Podcasts about Terrific

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Copy link to clipboard
  • 738PODCASTS
  • 1,148EPISODES
  • 45mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Dec 3, 2021LATEST

POPULARITY

20112012201320142015201620172018201920202021


Best podcasts about Terrific

Show all podcasts related to terrific

Latest podcast episodes about Terrific

Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes
In the News.. oral insulin tested for T1D, FDA looks at new tubeless pump, Bigfoot Clinic Hub & more!

Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 6:16


It's "In the News..." the only diabetes newscast. Top stories this week include: #T1D oral insulin study moves ahead, FDA gives breakthrough designation to new SIGI tubeless pump, study shines light on PBM profits, China demands huge drop in insulin prices and Bigfoot Biomedical launches their Clinic Hub -- Join us LIVE every Wednesday at 4:30pm EST Check out Stacey's book: The World's Worst Diabetes Mom! Join the Diabetes Connections Facebook Group! Sign up for our newsletter here ----- Use this link to get one free download and one free month of Audible, available to Diabetes Connections listeners! ----- Get the App and listen to Diabetes Connections wherever you go! Episode transcription below:  Click here for iPhone      Click here for Android   Hello and welcome to Diabetes Connections In the News! I'm Stacey Simms and these are the top diabetes stories and headlines of the past seven days. As always, I'm going to link up my sources in the Facebook comments – where we are live – we are also Live on YouTube and in the show notes at d-c dot com when this airs as a podcast.. XX In the News is brought to you by The World's Worst Diabetes Mom, Real life stories of raising a child with diabetes. Winner of the American Book Fest Prize for best new non-fiction. Available in paperback, on Kindle or as an audio book – all at Amazon.com. You can also get a big discount right now at diabetes-connections.com – use promo code celebrate to save $4 XX Our top story this week.. More good news for mice.. and maybe some day for people. Yale researchers are looking at an oral medication for type 1 diabetes. These lucky mice had metabolic function restored and inflammation reversed. There are a lot of studies going on to make oral insulin work – liquid insulin is destroyed in the stomach before it hits the bloodstream. This research involves a nanoparticle drug vehicle that can not only bring insulin to the pancreas safely, but the casing itself has therapeutic benefits. It's made out of an acid that seems to reduce the rogue immune cells that destroy the beta cells in the first place. The team says that the nanoparticles could also be used to carry other molecules, which could help with other conditions. https://newatlas.com/medical/oral-insulin-pill-prevents-type-1-diabetes/ XX A new tubeless pump is making its way through the US regulatory process. The FDA gives breakthrough device designation to AMF Medical's Sigi (SIG-ee) Insulin Management System. This is a patch pump, like Omnipod, but it's rechargeable and re-usable – you get two so you don't have to go without while it's charging. It's also an ACE pump, that's alternate control enabled which means it can interact with CGMs and controller devices like smartphones. This designation isn't FDA approval, but it should speed up the review. In the press release the company says, “Clinical study data has shown that Sigi™ is delightfully easy to use.” Which is kind of a nice thing to see in a write up like this. https://sigipump.com/amf-medical-receives-fda-breakthrough-device-designation-nbspfor-its-sigi-insulin-management-system/ XX Big news from the UK this week – they announced everyone in England with type 1 will be eligible for CGMs covered by the National Health Service there. This was preceeded by coverage for the Libre flash glucose monitor. That program was supposed to start at 20% but almost 50% of people with type 1 have opted in and the results in terms of better health and lower a1cs have really been outstanding. Next up, leaders there say they want CGM covered for anyone using insulin, regardless of diabetes type. https://pharmaceutical-journal.com/article/news/nice-proposes-wider-use-of-glucose-monitoring-devices-for-type-1-diabetes XX New research into insulin pricing is shining a light on the middle men.. many of us have known about PBMs for a long time. Researchers at USC found that drugmakers' share of revenue from insulin sales has dropped in recent years — and a greater share is being siphoned off by pharmacy benefit managers, drugstores, wholesalers and insurers. In 2014, 30% of insulin revenue went to PBMs. By 2018, those same middlemen were receiving 53%. Terrific write up as usual by David Lazurs in the LA Times – he lives with type 1 and I always love his stuff. I'll link this one up. The researchers here say since the PBMs are getting a greater share, there's pressure on the drug's manufacturers to keep raising prices so their own profits don't suffer. It's worth noting that these findings were possible because of newer state laws bringing greater transparency to insulin sales. https://www.latimes.com/business/story/2021-11-30/lazarus-healthcare-insulin-prices XX What works to bring down the price of insulin? Ask China. They decided a round of price cuts is due and as a result, 42 insulin products from companies in China and abroad took an average 48% price drop. Otherwise, they wouldn't have been used in that country's public hospitals. Lilly gave up the largest discount: After a 75% reduction, the price of Humalog went down to about $3 per pen. China has been making pharma cut prices for the last few years for other medications. This is the first time insulin has really been affected. https://www.fiercepharma.com/pharma-asia/novo-nordisk-sanofi-eli-lilly-cut-insulin-price-china-s-latest-vbp-off-patent-drugs XX Bigfoot releases some information and reaction to their Clinic Hub. This is how endos and clinics use the data from the Bigfoot Unity System to support patients. Unity launched this summer – it's their smart pen program. When you think about multiple daily injections whether it's for type 1 or type 2.. it's hard for health care providers to see what's going on day to day.. are doses correct, when they're giving, etc. Unity can also include CGM data. This is the launch phase of Clinic Hub.. Bigfoot says they've also added streamlined patient onboarding and more flexibility for patient updates and prescription management. https://www.drugdeliverybusiness.com/bigfoot-biomedical-touts-cloud-based-program-for-managing-diabetes/ XX I'm including the Vertex news here.. we reported this back in October but you probably had everyone you know send you that New York Times article about a cure for type 1 – at least in one guy.. I won't rehash everything here..  it's about stem cells, one patient off insulin but on immunosuppressive drugs..  Personally, I'm very hopeful, but the Times write up overly simplified a lot of this, in my opinion. Good write up in Healthline that I'll link to. https://www.healthline.com/diabetesmine/vertex-type-1-diabetes-research XX In the UK lots of attention on their Strictly Come Dancing competition… when it became apparent contestant Nikita Kuzmin wasn't hiding the Libra glucose monitor on his arm. He wasn't hiding much.. he took off his shirt for this performance. Loads of social media comments applauding him.. for both. By the way, his dance partner, Tilly Ramsey is the daughter of professional chef Gordon Ramsey.. and they were eliminated from the show this round. https://www.express.co.uk/life-style/health/1528577/strictly-come-dancing-nikita-kuzmin-health-diabetes-type-1-symptoms -- quick reminder that the podcast this week is with the UK co-lead on diabetes, Dr Partha Kar. We had a great chat about access and their Libre program and his whole philosophy.. really fun episode. Next week you'll hear from the folks at ConvaTec, they make almost all the pump insets and they have some great info for us all. you can listen to wherever you get your podcasts or if you're listening to this as on a podcast app, just go back an episode. That's In the News for this week.. if you like it, please share it! Thanks for joining me! See you back here soon.

FIFTEEN MINUTE FILM FANATICS
One Shot: Mike Not Impressed by Benedict Cumberbatch

FIFTEEN MINUTE FILM FANATICS

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 8:04


For about a year, Mike has been evasive when asked about Benedict Cumberbatch.  In this short episode, he unburthens himself of his feelings about the man whom some regard as one of our greatest living actors.  Is Cumberbatch overrated?  Is his praise undeserved?  Is Mike wrong?  Don your Dr. Strange cape and your Sherlock hat and give it a listen!   Please follow or subscribe to the show wherever you get your podcasts and on Twitter @15MinFilm.  You can also contact us at FifteenMinuteFilm@gmail.com, and support the show with a buck or two at Venmo @FifteenMinuteFiIm.  All proceeds go right back to the show! Terrific bumper music by Jackson Frederick Smith. URL: http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Jackson_F_Smith/Jackson_Frederick_Smith/Cantina_Rag Comments: http://freemusicarchive.org/ Curator: The Beehive Recording Company Copyright: Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States: http:// 

The Max Kellerman Show
Hour 1: Still Terrific

The Max Kellerman Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 43:23


Tom Brady and the Buccaneers handily beat the Giants on Monday Night Football. Who do you trust more to make it back to the Super Bowl: the Bucs or the Chiefs? Also, LeBron James was only suspended for 1 game following his altercation with Isaiah Stewart, which Jay disagrees with. Plus, Key's Real Rankings & Dan Graziano joins to play Overreaction or Not and Overreaction!

Keyshawn, JWill & Max
Hour 1: Still Terrific

Keyshawn, JWill & Max

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 43:23


Tom Brady and the Buccaneers handily beat the Giants on Monday Night Football. Who do you trust more to make it back to the Super Bowl: the Bucs or the Chiefs? Also, LeBron James was only suspended for 1 game following his altercation with Isaiah Stewart, which Jay disagrees with. Plus, Key's Real Rankings & Dan Graziano joins to play Overreaction or Not and Overreaction!

Mornings with Keyshawn, LZ and Travis
Hour 1: Still Terrific

Mornings with Keyshawn, LZ and Travis

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 43:23


Tom Brady and the Buccaneers handily beat the Giants on Monday Night Football. Who do you trust more to make it back to the Super Bowl: the Bucs or the Chiefs? Also, LeBron James was only suspended for 1 game following his altercation with Isaiah Stewart, which Jay disagrees with. Plus, Key's Real Rankings & Dan Graziano joins to play Overreaction or Not and Overreaction!

The Stephen A. Smith Show
Hour 1: Still Terrific

The Stephen A. Smith Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 43:23


Tom Brady and the Buccaneers handily beat the Giants on Monday Night Football. Who do you trust more to make it back to the Super Bowl: the Bucs or the Chiefs? Also, LeBron James was only suspended for 1 game following his altercation with Isaiah Stewart, which Jay disagrees with. Plus, Key's Real Rankings & Dan Graziano joins to play Overreaction or Not and Overreaction!

