environment Protection Agency (SEPA) says the wild salmon population is in crisis - but the new rules should limit their exposure to sea lice by defining protection zones. As the government announces it's going to ban peat in amateur gardening, we look at what crops can be grown in peatland. If you've been around Harper Adams University in Shropshire you might have done a double take as you came across a tractor and a combine this harvest - because neither had a driver. This is the extension of the 'hands free hectare' project we followed a few years back and is shaping not just the future of farm robots but also the regulations, and even the insurance farmers will need. All this week we're looking at bovine tuberculosis - how it affects farms, and efforts to control it., including developing better testing, vaccination badgers, and the annual cull of badgers in England. Presented by Charlotte Smith.

Best of Today
Food prices soar in economic difficulty

Best of Today

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 19:42


In the midst of a difficult economic climate and a war in Europe, consumers are feeling the effects on their food bills. Today teams up with Farming Today's Charlotte Smith and the Food Programme's Dan Saladino to investigate the production challenges facing farmers and the realities for shoppers at the tills. (Image Credit: James Manning/PA Wire)

Farming Today
23/08/22 - Carbon neutral meat processing, labour costs, river pollution

Farming Today

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 13:30


A meat processing plant is claiming to be carbon neutral, using animal fats from the abattoir process to power the plant. ABP has invested millions of pounds in the vast new site at Ellesmere in the Midlands, using state of the art equipment to make the process as easy as possible for the animals themselves, and providing data and insight for the farmers that supply them. A new report by a group of charities says chemicals are the hidden killer in our rivers. WildFish (formerly Salmon and Trout Conservation) worked with the RSPB, BugLife and the Pesticide Collaboration, testing invertebrates from 12 rivers to assess river health. They found the number of species had declined, and are calling on the government to better regulate and police water quality rules. Defra says it is committed to river health, including through the new Environment Act. As part of our week looking at the rising cost of food, today we meet a farmer who says a 'perfect storm' of Brexit, war in Ukraine and the effects of Covid, have led to a drastic shortage of labour to work on farms and in food processing, pushing prices up for farmers and consumers. Presented by Charlotte Smith.

Brexitcast
Dry Hard

Brexitcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 31:49


Is the UK heading for a drought? Adam speaks to the head of the Environment Agency, Sir James Bevan about the impact of the recent dry weather and soaring temperatures, which are forecast to hit 37C (99F) in some parts of the country in the coming days. Adam is also joined by Charlotte Smith from Radio 4's Farming Today and BBC Weather's Matt Taylor to assess how the hot conditions will affect crops and agriculture, and when we can expect some rain. Today's episode was produced by Tim Walklate with Beth Rose, Cordelia Hemming and Miranda Slade. The technical producer was Emma Crowe.

Farming Today
08/08/2022 - Reservoirs, Vertical farming, Harvest

Farming Today

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 10:54


With areas of the UK struggling with drought, we speak to a farm business which has invested hundreds of thousands of pounds building reservoirs to store winter rain ready for summer. One sure way to avoid much of the weather's impact is to grow inside - not just in greenhouses but in vertical farms which look more like warehouses. The Jones Food Company, which specialises in growing this way, has just opened a new research centre in Bristol to trial growing more veg and fruit inside. Harvest 2022 is already around two weeks ahead of previous summers, as the dry weather allows farmers to get out in the fields earlier. We speak to an analyst from the Agriculture and Horticulture Development Board about the opportunities and challenges of the heat. Presented by Charlotte Smith.

Farming Today
01/08/22 - Robots on farms, Tenant farmers

Farming Today

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 13:34


A review looking into robots on farms has been published, it calls for more cooperation between academia, business and farmers. It also recommends a longer-term seasonal workers scheme so that agriculture has enough staff while the automation industry becomes more mainstream. We hear from a farm in Cornwall where robots are already being used to plant crops. All this week Farming Today will be looking at tenant farmers. They manage 35% of the UK's farmed land area, and are a vital part of the food growing network. But they face some challenges - from increasingly shorter tenancies to a lack of available land. Council owned farms have also been sold off as the money is needed elsewhere. Charlotte Smith finds out about the difficulties facing tenants. Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced in Bristol by Sally Challoner.

Arts & Ideas
Charlotte Smith - women writers to put back on the bookshelf

Arts & Ideas

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 14:19


New Generation Thinker Sophie Coulombeau argues that we should salute this woman who supported her family through her writing, who perfected sonnets about solitude before Wordsworth began writing his, and who explored the struggles of women and refugees in her fiction. Mother to 12 children, Charlotte Turner Smith wrote ten novels, three poetry collections and four children's books and translated French fiction. In 1788 her first novel, Emmeline, sold 1500 copies within months but by the time of her death in 1803 her popularity had declined and she had become destitute. New Generation Thinkers is a scheme run by BBC Radio 3 and the Arts and Humanities Research Council to work with academics to turn their research into radio. Producer: Robyn Read

Farming Today
29/07/22 - Sea eagles, Dutch farmers' protest

Farming Today

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 13:05


Scottish MP Angus MacNeil is calling for a cull of sea eagles as farmers and crofters say they are taking more lambs as numbers grow. The bird - with a wing-span of around two metres - was driven to extinction in Scotland, until reintroduction programmes in the 1970s brought them back. Now there are more than a hundred breeding pairs. NatureScot is offering management schemes, including funding extra shepherds to help farmers. But so far there is no compensation for lost revenue, and no plans for a managed cull. Dutch farmers have been making headlines around the world, not for their agricultural produce but intensive protests. Tractors have rolled up outside parliament, blocked supermarket distribution centres and turned up outside politicians' homes. Even Donald Trump has weighed in, in support of the farmers. The demonstrations are against the Dutch government's plans to cut harmful nitrogen emissions to meet climate targets. The farmers argue the government's proposals are unrealistic and unfairly target their industry. The presenter is Charlotte Smith.

