Podcasts about Terrific

  • 1,089PODCASTS
  • 1,709EPISODES
  • 45mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Feb 6, 2023LATEST

POPULARITY

20152016201720182019202020212022

Categories



Best podcasts about Terrific

Show all podcasts related to terrific

Latest podcast episodes about Terrific

All of the Above Podcast
#98 - Truly Terrific Teaching Today with CA Teacher of the Year Jason Torres-Rangel!

All of the Above Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 6, 2023 73:40


Here at All of the Above we loooove teachers, especially super-dope ones. We're also, perhaps, a tad bit partial to California. That being the case, it should come as no surprise to our AOTA Family that we'd bring on yet another super-dope teacher from California–Jason Torres-Rangel!! Jason is a California State Teacher of the Year and a California nominee for the National Teacher of the Year competition, and he joins us to discuss the present and future of the teaching profession. But first, Jeff and Manuel take a look at recent headlines in education including a new study showing the benefits of small emergency grants for college students and a bit of shade being thrown at the Department of Education from the Government Accountability Office. → Get your Teach the Truth T-Shirt here! → View this episode on YouTube! AGENDA 0:00 - Welcome! 6:46 - Emergency grants boost college success 21:22 - GAO calls out Dept of Ed 35:55 - CA Teacher of the Year Jason Torres-Rangel 1:08:09 - Students walk out to protest CRT ban DO-NOW STORIES: Study shows small emergency grants can help college students stay in school Missing an opportunity: Ed Dept. criticized by GAO for teacher shortage strategy More about our guest: Los Angeles Unified AP English teacher is California nominee for national Teacher of the Year State Superintendent Tony Thurmond Announces 2023 California Teachers of the Year CLASS DISMISSED: Temecula students walk out to protest critical race theory ban Get MORE All of the Above: - Website - Podcast on multiple platforms via Anchor - Podcast via Apple Podcast - Podcast via Spotify - Twitter - Facebook Page Theme Music by its tajonthabeat --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/aota/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/aota/support

Screaming in the Cloud
The Evolution of DevRel with Jeremy Meiss

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 2, 2023 30:12


About JeremyJeremy is the Director of DevRel & Community at CircleCI, formerly at Solace, Auth0, and XDA. He is active in the DevRel Community, and is a co-creator of DevOpsPartyGames.com. A lover of all things coffee, community, open source, and tech, he is also house-broken, and (generally) plays well with others.Links Referenced: CircleCI: https://circleci.com/ DevOps Party Games: https://devopspartygames.com/ Twitter: Iamjerdog LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jeremymeiss/ TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Logicworks. Getting to the cloud is challenging enough for many places, especially maintaining security, resiliency, cost control, agility, etc, etc, etc. Things break, configurations drift, technology advances, and organizations, frankly, need to evolve. How can you get to the cloud faster and ensure you have the right team in place to maintain success over time? Day 2 matters. Work with a partner who gets it - Logicworks combines the cloud expertise and platform automation to customize solutions to meet your unique requirements. Get started by chatting with a cloud specialist today at snark.cloud/logicworks. That's snark.cloud/logicworksCorey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. I generally try to have people that I know in the ecosystem on this show from time to time, but somehow today's guest has never made it onto the show. And honestly, I have no excuse other than that, I guess I just like being contrary about it. Jeremy Meiss is the Director of DevRel and Community at CircleCI. Jeremy, thank you for finally getting on the show.Jeremy: Hey, you know what? I woke up months and months ago hoping I would be able to join and never have, so I appreciate you finally, you know, getting that celestial kick in the ass.Corey: I love the fact that this is what you lie awake at night worrying about. As all people should. So, let's get into it. You have been at CircleCI in their DevRel org—heading their DevRel org—for approximately 20 years, but in real-time and non-tech company timeframes, three years. But it feels like 20. How's that been? It's been an interesting three years, I'll say that much with the plague o'er the land.Jeremy: Yes, absolutely. No, it was definitely a time to join. I joined two weeks before the world went to shit, or shittier than it already was. And yeah, it's been a ride. Definitely see how everything's changed, but it's also been one that I couldn't be happier where I'm at and seeing the company grow.Corey: I've got to level with you. For the longest time, I kept encountering CircleCI in the same timeframes and context, as I did Travis CI. They both have CI in the name and I sort of got stuck on that. And telling one of the companies apart from the other was super tricky at the time. Now, it's way easier because Travis CI got acquired and then promptly imploded.Security issues that they tried to hide left and right, everyone I knew there long since vanished, and at this point, it is borderline negligence from my point of view to wind up using them in production. So oh, yeah, CircleCI, that's the one that's not trash. I don't know that you necessarily want to put that on a billboard somewhere, but that's my mental shortcut for it.Jeremy: You know, I'm not going to disagree with that. I think, you know, it had its place, I think there's probably only one or two companies nowadays actually propping it up as a business, and I think even they are actively trying to get out of it. So yeah, not going to argue there.Corey: I have been on record previously as talking about CI/CD—Continuous Integration slash Continuous Deployment—or for those who have not gone tumbling down that rabbit hole, the idea that when you push a commit to a particular branch on Git—or those who have not gotten to that point, push the button, suddenly code winds up deploying to different environments, occasionally production, sometimes staging, sometimes development, sometimes by accident—and there are a bunch of options in that space. AWS has a bunch of services under their CodeStar suite: CodeBuild, CodeDeploy, CodePipeline, and that's basically there as a marketing exercise by CI/CD companies that are effective because after having attempted to set those things up with the native offerings, you go scrambling to something else, anything else. GitHub Actions has also been heavily in that space because it's low friction to integrate, it's already there in GitHub, and that's awesome in some ways, terrible in others. But CircleCI has persistently been something that I see in a lot of different environments, both the open-source world, as well as among my clients, where they are using you folks to go from developer laptops to production safely and sanely.Jeremy: Absolutely, yeah. And I think that's one thing for us is, there's a niche of—you know, you can start if you're into AWS or you're into Google, or you're in—any of those big ecosystems, you can certainly use what they have, but those are always, like, add-on things, they're always like an afterthought of, “Oh, we're going to go add this,” or, “We're going to go add that.” And so, I think you adequately described it of, you know, once you start hitting scale, you're eventually going to start to want to use something, and I think that's where we generally fit in that space of, you know, you can start, but now you're going to eventually end up here and use best-in-class. I spent years Auth0 in the identity space, and it was the same kind of boat is that, you know, sure you can start with hopefully not rolling your own, but eventually you're going to end up wanting to use something best-in-class that does everything that you want it to do and does it right.Corey: The thing that just completely blows my mind is how much for all these companies, no matter who they are and how I talk to them, everyone talks about their CI/CD flow with almost a sense of embarrassment. And back in the days when I was running production environments, we use Jenkins as sort of a go-to answer for this. And that was always a giant screaming exemption to the infrastructure-as-code approach because you could configure it via the dashboard and the web interface and it would write that out as XML files. So, you wound up with bespoke thing lots of folks could interact with in different ways, and oh, by the way, it has access into development, staging, and production. Surely, there will be no disasters that happened as a result of this.And that felt terrible. And now we've gotten into a place where most folks are not doing that anymore, at least with the folks that I talk to, but I'm still amazed by how few best practices around a lot of this stuff has really emerged. Every time I see a CI/CD pipeline, it feels like it is a reimplementation locally of solving a global problem. You're the director of DevRel and have been for a few years now. Why haven't you fixed this yet?Jeremy: Primarily because I'm still stuck on the fact you mentioned, pushing a button and getting to XML. That just kind of stuck me there and sent me back that I can't come up with a solution at this point.Corey: Yeah, it's the way that you solve the gap—the schism as it were—between JSON and YAML. “Cool, we're going to use XML.” And everyone's like, “Oh, God, not that.” It's like, “Cool, now you're going to settle your differences or I'm going to implement other things, too.”Jeremy: That's right, yeah. I mean, then we're going to go use some bespoke company's own way of doing IAC. No, I think there's an element here where—I mean, it goes back to still using best-in-class. I think Hudson, which eventually became Jenkins, after you know, Cisco—was it Cisco? No, it was Sun—after Sun, you know, got their hands all over it, it was the thing. It's kind of, well, we're just going to spin this up and do it ourselves.But as the industry changes, we do more and more things on the cloud and we do it primarily because we're relocating the things that we don't want to have to manage ourselves with all of the overhead and all of the other stuff. We're going to go spit it over to the cloud for that. And so, I think there's been this shift in the industry that they still do, like you said, look at their pipelines with a little bit of embarrassment [laugh], I think, yeah. I chuckle when I think about that, but there is a piece where more and more people are recognizing that there is a better way and that you can—you don't have to look at your pipelines as this thing you hate and you can start to look at what better options there are than something you have to host yourself.Corey: What I'm wondering about now, though, because you've been fairly active in the space for a long time, which is a polite way of saying you have opinions—and you should hear the capital O and ‘Opinions' when I say it that way—let's fight about DevRel. What does DevRel mean to you? Or as I refer to it, ‘devrelopers?'Jeremy: Uh, devrelopers. Yes. You know, not to take from the standard DevOps answer, but I think it depends.Corey: That's the standard lawyer answer to anything up to and including, is it legal for me to murder someone? And it's also the senior consultant answer, to anything, too, because it turns out the world is baked and nuanced and doesn't lend itself to being resolved in 280 characters or less. That's what threads are for.Jeremy: Right [laugh]. Trademark. That is ultimately the answer, I think, with DevRel. For me, it is depending on what your company is trying to do. You ultimately want to start with building relationships with your developers because they're the ones using your product, and if you can get them excited about what they're doing with your product—or get excited about your product with what they're doing—then you have something to stand on.But you also have to have a product fit. You have to actually know what the hell your product is doing and is it going to integrate with whatever your developers want. And so, DevRel kind of stands in that gap that says, “Okay, here's what the community wants,” and advocates for the community, and then you have—it's going to advocate for the company back to the community. And hopefully, at the end of the day, they all shake hands. But also I've been around enough to recognize that there comes that point where you either a have to say, “Hey, our product for that thing is probably not the best thing for what you're trying to do. Here, you should maybe start at this other point.”And also understanding to take that even, to the next step to finish up the answer, like, my biggest piece now is all the fights that we have constantly around DevRel in the space of what is it and what is it not, DevRel is marketing. DevRel is sales. DevRel is product. And each of those, if you're not doing those things as a member of the company, you're not doing your job. Everybody in the company is the product. Everybody in the company is sales. Everybody in the company is marketing.Corey: Not everyone in the company realizes this, but I agree—Jeremy: Yes.Corey: Wholeheartedly.Jeremy: Yes. And so, that's where it's like yes, DevRel is marketing. Yes, it is sales. Because if you're not out there, spreading whatever the news is about your product and you're not actually, you know, showing people how to use it and making things easier for people, you're not going to have a job. And too often, these companies that—or too often I think a lot of DevRel teams find themselves in places where they're the first that get dropped when the company goes through things because sometimes it is just the fact that the company has not figured out what they really want, but also, sometimes it's the team hasn't really figured out how to position themselves inside the business.Corey: One of the biggest, I'll call it challenges that I see in the DevRel space comes down to defining what it is, first and foremost. I think that it is collectively a mistake for an awful lot of practitioners of developer relations, to wind up saying first and foremost that we're not marketing. Well, what is it that you believe that marketing is? In fact, I'll take it a step beyond that. I think that marketing is inherently the only place in most companies where we know that doing these things leads to good results, but it's very difficult to attribute or define that value, so how do we make sure that we're not first up on the chopping block?That has been marketing's entire existence. It's, you know that doing a whole bunch of things in marketing will go well for you, but as the old chestnut says, half your marketing budget is wasted and you'll go broke figuring out which half it is.Jeremy: Yeah. And whenever you have to make cuts, generally, they always, you know, always come to the marketing teams because hey, they're the ones spending, you know, millions of dollars a quarter on ads, or whatever it is. And so yeah, marketing has, in many ways figured this out. They're also the team that spends the most money in a company. So, I don't really know where to go with that isn't completely off the rails, but it is the reality. Like, that's where things happen, and they are the most in touch with what the direction of the company is going to ultimately be received as, and how it's going to be spoken about. And DevRel has great opportunities there.Corey: I find that when people are particularly militant about not liking sales or marketing or any other business function out there, one of the ways to get through them is to ask, “Great. In your own words, describe to me what you believe that department does. What is that?” And people will talk about marketing in a bunch of tropes—or sales in a bunch of tropes—where it is the worst examples of that.It's, “Terrific, great. Do you want me to wind up describing what you do as an engineer—in many cases—in the most toxic stereotype of Uber and 2015-style engineer I can come up with?” I think, in most cases if we're having a conversation and I haven't ended it by now, you would be horrified by that descriptor. Yeah. Not every salesperson is the skeezy used car salesman trying to trick you into something awful. Actual selling comes down to how do we wind up taking your pain away. One of my lines is, “I'm a consultant. You have problems and money. I will take both.”Jeremy: That's right [laugh]. Yeah, that's right.Corey: If you don't have a painful problem, I have nothing to sell you and all I'm doing is wasting my breath trying.Jeremy: Yeah, exactly. And that's where—I'll say it two ways—the difference between good marketing teams are, is understanding that pain point of the people that they're trying to sell to. And it's also a difference between, like, good and bad, even, DevRel teams is understanding what are the challenges that your users are having you're trying to express to, you're trying to fix? Figure that out because if you can't figure that out, then you or your marketing team are probably soon to be on the block and they're going to bring someone else in.Corey: I'm going to fight you a little bit, I suspect, in that a line I've heard is that, “Oh, DevRel is part of product because we are the voice of the community back into the development cycle of what product is building.” And the reason that I question that is I think that it glosses over an awful lot of what makes product competent as a department and not just a function done by other people. It's, “Oh, you're part of the product. Well, great. How much formal training have you had as part of your job on conducting user research and interviews with users and the rest?”And the answer invariably rounds to zero and, okay, in other words, you're just giving feedback in a drive-by fashion that not structured in any way and your product people are polite enough not to call you out on it. And that's when the fighting and slapping begins.Jeremy: Yeah. I don't think we're going to disagree too much there. I think one of the challenges, though, is for the very reason you just mentioned, that the product teams tend to hear your product sucks. And we've heard all the people telling us that, like, people in the community say that, they hear that so much and they've been so conditioned to it that it just rolls off their back, like, “Okay, whatever.” So, for DevRel teams, even if you're in product, which we can come back to that, regardless of where you're at, like, bringing any type of feedback you bring should have a person, a name associated with it with, like, Corey at Duckbill Group hates this product.Corey: Uh-oh [laugh]. Whenever my name is tied to feedback, it never goes well for me, but that will teach me eventually, ideally, to keep my mouth shut.Jeremy: Yeah. Well, how's that working for you?Corey: I'll let you know if it ever happens.Jeremy: Good. But once you start making the feedback like an actual person, it changes the conversation. Because now it's like, oh, it's not this nebulous, like, thing I can not listen to. It's now oh, it's actually a person at a specific company. So, that's one of the challenges in working with product that you have to overcome.When I think about DevRel in product, while I don't think that's a great spot for it, I think DevRel is an extension of product. That's part of where that, like, the big developer experience craze comes from, and why it is a valuable place for DevRel to be able to have input into is because you tend to be the closest to the people actually using the product. So, you have a lot of opportunities and a big surface area to have some impact.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Strata. Are you struggling to keep up with the demands of managing and securing identity in your distributed enterprise IT environment? You're not alone, but you shouldn't let that hold you back. With Strata's Identity Orchestration Platform, you can secure all your apps on any cloud with any IDP, so your IT teams will never have to refactor for identity again. Imagine modernizing app identity in minutes instead of months, deploying passwordless on any tricky old app, and achieving business resilience with always-on identity, all from one lightweight and flexible platform.Want to see it in action? Share your identity challenge with them on a discovery call and they'll hook you up with a complimentary pair of AirPods Pro. Don't miss out, visit Strata.io/ScreamingCloud. That's Strata dot io slash ScreamingCloud.Corey: I think that that is a deceptively nuanced statement. One of the things I learned from an earlier episode I had with Dr. Christina Maslach, is contributors to occupational burnout, so much of it really distills down—using [unintelligible 00:16:35] crappy layman's terms—to a lack of, I guess what I'm going to call relevance or a lack—a feeling like you are not significant to what the company is actually doing in any meaningful way. And I will confess to having had a number of those challenges in my career when I was working in production environments because, yeah, I kept the servers up and the applications up, but if you really think about it, one of the benefits of working in the system space—or the production engineers base, or DevOps, or platform engineering, or don't even start with me these days—is that what you do conveys almost seamlessly from company to company. Like, the same reason that I can do what I do now, I don't care what your company does, necessarily, I just know that the AWS bill is a bounded problem space and I can reason about it almost regardless of what you do.And if I'm keeping the site up, okay, it doesn't matter if we're streaming movies or selling widgets or doing anything, just so long as I don't find that it contradicts my own values. And that's great, but it also is isolating because you feel like you're not really relevant to the direction of what the company actually does. It's, “Okay, so what does this company do?” “We make rubber bands,” and well, I'm not really a rubber band connoisseur, but I could make sure that the website stays up. But it just feels like there's a disconnect element happening.Jeremy: That is real. It is very real. And one of the ways that I tried to kind of combat that, and I help my team kind of really try and keep this in mind, is we try to meet as much as possible with the people that are actually doing the direction, whether it be product marketing, or whether it's in product managers, or it's even, you know, in engineering is have some regular conversations with what we do as a company. How are we going to fit with that in what we do and what we say and all of our objectives, and making sure that everything we do ties to something that helps other teams and that fits within the business and where it's going so that we grow our understanding of what the company is trying to do so that we don't kind of feel like a ship that's without a sail and just floating wherever things go.Corey: On some level, I am curious as to what you're seeing as we navigate this—I don't know if it's a recession,' I don't know if it's a correction; I'm not sure what to call it—but my gut tells me that a lot of things that were aimed at, let's call it developer quality of life, they were something of a necessity in the unprecedented bull market that we've seen for the last decade at some point because most companies cannot afford to compete with the giant tech company compensation packages, so you have to instead talk about quality of life and what work-life balance looks like, and here's why all of the tools and processes here won't drive you to madness. And now it feels like, “Oh, we don't actually have to invest in a lot of those things, just because oh yeah, like, the benefits here are you're still going to be employed next week. So, how about that?” And I don't think that's a particularly healthy way to interact with people—it's certainly not how I do—but it does seem that worrying about keeping developers absolutely thrilled with every aspect of their jobs has taken something of a backseat during the downturn.Jeremy: I don't know. I feel like developer satisfaction is still an important piece, even though, you know, we have a changing market. And as you described, if you're not happy with the tool you're using, you're not going to be as productive than using the tool or using—you know, whether it's an actual developer productivity tool, or it's even just the fact that you might need two monitors, you're not going to be as productive if you're not enjoying what you're doing. So, there is a piece of it, I think, the companies are recognizing that there are some tools that do ultimately benefit and there's some things that they can say, we're not going to invest in that area right now. We're good with where we're at.Corey: On some level, being able to say, “No, we're not going to invest in that right now,” is the right decision. It is challenging, in some cases, to wind up talking to some team members in some orgs, who do not have the context that is required to understand why that decision is being made. Because without context, it looks like, “Mmm, no. I'm just canceling Christmas for you personally this year. Sorry, doesn't it suck to be you? [singing] Dut, dut.” And that is very rarely how executives make decisions, except apparently if they're Elon Musk.Jeremy: Right. Well, the [Muskrat 00:21:23] can, you know, sink any company—Corey: [laugh].Jeremy: — and get away with it. And that's one thing I've really been happy with where I'm at now, is you have a leadership team that says, “Hey, here's where things are, and here's what it looks like. And here's how we're all contributing to where we're going, and here's the decisions we're going to make, and here's how—” they're very open with what's going on. And it's not a surprise to anybody that the economic time means that we maybe can't go to 65 events next year. Like, that's just reality.But at the end of the day, we still have to go and do a job and help grow the company. So, how can we do that more efficiently? Which means that we—it leaves it better to try and figure that out than to be so nebulous, with like, “Yep, nope. You can't go do that.” That's where true leadership comes to is, like, laying it out there, and just, you know, getting people alongside with you.Corey: How do you see DevRel evolving? Because I think we had a giant evolution over the past few years. Because suddenly, the old vision of DevRel—at least in some quarters, which I admit I fell a little too deeply into—was, I'm going to go to all the conferences and give all of the talks, even though most of them are not related to the core of what I do. And maybe that's a viable strategy; maybe it's not. I think it depends on what your business does.And I don't disagree with the assertion that going and doing something in public can have excellent downstream effects, even if the connection is not obvious. But suddenly, we weren't able to do that, and people were forced to almost reinvent how a lot of that works. Now, that the world is, for better or worse, starting to open up again, how do you see it evolving? Are we going right back to a different DevOps days in a different city every week?Jeremy: I think it's a lot more strategic now. I think generally, there is less mountains of money that you can pull from to go and do whatever the hell you want. You have to be more strategic. I said that a few times. Like, there's looking at it and making sure, like, yeah, it would be great to go and, you know, get in front of 50,000 people this quarter or this year, whatever you want to do, but is that really going to move the bottom line for us? Is that really going to help the business, or is that just helping your Delta miles?What is really the best bang for the buck? So, I think DevRel as it evolves, in the next few years, has to come to a good recognition moment of we need to be a little bit more prescriptive in how we do things within our company and not so willy-nilly return to you know, what we generally used to get away with. That means you're going to see a lot more people have to be held to account within their companies of, is what you're doing actually match up to our business goal here? How does that fit? And having to explain more of that, and that's, I think, for some people will be easy. Some people are going to have to stretch that muscle, and others are going to be in a real tough pickle.Corey: One last topic I want to get into with you is devopspartygames.com, an online more or less DevOps, quote-unquote, “Personality” assortment of folks who wind up playing online games. I was invited once and promptly never invited back ever again. So first, was it something I said—obviously—and two what is that and how—is that still going in this post-pandemic-ish era?Jeremy: I like how you answered your own question first; that way I don't have to answer it. The second one, the way it came about was just, you know, Matty and I had started missing that interaction that we would tend to have in person. And so, one of the ways we started realizing is we play these, you know, Jackbox games, and why can't we just do this with DevOps tech prompts? So, that's kind of how it kicked off. We started playing around doing it for fun and then I was like, “You know, we should—we could do this as a big, big deal for foreseeable future.”Where's that now is, we actually have not done one online for—what is it? So probably, like, eight, nine months, primarily because it's harder and harder to do so as everybody [laugh]—we're now doing a little bit more travel, and it's hard to do those—as you know, doing podcasts, it takes a lot of work. It's not an easy kind of thing. And so, we've kind of put that on pause. But we actually did our first in-person DevOps Party Games at DevOpsDays Chicago recently, and that was a big hit, I think, and opportunity to kind of take what we're doing virtually, and the fun and excitement that we generally would have—relatively half-drunk—to actually doing it actually in-person at an event. And in the different—like, just as giving talks in person was a different level of interaction with the crowd, the same thing is doing it in person. So, it was just kind of a fun thing and an opportunity maybe to continue to do it in person.Corey: I think we all got a hell of a lot better very quickly at speaking to cameras instead of audiences and the rest. It also forced us to be more focused because the camera gives you nothing in a way that the audience absolutely does.Jeremy: They say make love to the camera, but it doesn't work anyways.Corey: I really want to thank you for spending as much time as you have talking to me. If people want to learn more about who you are and what you're up to, where should they go?Jeremy: Well, for the foreseeable future, or at least what we can guess, you can find me on the Twitters at @Iamjerdog. You can find me there or you can find me at, you know, LinkedIn, at jeremymeiss, LinkedIn. And you know, probably come into your local DevOpsDays or other conference as well.Corey: Of course. And we will, of course, put links to that in the show notes.Jeremy: Excellent.Corey: Thank you so much for being so generous with your time. It is always appreciated. And I do love talking with you.Jeremy: And I appreciate it, Corey. It was great beyond, finally. I won't hold it against you anymore.Corey: Jeremy Meiss, Director of DevRel at CircleCI. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, along with an angry, irritated comment talking about how CI/CD is nonsense and the correct way to deploy to production is via the tried-and-true method of copying and pasting.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.