Golic and Wingo
Hour 1: Still Terrific

Golic and Wingo

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 43:23


Tom Brady and the Buccaneers handily beat the Giants on Monday Night Football. Who do you trust more to make it back to the Super Bowl: the Bucs or the Chiefs? Also, LeBron James was only suspended for 1 game following his altercation with Isaiah Stewart, which Jay disagrees with. Plus, Key's Real Rankings & Dan Graziano joins to play Overreaction or Not and Overreaction!

Double Threat with Julie Klausner & Tom Scharpling
Gee, Your Hair Smells Terrific (with Margaret Cho)

Double Threat with Julie Klausner & Tom Scharpling

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 110:51


Legendary standup Margaret Cho joins Tom and Julie to rank bread baskets, talk shampoo bottle aesthetics, and watch GWAR on Joan Rivers. Plus a certified legendary segment in which Tom and Julie teach you how to successfully pitch a TV show. Also Julie's review of Clifford the Big Red Dog, can presidents drive, Uber Scooch, I'm Surrounded By Morons, ROFL, Todd Phillips' iPod, Woody Allen's Subterranean Homesick Blues, microwave popcorn tips, The 100 Laugh Guarantee, basic bitches, relatable references, Yellowstone, Yogi Bear, Geordi La Forge and Abraham Lincoln, Rogan the Rocky Snowman, James Hetfield's hair vs Dave Mustaine's hair, and Word-A-Day desktop calendars.SEE MARGARET CHO LIVE:https://margaretcho.comLISTEN TO DOUBLE THREAT AD-FREE ON FOREVER DOG PLUS:http://foreverdogpodcasts.com/plusDOUBLE THREAT MERCH:https://www.teepublic.com/stores/double-threatSEND SUBMISSIONS TO:DoubleThreatPod@gmail.comFOLLOW DOUBLE THREAT:https://twitter.com/doublethreatpodhttps://www.instagram.com/doublethreatpodDOUBLE THREAT IS A FOREVER DOG PODCAST:https://foreverdogpodcasts.com/podcasts/double-threatTheme song by Mike KrolArtwork by Michael KuppermanSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

BiggerPockets Daily
404 - Is That Turnkey Deal Terrific—Or a Real Stinker? Here's How to Know by Engelo Rumora

BiggerPockets Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 13:05


https://www.biggerpockets.com/blog/turnkey-analysis-real-estateSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Goat Gab
Terrific Tucson

Goat Gab

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 70:56


On this episode of Goat Gab, Cameron and Laura are joined by special guest Kim Gatliff, who brought her unique energy and excitement to the 2021 ADGA Convention, recently held in Tucson, AZ.  Our upbeat conversation touches on a brief overview of convention highlights.

Cool and Crazy Cats
Terrific Tigers

Cool and Crazy Cats

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 6:14


Hello, and welcome back to Cool and Crazy Cats this week! This week's cool and crazy episode will feature a famous orange and black striped feline, the terrific tiger! Just like in last week's episode, you will get to learn about a tiger's habitat, physical traits, lifestyle, and many more wild things about tigers! Press play to learn more about cats today! Meow! Source: Smithsonian's National Zoo and Conservation Biology Institute. (2021, May 12). Tiger. Smithsonian's National Zoo. Retrieved November 16, 2021, from https://nationalzoo.si.edu/animals/tiger

You Seem Interesting
You Seem Interesting Season 2 Episode 18: Crowd Investing, The SMBX & Ben Lozano

You Seem Interesting

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 39:37


What if you could invest in a local business? A restaurant you liked? A brewery? A pet store? What if you could earn money while supporting local entrepreneurs? Well, thanks to our guest Ben Lozano and https://thesmbx.com/ (The SMBX), now you can. Ben was terrific on a range of topics from the new opportunities for a new class of investors, what a company must go through to be able to partner with The SMBX, and helping would be investors understand that this process is on the same plane as other stock and investment transactions. Terrific conversation about a really exciting company. This podcast uses the following third-party services for analysis: Chartable - https://chartable.com/privacy Support this podcast

The Earth Station DCU Podcast
The Earth Station DCU Episode 261 – Magical Thinking

The Earth Station DCU Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 86:19


This Week on Earth Station DCU! Drew Leiter and Cletus do some Magical Thinking! Does Harvey Dent become the hero of Gotham or the monster of Gotham...find out in Batman '89 #3. Lady Bane kidnaps Jim Gordon and then reveals her origin in The Joker #8. The Titans must battle a powered-up Kiteman and then investigate a mysterious lab in Titans United #2. Blue Beetle and Booster Gold take on Omnizon who has claimed the Earth as part of her kingdom in Blue & Gold #3. When a kid kills the villain Anarchy, Jace goes on an investigation to discover the identity of a new villain named Seer in I Am Batman #2. It's a trap in Justice League: Last Ride #6. Superman takes on Ultra-humanite in Superman & The Authority #4. Mr. Terrific becomes a parent in Strange Adventures #12. Diana returns from the afterlife in Wonder Woman #780. All this plus, DC News, DC TV, Shout Outs, and much, much more! ------------------------ Table of Contents 0:00:00 Show Open 0:01:28 DC News 0:10:17 Batman '89 #3 0:14:24 The Joker #8 0:21:08 Titans United #2 0:25:00 Blue & Gold #3 0:28:49 I Am Batman #2 0:33:48 Justice League: Last Ride #6 0:37:06 Superman & The Authority #4 0:41:02 Strange Adventures #12 0:47:30 Batman: Urban Legends #8 0:56:12 Wonder Woman #780 1:02:01 Supergirl S6 Ep14 – Magical Thinking 1:05:34 Stargirl S2 Ep9 – Summer School: Chapter Nine 1:10:28 Titans S3 Ep6 – Lady Vic 1:16:58 Y: The Last Man S1 Ep4 – Karen and Benji 1:21:52 Show Close   Links Batman '89 #3 The Joker #8 Titans United #2 Blue & Gold #3 I Am Batman #2 Justice League: Last Ride #6 Superman & The Authority #4 Strange Adventures #12 Batman: Urban Legends #8 Wonder Woman #780 Booster Gold (1986-1988) #1 (Cletus's Read More Comics Pick) Earth Station One Tales of the Station Earth Station One Tales of the Station Vol. 2 The Chameleon Chronicles: Colors of Fate The Chameleon Chronicles: Sisters of the Thorn Want to Donate to the Show or Sponsor our Comics Talk for this week? No problem! Just click on the donate button below! If you would like to leave feedback, comment on the show, or would like us to give you a shout out, please call the ESDCU feedback line at (317) 564-9133 (remember long distance charges may apply) or feel free to email us @ earthstationdcu@gmail.com

The Art of Relationships Show
What Make Sex Terrific

The Art of Relationships Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 31:03


Marriage, Sex, Love and Relationship Advice from a Real Professional!Greg Dudzinski, MS, LPC is known as “Detroit's Love Guru.” The Art of Relationships Show is about helping you achieve the “relationship you've always craved!” Greg's passion is helping others. He offers a down to earth approach to obtain real results. Greg's passion is healing broken hearts, repairing relationships, plus increasing your sexual fulfillment. He has also appeared on TV, Radio, and is an author. Weekly videos on love, marriage, sex and much more! Let's find your spark!Greg is a fully licensed professional Counselor and Relationship & Sex Specialist. Like me on Facebook! @detroitsloveguruFollow me on Instagram! @detroitsloveguruFollow me on Twitter! @detroitloveguruBuy my book – Love, Sex & Everything In Between: A Relationship Guide https://www.amazon.com/dp/0578241692Take my 28 Days to Ignite Your Relationship course! ON SALE $37 (Original $99) https://bit.ly/33tPCHw Buy Love Intentionally merch! https://bit.ly/32pRh1ASupporters:www.DFWNplc.com (Family & Personal Injury Lawyers)Dan Williams: Cell: 313-421-8083 Bio: https://fowlerandwilliams.com/daniel-williams/Aimee Fowler: Cell: 313-421-6069 Bio: https://fowlerandwilliams.com/aimee-fowler/www.ihatepeople.club (real funny items!)

Catchin Dubs Podcast
55. Recapping the Warriors terrific start with Joe Viray

Catchin Dubs Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 33:07


On this new episode Zach and Ethan welcome on Warriors writer Joe Viray. The guys talk about the Warriors 5-1 start and give some rest of the season expectations as well. Follow Joe Twitter - JoeVirayNBA Follow us Twitter - dubspod Instagram - catchindubspod --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/catchindubspodcast/support

THE RAMBLING VIKING!
#240 The Terrific Tesla Test Drive!