Farming Today
28/07/2022 Music for pigs; drought in Italy; weir demolition

Farming Today

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 13:22


As part of our week looking at the global food crisis, we turn our attention to Northern Italy, where in some areas a state of emergency has been declared. Water levels in the River Po have hit record lows, and the largest farmers' union has warned that the drought could threaten more than 30% of agricultural produce. Italy is the EU's biggest rice producer, and we hear from an agronomist working to make growing rice more sustainable. We report on how a huge engineering project has begun to remove an 18th century weir from the River Nidd in North Yorkshire, to restore the natural life of the river system in the area. And as scientists in Belgium look into the effect music might have on pigs, we hear from a farmer in Suffolk who says classical tunes help to calm his stock. Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Beatrice Fenton.

Nature Tripping
Nature Tripping Episode 18 - Poetry and Birds in the Industrial Revolution

Nature Tripping

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 50:00


“Come, summer visitant, attach to my reed roof your nest of clay”. In this episode Jo and Cathy look back to the Victorian era with poetry scholar Clara Dawson. Clara introduces us to poems by Charlotte Smith, William Wordsworth, Christina Rosetti, Edward Thomas and Thomas Hardy, and the interweaving of human and bird worlds. What is revealed about the poets' relationships with nature as industrialisation took grip across the country? And how might these poems spark our own imaginations, both in terms of experiencing nature's previous plenitude, and in forging new relationships with the living world to carry us into an uncertain future? The poems are read by Clara and set to field recordings. This episode was supported by the University of Manchester.

Farming Today
02/07/22 - Farming Today This Week: the shape of the soft fruit sector

Farming Today

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2022 25:03


Charlotte Smith visits a fruit farm in Kent to investigate the challenges and the joys of growing fruit. Clock House Farm produced strawberries, raspberries, blackberries, apples and plums. They've face recruitment issues this year because of the war in Ukraine, since many of their seasonal workers normally come from there. Meanwhile the cost of labour as well as the price of other inputs like diesel and fertiliser have risen...meaning they are currently operating below the cost of production. But investment is still being made in innovation like the use of robotics. Presented by Charlotte Smith Produced for BBC Audio in Bristol by Heather Simons

Farming Today
01/07/22 - The 'environmental fruit-print'

Farming Today

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 13:38


To round off a week of programmes from Clock House Farm in Kent, this programme focuses on the environmental footprint of fruit. Charlotte Smith looks round the packhouse which handles the farm's produce, and packs 13,000 tonnes of soft fruit every year. She also finds out how the farm is trying to reduce it's use of water and agrochemicals. Presented by Charlotte Smith Produced for BBC Audio in Bristol by Heather Simons

Farming Today
30/06/22 - A shortage of labour in the fruit sector

Farming Today

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 13:40


The government's Seasonal Workers Scheme has been extended to provide 40,000 six-month visas for people coming to work in the UK on fruit, veg and flower farms as well as in food processing - but will it be enough? Charlotte Smith is on a fruit farm in Kent, asking how they've been effected by a shortage of labour. Presented by Charlotte Smith Produced for BBC Audio in Bristol is Heather Simons

Farming Today
25/06/22 - Farming Today This Week: farm labour, regenerative farming and avian flu

Farming Today

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022 25:06


The Ggovernment doesn't understand labour shortages in food and farming and is putting the future of the sector in danger - according to the EFRA Committee of MPs. What is regenerative agriculture and could it be the answer for the environment and farmers' bottom lines? Charlotte Smith visit Groundswell. Investigations continue into a suspected case of Foot and Mouth on a pig farm in Norfolk...although initial tests do not indicate the presence of disease. And why has this year seen the largest and longest ever outbreak of Bird Flu in the UK? Presented by Charlotte Smith Produced for BBC Audio in Bristol by Heather Simons

Farming Today
23/06/22 - Groundswell 2022

Farming Today

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 13:15


The principles of regenerative agriculture include increasing crop diversity, protecting the soil with ground cover, involving livestock, reducing tillage and keeping living roots in the soil. But why do it? In this programme, Charlotte Smith visits the regenerative agriculture show, Groundswell, to find out. Presented by Charlotte Smith Produced for BBC Audio in Bristol by Heather Simons

Make Money as a Life Coach
Ep #182: Loving Your Offer for Your People with Charlotte Smith

Make Money as a Life Coach

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 36:37 Very Popular


Whoever your people are, tune in this week to learn everything there is to know about providing your clients with an amazing offer and show up in your business loving that offer every single day. Charlotte Smith is discussing the thoughts she sees other coaches having about their offers that leave them doomed to failure, and how to make sure you don't fall into the same trap.     Get full show notes and more information here: https://staceyboehman.com/182

Farming Today
13/06/22 - salmon and rising egg costs

Farming Today

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 11:34


All week on Farming Today we're looking at the salmon industry - from wild populations to salmon farming. Scottish salmon is the UK's biggest fresh food export with overseas sales hitting £614 million in 2021, up 36 per cent from 2020. But it can be a controversial topic and we hear from both sides of the fence - the economics of the industry and the environmental impact and welfare concerns. With rising costs of feed, egg farmers are making a loss. There are fears many farmers will just get out of the industry - leaving consumers to pay more. Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced for BBC Audio by Caitlin Hobbs

Farming Today
Farming Today This Week: Chelsea Flower Show

Farming Today

Play Episode Listen Later May 28, 2022 24:58


All this week we've been looking at the business of growing flowers and plants, and we're at the Chelsea Flower Show to hear about what sort of state our horticulture industry is in. The industry of cut flowers and pot plants is big business - according to Government statistics, the UK grew £1.4 billion worth in 2020. We speak to the businesses carving out a niche market for their plants, a fantastic display of clematis and with the news that this week the government will allow commercial growing of gene-edited crops in England, we ask what the possibilities are for plant growers. And we hear from the team who won best in show at this year's Chelsea Flower Show for their rewilded garden. Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced for BBC Audio by Caitlin Hobbs

Farming Today
23/05/22 - Ukrainian Farmers, Community Supported Agriculture, Hothouse flowers