FIFTEEN MINUTE FILM FANATICS
One-Shot: The Man in the Iron Mask

FIFTEEN MINUTE FILM FANATICS

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 1, 2023 5:52


In this short episode, Mike defends one of his guilty pleasures from the 1990s: Randall Wallace's much-maligned Man in the Iron Mask (1998).  Why do the movies we see as kids stick with us like they do?  And why can't we celebrate the cheesy soundtrack played over the credits?  Mike can!  All for one!   Terrific bumper music:  Bluebird by E's Jammy Jams Creative Commons — Attribution 3.0 Unported— CC BY 3.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... Music provided by FreeMusic109 https://youtube.com/FreeMusic109 Please subscribe to the show wherever you get your podcasts and follow us on YouTube and Twitter and Letterboxd @15MinFilm.  Please rate and review the show on Apple podcasts and contact us at FifteenMinuteFilm@gmail.com.  Twitter: https://twitter.com/15minfilm Letterboxd: https://letterboxd.com/15MinFilm/ Website: https://fifteenminutefilm.podbean.com/  

The Real Estate Sales Podcast
TRES 242: Jimmy Burgess - 23 Real Estate Tech Tools All Agents Should Be Using

The Real Estate Sales Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2023 15:56


Tech is an INVALUABLE tool for real estate agents to use. In today's episode of The Real Estate podcast, Jimmy goes over 23 different tools that will generate CRAZY growth for you and your business. ChatGPT ChatGPT is an AI that focuses on creating natural, human-Esque speech based on a prompt. Testimonial Tree Testimonial Tree is a platform designed to help you manage your online reputation, a VITAL aspect of being a successful agent. BombBomb BombBomb is an online service that lets you send highly personalized and value-adding videos to clients. BoxBrownie BoxBrownie is a service designed to provide real estate agents with PREMIUM quality pictures and drawings for virtually every need. Keeping Current Matters Keeping Current Matters is a service that takes relevant, informative content and breaks it down into easily understandable terms for clients. HomeBot HomeBot sends out monthly letters to homeowners about their property with personalized branding for you and your business. CapCut CapCut is a free service that gives agents the ability to quickly create and edit videos, PERFECT for social media posts. Clip On Ring Lights Clip on ring lights, especially for phones, is a fantastic way to get INCREDIBLE lighting for your videos. RedX RedX is a service that offers agents lists of phone numbers they can call to generate leads. Spacio Spacio is a tool that helps agents market their listings and open houses that is optimized for social media and click-through. co co is an AI that actually provides HANDWRITTEN notes for real estate agents, to help them provide value for clients and generate leads. MileIQ MileIQ is an app that lets agents EASILY track how many miles they've traveled for both business and for personal reasons. Canva Canva is a platform that gives real estate agents TERRIFIC graphics for social media posts. TurboScan TurboScan is an app that lets real estate agents QUICKLY scan any documents they may need to scan. Forewarn Forewarn is an app that lets agents punch in information and receive detailed background checks on people they may meet with, to ensure their safety. Hootsuite Hootsuite is a platform that allows agents to create content calendars, so they know EXACTLY when to publish content and can focus on meeting with clients. ShowingTime ShowingTime is a time management tool and data provider used by PLENTY of real estate agents, and for good reason. Coffee and Contracts Coffee and Contracts is a website that provides several different formats for social media posts, as well as a content calendar. Adobe Premiere Pro Adobe Premiere Pro is an app that provides agents with professional editing software for their videos and content. Audible Audible is a platform that provides users with thousands of e-books and is a fantastic source of information for realtors. Calendly Calendly is a time management platform that lets you set and easily track appointments and open houses. Waze Waze is an app for your phone that provides directions for real estate agents when they're traveling. Quickbooks Quickbooks is an online accounting app that gives real estate agents VALUABLE information and makes accounting simple. We live in an age FULL of wild and important technologies. Use some of these technologies in your real estate business, and you'll be SHOCKED by how much growth you'll see. Do you have a video or content idea perfect for your business? Share it with Jimmy! Connect with Jimmy Burgess on LinkedIn and Facebook, and his YouTube channel.  If you like what you heard today, we'd love it if you'd share a rating or review and then subscribe to the podcast and tell others about it. You can find The Real Estate Sales Podcast on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify, Audible, and our website, The Real Estate Sales Podcast.

The Beer Engine
A Terrific Podcast for True Beer Lovers - Believe Me, It's HUGE

The Beer Engine

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2023 120:43


Let me tell you, folks, The Beer Engine is a fantastic podcast. Griff and Tony, they're great guys, they know their beer. And let me tell you, that Philly cheesesteak they talked about on the show, it was a disaster. Two hours for delivery? Can you believe it? Sad! But you know what, that's not even the best part of the show. The real winner is Tony's side project beer. It's going to be huge, believe me. And that game they play, Untrapped, it's a tournament of flagship beers. It's tremendous, just tremendous. I give The Beer Engine a solid 10 out of 10. A real winner.Follow us on Instagram: @beerenginepod Email us: beerengineshow@gmail.comGive us a tip: ko-fi.com/beerenginepodcast ★ Support this podcast ★

FIFTEEN MINUTE FILM FANATICS
One-Shot: Kindergarten Cop

FIFTEEN MINUTE FILM FANATICS

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2023 2:30


In this short "The 90s in 90" episode, Mike talks about Kindergarten Cop as a great 90s movie that makes everyone pine for the days of insane plots and the novelty of Arnold in street clothes.  It's not a tumor--so relax and give it a listen! Terrific bumper music:  Bluebird by E's Jammy Jams Creative Commons — Attribution 3.0 Unported— CC BY 3.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... Music provided by FreeMusic109 https://youtube.com/FreeMusic109 Please subscribe to the show wherever you get your podcasts and follow us on YouTube and Twitter and Letterboxd @15MinFilm.  Please rate and review the show on Apple podcasts and contact us at FifteenMinuteFilm@gmail.com.  Twitter: https://twitter.com/15minfilm Letterboxd: https://letterboxd.com/15MinFilm/ Website: https://fifteenminutefilm.podbean.com/  

Sound The War Cry
50. Growing Terrific Tomatoes

Sound The War Cry

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2023 22:42


Have you ever grown tomatoes before? With so many different, yummy varieties, I think this should be your year to really master growing tomatoes. In this podcast episode I will read an article from Mother Earth magazine about which tomato breeds are best to buy from seed to have in your garden this year. It's going to be amazing! Head on over to my other podcast "Healthy Families Rule" for more great tips on health and wellness. Rate and Review the Podcast on ItunesListen to my other podcast "Healthy Families Rule"Email me: Soundthewarcry@gmail.com

A Pen And A Napkin
A Pen And A Napkin-Episode #157 Dane Bacon

A Pen And A Napkin

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 62:42


Terrific conversation with Dane Bacon, GBB HC at Bellevue West (NE) High School. Coach Bacon and I go through a variety of topics, from rebuilding the culture of the T-Bird program to the keys to winning close games. In addition, we talk about their recent 93-91 game (you read that correctly), along with shooting drills, transition offense, BLOB philosophy and more!

