Podcasts about General election

Election in which all or most members of a given political body are chosen

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Latest podcast episodes about General election

World Business Report
India's Government unveil budget plans

World Business Report

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 1, 2023 27:15


The Indian government say growth predictions for the next year are below targets, as it looks to focus on growing its manufacturing base, and aiding the least well off. We hear from business owners and economists about the situation in the country with a year to go until the General Election. The UK has its biggest day of industrial action in over a decade, with more than half a million workers on strike. We find out what's behind the walkouts. And we speak to JP Morgan about their survey of market traders looking at the year ahead.

RTÉ - Morning Ireland
Undeclared 2016 election expenses haunting Min. Paschal Donohoe

RTÉ - Morning Ireland

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 11:24


Cian McCormack reports on criticism Minister for Public Expenditure Paschal Donohoe received in the Dáil last night over undeclared expenses in the 2016 General Election and Michéal Lehane, Political Correspondent, discusses the possible implications.

RNZ: Morning Report
Crucial caucuses begin as election year planning begins

RNZ: Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 6:11


Labour and National are in Napier today for their traditional summer caucus retreats.  The meetings mark the end of the summer political hiatus and the looming General Election is undoubtedly be focus for both parties.  Lawyer and political commentator, Liam Hehir and David Cormack, PR specialist and a former Director of Communications for the Green Party, spoke to Jimmy Ellingham.  

Beyond Currency by CurrencyTransfer.com
6 January 2023 - Mortgage costs driving down housing market

Beyond Currency by CurrencyTransfer.com

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 2:49


Jeremy Hunt, the Chancellor of the Exchequer, announced the additional payments that will be available to the lowest paid and recipients of certain benefits in the new financial year, this week. The cost-of-living element will be one thousand pounds paid in three installments spread throughout the year. The subsidy to assist with the cost of energy will also remain in place. This has cost close to eighteen billion pounds in this financial year, but is likely to cost less in the next as although the energy cap is being raised, meaning that the average household bill will rise from the thousand five hundred pounds to three thousand pounds, the wholesale cost of gas has fallen, and it is estimated that the average bill will be two thousand eight hundred pounds. Sir Keir Starmer, the Leader of the Opposition, set out his alternative plan for the country yesterday and while it was generally well received it fell short of announcing what the Labour Party would do to repair the economy were it to be elected in the next General Election. Starmer tried to show that his Labour Party is electable and can provide a genuine alternative to the Conservatives, who will have been in power for fifteen years by the time of the next election. Gone are the internal squabbles of the Corbyn leadership and the dominance of the left-wing trades unions. Beyond Currency Market Commentary: Aims to provide deep insights into the political and economic events worldwide that can cause currencies to change and how this can affect your FX Exposure.

The Red Box Politics Podcast
Have the Tories Run Out of Steam?

The Red Box Politics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2023 46:33


Are the Conservatives heading for a period out of office, or can they confound expectations before the next General Election?Sitting in for Matt, Patrick Maguire speaks to Tory-watchers Henry Hill, Salma Shah and pollster Patrick English. They're joined by former cabinet minister David Davis, who thinks Sunak is in with a chance but says "God help us" if Boris Johnson returns.Plus: Finkelvitch is back, with columnists Daniel Finkelstein and David Aaronovitch discussing the similarity between rail strikes and the bakers' strikes of the 1970s and how Labour will cope with increased scrutiny and a sometimes hostile press. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

BFM :: The Breakfast Grille
Best Of The Breakfast Grille 2022 - Politics

BFM :: The Breakfast Grille

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2022 25:06


The political uncertainty that dogged the country for the past 2 years has been put to rest for the time being following the 15th General Elections that saw an unprecedented unity government being formed under the leadership of Dato' Sri Anwar Ibrahim. We look back at conversations with politicians and analysts on the twists and turns of Malaysia's political saga that held our attention hostage this year.Image credit: Shutterstock

The Elephant in the Room
Lowman Henry

The Elephant in the Room

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2022 52:22


Sam and John are joined by Lowman Henry, Chairman and CEO of the Lincoln Institute of Public Opinion Research to discuss the lessons learned from the 2022 General Election, the 2023 Special Elections and preview the 2023 Leadership Conference.

New Books in Southeast Asian Studies
Making Sense of the 2022 General Elections in Malaysia

New Books in Southeast Asian Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2022 25:06


On 9 November 2022, Malaysia held its 15th General Elections. These elections took place within an unprecedentedly open and fragmented political landscape. Instead of the usual two main coalitions contending as frontrunners, Malaysia now has three main coalitions: Barisan Nasional (BN), Pakatan Harapan (PH), and Perikatan Nasional (PN). Not one of these coalitions won enough seats to form government, and it was only after much jockeying around that Pakatan Harapan, led by Anwar Ibrahim, was able to cobble together enough support to form the so-called unity government. Joining Dr Natali Pearson on SSEAC Stories, Dr Azmil Tayeb unpacks Malaysia's recent elections and its evershifting political landscape, discussing the return of ethnoreligious political parties, the future of coalition politics and the unexpected voting patterns of young Malaysian voters. About Azmil Tayeb: Dr Azmil Tayeb is a Senior Lecturer at the School of Social Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia in Penang. He has done extensive research on political Islam, social movements and local government politics, particularly in Indonesia and Malaysia. He is currently a Visiting Research Fellow at ISEAS-Yusof Ishak Institute in Singapore and an Adjunct Professor at Universitas Negeri Malang in East Java, Indonesia. He is the author of Islamic Education in Indonesia and Malaysia: Shaping Minds, Saving Souls (Routledge, 2018). He is also the co-editor of a forthcoming book by Routledge titled Education and Power in Contemporary Southeast Asia. For more information or to browse additional resources, visit the Sydney Southeast Asia Centre's website: www.sydney.edu.au/sseac. Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/southeast-asian-studies

New Books Network
Making Sense of the 2022 General Elections in Malaysia

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2022 25:06


On 9 November 2022, Malaysia held its 15th General Elections. These elections took place within an unprecedentedly open and fragmented political landscape. Instead of the usual two main coalitions contending as frontrunners, Malaysia now has three main coalitions: Barisan Nasional (BN), Pakatan Harapan (PH), and Perikatan Nasional (PN). Not one of these coalitions won enough seats to form government, and it was only after much jockeying around that Pakatan Harapan, led by Anwar Ibrahim, was able to cobble together enough support to form the so-called unity government. Joining Dr Natali Pearson on SSEAC Stories, Dr Azmil Tayeb unpacks Malaysia's recent elections and its evershifting political landscape, discussing the return of ethnoreligious political parties, the future of coalition politics and the unexpected voting patterns of young Malaysian voters. About Azmil Tayeb: Dr Azmil Tayeb is a Senior Lecturer at the School of Social Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia in Penang. He has done extensive research on political Islam, social movements and local government politics, particularly in Indonesia and Malaysia. He is currently a Visiting Research Fellow at ISEAS-Yusof Ishak Institute in Singapore and an Adjunct Professor at Universitas Negeri Malang in East Java, Indonesia. He is the author of Islamic Education in Indonesia and Malaysia: Shaping Minds, Saving Souls (Routledge, 2018). He is also the co-editor of a forthcoming book by Routledge titled Education and Power in Contemporary Southeast Asia. For more information or to browse additional resources, visit the Sydney Southeast Asia Centre's website: www.sydney.edu.au/sseac. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Political Science
Making Sense of the 2022 General Elections in Malaysia

New Books in Political Science

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2022 25:06


On 9 November 2022, Malaysia held its 15th General Elections. These elections took place within an unprecedentedly open and fragmented political landscape. Instead of the usual two main coalitions contending as frontrunners, Malaysia now has three main coalitions: Barisan Nasional (BN), Pakatan Harapan (PH), and Perikatan Nasional (PN). Not one of these coalitions won enough seats to form government, and it was only after much jockeying around that Pakatan Harapan, led by Anwar Ibrahim, was able to cobble together enough support to form the so-called unity government. Joining Dr Natali Pearson on SSEAC Stories, Dr Azmil Tayeb unpacks Malaysia's recent elections and its evershifting political landscape, discussing the return of ethnoreligious political parties, the future of coalition politics and the unexpected voting patterns of young Malaysian voters. About Azmil Tayeb: Dr Azmil Tayeb is a Senior Lecturer at the School of Social Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia in Penang. He has done extensive research on political Islam, social movements and local government politics, particularly in Indonesia and Malaysia. He is currently a Visiting Research Fellow at ISEAS-Yusof Ishak Institute in Singapore and an Adjunct Professor at Universitas Negeri Malang in East Java, Indonesia. He is the author of Islamic Education in Indonesia and Malaysia: Shaping Minds, Saving Souls (Routledge, 2018). He is also the co-editor of a forthcoming book by Routledge titled Education and Power in Contemporary Southeast Asia. For more information or to browse additional resources, visit the Sydney Southeast Asia Centre's website: www.sydney.edu.au/sseac. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/political-science

SSEAC Stories
Making Sense of the 2022 General Elections in Malaysia

SSEAC Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2022 25:06


On 9 November 2022, Malaysia held its 15th General Elections. These elections took place within an unprecedentedly open and fragmented political landscape. Instead of the usual two main coalitions contending as frontrunners, Malaysia now has three main coalitions: Barisan Nasional (BN), Pakatan Harapan (PH), and Perikatan Nasional (PN). Not one of these coalitions won enough seats to form government, and it was only after much jockeying around that Pakatan Harapan, led by Anwar Ibrahim, was able to cobble together enough support to form the so-called unity government. Joining Dr Natali Pearson on SSEAC Stories, Dr Azmil Tayeb unpacks Malaysia's recent elections and its evershifting political landscape, discussing the return of ethnoreligious political parties, the future of coalition politics and the unexpected voting patterns of young Malaysian voters. About Azmil Tayeb: Dr Azmil Tayeb is a Senior Lecturer at the School of Social Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia in Penang. He has done extensive research on political Islam, social movements and local government politics, particularly in Indonesia and Malaysia. He is currently a Visiting Research Fellow at ISEAS-Yusof Ishak Institute in Singapore and an Adjunct Professor at Universitas Negeri Malang in East Java, Indonesia. He is the author of Islamic Education in Indonesia and Malaysia: Shaping Minds, Saving Souls (Routledge, 2018). He is also the co-editor of a forthcoming book by Routledge titled Education and Power in Contemporary Southeast Asia. For more information or to browse additional resources, visit the Sydney Southeast Asia Centre's website: www.sydney.edu.au/sseac.