Farming Today

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 11:24


Ukrainian farmers are demanding that borders re-open so they can get their crops out of the country. It's estimated that 24 million tonnes of wheat and maize are stuck there as Russia continues to blockade Black Sea ports. Instead, farmers are heading to the land borders – and can face a week-long wait to get through. With harvest now looming they say this can't go on. Last week the UN highlighted the impact the war is having on global food supplies, warning that some countries could face long-term famines if Ukraine's exports are not restored to pre-war levels. Charlotte Smith catches up with one farmer who says the situation can't go on. As many people face a struggle to put food on their plates as the cost of living rises, community supported agriculture is being heralded as a way to bring farmers and consumers together, to share both the risks and the rewards of growing food. Although fairly well-established across Britain, the movement is in the early stages in Northern Ireland. We visit an open day designed encourage others to find out more about this model of farming. The British horticulture market is worth £2.2 billion a year according to the Flowers and Plants Association, and UK grown flowers are growing in popularity. This week Farming Today will be hearing from the people who help make gardens beautiful. One of the big challenges is competing with Dutch growers, who have dominated this market for decades. Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Sally Challoner.

Farming Today
19/05/2022 – the impact of the Northern Ireland protocol and vet shortages

Farming Today

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 13:21


Farmers and food businesses in Northern Ireland say anything other than a negotiated deal on changing the Protocol would be ‘sub optimal'. With the UK Government planning to unilaterally change the agreement it made with the EU, this has raised fears of a trade war. This week we're looking at worker shortages in the vet industry and we hear what's being done to increase diversity within the sector, after a study from 2015 found only 3% of the UK veterinary profession is non-white - compared to a UK population that is 14% non-white. And we hear the answer to 'which bird is it?' from yesterday's programme. Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced for BBC Audio by Caitlin Hobbs

Food Biz Wiz
145. How Mindset Matters: Change Your Thoughts, Change Your Results with Charlotte Smith

Food Biz Wiz

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 44:45


As business founders, we have ALL been in a space of overwhelm; of feeling like we have just too many tasks to complete and not enough energy or mental space to do it. That's why I'm so excited for this week's episode with Charlotte Smith. Charlotte is a marketing expert who specializes in marketing for agricultural professionals AND mindset coaching to move your business forward and reduce overwhelm and anxiety. Some of the questions we discuss include: What even is mindset and what should we understand about it? What questions can we start asking to shift our mindset? How can we empower our productive thoughts and recognize our negative thoughts? Plus even more! If you'd like to see more about the resources mentioned or how to connect with Charlotte, check out our full show notes here. This episode is sponsored by Wholesale Week, the FREE 5 days of actionable mini lessons for emerging food, bev and taxable grocery brands like yours. We have designed Wholesale Week to help you put your wholesale strategy in place for your next steps in 2022. Click here to sign up!

Food Biz Wiz
145. How Mindset Matters: Change Your Thoughts, Change Your Results with Charlotte Smith

Food Biz Wiz

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 44:46


As business founders, we have ALL been in a space of overwhelm; of feeling like we have just too many tasks to complete and not enough energy or mental space to do it. That's why I'm so excited for this week's episode with Charlotte Smith. Charlotte is a marketing expert who specializes in marketing for agricultural professionals AND mindset coaching to move your business forward and reduce overwhelm and anxiety. Some of the questions we discuss include: What even is mindset and what should we understand about it? What questions can we start asking to shift our mindset? How can we empower our productive thoughts and recognize our negative thoughts? Plus even more! If you'd like to see more about the resources mentioned or how to connect with Charlotte, check out our full show notes here. This episode is sponsored by Wholesale Week, the FREE 5 days of actionable mini lessons for emerging food, bev and taxable grocery brands like yours. We have designed Wholesale Week to help you put your wholesale strategy in place for your next steps in 2022. Click here to sign up!

Farming Today
12/05/22 - seasonal worker exploitation, environmental watchdog report, fish foodbank and Balmoral show

Farming Today

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 12:57


This week we're talking about spring veg, and ask about one of the big issues facing farmers and growers - who is going to pick it? We've reported on problems attracting both people already based in the UK and seasonal workers from abroad onto British farms, especially since Brexit - and the impact of the war in Ukraine. 30,000 people are allowed to work on farms via the seasonal worker visa - but some who come here say that they are badly treated. England's new Environmental Watchdog's first report into the government's efforts to protect and improve the environment is out. The newly created Office for Environmental Protection - which also covers Northern Ireland - says ministers must take decisive action before some key tipping points are passed. We hear from the skipper of a Cornish charter boat, which is donating its catch to local people at a foodbank each week, and show season is underway. The Balmoral show in Northern Ireland has kicked off, with showing cattle, showjumping, sheep shearing and food... Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced for BBC Audio by Caitlin Hobbs

Farming Today
05/05/2022 - Farm Machinery and LAMMA

Farming Today

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 13:26


We're at the farm machinery show LAMMA, which showcases the latest agricultural machinery services and equipment, and this year it's celebrating its' 40th anniversary. We hear from those attending about the rising costs despite farmers are facing and the impact this might have on affording farm machinery, the potential trade opportunities within the farm machinery sector and how agricultural machinery can offer a career to young entrants. Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced for BBC Audio by Caitlin Hobbs

Farming Today
29/04/22 - import checks, biosolids and George Eustice on agroforestry and American animal welfare

Farming Today

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 13:05


The government has announced a delay to import checks on goods coming into the UK from the EU; these checks were due to come in from July, having been delayed three times already. Last year a committee of MPs concluded that the lack of checks has undermined the competitiveness of British seafood and meat businesses in their home market and that there are concerns that this could have ‘serious implications for the spread of disease. The organic campaign group The Soil Association says trees are part of the answer to achieving the UK's nature and net zero targets while also growing enough food. It suggests that growing trees as part of a farming system - alongside crops and livestock, brings many benefits - and held a conference on this topic, this week. DEFRA Secretary George Eustice spoke at the conference about agroforestry and whether he is concerned that companies might plant trees as a means of offsetting their carbon emissions. He had also just come back from America where he'd been discussing the differences between animal welfare standards in the UK and the US. And this week on Farming Today we're looking at water. We hear how biosolids - otherwise known as human sewage turned into fertiliser - can be treated to create an alternative to increasingly expensive manufactured fertilisers. Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced for BBC Audio by Caitlin Hobbs