THE RAMBLING VIKING!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 61:21


In this dose of weird I recount my Tesla test drive, yes you read that correctly, I drove a Tesla and you can too! After the test drive my perspective shifted on them and while I'm not getting one anytime soon I would seriously consider one down the line and think they really are revolutionizing the way we view cars and driving. If you have driven one or have an experience with Tesla I would love to get that story, reach out or send it in! The Website with the info Tesla Cost to Charge Model Y Crash Test Matt's Off Road Recovery --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/theramblingviking/support

通勤學英語
15mins Live Podcast直播 - 鼓勵(祝人好運)與讚賞人可以如何說? Other ways to wish people good luck and a job well done

通勤學英語

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 80:40


歡迎通勤家族 週一晚上9pm,在Clubhouse上跟我與Peddy一同閒聊、練習英語!快加入 15Mins 通勤學英語直播室吧~   主題 - 鼓勵(祝人好運)與讚賞人可以如何說? Other Ways to Say “Good Luck” Best of luck! Finger crossed! I hope it all goes well! Break a leg! You'll do great! Knock ‘em dead. You'll do great. Let me know how it went. Blow them away.   Ways to Say GOOD JOB or VERY GOOD You're on the right track now! I'm very proud of you. You're really working hard today. Good work! You're doing a good job. I knew you could do it. Congratulations! Nice going. Keep up the good work. Terrific!   演練時間: Apply the phrases 請對你的練習夥伴使用以上的祝福語 他升職了 他即將要去大老闆面前簡報 他結婚了 / 他懷孕了 / 生小孩了 同事即將要跟男/女朋友表白/求婚 朋友即將要去參加專業執照考試 家人通過了專業執照考試    

FIFTEEN MINUTE FILM FANATICS

Dan isn't crazy about Frank Herbert's novel, but Mike likes it enough that he's already seen Dune--twice.  In this one shot, Mike offers some ideas about Denis Villeneuve's much-awaited (and hyped) adaptation.  So enjoy some spice while you give it a listen! Please follow or subscribe to the show wherever you get your podcasts and on Twitter @15MinFilm and Facebook at Fifteen Minute Film Fanatics.  You can also contact us at FifteenMinuteFilm@gmail.com, and support the show with a buck or two at Venmo @FifteenMinuteFiIm.  All proceeds go right back to the show! Terrific bumper music by Jackson Frederick Smith. URL: http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Jackson_F_Smith/Jackson_Frederick_Smith/Cantina_Rag Comments: http://freemusicarchive.org/ Curator: The Beehive Recording Company Copyright: Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States: http:// 

Pete the Job Guy
Now is a terrific time to join the world's greatest Navy! Pete interviews Lieutenant Commander Jason A. Clements, Officer Programs OIC, Navy Talent Acquisition Group, Jacksonville, and Navy Counselor Petty Officer First Class Emma K. Tinch, Assistant Di

Pete the Job Guy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 46:37


FIFTEEN MINUTE FILM FANATICS
One Shot: Jurassic vs. Jaws

FIFTEEN MINUTE FILM FANATICS

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 5:34


Dan mentioned to Mike that he could never understand the hype over Jurassic Park because "dinosaurs just aren't scary."  In this mini-episode, Mike talks to Dan about how his lack of interest in dinosaurs--and love of Jaws--reveals something about movie monsters and the effects of their being perfectly rendered on a screen.  The Xenomorph from Alien makes an appearance, too. Please follow or subscribe to the show wherever you get your podcasts and on Twitter @15MinFilm and Facebook at Fifteen Minute Film Fanatics.  You can also contact us at FifteenMinuteFilm@gmail.com, and support the show with a buck or two at Venmo @FifteenMinuteFiIm.  All proceeds go right back to the show! Terrific bumper music by Jackson Frederick Smith. URL: http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Jackson_F_Smith/Jackson_Frederick_Smith/Cantina_Rag Comments: http://freemusicarchive.org/ Curator: The Beehive Recording Company Copyright: Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States: http:// 

Definition Radio
2021/10/23 - K-man is playing the songs you requested us to "play it again..."

Definition Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021


Positive hip hop from Australia and beyond. K-man is playing the songs you requested us to "play it again Sam" (by Sam we mean K-man). Playlist: "Willy" by Andy Mineo & nobigdyl. "Indie Pen Dents" by Cas Metah & Sintax the Terrific & DJ Sean P ft. Mouf Warren "Victorious" by Sole Option ft. HiQ & Jah Tung "Sidewalk Psychology" by The Profit & Ryland Junior "Snake Eyes" by Izzy ft. Imbue "Praise" by Eternia & Rel McCoy "Done With That" by Sivion, RelMcCoy & Marksman Lloyd "Smoke & Mirrors" by Rel McCoy & Peace 586 "Son Sets" by The 4 Fathers "Hands Up" by The Plowman ft. Junyah, Uzo Buks & E.Man "Psych Check" by Phanatik "Victorious" by James Gardin "Mirror" by River Movement ft. Raw Torque "I'll Fly" by The Procussions ft. Tara Ellis Vote on the playlist at www.definitionradio.com/show/773 Leave your requests/shout-outs on our socials www.facebook.com/DefinitionRadio www.instagram.com/DefinitionHH www.twitter.com/DefinitionHH www.krosswerdz.com

Bri The Sports Guy
E363: The guys preview the NBA's Northwest Division (Jazz and Nuggets are terrific, Portland will make the playoffs-can they avoid the play in?; T Wolves have a nice "Big 3" but need some better forward play and the Thunder continue to give up wins for

Bri The Sports Guy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 37:06


The guys preview the NBA's Northwest Division (Jazz and Nuggets are terrific, Portland will make the playoffs-can they avoid the play in?; T Wolves have a nice "Big 3" but need some better forward play and the Thunder continue to give up wins for picks)

Trumpet Dynamics
No Jazz at Juilliard, Getting a Gig While Working at a Print Shop, Becoming Prolific While Scratching One's Own Itch and More with Chris Gekker!

Trumpet Dynamics

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 47:16


What can we say about Chris Gekker? -Terrific trumpet player and teacher -Prolific writer of method and exercise books -Pioneer in the realm of brass chamber music We could go on and on. But some things are best left unsaid - or unwritten in the show notes until you hear them said ;) Enjoy this episode! In my chat with Chris Gekker, you'll discover:-How he got along during the pandemic...-Chris' start and early career on trumpet...-Getting the call for the American Brass Quintet working at the print shop...-The most difficult skill on trumpet...-Creating exercises to scratch his own itch, which become multiple method books...-How the physicality of playing has changed over the years and decades...-Why Julliard once forbade the playing of jazz in its hallways...-When Chris will know it's time to hang up the spurs...-The process of recording and releasing a new recording...-How pop music supports more obscure, niche compositions...-The easy things are often the hardest things...-And much more!https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L2SVN4lmutw (Music at Emmanuel featuring Chris Gekker) Credits: Trumpet Dynamics: The Story of the Trumpet, In the Words of Those Who Play It Host: James Newcomb Guest: Chris Gekker Opening and closing music: "Serenade to a Bus Seat" performed by Mike Vax and Clark Terry Audio editing by: James Newcomb Show notes prepared by: James Newcomb

Podcast Minute Talk Show
#54: Tyler's Terrific Tale

Podcast Minute Talk Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 40:40


Hello viewers! Come one, come all, to the delightful show we've carefully prepared for you! In this episode, the boys are back at it again and can't quite seem what to make this episode be about! Thankfully, direction is achieved as Tyler tells one of his most riveting true tales from the deep recesses of his vacant mind. This time I'm certain you'll enjoy the episode! You'd better.