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
Episode 160: “Flowers in the Rain” by the Move

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2022


Episode 160 of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs looks at “Flowers in the Rain" by the Move, their transition into ELO, and the career of Roy Wood. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. Patreon backers also have a twenty-minute bonus episode available, on "The Chipmunk Song" by Canned Heat. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ Note I say "And on its first broadcast, as George Martin's theme tune for the new station faded, Tony Blackburn reached for a record." -- I should point out that after Martin's theme fades, Blackburn talks over a brief snatch of a piece by Johnny Dankworth. Resources As so many of the episodes recently have had no Mixcloud due to the number of songs by one artist, I've decided to start splitting the mixes of the recordings excerpted in the podcasts into two parts. Here's part one . I had problems uploading part two, but will attempt to get that up shortly. There are not many books about Roy Wood, and I referred to both of the two that seem to exist -- this biography by John van der Kiste, and this album guide by James R Turner.  I also referred to this biography of Jeff Lynne by van der Kiste, The Electric Light Orchestra Story by Bev Bevan, and Mr Big by Don Arden with Mick Wall.  Most of the more comprehensive compilations of the Move's material are out of print, but this single-CD-plus-DVD anthology is the best compilation that's in print. This is the one collection of Wood's solo and Wizzard hits that seems currently in print, and for those who want to investigate further, this cheap box set has the last Move album, the first ELO album, the first Wizzard album, Wood's solo Boulders, and a later Wood solo album, for the price of a single CD. Transcript Before I start, a brief note. This episode deals with organised crime, and so contains some mild descriptions of violence, and also has some mention of mental illness and drug use, though not much of any of those things. And it's probably also important to warn people that towards the end there's some Christmas music, including excerpts of a song that is inescapable at this time of year in the UK, so those who work in retail environments and the like may want to listen to this later, at a point when they're not totally sick of hearing Christmas records. Most of the time, the identity of the party in government doesn't make that much of a difference to people's everyday lives.  At least in Britain, there tends to be a consensus ideology within the limits of which governments of both main parties tend to work. They will make a difference at the margins, and be more or less competent, and more or less conservative or left-wing, more or less liberal or authoritarian, but life will, broadly speaking, continue along much as before for most people. Some will be a little better or worse off, but in general steering the ship of state is a matter of a lot of tiny incremental changes, not of sudden u-turns. But there have been a handful of governments that have made big, noticeable, changes to the structure of society, reforms that for better or worse affect the lives of every person in the country. Since the end of the Second World War there have been two UK governments that made economic changes of this nature. The Labour government under Clement Atlee which came into power in 1945, and which dramatically expanded the welfare state, introduced the National Health Service, and nationalised huge swathes of major industries, created the post-war social democratic consensus which would be kept to with only minor changes by successive governments of both major parties for decades. The next government to make changes to the economy of such a radical nature was the Conservative government which came to power under Margaret Thatcher in 1979, which started the process of unravelling that social democratic consensus and replacing it with a far more hypercapitalist economic paradigm, which would last for the next several decades. It's entirely possible that the current Conservative government, in leaving the EU, has made a similarly huge change, but we won't know that until we have enough distance from the event to know what long-term changes it's caused. Those are economic changes. Arguably at least as impactful was the Labour government led by Harold Wilson that came to power in 1964, which did not do much to alter the economic consensus, but revolutionised the social order at least as much. Largely because of the influence of Roy Jenkins, the Home Secretary for much of that time, between 1964 and the end of the sixties, Britain abolished the death penalty for murder, decriminalised some sex acts between men in private, abolished corporal punishment in prisons, legalised abortion in certain circumstances, and got rid of censorship in the theatre. They also vastly increased spending on education, and made many other changes. By the end of their term, Britain had gone from being a country with laws reflecting a largely conservative, authoritarian, worldview to one whose laws were some of the most liberal in Europe, and society had started changing to match. There were exceptions, though, and that government did make some changes that were illiberal. They brought in increased restrictions on immigration, starting a worrying trend that continues to this day of governments getting ever crueler to immigrants, and they added LSD to the list of illegal drugs. And they brought in the Marine Broadcasting Offences Act, banning the pirate stations. We've mentioned pirate radio stations very briefly, but never properly explained them. In Britain, at this point, there was a legal monopoly on broadcasting. Only the BBC could run a radio station in the UK, and thanks to agreements with the Musicians' Union, the BBC could only play a very small amount of recorded music, with everything else having to be live performances or spoken word. And because it had a legal obligation to provide something for everyone, that meant the tiny amount of recorded music that was played on the radio had to cover all genres, meaning that even while Britain was going through the most important changes in its musical history, pop records were limited to an hour or two a week on British radio. Obviously, that wasn't going to last while there was money to be made, and the record companies in particular wanted to have somewhere to showcase their latest releases. At the start of the sixties, Radio Luxembourg had become popular, broadcasting from continental Europe but largely playing shows that had been pre-recorded in London. But of course, that was far enough away that it made listening to the transmissions difficult. But a solution presented itself: [Excerpt: The Fortunes, "Caroline"] Radio Caroline still continues to this day, largely as an Internet-based radio station, but in the mid-sixties it was something rather different. It was one of a handful of radio stations -- the pirate stations -- that broadcast from ships in international waters. The ships would stay three miles off the coast of Britain, close enough for their broadcasts to be clearly heard in much of the country, but outside Britain's territorial waters. They soon became hugely popular, with Radio Caroline and Radio London the two most popular, and introduced DJs like Tony Blackburn, Dave Lee Travis, Kenny Everett, and John Peel to the airwaves of Britain. The stations ran on bribery and advertising, and if you wanted a record to get into the charts one of the things you had to do was bribe one of the big pirate stations to playlist it, and with this corruption came violence, which came to a head when as we heard in the episode on “Here Comes the Night”, in 1966 Major Oliver Smedley, a failed right-wing politician and one of the directors of Radio Caroline, got a gang of people to board an abandoned sea fort from which a rival station was broadcasting and retrieve some equipment he claimed belonged to him. The next day, Reginald Calvert, the owner of the rival station, went to Smedley's home to confront him, and Smedley shot him dead, claiming self-defence. The jury in Smedley's subsequent trial took only a minute to find him not guilty and award him two hundred and fifty guineas to cover his costs. This was the last straw for the government, which was already concerned that the pirates' transmitters were interfering with emergency services transmissions, and that proper royalties weren't being paid for the music broadcast (though since much of the music was only on there because of payola, this seems a little bit of a moot point).  They introduced legislation which banned anyone in the UK from supplying the pirate ships with records or other supplies, or advertising on the stations. They couldn't do anything about the ships themselves, because they were outside British jurisdiction, but they could make sure that nobody could associate with them while remaining in the UK. The BBC was to regain its monopoly (though in later years some commercial radio stations were allowed to operate). But as well as the stick, they needed the carrot. The pirate stations *had* been filling a real need, and the biggest of them were getting millions of listeners every day. So the arrangements with the Musicians' Union and the record labels were changed, and certain BBC stations were now allowed to play a lot more recorded music per day. I haven't been able to find accurate figures anywhere -- a lot of these things were confidential agreements -- but it seems to have been that the so-called "needle time" rules were substantially relaxed, allowing the BBC to separate what had previously been the Light Programme -- a single radio station that played all kinds of popular music, much of it live performances -- into two radio stations that were each allowed to play as much as twelve hours of recorded music per day, which along with live performances and between-track commentary from DJs was enough to allow a full broadcast schedule. One of these stations, Radio 2, was aimed at older listeners, and to start with mostly had programmes of what we would now refer to as Muzak, mixed in with the pop music of an older generation -- crooners and performers like Englebert Humperdinck. But another, Radio 1, was aimed at a younger audience and explicitly modelled on the pirate stations, and featured many of the DJs who had made their names on those stations. And on its first broadcast, as George Martin's theme tune for the new station faded, Tony Blackburn reached for a record. At different times Blackburn has said either that he was just desperately reaching for whatever record came to hand or that he made a deliberate choice because the record he chose had such a striking opening that it would be the perfect way to start a new station: [Excerpt: Tony Blackburn first radio show into "Flowers in the Rain" by the Move] You may remember me talking in the episode on "Here Comes the Night" about how in 1964 Dick Rowe of Decca, the manager Larry Page, and the publicist and co-owner of Radio Caroline Phil Solomon were all trying to promote something called Brumbeat as the answer to Merseybeat – Brummies, for those who don't know, are people from Birmingham. Brumbeat never took off the way Merseybeat did, but several bands did get a chance to make records, among them Gerry Levene and the Avengers: [Excerpt: Gerry Levene and the Avengers, "Dr. Feelgood"] That was the only single the Avengers made, and the B-side wasn't even them playing, but a bunch of session musicians under the direction of Bert Berns, and the group split up soon afterwards, but several of the members would go on to have rather important careers. According to some sources, one of their early drummers was John Bohnam, who you can be pretty sure will be turning up later in the story, while the drummer on that track was Graeme Edge, who would later go on to co-found the Moody Blues.  But today it's the guitarist we'll be looking at. Roy Wood had started playing music when he was very young -- he'd had drum lessons when he was five years old, the only formal musical tuition he ever had, and he'd played harmonica around working men's clubs as a kid. And as a small child he'd loved classical music, particularly Tchaikovsky and Elgar. But it wasn't until he was twelve that he decided that he wanted to be a guitarist. He went to see the Shadows play live, and was inspired by the sound of Hank Marvin's guitar, which he later described as sounding "like it had been dipped in Dettol or something": [Excerpt: The Shadows, "Apache"] He started begging his parents for a guitar, and got one for his thirteenth birthday -- and by the time he was fourteen he was already in a band, the Falcons, whose members were otherwise eighteen to twenty years old, but who needed a lead guitarist who could play like Marvin. Wood had picked up the guitar almost preternaturally quickly, as he would later pick up every instrument he turned his hand to, and he'd also got the equipment. His friend Jeff Lynne later said "I first saw Roy playing in a church hall in Birmingham and I think his group was called the Falcons. And I could tell he was dead posh because he had a Fender Stratocaster and a Vox AC30 amplifier. The business at the time. I mean, if you've got those, that's it, you're made." It was in the Falcons that Wood had first started trying to write songs, at first instrumentals in the style of the Shadows, but then after the Beatles hit the charts he realised it was possible for band members to write their own material, and started hesitantly trying to write a few actual songs. Wood had moved on from the Falcons to Gerry Levene's band, one of the biggest local bands in Birmingham, when he was sixteen, which is also when he left formal education, dropping out from art school -- he's later said that he wasn't expelled as such, but that he and the school came to a mutual agreement that he wouldn't go back there. And when Gerry Levene and the Avengers fell apart after their one chance at success hadn't worked out, he moved on again to an even bigger band. Mike Sheridan and the Night Riders had had two singles out already, both produced by Cliff Richard's producer Norrie Paramor, and while they hadn't charted they were clearly going places. They needed a new guitarist, and Wood was by far the best of the dozen or so people who auditioned, even though Sheridan was very hesitant at first -- the Night Riders were playing cabaret, and all dressed smartly at all times, and this sixteen-year-old guitarist had turned up wearing clothes made by his sister and ludicrous pointy shoes. He was the odd man out, but he was so good that none of the other players could hold a candle to him, and he was in the Night Riders by the time of their third single, "What a Sweet Thing That Was": [Excerpt: Mike Sheridan and the Night Riders, "What a Sweet Thing That Was"] Sheridan later said "Roy was and still is, in my opinion, an unbelievable talent. As stubborn as a mule and a complete extrovert. Roy changed the group by getting us into harmonies and made us realize there was better material around with more than three chords to play. This was our turning point and we became a group's group and a bigger name." -- though there are few other people who would describe Wood as extroverted, most people describing him as painfully shy off-stage. "What a  Sweet Thing That Was" didn't have any success, and nor did its follow-up, "Here I Stand", which came out in January 1965. But by that point, Wood had got enough of a reputation that he was already starting to guest on records by other bands on the Birmingham scene, like "Pretty Things" by Danny King and the Mayfair Set: [Excerpt: Danny King and the Mayfair Set, "Pretty Things"] After their fourth single was a flop, Mike Sheridan and the Night Riders changed their name to Mike Sheridan's Lot, and the B-side of their first single under the new name was a Roy Wood song, the first time one of his songs was recorded. Unfortunately the song, modelled on "It's Not Unusual" by Tom Jones, didn't come off very well, and Sheridan blamed himself for what everyone was agreed was a lousy sounding record: [Excerpt: Mike Sheridan's Lot, "Make Them Understand"] Mike Sheridan's Lot put out one final single, but the writing was on the wall for the group. Wood left, and soon after so did Sheridan himself. The remaining members regrouped under the name The Idle Race, with Wood's friend Jeff Lynne as their new singer and guitarist. But Wood wouldn't remain without a band for long. He'd recently started hanging out with another band, Carl Wayne and the Vikings, who had also released a couple of singles, on Pye: [Excerpt: Carl Wayne and the Vikings, "What's the Matter Baby"] But like almost every band from Birmingham up to this point, the Vikings' records had done very little, and their drummer had quit, and been replaced by Bev Bevan, who had been in yet another band that had gone nowhere, Denny Laine and the Diplomats, who had released one single under the name of their lead singer Nicky James, featuring the Breakaways, the girl group who would later sing on "Hey Joe", on backing vocals: [Excerpt: Nicky James, "My Colour is Blue"] Bevan had joined Carl Wayne's group, and they'd recorded one track together, a cover version of "My Girl", which was only released in the US, and which sank without a trace: [Excerpt: Carl Wayne and the Vikings, "My Girl"] It was around this time that Wood started hanging around with the Vikings, and they would all complain about how if you were playing the Birmingham circuit you were stuck just playing cover versions, and couldn't do anything more interesting.  