Farming Today
21/04/22 - Tree health, glasshouses, egg prices, fishing and conservation

Farming Today

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2022 13:34


The government is introducing new rules on sourcing trees - which could place more importance on growing in the UK, in line with the country's tree planting targets. From June anyone getting a grant can only get trees from approved suppliers, in an effort to improve tree health and prevent pests. Plus, all this week we're looking at glasshouse production, which typically might make you think of salad leaves, peppers, and tomatoes; but there are some unlikely crops being cultivated under glass too - such as trees! The Wash in East Anglia, which runs just south of Skegness to Hunstanton, supports around 60 boats fishing cockles, mussels and brown shrimp for generations. It's also an important overwintering site for hundreds of thousands of migratory birds. There's always been tension between fishing and wildlife, managed by an agreement, but it expires this year. Helen Mark visits for this week's Open Country. And free-range egg producers say that because of the rising costs they face, retailers should add 40p to the price of half a dozen eggs. We've had listeners get in touch to say they'd be happy to pay more, but how much can consumers really impact supermarket pricing? Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced for BBC Audio by Caitlin Hobbs

Farming Today
14/04/22 - Australia trade deal, Lump Sum Exit scheme, new entrants and tractor driving

Farming Today

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 14, 2022 13:35


There are concerns that the UK-Australia trade deal will be detrimental to farmers here in the UK, by allowing Australian imports produced to a lower standard into the country. Ministers asked the Trade and Agricultural Commission to scrutinise the agreement to establish the impact the deal will have on the UK, and the TAC has just released its report. It concludes that these worries are 'overblown'. This week we're talking to new entrants about getting into the farming industry and hearing how one of the hardest parts can be finding land. The government hopes that offering English farmers £100,000 to retire will help, as part of it's Lump Sum Exit scheme. Some farmers contemplating the scheme say it's not quite that simple, but the Tenant Farmers' Association think for farmers renting their land, it could be a way in to the industry. And on the theme of new entrants, we meet some young men learning to drive tractors in Lincolnshire and a young woman speaking to us from a lambing shed in Exmoor, about her own journey into farming. Emily Davis was first advised to study architecture, but instead chose farming despite no family links to agriculture. She says experience abroad can be a great way into agriculture. Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced for BBC Audio by Caitlin Hobbs

Farming Today
19/4/22 - Pig industry, glasshouses, SFI payments and farm diversification

Farming Today

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 14, 2022 13:41


The pig industry has seen a backlog of animals stuck on farm because of a shortage of butchers in processing plants, but this is starting to ease, and pig prices are going up. After months of talking about the crisis in the pig industry, this should be good news - but farmers worry that with increased costs of feed, they're still losing money on every pig. DEFRA, along with Pasture for Life and Landworkers' Alliance, has funded a "Your Farming Future" programme, which is running a series of farm visits, offering farmers a chance to see how schemes can help them adapt and become more sustainable - both economically and environmentally. The new Sustainable Farming Incentive - which is replacing subsidy payments in England - has been analysed by the levy body AHDB, which says for many farmers the scheme will only offer a small financial benefit. And this week on Farming Today we're looking at growing crops undercover. We speak to Martin Emmett, the newly appointed Chair of the National Farmers' Union's horticulture and potatoes board, about the current state of the growing industry and what the impact of rising gas prices is. Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced for BBC Audio by Caitlin Hobbs

Farming Today
09/04/22 Farming Today This Week: IPCC report, labour shortages, carbon offsetting, leaving farming

Farming Today

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 11, 2022 24:38


The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's latest report came out earlier this week, focusing on the action that needs to be taken globally to mitigate the impact of a warming climate. It says agriculture, land-use and forestry can all help provide large-scale emissions reductions, but cannot completely compensate for any delayed action on reducing emissions in other sectors, such as industry and travel. The report also points out that global greenhouse gas emissions must peak in just three years' time, and then reduce by 43 percent by 2030. It highlights that methane - a major emission from livestock farming - would need to be reduced by a third during that same timeframe. Recently there has been a lot of talk about planting trees to offset carbon emissions - which this week, the Welsh Affairs Committee has warned will impact family farms in Wales. The committee says it ‘recognised the importance of woodland to tackle the climate emergency,' but ‘that companies could be attempting to “game the system” by investing in farming land to offset emissions which is then lost to Welsh agriculture'. The Environment Food and Rural Affairs Committee has been investigating the impact the lack of staff is having on farms, food processing and distribution, and is critical of what it says is the government's failure to engage in the labour shortage problem. MPs from the EFRA committee have warned that a failure to tackle labour shortages ‘will permanently shrink the food sector.‘ And all this week on Farming Today we've been talking about farmers leaving the industry. We hear from arable farmer Henry DuVal in Hampshire about how he passed the farm onto his son Ed by setting up a bio-gas plant, where instead of growing crops for food, all their fields are producing fuel for anaerobic digestion. Most of the methane they produce goes into the gas grid, some makes electricity. Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced for BBC Audio by Caitlin Hobbs

Farming Today
08/04/22 - Farming in Ukraine, global food supply, milk prices and leaving farming

Farming Today

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 8, 2022 13:29


Kees Huizinga has been farming in Ukraine for 20 years with 15,000 hectares of crops and 2000 dairy cows on land between the capital Kyiv and the port of Odesa. Charlotte Smith asks him how the season is progressing as the war continues. Meanwhile, the increased price of fuel and fertiliser is beginning to bite. Dairy farmers call for consumers to pay around fifty per cent more for their milk. And a report published by the Scottish Environment and Forestry Directorate last month outlines barriers to people leaving farming as well as barriers to new entrants - so is that a problem and if so, how do we fix it? Presented by Charlotte Smith Produced for BBC Audio Bristol by Heather Simons