CFR On the Record
Higher Education Webinar: Civic Engagement in Higher Education

CFR On the Record

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021


Brian Mateo, associate dean of civic engagement and director of strategic partnerships in Bard College's Globalization and International Affairs Program and security fellow at the Truman National Security Project, discusses how higher education administrators can encourage student civic engagement and participation in global issues.   FASKIANOS: Welcome to CFR's Higher Education Webinar. I'm Irina Faskianos, vice president of the National Program and Outreach at CFR. Today's discussion is on the record and the video and transcript will be available on our website, CFR.org/Academic if you would like to reference after today's discussion. As always, CFR takes no institutional positions on matters of policy. So with that, I'm delighted to have the pleasure of introducing Brian Mateo to talk about how higher education administrators can encourage student civic engagement and participation in global issues. We've shared his bio with you, so I'll just give you a few highlights. Mr. Mateo serves as associate dean of civic engagement at Bard College, where he works with faculty and students across the Open Society University Network on experiential learning and civic engagement opportunities. Previously he worked with public diplomacy programs sponsored by the U.S. State Department Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs on U.S. foreign policy and engagement. He's also a security fellow at the Truman National Security Project, a term member at the Council on Foreign Relations, and a trained climate reality leader under former Vice President Al Gore. So, Brian, thank you very much for being with us. If we could just dive right in to talk about what is the role of higher education in civic engagement? How do you define it, and how do you encourage administrators and students to get more involved? MATEO: Thank you very much for having me here today at the Council on Foreign Relations, Irina. I'm very excited for this opportunity. So, yes, what is the role of higher education institutions when it comes to civic engagement? So the American Psychological Association defines civic engagement as individuals and collective actions designed to identify and address issues of public concern. At the core of Bard's mission is to be a private college in the public interest. And how we do that is by providing access and education, especially for students that are underrepresented or may not have access to a liberal arts education. This is evidenced by our Bard Early Colleges, which are high school—which are for high school aged students that can take up to a year or two years of free college credit to be able to accelerate their college career. It's also evidenced by our Bard Prison Initiative, which is the largest prison education program for incarcerated individuals in the nation. So when we think about how do we do this, I see—I can't help but think about Astin's model of student development, which says that for students that are hyper-involved in their institutions, they get to be more engaged and involved, and the quality of their involvement goes up. And if we provide high level of programs and resources, students are more likely to be engaged. And then Astin also encourages us to make sure that we are providing resources and programmatic efforts that are meeting the needs of the students today. And I will begin to talk about how we do this from the student level, the faculty/staff level, institutionally, and also talk about how we work with communities. And before I begin, Bard also is a founding member of the Open Society University Network, which is comprised of over forty academic and research institutions. So not only are we also collaborating with our local communities, we also have a transnational network that we're working with. So how do you engage students? We do this by making sure that we're merging the curricular and co-curricular learning. This is also evidenced by our Certificate of Civic Engagement Program, which is a structured path for undergraduate students that are interested in deepening their knowledge and understanding of civic engagement and community engagement. And students are able to participate in this program and also earn a certificate that will also be added to their transcript. We also provide students with grants and opportunities to pursue internships that are unpaid, which are—which are called Community Act Awards. So students that find unpaid internships related to civic engagement and also social justice issues can apply for a grant to be able to supplement that, and making it more equitable for our students. We also provide what are called microgrants, which are seed funding for students that want to be able to do community-based projects. For faculty and staff, we encourage them to teach courses on experiential learning. And these courses enable students to not only work with the community but bring the community also into our classroom. And looking at David Kolb's experiential learning cycle, where students need—where students start with concrete experience, work on reflection, and also thinking about the experience while then planning and learning what they've—and executing what they've learned, is very important when it comes to civic engagement work because students are—students are introduced to some of these issues in the classroom, and then they have the ability to work through those issues with a professor and community members as well. And some example of these courses are—I teach a course on civic engagement myself, where the course is historical, theoretical, and experiential. And we look at social movements in America that help effect change. And we look at the civil rights movement, women rights, LGBT rights, climate activism and climate action, as well as the role of the media and what is misinformation and disinformation. And in this course, students also have to conduct what's called the Community Needs Assessment. And the Community Needs Assessment, students come with a research question and then work to interview community members to see what are the issues that are happening there. For faculty that also want to learn more about how to create courses on experiential learning, we also offer an experiential leaning institute where faculty from the OSUN network can participate. And then students—examples of work that faculty have done with students have been implementing a digital platform to assist with teaching or tutoring practices, historical tours and workshops, and also storytelling and interviews of community partners as well. Faculty that teach experiential learning, students say that about 89 percent of them say that engagement this way has helped their awareness to social justice and community issues. And in 2020 we had over eight hundred students that participated in about eighty courses. And those courses worked with ninety-five community agencies or organizations. We also help faculty and graduate students on conducting engaged research and scholarship practice. So some of examples of these are looking at LGBT issues in South Africa, the intersection of how music supports education with people—with people with disabilities, and also peacebuilding and storytelling as well. And we also help staff and faculty create civic action plans, which help colleges around the OSUN network institutionalize civic engagement and strategically think of how these four pillars can work together. While working with community partners, we're also very intentional in making sure that we have equitable practices. We developed what's called the Principles of Equity, where faculty/staff and community members can read on our website on how we work with the community, and making sure that it's reciprocal, making sure that it's—that we're deepening and creating sustainable partnerships while also engaging community with resources and developing shared resources as well that can benefit both the community and students and the institution. When it comes to institutional engagement, I gave examples of the Bard Early Colleges and Bard Prison Initiative. Bard has also been able to work with student-led—with other student-led initiatives that have become part of the institution. Examples of these as well are Brothers At, which is a mentoring and college-readiness program nationwide for young men of color, as well as Sister to Sister, that does similar work but with young women of color. And recently, Bard also has worked with trying to evacuate nearly two hundred Afghan students and helping them get an education throughout our network as well. So those are some examples of institutional engagement at Bard—at Bard as well. And I constantly think to myself: What is it that we want our students to gain when they participate in our—in our program, or engage with our network? And looking back at Astin's theory of student involvement, we see that Astin talks about inputs, which are what students come with, the environment, what is it that we're providing for our students, and the outputs. As a result of a student attending our universities, what is it that we want them to get out of this, aside from just, you know, the academic knowledge. But how do we want them to be involved? And in my opinion, I feel like there's a few outputs that we would want, as higher education administrators. And I'll state them and then conclude my presentation. So I strongly believe that, you know, we want them to be critical thinkers. We want them to understand and practice equity, be strategic problem solvers, understand the power of reflection and active listening, community builders, practice empathy, be lifelong learners, and also ultimately be engaged individuals. Thank you. FASKIANOS: Brian, thank you very much. Let's go to all of you now. (Gives queuing instructions.)  So I'm going to go first go to Manuel Montoya. Please unmute yourself and tell us your institution. Q: Yeah. Hello. My name's Manuel Montoya and I am from the University of New Mexico. Thank you, Irina, for setting this up. I think this is an important discussion. And thank you, Mr. Mateo, for your presentation. I'm pleased to hear all the work that you're doing. That's inspiring. I will, I guess, do two parts. I will share some of the work that I've done and then share a question that I think is germane to this particular issue. We recently set up a global experiential learning curriculum at the university that is designed to get students to merge theory with practice and some sort of practical impact in terms of the global economy and other things. And we have a—we have a group of students that work with the largest folk art market in the world, which is based in Santa Fe. And we're trying to get them to work with indigenous communities throughout the world to try to have a larger platform for market entry. And we're—we've been in talks for the past four years to try to get the Olympic games to have some sort of mini pop-up folk art market that represents these types of market activities. And inside of that there is a lot of issues about human rights, but also about the value of crafting economy. There's all sorts of things that students are trying to engage with that require a liberal arts education. My question, or my frustration, often happens at places that aren't like Bard College, places that don't necessarily see community-engaged learning as having some sort of incentive structure for faculty. I'm one of many faculty members that does that, likely because I care about the issues and also because I think that it does make research and other forms of academic and intellectual contributions valuable. So my question to Mr. Mateo, or just generally to whoever's participating, is how are we creating an incentive structure for faculty and for other people who are engaged within the university system to make this transition to do the kind of work that Mr. Mateo is talking about? And what is that—what is that going to take in places that are embedded a little bit more traditionally in the way that higher education either incentivizes or evaluates faculty and stuff in more traditional ways? MATEO: Yes. Thank you so much for your question. And it's a question that we're all grappling with, right, as well. Some of us—some of us are doing the work deeper and, you know, sometimes taking risks, and others are in the inception piece. So I'll elaborate by saying this: Students more and more are asking how do I apply what I'm learning in the classroom to a job? How do I make sure that, as a result of me attending this institution, I'm also going to be competitive or be able to contribute to society, right? So I think that—I think that more and more institutions and faculty are thinking about this, because you—you know, students are less inclined to go be taught something and not be able to apply it. At the same time, students also want to see themselves, their history, and also what's going on in the community into the curriculum too. So this is also driving the conversation. It is not easy to teach courses on experiential learning. It takes a lot of time. It also takes resources. And you have to embed reflection and community engagement into the syllabus. And sometimes when you're teaching two days a week for an hour or an hour and a half—you know, fifteen-week curriculum for the semester, that can be difficult to do. So what we've done is that we've developed an experiential learning institute to help faculty understand how to bring this thing into it, how to work with community, how to start that timeline. Because it's very different to develop a syllabus than to bring in community, because you sometimes have to start setting that up earlier. And also, we provide grants to support them to be able to do either—to buy resources for transportation, if they need to hire a student intern to help them with this work as well. So those are some of the ways that we have tried to do this. I also want to talk about data and assessment, because I can't stress enough how much—how important that is. Because when you're measuring students' learning and you see that their learning has grown exponentially from an experiential based course, you cannot argue with that, right? So we try to do our best to make sure that we are—that we're also assessing learning and making sure that when—that when we are asking for funding or that when we are trying to create new programs and initiatives, that we are doing this not only evidence-based in theory and practice, but also on the data that proves that this is something that is of a benefit to the community, to our students, and our institution. Q: Thank you, Mr. Mateo. I guess I have one follow-up question, if it's permissible, Irina. FASKIANOS: Sure. Go ahead, Manuel. Q: Yeah, yeah. So I think you're entirely right. I think that assessment at the student level and the student engagement level, being able to see how this connects to the vocational and even their social destinies is a really, really important factor. I've noted that many institutions across the country are having a great difficulty trying to incorporate or embed community engagement as how they evaluate their faculty. And I'm a tenured faculty at the university, and it's a research one institution. It's not a liberal arts institution. But, you know, publish or perish becomes still one of the ways in which I'm evaluated. So I have to—I have to attend to this kind of master of publishing in peer-reviewed journals, while at the same time my heart and really the most effective work that I do is during community engagement work. So I guess my question is also fundamentally about how we're—how we're transforming institutions to be able to adapt and really incorporate the type of community engagement work that you're talking about, Mr. Mateo, while at the same time valuing and validating its value with the assessment of faculty every year. Because I would say that you'd get a ton of faculty who'd be really good at doing this kind of work, but they're disincentivized to do it because they're only evaluated by their peer-reviewed journal work. So how does one connect the two? What is the frontier for that in higher education that you guys have seen? And I'd really, really like to know, because I think that's going to be a really important part of the frontier of what higher education is dealing with. MATEO: Well, yes, thank you. And, you know, as a field of higher education we're here not only teach, but provide knowledge, and hopefully that that knowledge helps better communities or help create an awareness, right? So that's something that needs to—that needs to be a driving source and conversation because, you know, what we try to do is to incentivize faculty whenever they