They were also becoming more acutely aware of how successful they *could* have been, because one of the Brumbeat bands had become really big. The Moody Blues, a supergroup of players from the best bands in Birmingham who featured Bev Bevan's old bandmate Denny Laine and Wood's old colleague Graeme Edge, had just hit number one with their version of "Go Now": [Excerpt: The Moody Blues, "Go Now"] So they knew the potential for success was there, but they were all feeling trapped. But then Ace Kefford, the bass player for the Vikings, went to see Davy Jones and the Lower Third playing a gig: [Excerpt: Davy Jones and the Lower Third, "You've Got a Habit of Leaving"] Also at the gig was Trevor Burton, the guitarist for Danny King and the Mayfair Set. The two of them got chatting to Davy Jones after the gig, and eventually the future David Bowie told them that the two of them should form their own band if they were feeling constricted in their current groups. They decided to do just that, and they persuaded Carl Wayne from Kefford's band to join them, and got in Wood.  Now they just needed a drummer. Their first choice was John Bonham, the former drummer for Gerry Levene and the Avengers who was now drumming in a band with Kefford's uncle and Nicky James from the Diplomats. But Bonham and Wayne didn't get on, and so Bonham decided to remain in the group he was in, and instead they turned to Bev Bevan, the Vikings' new drummer.  (Of the other two members of the Vikings, one went on to join Mike Sheridan's Lot in place of Wood, before leaving at the same time as Sheridan and being replaced by Lynne, while the other went on to join Mike Sheridan's New Lot, the group Sheridan formed after leaving his old group. The Birmingham beat group scene seems to have only had about as many people as there were bands, with everyone ending up a member of twenty different groups). The new group called themselves the Move, because they were all moving on from other groups, and it was a big move for all of them. Many people advised them not to get together, saying they were better off where they were, or taking on offers they'd got from more successful groups -- Carl Wayne had had an offer from a group called the Spectres, who would later become famous as Status Quo, while Wood had been tempted by Tony Rivers and the Castaways, a group who at the time were signed to Immediate Records, and who did Beach Boys soundalikes and covers: [Excerpt: Tony Rivers and the Castaways, "Girl Don't Tell Me"] Wood was a huge fan of the Beach Boys and would have fit in with Rivers, but decided he'd rather try something truly new. After their first gig, most of the people who had warned against the group changed their minds. Bevan's best friend, Bobby Davis, told Bevan that while he'd disliked all the other groups Bevan had played in, he liked this one. (Davis would later become a famous comedian, and have a top five single himself in the seventies, produced by Jeff Lynne and with Bevan on the drums, under his stage name Jasper Carrott): [Excerpt: Jasper Carrott, "Funky Moped"] Most of their early sets were cover versions, usually of soul and Motown songs, but reworked in the group's unique style. All five of the band could sing, four of them well enough to be lead vocalists in their own right (Bevan would add occasional harmonies or sing novelty numbers) and so they became known for their harmonies -- Wood talked at the time about how he wanted the band to have Beach Boys harmonies but over instruments that sounded like the Who. And while they were mostly doing cover versions live, Wood was busily writing songs. Their first recording session was for local radio, and at that session they did cover versions of songs by Brenda Lee, the Isley Brothers, the Orlons, the Marvelettes, and Betty Everett, but they also performed four songs written by Wood, with each member of the front line taking a lead vocal, like this one with Kefford singing: [Excerpt: The Move, "You're the One I Need"] The group were soon signed by Tony Secunda, the manager of the Moody Blues, who set about trying to get the group as much publicity as possible. While Carl Wayne, as the only member who didn't play an instrument, ended up the lead singer on most of the group's early records, Secunda started promoting Kefford, who was younger and more conventionally attractive than Wayne, and who had originally put the group together, as the face of the group, while Wood was doing most of the heavy lifting with the music. Wood quickly came to dislike performing live, and to wish he could take the same option as Brian Wilson and stay home and write songs and make records while the other four went out and performed, so Kefford and Wayne taking the spotlight from him didn't bother him at the time, but it set the group up for constant conflicts about who was actually the leader of the group. Wood was also uncomfortable with the image that Secunda set up for the group. Secunda decided that the group needed to be promoted as "bad boys", and so he got them to dress up as 1930s gangsters, and got them to do things like smash busts of Hitler, or the Rhodesian dictator Ian Smith, on stage. He got them to smash TVs on stage too, and in one publicity stunt he got them to smash up a car, while strippers took their clothes off nearby -- claiming that this was to show that people were more interested in violence than in sex. Wood, who was a very quiet, unassuming, introvert, didn't like this sort of thing, but went along with it. Secunda got the group a regular slot at the Marquee club, which lasted several months until, in one of Secunda's ideas for publicity, Carl Wayne let off smoke bombs on stage which set fire to the stage. The manager came up to try to stop the fire, and Wayne tossed the manager's wig into the flames, and the group were banned from the club (though the ban was later lifted). In another publicity stunt, at the time of the 1966 General Election, the group were photographed with "Vote Tory" posters, and issued an invitation to Edward Heath, the leader of the Conservative Party and a keen amateur musician, to join them on stage on keyboards. Sir Edward didn't respond to the invitation. All this publicity led to record company interest. Joe Boyd tried to sign the group to Elektra Records, but much as with The Pink Floyd around the same time, Jac Holzman wasn't interested. Instead they signed with a new production company set up by Denny Cordell, the producer of the Moody Blues' hits. The contract they signed was written on the back of a nude model, as yet another of Secunda's publicity schemes. The group's first single, "Night of Fear" was written by Wood and an early sign of his interest in incorporating classical music into rock: [Excerpt: The Move, "Night of Fear"] Secunda claimed in the publicity that that song was inspired by taking bad acid and having a bad trip, but in truth Wood was more inspired by brown ale than by brown acid -- he and Bev Bevan would never do any drugs other than alcohol. Wayne did take acid once, but didn't like it, though Burton and Kefford would become regular users of most drugs that were going. In truth, the song was not about anything more than being woken up in the middle of the night by an unexpected sound and then being unable to get back to sleep because you're scared of what might be out there. The track reached number two on the charts in the UK, being kept off the top by "I'm a Believer" by the Monkees, and was soon followed up by another song which again led to assumptions of drug use. "I Can Hear the Grass Grow" wasn't about grass the substance, but was inspired by a letter to Health and Efficiency, a magazine which claimed to be about the nudist lifestyle as an excuse for printing photos of naked people at a time before pornography laws were liberalised. The letter was from a reader saying that he listened to pop music on the radio because "where I live it's so quiet I can hear the grass grow!" Wood took that line and turned it into the group's next single, which reached number five: [Excerpt: The Move, "I Can Hear the Grass Grow"] Shortly after that, the group played two big gigs at Alexandra Palace. The first was the Fourteen-Hour Technicolor Dream, which we talked about in the Pink Floyd episode. There Wood had one of the biggest thrills of his life when he walked past John Lennon, who saluted him and then turned to a friend and said "He's brilliant!" -- in the seventies Lennon would talk about how Wood was one of his two favourite British songwriters, and would call the Move "the Hollies with balls". The other gig they played at Alexandra Palace was a "Free the Pirates" benefit show, sponsored by Radio Caroline, to protest the imposition of the Marine Broadcasting (Offences) Act.  Despite that, it was, of course, the group's next single that was the first one to be played on Radio One. And that single was also the one which kickstarted Roy Wood's musical ambitions.  The catalyst for this was Tony Visconti. Visconti was a twenty-three-year-old American who had been in the music business since he was sixteen, working the typical kind of jobs that working musicians do, like being for a time a member of a latter-day incarnation of the Crew-Cuts, the white vocal group who had had hits in the fifties with covers of "Sh'Boom" and “Earth Angel”. He'd also recorded two singles as a duo with his wife Siegrid, which had gone nowhere: [Excerpt: Tony and Siegrid, "Up Here"] Visconti had been working for the Richmond Organisation as a staff songwriter when he'd met the Move's producer Denny Cordell. Cordell was in the US to promote a new single he had released with a group called Procol Harum, "A Whiter Shade of Pale", and Visconti became the first American to hear the record, which of course soon became a massive hit: [Excerpt: Procol Harum, "A Whiter Shade of Pale"] While he was in New York, Cordell also wanted to record a backing track for one of his other hit acts, Georgie Fame. He told Visconti that he'd booked several of the best session players around, like the jazz trumpet legend Clark Terry, and thought it would be a fun session. Visconti asked to look at the charts for the song, out of professional interest, and Cordell was confused -- what charts? The musicians would just make up an arrangement, wouldn't they? Visconti asked what he was talking about, and Cordell talked about how you made records -- you just got the musicians to come into the studio, hung around while they smoked a few joints and worked out what they were going to play, and then got on with it. It wouldn't take more than about twelve hours to get a single recorded that way. Visconti was horrified, and explained that that might be how they did things in London, but if Cordell tried to make a record that way in New York, with an eight-piece group of session musicians who charged union scale, and would charge double scale for arranging work on top, then he'd bankrupt himself. Cordell went pale and said that the session was in an hour, what was he going to do? Luckily, Cordell had a copy of the demo with him, and Visconti, who unlike Cordell was a trained musician, quickly sat down and wrote an arrangement for him, sketching out parts for guitar, bass, drums, piano, sax, and trumpets. The resulting arrangement wasn't perfect -- Visconti had to write the whole thing in less than an hour with no piano to hand -- but it was good enough that Cordell's production assistant on the track, Harvey Brooks of the group Electric Flag, who also played bass on the track, could tweak it in the studio, and the track was recorded quickly, saving Cordell a fortune: [Excerpt: Georgie Fame, "Because I Love You"] One of the other reasons Cordell had been in the US was that he was looking for a production assistant to work with him in the UK to help translate his ideas into language the musicians could understand. According to Visconti he said that he was going to try asking Phil Spector to be his assistant, and Artie Butler if Spector said no.  Astonishingly, assuming he did ask them, neither Phil Spector nor Artie Butler (who was the arranger for records like "Leader of the Pack" and "I'm a Believer" among many, many, others, and who around this time was the one who suggested to Louis Armstrong that he should record "What a Wonderful World") wanted to fly over to the UK to work as Denny Cordell's assistant, and so Cordell turned back to Visconti and invited him to come over to the UK. The main reason Cordell needed an assistant was that he had too much work on his hands -- he was currently in the middle of recording albums for three major hit groups -- Procol Harum, The Move, and Manfred Mann -- and he physically couldn't be in multiple studios at once. Visconti's first work for him was on a Manfred Mann session, where they were recording the Randy Newman song "So Long Dad" for their next single. Cordell produced the rhythm track then left for a Procol Harum session, leaving Visconti to guide the group through the overdubs, including all the vocal parts and the lead instruments: [Excerpt: Manfred Mann, "So Long Dad"] The next Move single, "Flowers in the Rain", was the first one to benefit from Visconti's arrangement ideas. The band had recorded the track, and Cordell had been unhappy with both the song and performance, thinking it was very weak compared to their earlier singles -- not the first time that Cordell would have a difference of opinion with the band, who he thought of as a mediocre pop group, while they thought of themselves as a heavy rock band who were being neutered in the studio by their producer.  