Comics In Motion Podcast
A Dummies Guide to Geekdom: Mr. Terrific

Comics In Motion Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 41:40


In this episode, we're joined by Matt B Lloyd, to answer the question 'Who is Mr Terrific?'. First appearing for DC Comics in 1942, Mr Terrific is actually two different characters, with the second appearing in 1997. Both found their way to crimefighting in unexpected ways but quickly grew into the role. Terry Sloane, then Michael Holt, are both non-super-powered characters trying to do their best for their communities. With a possible TV show in the works, this is definitely worth a listen! Find more from Matt on his Twitter: https://twitter.com/MattB_Lloyd His podcast shows "Classic Comics with Matt B Lloyd" and "Earth-Two in the Bronze Age" are available on the Comics In Motion podcast feed https://anchor.fm/comics-in-motion-podcast/ He is also a contributor to two books "Politics in Gotham: The Batman Universe and Political Thought" and "Black Panther and Philosophy: What Can Wakanda Offer the World?" both are available now from amazon. Find more from the show, including how you can send in suggestions and questions, at: https://superdummy.co.uk/geekguide --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/comics-in-motion-podcast/message

TV Guidance Counselor Podcast
TV Guidance Counselor Episode 562: Rockne S. O'Bannon

TV Guidance Counselor Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2023 134:48


April 29 - May 5, 1967 This week Ken welcomes director, producer and writer (Evil, Farscape, The New Twilight Zone, V, Seaquest DSV) Rockne S. O'Bannon to the show.  Ken and Rockne discuss Ken's long time love of Rockne's work and how often it comes up on the show, 1967, the amazing nature of not aging since 1967, the boom of sci-fi TV in 1966, Film reboots of classic TV shows, quantum entanglement, growing up in LA, Rockne's mother being a Busby Barkley dancer, Rockne's father being a gaffer at Warner Brothers, writing your first pilot script at age 10 for The Boy from U.N.C.L.E., realizing people make television at an early age, Isaac Asimov's essay on how sexy Mr. Spock is, Lawrence Welk swimsuit issue, innovation in animal training, Raven with a Gun, writing for streaming shows and dealing with not needing the convention ad break structure, Sci-Fi Channel movie templates, Laugh-In, Hollywood Teletype, commissioned art, the rise of hippy culture in the mainstream, TV Guide's incredibly detailed listings for everything including reruns and sports, Frankenstein Jr, Space Angel, Clutch Cargo, The Andy Griffith Show, The Dick Van Dyke shows status as the greatest TV sitcom ever, Pistols & Petticoats, Gunsmoke, Tom Skerrit's week, The Avengers, Johnny Carson reruns, Saturday Night Live, TV shows about television, It's About Time, Ed Sullivan, the pre-muppet Muppets, Roger Miller's variety show, FBI, Rockne's Dad taking home TV scripts for him to study, the horror of pay tv, white guys as Native Americans, westerns, Steve Allen's invention of everything, Mr. Terrific, Captain Nice, Buck Henry, Get Smart!, The New Twilight Zone, "Wordplay", "The Shadow Man", Darkroom with James Coburn, Joey Bishop, Don Herbert is Mr. Wizard, TV Close Ups, The National Science Test, The Saint, The Man from U.N.C.L.E., Girl from U.N.C.L.E., Red Skelton, The Invaders, pinkies, playing it cool around celebrities, Albert Brooks, Night of the Meek, The Afterhours, Fame is the Name of the Game, Lost in Space, Batman '66, Fringe, Evil, time travel, Time Tunnel, being the new Irwin Allen by mistake, gadgets, I Spy, Wild Wild West, Honey West, Green Hornet, Once Upon a Time in Hollywood, F Troop, Larry Storch and Forrest Tucker's chemistry, not wanting to talk to Milton Berle, short lived shows that had an outsized impact on pop culture, the power of villains, vigilantes, Bob & Ray, Tim Conway, "you're very pleased to meet me", Patrick McNee's secrets to life, nudists, Mod Tampons, TV Teletype, and Chuck Connors, as a Cowboy in Africa. 

You Better You Bet
Terrific Football Tuesday (1/10)

You Better You Bet

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2023 20:43


Shaun Morash and Adam Candee are in for Nick & Ken today and kicking off Tuesday's show reacting to last night's College Football National Championship between Georgia & TCU, a game in which Georgia rail-roaded, dump-trucked, seal-clubbed, curb-stomped and outright dominated TCU, winning the title game 65-7. To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices

WROL Broadcast: DC Legends Unofficial Podcast!
Burgershack: Dawnstar & Mr. Terrific review

WROL Broadcast: DC Legends Unofficial Podcast!

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2023 46:17


In this edition of the Burgershack we discuss Dawnstar and Mr. Terrific! We also discuss reworks of Cyborg Superman and Livewire plus the new Tournament of Legends! Watch with video: YouTube: https://youtu.be/ptrZTOfFJPw Rumble: https://rumble.com/dclegends Audio Only: https://linktr.ee/WROLBroadcast Legendary Orders: Dawnstar - 5,4,1]2/3 Mr. Terrific - 4,3 or 5,1 then 2 (need L5 to have full use of his kit) Cyborg Superman - 4,3,2,1],5 (1 much earlier if you are building for evasion/Cheshire) - 2023 rework Livewire - 1,5]4/3/2 (dealers choice after first two - 2023 rework) _____________________________________________________________________________ Resources: Our Discord Channel: https://discord.gg/M4Dojo New Player Guide: https://youtu.be/70ed36-sVPk Hatemael's Legendary Order Guide: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1uDmcPgUQUfbyjhKb1bBGFEqmVsN_thqf-5VyHPpvJI8/edit?usp=sharing The Court of Owls Master Tier List Spreadsheet version: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1-13VDLLLG4SlzpbbV24LrQrXkxf6x9hnAzqZbmHYBQc/edit?usp=sharing Abcuts' amazing website: https://dcltoolkit.com/ Contact us: WROLBroadcast@gmail.com Twitter- @WROLBroadcast ______________________________________________________________________________ Attribution: https://freesound.org/s/371517/ Synthetic Church Choir by Timbre https://freesound.org/s/352531/ Epic_Heroic_Orchestral_Dramatic.mp3 by SoundFlakes https://freesound.org/s/423499/ Dream (Epic Retro Synth Music).wav by bigmanjoe https://freesound.org/s/426669/ https://freesound.org/s/250164/ by Kwahmah_02 https://freesound.org/s/391828/ by zagi2 https://freesound.org/s/27451/ by acclivity https://freesound.org/s/96541/ by tim.kahn https://freesound.org/s/61322/ by mansardian https://freesound.org/s/437332/ by FullMetalJedi https://freesound.org/s/405564/ by Timbre https://freesound.org/s/218372/ by copyc4t

Slay Away
BONUS: [Interview] Director George Popov Invites Us to Step Through a Doorway and Into the SIDEWORLD

Slay Away

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 43:44


E.L. King interviews special guest George Popov, director of the folk horror documentary series SIDEWORLD. Bulgarian-born Popov has been revered for his unique visual style and carefully crafted atmosphere. The SIDEWORLD series currently has three installments, Haunted Forests of England, Terrors of the Sea, and Damnation Village. Each explores a trove of frightening tales, myths, and folklore. George's early impact on British cinema is an exciting sign of things to come, with his work ‘Hex' (2017) and ‘The Droving' (2020) featured in Rob Young's book 'The Magic Box: Viewing Britain through the rectangular window', a catalog and exploration of culturally defining British films and television, labeled "Terrific" and "A lucid and patriotic guided tour" by the New York Times. Both films also received glowing reviews from top UK film critic and writer for Empire Magazine, Kim Newman, who praised the films for breathing life into the folk horror genre. You can #SlayAwayWithUs for new episodes on Fridays as we chat about lore, gore, the inspiration behind your favorite horror films, and every kill in between with special guests. "It's Slaying Time" is performed by voice actor Chris Kane. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/slay-away/message

The Best Interest Podcast
Episode 45 - A Terrific Interview - Jesse Cramer on “The Struggle is Real”

The Best Interest Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 57:01


Big thanks to Justin Peters, from The Struggle is Real podcast, for allowing me to share this episode. A few months ago, Justin and I sat down to discuss helping young adults with their personal finances. We had a great conversation, which I want to share with you in its entirety!    If you're curious to learn more, check out Justin's Show Notes below:   If you're paying attention to your portfolio right now, you know the stock market has been on a nosedive, and if you're anything like me, this market drop has you feeling discouraged.   I continue doing all the right things. I maxed out my IRA, I'm dollar cost averaging through my 401K, and even investing my net earnings in my brokerage account.   All of this yet I'm still seeing my net worth go backwards. I'm beginning to question if investing my money is still the right thing to do.   Well luckily my friend Jesse Cramer is here to talk me off the ledge. It could be investing for your future or changing your career path to align with your passion. Jesse reminded me that the right choice doesn't always create short-term success but over the long-run, it will.   Aside from being my personal therapist, Jesse has had a ton of success in creating his personal finance blog, The Best Interest. His writing has also been featured in CNBC, MSN, the Motley Fool, Yahoo Finance, and more.   Jesse started The Best Interest blog in 2018 when he was working as an engineer but over the last year, realizing how much passion he had for personal finance, he made a career pivot and now works for a wealth management firm.   If you are considering changing careers to align more with your passion, this will be a great episode to listen to. Jesse shares his thought process behind his decision even though it meant taking a pay cut (for now).   We get into a lot of money conversation as well including the financial order of operations, investing in the market vs investing in yourself, and a useful thought process called the success to stress ratio. From my “lost and confused” to my senior investors, this episode has something for everyone.   Key Takeaways: - How Jesse went from being lost with finances to a personal finance blogger - Why Jesse took a pay cut to switch careers - Why making the right choice now will lead to success in the long-run even if in the short-term it doesn't pay off - Using the financial order of operation to get started investing - Should I invest or pay off debt first? What about investing in a business? - How to get started budgeting - Success to stress ratio - What Dave Ramsey got right about credit cards (absolute rules) - Merging money with your significant other   Mentions: Joel O'Leary on TSIR (Apple Podcasts or Spotify) Darren Chait on TSIR (Apple Podcasts or Spotify)   More of Justin & The Struggle is Real: Show Notes: https://justinpeters.co/thestruggleisreal/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/justinleepeters/   More of The Best Interest: Check out the Best Interest Blog at bestinterest.blog Contact me at jesse@bestinterest.blog   The Best Interest Podcast is a personal podcast meant for educational and entertainment. It should not be taken as financial advice, and is not prescriptive of your financial situation.

Social Science Bites
David Dunning on the Dunning-Kruger Effect

Social Science Bites

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2023 19:22


In the most innocent interpretation, suggesting someone should ‘do their own research' is a reasonable bit of advice. But in the superheated world of social media discourse, #DoYourOwnResearch is a spicy rejoinder that essentially challenges someone to Google the subject since they clearly don't know what they're talking about. But Googling, social psychologist David Dunning pointedly notes, is not research. “The beauty and the terror of the internet,” he tells interviewer David Edmonds in this Social Science Bites podcast, “is that there's a lot of terrific information, but there's also a lot of misinformation and sometimes outright fraud. “People often don't have the wherewithal to distinguish.” This distinguishing is an area where Dunning, a professor at the University of Michigan, does his own research. While doing your own internet sleuthing isn't toxic on its face, Dunning suggests that often “you don't know when you're researching your way into a false conclusion, and … you don't know when to stop. The real hard problem with DYOR is when do you know when to stop: you go and you look at a couple of web pages, and ‘Well, you've learned something! Terrific!' But you don't know how much there is behind it that you still need to learn.” One driver of DYOR, Dunning adds, is the idea that gaining (and deploying) knowledge is one's own responsibility, which pretty much runs counter to science, which sees gaining knowledge as a collective enterprise. One piece of collective effort in which Dunning has made a very public mark is in describing what's come to be known as the Dunning-Kruger effect, named for Dunning and fellow social psychologist Justin Kruger of New York University, after work they originally described two decades ago in “Unskilled and unaware of it: How difficulties in recognizing one's own incompetence lead to inflated self-assessments” in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. The popular definition of the Dunning-Kruger effect, Dunning explains, is that “people who are incompetent or unskilled or not expert in a field lack expertise to recognize that they lack expertise. So they come to conclusions, decisions, opinions that they think are just fine when they're, well, wrong.” Dunning and Kruger's initial research was based on simple tests – of grammar, logical thinking, classical psychology quizzes, even sense of humor – asking subjects how well they think they're doing relative to everyone else. They found that the bottom 25 percent of participants tended to think they were doing above average. “But no.” “To know what you don't know,” he offers, “you need to know what you need to know to realize that your thinking diverges from that.” It's not true in every endeavor, he adds. “I'm a terrible golfer,” Dunning says. “And I'm fully aware that I‘m a terrible golfer!” The effect tends to show up when the skill of assessing outcomes is roughly similar to the skill of achieving outcomes. So when your golf ball flies into the nearby body of water, you don't need special skills to know that's bad. Becoming an expert in everything is out of the question; the real skill will be in identifying who is a legitimate expert and drawing on their insights. (And the right expert, Dunning notes “is the right experts. With an S on the end.”) For the record, the pair – who just received the 2023 Grawemeyer Award in Psychology for their Dunning-Kruger effect work - did not name the concept after themselves, although, as Dunning says, they're “tickled pink that our names will forever be associated with the nincompoops, incompetent ignorant cranks, if you will.”