aren't conducting research, and also students as well, when they want to do community-based work, to see who they can partner with, how they can go about and do that. And making sure that we're amplifying voices and showing the level of work that people are doing so, like, that their work can be recognized and that it also shows that there's a value to this as well. So that's what I would say there. It's still something that I think institutions grapple with, but more and more I believe that as institutions begin to see the value of being civically engaged, because at the end of the day, you know, we all also exist in the community. Our colleges and our campuses are within our community, within a community, within a domestic national and international realm. And, you know, what is it that we want to do? We want to contribute. And that's one of the reasons why we also provide engaged research grants for faculty too. So I hope that that answers your question, Manuel, and I'm happy to elaborate more. Q: I'll yield to other questions. But thank you very much. I appreciate it. FASKIANOS: I'm going to go next to Laila Bichara, who has a raised hand. And if you could unmute and identify your institution. Q: Hi. Well, I work for SUNY Farmingdale. And generally speaking, I teach with experiential learning. I use all kinds of newspapers and case studies and current affairs to make sure that the theory we cover in global business, you know, management and all other courses are, you know, applied and showing the results and what's going on. That said, I am currently serving on an adjunct staff to work on couple of issues. One is social mobility and the second is community engagement, and I see a lot of interrelation between this and experiential learning. And I just wanted to see if there is any work done or papers done in the social mobility, because our students are typically first-generation college students. They don't have role models at home and they rely heavily on us to guide them, and they're usually kids or, you know, students in their twenties that have two or three jobs to pay for their education. So any ideas, any links, any guidance for me to start to make advancement in that project and help my students. MATEO: Great. Thank you. So what I hear you say is that looking at the linkages between social mobility, community engagement, and which one was the third one? Q: Experiential learning as well. MATEO: Experiential learning. Yes. Q: Yeah. It's all a kind of, like, spiral to me. You know, that's how I see it. MATEO: Yes. So when allowing students to do experiential learning into the classroom and bringing into the classroom, you're also helping them get applied skills, and yes, so there is at times a level of—a disadvantage when a student is working three jobs while also studying and then you're telling them like, oh, go volunteer, or go do this, right. By embedding experiential learning into the curriculum, you're still teaching students with some of these applicable skills that they can use as a part of a resume and also can speak to in an interview and saying, like, this is how I was able to do this as evidenced by that, right. And that, in turn, helps students to be able to find other opportunities as well. In terms of links, so we do have resources at our Center for Civic Engagement website, which is cce.bard.edu, and there's a resource link there, and then we also have resources as well on our OSUN website, osun.bard.edu. So those are—those are places that you that you can find some of these resources. FASKIANOS: Great. And we'll send out after this a link to this webinar as well as with those URLs so that people—websites so people can go back and dig deeper. So I'm going to go next to David Kim's written question. He's an assistant professor at UCLA. Thank you for this discussion. I'd like to hear more about insights into community engagement on an international or global level. What are some best practices when faculty, communities, and students work across borders—international borders? How are they different from community engagement at a local or national level? MATEO: Thank you. So we have to be aware of, you know, what we can provide and also what is it—what are some of the needs or how it can be reciprocal. So a lot of listening and intentionality has to be brought into it because sometimes, you know, we can come in with our own mindset of, oh, this is how we do it and we do it well, and then you meet other counterparts and then they're, like, well, but this is also another way of doing it. So there has to be a collaborative and reciprocal way or a mutual, respectful, reciprocal way of engaging, and, typically, you know, how we've done that is that we've partnered with other universities. We've also seen who are the community partners that are there in the international realm and how we can work around that, too. So I would say being intentional, making sure that you have capacity for what you are doing so, like, that you can deliver and also having a mutual reciprocal approach as well as active listening, and be willing to learn also from our international partners, too. FASKIANOS: I think, Brian, you mentioned that you were looking at LGBTQ+ issues in South Africa. Do you have any partnerships? Can you sort of give us examples of how you're doing that? MATEO: Yes. That's one of the research grants that we have provided to someone to be able to do that research. So the individual there is partnered with organizations and are conducting that research, and once that research is done we will make sure to publish it. FASKIANOS: Great. OK. I'm going to go next to Isaac Castellano from Boise State University. Our career center just landed a grant to pilot a program to pay students for their internship experiences. For us, a lot of students—our students have to work and this is another way beyond embedding experiential learning into their coursework. So I think he's sharing more than asking a question, but maybe you have a reaction to that. MATEO: Yes, and thank you so much, Isaac. So yeah. So we piloted this a couple of years ago and it's been very successful, and the way that it—the way that it works is it's for summer internships and students can request up to $3,000 for any unpaid internship. And we have them submit an application as well as a supervisor form and an agreement of what the students will be doing for that organization. And then, in return, the students will write one to two reflection papers on their experience, and then when they come back to campus the next semester they get to present about their experience and what they've done for that internship. So that's how we—that's how we run our community action awards, and it's been super successful. It has been able to provide access to students that wouldn't otherwise be able to do an unpaid internship, and the students submit a budget of up to $2,000 and then we see how we can—how we can help fund that. So I highly encourage you to definitely do that pilot, and if you do want any other insight or how to be able to do that, I'm happy to share my email as well with Irina when she sends out the resources. FASKIANOS: Great. And Isaac has a follow-up. Where does the money come from, that paid summer program that you're talking about? MATEO: It could—grants. We also try to fund—try to find funding and resources as well. So it comes through various sources, and so that's how we try to support our students. FASKIANOS: Great. Thank you. OK. So the next question is another written question. And people can ask their questions, too, but this is from Chip Pitts at Stanford University. Have you encountered obstacles in this environment characterized by major demographic changes and increasing polarization, e.g., mandates against critical race theory, based on the perceived political nature, even leftist nature of, quote/unquote, “social justice” and “human rights” or “environmental community engagement efforts”? And if so, or for those in places where there are more conservative values, what have you seen or would you suggest to shore up and spur more courage and leadership among the reluctant or shy faculty and administrators and overcome and avoid such blockages? MATEO: Mmm hmm. Thank you. So you have to meet communities where they're at, right, and making sure that they also understand that we're here to work with them, too, and this is why active listening and making sure that there is a reciprocal approach to this is important. And it's not—sometimes it can be fairly easy to be able to say, hey, we want to collaborate with you, and other times it can be extremely difficult and tenuous. But continuing to demonstrate and show the level of learning or how that community is continuously being engaged is something that's very important because, in my opinion, I think that sometimes, you know, we have a hard time of showing all the great work that we're doing, and in order for us to be able to partner and work more with community members we also have to show the research and demonstrate and be able to present this so people understand what we are trying to do. So there are times that it is challenging, and there are some things that will work with some communities and some things that will not. So where then are you able to then find what can work and how you can make it happen, and then from there be able to build up from there—from the ground up. So yeah, so there are some communities where you can do, like, one to ten things and then other communities that you can do one to three things and, hopefully, that you can start to do four or five, but then how do you still provide that access and education and equity as well. FASKIANOS: Brian, what would you say are the—in your opinion, the global issues students are most interested in? And, you know, if a college can only take on or faculty can only take on one issue that they're trying to push, you know, what would be the one, or to drive a—foster more civic engagement? What do you think would be a viable and a good starting—steppingstone to sort of expand this into their community and both on campus and off? MATEO: Wow. That's a great question, Irina. I would say that students are very interested in gender equity, LGBT. They're also very interested in making sure that underrepresented populations are included in conversations, as well as awareness in disability. An all-encompassing issue that students are also passionate about because most of them experience this globally every day is climate change, and making sure that, you know, how we can engage students through there. So that—so out of everything that I mentioned, this also encompasses these issues as a major one, and Bard, through the Open Society University Network, is actually having a global teach-in, which is—you can find this in the Solve Climate by '30 and I can send the link to Irina as well—where all colleges and universities can come in and do a global teach-in and as well get resources, and we're providing opportunities for students around the world to also be able to receive opportunity to get engaged, too. So we're doing this in March, and we're trying to get a robust number of institutions to participate in this because climate doesn't only affect, you know, our living environment, but it also affects students' educational pursuits. Harvard conducted a study called Heat and Learning that showed that for every degree Fahrenheit that goes up student learning goes down by 1 percent. It's also shown disparities that—you know, climate change also has, you know, a disproportionate effect on young people of color because of regions where people live in cold and hot environments, as well as disparities when it comes to gender. Women are more likely to be taken out of the classroom when there are climate change disasters to be caretakers, and we're also seeing a rise in child marriages because of that, too. You know, it also—you also talk about sanitation when it comes to climate change and educational environments. You know, if you start to—if your building starts to get moldy and also if students start to get sick because of the infrastructure or it gets too hot, you're going to see an increased rate of students showing up—not showing up and being absent or dropout rates as well. So climate change exacerbates or, as it's called, a threat multiplier, and this is something that as higher education administrators we have to also make sure that we are—that we're constantly thinking and showing how can we, based on students' interests, can help to solve climate as well. FASKIANOS: Great. So if others have questions—Manuel, I don't know if you had a follow-on. You said you would cede the floor but you can come back on. You can raise your hand or write—type your question in the Q&A box, or I could ask more. Just waiting to see if Manuel wanted to come back in. OK. There is a—oh, Manuel said his question was answered. OK. Great. So—sorry, I'm just looking—toggling a lot of things. All right. So my next question would be—you did talk about this earlier—you know, there has been a lot written about what is a college education worth, and I think this connection of the critical thinking and the internships and the experiential learning. But could you talk a little bit more about students' educational performance and career path and how they can leverage these—you know, what they're doing, civic engagement, into their future career plans? MATEO: Yes. Thank you. FASKIANOS: And then I have another random question. Mmm hmm. MATEO: Yes. So helping students to understand that some of the work that they do outside of a classroom could also translate both inside as well because when I have—when I see students when they're thinking about their career path, they're like, oh, but I've never done an internship before, or, oh, but I've never actually had a job here or there. But then when you start to look at the classes that they're taking and the application piece in those courses, you can sort of say, yes, but you also in this course did storytelling of a community and also created a podcast. So this is also an application piece where you can add to your resume, too. So helping students to think and link experiential learning to application, and demonstrating that is definitely an added plus, and this is why a lot of these courses are also very popular and very highly rated for students because they're starting—they start to see that they're also gaining transferable skills while engaging in these courses, too, that they can then add to their resume and be able to speak to at an interview as well. Like, I'll give you the example of the community needs assessment that the students that I work with conduct. You know, they can talk about research. They can talk about, you know, being able to work with communities. They also have to interview a leader in that community, whether that be a politician or a school leader or anyone. You know, so there are skills that they can then say here are some tangible outcomes as a result of this assignment, and that's why experiential learning can also help when it comes to merging career paths for students. FASKIANOS: Great. So a few more questions in the chat. Jim Zaffiro, who is at Central College, has asked what recommendations would you have for incorporating civic engagement into a common first-year experience course? MATEO: Mmm hmm. Yes. So looking back at Astin's model of input-environment-outputs, right, so we need to figure out, like, you know, how can we create a baseline for students to best understand what it means to be civically engaged and the environments piece of it. So what I would say, making sure that they understand the community they're a part of, what are some of the issues and needs, providing reflection for them to talk about how they have been engaged, how do they see themselves as engaged citizens and providing opportunities for them to get exposure to working with community members and working outside of the community as well. So we do this starting from our orientational language and thinking, where we start to not only provide articles and readings on this but we're also getting students to volunteer and get—and having students to think about how they want—how they want to be involved, and showing them a lot of the student-led initiatives that we offer that they can either get involved or start on their own. And then throughout the first year they also have what's called the Citizen Science Program, which is a January term, where students start to see how science and citizenship come together and work together. And during that time, we also have our MLK Day of Engagement, which is a day for students to also go out and volunteer into the community and reflect on their volunteer work as well. So that's kind of how we've embedded a lot of engagement for our first-years to