In particular, Cordell didn't like that the band fell slightly out of time in the middle eight of the track. He decided to scrap it, and get the band to record something else. Visconti, though, thought the track could be saved. He told Cordell that what they needed to do was to beat the Beatles, by using a combination of instruments they hadn't thought of. He scored for a quartet of wind instruments -- oboe, flute, clarinet, and French horn, in imitation of Mendelssohn: [Excerpt: The Move, "Flowers in the Rain"] And then, to cover up the slight sloppiness on the middle eight, Visconti had the wind instruments on that section recorded at half speed, so when played back at normal speed they'd sound like pixies and distract from the rhythm section: [Excerpt: The Move, "Flowers in the Rain"] Visconti's instincts were right. The single went to number two, kept off the top spot by Englebert Humperdinck, who spent 1967 keeping pretty much every major British band off number one, and thanks in part to it being the first track played on Radio 1, but also because it was one of the biggest hits of 1967, it's been the single of the Move's that's had the most airplay over the years. Unfortunately, none of the band ever saw a penny in royalties from it. It was because of another of Tony Secunda's bright ideas. Harold Wilson, the Prime Minister at the time, was very close to his advisor Marcia Williams, who started out as his secretary, rose to be his main political advisor, and ended up being elevated to the peerage as Baroness Falkender. There were many, many rumours that Williams was corrupt -- rumours that were squashed by both Wilson and Williams frequently issuing libel writs against newspapers that mentioned them -- though it later turned out that at least some of these were the work of Britain's security services, who believed Wilson to be working for the KGB (and indeed Williams had first met Wilson at a dinner with Khrushchev, though Wilson was very much not a Communist) and were trying to destabilise his government as a result. Their personal closeness also led to persistent rumours that Wilson and Williams were having an affair. And Tony Secunda decided that the best way to promote "Flowers in the Rain" was to print a postcard with a cartoon of Wilson and Williams on it, and send it out. Including sticking a copy through the door of ten Downing St, the Prime Minister's official residence. This backfired *spectacularly*. Wilson sued the Move for libel, even though none of them had known of their manager's plans, and as a result of the settlement it became illegal for any publication to print the offending image (though it can easily be found on the Internet now of course), everyone involved with the record was placed under a permanent legal injunction to never discuss the details of the case, and every penny in performance or songwriting royalties the track earned would go to charities of Harold Wilson's choice. In the 1990s newspaper reports said that the group had up to that point lost out on two hundred thousand pounds in royalties as a result of Secunda's stunt, and given the track's status as a perennial favourite, it's likely they've missed out on a similar amount in the decades since. Incidentally, while every member of the band was banned from ever describing the postcard, I'm not, and since Wilson and Williams are now both dead it's unlikely they'll ever sue me. The postcard is a cartoon in the style of Aubrey Beardsley, and shows Wilson as a grotesque naked homunculus sat on a bed, with Williams naked save for a diaphonous nightgown through which can clearly be seen her breasts and genitals, wearing a Marie Antoinette style wig and eyemask and holding a fan coquettishly, while Wilson's wife peers at them through a gap in the curtains. The text reads "Disgusting Depraved Despicable, though Harold maybe is the only way to describe "Flowers in the Rain" The Move, released Aug 23" The stunt caused huge animosity between the group and Secunda, not only because of the money they lost but also because despite Secunda's attempts to associate them with the Conservative party the previous year, Ace Kefford was upset at an attack on the Labour leader -- his grandfather was a lifelong member of the Labour party and Kefford didn't like the idea of upsetting him. The record also had a knock-on effect on another band. Wood had given the song "Here We Go Round the Lemon Tree" to his friends in The Idle Race, the band that had previously been Mike Sheridan and the Night Riders, and they'd planned to use their version as their first single: [Excerpt: The Idle Race, "Here We Go Round the Lemon Tree"] But the Move had also used the song as the B-side for their own single, and "Flowers in the Rain" was so popular that the B-side also got a lot of airplay. The Idle Race didn't want to be thought of as a covers act, and so "Lemon Tree" was pulled at the last minute and replaced by "Impostors of Life's Magazine", by the group's guitarist Jeff Lynne: [Excerpt: The Idle Race, "Impostors of Life's Magazine"] Before the problems arose, the Move had been working on another single. The A-side, "Cherry Blossom Clinic", was a song about being in a psychiatric hospital, and again had an arrangement by Visconti, who this time conducted a twelve-piece string section: [Excerpt: The Move, "Cherry Blossom Clinic"] The B-side, meanwhile, was a rocker about politics: [Excerpt: The Move, "Vote For Me"] Given the amount of controversy they'd caused, the idea of a song about mental illness backed with one about politics seemed a bad idea, and so "Cherry Blossom Clinic" was kept back as an album track while "Vote For Me" was left unreleased until future compilations. The first Wood knew about "Cherry Blossom Clinic" not being released was when after a gig in London someone -- different sources have it as Carl Wayne or Tony Secunda -- told him that they had a recording session the next morning for their next single and asked what song he planned on recording. When he said he didn't have one, he was sent up to his hotel room with a bottle of Scotch and told not to come down until he had a new song. He had one by 8:30 the next morning, and was so drunk and tired that he had to be held upright by his bandmates in the studio while singing his lead vocal on the track. The song was inspired by "Somethin' Else", a track by Eddie Cochran, one of Wood's idols: [Excerpt: Eddie Cochran, "Somethin' Else"] Wood took the bass riff from that and used it as the basis for what was the Move's most straight-ahead rock track to date. As 1967 was turning into 1968, almost universally every band was going back to basics, recording stripped down rock and roll tracks, and the Move were no exception. Early takes of "Fire Brigade" featured Matthew Fisher of Procol Harum on piano, but the final version featured just guitar, bass, drums and vocals, plus a few sound effects: [Excerpt: The Move, "Fire Brigade"] While Carl Wayne had sung lead or co-lead on all the Move's previous singles, he was slowly being relegated into the background, and for this one Wood takes the lead vocal on everything except the brief bridge, which Wayne sings: [Excerpt: The Move, "Fire Brigade"] The track went to number three, and while it's not as well-remembered as a couple of other Move singles, it was one of the most influential. Glen Matlock of the Sex Pistols has often said that the riff for "God Save the Queen" is inspired by "Fire Brigade": [Excerpt: The Sex Pistols, "God Save the Queen"] The reversion to a heavier style of rock on "Fire Brigade" was largely inspired by the group's new friend Jimi Hendrix. The group had gone on a package tour with The Pink Floyd (who were at the bottom of the bill), Amen Corner, The Nice, and the Jimi Hendrix Experience, and had become good friends with Hendrix, often jamming with him backstage. Burton and Kefford had become so enamoured of Hendrix that they'd both permed their hair in imitation of his Afro, though Burton regretted it -- his hair started falling out in huge chunks as a result of the perm, and it took him a full two years to grow it out and back into a more natural style. Burton had started sharing a flat with Noel Redding of the Jimi Hendrix Experience, and Burton and Wood had also sung backing vocals with Graham Nash of the Hollies on Hendrix's "You Got Me Floatin'", from his Axis: Bold as Love album: [Excerpt: The Jimi Hendrix Experience, "You Got Me Floatin'"] In early 1968, the group's first album came out. In retrospect it's arguably their best, but at the time it felt a little dated -- it was a compilation of tracks recorded between late 1966 and late 1967, and by early 1968 that might as well have been the nineteenth century. The album included their two most recent singles, a few more songs arranged by Visconti, and three cover versions -- versions of Eddie Cochran's "Weekend", Moby Grape's "Hey Grandma", and the old standard "Zing! Went the Strings of My Heart", done copying the Coasters' arrangement with Bev Bevan taking a rare lead vocal. By this time there was a lot of dissatisfaction among the group. Most vocal -- or least vocal, because by this point he was no longer speaking to any of the other members, had been Ace Kefford. Kefford felt he was being sidelined in a band he'd formed and where he was the designated face of the group. He'd tried writing songs, but the only one he'd brought to the group, "William Chalker's Time Machine", had been rejected, and was eventually recorded by a group called The Lemon Tree, whose recording of it was co-produced by Burton and Andy Fairweather-Low of Amen Corner: [Excerpt: The Lemon Tree, "William Chalker's Time Machine"] He was also, though the rest of the group didn't realise it at the time, in the middle of a mental breakdown, which he later attributed to his overuse of acid. By the time the album, titled Move, came out, he'd quit the group. He formed a new group, The Ace Kefford Stand, with Cozy Powell on drums, and they released one single, a cover version of the Yardbirds' "For Your Love", which didn't chart: [Excerpt: The Ace Kefford Stand, "For Your Love"] Kefford recorded a solo album in 1968, but it wasn't released until an archival release in 2003, and he spent most of the next few decades dealing with mental health problems. The group continued on as a four-piece, with Burton moving over to bass. While they thought about what to do -- they were unhappy with Secunda's management, and with the sound that Cordell was getting from their recordings, which they considered far wimpier than their live sound -- they released a live EP of cover versions, recorded at the Marquee. The choice of songs for the EP showed their range of musical influences at the time, going from fifties rockabilly to the burgeoning progressive rock scene, with versions of Cochran's "Somethin' Else", Jerry Lee Lewis' "It'll Be Me", "So You Want to Be a Rock and Roll Star" by the Byrds, "Sunshine Help Me" by Spooky Tooth, and "Stephanie Knows Who" by Love: [Excerpt: The Move, "Stephanie Knows Who"] Incidentally, later that year they headlined a gig at the Royal Albert Hall with the Byrds as the support act, and Gram Parsons, who by that time was playing guitar for the Byrds, said that the Move did "So You Want to Be a Rock and Roll Star" better than the Byrds did. The EP, titled "Something Else From the Move", didn't do well commercially, but it did do something that the band thought important -- Trevor Burton in particular had been complaining that Denny Cordell's productions "took the toughness out" of the band's sound, and was worried that the group were being perceived as a pop band, not as a rock group like his friends in the Jimi Hendrix Experience or Cream. There was an increasing tension between Burton, who wanted to be a heavy rocker, and the older Wayne, who thought there was nothing at all wrong with being a pop band. The next single, "Wild Tiger Woman", was much more in the direction that Burton wanted their music to go. It was ostensibly produced by Cordell, but for the most part he left it to the band, and as a result it ended up as a much heavier track than normal. Roy Wood had only intended the song as an album track, and Bevan and Wayne were hesitant about it being a single, but Burton was insistent -- "Wild Tiger Woman" was going to be the group's first number one record: [Excerpt: The Move, "Wild Tiger Woman"] In fact, it turned out to be the group's first single not to chart at all, after four top ten singles in a row.  The group were now in crisis. They'd lost Ace Kefford, Burton and Wayne were at odds, and they were no longer guaranteed hitmakers. They decided to stop working with Cordell and Secunda, and made a commitment that if the next single was a flop, they would split up. In any case, Roy Wood was already thinking about another project. Even though the group's recent records had gone in a guitar-rock direction, he thought maybe you could do something more interesting. Ever since seeing Tony Visconti conduct orchestral instruments playing his music, he'd been thinking about it. As he later put it "I thought 'Well, wouldn't it be great to get a band together, and rather than advertising for a guitarist how about advertising for a cellist or a French horn player or something? There must be lots of young musicians around who play the... instruments that would like to play in a rock kind of band.' That was the start of it, it really was, and I think after those tracks had been recorded with Tony doing the orchestral arrangement, that's when I started to get bored with the Move, with the band, because I thought 'there's something more to it'". He'd started sketching out plans for an expanded lineup of the group, drawing pictures of what it would look like on stage if Carl Wayne was playing timpani while there were cello and French horn players on stage with them. He'd even come up with a name for the new group -- a multi-layered pun. The group would be a light orchestra, like the BBC Light Orchestra, but they would be playing electrical instruments, and also they would have a light show when they performed live, and so he thought "the Electric Light Orchestra" would be a good name for such a group. The other band members thought this was a daft idea, but Wood kept on plotting. But in the meantime, the group needed some new management. The person they chose was Don Arden. We talked about Arden quite a bit in the last episode, but he's someone who is going to turn up a lot in future episodes, and so it's best if I give a little bit more background about him. Arden was a manager of the old school, and like several of the older people in the music business at the time, like Dick James or Larry Page, he had started out as a performer, doing an Al Jolson tribute act, and he was absolutely steeped in showbusiness -- his wife had been a circus contortionist before they got married, and when he moved from Manchester to London their first home had been owned by Winifred Atwell, a boogie piano player who became the first Black person to have a UK number one -- and who is *still* the only female solo instrumentalist to have a UK number one -- with her 1954 hit "Let's Have Another Party": [Excerpt: WInifred Atwell, "Let's Have Another Party"] That was only Atwell's biggest in a long line of hits, and she'd put all her royalties into buying properties in London, one of which became the Ardens' home. Arden had been considered quite a promising singer, and had made a few records in the early 1950s. His first recordings, of material in Yiddish aimed at the Jewish market, are sadly not findable online, but he also apparently recorded as a session singer for Embassy Records. I can't find a reliable source for what records he sang on for that label, which put out budget rerecordings of hits for sale exclusively through Woolworths, but according to Wikipedia one of them was Embassy's version of "Blue Suede Shoes", put out under the group name "The Canadians", and the lead vocal on that track certainly sounds like it could be him: [Excerpt: The Canadians, "Blue Suede Shoes"] As you can tell, rock and roll didn't really suit Arden's style, and he wisely decided to get out of performance and into behind-the-scenes work, though he would still try on occasion to make records of his own -- an acetate exists from 1967 of him singing "Sunrise, Sunset": [Excerpt: Don Arden, "Sunrise, Sunset"] But he'd moved first into promotion -- he'd been the promoter who had put together tours of the UK for Gene Vincent, Little Richard, Brenda Lee and others which we mentioned in the second year of the podcast -- and then into management. He'd first come into management with the Animals -- apparently acting at that point as the money man for Mike Jeffries, who was the manager the group themselves dealt with. According to Arden -- though his story differs from the version of the story told by others involved -- the group at some point ditched Arden for Allen Klein, and when they did, Arden's assistant Peter Grant, another person we'll be hearing a lot more of, went with them.  