Farming Today
07/04/22 The future of farming in Wales and Lump Sum Exit payments

Farming Today

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 7, 2022 13:15


Farms in Wales face a challenging future according to a new report from MPs. The all party Welsh Affairs Committee points to pressures on farms' economic viability and is calling for more information on companies buying farmland for carbon offsetting schemes. MPs say they ‘recognise the importance of woodland to tackle the climate emergency,' but ‘that companies could be attempting to “game the system” by investing in farming land to offset emissions'. We speak to the Chair of the Welsh Affairs Committee and Conservative MP Stephen Crabb. And we hear from the Minister for Rural Affairs in the Welsh Government, Lesley Griffiths, about Wales' new post-Brexit rural support package worth £227m, which includes funds for farmers to make environmental improvements. This week we're talking about leaving farming - and how easy or difficult this can be. One of the government's new ideas for easing the process of retirement in England is the Lump Sum Exit Scheme, due to come online any day now. Some farmers are wary of whether the scheme will work for them; we've been speaking to young farmer Abi Irwin and her dad Michael who are in the process of a family farm handover and who have decided not to go for the Lump Sum scheme. Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced for BBC Audio by Caitlin Hobbs

Farming Today
01/04/22 - Upland farmers, trade deals and Australian beef farmers

Farming Today

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 1, 2022 13:33


England's upland farmers are facing an uncertain future despite increases in payments announced this week. The payment under the Sustainable Farming Initiative for moorland was £6.45 a hectare, which has now been increased to £10.30 a hectare, plus an added £6.15 a hectare for common land - so a possible increase of £16.45. However the Foundation for Common Land warns that the transition from the EU system of direct payments to a public money for public goods approach will leave many farming on fells and moorland significantly worse off. All week we've been looking at the free trade deal agreed between the UK and Australia and its impact on food and farming here. We consider what it might mean for the UK's beef industry and we hear from the BBC's Global Trade Correspondent Dharshini David about other trade deals currently in negotiation. Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced for BBC Audio by Caitlin Hobbs

Farming Today
31/03/22 - Fertiliser, food waste and Australian sheep farmers

Farming Today

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 31, 2022 13:32


With fertiliser prices rising, Defra Secretary George Eustice responds by delaying new restrictions on some, and clarifying the rules on muck spreading. And we hear more detail on have also been released about the Sustainable Farming Incentive or SFI - part of the new system of farm payments being introduced in England. The food waste charity WRAP estimate that just over 3% of food harvested is wasted before it gets to consumers - and once in our homes we waste far more. With MPs discussing food security and prices in a Westminster Hall debate called for by the SNP, we hear from farmer Will Woodhall who grows spring onions and beetroot alongside cereal crops - but who this year hasn't been able to sell all his produce. The Trade and Agriculture Commission deliver their advice on the Australia-UK trade deal to ministers today - looking at the impacts of the deal on UK food and farming - and that's what we've been doing all week. Farmers here are worried they will be exposed to imports of cheaper meat, and in particular lamb meat, which is produced in ways that aren't allowed here. Peter Hadfield has been in Merriwa to hear what Australian sheep farmers make of it. Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Caitlin Hobbs

Farming Today
26/03/22 Farming Today This Week: Seed potatoes going to Russia, Manure to replace fertiliser, Lambs

Farming Today

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 26, 2022 25:05


A large consignment of seed potatoes is being sent from Scotland to Russia, despite a plea from the Scottish Government for businesses to 'disengage from trade with Russia' in response to the war in Ukraine. High artificial fertiliser prices remain a worry for farmers. One farmer in Lancashire is reported to be spending a lottery win on it. The cost has quadrupled with some farmers saying they're being asked to pay around £1,000 a tonne, and there are warnings that the knock-on effect will be less, and more expensive grain. But the Defra Secretary George Eustice says there is a longer term solution: manures. And to celebrate spring actually springing over much of the country this week, complete with lambs, Farming Today has been talking sheep. Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Beatrice Fenton.

Impact Podcasts
Girl Talk: Ep. 3 Controversial Female Figures

Impact Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 21, 2022 36:30


Welcome to Girl Talk, a safe space for female and non-binary students at the University of Nottingham to come together and share experiences. This is a place for the light-hearted to the heavy, from music to politics and business to film. In today's episode, Hannah, Amelia, and Cora discuss whether highly successful female figures should be celebrated by feminists if their actions are antifeminist. They take the case studies of Margaret Thatcher and Priti Patel to delve into this topic. Featured image courtesy of Charlotte Smith and Impact Podcasts via Canva. Music: Leopard Print Elevator by Kevin MacLeod Link: incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/3974-le…int-elevator License: filmmusic.io/standard-license

The Flower Podcast
Having a Profitable Mindset with Charlotte Smith

The Flower Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 21, 2022 62:36


Our guest this week is Charlotte Smith and she teaches farmers the skills they need to make money on their farms AND live calm, balanced lives through mindset coaching. Going against what most of us have been taught, Charlotte coaches in 13 countries to build successful profitable farms while also getting out from feeling overwhelmed, stressed and anxious. In 2016, Charlotte was named one of the Top 25 Most Influential Women in the World in Food and Agriculture by the non-profit, Food Tank and she is giving us a little dose of her coaching today on The Flower Podcast.   Learn more about Charlotte and all of our past guests on TheFlowerPodcast.com Also Subscribe on your favorite podcast platform. We are available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, Amazon Music, Gaana, and many more! Subscribe to our YouTube Channel for access to all of our Zoom chats, tutorials, IG Lives, and video extras. Sponsors of The Flower Podcast Curate Accent Decor Garden Roses Direct ASCFG Florabundance, Inc. Intrigued Experience Conference Rooted Farmers Real Flower Business

Costing the Earth
The Right to Swim

Costing the Earth

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 1, 2022 27:58


On a hot summer's day the River Wharfe in Ilkley in West Yorkshire is a tempting place to swim. In 2020 it was designated as the first inland waterway to be safe for bathing. Just over a year later the water was found to be polluted by animal and human faeces and locals and tourists were advised to stay out of the river. The River Wharfe certainly isn't unique, Britain's rivers are taking the brunt of rising populations, antiquated sewage treatment and intensive agriculture. Too much waste- human, animal and chemical- is entering our rivers, exposing swimmers and wildlife to infection. Extreme weather as experienced in February is only making matters worse. Charlotte Smith and Caz Graham search for solutions to Britain's polluted rivers. Producer: Hermeet Chadha

The Bridgeton Beacon
Oberlin Smith

The Bridgeton Beacon

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 8:53


Oberlin Smith was born in Cincinnati, Ohio on March. 22, 1840 to George R. and Salome (Kemp) Smith. Both his parents were natives of England, and his father was a leader in the early anti-slavery works of Salmon P. Chase and operated a link in the Pre-Civil War "underground railroad". Oberlin Smith's unusual first name likely reflected his parent's abolitionist sentiments, and to honor a friend of his father's who had founded Oberlin College. Oberlin was the older of four siblings, having a brother Frederick, and two sisters Emily and Mary. His first cousin was Robert Longsdon, partner of Sir Henry Bessemer, and co inventor of the Bessemer process of steel manufacture. Young Oberlin displayed an early mechanical aptitude, and built a working steam engine at the age of fifteen, most likely while learning metalworking at one of the city's riverboat engine yard, while being educated in the public and technical schools of Cleveland. By 1873, Webb amicably left the partnership to pursue his career in academia, starting as a professor of mathematics at the University of Michigan, and later an engineering professor at Indiana, Cornell, and Stevens Institute. Smith and Webb crossed professional paths several times until Webb's death in 1912. Smith brought in his younger brother Frederick as a replacement partner, and committed his facilities to the manufacture of foot-driven presses for canning enterprises, and began advertising in industrial periodicals. Within three years, he designed a version for belt-power hookup; seventy-two machines of both varieties and in four models sold during 1874-76, three of which went to international customers in Canada, Australia, and Sweden. Oberlin Smith met Miss Charlotte E. Hill while she was teaching at the Ivy Hall School for Girls in Bridgeton. They were married on Christmas Day, 1876 in Bernardston Mass. Two children were born to Oberlin and Charlotte Smith; Winifred Hill in 1878 and Percival Hill in 1880. David Sheppard House In 1877, the small business was incorporated as the Ferracute Machine Company and moved to an old brick factory site on the eastern shore of East Lake in Bridgeton. The company engaged in the manufacture of various forms of machinery, including many of his Smith's own inventions. Ferracute Machine Co. specialized in the manufacture presses for working metals. Over the sixty-three years of Oberlin Smith's tenure as chief engineer and president of Ferracute, he designed over five hundred kinds and sizes, and obtained over fifty patents on these designs alone. While most of Mr. Smith's inventions related to presswork, there were several in entirely outside fields. Among them were such widely divergent lines as improved looms, dump carts, keyless locks, automatic garage door openers and egg boiling. In 1883 he achieved considerable publicity through the invention of a magneto-electric phonograph. Citizens of Bridgeton bear witness to Mr. Smith's having frequently driven through the streets of town in a motor propelled vehicle long before the days of automobiles. Oberlin Smith was a prolific writer and lecturer, his works covering science, fiction and even theology. He published two books, "Press Working of Metals" still considered to be an authoritative work on the subject, and a metaphysics work, "Tho Material, Why Not Immortal?" Other interests that Oberlin Smith enjoyed were rowing, motoring, dancing, and golf, most of which he was active in well in the later years of his life. Join local conversations with the "beacons' of Bridgeton, New Jersey at https://bridgetonbeacon.com YouTube: https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PL8VBp2FMg5KKl5irPJc02YzacOkzURgnK Podcast clips on Instagram: https://tinyurl.com/NichePodcastClipstagram Podcast

The Sports Deli Podcast - Where Everyone Deserves a Seat at the Table; An Anti-Racist, Equality Pod
National Champion and Former WNBA Player - Sylvia Crawley Joined Hoot in The Sports Deli Podcast for this Incredible 2-Part Series - S2:E70:P1

The Sports Deli Podcast - Where Everyone Deserves a Seat at the Table; An Anti-Racist, Equality Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2021 29:17


Former NCAA Champion and WNBA star, Sylvia Crawley, chronicles in detail her and her teammates National Championship run in 1994 in Part 1 of this 2-Part Podcast. The Tar Heels' Charlotte Smith hit the game winner on a baseline out of bounds play with .7 seconds remaining. You don't want to miss this incredible conversation and why Sylvia feels that losing twice to Virginia while losing the rebounding battle during one of their wins causing them to do 23 suicides the next day at practice helped them win the National Title. She also feels that her legendary coach, Sylvia Hatchell was instrumental in leading the charge. In part 2, Sylvia and Hoot discuss her childhood and how she learned to be tough and never quit from her parents, in particular her father, who worked for the Wheeling Pittsburgh Steel Mill. You don't want to miss our very famous rapid fire, "This or That" at the end where she reveals her thoughts on Paige, Candace, Kobe, Pat, and other influencers in the Women's basketball space as well as if she prefers popcorn or candy at the movies and French toast, waffles, or pancakes. Check it out where ever you listen to your audio podcasts: (Now on) AUDIBLE: https://lnkd.in/gXAwci_9 Google: https://lnkd.in/gDN-XnKU iHeart: https://lnkd.in/e8SzqHz Apple: https://lnkd.in/gDdqxh8b Spotify: https://lnkd.in/gzR3peVj Check out the Video Podcast at: YOUTUBE: https://lnkd.in/gdUy4iH #UNC #TarHeels #NCAA #WomensBasketball #Basketball #CollegeBasketball #ESPN #ESPNW #CBSSports #ABCSports #D1 #FoxSports #NBCSports #YahooSports #BlackLivesMatter #WNBA #Coaching #NorthCarolina #Sports #Podcast #Podcasting #Podcasts #SportsPodcasting #SportsPodcast #NationalChampionship #NationalChampions #NationalChamps #BetonWomen #Equality #thefemalelead #womensupportingwomen --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/the-sports-deli/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/the-sports-deli/support

A Cuppa Tea with the DBE
Halloween Bonus-Mini: The Ghosts of Hampton Court Palace

A Cuppa Tea with the DBE

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 4:09


Join us this week for a special mini-episode to get you in the Halloween spirit!Georgia is joined by Charlotte Smith from Colorado's Mary Wollstonecraft chapter to talk about the ghosts of Hampton Court Palace, including two of Henry VIII's wives, Jane Seymour and Catherine Howard. If you would like to learn more about the DBE, or are interested in becoming a member, you can find us online at www.dbenational.org.If you have any questions or comments about this episode, you can email us at podcast@dbenational.org.You can follow us on social media:Facebook: facebook.com/dbenationalInstagram: @dbenational1909Pinterest: pinterest.com/dbenationalThe Daughters of the British Empire is a 501(c)3 nonprofit American society of women of British or Commonwealth birth or ancestry. We share and promote our heritage while supporting local charities and our senior facilities across the United States. 

habibti please
Episode 35 with Encampment Support Network Toronto

habibti please

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2021 42:34


Two weeks ago hundreds of police officers and parapolice descended upon Trinity Bellwoods park in Toronto to violently evict the residents living there, displacing people from their homes and severing communities. Toronto has been cruel and brutal to the people living in this city. The austerity measures put in place using the pandemic as an excuse for imposing cruelty will not suddenly dissipate after the pandemic “ends.” It is important to note how the pandemic continues to ravage other places in the world. Many are under the illusion that it is near the end because of the inequitable global vaccine rollout and apartheid. While companies thrived, many have died. This episode was done in collaboration with the Encampment Support Network (ESN) in Toronto. We worked with Charlotte, an outreach volunteer with ESN. We discussed the evictions at Lamport Stadium that took place in May which involved a bulldozer to forcibly remove residents. Throughout the pandemic Encampment Support Network Toronto has provided help for people in encampment sites. Right now in the city, there is increasing pressure to re-open, and we must reckon with what reopening and “back to normal” means for those most disenfranchised. Public officials informed the “general public” to socially distance, while at the same time pushing unhoused people to live in crowded shelters and shelter hotels where the virus was spreading and killing. There are a number of obscene contradictions like this that reveal how people in power intentionally make others live in deplorable conditions to die.The lives of unhoused people do not matter to Mayor John Tory and downtown City Councillor Joe Cressy. Although many have known this for far too long, it has again become blatantly obvious this week. Who we let live and who we let die speaks volumes about our society and cities. Depredation and violence by capitalists and the governments that back them were fully demonstrated viscerally throughout the pandemic and should not be surprising. The pandemic again brought this out revealing sores in the underbelly of Toronto brought about by austerity measures. Entire populations are subjected to death and disease by choice. Laid bare by the pandemic are the conditions which have always existed for those marginalized by the state. Capitalism is functioning as it should be, and the pandemic has only accelerated its efficiency. The proliferation of narratives by people like high-ranking public servant Brad Ross claiming the park was “dirty” continues to push the selective disposal of human beings. They want you to imagine that people who live in encampments are unclean but also disposable; not worthy of public space or full lives.  As Zoë Dodd posted, “people are not garbage.”As Dodd and many others have pointed out these were people's homes. Dodd also reminds us how violence is a spectacle and more specifically how words like “safety” are weaponized against those who are cash poor. Parks are public spaces and necessary. Parks are a space of life, however, the City appears to only want some to enjoy parks while others must be dispossessed of public space. As Alex V. Green reminds us, parks are a site and space for so much life. The violent clearing events at Trinity Bellwoods serve as a harbinger. Austerity and privatization are in full effect as the means with exterminism as the goal. It is reasonable to expect that the new austerity and security measures are here to stay “post” pandemic. The city attempted media rehabilitation after images of the full force of their violence turned public opinion against their immorality,  claiming there were public health issues and that people in the encampment were offered housing. This is false: only one individual was offered housing. It is important that we cut to the truth and do not cast doubt on the City of Toronto's violence and injustice by their spin and narratives. This episode highlights how encampments are an alternative for so many and the reasons behind that. It also speaks to the work Encampment Support Network Toronto is doing. This episode discusses the tactics deployed by the city, police, and para-police. It also highlights how people can and do care for each other.In these moments, it is also vital to connect our discontents. We will continue to bear witness to evictions and mutations of evictions. It is necessary that we understand the global nature of clearing people. There is creative destruction in so many urban environments, but also an urbanization that has cultivated a specific desire for a specific class of citizen that the nation desires. Here, it is the rich who are desirable. It is impossible for low-income and marginalized populations to live in cities or centers of cities. Pulling from Henri Lefebvre, it is a necessity to think about who has the right to the city, the right to everything urban life offers. We deserve cities that offer life to all residents. These discontents should never neglect this struggle globally. Presently in Silwan village in East Jerusalem, thousands of Palestinians are losing their homes and even being forced to destroy their own homes. Capitalism, white supremacy, and fascism yield a massive graveyard. Criminalizing poverty is a war on people. The war on drugs is a war on people. Only through connecting our oppressions will we move forward. We do all owe each other so much, and so many deserve so much better.This is a free episode, but we hope people who are able to consider donating to groups in the mutual aid section of the shownotes. We also hope people support Idle No More, other Indigenous organizations, movements, and people in their calls to #CancelCanadaDay. You can learn more here. Habibti Please is proud to be part of the Harbinger Media Network, this episode was graciously edited by executive director Andre Goulet. The Harbinger Media Network is working towards building a left media ecosystem in Canada and we urge you to check it out if that's your thing! We are also grateful to partner with Canadian Dimension.Mutual Aid & Community Support:Although this episode is not paywalled we would deeply appreciate it if people would share or give (if able to do so) to any of the causes or groups listed below. The Encampment Support Network Toronto (ESN)  is an ad-hoc, volunteer-run network supporting people living in encampments in 6 locations throughout Toronto. This includes ESN Parkdale, ESN Trinity Bellwoods, ESN Scadding Court, ESN Moss Park, ESN LNP, and ESN Cherry Beach. We advocate for better conditions in encampments, report on city conditions and activity in encampments, and advocate for long-term permanent housing for people in their communities of choice. ESN also collects and compiles feedback from residents to support our advocacy efforts and continues to pressure the city to develop real solutions to the housing crisis. The only way to provide effective support and find solutions is by listening to and centring the needs of people experiencing homelessness.You can support their work here. website:https://www.encampmentsupportnetwork.com/instagram: https://www.instagram.com/esn.to.4real/twitter: https://twitter.com/esn_toyoutube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC0ZLEEETJXZtA4kSv6W7qJAThis Way Up Collective is a group of queer and trans BIPOC youth that are on the ground providing mutual aid. Taken from their website: “our goal is to actively engage the communities that we are a part of and fill in the gaps wherever possible. We support encampments, youth in shelters, and anyone in need via care packages, weekly hot meal drops, and community arts programming.” * they are one of the groups that have been helping provide meals to encampment residents and doing amazing work. You can support their work here. website: https://www.thiswayup.ca/instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thiswayupcollective/Toronto Indigenous Harm Reduction (TIHR) emerged in April 2020 during the first wave of the COVID19 pandemic in response to a massive shutdown of frontline services and a lack of basic needs for Indigenous houseless folks in the city of Toronto. Over the past year, we have provided basic needs, access to critical health support & covid 19 testing, harm reduction supplies, sexual, reproductive health and prenatal support, traditional medicines, traditional food, expressive arts, and ceremony to some of our most vulnerable people. TIHR aims to reduce the negative impacts of substance use and other stigmatized behaviours and experiences through culture and unconditional support. TIHR is an entirely queer and Two-Spirit Indigenous collective founded by Nanook Gordon, co-led by Brianna Olson Pitawanakwat and Lua Mondor, and supported by Dashmaawaan Bemadzinjin (They feed the people) and countless volunteers.To date they have served over 3,000 meals to the encampments and Indigenous street folks. You can support their work here.website: https://www.torontoindigenoushr.com/facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TorontoIndigenousHarmReductioninstagram: https://www.instagram.com/torontoindigenousharmreduction/Additional Resources:Some resources that complement this episode: Take action with the #NoEncampmentEvictions toolkitESN Toronto NewslettersWe Are Not the Virus PodcastFixing the housing crisis will mean treating shelter as a right—not a commodity by David MoscropEviction at Trinity Bellwoods repeats history by Cathy CroweDemolishing Palestinian homes for an Israeli religious theme park by Al JazeeraGuest Information Guests of the Week: Charlotte Smith of Encampment Support Network TorontoCharlotte is an outreach volunteer with the Encampment Support Network in Toronto, Ontario. The Encampment Support Network Toronto (ESN)  is an ad-hoc, volunteer-run network supporting people living in encampments in 6 locations throughout Toronto. This includes ESN Parkdale, ESN Trinity Bellwoods, ESN Scadding Court, ESN Moss Park, ESN LNP and ESN Cherry Beach. We advocate for better conditions in encampments, report on city conditions and activity in encampments, and advocate for long term permanent housing for people in their communities of choice. ESN also collects and compiles feedback from residents to support our advocacy efforts and continues to pressure the city to develop real solutions to the housing crisis. The only way to provide effective support and find solutions is by listening to and centring the needs of people experiencing homelessness.Production Credits:Hosted by Nashwa Lina Khan Show Music by Johnny Zapras and postXamericaArt for Habibti Please by postXamericaProduction by Andre GouletProduction Assistance by Charlotte Smith, Ali McKnight, Nashwa Lina Khan, and Canadian DimensionSocial Media & Support:Follow us on Twitter @habibtipleaseSupport us on PatreonSubscribe to us on Substack This is a public episode. If you'd like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit habibtiplease.substack.com/subscribe

Notes To My (Legal) Self
Season 2, Episode 15: Limitless Mindsets to Elevate Your Legal Career with Charlotte Smith

Notes To My (Legal) Self

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2021 29:35


Charlotte Smith is a former lawyer and professionally certified leadership coach. Starting her career at a top-tier UK law firm, she now resides in Silicon Valley coaching lawyer leaders from around the globe. Charlotte is the premier lawyer coach for the next generation of leaders in the law. She takes general counsels, in-house counsel, attorneys, legal operators, and lawyer entrepreneurs, on a transformational journey to let go of feeling stifled, so that they can create a life and career which is in alignment with who they truly are. She supports her clients to harness their true potential on the journey of becoming who they are meant to be, as leaders, and as individuals. In this episode, we discuss how to overcome common mindset challenges facing lawyers. How does mindset impact performance when it comes to our legal careers? How can we be more aware of our mindsets? Imposter syndrome impacts many lawyers. Why is that, and what can we do about it, as individuals and as leaders?

The Lawyer's Escape Pod
Charlotte Smith goes from employment attorney to life design coach for lawyers

The Lawyer's Escape Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2020 45:34


Charlotte Smith is a former UK employment attorney who now runs her own business coaching lawyers in her Life Design for Lawyers program. You can also check out her podcast, Limitless Lawyer. Charlotte tells us about her journey away from practicing law. She followed the breadcrumb path of her interests and intuition to her new career. It wasn't always smooth, but these paths often aren't. Charlotte's core message to lawyers is that anything is possible, and you should design your life around what you want - rather than letting life happen to you. In this episode, we discuss: Charlotte was on the traditional path in employment law, finding success When faced with the opportunity to be made partner, she stopped for the first time to ask “is this what I actually want?” Charlotte was a food blogger on the side, which exposed her to a different, creative universe   A move to California from the UK gave Charlotte an opportunity to reconsider her path Pulling together her various interests, she landed as a partner at a creative agency  Finding that position was serendipitous: but that only happens when you've laid some groundwork The transition was not all smooth sailing; clarity does not always come in a straight line Charlotte did deep dive on her purpose; worked with a career coach It is important to identify and push through limiting beliefs Life is too short to be unhappy or to play small Charlotte highly valued autonomy - and realized she had to design a life with that in mind She started her own coaching business - Life Design For Lawyers Remember the mantra: Everything is possible Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thelawyersescapepod/  Website: www.thelawyersescapepod.com Guest Websites: https://www.charlotte-smith.com/ https://limitless-lawyer.com/