making sure that we're providing them with engagement, adding courses for them to think about what does it mean to be engaged in either a civic engagement course or experiential learning courses and opportunities throughout the year for them to be involved, which, ultimately, we were then promoting for them how they can—how they can apply for these community action awards and also for the summer, but also what are ways for them to get engaged through the broader OSUN network. FASKIANOS: Great. How has the pandemic exacerbated preexisting community needs? How have you at Bard deepened students' civic engagement in order to help alleviate the pandemic-related effects that we are seeing in our communities? MATEO: Yes, and as we all know, when it comes to community-based work in civic engagement, you know, we all had to, you know, come indoors, and we had this notion that we had to be there to be able to engage with the community. So we developed—and this is also part of our civic engagement website—a tool kit on how to do engagement virtually, how to be able to do blended learning as well, and making sure that we still had a commitment to our community leaders. And our community partners also were able to come into our classes via Zoom and engage with students as well, and we helped students find virtual engagement, whether it be tutoring, whether it be, you know, helping to analyze something and sending it back. So these were some of the ways. But it did definitely create a halt, though we quickly found ways to not only build and provide resources but also pivot and making sure that we provide opportunities for students that were online and making sure that we showed a commitment to our partners as well. FASKIANOS: So John Dietrich at Bryant University asks for examples, more examples in practice of bringing experiential learning into the classroom, so if you could put some— MATEO: Yes. Yeah, so we have a course that's called All Politics is Local and what we do in that—and what the faculty members do in that course is that they're able to pair students with local internships in different government organizations, so not only are students learning about local government in the class but they're actually interning at the same time in different local governments. Another example of a professor that teaches studio arts is a class called Portraits and Community where they get to talk to community members and identify the history of that community, also talk with Congress—with a member of Congress while painting these community members and learning their stories, learning how to tell their stories but using art as a way of engagement. Another example is being able to develop tool kits, so, for example, looking at, you know, if you're a professor in biology or in chemistry and you have a local river or you have, you know, an ecosystem or environment, you know, how has that changed throughout the years and how can students create experiments and be able to then provide knowledge for local leaders or community members to see if there has been change that has been happening there? So I hope that this gives you some examples of community-based learning and education when it comes to doing it in the classroom. Podcasts have also been something that have been very important because students not only learn the skill on how to run a podcast and how to do a podcast, but then they also get to interview community members and do it—and be able to speak and provide the opportunity for storytelling as well. FASKIANOS: Can you talk a little bit about the role civic engagement plays in international students' educational experience? I mean, a lot of campuses have international students, and what does it mean for them and what are they taking back to their countries? MATEO: Yeah, so working with the OSUN network I've learned a lot about what other campuses have been doing and how they do civic engagement, and at some campuses civic engagement is embedded from the beginning. They are taking courses, they have to graduate with a certain amount of hours to be able to get their degree, you know, and some institutions in the United States do that, some don't per se, you know, so—and then also thinking about what—so for them also thinking about what does it mean to be engaged in their communities, and what are some of the work that they are doing as well? So civic engagement can look differently, so some of it can be tutoring. Some of it can be, you know, mostly youth engagement. A lot of it can be gender equity and working to raise awareness on gender issues. So there has been a great sense of education knowledge on my part on seeing how other institutions work on civic engagement. At the same time, it's also great because we're able to talk about civic engagement and develop that baseline and learn how we can grow together, and what are some things that they're doing that we can do and vice versa? So that—so I would say that in some institutions globally, civic engagement is embedded from the beginning and students have to make sure that they are taking courses on engagement. Some of them have, like, first-year sophomore-, junior-, senior-level seminars on engagement, and then others, you have to have a requirement of graduation for a certain amount of hours. So that's how, kind of, it's worked. FASKIANOS: Brian, you talked about inputs and outputs and metrics, so have you measured how civic engagement, the programs that you're doing are affecting students' perspectives on diversity, equity, and inclusion? MATEO: Yes, we have, actually, and—I have this here in my notes—yes, and 89 percent of them say that it has created an awareness of social justice issues and it has also enhanced their learning. So we're seeing that this is something that is showing and demonstrating that by engaging, and also at times engaging with difference, it has helped their learning. And over 90 percent of students say that they would continue to engage our—engage with arts and science courses or experiential courses as a result of that. FASKIANOS: Do you do that survey after each semester or is it at the end of the academic year? How are you doing that? MATEO: Yeah, so we do that survey at the end of each semester when it comes to faculty courses. When it comes to the engagement that students are doing outside of the classroom we also try to assess that, too, which I do midway and also at the end, and some students also do culminating projects, as well, that they are incorporating—at the end of their academic career they are talking about how civic engagement has helped them. So an example of that is—and this is the certificate in civic engagement that we've recently launched. You know, students will be able to apply for what's called an engaged senior project grant that they can get funding to be able to add civic engagement into their final project too, so that's—we're measuring and seeing how many students are interested and want to be able to engage in that. So I would say all together we are doing—you know, and sometimes, you know, we capture a lot of data and sometimes, you know, so we try to make sure that we're doing it as holistic as possible but we do it at the end, so at the end of each semester if a course qualifies as experiential learning, we are doing—so it's a separate evaluation outside of the normal class evaluation, and then we start to see and look at the metrics and what students have learned and, like, now we can start to gather and tell stories behind, you know, what these courses are doing. FASKIANOS: Great. So we have a follow-up question from Manuel Montoya: How does experiential learning and community engagement avoid essentializing the communities you engage with? On a related note, how does one navigate who gets to represent community needs when working on issues of engagement? MATEO: Yeah, this is a very, very, very, like, a thin line. Right? And it comes, again, with mutual respect, reciprocity, active listening. Some of the time community partners come to us and say, hey, we have a need and then we evaluate it and see how we can help that need. Other times, faculty or even students are like, hey, here is something that we should be working on and then we do that. Right? So an example of that is the Bard Prison Initiative. A student came and said, hey, look, we should be working on this and then it became an institutional part of Bard and now it's one of the largest prison education programs for incarcerated individuals across the nation. You know, so—and it takes a lot of reflecting and making sure that the community's needs are also in the forefront, because we don't want to usurp or take on, you know, or say, like, oh, this is ours now. No, this is “in collaboration with.” This is not a “we do this” per se. So that's why we have developed the principles of equity, and I'll share that, as well, with Irina so you can get a sense—that talks about this is, how can we make this equitable? How can we acknowledge and reflect on the work that we're doing? How do we—how are we not making sure that we're showing up and saying, like, oh, look, we're here, as like, you know, how—saving a community. But no, we're here to help enhance a community while they're enhancing our learning and providing assistance for us as well. So it has to be reciprocal in order for you to maintain a deep and sustained relationship. FASKIANOS: Great. And I'm just going to flag—I don't know if people are looking at the Q&A but Chip Pitts was building on what you talked about the importance of climate as a health issue. There's a study that's worth looking at, www.thelancet.com/countdown-health-climate, so you can look there. MATEO: Thank you, Chip. FASKIANOS: We do have another comment. I've benefited immensely from this discussion, bringing to fore the relevance of community engagement for students and faculty. I'm seeing new areas I can suggest for experiential learning to my institution. Terrific. That's great. MATEO: Thank you. I'm glad. FASKIANOS: Really appreciate that from NenpoSarah Gowon—and the last name is cut off. All right, so I wanted to ask you about—in your view, do you—I mean, you've been doing this for a long time. What do you see as the challenges that you've faced in sort of bringing this along in your community? And what have been the unexpected surprises and the receptivity to this approach of experiential learning and critical thinking, et cetera? MATEO: Thank you. That's an excellent question and here's reflection, you know, as we talk about experiential learning. Right? So I would say that my—so I was—so I'm fortunate enough to be able to work with the OSUN network to be in—and become a lifelong learner myself and learn how other institutions have been doing this. And going back to what Manuel was alluding to is that when something is new it's hard to bring in change. Right? So when asking people, hey, do you want to teach a course on experiential learning or asking a student, hey, do you want to also do this type of civic engagement work, what sometimes is heard is, oh, this is more work; this is going to be too hard. Right? So how do you show those benefits, right? And in the beginning, initial stages, it's going to be an uphill battle. But once you have one or two or a group of people doing it and talking about how great it is and how their students are engaged—like, in some of the assessments students are asking for more time in those courses because they're like, this is so—this is great, that we want to make sure that we meet more or we want to make sure we have more time to do—to engage in these courses, so now we're seeing that students want more of these courses and not just of the courses in general but maybe adding a third section instead of just meeting two times a week per se. You know? And then—and funding can also be something that's very—that can be challenging because, you know, you need to make this a commitment in saying, like, yes, we are going to fund, let's say, for example, thirty student internships over the summer because we believe that this is going to help engage their learning. We believe this is going to create an opportunity for them moving forward. Right? So—and researcher—sometimes, you know, if you're in a metropolitan area, it's easier for you to say, yeah, we're going to go to a museum or we're going to go to this community because we can all just take public transportation. But if you're in a rural environment, you're relying on vans and buses and so on and so forth, and that can sometimes run you $500 to $2,000 per visit, you know. So you also have to think really strategically and think smarter, not harder, and how are you engaging? Right? Because one of the detriments is that great, we went to one community once and as a result of that, like, what would happen—because, again, it goes back to sustained, deepening relationships, so those are some of the things that can be some of the challenges. Some of the breakthroughs for me is when you start to see the learning connect, when a student's like, you know—you know, I once had someone from the New York City's mayor's office come speak to the students in my class and it really warmed my heart when a student was like, I didn't know that I had access; I didn't realize that someone like me could be able to speak to someone from the mayor's office. And I'm like, but you're also a citizen of New York City and this is what—you know, so there was that disconnect for the student; it was like, wow, I can do this. Another student wants to—is pursuing, you know, a degree in political science and stuff like that. You know, or even when a student did a research project on the tolls of the taxi in New York City because that student felt they had a personal connection to this, and then they were able to see how, you know, some stories were similar to what—to the narrative that they had and be able to then share some possible solutions and show that they can also be active citizens and engage and be empowered. That is the other piece that, like, once you see that people start to be empowered, they want to continue doing this work and it's, you know, my job and the job of others at other higher education institutions to continue to empower and continue to provide opportunities and shed light, you know, because some of this is also exposure. You know, thinking about outputs; it's like sometimes you know what you know, but then when you meet a professor that's doing some type of research that you're just like, wow, this is so intriguing; I never knew I could do this. That's something that is also very influential for the student. And I'll give you a personal anecdote about myself. I myself have been an experiential learner. You know, I went to college and I got my master's in higher ed administration, but all of a sudden I'm working with international communities, I'm also part of the Council on Foreign Relations doing research on climate, and teaching experiential learning. And that is as evidenced by Bard being a private college for public interest, and also enabling us to be a part of the system that we ourselves can be experiential learners and be able to do different things and sometimes, you know, like, not necessarily shift our careers but find new interests, because this is what we want to do and develop the system that can be reciprocal for our students, faculty, staff, and community. FASKIANOS: Well, with that, we've reached the end of our hour. Brain Mateo, thank you very much for sharing what you're doing at Bard, your stories, and we will circulate to everybody the resources that you mentioned, and, you know, just want to thank you for your dedication. And to everybody on this call, I mean, it really has brought home for me the important work that you all are doing to raise the next generation of leaders, and we need them and you all are role models for young adults who, as somebody said, their parents have never gone to college and really need some guidance on next steps. So thank you to you, Brian, and to everybody on this call for what you're doing in your communities. We will share Brian's email address and you can follow him on Twitter at @brianmateo. So I encourage you to follow him there. Our next Higher Education Webinar will be in November, and we will send the topic speaker and date under separate cover. And so I encourage you to follow us, @CFR_Academic on Twitter, and visit CFR.org, ForeignAffairs.com, and ThinkGlobalHealth.org for more resources. And of course, as always, you can email cfracademic@cfr.org, with suggestions of future topics or speakers you would like to hear from. We're trying to be a resource for all of you and support you and the important work that you are doing. So Brian, thank you again. MATEO: Thank you. And I'll make sure to share resources with you. Have a great day. FASKIANOS: Wonderful. (END)