Arden, by his own account, flew over to see Klein and threatened to throw him out of the window of his office, which was several stories up. This was a threat he regularly made to people he believed had crossed him -- he made a similar threat to one of the Nashville Teens, the first group he managed after the Animals, after the musician asked what was happening to the group's money. And as we heard last episode, he threatened Robert Stigwood that way when Stigwood tried to get the Small Faces off him. One of the reasons he'd signed the Small Faces was that Steve Marriott had gone to the Italia Conti school, where Arden had sent his own children, Sharon and David, and David had said that Marriott was talented. And David was also a big reason the Move came over to Arden. After the Small Faces had left him, Arden had bought Galaxy Entertaimnent, the booking agency that handled bookings for Amen Corner and the Move, among many other acts. Arden had taken over management of Amen Corner himself, and had put his son David in charge of liaising with Tony Secunda about the Move.  But David Arden was sure that the Move could be an albums act, not just a singles act, and was convinced the group had more potential than they were showing, and when they left Secunda, Don Arden took them on as his clients, at least for the moment. Secunda, according to Arden (who is not the most reliable of witnesses, but is unfortunately the only one we have for a lot of this stuff) tried to hire someone to assassinate Arden, but Arden quickly let Secunda know that if anything happened to Arden, Secunda himself would be dead within the hour. As "Wild Tiger Woman" hadn't been a hit, the group decided to go back to their earlier "Flowers in the Rain" style, with "Blackberry Way": [Excerpt: The Move, "Blackberry Way"] That track was produced by Jimmy Miller, who was producing the Rolling Stones and Traffic around this time, and featured the group's friend Richard Tandy on harpsichord. It's also an example of the maxim "Good artists copy, great artists steal". There are very few more blatant examples of plagiarism in pop music than the middle eight of "Blackberry Way". Compare Harry Nilsson's "Good Old Desk": [Excerpt: Nilsson, "Good Old Desk"] to the middle eight of "Blackberry Way": [Excerpt: The Move, "Blackberry Way"] "Blackberry Way" went to number one, but that was the last straw for Trevor Burton -- it was precisely the kind of thing he *didn't* want to be doing,. He was so sick of playing what he thought of as cheesy pop music that at one show he attacked Bev Bevan on stage with his bass, while Bevan retaliated with his cymbals. He stormed off stage, saying he was "tired of playing this crap". After leaving the group, he almost joined Blind Faith, a new supergroup that members of Cream and Traffic were forming, but instead formed his own supergroup, Balls. Balls had a revolving lineup which at various times included Denny Laine, formerly of the Moody Blues, Jackie Lomax, a singer-songwriter who was an associate of the Beatles, Richard Tandy who had played on "Blackberry Way", and Alan White, who would go on to drum with the band Yes. Balls only released one single, "Fight for My Country", which was later reissued as a Trevor Burton solo single: [Excerpt: Balls, "Fight For My Country"] Balls went through many lineup changes, and eventually seemed to merge with a later lineup of the Idle Race to become the Steve Gibbons Band, who were moderately successful in the seventies and eighties. Richard Tandy covered on bass for a short while, until Rick Price came in as a permanent replacement. Before Price, though, the group tried to get Hank Marvin to join, as the Shadows had then split up, and Wood was willing to move over to bass and let Marvin play lead guitar. Marvin turned down the offer though. But even though "Blackberry Way" had been the group's biggest hit to date, it marked a sharp decline in the group's fortunes.  Its success led Peter Walsh, the manager of Marmalade and the Tremeloes, to poach the group from Arden, and even though Arden took his usual heavy-handed approach -- he describes going and torturing Walsh's associate, Clifford Davis, the manager of Fleetwood Mac, in his autobiography -- he couldn't stop Walsh from taking over. Unfortunately, Walsh put the group on the chicken-in-a-basket cabaret circuit, and in the next year they only released one record, the single "Curly", which nobody was happy with. It was ostensibly produced by Mike Hurst, but Hurst didn't turn up to the final sessions and Wood did most of the production work himself, while in the next studio over Jimmy Miller, who'd produced "Blackberry Way", was producing "Honky Tonk Women" by the Rolling Stones. The group were getting pigeonholed as a singles group, at a time when album artists were the in thing. In a three-year career they'd only released one album, though they were working on their second. Wood was by this point convinced that the Move was unsalvageable as a band, and told the others that the group was now just going to be a launchpad for his Electric Light Orchestra project. The band would continue working the chicken-in-a-basket circuit and releasing hit singles, but that would be just to fund the new project -- which they could all be involved in if they wanted, of course. Carl Wayne, on the other hand, was very, very, happy playing cabaret, and didn't see the need to be doing anything else. He made a counter-suggestion to Wood -- keep The Move together indefinitely, but let Wood do the Brian Wilson thing and stay home and write songs. Wayne would even try to get Burton and Kefford back into the band. But Wood wasn't interested. Increasingly his songs weren't even going to the Move at all. He was writing songs for people like Cliff Bennett and the Casuals. He wrote "Dance Round the Maypole" for Acid Gallery: [Excerpt: Acid Gallery, "Dance Round the Maypole"] On that, Wood and Jeff Lynne sang backing vocals. Wood and Lynne had been getting closer since Lynne had bought a home tape recorder which could do multi-tracking -- Wood had wanted to buy one of his own after "Flowers in the Rain", but even though he'd written three hit singles at that point his publishing company wouldn't give him an advance to buy one, and so he'd started using Lynne's. The two have often talked about how they'd recorded the demo for "Blackberry Way" at Lynne's parents' house, recording Wood's vocal on the demo with pillows and cushions around his head so that his singing wouldn't wake Lynne's parents. Lynne had been another person that Wood had asked to join the group when Burton left, but Lynne was happy with The Idle Race, where he was the main singer and songwriter, though their records weren't having any success: [Excerpt: The Idle Race, "I Like My Toys"] While Wood was writing material for other people, the only one of those songs to become a hit was "Hello Suzie", written for Amen Corner, which became a top five single on Immediate Records: [Excerpt: Amen Corner, "Hello Suzie"] While the Move were playing venues like Batley Variety Club in Britain, when they went on their first US tour they were able to play for a very different audience. They were unknown in the US, and so were able to do shows for hippie audiences that had no preconceptions about them, and did things like stretch "Cherry Blossom Clinic" into an eight-minute-long extended progressive rock jam that incorporated bits of "Jesu, Joy of Man's Desiring", the Nutcracker Suite, and the Sorcerer's Apprentice: [Excerpt: The Move, "Cherry Blossom Clinic Revisited (live at the Fillmore West)"] All the group were agreed that those shows were the highlight of the group's career. Even Carl Wayne, the band member most comfortable with them playing the cabaret circuit, was so proud of the show at the Fillmore West which that performance is taken from that when the tapes proved unusable he kept hold of them, hoping all his life that technology would progress to the point where they could be released and show what a good live band they'd been, though as things turned out they didn't get released until after his death. But when they got back to the UK it was back to the chicken-in-a-basket circuit, and back to work on their much-delayed second album. That album, Shazam!, was the group's attempt at compromise between their different visions. With the exception of one song, it's all heavy rock music, but Wayne, Wood, and Price all co-produced, and Wayne had the most creative involvement he'd ever had. Side two of the album was all cover versions, chosen by Wayne, and Wayne also went out onto the street and did several vox pops, asking members of the public what they thought of pop music: [Excerpt: Vox Pops from "Don't Make My Baby Blue"] There were only six songs on the album, because they were mostly extended jams. Other than the three cover versions chosen by Wayne, there was a sludge-metal remake of "Hello Suzie", the new arrangement of "Cherry Blossom Clinic" they'd been performing live, retitled "Cherry Blossom Clinic Revisited", and only one new original, "Beautiful Daughter", which featured a string arrangement by Visconti, who also played bass: [Excerpt: The Move, "Beautiful Daughter"] And Carl Wayne sang lead on five of the six tracks, which given that one of the reasons Wayne was getting unhappy with the band was that Wood was increasingly becoming the lead singer, must have been some comfort. But it wasn't enough. By the time Shazam! came out, with a cover drawn by Mike Sheridan showing the four band members as superheroes, the band was down to three -- Carl Wayne had quit the group, for a solo career. He continued playing the cabaret circuit, and made records, but never had another hit, but he managed to have a very successful career as an all-round entertainer, acting on TV and in the theatre, including a six-year run as the narrator in the musical Blood Brothers, and replacing Alan Clarke as the lead singer of the Hollies. He died in 2004. As soon as Wayne left the group, the three remaining band members quit their management and went back to Arden. And to replace Wayne, Wood once again asked Jeff Lynne to join the group. But this time the proposition was different -- Lynne wouldn't just be joining the Move, but he would be joining the Electric Light Orchestra. They would continue putting out Move records and touring for the moment, and Lynne would be welcome to write songs for the Move so that Wood wouldn't have to be the only writer, but they'd be doing it while they were planning their new group.  Lynne was in, and the first single from the new lineup was a return to the heavy riff rock style of "Wild Tiger Woman", "Brontosaurus": [Excerpt: The Move, "Brontosaurus"] But Wayne leaving the group had put Wood in a difficult position. He was now the frontman, and he hated that responsibility -- he said later "if you look at me in photos of the early days, I'm always the one hanging back with my head down, more the musician than the frontman." So he started wearing makeup, painting his face with triangles and stars, so he would be able to hide his shyness. And it worked -- and "Brontosaurus" returned the group to the top ten. But the next single, "When Alice Comes Back to the Farm", didn't chart at all. The first album for the new Move lineup, Looking On, was to finish their contract with their current record label. Many regard it as the group's "Heavy metal album", and it's often considered the worst of their four albums, with Bev Bevan calling it "plodding", but that's as much to do with Bevan's feeling about the sessions as anything else -- increasingly, after the basic rhythm tracks had been recorded, Wood and Lynne would get to work without the other two members of the band, doing immense amounts of overdubbing.  And that continued after Looking On was finished. The group signed a new contract with EMI's new progressive rock label, Harvest, and the contract stated that they were signing as "the Move performing as The Electric Light Orchestra". They started work on two albums' worth of material, with the idea that anything with orchestral instruments would be put aside for the first Electric Light Orchestra album, while anything with just guitar, bass, drums, keyboard, and horns would be for the Move. The first Electric Light Orchestra track, indeed, was intended as a Move B-side. Lynne came in with a song based around a guitar riff, and with lyrics vaguely inspired by the TV show The Prisoner, about someone with a number instead of a name running, trying to escape, and then eventually dying.  But then Wood decided that what the track really needed was cello. But not cello played in the standard orchestral manner, but something closer to what the Beatles had done on "I am the Walrus". He'd bought a cheap cello himself, and started playing Jimi Hendrix riffs on it, and Lynne loved the sound of it, so onto the Move's basic rhythm track they overdubbed fifteen cello tracks by Wood, and also two French horns, also by Wood: [Excerpt: The Electric Light Orchestra, "10538 Overture"] The track was named "10538 Overture", after they saw the serial number 1053 on the console they were using to mix the track, and added the number 8 at the end, making 10538 the number of the character in the song. Wood and Lynne were so enamoured with the sound of their new track that they eventually got told by the other two members of the group that they had to sit in the back when the Move were driving to gigs, so they couldn't reach the tape player, because they'd just keep playing the track over and over again. So they got a portable tape player and took that into the back seat with them to play it there. After finishing some pre-existing touring commitments, the Move and Electric Light Orchestra became a purely studio group, and Rick Price quit the bands -- he needed steady touring work to feed his family, and went off to form another band, Mongrel. Around this time, Wood also took part in another strange project. After Immediate Records collapsed, Andrew Oldham needed some fast money, so he and Don Arden put together a fake group they could sign to EMI for ten thousand pounds.  The photo of the band Grunt Futtock was of some random students, and that was who Arden and Oldham told EMI was on the track, but the actual performers on the single included Roy Wood, Steve Marriott, Peter Frampton, and Andy Bown, the former keyboard player of the Herd: [Excerpt: Grunt Futtock, "Rock 'n' Roll Christian"] Nobody knows who wrote the song, although it's credited to Bernard Webb, which is a pseudonym Paul McCartney had previously used -- but everyone knew he'd used the pseudonym, so it could very easily be a nod to that. The last Move album, Message From The Country, didn't chart -- just like the previous two hadn't. But Wood's song "Tonight" made number eleven, the follow-up, "Chinatown", made number twenty-three, and then the final Move single, "California Man", a fifties rock and roll pastiche, made the top ten: [Excerpt: The Move, "California Man"] In the US, that single was flipped, and the B-side, Lynne's song "Do Ya", became the only Move song ever to make the Hot One Hundred, reaching number ninety-nine: [Excerpt: The Move, "Do Ya"] By the time "California Man" was released, the Electric Light Orchestra were well underway. They'd recorded their first album, whose biggest highlights were Lynne's "10538 Overture" and Wood's "Whisper in the Night": [Excerpt: The Electric Light Orchestra, "Whisper in the Night"] And they'd formed a touring lineup, including Richard Tandy on keyboards and several orchestral instrumentalists. Unfortunately, there were problems developing between Wood and Lynne. When the Electric Light Orchestra toured, interviewers only wanted to speak to Wood, thinking of him as the band leader, even though Wood insisted that he and Lynne were the joint leaders. And both men had started arguing a lot, to the extent that at some shows they would refuse to go on stage because of arguments as to which of them should go on first. Wood has since said that he thinks most of the problems between Lynne and himself were actually caused by Don Arden, who realised that if he split the two of them into separate acts he could have two hit groups, not one. If that was the plan, it worked, because by the time "10538 Overture" was released as the Electric Light Orchestra's first single, and made the top ten -- while "California Man" was also still in the charts -- it was announced that Roy Wood was now leaving the Electric Light Orchestra, as were keyboard playe