Atlantis After Dark
Goals vs Resolutions, sitcom characters and is Cyborg Superman the answer to Cheshire

Atlantis After Dark

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2023 86:52


Hello, hello everyone and welcome to a New Year's Day episode of AAD. Ryno joins the show, we talk re-works and new chars, SEKJU is worried Mr. Terrific might not live up to his name and Jerry Seinfeld asks “What's the deal with Dawnstar?” How good is Cyborg Superman, Tewty announces he's playing Blanche on a re-boot of the Golden Girls and who's better… Cap'n Cold or Cap'n Crunch? In a bonus (non-DCL) topic BIFF counts down his top 25 sitcom characters of all-time, the group debates and Miss Junk anticipates the Reddit blowback. So grab a glass for some “hair of the dog” and tune in right now…. same AAD time, same AAD channel.

Faith Community Bible Church
Faith and Works – Part 1

Faith Community Bible Church

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2023 39:04


Slideshow for this message is available Introduction James 2 Happy New Year, Faith Community Bible Church. Welcome to 2023. Today we return to the book of James and we are in James chapter 2 verse 14. So turn with me there. Now it's been about a month since we've been in the book of James and today we come to the heart. Everything James is trying to say revolves around the hub of chapter 2 verses 14-26. There could hardly be a more important section of the Bible to understand if you are going to get your mind the doctrine of justification, the doctrine of how we are made right with God. Let's review what James is trying to do. Remember the setup of the book of James. James was the brother of Jesus. He grew up with Jesus. He washed dishes along side of Jesus. He split wood and worked in the garden with Jesus. But he didn't believe in Jesus till after the resurrection. The fact that this sort of unbelief was possible frightened him. Realizing that it was possible to be in this kind of proximity to the Lord of the universe without possessing genuine faith was eye opening to say the least. How could that be? He thought he had a faith. But upon examination, it's pretty hard to say you have a genuine faith while simultaneously accusing the Messiah, God come in the flesh, of being a lunatic. That's a pretty good indication your not on the right track. So it probably got James wondering, “How many people think they have saving faith but really don't.” How many people think, “Oh yeah, I'm good with God.” And God saying to them, “I'm not good with you.” So the book of James was written as a test for the legitimacy of our faith. James is on a mission to make sure you and I are not deceived the way he was. Many people come to church, live moral lives and think because they do those things, they are Christians. But that does not make them Christians. So what does? James wants to tell us. He doesn't want us to be deceived. Here's the really, really scary thing about being deceived. By definition, you don't know it. You are convinced you are not one of those poor deceived fellows. There's not even a hint of doubt. I'm not deceived! But the reality is you are. When the reality finally lands, there is shock, surprise, maybe even horror. Let me give you an example. If I were to ask you, “Do you think you are good judge of people's character?” You'd probably say, “Yes.” That's how 99% of the human race answers that question. Let me ask you a second question, do you think that 99% of people are good judges of character? Not a chance in the world. In fact, most studies reveal that the people who are the worst at this are the most confident. They are the most blind. And you might think, there's no way. I know I'm a good judge of character. But how do you know you're not one of the people who is the most confident but in fact is the most blind? The only way to know for sure would be to take an objective test. To trust a test outside of our own perception. Well, that's what James is doing here in regards to faith. He's saying, “I actually don't really care what you say. People can SAY and do SAY anything. I'm going to trust the objective test results.” He's trying to push our confidence outside of our own perception to something objective. He's trying to say, the whole problem with being deceived is that you are listening to the wrong source. You need other sources of truth. Your relying too heavily on your internal world. You need to locate your confidence on something objective outside of your internal world. And so he's developing a series of objective tests to help us evaluate the genuineness of our faith. That's what the book of James is all about. And we've seen many of these test thus far in the book. Genuine faith has joy in trials Genuine faith doesn't seek the world's approval Genuine faith is not characterized by anger. Genuine faith does not show favoritism. But today we come to the core principle at work in all tests. It's the operating principle out of which the test questions come. And here is that principle: Genuine faith works. This is a two week series on verses 14-26. Today we are going to focus on the principle in verses 14-18 and then next week will focus on the examples he gives in verses 19-26. So let's look at the principle here: Now every Christian who reads their Bible carefully, at some point in their life struggles with this text. Why? Because it appears on a surface reading to be in direct contraction to what Paul says about faith in Romans 3 and in Galatians 2. So keep in mind that James is saying faith without works is useless. In fact, he's going to summarize it here in verse 24. That's the summary point of this entire section. If you know anything about the reformation, you can almost hear Martin Luther and Zwingli and Calvin groaning right there. All the reformers would just be squirming in their chairs. All the reformers focused on Paul's articulation of justification which, in fact, is the exact opposite of James. So get James' articulation in your head. A person is justified by WORKS and not by faith alone. Now let's read Paul. Paul is in a section in Romans 3 where he is talking about the hopeless condition of mankind in their sin. He's saying we are all under sin. We are just sin machines. If you want to use works as a qualifier to enter heaven, we are all failures. None of us can be justified, can be made right with God on the basis of our works. Romans 3 If that wasn't clear enough he says it again in verse 28. And if that wasn't clear enough listen to how he says it in Galatians 2. In Galatians 2 Paul is talking about the danger of trying to make distinctions among ourselves based on our works. He's saying, “Listen, our works don't make us right with God. God makes us right with God.” Listen how he says it. Galatians 2 Now just to illustrate this in all it's brilliant 3D color, let's put Paul and James side by side, let's put them in the boxing ring and let em fight it out: So what's going on here. Is the Bible contradicting itself? If the Bible is contradicting itself, we all just need to go home because one of the most basic tenants of Christianity is that the Bible has internal consistency. There's an integrity to it. Well, let me put an end to the suspense. The Bible is not contradicting itself. Let's begin by saying, even within the book of James, there's plenty of evidence that James agrees with Paul and the reformers. Salvation is by grace alone through faith alone apart from any works of the law. James would agree with that. Both Paul and James were at the Jerusalem counsel in Acts 15 where they all agreed salvation is for all people apart from works of the law. Earlier in chapter 2:5 James talks about Christians as being heirs of the kingdom. Think about what that implies regarding salvation. What is the difference between wages and an inheritance? Wages are given because of work performed. Inheritances are given because of who you are. Wages are related to effort. Inheritance is related to DNA. Wages are conditional upon performance. Inheritance is certain. Wages are deposited piece by piece according to merit. Inheritance is already in the bank. These are massively different concepts. For James to say that Christians are heirs to the kingdom means we are not earning our salvation; we are heirs of salvation. There's no way James is saying, "You are heirs of the kingdom of God, now work to get your inheritance."James agrees with Paul. We are saved by grace. So why do Paul and James sound so different? Why do they sound like they are contradicting one another. The answer is simple. Paul is using the word justification differently than James. To illustrate this, let me ask you to interpret this sentence. Here's the sentence: What do I mean? It can mean one of two things. If I just got in trouble with the law, then it almost certain means, I'm going to a lawyer and he is going to give me some advice. But grammatically it has another possible meaning. Let's just paint a different context. Let's say I was a successful well-known, seasoned lawyer who had been in the industry for 40 years and I changed my focus from practicing to consulting. Now what does that sentence mean? I'm going to go consult a lawyer. It's literally the opposite meaning. Instead of going to receive advice, I'm going to go give advice. The word justification is similar in that it can have opposite meanings. James is using the word justified in a different way than Paul is using it. So let's start by explaining the two possible different meanings: The word justified, δικαιόω, can mean to be made right. So, given that definition, if you have a debt, you justify yourself, you make yourself right, by paying the debt. When you make that payment you have become justified because now the debt has a zero BALANCE. Think about how we use the word in reference to our word processors. When we JUSTIFY the margins in our documents we are balancing the left and right sides of the document. Justified is to make everything balanced. So that's one usage of the word. This is the way Paul is using the word. But the word justified has another possible meaning. It had another meaning then just as it has another meaning now. It can also mean, to prove yourself right? For example, I'm a tech nerd so I love clean energy. If you said to me, hey solar energy is bad for the environment, I'd say, "Can you justify that statement." How am I using the word justify there. I'm not saying, you're in debt and you need to balance the books. Rather, I'm saying, demonstrate that this statement is a true statement. Demonstrate that the claim is legitimate. I'm saying, prove to me that what you said is true. Give me evidence for your claim. That's exactly the difference between Paul and James. When Paul says we're justified by faith, he means we cannot BALANCE the debt on our own. We cannot be made right with God except through the merits of Jesus Christ and the works of Jesus Christ. We can't make ourselves right. It doesn't matter how much we work. Our works will never balance the books. The only way to balance the books is for God to credit us his righteousness. The credit, the balancing is an act of the mercy of God apart from our works. That's why he says, “by works of the law no one will be justified” James on the other hand is coming at it from the opposite perspective. You claim you've been justified apart from the works of the law. Great, demonstrate it. Prove to me that what you are saying is more than just words. Let me illustrate this way. Right now, it's winter and all the leaves are off the trees so it's hard to tell the variety. You come over to my house and you see these two trees in my back yard. And I make a claim, “This tree is an apple trees.” Paul and James would respond differently to that claim. Paul would say, I don't care what you say. What makes an apple tree an apple tree is DNA. It's genetics. No amount of spading the ground, fertilizing, watering will make an apple tree. No amount of talking. An apple tree has to be born of an apple seed. And an apple seed comes from God. God makes apple trees apart from the will of the apple tree or men. That's Paul. James would listen to that same claim, “This tree is an apple tree.” And he would, "I don't care what you say. How do I know those aren't just words. Prove it. Let me see the shape of the leaf. If it's an apple tree it will have a certain shape. If it's an apple tree there will be a certain type of flower when it blossoms and then you will see the fruit. Give me some evidence that your claim is true. That's James James and Paul looking at Justifications from opposite sides of same coin. Paul is talking about cause. What's caused you to become saved. James is talking about effect. If you have been saved, what effect will that have on your life. What effect does that salvation have on your living. Paul and James are concerned about different abuses. Paul says, “You think WORKS can get you into heaven. Ha! Your fooled.” James says, “You think WORDS can get you into heaven. Ha! Your fooled.” Paul is guarding against people who think they can TOIL their way into kingdom. James is guarding against people who think they can TALK their way into kingdom. When Paul says we're justified WITHOUT works, he means it's God's mercy that MAKES us right with God. When James says we're justify BY our works, he means it's our works DEOMONSTRATE God's work. Or as it has been famously articulated: I think you need quotes on the second faith in order to read it properly. So that's how to understand the text. The Application Now there's a tremendous amount of satisfaction that comes in understanding the concept here. It feels good to have intellectual resolve. But we need to make sure we don't miss the point. It is so important to not just understand how the test works but to actually take the test. It's literally the difference between understanding how an MRI machine works and getting an MRI. Let's not treat this like an academic exercise. James intends this test to land and confront us. He intends us to take the test and to have the test results come back. Don't give this test to other people. Give it to yourself. Here's how you take the test. There's three questions on the test. So in order to pass the test you just have to check yes to three questions. It's a very simple test. The test will answer this question: do I have saving faith? Historically, theologians have given saving faith three characteristics, and they've used three Latin words to describe these elements of saving faith. So the first question on the test is do you have notitia? Do you have the information of the gospel? The first “element” that saving faith entails is an intellectual understanding to the bare facts of the gospel. It's the raw fact. It's the data. It's the information. You have to know what the gospel is or you cannot be a Christian — you must know that Jesus, the eternal Son of God took on flesh and was born of the virgin Mary. He was born under the Law and was obedient to God and then died on the cross for our sins and rose again all in fulfillment of the Scriptures. You have to know who God is. You have to know the facts. Being a Christian is not less than that. But James wants us to go beyond the intellect. Let's get beyond the raw data. Now the way he illustrates the necessity of going beyond raw data is by giving us an example. It's just absolutely startling example. What is he saying here. It's not bad to know about God. You do well. But let me just remind you, it'a a lot more than knowledge. Be careful in being smug in your knowledge. Be careful in pointing to knowledge as the evidence that your faith is genuine. Knowledge is part of the equation but it's not all of the equation. Could a demon write a systematic theology? Yes. What would a demon score on a quiz in seminary about the attributes of God. He would score 100% Do you see the point? Knowledge of God is great. But you can have perfect knowledge of God and still be nothing more than a demon. Perfect knowledge of God has elevated you no higher than rank of demon. That might surprise you. But it's true. So what else do I need? How do I distinguish between true saving faith and the experience of demons? It must be related to something other than knowledge. Well there's a second aspect. Here's the second question on the test. Not only must there be an intellectual assent to the facts of the gospel, there must also be a conviction that these facts are true. When the facts land, an emotional response is created. There must be an emotional response. For example, I can tell you all the facts (information, the notitia) of the story of the Apollo missions and the landing on the moon. But you must believe that it is true. Some people have a knowledge of the facts of the lunar landing. But they believe the whole thing was a great big fabrication. They think it was all one big giant hoax and consequently they feel nothing. There's no assensus. But if you do believe it's true, if you watch the footage, you see the rocket taking off, you watch it land on the moon, it creates a feeling of awe. That's amazing that they did that. Saving faith both understands the gospel facts and believes that those facts are true. But you know what? You still haven't advanced beyond a demon. He says, “You believe God is one. Good! So do the demons. The demons believe and what? Shudder. There's assensus.” Belief is a shorthand way of saying you have both notita and assensus. You see a demon has notitia (knowledge). He has knowledge that God is one. And he has assensus (believes) - he believes that God is one. And because he believes there is an emotional response. He shudders. There's the emotional component. Believe me: a demon respects God. I think it's probably quite accurate to say that a demon believes that God is one more than you or I believe God is one. Demons have been to the absolute greatest seminary in the universe. They've been to heaven. They have seen God. They know more about God than Paul, James, Moses combined. They both know and believe. "Get all the knowledge you can about God. That's wonderful. Be as precise and accurate as possible. Terrific. Then believe that these things are true. Terrific. But those two things by themselves still don't qualify you to be anything more than a demon. You can be a demon and have that. So what is it. Your killing me. What separates demons from Christians? There's a third aspect. He's the third question on the test. It's the trust. It's a decision of the will to place my life under submission to what I know and believe. To return to the appollo rocket analogy. Faith is not just receiving the raw information that rockets made it to the moon. It's not just agreement that this event happened. It's also trust. It's saying, “I'll get on that rocket. I'll believe it to the point where I will put my life in that rocket.” Faith is not merely a matter of the intellect, nor of the intellect and the emotions combined; it is also a matter of the will. It's a determination of the soul to commit and entrust my life entirely to something. Without this act of the will, the object of belief - which in this case God - which remains outside of him. It cannot be part of him until he surrenders his will. God is able to help; he is willing to help. But if the sinner is unwilling to trust him, if he has no fiducia then God cannot help. Listen it is at this point where most ‘so called Christians' are deceived. This is why James is so big on works. Because the works is the evidence that you have fiducia. The works is the evidence that your faith is genuine. It's why he gives the example of helping the poor. How can you say, “I have genuine faith in God” when I'm not interested in what God tells me to be interested in. How can you say, “I've gone all in with God.” while not going all in with God? That's not faith. That's something else. Let's take the book of James and apply it to TESLA stock, “If you came up to James and said, I have faith that TESLA stock will tripple this year." James would look at you and say, "Really? That's great.” I've got one question for you: How much do you have invested? Well, Nothing. James would say: You have notitia. You have assensus. But you do not have fiducia. You don't have trust. If you had faith, your investment would demonstrate your faith. But you no investment; therefore, you have no faith. James wants to know, “Are you a true Christian like you think you are? Are you invested? Does your life demonstrate that you actually believe these things? Have you actually entrusted yourself and all that you are into the hands of the God of truth.” This is why faith and repentance are always related. Those who put their faith in Christ turn from their sins. Investing in TESLA is a decision to not invest in everything else. Boarding the rocket is choosing to not stay on earth. And TRUSTING in Jesus Christ is a decision to NOT trust in anything else this world has to offer. It's not trusting in money, it's not trusting in people's opinions, your ability, your talents, your status… Repentance is not faith and faith is not repentance. But the two are impossibly interconnected. The turn to God in saving faith causes true repentance of turning from sin. I think what James is really concerned about is just how scary possible it is to have notitia (knowledge) and (assensus) and not have the one key piece (fiducia). This happens at all levels of life. How many of you know that overeating is bad for you (notitia)? How many of you believe that overeating is bad for you (assensus)? How many of you still overeat? You lack the fiducia. You actually trust something else. No matter how unhealthy it is, I choose to submit to food, because I want what food gives me. Why would we do that? We are willfully ignorant of the consequences, in pursuit of our precious. We think that by stubbornly fighting, we can somehow alpha male our way through it. Oh it's scary possible, friend. It's scary possible to have information about something, agree with something but not ultimately submit to it. That's why James uses demons as his primary demonstration of this phenomena. Demons don't shake their fist at God. What do they do? They shudder! They run from him. They respect the greatness of God and therefore they are frightened. They know what he can do. And rather to submit to him, they move about in the shadows. Remember what the demons said to Jesus during his earthly ministry. Leave us alone. Depart from us Son of God. They know what he was capable of doing. This, my friend, is the greatest evidence that you who think you are a Christian, in fact are not a Christian at all. Is that how you live your life? Leave me alone God. Leave me to myself. Leave me to my own devices. I want to lurk here in the shadows. If that's true, then you don't have fudicia. You aren't any different than a demon. It's very possible for us to know God is great, to believe God is great and shudder. It's possible to be scared of punishment, and to even alter your behavior and become a very moral person, even an incredibly moral person, even an incredibly religious person. But all of your religion and all of your morality is nothing but shuddering. It's just religious fire insurance. I know there's a God but I don't want to submit to him. I'll do just enough to keep him happy, to keep him off my back. The Gospel and How to Receive it So what do you need to do? What is the one thing you need to do? You need entrust yourself to the God of the Universe. You need to go all in. That's the ticket. That's the key. How do you know if you have saving faith? It works. It evidences itself in the will being bent in a certain direction. Windows orphas, trials. all sorts of stuff. There's an evidence in your life that you are all in with Jesus. The point for us is that all three of these characteristics must be present in faith or otherwise it is not saving faith. Let's take a moment and pray and bend the will to God. Prayer of Submission

FIFTEEN MINUTE FILM FANATICS
One-Shot: The Best of 2022

FIFTEEN MINUTE FILM FANATICS

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2022 13:31


In this short episode, Mike and Dan look back and select the three movies from this year's shows that they are especially glad they discovered.  At the end, they each also name one movie they saw this year that they didn't use for the show but wish they had.  Thanks for listening, everyone! Terrific bumper music:  Bluebird by E's Jammy Jams Creative Commons — Attribution 3.0 Unported— CC BY 3.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... Music provided by FreeMusic109 https://youtube.com/FreeMusic109 Please subscribe to the show wherever you get your podcasts and follow us on Twitter and Letterboxd @15MinFilm.  Please rate and review the show on Apple podcasts and contact us at FifteenMinuteFilm@gmail.com.  Twitter: https://twitter.com/15minfilm Letterboxd: https://letterboxd.com/15MinFilm/ Website: https://fifteenminutefilm.podbean.com/    

You Better You Bet
Terrific Football Tuesday (12/27)

You Better You Bet

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2022 20:46


Nick Kostos & Ken Barkley open Tuesday's show discussing the Colts/Chargers Monday Night Football "game" and previewing the rest of the day's jam-packed proceedings. To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Downward Facing Spiritual Spiral
Tundé Terrific VS. Dr. Downer

The Downward Facing Spiritual Spiral

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2022 28:45


Happy Holidays and Happy New Year everyone and as we reach the end of another year, I felt inspired to record one final episode for 2022. On today's episode, I talk about some of the personal health issues I've dealt with over the last year and why I believe it's paramount to have a physician who has a positive outlook on your health. See, the other day I was riding on my Peloton and taking a class with Tundé who happens to be my FAVORITE teacher. She's fun, magnetic, inspiring and such a positive source of energy. On the other hand, most of the doctors I've seen over the last two years have this sort of Debbie Downer attitude. And if I offer up an alternative approach to treat particular maladies, they make me feel like they won't work, merely preventing the inevitable which is prescription medication or invasive surgery. As a culture, how much is a negative outlook towards health impacting not only our mental health but even our physical health? Let's say physicians had a more open and positive outlook like Tundé? Is it possible the world be a healthier place just by simply changing our attitude? I share a few anecdotes from the last year that I hope offer you some renewed perspective on the health industry in America. I'm certainly not a doctor, nor in a position to offer professional medical advice, but I do believe it's vital to be surrounded by doctors who are not only upbeat, but also open towards alternate health modalities. Thanks so much for listening to the show, and remember, I'm also very excited to say my new book SSAFY can be purchased by visiting SSAFYoga.com or on Amazon by clicking HERE and if you enjoy today's episode and you want to support the show, please subscribe to the podcast on iTUNES or Spotify. It's always helpful if you share the show with your friends or head over to iTunes and write a quick review. You can also support the show by becoming a subscriber at www.patreon.com/eddiecohn and on the music side, you can also purchase my new record at eddieconn.bandcamp.com or visit my website www.iameddiecohn.com and sign up for my email list and newsletter. As always, thanks so much for listening and supporting the show. Please reach out on IG @eddiecohn with any questions. Thanks for listening. 

Marketing Mysteries Solved!
The Inputs Mystery

Marketing Mysteries Solved!

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2022 35:26


Sales and marketing outcomes are directly impacted by inputs. What inputs are mission critical? In this episode, my guests say critical inputs include research to uncover true messaging from brand to values and beyond, mutual respect for everyone on the internal and external team, dedicated and structured inter-team communications and repetition, repetition, repetition. I talk with Lisa Detweiler, VP of Sales and Marketing, and Jodie Roberts, Director of Marketing, both with Senior Services of America. Together, they oversee all sales and marketing for 19 communities across three states – and they have dialed in the right inputs to achieve impressive outcomes. Jodie even shares with our listeners two great questions to ask to sharpen time management. Terrific inputs add up to great outcomes. 

Rough Night Movie Podcast
Episode 164 - Disney's A Christmas Carol

Rough Night Movie Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2022 96:59


MOTIVATIONAL COUNSELLOR (enthusiastic) Terrific! You should feel insignificant! For the first time, we see the ant MOTIVATIONAL COUNSELLOR. He's a mixture of Tony Robbins and Ron Popiel (the hyperactive late-night TV huckster, and founder of "Ronco"). Z ...I should? MOTIVATIONAL COUNSELLOR (hopping around enthusiastically) YES!!! You know, people ask me, "Doctor, why are you always happy?" And I tell them it's mind over matter. I don't mind that I don't matter! Do you get it? Do you get it? Z gives a fake smile. Email: roughnightpodcast@gmail.com

Squiz Today
Friday, 16 December: The growing threat of extremism; South Australia's river towns on high alert; The final battle for the World Cup; And two terrific trifles

Squiz Today

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2022 10:34


The Squiz is your shortcut to the news. More details and links to further reading for all of today's news can be found in The Squiz Today email. Click here to get it in your inbox each weekday morning. Find the recipe for the banana, brandy and butterscotch trifle here. Other things we do: Squiz Shortcuts - a weekly explainer on big news topics Squiz Kids - a news podcast for curious kids. Age-appropriate news without the nasties!

Aches and Gains with Dr. Paul Christo
Ticks, Targets, and Terrific Pain, Part I

Aches and Gains with Dr. Paul Christo

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022


Imagine your nerves are doused in gasoline and lit on fire. For many patients living with Post Treatment Lyme Disease Syndrome, this kind of pain can be a reality. With pain ranging from flu-like headaches, muscle and joint aches, to muscle spasms, pain shooting down the arms, and widespread arthritis, living with the pain of […]

Aches and Gains with Dr. Paul Christo
Ticks, Targets, and Terrific Pain, Part I

Aches and Gains with Dr. Paul Christo

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022


Imagine your nerves are doused in gasoline and lit on fire. For many patients living with Post Treatment Lyme Disease Syndrome, this kind of pain can be a reality. With pain ranging from flu-like headaches, muscle and joint aches, to muscle spasms, pain shooting down the arms, and widespread arthritis, living with the pain of […]

FIFTEEN MINUTE FILM FANATICS
One-Shot: The Harder They Fall

FIFTEEN MINUTE FILM FANATICS

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022 10:13


In this short episode, Dan and Tim talk about Mark Robson's The Harder They Fall (1956), know by its alternate title, Bogart's Last Movie.  But, as they both say, there's no reason to give this one a pity recommendation: it's solid stuff, a terrific look at a man who leaves his shell of cynicism to do the right thing, as we've seen in that other, lesser-known Bogart film.  The fix is in--give it a listen! Terrific bumper music:  Bluebird by E's Jammy Jams Creative Commons — Attribution 3.0 Unported— CC BY 3.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... Music provided by FreeMusic109 https://youtube.com/FreeMusic109

Zen Parenting Radio
8 Ways To Make Your Holidays Super Terrific- Podcast #688

Zen Parenting Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2022 52:10


Todd and Cathy offer 8 suggestions to make the holiday season more connective and less overwhelming. They discuss how to set boundaries, deal with grief, and find ways to limit social media and say no. They also discuss their new Team Zen app and the exclusive podcasts that will be shared on January 10th.

A Pen And A Napkin
A Pen And A Napkin-Episode #154 Tim Sandquist Kirkwood CC (IA)

A Pen And A Napkin

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2022 75:14


This week we are excited to talk to Tim Sandquist, the highly successful Men's HC at Kirkwood CC (IA)! Coach Sandquist touches on a wide variety of topics, including his basketball journey, hiring of assistant coaches, the stresses of being a head coach as opposed to an assistant, practice execution, half court defense and more! Terrific conversation with one of the best JuCo coaches in the country!

Dynamite Hemorrhage Radio
Dynamite Hemorrhage Radio #196

Dynamite Hemorrhage Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2022 108:30


First Dynamite Hemorrhage Radio episode in our "new era" in which all of our previous podcasts - both DH Radio and several spin-offs - are combined into one super-spectacular, raw, sub-underground musical  cornucopia. Read all about the "format change" right here. Terrific new stuff from the Analog Africa label this time around, along with The Strange Girls, Non Plus Temps, Allysen Callery, The Ornette Coleman Trio, Polka Dots, Laurel Premo, Jooklo Sextet and much more. Track listing:JOOKLO SEXTET - LSD Mingus Post BlackoutSONIDO VERDE DE MOYOBAMBA - ZarzamoraMITA Y SU MONTE ADENTRO - El YoyoTHE MOVERS - Give Five Or MoreLOS SIDERALS - Virgenes Del SolTHE NIGHT HAWKS - Rockin' HawkTHE BLUE BIRDS - Khari Neem Ke NicheyTHE STRANGE GIRLS - WaspNON PLUS TEMPS - Endless Jetty NightCHILDREN MAYBE LATER - 27 ClubCAPTAIN BEEFHEART & THE MAGIC BAND- Dropout BoogiePOLKA DOTS - ZweifelALLYSEN CALLERY - Crazy Lady BluesDIANE HILDEBRAND - Early Morning Blues and GreensSAMMI SMITH - Manhattan, KansasOLIVER - Off on a TrekLAUREL PREMO - Torbjørn Bjellands BruremarsjJOHNNY YOUNG - Untitled #1GEORGE GRUNTZ - Main ThemeBYRON ALLEN TRIO - Decision for the Cole-ManSTEVE REID - C You AroundTHE ORNETTE COLEMAN TRIO - Faces and PlacesROBERTO DE SIMONE - Secondo Coro Della Lavandaie

The Money Pit Home Improvement Podcast
Best Way to Warm Up a Chilly Room | 4 Terrific Tub Tune-ups | The Dangers of Gutters Gone Bad | Ep #2264

The Money Pit Home Improvement Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2022 39:57


SHOW NOTES: Gutter Maintenance: Faulty gutters can cause expensive damage all around your home. Learn how to keep your gutters in shape. Space Heaters: Want to warm up that chilly room? These space-age space heaters offer the perfect solution. Bathtub Refinishing: Tired of seeing that ring around the bathtub? We've got 4 refinishing ideas for a tub that needs a good scrub.  Plus, answers to your home improvement questions. Contractors: Is there a way to handle pushy contractors with bad attitudes? We offer Rita a suggestion on how to find the best home improvement contractors. Pavers: George wants to know the best way to lock concrete pavers in place. He gets tips on how much space he needs and using a flexible patio border edging. Wood Paneling: There's dark wood paneling throughout Dena's house. We tell her how to clean, sand, and prime the paneling before painting it over. Bathroom Exhaust Fan: Condensation drips down the bathroom walls every time Brian uses the shower. He should get a more powerful exhaust fan that vents outside the house and be sure it runs long enough. Window Drafts: It's freezing in Renea's apartment! We've got tips on using weatherstripping caulk and shrink film to seal the drafts around windows and sliding doors. Hard Water: Even with a water softener system, mineral deposits are causing spots when Clair washes the cars. It's time to have the water softener checked and serviced again. Wallpaper Removal: Is there an easy way to remove layers of wallpaper? We tell Thomas how to cut, moisten, and loosen the paste or rent a wallpaper steamer. Cleaning Garage Floors: Laurie's garage floor is coated with layers of oil and grease. Her best bet is to power wash it with a TSP solution, then add an epoxy finish. Stone Countertops: Is there a maintenance-free natural stone countertop? Quartz and concrete are good alternatives to granite, but Ross will still need to give them some amount of care.   Do you have a home improvement or decor question? Call the show 24/7 at 888-MONEY-PIT (888-666-3974) or post your question here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Cat 81 Radio
Radioactive

Cat 81 Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2022 38:35


Terrific message by Pastor Skip Hertzig.

Hidden Pearls Podcast
122. ED, Andy, Curt & Hayes with Pat Coen & Bruce Kittle

Hidden Pearls Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 103:30


Niners win again13-0 over the Saints! Now at 7-4 and riding a 4-game win streak, on top of the NFC West with no losses in the division. Last Sunday we watched an unbelievable performance by Niner defense in a shut out of the Saints (which makes 4 straight games with 2nd half shutouts!). Terrific goal line stands with turnovers caused by hard hitting tackles and great team defense.  Niner D is ranked #1 in NFL in every significant defensive category. Offense was a bit sluggish but got it done and give some credit to Saints defense who had both starting DE's back in the lineup. This is always a very physical matchup and this game lived up to that mark as well.This week we host the Miami Dolphins with our good friend and former run game coordinator Mike McDaniel at the helm. Miami enters WK 13 at 8-3 and tied for 1st in the AFC East with Buffalo and playing great football.  Should be a great game as McDaniel and Kyle know each other very well (McDaniel started as an intern under Mike Shanahan in Denver back in 2005). Lot's of scheming and planning going into this one as well as seeing some former Niner players who are now on the Miami roster, including WR Trent Sherfield, RB Raheem Mostert, and RB Jeff Wilson Jr. In addition, former Niners Tight Ends Coach John Embry is now on the staff at Miami. And you have QB Tua Tagovailoa, as well as former Chief's standout WR Tyreek Hill to contend with. Should be a great matchup all over and I am excited to watch it all play out.   This week we have another great show for you as we sit down with Andy and Curtis Hayes (father and son) to tell the story of Ed Hayes (Andy's father and Curtis's grandfather). This story has a lot of overlap for us personally as Ed and the Hayes family all hail from Mt Pleasant Iowa in Henry County (SE Iowa), which is where George's mom Jan and all her family are from. In addition, Ed graduated from the University of Iowa as an undergrad but also from the UI Law School (which I also graduated from). Helping us with the Iowa Connections is retired Army Colonel (and my brother-in-law) Pat Coen. While all of that is cool enough, we offer it to you this week in honor and remembrance of Pearl Harbor Day, which is next week on December 7. The Pearl Harbor attack was on Dec 7, 1941, which was right smack in the middle of Ed's first semester in law school at Iowa. As a result, Ed immediately was drafted, left law school, reported and shortly thereafter left on what would be a 4+ year deployment overseas as part of the WW II war effort. He was stationed in North Africa, and later in Italy after the front moved, attached to a MASH unit. Finally coming home in 1945 to marry the love of his life Cora. You will hear of that journey as well as his lifelong tenure at Drake University Law School in Des Moines Iowa, where he served and taught until 1990 when he retired. This is a story of humility, engagement, sacrifice, loyalty, and service, which are all a common theme of that generation. I found this story inspiring and hopeful, as it connects us to each other in powerful ways, and affirms the need to always have a lookout for the welfare of our neighbor and the common good. We also hear from Curtis (grandson to Ed) who is Command Sargent Major and served in the Army and was also the Recruiting Battalion commander in California who we have worked with for the past 2 years to help us bring more than 150 veterans to Niner games, both at Levis and on the road. He shares his journey into the military, lessons learned, deployments, and transitions home. He also explains how his grandfather Ed shaped and formed him, directly and indirectly through his father Andy. This is a great family military story and one I know you will enjoy. Happy holidays as we enter into December. Encouragement to all of us to use self-care during these times, know that it is OK to say no and to set boundaries

Gavin Dawson
Terrific Sports Audio

Gavin Dawson

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 40:20


2nd hour of the G-Bag Nation Cowboys Practice Cuts Terrific Sports Audio Restroom Revelations

Stand-Up Memories
Stand-Up Memories S2 Ep 22 This episode the stars of Stand-Up Memories have as their guest their long-time good friend, the terrific Long Island journalist David J. Criblez.

Stand-Up Memories

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 23:54


“This episode the stars of Stand-Up Memories have as their guest their long-time good friend, the terrific Long Island journalist David J. Criblez. Among the topics, they of course toss around the more and more prominent factor of political correctness of today's comedy.”   As they delve into the realm of political correctness, for some unknown reason Jackie thinks he can chime in. The inter-show insults are more fun than ever, even mid-compliment, and the conversation goes to totally unexpected places, insuring this episode will draw you in .. especially when Background Muppet Bales takes the reins ..   Lots of GREAT stories! Follow us and SUBSCRIBE on Youtube https://www.youtube.com/c/standupmemories Standup Memories with Jackie “The Joke Man” Martling & Peter Bales is a look at the world of standup comedy through the eyes and collective memories of two men who have lived through the evolution of standup and comedy clubs from the late 1970s through the modern era. Jackie “The Joke Man” Martling is best known for his 16 years as head writer and on-air personality for the Howard Stern Show. He is a veteran of the Long Island, NY comedy scene and has been a successful standup comedian and joke writer for more than 4 decades. The comedy legends he has worked with include Rodney Dangerfield, Eddie Murphy, Jerry Seinfeld, Bob Nelson, Richie Miniveri, Rob Bartlett, Dave Hawthorne, Jim Myers, Paul Reiser, Jackie Mason, and many more. Martling started a telephone joke line (516) 922 Wine, that has been in operation since the early '80s and has recorded 4 comedy albums, and has been featured in the films Private Parts and The Aristocrats. Peter Bales has appeared as a stand-up comedian at countless comedy clubs, corporate functions, and colleges across the country and has appeared on a variety of television networks including FOX, A&E, Comedy Central, Lifetime, MTV, VH-1, and, most recently, "The New Rascals Comedy Hour" podcast for XM Satellite Radio. Peter has also hosted his radio programs on NYC's WABC (770 AM) and WEVD (1050 AM). He studied at Chicago's famous "Second City" and in the eighties directed The Laughter Company, an improvisational comedy group that helped launch the careers of Rosie O'Donnell and Bob Nelson. Tiedin is Not responsible for the occasional penis joke or any reference to oral sex.      

You Better You Bet
Terrific Futbol Tuesday (11/29)

You Better You Bet

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 20:45


Nick Kostos & Ken Barkley are ALL IN on the USA/Iran World Cup matchup, with the US needing to win to advance to the Knockout Stage. To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Comics for Fun and Profit
Episode 784: Episode 784 - Andor's Awesome What's Next, Terrific Time, Silk Good News Bad News, Final Orders, Sneak Peek at Next Week with Kyle & Drew

Comics for Fun and Profit

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2022 78:07


Episode 784 - Andor's Awesome What's Next, Terrific Time, Silk Good News Bad News, Final Orders-Moon Knight #19 & One Bad Day Catwoman #1, Sneak Peek at Next Week with Kyle & Drew-High Republic Adventure #1 & Plush #1, Support Our Patreon Unlock More C4FaP Bonus Content  https://www.patreon.com/comicsfunprofit Kyle's RPG Podcasts: Encore of the Lost & Two Past Midnight @DorkDayPodcast https://www.dorkdayafternoon.com Shop Kowabunga's Exclusive Variants https://shopkowabunga.com/shop/ Donations Keep Our Show Going, Please Give https://bit.ly/36s7YeL Get on the Kowabunga (Deep  Discount Comics) FOC and Preorder list http://eepurl.com/dy2Z8D Thank You Shout Out to Our Patrons: Adam P., Eric H., Jon A., Andrew C., Bradley R., Aaron M., Darrin W., Dennis C., David D., Martin F.  Email us at: Comicsforfunandprofit@gmail.com - questions, comments, gripes, we can't wait to hear what you have to say. Follow us on twitter.com/ComicsFunProfit & instagram.com/comicsforfunandprofit Like us on Facebook.com/ComicsForFunAndProfit Subscribe, rate, review on itunes, Spotify, Stitcher, YouTube. Thank you so much for listening and spreading the word about our little comic book podcast. All the C4FaP links you could ever need in one place https://beacons.ai/comicsfunprofit Listen To the Episode Here: https://comcsforfunandprofit.podomatic.com/ 

The Nerds With Accents Podcast
Nerdery & Nonsense: Pokémon Scarlet and Violet, Cyberpunk: Edgerunners Excellence, DC's (Mr.) Terrific News and more!

The Nerds With Accents Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 107:39


Joe and JayG discuss Bleach TYBW, YamaGOATo and Tite Kubo embarrassing all our legends, Chainsaw Man growing on Joe, The Peripheral, JayG's thoughts on Pokémon Scarlet and Violet, Vampire in the Garden, Joe's thoughts on Cyberpunk: Edgerunners, The Bastard Son & The Devil Himself, Kindred, That Time I Got Reincarnated as a Slime The Movie: Scarlet Bond is coming, James Gunn Teases Mr. Terrific as Next DCEU Hero, The Rock on Black Panther 2, Puma x Pokemon, whether you should date someone whose favorite character is Vegeta, House of the Dragon started a petition to remove writer Sara Hess, Absurd Nerdery, listener feedback and plenty more nonsense. To send feedback hit us up on Facebook , Twitter or E-mail us at thenerdswithaccents@gmail.com. We will read it on the show! Join the new TNWA Patreon for early access to episodes, bonus content AND full video podcasts! If you love or hate this show, share with your best friends OR worst enemies! Joe's Socials: Twitter | JG's Socials: Twitter | TNWA Facebook | TNWA Twitter | TNWA Patreon | --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/tnwa/message

Breakthrough Babe Podcast
Your Frequency Begins with the Gratitude you Bring

Breakthrough Babe Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 9:53


Are you being bombarded by Black Friday sales already even though it's not even Thursday yet? Me too!   These days, it seems like Thanksgiving gets lost where Halloween ends and Christmas begins. But I'm not ready to write it off as the lost holiday - it's just too important.   In today's new post, I'm encouraging you to use this Thanksgiving holiday as a time to reinstate & refresh your own gratitude practice.    Because cultivating consistent gratitude can literally change your life.    Read on to peek inside my own daily gratitude habit and learn how practicing gratitude daily will have compound effects that transform every aspect of your world from your sleep to your relationships to your business.         Training your brain to operate from gratitude   I went shopping with my mom yesterday, and we visited one of those big discount stores that tends to be hit or miss. On our way in, she turned to me and said, “I don't know if this is worth it, Jen. The last three times I've been here, it's really been a miss. I haven't liked anything.”   My response? “Terrific. This is a hit or miss kind of store. So if you've had a bunch of misses, that means today is going to be a hit. We're going to walk in and find a bunch of stuff we love.”   She looked at me like I was nuts, but I could tell her mood had improved and she was entering the store with a fresh energy.    While this is a bit of a trivial story about shopping, I share it because it's the epitome of how I think. When encountering negativity or roadblocks, my brain quickly refocuses its energy onto a more positive direction. And I attribute a large part of this skill to a conscious practice of gratitude.  Where's your own gratitude practice at?   Do you have a gratitude practice in your day to day life? What does it look like? Does it feel like it suits you, or could it use a refresh?   This week, you're no doubt hearing more about gratitude than normal. But with all of the benefits that gratitude can bring to your life, I can't help but wonder why we as a society only tend to focus on it for one week out of the year.    The many benefits of a consistent gratitude practice have been scientifically proven again and again. Physically, it improves sleep and cognitive functioning. Emotionally, it improves overall happiness, optimism, and positivity. Gratitude allows us to feel more satisfied with our lives because it trains our brains to seek out the good. The more grateful we are, the more we naturally dwell on the positive versus the negative. A simple gratitude practice you can adopt daily   So with all of the indisputable benefits in mind, why aren't more of us regularly incorporating gratitude into our daily lives?   I hear from clients that they tried for a bit, but couldn't get the habit to stick. Or, they found that it worked for a while, then it stagnated.    For me, daily gratitude comes naturally now. But it didn't always.   I believe that gratitude is truly a practice. And just like anything that you practice - a sport, a musical instrument, a foreign language - the more you do it, the better you'll get at it and the more natural and easy it becomes.    To reap the full benefit of gratitude, you've got to commit to it daily.    My daily gratitude practice begins each morning with journaling. I keep it simple, jotting down everything I'm feeling grateful for at the moment. Then, I read it back to myself aloud so I can hear it as well. Next, I express my gratitude to someone else. This step keeps the positive energy of gratitude circulating.    It's really that simple. And because it's simple, it makes it easy to stick to daily.  Use this Thanksgiving to reinstate your own gratitude practice   This is the perfect time to launch a daily gratitude habit of your own. Make sure it's something you can commit to every day. Here's why:   While you may not notice the benefits of practicing gratitude from doing it just for one day or even a week, gratitude roots itself into your life & brain slowly. There is a compound effect that after several weeks and several months, you are going to begin to notice a higher vibration… that you're operating from a higher frequency within you.   And let me tell you this: it is going to rock your world.    If you know me, you know that I'm all about energy. I'm all about the frequency that you bring to this world. And the truth is, it begins with the gratitude that you bring.    Spread some gratitude this week, and continue to do so in the weeks to come. Then watch the magic happen.  Thanks to you   Before I sign off, I want to let you know that I'm grateful for you. I'm grateful for your loyal readership and, to those who also subscribe to the podcast, your loyal listenership! I'm grateful every time you share my blog & podcast with someone else, and for every time you message me to let me know what resonated with you. I am so grateful for you taking the time to be here and invest in yourself.   Until next time, I'm Jen Gitomer and I'm reminding you to go activate your success frequency.

The Nerds With Accents Podcast
Episode 143: Nerdery & Nonsense: Pokémon Scarlet and Violet, Cyberpunk: Edgerunners Excellence, DC's (Mr.) Terrific News and more!

The Nerds With Accents Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 107:39


Joe and JayG discuss Bleach TYBW, YamaGOATo and Tite Kubo embarrassing all our legends, Chainsaw Man growing on Joe, The Peripheral, JayG's thoughts on Pokémon Scarlet and Violet, Vampire in the Garden, Joe's thoughts on Cyberpunk: Edgerunners, The Bastard Son & The Devil Himself, Kindred, That Time I Got Reincarnated as a Slime The Movie: Scarlet Bond is coming, James Gunn Teases Mr. Terrific as Next DCEU Hero, The Rock on Black Panther 2, Puma x Pokemon, whether you should date someone whose favorite character is Vegeta, House of the Dragon started a petition to remove writer Sara Hess, Absurd Nerdery, listener feedback and plenty more nonsense.  To send feedback hit us up on Facebook , Twitter or E-mail us at thenerdswithaccents@gmail.com. We will read it on the show!     Join the new TNWA Patreon for early access to episodes, bonus content AND full video podcasts!If you love or hate this show, share with your best friends OR worst enemies!Joe's Socials: Twitter  | JG's Socials: Twitter | TNWA Facebook | TNWA Twitter | TNWA Patreon | 

A Pod Called Blerd
Rasta Pasta Syndrome

A Pod Called Blerd

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 167:39


-AEW Full Gear (12:45) -Chris breaks down about school (25:45) -Back to AEW (35:05) -Passing of JDF (1:10:30) -Chris Hemsworth steps away from acting (1:36:35) -Chainsaw Man 2 episode review (1:31:50) -Daredevil Born Again news (1:58:26) -James Gunn may have in interest in Mr. Terrific and Lobo projects (2:02:04) What's in Your Longbox? Chris- Power Rangers Soul of the Dragon (2:25:44) Marcell- Wildcats (2:33:30)

On the Brink with Andi Simon
338: Helen Newman—What Are Your Memories Of Growing Up, And Why Are They So Important To You Now?

On the Brink with Andi Simon

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 28:26


Hear how memories impact you now and guide your future What are your memories of growing up? Your friends? Neighborhood? Life-changing moments in our society? In today's podcast, Helen Newman, a friend from my elementary school (Davis Elementary School in New Rochelle, NY) and I discuss the power of memories. Although we had different experiences in high school (she was in a sorority, I was president of the Salmagundi Club), we both experienced the good times and not-so-good times of the 1960s. The funny thing about memories is that they're selective. We pick and choose the ones that fit our own story, often one where we are the heroes and we forget what others were struggling with or enjoying all around us. I guarantee that after listening to Helen, you will be amazed at her wisdom and joy. Helen writes about something every month. Sometimes it is about why that month means something to her. Other times, she writes about old friends and new ones. But in today's conversation, we go deeply into the anguish we all felt during high school. If you were alive then, you like us will forever ask: "Where was I when John F. Kennedy was shot?" We even remember what we were wearing. We also talk about how we felt when our biology teacher, Mrs. Schwerner, lost her son during the civil rights unrest in the South. And the conflicting passions surrounding the Vietnam War. To state the obvious, we grew up in very challenging times. This month (November), she wrote about our autograph books. It was hysterical to remember what people wrote about. Her book was filled with poignant, loving, sincere and sentimental sayings, like: "Helen and whomever, sitting in a tree, K-I-S-S-I-N-G." You remember those. Her favorite, and mine as well: “When you get old and out of shape, remember girdles are $2.98.” Sadly, they don't make autograph books anymore, and I would have to dig into my attic to find mine. But you get the point! Helen never expected to be a writer. A while ago, she started to write and then it became a wonderful hobby. I love the blog posts that seem to touch everyone's heart. She remembers stuff that we might also, but she puts it into a story (usually her own) and brings us back to the days when...you can finish my sentence. My message to you, our listeners, is to find your own Helen Newman. Or become one for others. Remembering is so important as time flies, and the moment brings back the time and place you were growing up in. We might still be growing up, never growing old, but we continue to live each day, forgetting how our past framed our present and set the stage for the future. I cannot thank Helen enough for joining us today and sharing her own story. Think about writing yours. You can contact Helen at hnewman@tsjesq.com. My quote for us today: “The worst part of holding the memories is not the pain. It's the loneliness of it. Memories need to be shared.”   ― Lois Lowry, The Giver  For more about storytelling and the role it plays in our memories, try these: Blog: How Storytelling Can Transform Your Culture And Energize Your Team Podcast: Karen Dietz—Your Story Is Your Secret to Amazing Success Podcast: Roshni Pandey—To Find Your Happiness, Assemble The Kind Of Life You Want Additional resources for you My two award-winning books: Rethink: Smashing The Myths of Women in Businessand On the Brink: A Fresh Lens to Take Your Business to New Heights Our website: Simon Associates Management Consultants   Read the transcript of our podcast here Andi Simon: Welcome to On the Brink With Andi Simon. Hi, I'm Andi Simon. As you know, I'm your host and your guide, and my job is to get you off the brink. You know, my company, Simon Associates Management Consultants, we've been around for 20 years, helping people see, feel and think in new ways so they can change. And I often look for people who are going to give you a new perspective so you too can begin to see things through a fresh lens. You maybe even step back like an anthropologist (like myself) and observe what's going on and reflect on it, reflect on yourself, and begin to find great ways to think in new ways. So today, I have a wonderful woman here, Helen Newman. Helen and I go back to elementary school. And I'm going to let her tell you her story because as we were talking, and I was reading the things that she writes on Facebook, to bring back the memories, I said, "My audience should hear you remember." We're storymakers. Humans love to make stories. And when we do use memories to create them, we connect in ways that are really magical. I'm going to read you one of hers in a moment. But first, Helen, thanks for joining me today. Helen Newman: It's a pleasure to be here. Andi Simon: Tell the listeners, who is Helen Newman and what's your journey all about? Helen Newman: My journey, let's say I'm a senior citizen so I've had a long journey. I grew up in New Rochelle, a suburb of New York. And when I look back, I think of my childhood as wonderment. Of course, there were bad days, a middle child, typically an outgoing introvert. And I had to fight for my place in the house. There were three girls, and I'm in the middle. It was my friends, my school that meant the most to me. And I never forgot that. I went to New Rochelle High School with you. I met my husband in New Rochelle. He wasn't in the high school with me because he had already graduated. But he also was from New Rochelle. He passed away 10 years ago. I went to art school after high school, I wanted to be an art teacher. But I always secretly wanted to be a writer. In those years, I hope your listeners remember that for women, it wasn't all that easy. And even my own mother who was kind of a beatnik, she was a pianist, even she said, "Well, be a teacher. You know, you'll be home in the summer with your kids." And all of that 1963, mid '60s, feeling. But secretly, I always wanted to be a writer. Andi Simon: But you didn't become a writer? Helen Newman: No, I did not. As a child, I lived in a cul de sac. And I used to write plays when I was nine years old. And made all of the girls in the cul de sac be in the play and make the parents pay to come and see it. Andi Simon: I know when you were telling me that, I suspect that I even attended them. Helen Newman: I remember doing The Princess and The Pea. I got the Golden Book and then wrote my own scripts. And I think I was about nine or 10. But I was never encouraged in any way other than to be an artist. She couldn't see beyond the teacher. And I love children. So she knew that. My father, however, said to me, "You should be an attorney because you can argue on any subject." And I ended up working in a law firm after teaching. It's really funny because I still remember my father saying, "You can argue any case." He didn't have any sons so I was the son he never had. Andi Simon: Oh, I love it. The interesting part, as we were preparing for this, we were reminiscing. You know, we both went to school at a time when New Rochelle was, I'm going to guess, half Jewish and half African American, maybe 40/40. But it was a very interesting time. We held hands and sang We Shall Overcome. Absolutely. It was a time when Michael Schwerner, who was our biology teacher's son, was killed in the South. And one of the folks on the Facebook stream went under the Michael Schwerner bridge on the Hutchinson Parkway and was reminiscing. The reminiscing part is really important. We were there when John Kennedy was shot. And we all can vividly remember what we were doing and where we were at that moment in high school. Helen Newman: Yeah, just recently, a niece of my daughter in-law from New Jersey interviewed me on where I was the day Kennedy was shot, and what I was doing, and I said, "Not only do I remember everything, but I can tell you what I was wearing. That's the impact." Andi Simon: But I remember that all of us had gone through the Vietnam War period. I mean, we were all growing up in a transformational moment for American society. I don't think it's ever stopped being transformed. But I agree, I do think that we were growing up and changing at the same time. Helen Newman: Yes. I think it's really important to change. When you grow, you change when you go out into society. When you meet people, you change. That's why friends of mine have used the term, "Oh, I'm old school." And they do it on purpose. Because it drives me crazy, the hairs on my neck stand up. Old school means you're not changing with the times. Andi Simon: Oh, so interesting. So they've boxed you in yet you do your own thing. Ten years ago, you lost your husband and then you started to write on Facebook on our New Rochelle High School class of '64 Facebook places. Was losing your husband a catalyst for this or just you needed something to do? What was the momentum there? Helen Newman: No, actually, starting in 1974, I was called by a few friends because I have this weird organizational talent. Don't ask me why. They called me and said, "Let's have a ten-year reunion." And I always like working. I always like having a project. So I said, "Okay, I'll do it." And I did. And it's very interesting. Very few people came. And it was the 23rd year of our graduation when someone called me and truthfully, I don't even remember who it was, I think it was three or four people called, and said, "You should do a 25th." And I said, "Oh, God, it's a lot of work." But I did it. We had 400 of our graduates come to White Plains, NY for the 25th reunion. And the feeling, I can tell you something that I still remember, I was sitting at the welcoming table because I had to be like the boss and show everybody what to do. And I saw two groups of people walk in and see each other for the first time in 25 years. And they started screaming and running to each other. And I looked at my friends and I said, "This is worth it. It's worth it. Look at these people. They are so happy to see each other." And that was when it started. Then when it was our 48th anniversary, I got another call who said, "You have to do it for 50 years." And I said, "It's a lot of work, but I'll do it." I formed a committee on Facebook. There's a Facebook New Rochelle High School Facebook page. And I started to promote it. How else do you do it? So I started writing. Ah, and from then on the countdown, all of the questions that helped me find people all over the country. Very few stayed in New Rochelle. I've been one of the only few that are still here. And it snowballed into people calling me and saying, "What are you posting? I love your posts." And again, I'm the typical outgoing introvert. I like to be with a lot of people but I like to be by myself. Oh, this was way after the reunion, I got phone calls again: "Don't stop posting. I look forward to it," because people want to remember. They do want to remember. And it's important. Our friendships were important. We lost contact with people, we regained that contact. It's so special to me that I don't even have the words and I'm filled with words. I don't have the words to express to you how much it means to me that people have reconnected because of me. Andi Simon: I'm going to read Helen's latest September 2nd posting, a piece of it, so you can get the feeling because I want to go back to what she said is important to her. But it's also important to all the 1000 folks who are graduates who are reading it, and the 125 who view it and then share it and then comment on it. And I watch their names and I'm going to say we hung out. This is cool. So this is September: As I was pondering what to write, I suddenly realized that the month of September is filled with memories and holidays to celebrate. Now, the hard part is trying to focus on one particular aspect of the month. Oh my goodness, obviously, I cannot write funny anecdotes about how deliriously happy we are that our kids are going back to school. I can't even write about how deliriously unhappy teachers are to go back to school. Most of you, not all, but most of you must be retired, so you know that subject. I could write about Labor Day, but I believe I've told you all this. However, one statistic is interesting. Did you know that more people are born in September than any other month of the year? Yeah, that was interesting. Is that why we celebrate Labor Day in September? Maybe? September 10 Is TV dinner day. Do you remember the TV dinners? Oh, I remember them. Except they're called streaming dinners now, and I laugh. Also September 17 is locate a friend. But I've already located all of you. And then there's September 19: respect for the aging day. No, definitely not that. And I can tell you, Helen, I'm not the only one who was laughing. So here's what I've decided. I'd like to celebrate Google. Oh, so important. No, so needed effect. Did you know that Backrub was the original name of Google? You imagine it being called Backrub? I got to get a backrub. Really? I know. You can tell me more about it. Google was founded on September 4, 1998. Now think about it. By Larry Page and Sergey Brin while they were PhD students at Stanford. I shudder to think of what my life would be like if I didn't Google everything. I watch a film and Google the director. I read a book and Google the author. I'm a Google libertarian. Helen Newman: Don't bother googling me. I come up as Helen Newman Hall, rec center. Andi Simon: And so enjoy your Labor Day weekend. And then keep laughing. And those comments are all absolutely beautiful comments, because we never stop learning interesting things about September. I can't even begin to count the time. So I'm asking Google for info. Thanks, Helen. I love this post. I wonder if the number of babies born in September were after the end of the war. So I share with you my listeners and my audience why Helen was so important to bring to you. Because she makes us laugh. You can't read her stuff. You're not part of the private group. But she can tell us about that. How do you decide what to write about? And where do you get the humor, and how I want the listeners to think about their stories, and how important it is in their lives, to connect, to belong and to be part of something more than just where you are today. The memories make your life more meaningful. So tell us how you became this writer? That's just brilliant. Helen Newman: Well, thank you. I love writing. I love making people laugh. Those are my two specialties. I researched the months. Two weeks before I post, I research the month to see what holidays people make up. I don't know where these holidays ever came from but they're on Google. You can Google a month and you will see 50 to 60 holidays. Then I print them out and I circle the ones that could be funny to us and circle the ones that would mean something to us. I try to incorporate something funny about being a senior. Something funny about our childhood and something to remember for all of us to remember. And I start writing. I write on my computer, I print it out, I edit it. The next day I look it over, I make it funnier. It's like a job, but it's a job I love. Yes. And I'll tell you, what keeps me going is that one month, I think I was in California visiting my children. And I didn't come home until the sixth of the month. When I got home, I had four messages on my answering machine: "Are you okay? Did something happened? I'm waiting for your post." And I thought, oh my god, people really do wait for it. People love to remember. People love the funny things we can remember. People love to remember their childhood friends. Yep. And it means so much to me that 125 people at least read those posts that I post. And because I don't post anything on regular Facebook, it's only on our page. I don't believe in my life being that important to someone to my 400 friends on Facebook, because I love the fact that people love to talk about their past and what we were like when we were children. Just the other morning, I was like at the Tweed Ward school. I don't know, your listeners won't know. But you'll know, on Quaker Ridge Road between Ward School and Albert Lemon, and the crossing guard was letting a young lady cross. I would say she was in the eighth, seventh or eighth grade. She was wearing Ugg slippers, short shorts, her backpack, a short t-shirt and a sweatshirt. And all I could remember was Mr. Daley called my mother because my skirt was above my knee. I thought she was adorable. But, all I could remember was Mr. Daley calling my mother and said that my skirt was too short. That was probably in 1960, probably 1961. I think the New Abbot Leonard that we went to was in 1961, wasn't it? Andi Simon: Albert Leonard was a junior high school and Ward School became an elementary school. At the time, the population of children was growing very rapidly. And I only moved up there when I was 10. So you can get some dating and it was promos that I went to, and we all walked there. And Joyce was there. And we all rode our bikes. And we rode our bikes to Lord and Taylor. And it was a great community. Helen Newman: When Lord and Taylor closed, I almost was in tears because we used to ride our bikes there. Andi Simon: So the memories are essential to who we are. Helen Newman: They are absolutely essential to who we are. It. I think one of my posts mentioned, we had to have license plates on our bicycles. And I remember the test at Davis School. Kids don't have to do it now. We were so into our school. We were so into each other. It means a lot to remember that. Andi Simon: It does. It does. And sometimes I need some clarity on my memories, because I lived on Primrose Avenue. But I went to the Davis School. And as I said those words I said, No, that's not right. You didn't go to the Primrose School, you went to the Davis School up the hill. And I do think that sometimes our minds forget all important kinds of things that we want to learn to remember. So as you're looking forward, I always like to look ahead a little bit. You know, it sounds like you're going to be doing this for a long time. It gives you great pleasure. Helen Newman: It gives me great pleasure. It's getting harder because I don't want to repeat myself and I've been doing it for 10 years, once a month for 10 years. So I will keep doing it as long as the people respond because that's what keeps me going. They love to remember that we were great kids. Kids are great.  Andi Simon: We were great kids and we cared about each other. And one of my mom's legacies was when she would say to me, "Andrea, I really don't care what everyone else was doing, you only hear what you're doing." It was a very hard way to grow up, because I wasn't quite sure what I was supposed to be doing. And then once you want to watch what other people are doing, and then figure out if that was good or bad, but I remember growing up and having to make choices. And it was a time where you had to find good friends who helped you make good choices, because it wasn't hard to make bad ones. Helen Newman: Absolutely. It wasn't hard at all. And yet, I don't know any kids that I ever knew that made terrible choices, which was very lucky on my part. We didn't drink. We didn't smoke. We didn't do drugs. We didn't work in my house. We listened to music because my mother was a pianist. So music has always been a big part of my life. And my mother died when she was quite young. So that's another reason why I like to remember. Andi Simon: You spoke about how you do this but that sounds like a pretty good process for anybody who's listening. And we'd like to do it as well. You got to do a little research. Right? Helen Newman: Look at what's around you. I don't know if it was last October, or the October before conducting three years ago, I don't know. I was driving to work and I saw a sign for Oktoberfest. And right away, as I'm driving to work, I'm composing my post about Oktoberfest. There's always ways you can connect. And I'll tell you what's really the loveliest part, there's a few of the women who post on Facebook, answering my posts, and they come here twice a year to have lunch with me. That's pretty cool. To have them live in the city, which is not far away. But one of them lives in South Carolina, the other lives in Florida. They come up to New York to see their children and for other reasons. And they make sure to call me and usually in December, we have a little lunch. And just as these are my friends from forever. Andi Simon: I was a professional up in Poughkeepsie, and I'm at a party. And a woman walks over and said, "Are you Andi Simon?" And I said, "Yes." She said, "I'm Dana Men." So I said, "Oh my gosh!" You know, I was like, ah, you know, six degrees of separation. Helen Newman: You're absolutely right. And with me still being here and my husband from New Rochelle, no matter where I go, someone will say, "Wait, did I know you in high school?" Yeah, it's fun. It's important for us to remember our childhood, see this and grow from that. Not everyone had a perfect childhood. I always told my kids, and I'll probably leave you with this: there are three types of families. There's dysfunctional, semi-dysfunctional, and television. Called my kids that perfect family except Father Knows Best. Andi Simon: You're so funny. Helen Newman: And now that we're parents and grandparents, remember your parents and your grandparents and what they went through. Andi Simon: I feel extremely blessed because my kids are out in California and visiting my kids is just terrific. Ones are in New Hampshire, terrific ones in California. Terrific. They have great families, and they're raising great grandkids. And so I sit back and I look and I say, Well, I was professional from the time you were babies. And you seem to have raised yourselves really well. And I'm delighted. Helen Newman: So they raised themselves. I have two children, both living in California, both working in Hollywood. So they were brought up with a mother who cared about music, art and film and writing. And they themselves are there. So doing the same thing. Andi Simon: Helen, any last words or shall we wrap up for our listeners? Helen Newman: It was a pleasure to talk to you. I love my Facebook, my New Rochelle High School Facebook page. I'm so glad that you read my posts. I want everyone out there to understand that your childhood is really important. Yeah, don't forget to think about it and don't forget it. Andi Simon: I'm going to add to that being an anthropologist, like I am, we spend a lot of time understanding that people are story makers and storytellers. I will tell you there's nothing in Helen's posts, she's a wonderful novelist, but none of our own memories are true. The only thing we have are our memories, which are great stories, right? That's why when she and I started comparing the numbering, meaning, where we were and how your mind wants to make sense out of now, in the context of where you were, then exactly. And so the best thing you can do is start to write and make it a blog that you can share with your family, or just make it in your diary so that you can keep it for yourself, but don't lose the memories. Because it helps you belong to something bigger than just yourself. And your thoughts? Helen Newman: Well, that's exactly how I feel. Andi Simon: Now I'm going to post this and push this out into the world. And for our listeners, we are in the top 5% of global podcasts. And I'm honored because it's you who helps share, and so many of you listen and then email us and tell us what you've enjoyed. I'm anxious to hear about starting to write your own stuff and share it with us. And let's use Facebook for all the things that can be done and Google as well. So at the end of the day, I want you to have a very happy day and enjoy the memories. Thanks again. Goodbye.

Trick or Treat Radio
TorTR #538 - Stick a Pitchfork in It

Trick or Treat Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 155:40


In 2022, a young man on the brink of madness pursues stardom in a desperate attempt to escape the drudgery, isolation and lovelessness of a life filled with white caucasian guilt. On Episode 538 of Trick or Treat Radio we discuss Pearl, the prequel to X from director Ti West! We also pay tribute to our Batman, we find out why Masters of the Universe was set on earth, and we talk about the stark differences and scary similarities between 1918 America and 2022 America. So grab a pitchfork, steer clear of the dust bowl, and strap on for the world's most dangerous podcast! Stuff we talk about: RIP Kevin Conroy, Batman: The Animated Series, Smallville, Joe R. Lansdale, Martin Powell, Batwoman, Kobayashi Maru reunion, Masters of the Universe, Dolph Lundgren, Billy Barty, Cobra Kai, not hawk, Tanner Buchanan, Xolo Mariduena, G.I. Joe The Movie, Courtney Cox, The Sandman, Patreon Exclusive Episodes, Wakanda Forever, Black Adam, James Gunn, Justice Society of America, Mr. Terrific, Golden Age Sandman, Blackout Friday, rear back gear down and get ready to talk all raw, cock your gun, Pearl, Ti West, X, Mia Goth, secret prequels, 1918 Flu Pandemic, scientific advancements, white caucasian, the dust boil, the golden age of Hollywood, the definition of a psychopath, 1918 Stag Films, bad nana, MaXXXine, “it's not Clue”, The ABCs of Death, The House of the Devil, Mark Ruffalo Stance, Dick the Halls, The Great Begatsby, Pearl Gon' Give It To Ya, Latitudes and Gratitudes, The Innkeepers, Leonardo DiCaprio meme, Terrifier 2, 2 hours and 18 minutes of nihilism, Damien Leone, too much of something, Brooklyn 99, Atlanta, Raising Hope, Cloris Leachman, Martha Plimpton, The Wire, and white caucasian guilt.Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/trickortreatradioJoin our Discord Community: discord.trickortreatradio.comSend Email/Voicemail: mailto:podcast@trickortreatradio.comVisit our website: http://trickortreatradio.comStart your own podcast: https://www.buzzsprout.com/?referrer_id=386Use our Amazon link: http://amzn.to/2CTdZzKFB Group: http://www.facebook.com/groups/trickortreatradioTwitter: http://twitter.com/TrickTreatRadioFacebook: http://facebook.com/TrickOrTreatRadioYouTube: http://youtube.com/TrickOrTreatRadioInstagram: http://instagram.com/TrickorTreatRadioSupport the show

Take A Knee For Marvel Vs DC
Episode 187- James Gunns "Terrific" Plan?

Take A Knee For Marvel Vs DC

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 72:27


New episode is out!! This week we talk some news tidbits, James Gunns potentially "Terrific" plans, and so much more. Recorded 11/16/22Twitter: @knee4marvelvsdcEmail: Knee4marvelvsdc@gmail.comVoicemail: 804-518-6631

Locked On Jazz - Daily Podcast On The Utah Jazz
A Step off v. the New York Knicks, Kelly Olynyk is terrific, Simone steps up. Close game review

Locked On Jazz - Daily Podcast On The Utah Jazz

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 36:41


The Utah Jazz fell to the New York Knicks last night in a game where they were just a step slow all night long. The Jazz turnovers have become an issue because it is leading to a ton of transition for the opponent. With that said their were a lot of things to like from the Jazz they played right, they shared, they got good shots and had good shot distrubution. Kelly Olynyk is better the more we watch him and David Locke, radio voice of the Utah Jazz and Jazz NBA Insider, thought it might turn out to be the opposite. Instead, Kelly does all of the little things this team needs plus is basically the back up point guard on the Utah Jazz Simone Fontecchio got extended playing time last night and was really solid for the Utah Jazz. Locke does a close game watch last night and touches on the Los Angeles Clippers, Dallas Mavericks, San Antonio Spurs, Portland Trailblazers, Miami Heat and the Phoenix Suns. 0:00: Intoduction 3:00: A Step Slow 7:00: Transition defense 11:00: Strong effort 15:00: Kelly Olynyk is terrific 20:00: Simone Fontecchio 27:00: How to play Colin Sexton 29:00: Dallas Mavericks v. Los Angeles Clippers 31:00: Portland Trailblazers v. San Antonio Spurs 32:00: Miami Heat v. Phoenix Suns Locked On Jazz Podcast

Doug & Wolf Show Audio
Wolf & Luke discuss the terrific play of Mikal Bridges, Cam Payne and Devin Booker in the Suns' victory over the Timberwolves

Doug & Wolf Show Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 40:34


In hour No. 3, Wolf and Luke discuss the terrific play of Mikal Bridges, Cam Payne and Devin Booker in the Suns' victory over the Timberwolves.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Breitbart News Daily Podcast
Desperate Brandon: Biden's Divisive Midterm Message, Guest: Tom Cotton on How the Democrats Make Us Less Safe

The Breitbart News Daily Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 65:05


On today's Breitbart News Daily podcast, we begin with an in-depth analysis of Pres. Joe Biden's speech on Democracy. He believes our country is under attack from MAGA based on the apparently violent actions of one illegal alien nudist hippie from Berkeley. The speech gives you a good sense on where the Democrats' heads are at heading into the election. Then, we touch on a couple other items including Elon Musk meeting a bunch of left-wing radicals (and no conservatives) about combatting hate speech on Twitter. Terrific. Our guest today is Arkansas Senator Tom Cotton (R), who has a new book out called "Only The Strong: Reversing the Left's Plot to Sabotage American Power." It is a scholarly work of history of Democrat foreign policy failings over the last 100 years, and includes insights into how the American Left has made us much less safe over that time and what we need to do to for a course correct. 

Insurance Dudes: Helping Insurance Agency Owners Gain Business Leverage
The Terrific Toby Hedges Totally Tipsy In Mississippi PART 2

Insurance Dudes: Helping Insurance Agency Owners Gain Business Leverage

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 28:40 Transcription Available


The Insurance Dudes are on a mission to find the best insurance agentsaround the country to find out how they are creating some of the top agencies. But they do not stop there, they also bring professionals from other industries for insights that can help agents take their agencies to the next level. The Insurance Dudes focus on your agency's four pillars: Hiring, Training, Marketing and Motivation! We have to keep the sword sharp if we want our agencies to thrive. Insurance Dudes are leaders in their home, at their office and in their community. This podcast will keep you on track with like minded high performing agents while keeping entertained!About Jason and Craig:Both agents themselves, they both have scaled to around $10 million in premium.  After searching for years for a system to create predictability in their agencies, they developed the Telefunnel after their interviews with so many agents and business leaders.  Taking several years, tons of trial and error, and hundreds of thousands of dollars on lead spend, they've optimized their agencies and teams to write tons of premium, consistently, and nearly on autopilot!LEARN MORE BY Registering for TUESDAY's LIVE CALL With The Insurance Dudes!Bio of  Toby HedgesI'm from Arkansas and I started a scratch agency in MS,  I did not know anyone in the town or the state….I have been in the insurance business all my working life. I did an internship with Northwestern Mutual in college.Then I went to work for Shelter Insurance in 1998, I was the youngest if not the youngest agent to every start with the companies at the age of 22Shelter is a captive company in the states around MO, primary personal lines insuranceI was inducted to the Shelter Hall of Fame in 2012References:Website: https://www.shelterinsurance.com/CA/agent/TOBYHEDGESFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/Toby-Hedges-Shelter-Insurance-245077376335084/Yelp:https://www.mapquest.com/us/mississippi/shelter-insurance-toby-hedges-352570932Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/toby-hedges-758a8473/

Insurance Dudes: Helping Insurance Agency Owners Gain Business Leverage
The Terrific Toby Hedges Totally Tipsy In Mississippi PART 1

Insurance Dudes: Helping Insurance Agency Owners Gain Business Leverage

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 27:28 Transcription Available


The Insurance Dudes are on a mission to find the best insurance agentsaround the country to find out how they are creating some of the top agencies. But they do not stop there, they also bring professionals from other industries for insights that can help agents take their agencies to the next level. The Insurance Dudes focus on your agency's four pillars: Hiring, Training, Marketing and Motivation! We have to keep the sword sharp if we want our agencies to thrive. Insurance Dudes are leaders in their home, at their office and in their community. This podcast will keep you on track with like minded high performing agents while keeping entertained!About Jason and Craig:Both agents themselves, they both have scaled to around $10 million in premium.  After searching for years for a system to create predictability in their agencies, they developed the Telefunnel after their interviews with so many agents and business leaders.  Taking several years, tons of trial and error, and hundreds of thousands of dollars on lead spend, they've optimized their agencies and teams to write tons of premium, consistently, and nearly on autopilot!LEARN MORE BY Registering for TUESDAY's LIVE CALL With The Insurance Dudes!Bio of  Toby HedgesI'm from Arkansas and I started a scratch agency in MS,  I did not know anyone in the town or the state….I have been in the insurance business all my working life. I did an internship with Northwestern Mutual in college.Then I went to work for Shelter Insurance in 1998, I was the youngest if not the youngest agent to every start with the companies at the age of 22Shelter is a captive company in the states around MO, primary personal lines insuranceI was inducted to the Shelter Hall of Fame in 2012References:Website: https://www.shelterinsurance.com/CA/agent/TOBYHEDGESFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/Toby-Hedges-Shelter-Insurance-245077376335084/Yelp:https://www.mapquest.com/us/mississippi/shelter-insurance-toby-hedges-352570932Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/toby-hedges-758a8473/

ADHD Essentials
Noticing The Green Lights with Brendan Mahan, Your Terrific Traffic Tour Guide

ADHD Essentials

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2022 8:45


Today, it's just me.  I'm discussing a metaphor I've been sharing for years in my workshops, but somehow haven't brought to the podcast yet.  It's a way to pay more attention to the things that are going smoothly, rather than the things that are getting in the way and causing trouble.  It's an important skill to develop, so we can reinforce the things we want, and have a better outlook on our lives.  And it's especially critical with ADHD in the mix. Where's Brendan? November 1st– I'll be doing a live webinar for ADDitude on how teachers and parents can help lonely teenagers who are dealing with peer rejection. November 7th– I'm part of the Putting Mama First Virtual Summit where I'll be talking about why setting boundaries is part of self-care, and how to set them. November 7th– I'm also part of the See Beyond ADHD Virtual Summit.  This one is a more free ranging interview where I talk about everything from the foundations of ADHD management, to homeschooling, to why we should give ourselves more credit. November 17th– I'll be at the International Conference on ADHD in Texas sharing a workshop on for ADHD professionals on how to be a good podcast guest. November 18th– I'll still be at the ADHD conference, and I'll be hosting a panel of ADHD influencers featuring Jessica McCabe, René Brooks, John Hazelwood, and Dani Donovan. December 3rd - I'm on a panel at the board gaming convention, PAX Unplugged in Philly, talking about the relationships between ADHD and Dungeons and Dragons. ADHD Essentials Links:   Learn about & Register for the The ADHD Essentials Online Parent Coaching Groups  Join Our Facebook Community Check out the ADHD Essentials Homepage Contact Brendan at brendan@ADHDessentials.com   ADHD reWired Podcast Network Plugs: ADHD reWired Hacking Your ADHD ADHD Essentials ADHD Diversified ADHD Friendly Lifestyle