Cruise Altitude
EP 23 - Greatest Aircraft Part 2 - The Terrific Tri-Jets!

Cruise Altitude

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 56:18


It's the second episode of our 5 part mini-series, as the Cruise Altitude team continue their quest to find the worlds greatest ever Airliner! In this episode we look at the “Terrific Tri-Jets”, but which one will be the winner in this rather retro category?! Plus we talk pigs and penguins!Don't forget to subscribe and get in touch via our various Social media platforms, email us at cruisealtitude@outlook.com or jump on the website, www.cruisealtitude.comFor Cruise Altitude Final Call visit:https://youtube.com/channel/UCtE_yrd36h8tXQgoxALOT8gKeep it down to earth with Cruise Altitude!**The views expressed are our own, and are not in any way intended to represent the views or policies of our employer(s).**

FIFTEEN MINUTE FILM FANATICS
One Shot: Casino Royale

FIFTEEN MINUTE FILM FANATICS

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 7:42


In preparation for No Time to Die, Mike and Dan do a short episode on Casino Royale, the 2006 film in which Daniel Craig first appeared as 007.  What makes Daniel Craig a terrific Bond and Casino Royale on of the top films in the franchise?  Push in those chips and give us a listen!  Please follow or subscribe to the show wherever you get your podcasts and on Twitter @15MinFilm and Facebook at Fifteen Minute Film Fanatics.  You can also contact us at FifteenMinuteFilm@gmail.com, and support the show with a buck or two at Venmo @FifteenMinuteFiIm.  All proceeds go right back to the show! Terrific bumper music by Jackson Frederick Smith. URL: http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Jackson_F_Smith/Jackson_Frederick_Smith/Cantina_Rag Comments: http://freemusicarchive.org/ Curator: The Beehive Recording Company Copyright: Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States: http://   

FIFTEEN MINUTE FILM FANATICS
One Shot: Jerry Lewis and The Horrible Interview

FIFTEEN MINUTE FILM FANATICS

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 9:16


In 2016, Jerry Lewis was interviewed for the millionth time--but this one became legendary for the actor's one-word answers, obvious anger, and refusal to entertain the most innocuous questions.  It's fascinating.  Mike and Dan talk about this trainwreck in terms of its high drama.  They compare it to a Beckett play and Hemingway story in their attempts to describe what makes it so compelling.  You can see the interview here: https://youtu.be/s8SfWiNhTJo Please follow or subscribe to the show wherever you get your podcasts and on Twitter @15MinFilm and Facebook at Fifteen Minute Film Fanatics.  You can also contact us at FifteenMinuteFilm@gmail.com, and support the show with a buck or two at Venmo @FifteenMinuteFiIm.  All proceeds go right back to the show! Terrific bumper music by Jackson Frederick Smith. URL: http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Jackson_F_Smith/Jackson_Frederick_Smith/Cantina_Rag Comments: http://freemusicarchive.org/ Curator: The Beehive Recording Company Copyright: Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States: http:// 

Pod'ems UP!
Episode 95 – What is it about Texas?/ DIY Advice

Pod'ems UP!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 44:52


This week I speak of the deplorables of Texas and also one from Kentucky. Surface Barr, Durham and the AZ audits as a reminder of just how wrong republicans have been. Then disperse a few nuggets of wisdom for those do-it-yourself projects. Beer this week was a seasonal Arbor Brewing Dark Amber. Terrific brew! Drink up, listen up and Pod'ems UP!

Enough Wicker: Intellectualizing the Golden Girls
Episode 75: Mister Worse than the Empty Nest Episode

Enough Wicker: Intellectualizing the Golden Girls

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 23:51


In what is the opposite of a fan-favorite, Rose dates Mr. Terrific, Dorothy attempts to fix his show and is sexually harassed by a puppet, and Blanche gets a different bed than the one she ordered. We're here to dunk on the sub-par (for this show) writing, the strange deliveries of lines, and pretty much everything else.

Classic 45's Jukebox
Boo On You by Bazooka

Classic 45's Jukebox

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021


Label: Bang 559Year: 1968Condition: M-Price: $12.50Terrific bubblegum at its goofy best! Note: This copy has pristine Mint vinyl and audio. The labels have a touch of ringwear (see scan).

Jean & Mike Do The New York Times Crossword
Thursday, October 7, 2021 - This puzzle's terrific -- ASKANYONE

Jean & Mike Do The New York Times Crossword

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 10:30


One look at the grid, with a series of 1 letter squares with black on both sides (something that almost *never* happens) was a tipoff that something unusual was happening. Fortunately, the puzzle was written by Timothy Polin, who's usual behavior is to crank out great crosswords, and he is in fine form today, apparently able to create cross-lesswords as well as crosswords. We rate this an awed 5 squares on the JAMCR scale -- download and listen up to get all the deets.

FIFTEEN MINUTE FILM FANATICS
One Shot: Mike Detests Joe Buck

FIFTEEN MINUTE FILM FANATICS

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 3:18


Dan doesn't follow the NFL but Mike does--and when he said for the thousandth time how much he hates Joe Buck, Dan said, "Let's do a one-shot on why."  So here's Mike in a three-minute speech about why Joe Buck irritates him so much.  Believe it or not, DIary of a Wimpy Kid and 1984 also come up in the conversation.  Go Giants! Please follow or subscribe to the show wherever you get your podcasts and on Twitter @15MinFilm and Facebook at Fifteen Minute Film Fanatics.  You can also contact us at FifteenMinuteFilm@gmail.com, and support the show with a buck or two at Venmo @FifteenMinuteFiIm.  All proceeds go right back to the show! Terrific bumper music by Jackson Frederick Smith. URL: http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Jackson_F_Smith/Jackson_Frederick_Smith/Cantina_Rag Comments: http://freemusicarchive.org/ Curator: The Beehive Recording Company Copyright: Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States: http:// 

Drake Sports Media Podcast
Drake football--The Bulldogs get ready to host Dayton in a key PFL match-up, and a terrific conversation with with Declan Carr and Matt Hartlieb.

Drake Sports Media Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 50:33


Drake football--The Bulldogs get ready to host Dayton in a key PFL match-up, and a terrific conversation with with Declan Carr and Matt Hartlieb.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

You Seem Interesting
You Seem Interesting Season 2 Episode 16: NFL Agents & Andy Ross

You Seem Interesting

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 40:47


Andy Ross has represented NFL players for more than 2 decades. We discussed everything from the recruiting of new players, helping shepherd them through life changing experiences, and how he lost $100 for not being faster than a guy moving backwards. Andy has some terrific stories about getting his foot in the door, getting feedback from a client he didn't land, and when a player he repped didn't show up. Terrific convo with an outstanding guy. This podcast uses the following third-party services for analysis: Chartable - https://chartable.com/privacy Support this podcast

What's That Smell?
Once Upon a Heavy Gullet

What's That Smell?

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 51:34


Ok, look. We can't control what our parents called us when we were kids. We can't control the fact that those things are so deeply ingrained in our families that they still call us those things to this very day. We absolutely CAN control whether or not we talk about them on a sometimes-funny podcast for everyone to hear, but we lack the self control to stop ourselves from doing it. Please be gentle. Heavy show. Very heavy. Pete's helping a listener with a sort of existential dread this week that might have you noodling about it yourselves. Let's say you're sitting in a chair. Take away the chair and what happens? You fall. What if there was no floor to stop you? No ground? No crust on this planet of ours? You just keep falling. It's the fear of gravity on the show this week, and it's a doozy. No, DATphagia. So, it was an easy joke. Tommy's dealing with some very real swallowing issues and hot on the heels of that big nickname reveal, he's decided to process in real time on the show. So, it's Dysphagia day, everybody! Along the way, we visit a little fashion cafe in New York that marks one of the great business failures in food. Oh, I spoiled the surprise there. See, this was a terrific idea that paired super models and fine dining! Terrific, we tell you... Positively GANGbusters. How'd it turn out? You'll have to listen in to learn!