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Pratt on Texas
Episode 3108: El Paso center stage in border crisis | Big biz wants handouts continued with Chapter 313 renewal – Pratt on Texas 12/20/2022

Pratt on Texas

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2022 43:50


The news of Texas covered today includes:Our Lone Star story of the day: Governor Abbott steps us busing of illegal aliens from El Paso to other states; deploys more National Guard to El Paso and has them stringing some barbed wire, and; sends President Biden a nasty letter good for nothing but political points in the conservative press. So far its all political theater but a real crisis on the ground. Will Abbott actually send guard members and DPS troopers to actually prevent the illegal crossing of the border? Until that's done it is mostly hot air.About the case the Supreme Court stepped into relating to Title 42.Our Lone Star story of the day is sponsored by Allied Compliance Services providing the best service in DOT, business and personal drug and alcohol testing since 1995.Very large companies in Texas are pressing for a renewal of the crony capitalism handouts of Chapter 313 in the next legislative session. If it is to be stopped, or even well curtailed, you need to contact reps and senators now through mid-January and tell them “no renewal of Chapter 313 or similar.”Texas Secretary of State releases Phase 2 Report on full forensic audit of 2020 General Election in Texas. The report shows what I have long said to be the truth: A bigger problem than any cheating is the incompetence at the job of running elections we see in so many counties.And, other news of Texas.Listen on the radio, or station stream, at 5pm Central. Click for our affiliates.www.PrattonTexas.com

Feisty Productions
That Was The Year That Was

Feisty Productions

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 67:39


In the final podcast of 2022, we look back at the people, events, and moments that defined the past 12 months for us.Three Prime Ministers, four Chancellors. Was this a UK crisis of simply the past year or one decades in the making?2022 has also seen a wave of industrial action by trade unionists almost unprecedented in nature because of the impact of the successive Tory governments. It's also brought to the fore in terms of media attention of a new generation of articulate, passionate, trade union leaders willing to put, not just the case for their members, but articulate opposition to the privatized economy and society that is the UK.We also reflect on the ongoing Tory culture wars and anti-refugee narrative, and the state of the Labour Party response to it all.Russia's invasion of Ukraine in February was a war that Putin thought would be over in a few days. 10 months later, due to the courage of the Ukrainian people and their leaders, Russia is bogged down in a conflict that has caused thousands of deaths and displaced over 14 million people.In the wake Putin's failure in Ukraine, of Johnson's resignation in disgrace and the legal proceedings against Trump over January 6th, is the era of impunity over.What might the death of Queen Elizabeth mean for the future of the monarchy?The Supreme Court decision ruling out the possibility of the Scottish Parliament legislating for indyref2 was a pivotal moment in revealing the nature of the "voluntary" union. Almost simultaneously a new leadership of the SNP group took over and subsequent opinion polls showed a shift to support for independence. Will all this spark the development by the SNP of a clear strategy for a de facto referendum at the next General Election?All this plus some thoughts on cricket and movies.  ★ Support this podcast ★

OceanFM Ireland
Harkin says No to Varadkar, while MacSharry says Yes

OceanFM Ireland

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2022 16:24


Marian Harkin says lack of action on balanced regional development is the reason she voted against the election of Leo Varadkar at the weekend. While Marc MacSharry says he voted yes, as he didn't want to prompt a General Election, and has received assurances on services at Sligo University Hospital

Africalink | Deutsche Welle
AfricaLink on Air — 16 December 2022

Africalink | Deutsche Welle

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2022 29:57


South Africa's ANC Congress kicks off amid Ramaphosa graft scandal +++ How strong is the ANC ahead of 2023 elections? +++ Zimbabwe's political landscape ahead of 2023 polls +++ World Cup Final preview

Beth Rigby Interviews...
Beth Rigby Interviews... Sajid Javid

Beth Rigby Interviews...

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2022 41:45


In an exclusive interview, Sky News' political editor Beth Rigby speaks to the former health secretary and Chancellor Sajid Javid. They discuss his time in office as he prepares to stand down at the next General Election and the Conservative party's future. Beth and producer Mollie Malone also reflect on how we'll look back on politics in 2022 - the big shocks, OMG moments and more. Plus, the last listener emails for this year. Email the podcast at bethrigbypodcast@sky.uk Rosie Gillott – podcast producer Annie Joyce – senior podcast producer Paul Stanworth – editor

Baffled: Amazing Facts That Are Complete Nonsense
Bitesize: When a Monkey ran for President

Baffled: Amazing Facts That Are Complete Nonsense

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022 4:30


In Brazil a Monkey ran to be President and received more than 400,000 votes... That's like us putting Conor in the General Election. All on today's Bitesize Baffled!If you want to get involved then get in touch:Email us info@baffledpod.comFollow us on Instagram and TikTok @BaffledPodAnd see more of us on our YouTube---A Create Podcast Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Feisty Productions
Let's See Action

Feisty Productions

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2022 67:02


There's been a change in SNP leadership at Westminster with Stephen Flynn and Mhairi Black replacing Ian Blackford and Kirsten Oswald. Was it mere coincidence that this changing of the old guard took place just 10 days after the Supreme Court ruling, and does it signal a galvanization of the party in the same way the ruling appears to have fired up the wider movement?The STUC has published a report just days before the Scottish budget statement suggesting radical, progressive, reforms right across the fiscal landscape. We look at them and speculate on what the response will be from the SNP not just at Holyrood but from the membership.We also wonder why the apparent silence from Scottish Labour.Sir Keir Starmer hasn't been so quiet in his campaign to paint Labour as the party of the Union, getting his lick in first in the SNP blame game if he fails to get a majority at the next General Election.All these plus thoughts on more bravura performances from Mick Lynch of the RMT and Frank Capra's It's A Wonderful Life.  ★ Support this podcast ★

The Red Box Politics Podcast
Ed Balls All at Sea

The Red Box Politics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2022 43:12


Finding themselves on a week-long Times cruise from New York to Southampton, Matt Chorley talks to former cabinet minister Ed Balls about the chances of him returning to politics, his next big challenge and the risk of Keir Starmer becoming complacent in the same way Labour did ahead of the 1992 General Election.Plus columnists Rachel Sylvester and David Aaronovitch ask whether union leader Mick Lynch has gone overboard in his latest round of media interviews, the motivation behind Priti Patel's new group calling for Tory party democracy, and whether Wes Streeting is the next leader of the Labour Party. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Underground USA
Republicans Need To Pivot To Policy Or Pay The Price

Underground USA

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2022 25:13


Before I get into this morning segment with Matt Bruce, I want to touch on something that we discussed in one of the latter segments and that is a statement by future House Speaker McCarthy about starting the investigations into, I believe, 21 people who had something to do with Russiagate.Unless there's something that's going to come out of an investigation like this it's really just another opportunity to showboat.We need to expunge the political careerists at the Department of Justice and in the FBI because they've been politicized. Those departments are not supposed to be politicized. Justice is supposed to be blind. Justice and the pursuit of justice is supposed to not see political party. That's not the case today.Larger than that is the failure of the Republican Party – at State and National levels – to understand that you can't just keep demonizing your opposition and expect to win elections. You need to explain to the people what your policies are, how they will affect them in a positive way, and how you're going to go about establishing them so they could be executed.The last midterm election should have been proof positive that if all you're going to do is demonize the other party and make the contest a cult of personality you're going to lose.We've got two years to go before the General Election in 2024. The Republicans need to get their shit together and start talking about the policies that will serve the people and stop with the tit-for-tat investigations that will go absolutely nowhere...Cast Off The Censorship Get full access to Underground USA at www.undergroundusa.com/subscribe

The Mike Hosking Breakfast
Tim Dower: What do we read from the by-election itself?

The Mike Hosking Breakfast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2022 1:52


So National won the by-election in Hamilton West...I don't think anyone's too surprised about that. New MP Tama Potaka is with us after half past and he looks like a decent bloke from what I've seen...family man...and still young enough to give us a decent decade or so. Question is what do we read from the by-election itself? If the country really is raging against the current administration, would you maybe have expected a stampede to the polls to send that message? Well, maybe...but by-elections don't spin people's wheels, and my read is that we're actually more sick and tired, than we are steaming mad right now. Hence...less than 15 thousand bothered to vote...30-odd percent...against nearly 40 thousand in Hamilton West at the last general election. The message...if there was a message was to the man who caused this million-dollar ferago...Dr Sharma. 1100 votes against the 20 thousand he had wearing a red rosette...pretty sad...and likely the last we'll hear from him on the political stage...good night and thank you. And Act can afford to be pretty chuffed with their result...Act's share of the vote was triple what they got at the General Election. It's less than a year to the next election and Labour looks to be gone...one commentator a few days ago was saying they know that, so they're engaged now in scorched earth tactics as they retreat. So, while the Nats will tell us it's a serious spanking for the government, and a resounding endorsement of their plan for change...I'm not convinced. And I'm not convinced yet that Christopher Luxon has what it takes...pleasant and reasonable is one thing...but he needs to crank it up. Overall, reflecting on Hamilton West, change can't come soon enough.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Proletarian Radio
What is really meant by the demand for a ‘general election now'?

Proletarian Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2022 12:39


https://thecommunists.org/2022/12/05/news/what-really-meant-by-general-election-demand-sunak-tory-labour/

RNZ: Morning Report
Hamilton West result not indicative of what will happen at general election - Ardern

RNZ: Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2022 7:29


A cabinet reshuffle and at least one ministerial resignation are on the way for the Labour Party as they prepare for 2023, election year. The change comes amid a by-election result in Hamilton West, where the National Party's candidate, Tama Potaka, swept to victory with 6600 votes, more than 2000 ahead of Labour's candidate Georgie Dansey. Potaka won 46 percent of the vote, to Dansey's 30 percent. So is the result in Hamilton West a sign of things to come? Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern spoke to Corin Dann.

Singapore Literature reviewed by an Angmoh

Episode 46: Alfian Sa'at's 2012 book – or rather play – called ‘Cooling Off Day'. Alfian Sa'at interviewed a number of Singaporeans about their reflections and views after the 2011 General Election.This has resulted in a very interesting book. A book about fear, gratefulness and hope and dreams – or lack of same.PS I also explain the term ‘Cooling Off Day' 

Political Contessa
Living the American Dream on the RI Campaign Trail with Former Congressional Candidate Allan Fung

Political Contessa

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2022 44:01


Allan Fung is a former congressional candidate for Rhode Island, a two-time Republican Governor nominee, and the former Mayor of Cranston, RI. During his tenure as mayor, Allan reformed his beloved city, turning it into one of the Top 50 Cities to Live in America. In addition, he has been nationally recognized for his work in fighting Anti-Asian bias and promoting Asian Americans in government. After leaving the mayor's office with an astounding 82% approval rating in 2020 due to term limits, Allan returned to practicing law as a Partner at Pannone, Lopes, Devereaux, and O'Gara. Allan is living proof that the American Dream is attainable due to his parent's sacrifices – leaving family and friends in Hong Kong to move to the U.S. and create a better life for their family. Their hard work and sacrifices, coupled with Allan's work ethic, led him to become the first in his family to graduate, earning a Bachelor's degree in Political Science from Rhode Island College and graduating with honors from Suffolk University Law School in Boston. Allan joins me today to share his experience while running for congressional office in Rhode Island. We discuss the power of connecting with voters while on the campaign trail and what Alan believes campaigning for higher office truly means. Alan shares the most memorable moments he experienced while campaigning and how Donald Trump ‘teasing' his decision to re-run for presidency impacted the 2022 General Election. We also discuss why our government needs political diversity, what American voters can do to help promote political diversity across the country, and why the Republican party needs to adopt new, modern strategies to get more voters to the polls. “As the candidate, you become the voice for those individuals.” - Allan Fung This week on Political Contessa: Allan's experience while running for Congress The value of having a supportive partner or spouse The power of connecting with voters on the campaign trail How Donald Trump ‘teasing' his decision to run for president again impacted the general election Balancing Democratic and Republican voices in higher office What RI voters can do to help promote political diversity Adopting new techniques and technology to improve voter turnout Connect with Alan Fung: Fung for Congress Website Allan Fung on Facebook Allan Fung on Twitter Awaken Your Inner Political Contessa Thanks for tuning into this week's episode of Political Contessa. If you enjoyed this episode, please subscribe and leave a review wherever you get your podcasts. Spotify | Stitcher | Apple Podcasts | iHeart Radio | TuneIn | Google Podcasts Be sure to share your favorite episodes on social media. And if you've ever considered running for office – or know a woman who should – head over to politicalcontessa.com to grab my quick guide, Secrets from the Campaign Trail. It will show you five signs to tell you you're ready to enter the political arena.    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Woman's Hour
Kate Winslet, Professor Sue Black, Chloe Smith, Beryl Cook

Woman's Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2022 58:38


Oscar winning actor Kate Winslet stars alongside her real life daughter Mia Threapleton in Channel 4's female led drama series ‘I am..'. The feature length episode tells the story of Ruth, a mother, who becomes concerned for her teenage daughter's welfare, after she witnesses her retreating more and more into herself. Freya has become consumed by the pressures of social media and is suffering a mental health crisis. The story was developed and co-authored by Kate and Dominic Savage. Kate talks to Emma about the issues examined in the film and working with her daughter. This year the Royal Institute Christmas Lectures will be given by Professor Dame Sue Black; one of the world's leading forensic investigators. She is currently the President of St Johns College Oxford, but her previous achievements include heading the British Forensic Team in Kosovo, identifying victims from the 2004 Boxing Day tsunami, and convicting Scotland's largest paedophile ring. In the lectures she will share the real-life scientific detective process that she uses to identify both the dead and the living. She tells Emma Barnett how she will be separating crime fiction from fact using examples from her own casebook. Conservative MP Chloe Smith is one of a number of parliamentarians who have already announced they won't be standing at the next General Election in two years time. Aged only 40 she has served in a range of ministerial positions including her last post when she made it to the cabinet as Secretary of State for Work and Pensions albeit for only seven weeks during Liz Truss's brief tenure as Prime Minister. What have been her main achievements? and what does she plan to do with her life after leaving the commons? The work of the British artist, the late Beryl Cook, has been given a new lease of life in a gallery in New York. The exhibition, entitled, Beryl Cook Takes New York, is the first ever exhibition of her work abroad. Cook's colourful pictures documented ordinary people in their every day surroundings and she was known for her robust women and men, all seemingly having a fantastic time. Celebrities such as Whoopi Goldberg and Yoko Ono own her work. Emma speaks to Beryl's daughter in law, Teresa Cook and Rachel Campbell-Johnston about her enduring appeal.

Constructive Voices
Rats and Other Disasters in the Palace of Westminster

Constructive Voices

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2022 62:35


“If we're not careful, the United Kingdom is going to have its Notre Dame moment…. that Parliament is going to burn to the ground.”Ian Paisley, Jnr. Member of Parliament, United Kingdom“It's very politically sensitive because no politician wants to be the one who tells the public that a very large amount of taxpayers' money has to be spent on MPs' place of work.”Rowan Moore, Architect Critic for The GuardianIn this episode, Rats and Other Disasters in the Palace of Westminster these two experts delve into the danger of this historic place.Urgent intervention is needed to save the Palace of Westminster which is not only on its last legs but is potentially hazardous in various ways. This is not fresh news sadly but our two distinguished experts will certainly offer you some fresh perspective.Rowan Moore, Architecture Critic, The Guardian & ObserverRowan Moore is architecture critic of the Observer and was named Critic of the Year at the UK press awards 2014. He is the author of Slow Burn City and Why We Build. Follow him on twitter: @rowanmoore“Obviously, the longer it takes to do the work, the greater the risk, you simply multiply the risk per year by the number of years it takes. And also all the work done on a project so far says the more slowly you do it, the more it costs.”Ian Paisley, Jnr. MP, Westminster Spokesperson for Digital, Culture, Media and SportsMember of the Joint Parliamentary Committee of Refurbishment and RestorationIan has represented North Antrim since 1996 when he was elected to the Northern Ireland Forum for Political Dialogue. In 1998 he was then elected to the Northern Ireland Assembly for North Antrim.As a member of the Assembly Ian served as Chairman of the Agriculture Committee and also as a Junior Minister in the Office of First Minister and Deputy First Minister from 2007 until 2008. He was also a member of the Northern Ireland Policing Board from 2001 until 2007.“You have to have a crew of four man walk that building constantly 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year, and they spot fires, fire hazards and put them out and we're working in that building.”After Dr Paisley stepped down as the Member of Parliament for North Antrim Ian contested the General Election of 2010 and comfortably retained the seat for the Democratic Unionist Party. He was again re-elected at the General Election in 2015, 2017 and 2019.Ian is currently the DUP spokesperson for Communities, Local Government and Culture, Media and Sports. He is also a member on the Northern Ireland Affairs Committee.Read the full page here on Constructive Voices.Constructive Voices: Inspiring change within the construction industry and related sectorsFollow Constructive Voices on:LinkedInTwitterFacebookRequest a media pack: jackie@constructive-voices.com

Feisty Productions
Brownian Notions

Feisty Productions

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2022 60:35


Gordon Brown's New Britain Report promised a radical examination of the state of the UK. We see if it lives up to Labour's hype. Trust us, it doesn't.The opinion polls and the recent Chester by election result suggest that Labour, either as a minority or majority, will form the Westminster government post the 2024 General Election. Where does this leave the SNP de facto referendum strategy, would this be enough to tempt the Scottish left back into the Labour fold, and would Labour call a snap indyref2?Meanwhile Ian Blackford has resigned as SNP leader at Westminster. Stephen Flynn and Alison Thewliss are the two candidates vying to take over. What difference, if any, will victory for either candidate mean?Away from the world of party politics Lesley wonders if the Yes movement can learn from, and be inspired by, the successful Eigg buy out campaign. ★ Support this podcast ★

Sunday Supplement
General election candidates 2023, constitution's 'jagged edge' and Beveridge Report 80 years on

Sunday Supplement

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2022 54:06


Political news, discussions and analysis, plus a round up of the Sunday papers with our guest reviewers.

So what you're saying is...
Reform Party Agenda: Open Border Tories Betrayed Brexit Britain - We Can Fix It.

So what you're saying is...

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2022 48:40


The latest YouGov poll shows the Reform Party surging in the polls. It is now tied with the Liberal Democrats at 9%, a mere 13% behind the Conservative Party at 22%. What does this mean? At the next General Election, could the Reform Party pose an existential threat to the Conservative Party and replace it as the natural party of true, small 'c', conservatives? Richard Tice, Leader of the Reform Party, joins Peter Whittle on the "So What You're Saying Is..." sofa to discuss the Reform Party's agenda for change and explain how it would solve Britain's myriad problems. From immigration to the culture wars, welfare to education, industry to employment and net zero to constitutional reform, Mr. Tice lays out the Reform Party's agenda in clear terms. ------------------ SUBSCRIBE: If you are enjoying the show, please subscribe to our channel on YouTube (click the Subscribe Button underneath the video and then Click on the Bell icon next to it to make sure you Receive All Notifications) AUDIO: If you prefer Audio you can subscribe on itunes or Soundcloud. Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/user-923838732 SUPPORT/DONATE / JOIN OUR MEMBERSHIP SCHEME The NCF Channel is still very new and to continue to produce quality programming we need your support. Your donations will help ensure the channel not only continues but can grow into a major online platform challenging the cultural orthodoxies dominant in our institutions, public life and media. You can join our membership scheme or donate in a variety of ways via our website: http://www.newcultureforum.org.uk It is set up to accept one time and monthly donations. JOIN US ON SOCIAL MEDIA: Web: http://www.newcultureforum.org.uk F: https://www.facebook.com/NCultureForum/ I: https://www.instagram.com/newculturef... Y: http://www.youtube.com/c/NewCultureForum T: http://www.twitter.com/NewCultureForum (@NewCultureForum)

Podlitical
Tanks On Lawns?

Podlitical

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 22:47


Ian Blackford has announced he will stand down as leader of the SNP Westminster group, but why now, and what does this tell us about divisions within the SNP? The team discuss the news, who might take over, as well as the thorny issues in PMQs and FMQs from housing stock to a National Care Service. Are party leaders placing policy 'tanks on lawns' ahead of the next General Election, and what does it tell us about the potential future 'battlefields' of politics?

The Daily Chirp
Two members of Board of Sups refuse to approve canvass of general election; Arizona's minimum wage; Remembering Eduardo Arsenio Lujan

The Daily Chirp

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 14:23


Once again, the two Republican members of the Cochise County Board of Supervisors have refused to approve the canvass of the November 8th general election.Support the show: https://www.myheraldreview.com/site/forms/subscription_services/See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Dale Jackson Show
Dale and Brad Presnall discuss how they think the various AL General Election winners are going to conduct themselves - 11-28-22

The Dale Jackson Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 19:30


See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Pratt on Texas
Episode 3091: DPS makes absurd $1.2 billion facility request | Has anything changed at Lubbock city hall? – Pratt on Texas 11/23/2022

Pratt on Texas

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022 43:55


The news of Texas covered today includes:Our Lone Star story of the day: Texas Department of Public Safety shamefully latches on the “never let a crisis go to waste” model and requests an incredible, absurd $1.2 BILLION training center. And of course, they want the facility on some of the more expensive land in the state. A tenth of that number could construct a world-class training center. Lawmakers should shut this down ASAP but what do you bet many will go with the flow as “supporting law enforcement.” What they'll be supporting is ridiculous spending by avaricious bureaucrats.Our Lone Star story of the day is sponsored by Allied Compliance Services providing the best service in DOT, business and personal drug and alcohol testing since 1995.The City of Lubbock may have a new conservative mayor and couple of councilmembers but you'd not know anything had changed from it's big-government anti-taxpayer list of legislative priorities.Two cities, Killeen & Harker Heights, that had pro-drug use ordinances pass on the General Election ballot are wondering how they square the ordinances with state law.GOP's McCarthy Threatens to Impeach Mayorkas Over Border. Meanwhile: 40 suspects on FBI's Terror Watchlist arrested at the border in October and 5,903 known got-aways in the Del Rio Sector alone last week. How many potential terrorists made it through?Harris County elections certification moved forward but the Supreme Court required late-hours ballots to be counted separately and left open a door to challenge any results caused by these after hours votes.And, other news of Texas.Listen on the radio, or station stream, at 5pm Central. Click for our affiliates.www.PrattonTexas.com

Yah Lah BUT...
#342 - Malaysia king to decide on next PM & Singapore might soon have an extra 1.5 hours of quiet everyday

Yah Lah BUT...

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 60:46


After the latest General Election, Malaysia is facing a hung parliament for the first time ever, with two rival factions tussling for power. The king has been tasked with the tough decision of selecting the new PM. We go through the sequence of events that led us to this situation, and try to break it down for the average Singaporean to understand. Closer to home, we might have an extra 1.5 hours of quiet time in our neighbourhoods, if the recommendations of the Community Advisory Panel on Neighbourhood Noise are adopted. Do we need more quiet time in Singapore? Find us here! - YLB Subreddit - YLB TikTok - YLB IG Folklory If you're looking for a meaningful Christmas gift, we'd love to help you create a personal podcast for a loved one. Get started at Folklory.com! And here are the full answers from Terence and Haresh to the question: "Who made 2022 great for You?" Malaysia king to decide on next PM Malaysia king to choose prime minister in post-elec