The Final Furlong Podcast
Terrific Torquator Storms to Arc Victory & Weekend Review

The Final Furlong Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 192:11


Emmet Kennedy is joined by Rory Delargy review a epic Arc as Germany win the race for the third time in 100 Years with Torquator Tasso causes a massive shock to defeat Tarnawa and Hurricane Lane. Rory and Emmet also discuss Zellie, Angel Bleu, Space Blues, A Case Of You, Rougir, Real World, Trueshan and Saffron Beach. So much ground for the lads to cover and plenty of craic as well. Listen now for free on Spotify or Your Podcast App. For more info on TOTE checkout tote.co.uk Show Your Support for The FFP with Likes & Shares on Twitter, Instagram or Facebook

Mornings with Keyshawn, LZ and Travis

Tom Brady made his return to New England, and came up with a 19-17 win following a missed field goal by the Patriots. Belichick & Brady has a small hug after the game. How surprising was the lack of interaction between the two? The guys run the No Huddle on the biggest stories from yesterday. Plus, is it time for the Steelers to call Cam?

Golic and Wingo
Hour 1: Terrific Tom

Golic and Wingo

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 43:38


Tom Brady made his return to New England, and came up with a 19-17 win following a missed field goal by the Patriots. Belichick & Brady has a small hug after the game. How surprising was the lack of interaction between the two? The guys run the No Huddle on the biggest stories from yesterday. Plus, is it time for the Steelers to call Cam?

The Max Kellerman Show
Hour 1: Terrific Tom

The Max Kellerman Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 43:38


Tom Brady made his return to New England, and came up with a 19-17 win following a missed field goal by the Patriots. Belichick & Brady has a small hug after the game. How surprising was the lack of interaction between the two? The guys run the No Huddle on the biggest stories from yesterday. Plus, is it time for the Steelers to call Cam?

The Stephen A. Smith Show
Hour 1: Terrific Tom

The Stephen A. Smith Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 43:38


Tom Brady made his return to New England, and came up with a 19-17 win following a missed field goal by the Patriots. Belichick & Brady has a small hug after the game. How surprising was the lack of interaction between the two? The guys run the No Huddle on the biggest stories from yesterday. Plus, is it time for the Steelers to call Cam?

Keyshawn, JWill & Max
Hour 1: Terrific Tom

Keyshawn, JWill & Max

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 43:38


Tom Brady made his return to New England, and came up with a 19-17 win following a missed field goal by the Patriots. Belichick & Brady has a small hug after the game. How surprising was the lack of interaction between the two? The guys run the No Huddle on the biggest stories from yesterday. Plus, is it time for the Steelers to call Cam?

Five Takes On The Five Stripes
The one where we got pout-ine our place

Five Takes On The Five Stripes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 35:04


1: Terrific pressing from us in the first half. We were smothering the ball and forcing turnovers frequently. Honestly the pressure was really good in both halves. We were great at keeping the ball in the foot's half, and attacks always seemed to be in development and the chances started coming at the end of the first.    2: Moreno's absence was a huge factor. We were missing that link up play and Rossetto didn't really provide it. We saw Barco and especially Josef dropping back trying to link things up. When Moreno isn't available we need Rossetto to be more involved and get forward a little more.    3: Ever see a boat fly? Barco's confidence is soaring. He's trying some audacious stuff and if it doesn't always come off, boy is it close. He just didn't have the support he needed tonight. Apart from the goal created by the combination of Mulraney and Araujo, he was the sole chance creator out there. Unfortunately with Josef out for the entirety of 2nd, there really wasn't anyone to get on the end of the chance creation. That's a problem Gonzo will have to solve. We still don't have a great like for like replacement for Jo or a different way of scoring when he's not out there. Tho, Barco damn near put the team on his back and drew us level towards the end. He really put in a shift.    4: Bello needs to be better in the final third. He's been great in receiving the ball and continuing to develop the attack but that last pass from him or shot needs to come sooner. Be more decisive Bello, please and thank you.    5: Jake Mulraney was terrific again. He hasn't seen a ton of minutes over the last few months so it's great to see him be so impactful. Also, has his footwork always been that good? He's known to us for his speed and energy but he ain't half bad on the dribble either. 

FIFTEEN MINUTE FILM FANATICS
One-Shot: Liz from @MrPaulMuni

FIFTEEN MINUTE FILM FANATICS

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 9:51


In their previous episode on I AM A FUGITIVE FROM A CHAIN GANG and THE LIFE OF LOUIS PASTEUR, Mike and Dan mention the great Twitter feed, @MrPaulMuni.  Join the guys in this short episode as they talk to Liz, the feed's curator and ultimate Muni fan.  What makes him such a great actor?  What are his best films?  And how did Liz become so devoted?  Give it a listen and be sure to check out @MrPaulMuni on Twitter. Please follow or subscribe to the show wherever you get your podcasts and on Twitter @15MinFilm and Facebook at Fifteen Minute Film Fanatics.  You can also contact us at FifteenMinuteFilm@gmail.com, and support the show with a buck or two at Venmo @FifteenMinuteFiIm.  All proceeds go right back to the show! Terrific bumper music by Jackson Frederick Smith. URL: http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Jackson_F_Smith/Jackson_Frederick_Smith/Cantina_Rag Comments: http://freemusicarchive.org/ Curator: The Beehive Recording Company Copyright: Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States: http:// 

The Grant Williams Podcast
Super Terrific Happy Hour Ep. 13 - Sam Zell

The Grant Williams Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 15:12


This week, on the Super Terrific Happy Hour, Stephanie & Grant are joined by the legendary Sam Zell, a billionaire investor, entrepreneur and philanthropist whose uncanny knack of knowing not just which businesses to get into, but when to let somebody else take them off his hands (at significantly higher prices) is unmatched. In this wonderful conversation, Steph and Grant expose the details of Sam's first ever business venture, the personality traits which give him an edge over his competitors and the methods by which he identifies potential opportunities amidst an onslaught of pitches from people keen to have him be a part of their latest venture. Frank, humble and insightful, Sam is everything you'd want him to be and so much more... Every episode of the Grant Williams podcast, including The End Game, Super Terrific Happy Hour, and The Narrative Game, is available to Copper, Silver and Gold Tier subscribers at my website www.Grant-Williams.com. Copper Tier subscribers get access to all podcasts, while members of the Silver Tier get both the podcasts and my monthly newsletter, Things That Make You Go Hmmm… Gold Tier subscribers have access to my new series of in-depth video conversations, About Time. So if you enjoy what you hear on this show and want more high-quality content like it, make your way over to www.Grant-Williams.com and join our exciting community today!

FIFTEEN MINUTE FILM FANATICS
One shot: RIP Norm MacDonald

FIFTEEN MINUTE FILM FANATICS

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 10:05


Dan and Mike try to capture what made Norm the funniest person on the planet.  It's not easy, but they get as close as they can to an answer concerning the "aura of Normness" that he created in his carefully-crafted persona.   Please follow or subscribe to the show wherever you get your podcasts and on Twitter @15MinFilm and Facebook at Fifteen Minute Film Fanatics.   You can also contact us at FifteenMinuteFilm@gmail.com, and support the show with a buck or two at Venmo @FifteenMinuteFiIm.  All proceeds go right back to the show! Terrific bumper music by Jackson Frederick Smith. URL: http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Jackson_F_Smith/Jackson_Frederick_Smith/Cantina_Rag Comments: http://freemusicarchive.org/ Curator: The Beehive Recording Company Copyright: Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States: http:// 

Podcasts Bickley & Marotta
Bickley+Marotta discuss the terrific play of Rondale Moore

Podcasts Bickley & Marotta

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 38:31


Hour 3 has a Bickley Blast on Cards-Vikings and a visit from ASU coach Herm Edwards. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Podcasts Bickley & Marotta
Bickley+Marotta discuss the terrific play of Rondale Moore

Podcasts Bickley & Marotta

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 38:31


Hour 3 has a Bickley Blast on Cards-Vikings and a visit from ASU coach Herm Edwards. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The GAA Hour with Colm Parkinson
Terrific Tyrone, Mayo final mentality & ‘goals win games'

The GAA Hour with Colm Parkinson

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 82:25


Wooly is joined by Alan Brogan and Colm Cavanagh to review the All Ireland final.

Bavarian Football Works: For Bayern Munich fans
Bavarian Podcast Works: Weekend Warm-up Podcast Season 1, Episode 16 — A look at Germany's terrific performances; Addressing those Timo Werner and Konrad Laimer rumors; Looking at RB Leipzig and FC Barcelona!

Bavarian Football Works: For Bayern Munich fans

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 28:45


What a week it was for Bayern Munich players during this international break. There were plenty of wins and goals and perhaps an injury or two, but we've all made it to the weekend once again. Get ready for the next few days with Chuck....and JAKE! After weeks of promising to bring in a guest, Jake hopped on to give his takes on several pertinent topics. Here is what we have on tap: A quick look at the re-energized Germany squad and what this means under Hansi Flick moving forward. A discussion on the rumors linking Bayern Munich to both RB Leipzig's Konrad Laimer and Chelsea FC's Timo Werner. Assessing how Bayern Munich — with its weary legs — matches up with RB Leipzig and FC Barcelona. Find any of the contributors on Twitter @BavarianFBWorks, @jeffersonfenner, @TheBarrelBlog, @TommyAdams71, and @bfwinnn. For the latest and greatest in football news, Bayern news, Germany news, and transfer rumors, be sure to visit www.bavarianfootballworks.com! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices