Podcasts about Sort

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Copy link to clipboard
  • 5,351PODCASTS
  • 7,860EPISODES
  • 46mAVG DURATION
  • 3DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Oct 17, 2021LATEST

POPULARITY

20112012201320142015201620172018201920202021


Best podcasts about Sort

Show all podcasts related to sort

Latest podcast episodes about Sort

Recovery (Sort Of)
105: Being of Service Outside of our Program (Sort Of)

Recovery (Sort Of)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 70:55


What is our responsibility, or commitment, in our recovery? Is it solely to the program or fellowship environment we belong to? We have spent most of our recoveries believing that showing up at a meeting to be of service to the newcomer arriving at that place is all we need. But is there more? Are there needs in the recovery/addiction community that go unmet when we only show up at our local meeting? Maybe if we invest some of the time in a bigger picture, we can be of greater benefit to our society and recovery community. We talk with Jenn T. about how she has branched outside of her program to take a proactive approach to helping the addiction recovery community. Jenn talks about how there is money earmarked to be spent on recovery, but in many areas, this money ends up going to for-profit treatment centers by default, because there are no other programs available in the community. Jenn goes on to talk about how to get involved with existing non-profits, or start your own if none exist in your area. Join the conversation by leaving a message, emailing us at RecoverySortOf@gmail.com, or find us on Twitter, Facebook or Instagram, or find us on our website at www.recoverysortof.com. Jenn T's email: voicesofhope414@gmail.com Wound Care episode Drug Policy Alliance episode Health Department episode Jokes episode Recovery Cafe episode --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/recoverysortof/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/recoverysortof/support

The Zen of Everything
Episode 59: Goldilocks is the Buddha

The Zen of Everything

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 27:34


Jundo and Kirk discuss how moderation is enlightenment, and how Goldilocks is the Buddha. Sort of. Treeleaf Zendo (https://www.treeleaf.org) Episode 58: In the Moment (https://www.zen-of-everything.com/58) The Goldilocks principle (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Goldilocks_principle) Soryo (僧侶) (https://www.tanoshiijapanese.com/dictionary/entry_details.cfm?entry_id=38281) Golden, B.C., woman nearly hit by meteorite in her own home (https://www.theglobeandmail.com/canada/british-columbia/article-golden-bc-woman-nearly-hit-by-meteorite-in-her-own-home/) Theme music by Kiku Day (http://www.kikuday.com). To get in touch, send an email to podcast@zen-of-everything.com (mailto:podcast@zen-of-everything.com). If you like the podcast, please subscribe in iTunes (https://itunes.apple.com/podcast/the-next-track/id1116242606) or your favorite podcast app, and please rate the podcast.

Africa Daily
Why can't Kenya and Somalia sort their sea border dispute?

Africa Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 15:07


Kenya and Somalia are having a bit of trouble with their closest neighbours…each other. For years they have disagreed about where their sea border should be drawn. When Somalia wasn't happy with the direction of negotiations, they asked the International Court of Justice to step in. But, despite a decision from the court this week, it doesn't look like the matter will be resolved any time soon. So, can Kenya and Somalia every agree on their sea border? Host: Karnie Sharp (@KarnieSharp) Reporting: Ferdinand Omondi (@FerdyOmondi) #AfricaDaily

The Darren Smith Show
Landon Donovan “Right now they're sort of flying the plane as they build it”

The Darren Smith Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 19:10


Landon Donovan discussed the USMNT's win over Costa Rica, why it's a growing process for a young, resilient US team, the San Diego Loyal's playoff picture and the impact of Alejandro Guido.

The Chad & Cheese Podcast
LinkedIn Exits China (Sort Of)

The Chad & Cheese Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 3:53


The Shred is a bite-sized bit of recruitment news to help make sure you're in-the-know, even if you're on-the-go. The Shred is brought to you by Recruitology.

The Anna & Raven Show
Do You Have A Moment For A Short Survey?

The Anna & Raven Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 9:19


Don't you just hate all those survey's that companies ask you to take? We decided to make our own survey, but we promise it's worth the three minutes of your time to answer it...Sort of.

LensWork - Photography and the Creative Process
HT0954 - Fellow Travelers of a Different Sort

LensWork - Photography and the Creative Process

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 2:43


HT0954 - Fellow Travelers of a Different Sort When it comes to improving our photography, it can be important to select with considerable care those whom we choose to study. There are some who are fellow travelers and some who are terrific in their own right but perhaps have less to teach us. And then there are lessons that can come from totally unexpected directions.

Mind Pump: Raw Fitness Truth
1662: Mind Pump's 21 Best Tips

Mind Pump: Raw Fitness Truth

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 69:00


In this episode Sal, Adam & Justin go over 21 of their best tips as chosen by their private forum. Mind Pump's 21 Best Tips. (1:47) #1 – Conduct Full Body Workouts. (2:30) #2 – Stop 2-3 Reps Short of Failure. (4:27) #3 – Speed Up Recovery by Movement. (6:50) #4 – Sort the Silverware Before you Start the Dishwasher. (9:39) #5 – Do What you are Not Doing. (11:21) #6 – Stop Working Out and Start Practicing. (15:17) #7 – Stop Doing so Much Cardio. (20:06) #8 – Understand the Concept of Reverse Dieting. (23:38) #9 – Men, Sit Down When you Pee at Night. (26:25) #10 – Prime your Body before you Workout. (28:26) #11 – Apply Mini Cuts and Mini Bulks. (33:02) #12 – Chase Health, Aesthetics will Follow. (36:12) #13 – Eat for How Foods Make you Feel. (40:14) #14 – Focus on the Big Rocks. (44:09) #15 – Women Should Bulk. (46:41) #16 – It Depends... (48:49) #17 – More is Not Always Better. (50:48) #18 – Quit Measuring Success by the Scale. (54:49) #19 – Don't Buy a Horse for Your Family if you Can't Afford it. (58:38) #20 – Fall in Love with the Process. (1:01:14) #21 – Focus on Strength. (1:04:37) Related Links/Products Mentioned October Promotion: MAPS Anabolic and NO BS 6-Pack Formula – Get Both for $59.99!    Visit Super Coffee for an exclusive offer for Mind Pump listeners! **Promo code “MINDPUMP” at checkout** Body Part Split vs. Whole Body Workout: Which Is Best? - Mind Pump Blog Which Is Better: Low Reps Or High Reps? - Mind Pump Blog How Phasing Your Workouts Leads to Consistent Plateau Free Workouts – Mind Pump Blog Stop Working Out And Start Practicing – Mind Pump Blog Cardio Sucks for Fat Loss – Mind Pump Blog Reverse Dieting: What Is It and Should YOU Try It?? | MIND PUMP Priming Your Body Before and After Workouts – Mind Pump Blog The Importance of Mobility Training in Regards to Chronic Pain – Mind Pump Blog MAPS Prime Webinar MAPS Prime Pro Webinar How To Use Mini Cuts & Mini Bulks To Maximize Gains Exercise For More Than Just Aesthetics – Mind Pump Blog Why We Engage in Unhealthy Habits – Mind Pump Blog Mind Pump #1565: Why Women Should Bulk Why The Scale Is Not Always The Best Way To Measure Progress – Mind Pump Blog Workout Because You Love Yourself Not Because You Hate Yourself – Mind Pump Blog Facebook Forum | Mind Pump Media Mind Pump Podcast – YouTube Mind Pump Free Resources People Mentioned Justin Brink DC (@dr.justinbrink)  Instagram

Putting it Together
Pride & Prejudice* (*sort of)

Putting it Together

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 60:20


To celebrate this amazing show opening in the West End, we've got a round up of all the great episodes featuring the cast! The post Pride & Prejudice* (*sort of) appeared first on Putting it Together.

Media Boys Podcast
Ghost in the Shell - MB JR. #6

Media Boys Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 23:55


Every day I live I become more of a shell of a person. Almost like I'm a ghost existing in a shell. Sort of like this 1995 Sci-Fi Anime classic capturing everything cyberpunk. I sure hope your waifu is not Major shes a bit cold, kind of like a robot cyborg or something. YouTube - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCNvFjMyga8ob_UHmSw4XUoA Twitter - https://twitter.com/mediaboys_pod?lang=en

All About Android (Video HI)
AAA 546: Pixel Pass Preview - RCS on iPhone? New Google TV features, goodbye "Hey Google" (sort of)

All About Android (Video HI)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 90:07


Google TV receives multi-user profile support, glanceable cards in ambient mode, and more 'Pixel Pass' is Google's rumored response to Apple One SVP of Android offers an open invitation to help Apple put RCS texting on the iPhone Nokia T20 Android tablet launches under $250 w/ 3 years of updates promised Pixel 6 marketing site confirms 30W charging, '80% faster performance' from Tensor Pixel 6 and Pixel 6 Pro press renders leak to reveal new At a Glance, face unlock, more Google says Pixel 6 camera captures '150% more light,' shows 'Magic Eraser' on leaked marketing site Pixel 6 leaks: Five years of security updates, ~$749 and $1,049 price tags Google's Pixel Fold, Watch, and some Nest speakers to join the Pixel 6 event The first Google TV streaming stick since Chromecast will launch on October 13 Chrome's RSS follow button is now available to all Android users You can now use the Google Assistant without the 'Hey Google' hotword Ron's Nest Hub is not listening to him! Google Search has a handy new built-in, cross-platform guitar tuner "HP X2 Chromebook is my tablet." "I purchased a Lenovo Tab P11 Pro too!" "Have in-display fingerprint sensors improved since the OnePlus 6T?" Read our show notes here: https://bit.ly/3v8qTpJ Hosts: Jason Howell and Ron Richards Guest: Chiu-Ki Chan Subscribe to All About Android at https://twit.tv/shows/all-about-android. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: userway.org/twit udacity.com/TWiT offer code TWIT75

All About Android (MP3)
AAA 546: Pixel Pass Preview - RCS on iPhone? New Google TV features, goodbye "Hey Google" (sort of)

All About Android (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 89:42


Google TV receives multi-user profile support, glanceable cards in ambient mode, and more 'Pixel Pass' is Google's rumored response to Apple One SVP of Android offers an open invitation to help Apple put RCS texting on the iPhone Nokia T20 Android tablet launches under $250 w/ 3 years of updates promised Pixel 6 marketing site confirms 30W charging, '80% faster performance' from Tensor Pixel 6 and Pixel 6 Pro press renders leak to reveal new At a Glance, face unlock, more Google says Pixel 6 camera captures '150% more light,' shows 'Magic Eraser' on leaked marketing site Pixel 6 leaks: Five years of security updates, ~$749 and $1,049 price tags Google's Pixel Fold, Watch, and some Nest speakers to join the Pixel 6 event The first Google TV streaming stick since Chromecast will launch on October 13 Chrome's RSS follow button is now available to all Android users You can now use the Google Assistant without the 'Hey Google' hotword Ron's Nest Hub is not listening to him! Google Search has a handy new built-in, cross-platform guitar tuner "HP X2 Chromebook is my tablet." "I purchased a Lenovo Tab P11 Pro too!" "Have in-display fingerprint sensors improved since the OnePlus 6T?" Read our show notes here: https://bit.ly/3v8qTpJ Hosts: Jason Howell and Ron Richards Guest: Chiu-Ki Chan Subscribe to All About Android at https://twit.tv/shows/all-about-android. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: userway.org/twit udacity.com/TWiT offer code TWIT75

All About Android (Video HD)
AAA 546: Pixel Pass Preview - RCS on iPhone? New Google TV features, goodbye "Hey Google" (sort of)

All About Android (Video HD)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 90:07


Google TV receives multi-user profile support, glanceable cards in ambient mode, and more 'Pixel Pass' is Google's rumored response to Apple One SVP of Android offers an open invitation to help Apple put RCS texting on the iPhone Nokia T20 Android tablet launches under $250 w/ 3 years of updates promised Pixel 6 marketing site confirms 30W charging, '80% faster performance' from Tensor Pixel 6 and Pixel 6 Pro press renders leak to reveal new At a Glance, face unlock, more Google says Pixel 6 camera captures '150% more light,' shows 'Magic Eraser' on leaked marketing site Pixel 6 leaks: Five years of security updates, ~$749 and $1,049 price tags Google's Pixel Fold, Watch, and some Nest speakers to join the Pixel 6 event The first Google TV streaming stick since Chromecast will launch on October 13 Chrome's RSS follow button is now available to all Android users You can now use the Google Assistant without the 'Hey Google' hotword Ron's Nest Hub is not listening to him! Google Search has a handy new built-in, cross-platform guitar tuner "HP X2 Chromebook is my tablet." "I purchased a Lenovo Tab P11 Pro too!" "Have in-display fingerprint sensors improved since the OnePlus 6T?" Read our show notes here: https://bit.ly/3v8qTpJ Hosts: Jason Howell and Ron Richards Guest: Chiu-Ki Chan Subscribe to All About Android at https://twit.tv/shows/all-about-android. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: userway.org/twit udacity.com/TWiT offer code TWIT75

All About Android (Video LO)
AAA 546: Pixel Pass Preview - RCS on iPhone? New Google TV features, goodbye "Hey Google" (sort of)

All About Android (Video LO)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 90:07


Google TV receives multi-user profile support, glanceable cards in ambient mode, and more 'Pixel Pass' is Google's rumored response to Apple One SVP of Android offers an open invitation to help Apple put RCS texting on the iPhone Nokia T20 Android tablet launches under $250 w/ 3 years of updates promised Pixel 6 marketing site confirms 30W charging, '80% faster performance' from Tensor Pixel 6 and Pixel 6 Pro press renders leak to reveal new At a Glance, face unlock, more Google says Pixel 6 camera captures '150% more light,' shows 'Magic Eraser' on leaked marketing site Pixel 6 leaks: Five years of security updates, ~$749 and $1,049 price tags Google's Pixel Fold, Watch, and some Nest speakers to join the Pixel 6 event The first Google TV streaming stick since Chromecast will launch on October 13 Chrome's RSS follow button is now available to all Android users You can now use the Google Assistant without the 'Hey Google' hotword Ron's Nest Hub is not listening to him! Google Search has a handy new built-in, cross-platform guitar tuner "HP X2 Chromebook is my tablet." "I purchased a Lenovo Tab P11 Pro too!" "Have in-display fingerprint sensors improved since the OnePlus 6T?" Read our show notes here: https://bit.ly/3v8qTpJ Hosts: Jason Howell and Ron Richards Guest: Chiu-Ki Chan Subscribe to All About Android at https://twit.tv/shows/all-about-android. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: userway.org/twit udacity.com/TWiT offer code TWIT75

Out of Boundz
The Cards Continue Their NFC West Dominance (Sort Of); Buffalo Dominates In Kansas City; Joe Still Has Questions About New Orleans & Washington; Derrick Henry Was the Only Reason To Watch That Game; Plus, Jon Gruden Finds Out About Consequences

Out of Boundz

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 57:56


Joe and Shawn are a day late, but not a take short. They go through every single Week 5 Matchup and state what they were thinking about coming out of each one. Then, Joe breaks down some injury news (sucks to be a football fan in New Jersey). They end the episode by providing some initial thoughts on the Jon Gruden fiasco in Las Vegas. Stay safe where you are! Follow our https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC2ztKcwf4ShB2zLluSroUCA (YouTube Page) for all our videos! (Be sure to Subscribe to be notified in the future!) Follow Shawn https://twitter.com/sHawInigan23 (@sHawInigan23) & Joe https://twitter.com/JoeMcDonnellOOB (@JoeMcDonnellOOB) on Twitter Follow Out of Boundz on https://www.instagram.com/outofboundzpodcast/ (Instagram) https://www.angrywhitedad.com/podcasts/?utm_source=oob-pod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_term=&utm_content=oob-episode&utm_campaign=external-links (AWD's Out of Boundz Page for all episodes) https://linktr.ee/OutOfBoundzPodcast (Linktree) for all content links Out of Boundz Podcast https://www.angrywhitedad.com/podcasts/out-of-boundz-podcast/out-of-boundz-glossary/?utm_source=oob-pod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_term=episode&utm_content=&utm_campaign=episode-link (Glossary of Terms) Out of Boundz Podcast https://www.angrywhitedad.com/podcasts/out-of-boundz-podcast/qb-stock-prices/?utm_source=oob-pod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_term=episode&utm_content=&utm_campaign=episode-link (QB Stock Values) This podcast uses the following third-party services for analysis: Podcorn - https://podcorn.com/privacy Support this podcast

CaregiverDave.com
Sort & Succeed:Organizing with Systems to Make Caregiving Easier, Darla Demorrow

CaregiverDave.com

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 39:00


Everything is Easier When You Are Organized.  SORT and Succeed: Organizing with Systems to Make Caregi;ving Easier.  a mom of two children and company owner with employees. Although my daily life doesn't revolve around caregiving, I'm keenly aware that “The disability community is the only minority group that anyone can join at any time.” (from https://TheArc.org) Everyone needs help at some point or another. I believe that everyone has something to learn, and everyone has something to share.

Mention It All
There's Finally A Real Housewife In The White House… Sort Of (RHOSLC, RHOP)

Mention It All

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 47:14


Dylan and Bari start the episode with our version of a royal wedding—a Biden and a Bravoleb. Next, they recap RHOSLC, where Lisa and Whitney pick up the pieces of their non-friendship, and Brooks and Jen finally break bread and hash things out. Later, they recap RHOP, which sees Candiace's issues with Mia and Ashley flare out of control.

Sort of Brilliant
24. Sort of 9-1-1: Buck and Eddie

Sort of Brilliant

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 118:03


"911, what's your emergency?" The emergency here is Lauren and Rachel have only seen three episode of 9-1-1 (and not even the same episodes - Lauren's a screw up, don't worry about it). You know what that sounds like - it's another shitsorting episode! We're joined this week by Hailee of former Outlander shitsorting fame and Illy, our graphic designer and the BIRTHDAY GIRL. Wish her a happy birthday. And then go watch 9-1-1, it'll make her happy. Our sorting victims this week, after much deliberation, were Eddie and Buck, of Buddie shipping fame. We hear they're the hottest thing on TV since Dean and Cas, so we were excited to check them out, and...it's another one of THOSE pairings. Tune in for an episode where Lauren and Rachel have no idea what they're talking about, Hailee and Illy do, and Hailee gets convinced of something else anyway (we love you Hailee). It's sort of 9-1-1!

In the Foreground: Conversations on Art & Writing
“What Sort of Problems Does an Artwork Pose?”: Joan Kee on Art History as an Infinite Game

In the Foreground: Conversations on Art & Writing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 57:02


In this episode, Caro Fowler (Starr Director of the Research and Academic Program at the Clark Art Institute) speaks with Joan Kee, professor of art history at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. Joan describes the influence of growing up in Seoul, Korea, but shares her uneasiness with centering a sense of self within art historical writing. She reflects on modes of description and their political resonances, and muses about the specific strengths and limitations of art history, particularly when it comes to categories like “global contemporary” or an assumption of a unified “we” within the discipline. Finally, she shares current projects, including one on Black and Asian artistic intersections from the early 1960s to the present.

Virtual Legality
Did The EEOC Just DESTROY California's Activision Blizzard Lawsuit? (VL557)

Virtual Legality

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 77:59


When the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) both sued and settled with Activision Blizzard on September 27, 2021, it was unclear how the State of California would take it. Now we know that the answer to that question was "not very well", as California's Department of Fair Employment and Housing (DFEH) has moved to challenged the proposed consent decree (settlement). What California may not have been prepared for, however, is just how the EEOC would react to such a request, and now their entire case may well be in jeopardy. We can't really recommend pissing off a federal agency...in Virtual Legality. CHECK OUT THE VIDEO AT: https://youtu.be/ZDOGC3PUGwo #Activision #California #EEOC *** SUPPORT THE CHANNEL PATREON - https://www.patreon.com/VirtualLegality STREAMLABS - https://streamlabs.com/richardhoeg STORE - https://teespring.com/stores/hoeg-law-store *** CHAPTERS 00:00 Introduction 01:35 California Challenges the EEOC Settlement (Consent Decree) 10:32 EEOC Standards and Misreporting 24:11 EEOC Fights Back (Merits Objection) 42:14 Understanding Conflicts of Interest 58:27 EEOC Brings the Thunder (Conflict, Ethics Violations) 1:15:50 Conclusion *** Discussed in this episode: "Everybody vs Activision Blizzard: A Legal View" YouTube Playlist - Hoeg Law https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1zDCgJzZUy9PBxr5dNcoQLh2erIt2XrZ "Activision Blizzard: Sued By EEOC, Settles about an Hour Later (VL549)" YouTube Video - September 27, 2021 - Hoeg Law https://youtu.be/73rAxOukWWk EEOC v Activision Blizzard Proposed Consent Decree https://investor.activision.com/consent-decree-with-EEOC EEOC v Activision Blizzard Motion to Intervene (DFEH/California) https://storage.courtlistener.com/recap/gov.uscourts.cacd.832570/gov.uscourts.cacd.832570.13.1.pdf EEOC Website https://www.eeoc.gov/settlement-standards-and-procedures#section2d https://www.eeoc.gov/d-notice-and-claims-procedures-settlement-class-cases https://www.eeoc.gov/c-considerations-requesting-fairness-hearing https://www.eeoc.gov/federal-sector/settlement-agreement EEOC v Activision Blizzard Declaration of Games Journalism Articles (DFEH/California) https://storage.courtlistener.com/recap/gov.uscourts.cacd.832570/gov.uscourts.cacd.832570.13.8.pdf "California Steps In To Prevent Activision Blizzard Destroying Sexual Harassment Evidence" Kotaku - October 7, 2021 https://kotaku.com/california-steps-in-to-prevent-activision-blizzard-dest-1847821066 "Sort of feels like..." Twitter Thread - October 8, 2021 - Alanah Pearce https://twitter.com/Charalanahzard/status/1446548326241882112 EEOC v Activision Blizzard Opposition to Intervention - Exhibit A (EEOC) https://storage.courtlistener.com/recap/gov.uscourts.cacd.832570/gov.uscourts.cacd.832570.15.6.pdf EEOC v Activision Blizzard Opposition to Intervention (EEOC) https://storage.courtlistener.com/recap/gov.uscourts.cacd.832570/gov.uscourts.cacd.832570.15.5.pdf *** "Virtual Legality" is a continuing series discussing the law, video games, software, and everything digital, hosted by Richard Hoeg, of the Hoeg Law Business Law Firm (Hoeg Law). CHECK OUT THE REST OF VIRTUAL LEGALITY HERE: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1zDCgJzZUy9YAU61GoW-00K0TJOGnPCo DISCUSSION IS PROVIDED FOR INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT TO BE CONSTRUED AS LEGAL ADVICE. INDIVIDUALS INTERESTED IN THE LEGAL TOPICS DISCUSSED IN THIS VIDEO SHOULD CONSULT WITH THEIR OWN COUNSEL. *** Twitter: @hoeglaw Web: hoeglaw.com

The Selling Your Screenplay Podcast
SYS Podcast Episode 401 – Filmmaking, Money, Fascism and Some Sort of Acid

The Selling Your Screenplay Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 34:08


Read 'SYS Podcast Episode 401 – Filmmaking, Money, Fascism and Some Sort of Acid' at http://www.SellingYourScreenplay.com. This week Ashley Scott Meyers talks with Filmmaker Janek Ambros. They talk about the long journey it took for him to write and direct Mondo Hollywoodland (2019). Janek is also the Writer/Director of Money, Fascism and Some Sort of […]

Hell Bent For Metal
#49 – Death Metal Vs Homophobes

Hell Bent For Metal

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 50:09


There's a bumper crop of news for Hell Bent For Metal, with talk of specials, and details of the podcast's first live event.The main chat for the week is about how the most Swedish sounding band ever to come out of the US, Black Breath, wrote a Satanic death metal song that sounds like defiance to homophobes. Sort of. Who knew it was so easy to get from 'Black Sin (Spit On The Cross)' to eschatological homophobic religious extremists?Plus it's a trio of additions for the Hate Crew Gaybar jukebox, with In The Court Of The Dragon by Trivium, Classics by Four Stroke Baron, and Oxidized by Frontierer all added.

La chronique de Benaouda Abdeddaïm
Benaouda Abdeddaïm : Le sort de la directrice générale du FMI, impacts géopolitiques sur le multilatéralisme - 11/10

La chronique de Benaouda Abdeddaïm

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 3:40


Ce lundi 11 octobre, le sort de l'actuelle directrice générale du FMI, Kristalina Georgieva, accusée d'avoir manipulé des données d'un rapport en faveur de la Chine quand elle dirigeait la Banque mondiale, a été abordé par Benaouda Abdeddaïm dans sa chronique dans l'émission Good Morning Business présentée par Sandra Gandoin et Christophe Jakubyszyn sur BFM Business. Retrouvez l'émission du lundi au vendredi et réécoutez la en podcast..

La chronique de Benaouda Abdeddaïm
Benaouda Abdeddaïm : Le sort de la directrice générale du FMI, impacts géopolitiques sur le multilatéralisme - 11/10

La chronique de Benaouda Abdeddaïm

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 3:40


Ce lundi 11 octobre, le sort de l'actuelle directrice générale du FMI, Kristalina Georgieva, accusée d'avoir manipulé des données d'un rapport en faveur de la Chine quand elle dirigeait la Banque mondiale, a été abordé par Benaouda Abdeddaïm dans sa chronique dans l'émission Good Morning Business présentée par Sandra Gandoin et Christophe Jakubyszyn sur BFM Business. Retrouvez l'émission du lundi au vendredi et réécoutez la en podcast..

MGoBlog: The MGoPodcast
MGoPodcast 13.6: The Solution to College Crappe

MGoBlog: The MGoPodcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 91:55


1 hour and 32 minutes The Sponsors Thank you to Underground Printing for making this all possible. Rishi and Ryan have been our biggest supporters from the beginning. Check out their wide selection of officially licensed Michigan fan gear at their 3 store locations in Ann Arbor or learn about their custom apparel business at undergroundshirts.com. And let's not forget our associate sponsors: Peak Wealth Management, HomeSure Lending, Ann Arbor Elder Law, Michigan Law Grad, Human Element, The Phil Klein Insurance Group, SignalWire (use the code MUPPETS), Prentice 4M, where we recorded this, and introducing The View from the Cheap Seats podcast by the Sklars, who will now be joining us for the Hot Takes segments. Please go subscribe and like their podcast, and leave your hot takes about this game in the reviews. 1. Offense vs Nebraska starts at 1:00 Better in numbers than it felt. Sort of a Washington game but with dinky doo passing. The TE leak stuff was something they saw on film and kept working. McCarthy's arc read worked when they thought it was Cade, but they need a pop pass or something off of it because it's too obvious late. Had to use multiple guards—Stueber wrecked. Appreciation for the running backs—greatest hurdle of all time? McNamara deep accuracy, where'd you go? [The rest of the writeup and the player after THE JUMP] 2. Defense vs Nebraska starts at 23:45 Nebraska is very good at college crappe, not very good at fundamental football. DTs have a very good day again, impressive that Mazi Smith could keep going after the opening screen. Jenkins had the 3rd down stuff. Hinton was great. They're not pass rushers however, which is still a step-up problem. Michigan had crappe as well, especially when Morris and Hawkins played that 4th and 2. 3. Hot Takes, Special Teams, and Game Theory starts at 47:15 Not a lot of weird decisions—both teams punted on 4th and 1 in their own territory. Special teams battle wasn't as big as we expected because of Michigan's punt returns: one flub, one ran backwards, one let bounce and lucky it went in the endzone. The rest was great: Robbins added distance to his Boom. MAAR blood in Moody. 4. Around the Big Ten, wsg Jamie Mac starts at 1:14:03 Iowa-Penn State changed when PSU didn't have a backup quarterback, which is very hard to do in 2021 when your Will Levis can just go start at Kentucky. PSU's defense is legit: Luketa is doing the Micah Parsons stuff, and their secondary is filled with stars. MSU-Rutgers you can watch the highlights because that's all there was. Wisconsin's best RB was booted from the program. Ohio State is shoveling coal again. MUSIC: “You and Me ”—Penny and the Quarters “Maria También”—Khruangbin “On the News”—Your Old Droog “Across 110th Street”

Recovery (Sort Of)
104: Tradition 10 - Narcotics Anonymous Has No Opinion on Outside Issues; Hence the NA Name Ought Never be Drawn into Public Controversy (Sort Of)

Recovery (Sort Of)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 52:13


The 10th tradition, Narcotics Anonymous has no opinion on outside issues; hence the NA name ought never be drawn into public controversy, is under discussion in this episode. What does it mean we have no opinions? About nothing? That seems impossible. Why would tradition ten guide us away from having opinions about anything? Don't we think we should have opinions about what treatment works if there is evidence to prove it so? Or at least have opinions about what treatment doesn't work? In looking at the tenth tradition, we examine if there is any controversy about this idea of having opinions. Also, we mention that having opinions only stands at a fellowship, or program, level. Our members individually have lots of opinions and that's okay. Join the conversation by leaving a message, emailing us at RecoverySortOf@gmail.com, or find us on Twitter, Facebook or Instagram, or find us on our website at www.recoverysortof.com. Enabling episode AA episode --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/recoverysortof/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/recoverysortof/support

In the News
22: Siri, a Mini, and the Find My Shimmy

In the News

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 38:08


Watch the video!https://youtu.be/294hQeUDJwcIn the News blog post for October 8, 2021:https://www.iphonejd.com/iphone_jd/2021/10/in-the-news598.htmlA Happy 10 Years, and a Bittersweet Anniversary…Maybe a Mini is More than MiddlingHas Anyone Seen (or Heard) my AirPods Pro?BONUS #1: Get Your Apple Watch 7 Before They're Gone!BONUS #2: We're Hyper-Excited about this New HyperDrive Hub!Brett's iPadOS 15 Tip: Use “Group By” in the Files AppJeff's iPhone Tip: Set up Medical ID in the Health App!Apple's Tribute Video to Steve Jobs: “Celebrating Steve”Jason Snell on the iPhone 13 miniJohn Voorhees: Hands On with AirPods' New Find My SupportJeff's article on ordering the Apple Watch Series 7Chance Miller: Hyper launches new 6-in-1 Media Hub for iPad Pro, iPad Air, and iPad miniBrett's iPadOS 15 Tip: New in iOS 15 / iPadOS 15 in the Files app, is the ability to “Use Groups” when viewing your files. Tap either the bullet list/grid icon on iPad, or the circle-ellipsis on iPhone, and you'll see the option to tap “Use Groups” at the bottom. By default, this will group your files by “Kind” but you can tap again to group your file by “Date” or “Size. You've always been able to “Sort” your files by “Kind” but I like using the “Group By” option - it's just more visually intuitive to me. Jeff's iPhone Tip: Medical ID helps first responders access your critical medical information from your iPhone's Lock screen, without needing your passcode. They can see information like allergies and medical conditions as well as who to contact in case of an emergency. It's easy to set this up and you (and all your family members) should do this. Here is Apple's Support Page on how to set this up in the Health App. Brett Burney from http://www.appsinlaw.com Jeff Richardson from http://www.iphonejd.com  

Bitch Slap  ...The Accelerated Path to Peace!
Interview #40 Donnie Dee CEO San Diego Rescue Mission speaks service..

Bitch Slap ...The Accelerated Path to Peace!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 35:28


Ex NFL Player and CEO San Diego Rescue Mission Donnie Dee discusses service as a tool for a good life on the Tools For A Good Life Summit.  Truly inspirational Donnie Dee is literally saving lives.  Helping get homeless people off of the streets and back into a good life.  Careful if you listen…you will want to volunteer. Administrative: (See episode transcript below)Donate, support, and check out the San Diego Rescue Mission here: https://www.sdrescue.org/Check out the Tools For A Good Life Summit here: Virtually and FOR FREE https://bit.ly/ToolsForAGoodLifeSummitStart podcasting!  These are the best mobile mic's for IOS and Android phones.  You can literally take them anywhere on the fly.Get the Shure MV88 mobile mic for IOS,  https://amzn.to/3z2NrIJGet the Shure MV88+ for  mobile mic for Android  https://amzn.to/3ly8SNjGet A Course In Miracles Here! https://amzn.to/3hoE7sAAccess my “Insiders Guide to Finding Peace” here: https://belove.media/peaceSee more resources at https://belove.media/resourcesEmail me: contact@belove.mediaFor social Media:      https://www.instagram.com/mrmischaz/https://www.facebook.com/MischaZvegintzovSubscribe and share to help spread the love for a better world!As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.Transcript: 0:00:07.1 Mischa Z: Welcome back everybody to the Tools For A Good Life Summit and right now, I would like to introduce to you, Donnie Dee, President and CEO of the San Diego Rescue Mission. Welcome, Donnie.0:00:23.1 Donnie Dee: Well, welcome to you. Thanks for having me.0:00:25.4 Mischa Z: Indeed, indeed. And then before we get started here, I'm gonna read your bio really quick, if that's okay.0:00:30.7 Donnie Dee: Absolutely.0:00:31.6 Mischa Z: Alright, fantastic. Donnie Dee joined the San Diego Rescue Mission as President/CEO, mid-July, 2017. Anniversary is coming up or you just hit it?0:00:43.3 Donnie Dee: This week, yeah. Today, as a matter of fact.0:00:46.1 Mischa Z: Oh, wow.0:00:46.6 Donnie Dee: Yeah, four years ago today.0:00:48.5 Mischa Z: Oh, fantastic. Growing up in Kansas City, sports have always been important to Dee. He played football and basketball for Oak Park High School and was a four-year letterman in football at the University of Tulsa, graduating from there in 1988 with a business management degree. He was then drafted by the Indianapolis Colts and played in the NFL for two and a half years for the Colts and Seahawks. And then quick, was that an injury or you just... Go ahead.0:01:22.5 Donnie Dee: I did finish with an injury. I actually played for another team but just never really felt right, and so, yeah, I would say it was an injury that ended my career.0:01:32.4 Mischa Z: Yeah, yeah, yeah. And was that a heavy moment?0:01:37.5 Donnie Dee: It was. You dream your whole life about playing a sport like that, and so for it to come down and you did not have a lot of control over how it ends is a little disappointing and a heavy thing to process. You play football your whole life and then for some of us, it just comes to an abrupt ending. It takes a little while to get used to.0:01:56.2 Mischa Z: Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah. And I'm guessing, and we can get into this in a minute, but your faith was not only tested but enriched and really helped you through that time?0:02:06.9 Donnie Dee: 100%. I think you find out what's most important and what you really value. And look, at the end of the day, football's a game, it can't be the most important thing in your life, and it's a game and it's why they call it a game. And so I think I was able to make the transition.0:02:23.4 Mischa Z: Yeah, what a great lesson too and I think what a great thing or analogy, or whatever that... For me, I just hear that and I'm like, "Yeah, how much stuff do I put attachment on where it's just money or it's just this or just that when really... " I think is the lesson there.0:02:42.8 Donnie Dee: Well, yeah, and it's easy to do because what our priorities are end up being the things that we chase and we center our whole life around, but what happens if we have the wrong priorities? Well, then we have established a life that isn't very deep, doesn't have a lot of substance, and those things always... You end up finding that out as time goes on that, "Hey, maybe this isn't as big a deal I thought it was." And that was really my relation with football. I went to University of Tulsa and football was the most important thing in my life. And then I got hurt in college and realized that, "Look, this can give you a lot of opportunities but it can't be the most important thing in your life 'cause it's gonna let you down eventually."0:03:26.0 Mischa Z: Yeah, and I'm thinking too, I bet from that part of the country you grew up in and just... That was probably your destiny to a certain extent. That's the lifestyle...0:03:38.8 Donnie Dee: Well, yeah, I think sports is a really big deal in the Midwest. Football is an enormous thing in Oklahoma. But even for me personally, my father was a professional basketball player for the Indiana Pacers and he won an actual gold medal, which I think is one of the most difficult accomplishments in all of sports, is winning a gold medal in the 1968 Olympics playing basketball. And so, yeah, I would say it was very much my destiny. I wanted to be an athlete, I wanted to accomplish what my dad had accomplished, I wanted to make him proud. I never imagined not being an athlete and I put that pressure on myself.0:04:14.6 Mischa Z: Yeah, I will say too, for anybody younger, back in the day... So when your father went to play basketball in the Olympics, that was amateurs. There was no Michael Jordan, no LeBron James showing up, that was strictly amateur class.0:04:32.6 Donnie Dee: These are all college guys playing against other countries and they were the best in the world, they were the best in the world. It has changed and now we've got pros playing against pros in the Olympics.0:04:42.9 Mischa Z: Yeah, I think that's cool. I think I'm even more excited now to have you on the summit because I think, to have your identity in sports that much or as a pro football player and to have those cracks start to happen in college and then perhaps ultimately in the NFL, that it's such a powerful testament to what we're offering. How do we make it through those rough parts of life when our identity is shattered a little bit? So anyway, yeah, let me finish up here and thank you for indulging those questions. So here we are. Dee began his career in 1990 with the Fellowship of Christian Athletes in Colorado. Dee went on to become COO or Chief Operating Officer of the FCA for five years before relaunching the Tom Landry Associates, a major donor program at FCA. Again, the Fellowship of Christian Athletes. Dee is married to his college sweetheart, Jackie, who was also a college athlete. They have two grown children, Johnny, who's now 28 and about to get married, right?0:06:00.7 Donnie Dee: That's correct.0:06:01.7 Mischa Z: Yeah, very exciting, congratulations. And Jennifer, 25, who both played college basketball at USD and UCI, respectively. If I'd quickly touched on a... And again, for any of the younger people, Tom Landry, he was the coach... He was the man in football for a few decades, perhaps.0:06:23.0 Donnie Dee: Very successful coach, went to the playoffs 23 years in a row, still has, I think, that record, and Bill Belichick's about to break it or maybe he was about to break it before last year because I don't think he went to the... I don't think the Patriots went to the playoffs last year, but Tom Landry is a very successful coach. He wasn't our founder but he got involved very early on with the Fellowship of Christian Athletes and really put us on the map. I think once he got involved and used FCA as his platform to share his thing, I think our ministry really exploded when I was with FCA, and I'm certainly thankful for his life and his leadership.0:07:01.0 Mischa Z: Yeah, and you had a chance to interact a little bit with Tom Landry?0:07:05.3 Donnie Dee: I did. We had an annual giving campaign that people would give $10,000 or more in a year in honor of Tom Landry and that was used for local field ministry to work with coaches and athletes at the local level.0:07:22.2 Mischa Z: I wanted to touch really quick before we get to the question and the meat of the summit question, to you, is that... Clearly, it's evident to me through your history and what you do that your faith is very important to you and it's been a very powerful part of your life, yeah?0:07:42.1 Donnie Dee: Yeah, it is and it has been, and I think it always will be. I didn't grow up in a Christian home, didn't grow up in the church, and so really just trying to figure out life by myself. I'm from a broken home, my father was an alcoholic, and so I think that, in many ways, I was gonna follow in his footsteps, not only athletically but also socially. I think I was destined to just be an alcoholic and to probably bounce around from relationship to relationship. And it wasn't until I got to college that I saw some other athletes that lived out their faith and that became inspirational for me and interesting to me that I asked questions. I think, in the end, I just began to embrace my faith and allow God to have a role in my life, and to have this daily relationship where I get a chance to strengthen my faith and try to be all that God has called me to be.0:08:39.4 Mischa Z: It's beautiful. So your interest and that nurturing in your college years, that's what led you to, obviously, your work in things like the San Diego Rescue Mission, yes?0:08:55.8 Donnie Dee: 100%. Yeah, I think faith and really beginning to understand the God of the Bible and really what the scripture teaches really compels you to wanna make a difference in the world and to wanna see other people not just as humans at different stages and different statuses in life but to begin to see them as God's creation and that whether you're homeless or whether you have billions that we're really all the same in terms of God's eyes and he calls upon us that have been given much to help those that maybe aren't as privileged or haven't been given as much, and I just think that's a great way to live your life. And I've seen so many that have gone before me that lived their lives that way and it really challenged me to embrace that.0:09:38.9 Mischa Z: Yeah, fantastic. I think my relationship with source or a higher power, or God, as you say, has been more from a recovery lens, like a traditional 12-step, that was my entry point, but I'd love...0:09:55.3 Donnie Dee: That's good.0:09:56.1 Mischa Z: Yeah, yeah. I'm excited for your viewpoint. [laughter] And what I wanna touch on here too is service. So you are CEO and President of the San Diego Rescue Mission. So the San Diego Rescue Mission is feet on the street, helping people, yeah?0:10:22.0 Donnie Dee: That's correct. Yeah, we have a large facility downtown. It's an old hospital. I have 366 beds, 60 of those beds are used for emergency shelter use overnight, women and children only, and they stay there one night at a time, two nights at a time. The other 300 beds are used for what I believe to be the number one solution for homelessness and that is rehabilitation. You understand that, you understand the power of a program, you understand the power of accountability and direction, and support 'cause you've obviously overcome some things in your own life. And we have people that come to us that, yes, circumstantially, they may be homeless but there's other things that are going on in their heart that have led them to this lifestyle of homelessness and we're trying to address what's going on in the heart so that they can overcome and really be free from this challenge of living on the streets. So they live with us for a year. We call them students. The first semester is wellness, the second semester is education, the third semester is job placement and housing. And we tell them on day one, "Give us a year, we'll get you off the streets permanently." And we do that through our rehabilitation program.0:11:33.2 Mischa Z: It's beautiful. I love it. Well, good. I think we've laid the framework for service as a tool for a good life. So I have a question that I'm gonna ask you and I'm gonna lay the scenario and basically, if we think of life as a three-legged stool of relationships, finance, and...0:11:57.9 Donnie Dee: Health.0:12:00.0 Mischa Z: Health. Thank you. [chuckle]0:12:00.3 Donnie Dee: Absolutely. I read the question.0:12:01.9 Mischa Z: That's good. [laughter] I appreciate that, Donnie. Thank you. And then if we think of someone who was successful or is successful and two or three of the legs fall out from under them, so perhaps... So I'll speak for me. I went through divorce, another failed relationship after that, both my parents died in rapid succession, this was all 5 to 10 years ago, career upheaval. And up until that point, success had served me very well. And so pull myself up from my bootstraps, that mentality, that "Fix it. Work your way through it. Sort it out", that was no longer working. [laughter] I needed new tools. [laughter] And so by the grace of God, I got new tools. And so my question to you is, thinking of service to community as a tool, what are the exact next steps you would offer a person like me who is, perhaps, hitting that rough part of life? What are the exact next steps you would offer this person so they know they are headed in the new, right direction that they will have positive momentum towards getting their life back on track?0:13:27.7 Donnie Dee: That's a big question, that's a heavy question, and I don't know that there's an easy answer to that. I can tell you what comes to mind for me and I can tell you what has worked for me. I think the exact next steps really have to do with how you view the world. I think everything starts internally first. I can't be for the world if I'm not first that in myself. I can't impart what I don't possess. And so I think I have to have a philosophy of life. I think I have to have a view of the world that is healthy so that I can begin to see people and see others the way that would allow me to have influence on them.0:14:12.0 Donnie Dee: I think, for me, it starts with gratefulness. I think that so many of us, especially today, in this world feel like we need to play the role of the victim and I think we're losing sight of the amazing Americans that have overcome so much to make a life of themselves and they didn't play the victim. They played the, "I'm gonna get up every day, I'm gonna do the best I can, and I'm grateful for this opportunity." I think thankfulness and having a thankful heart really centers someone to really begin to see their circumstances and to see the world in a way that allows them to take advantage of their opportunities. I think that's the first step, is do you realize how much you have? It's like the guy that said that he was complaining having no shoes until he saw the guy who didn't have any feet. I think you don't have to look far, especially when you live in San Diego, to spend some time in Mexico and you see that it's a whole different world down there.0:15:25.0 Mischa Z: A whole different world, yeah.0:15:26.6 Donnie Dee: We have a lot to be thankful for and I think it starts with that.0:15:32.7 Mischa Z: Let me ask you a question, do you have any sort of things that you do to bring that gratitude forefront in your day?0:15:41.5 Donnie Dee: I do. I start each day in reading and in meditation, specifically reading the Bible and in praying out my faith and just trying to center myself around the opportunities I have for that day. It's easy for me to get out of the bed and to rush into the mission because of the volume of responsibilities that's down here. And we've got 300 people living with us and even during COVID. It's not like we kicked them out. They stayed with us, that's their home for a year. And so just the pressure and the volume of responsibility, and the stress, and the decisions that need to be made. I can't come down to this work everyday without something to give and I gotta have life to give if I'm gonna help somebody that's broken figure out how to take steps in their life. So I can encourage them to be grateful and to be thankful that they've got a place to live even though that in the world's eyes they're probably at the bottom of the...0:16:49.7 Mischa Z: Pecking order.0:16:50.0 Donnie Dee: Probably the bottom of the pecking order. There's a lot to be thankful for. They have a lot to be thankful for. They've got a bed, they've got a safe place, they've got meals. And I can't communicate that to them if I'm not coming from a position of gratefulness and thankfulness. And so, yeah, I think starting each day in just prayer and in reading, and centering myself around what I know to be true is one of the things I practice daily.0:17:14.9 Mischa Z: Fantastic. And I heard you say meditation in there too. Real quick, how much time do you dedicate to that in your morning?0:17:26.0 Donnie Dee: Thirty minutes or so. I read and pray and sometimes I'll listen to a good message but I really just try to carve out before I actually get up. I workout, then I sit out back and read and pray, and then I jump in the shower and grab my stuff, and I hit the road 39 miles south to the San Diego Rescue Mission. So that is in my routine six days a week.0:17:51.8 Mischa Z: Fantastic, thank you. Alright, so number one, start with gratitude, and you gave some great ways to do that. What do we have next? What's after that?0:18:01.6 Donnie Dee: Well, I think the next thing is to look for opportunities to serve. The world is full of need. There is so much suffering in the world and so many that are just challenged by their own circumstances, and you don't have to go far. You don't even have to do anything formally or structurally. You can just look around your neighborhood and see somebody that needs a helping hand, that needs a word of encouragement, that needs somebody to come alongside of them and just put their hand on their shoulder, and say, "It's gonna be okay." I think how we view the world and how we see the world really determines the opportunity, I believe, God gives us to serve the world. There's so many opportunities to serve. I had a friend that is no longer alive, he was a tennis pro at El Camino Country Club, and I would say my best friend ever.0:18:51.8 Mischa Z: Who is your best friend ever?0:18:53.1 Donnie Dee: He was my best friend. He passed away probably 10 years ago. I've got a picture of him up here in my bookshelf. He passed away about 10 years ago of a brain tumor and it really came on fast, and I just watched him go through all of that and really die in an honorable way. And he was just a tennis pro. He'd make a lot of money but then I saw him have an impact on a lot of people. I had a chance to officiate his memorial service. There's probably 500 people standing remotely in this little chapel. But I remember he used to tell his kids... And he's about 10 years older than me, so I kinda looked up to him a little bit. And I remember he told his kids who were a few years older than my kids that if you're having a bad day, go be a blessing to somebody. Go find somebody and be a blessing to them and not only will you make their day a much better day but it'll take your eyes off of what concerns you most. And I think that's a powerful principle that is easy to implement that can change your complete perspective and how you see your circumstances by, one, being grateful and by, two, looking for opportunity to be a blessing to somebody else, formally or informally.0:20:10.3 Mischa Z: I love that a lot. Service, for me, has been so impactful in my life to get me out of my head and all those things that you said, and to find that gratitude in a lot of what I do. My current state in the world, I'm trying to let go of what being of service means. So I have my vision and it usually has lots of accolades. I want to be of service and then the shiny objects but I... So I wanna ask you... Easy to implement. So tell me, give me some easy to implement both, I think you said, official and unofficial.0:20:58.8 Donnie Dee: Yeah, or formally or informally.0:21:00.0 Mischa Z: There we go.0:21:01.0 Donnie Dee: And I would say, formally, there's lots of organizations like the San Diego Rescue Mission. I had 240 volunteers down here last week that get what it means to serve the world, that get what it means to serve the community. They got things going on, they've got kids, little league games, and work, and church responsibilities, and yard work, and all kinds of stuff like the rest of us, but they come down every week, many of them, and they serve meals. They come down every week, many of them, and they help us run the mission; 240 volunteers that showed up last week. Now, some of them were regulars and then some of them came down for their once a month service project but I love that they're committed to this place. And I would say that's one of the ways to serve, is to be consistent, is to find a place that really hits your heart and a place that you wanna make a difference because there's lots of organizations like ours out there that need the help. We don't have enough staff to do all the things that we need to do around here and when volunteers come down and serve, not only does it help us raise our level of leadership but it helps those that we're serving because now we could do it at a much higher level.0:22:18.1 Mischa Z: I love that. I like what you said, and I'm gonna frame it this way, take the time to find some place that inspires you to be consistent. So go to the San Diego Rescue Mission and if that grabs you, awesome, be consistent but if it doesn't, perhaps look again. Keep looking until you can find that thing that maybe resonates, yeah?0:22:45.0 Donnie Dee: Yeah, and I think that we don't have to do everything, but what if all of us at this summit did something? And I'm sure that if you had the ability to find out all of the areas that people at this summit are involved in, we'd probably be impressed and probably be in awe, but there's probably somebody that this really speaks to them. You've been feeling like you need to get involved, you've been feeling like you need to do something, and I would say, find that thing and also, step back and evaluate your own story. What is it that you've been through? What is it that you've been challenged by, either as you grew up or even later in life? And typically, I have found that that ends up being something that you wanna give back too because you've been given so much. Like for you, I can only imagine what it's like for you to sit down with somebody who's struggling with an addiction and the power of that is, is that you know exactly what that's like, you know exactly what that means.0:23:53.4 Donnie Dee: I remember I'm the oldest of four and my parents got divorced when I was in eighth grade, and I always resented it. I was like... I never really understood how difficult and challenging it is to be married till I got married. I'm just a kid and I resented it, and I always wondered why it had to happen, because it was hard on us. It was really hard on us. But it wasn't until I was 25 years old and I took a position in Colorado working with coaches and athletes, and I met a kid whose mom asked me, "Would you meet with him because me and his dad are going through a divorce and he's really struggling?" And I sat down with him at Taco Bell and that divorce that I went through as an eighth grader made sense to me because I could speak to him in a way that I think he listened to me more than he listened to anybody else because I could relate. And I think that's the challenge, is not only to be consistent at that thing that you feel compelled to do but to find something that really resonates with your heart because you've been impacted, you've changed, you've overcome. And I think that puts you in a position to really have an impact on other people that will trust you because you've been there.0:25:08.3 Mischa Z: Yeah, that's good. That experience, bring that experience to the table and use that as a tool to serve. That's very powerful. How about informally? So we covered formally, tell me some informal.0:25:25.3 Donnie Dee: I think that some of us are more relational than others, and so as I mentioned earlier, just having a world view where you see people as people, not as a hassle or as a distraction, or as a... We've got... I remember when I was a kid, if somebody rang the doorbell, it wasn't uncommon growing up in a neighborhood. We were bouncing around from house to house. Somebody rings my doorbell now, I'm half freaked out. [laughter] What do they want? Am I in trouble? Am I about to get robbed? Why are they ringing my doorbell? We live in a world of garage door openers where we pull our car in and we get out, and walk into the house and we don't connect with anybody, and I just don't think that's... I don't think that's best for society. We are human beings, we are meant to connect, and I think the absolute most fulfilling way to connect is to help others. And so as we began to see in our neighborhoods, as we begin to see in our workplace, as we begin to see at the gym, as we begin to see people at our kids practices, and as we begin to build relationships, I think you find that there's a whole world out there that's waiting to be touched and waiting to be blessed if we'll have the eyes to see that.0:26:45.7 Mischa Z: Yeah, I loved that thought. This is what I hear, a lot of what I hear, is how powerful, when I walk out the door, a smile can be, a generous nod, an open, generous... And when I say generous, meaning... I don't mean literally having to give something to somebody but that... You know what I'm saying when I say generous?0:27:11.9 Donnie Dee: We all know people that when you're around them, they're life-giving, they're so positive, they're so enthusiastic, they're so full of joy. That's actually contagious. And when I see that, not only do I benefit from that but it's also a challenge to me that I wanna be that kind of person. I wanna be that kind of person that when others are around me, it raises their level of influence and leadership capacity.0:27:40.2 Mischa Z: Yeah, and the other thing I heard was, if I'm having... If I see somebody and I go negative and I get judgmental or whatever that could be, they shouldn't have crossed the street in front of me, or the gamut that can go through our brain is literally practiced to be like, "Wait a minute, can I shift how I view that person to a positive attitude or from a positive set of glasses?" or say it however you want.0:28:09.9 Donnie Dee: Yeah, yeah, no, I think it goes back to that way we view the world and we are all pretty selfish and we all are the most very self-centered and self-focused, and self-aware, and if I can begin to see the world from a standpoint of, "Look, it's not about me"... I need to remind myself of that daily. That's almost something I should rehearse in my head over, "It's not about me. This is not about me. This is not about me, my needs, my wants, my desires. What if I begin to make the world about other people?" and I think that's legacy. You start talking about how to make the most of our lives. Well, service is certainly a way to do that and at the end of our lives, what you have in an auditorium, like my friend that I mentioned, is a bunch of people that you've impacted if we dare to see the world in another's focused view. If we see the world in a self-focused view, then at the end of our lives, probably not a whole lot of people are around to celebrate your legacy, right?0:29:20.2 Mischa Z: Right, it's true.0:29:21.3 Donnie Dee: We know that now, so why don't we do something about it? Why don't we do something different?0:29:25.8 Mischa Z: Yeah, yeah. If we can dare... Say that again, if we can dare to see the world... How did you say that? If we...0:29:33.2 Donnie Dee: Well, if we can dare to see the world others-focused instead of me-focused, then really I think build a legacy that has an impact on lots of people's lives.0:29:45.7 Mischa Z: Yeah, that's great. So good. Donnie, I love it. I think that that's a great place to stop interview one. So if this interview with Donnie Dee was fantastic and you want to get even more content from Donnie, upgrade to the all access pass for that bonus interview. And I've got some good questions and I know we're gonna have some fun, and I'm gonna give you an opportunity to be vulnerable, so I think that's always really good. Any final thoughts to share that we did not get a chance to cover, Donnie?0:30:29.0 Donnie Dee: No, just that I think we should all be mindful that life is short, and so each day's a gift. The Bible teaches that this is the day that the Lord has made, let us rejoice and be glad in it. And I think that regardless of your faith orientation, I think we would all agree that life is short and goes by very quickly, and so what we do with these days really determines a successful life. If you want another tip, I think, in terms of how to have an effective life and to be well-rounded and to be well-balanced like that three-legged stool, then we gotta get up every day and make this day count by treating it as a gift.0:31:09.7 Mischa Z: Yeah, that's good. That's good stuff, Donnie. Thank you so much. You can find out all about what Donnie does as President and CEO of the San Diego Rescue Mission by going to sdrescue.org. Again, sdrescue.org. There's opportunities to donate. I'm sure you would always love donations, donation-supported...0:31:38.2 Donnie Dee: Yeah, we've got a lot of opportunities to serve, a lot of opportunities to give, a lot of opportunities to praise, so yeah, we'd love to have any of your listeners involved in any one of those plans.0:31:48.6 Mischa Z: Alright, fantastic, Donnie. And again, everybody click on the all access pass button below so you can get unlimited access to all of our interviews with Donnie and all of the bonus interviews which Donnie and I are going to get into next. I'm gonna hit stop and thank you so much for round one, that was beautiful.0:32:10.5 Donnie Dee: Thank you.

TBTL- Too Beautiful to Live
#3527 And You Don't Believe In A Content God?

TBTL- Too Beautiful to Live

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 67:24


Andrew has jumped head-first into the surveillance game, and it's paying off. Sort of. Plus, Luke's awkward exchange in an elevator forces him to adopt a British accent from this day forward.

Radio foot internationale
Radio Foot Internationale - Équipe de France, avenir en club: Mbappé sort du silence

Radio foot internationale

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 48:30


Au sommaire de Radio Foot : Mbappé à la Une ! Le Bondynois sort du silence, se confie aux médias. - Sortie prématurée à l'Euro, avenir des «Bleus», transfert avorté à Madrid, critiques sur son individualisme voire son arrogance, il avoue les comprendre. - Son avenir est-il à Paris ou au Real ? Il n'en précise pas les contours, avoue se concentrer sur les objectifs de la saison. - Florentino Perez réagit, veut accélérer sur le recrutement de l'attaquant. - Leonardo s'agace et demande au club espagnol de cesser ses manœuvres autour de l'international ! - Retrouvailles entre Diables rouges et Bleus en Ligue des nations. L'équipe de Deschamps a-t-elle digéré la désillusion de l'Euro ? Le coach a-t-il repris la main sur le groupe ? - Les frères Hernandez convoqués, qu'est-ce que ça change ? - Les Belges à l'heure de la revanche ? Forces et faiblesses des 2 formations - Éliminatoires Mondial 2022 zone Afrique : le match Guinée-Bissau/Maroc aura-t-il lieu ? Les «Djurtus», victimes d'une intoxication alimentaire la veille de l'affrontement ! - Le Maroc avantagé avec 3 matches à domicile ? Aurier signe à Villarreal, avant de rejoindre les «Éléphants» pour affronter le Malawi. Autour d'Annie Gasnier : Carine Galli, Naïm Moniolle et Patrick Juillard. Technique/réalisation : Laurent Salerno, préparation : David Fintzel/Pierre Guérin, coup d'envoi : 16h10 T.U.

How I Make Music
102 Marsfall - Sam Boase-Miller - The Trial

How I Make Music

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021


Discover new audio drama by music. How I Make Music is where audio drama composers get to tell their own stories. Visit https://howimakemusic.com and subscribe in your podcast app. TRANSCRIPT The piece of music we're listening to in the background is called The Trial. It's featured in the soundtrack from the fiction podcast Marsfall. Today we'll break it down and get into why and how it was made. You're listening to How I Make Music, where audio drama composers get to tell their own stories. In this show, we break apart the music of a fictional podcast and take a trip into how it was made. My name is Sam Boase-Miller. I'm a composer, producer and voice actor from the US and this is How I Make Music. Welcome back to How I Make Music, The Trial by me Sam Boase-Miller. Thanks for listening in. 1:06 ABOUT Marsfall is a sci-fi/fantasy story about the first colonists to settle on Mars. We follow them starting in the year 2047. So maybe 2047 is actually the year that we'll get people on Mars. Mini helicopter that's flying around from the Perseverance lander. And yeah, it's pretty incredible the strides that we're making. Life imitating art! The scene takes place in the trial for ANDI, our colony AI. It's his trial for closing the door on a particular colonist who was about to create havoc for the rest of the colony. That philosophical debate, the trolley debate: should you pull the lever and try to avoid most people knowing that you'll kill one person? Or should you just let the trolley kill all five people to save the one. So this was the trial that we're all of our main characters kind of come together for the first time. And in this scene, we hear interjections from several of our characters. 2:52 CELLO I started playing cello in school. Sort of like a string music petting zoo. My good friend at the time was playing viola. And so I thought, I really want to play viola. So I expressed this to the director of the orchestra and she was like, “no, you don't want to play viola. Your hands are big. You should play the cello.” So I was already at nine years old being told what to do! Like what musical instrument I should be taking up. It's actually the closest instrument (other than the trombone) to the range of the human voice. Both really, really low and it also gets into that high coloratura kind of soprano end of things 4:38 P-FUNK & INFLUENCES I'm a big George Clinton fan. And part of what I love about Parliament Funkadelic is that they're very imaginative harmonically and melodically and rhythmically. Yeah, I just I love that era. funk music from the 70s. Right around, you know, ‘75, ‘76. The orb is an electronic music group, I really got into their ethereal and ambient music where you're just like taking on a whole journey. The place where you end up is certainly very different from where you started. 6:03 ERIC SARAS My co creator and music editor, he's director extraordinaire, Eric Saras. He's also one of our writers of the show, he and I first connected through music, we both went on an orchestra tour to China together. And as you can imagine traveling to another country and touring and performing music brings people close together pretty quickly. And so I met him and we realized that we were very similar in our outlook on music, and that just got a lot of things kind of kicked off creatively. We wanted music to be featured really heavily. He kind of realized that there was more or less these like kind of pillars or buckets that the majority of our music was falling into. And we called them a numbering system essentially like one through six being silence to total music taking over and being the focal point of the scene. So going through that and knowing that ahead of time helps me really plan. Okay, my workload, is this seen a one or is it a six? Or is it somewhere in between that, and the way that 07:15 LEITMOTIFS & MUSICAL TRANCE I write music in leitmotifs, which are little motives for each character or place or emotion. What you're hearing now is the claps. I picked up clapping after cello, you know. I phased it so that it's actually kind of moving around your ears. Even though you're hearing that over and over again. Since it's panning around and moving around your head a little bit subconsciously, it's keeping the rhythm driving and moving. This point, I would consider myself a professional clapper. There are several speakers during the scene of the trial. We'll hear interjections from Jeff. He's the finance officer of the colony. That low cello by being that that's actually one of the first themes that I wrote of the entire series. We hear Kyla, our medical doctor's theme. She's got several horn pads. So you'll hear those horn chords. Chip Huddleston, the character I actually play, he interjects a couple of times. So you'll hear this kind of muddy patch just really jokingly kind of come in and dip out because all of his interjections are just jokes, they're just little quips. So I wanted the attitude of the character to be represented or representative of the music that you're hearing. You know, the beats that I sampled from Ableton and bring in drop in and then highlight at different times, they help to kind of break up you know, the monotony of that clapping rhythm. There's a whole cadre of composers from the 60s 70s 80s that was using minimalism to try and get you into musical trance almost like you're looking through a kaleidoscope. So a lot of what I tried to do here was take this continuous beat and then add a little something to it, or take away a little something that would highlight or dampen the inherent, strong or weak parts of the beat that you'd hear. 10:11 PLUS ONE With podcast or film or television, all of that is collaborative. And so you, you immediately have to shelve your ego and say, What's the best thing for this whole artwork? Rather than what's the best thing for my track? Or what's the best thing for, for me as the composer, none of that matters? What matters is how does the whole thing come together? And how am I adding to it? How am I plus one-ing rather than deterring, or covering something up? That seems to be of the main thing that I've learned over the last...this entire project working on Marsfall. Sometimes I just want people to just listen. The best way for you to know me and to know my music is to just like, check it out. Just go and slap on some really good headphones, or go stand in the dark with some giant speakers and like, you know, close your eyes and like, just get swallowed up by the sound. And then you'll know. The one thing about music is the ability to communicate with people around the world on a different level that almost has nothing to do with what language you speak, but it is that other language right? 11: 42 OUTRO And that's about it for this week's episode. We'll listen to the full track in just a moment. Thanks for listening to How I Make Music. Catch new episodes on HowIMakeMusic.com or wherever else you get your podcasts. We've been listening to music featured in the audio drama called Marsfall. To hear the full story or to check out my other work, follow the links in the show notes. We video recorded the making of this episode, check it out and support the musicians of audio drama by becoming a patron at https://patreon.com/howimakemusic. Top tier patrons get mentioned right here in the credits of every episode. How I make music is created by John Bartmann. And now here's The Trial, a quirky, minimal electronic soundtrack in its entirety. My name is Sam Boase-Miller, and thanks for listening to How I Make Music. Catch you next time. SHOW NOTES Marsfall audio drama https://marsfallpodcast.com/ Sam Boase-Miller https://sjboase-miller.com/ MUSIC CREDITS Music: Sarabande in D Major from Suite No.6 by J.S.Bach (performed by Sam Boase-Miller) Music: The Cave Paintings by Sam Boase-Miller Music: One Nation Under a Groove by Funkadelic Music: Little Fluffy Clouds by The Orb ABOUT THIS SHOW Discover new audio drama musically. How I Make Music is where audio drama composers get to tell their own stories. In a dramatically edited sound experience, we challenge fiction podcast music composers to break apart a song, soundtrack or composition and get into why and how it was made. Subscribe to How I Make Music https://pod.link/howimakemusic Support How I Make Music https://patreon.com/howimakemusic Visit How I Make Music https://howimakemusic.com How I Make Music is created by John Bartmann https://johnbartmann.com

Locked On Magic - Daily Podcast On The Orlando Magic
Don't forget about Wendell Carter! How the Orlando Magic sort out their center position

Locked On Magic - Daily Podcast On The Orlando Magic

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 33:36


The Orlando Magic have a couple of young centers to develop in Wendell Carter and Mohamed Bamba. Both have shown plenty to get excited about in the Magic's preseason game. And both have a lot to prove as they enter a critical season in their careers. Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! SweatBlock Get it today for 20% off at SweatBlock.com with promo code LockedOn, or at Amazon and CVS. Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKED15” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline AG There is only 1 place that has you covered and 1 place we trust. Betonline.ag! Sign up today for a free account at betonline.ag and use that promocode: LOCKEDON for your 50% welcome bonus. Rock Auto Amazing selection. Reliably low prices. All the parts your car will ever need. Visit RockAuto.com and tell them Locked On sent you. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Ask a House Cleaner
How to Wash Microfiber Towels and Cloths the Way That Professional Cleaners Do

Ask a House Cleaner

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 7:49


Wanna know how to wash microfiber towels and cloths the way that professional cleaners do? Spoiler alert, it involves buckets, mesh bags, and gentle laundry soap. Microfiber is such a fantastic tool for house cleaners. And to keep your tools in good shape you have to learn microfiber care. You also have to learn how to dry microfiber cloths on low heat so you don't ruin the recycled fabric. Today's #AskaHouseCleaner sponsor is #SavvyCleaner training and certification for house cleaners and maids. (https://savvycleaner.com/join) And your host today is #AngelaBrown *** HOW TO WASH MICROFIBER TOWELS AND CLOTHS CHAPTERS *** 0:00 - How do you wash microfiber towels and cloths the way professional cleaners do? 0:07 - Meet Angela Brown the House Cleaning Guru 0:19 - Keep microfiber cloths separate to prevent cross-contamination 1:29 - Sort your cloths in the car to prevent accidental re-use 2:07 - Sort them at home in 5-gallon buckets 2:48 - Soak them in water with some mild laundry soap 3:03 - Launder them in mesh backs to prevent them from picking up lint from other laundry 4:05 - Use mesh bags for your microfiber mop pads and dusting mitts 4:58 - Tumble dry on low heat with no fabric sheets 5:25 - You can also hang them over a rack to drip dry 6:10 - The program is scalable even if you have more cleaning cloths *** PROMISED LINKS AND GOOD KARMA RESOURCES *** Zipper Mesh Microfiber Wash Bags Drawstring Mesh Landry Bags - https://amzn.to/2WKrktD Over the door shoe rack to hang cloths - https://amzn.to/3AhIXi5 5 Gallon Cloth Soaking Buckets with Lids - https://amzn.to/3uJpYfa Edgeless Microfiber Cloths - https://amzn.to/2WHWCRI Streak-Free Glass Cloths - https://amzn.to/3uLs3XO Supply Maid Apron - https://amzn.to/3le0ZO7 Photo ID Badge - https://verifymyrecords.com These good karma links connect you to affiliated sites that offer products or services that relate to today's show. As an Amazon Associate, I earn from qualifying purchases. Your support pays our production costs to bring you these free daily tips. THANK YOU. *** RATE THIS SHOW *** https://sotellus.com/r/savvy-cleaner *** RATE THIS PODCAST *** https://ratethispodcast.com/askahousecleaner *** TRAINING & CLEANING CERTIFICATION*** https://savvycleaner.com/join *** MOST REQUESTED LIST OF CLEANING STUFF I USE *** https://www.Amazon.com/shop/AngelaBrown ***FUNNY CLEANING SHIRTS – THANK YOU GIFTS FOR MAIDS*** Daily Giveaway - https://funnycleaningshirts.com *** CONNECT WITH ANGELA ON SOCIAL MEDIA *** LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/savvycleaner/ Facebook: https://Facebook.com/SavvyCleaner Twitter: https://Twitter.com/SavvyCleaner Instagram: https://Instagram.com/SavvyCleaner Pinterest: https://Pinterest.com/SavvyCleaner *** GOT A QUESTION FOR A SHOW? *** Email it to Angela[at]AskaHouseCleaner.com Voice Mail: Click on the blue button at https://askahousecleaner.com *** FREE EBOOK – HOW TO START YOUR OWN HOUSE CLEANING COMPANY *** http://amzn.to/2xUAF3Z *** PROFESSIONAL HOUSE CLEANERS PRIVATE FACEBOOK GROUP *** https://www.facebook.com/groups/ProfessionalHouseCleaners/ *** VRBO AIRBNB CLEANING FACEBOOK GROUP *** https://www.facebook.com/groups/VRBO.Airbnb.Cleaning/ *** LOOKING FOR A WAY TO GET MORE CLEANING LEADS *** https://housecleaning360.com *** SPONSORSHIPS & BRANDS *** We do work with sponsors and brands. If you are interested in working with us and you have a product or service that is cohesive to the cleaning industry read this: https://savvycleaner.com/product-review *** THIS SHOW WAS SPONSORED BY *** SAVVY CLEANER - House Cleaner Training and Certification – https://savvycleaner.com MY CLEANING CONNECTION – Your hub for all things cleaning – https://mycleaningconnection.com SAVVY PERKS – Employee Benefits for Small Business Owners – https://savvyperks.com VRBO AIRBNB CLEANING – Cleaning tips and strategies for your short-term rental https://TurnoverCleaningTips.com FUNNY CLEANING SHIRTS – Incentive and thank you gifts for house cleaners and maids. https://FunnyCleaningShirts.com *** VIDEO CREDITS *** VIDEO/AUDIO EDITING: Kristin O https://savvycleaner.com/reviews/kristin-o HOST: Angela Brown https://savvycleaner.com/reviews/angela-brown PRODUCER: Savvy Cleaner https://savvycleaner.com

Charlottesville Community Engagement
October 5, 2021: Charlottesville City Council approves garden lease, $50,000 for B.U.C.K. Squad; RSWA planning for new paper-sort facility

Charlottesville Community Engagement

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 17:21


In today’s Patreon-fueled shout-out:Fall is here, and with it, more moderate temperatures. While your HVAC takes a break, now is the perfect time to prepare for the cooler months. Your local energy nonprofit, LEAP, wants you and yours to keep comfortable all year round! LEAP offers FREE home weatherization to income- and age-qualifying residents, so, if you’re age 60 or older, or have an annual household income of less than $74,950, you may qualify for a free energy assessment and home energy improvements such as insulation and air sealing. Sign up today to lower your energy bills, increase comfort, and reduce energy waste at home!On today’s show:A private vendor will be setting up a community vaccination center at the Big Lots in Seminole SquareVDOT’s hired a new engineer to run the Culpeper District that includes our communityPlanning is underway to replace a machine that helps with paper and cardboard recycling in Albemarle and CharlottesvilleCity Council votes to join a regional tax board and to give $50,000 to a community policing effortPandemic updateThe Virginia Department of Health reports 1,428 new cases of COVID-19 this morning. Last night, the head of the Blue Ridge Health District had the beginnings of good news to report to City Council. “We’re beginning to see a slight downturn in our current infection rate,” said Dr. Denise Bonds. “For the first time last week we did not have any triple-digit days with regards to cases. They were all below 100.”Dr. Bonds said most of the cases are the delta variant and there are currently no signs of any other new strain. There is currently no universal recommendation that vaccinated individuals get booster shots, but they are available for people who had the Pfizer vaccine and who are older than 65 or people with underlying medical conditions. “We do ask that you schedule an appointment so we have enough Pfizer on board but they are available everywhere that we are vaccinating,” Bonds said. Beginning next week, a new site at Big Lots location in Seminole Square in the location where the University of Virginia was providing vaccines. “This is actually a vendor-run vaccination clinic,” Bonds said. “It’s a contract that our central office at [the Virginia Department of Health] has with an emergency response organization called Ashbritt.” An official announcement will be forthcoming regarding the new community vaccination center. Later this month on October 14 and October 15, a Food and Drug Administration panel will review data regarding the possibility of boosters for Moderna and Johnson and Johnson vaccines. (meeting announcement)“This will be emergency use authorization again and it will still even if its approved on that date will have to go to the CDC advisory committee,” Dr Bonds said.Dr. Bonds said the FDA has tentatively scheduled a meeting for October 26 to consider use of the Pfizer vaccine in children under the age of 12. New VDOT leader for Charlottesville areaWhen the Charlottesville-Albemarle Metropolitan Planning Organization’s Policy Board next meets, there will be a new person representing the Virginia Department of Transportation. Sean Nelson will become the new district engineer for VDOT’s Culpeper District, which spans nine counties.“I am honored to return to Culpeper District as the district engineer and look forward to working with our talented teams and valued community partners,” Nelson is quoted in a September 30 press release. “I was born and raised in Louisa and am now raising my family there. I am proud to come home and am committed to making a difference in this region.”Nelson’s last post was as the maintenance engineer for VDOT’s Richmond District. In the new job, he will be in charge of “construction, maintenance and operations maintenance, project development and business functions of nearly 10,500 lane miles.” VDOT manages road construction projects in all of those counties, including six projects being designed and built under one contract in Albemarle County. However, Charlottesville manages its own construction projects and has been the recipient of multiple projects under Smart Scale. Last month, Council signaled it would likely forgo $3.25 million in VDOT funds for the first phase of the West Main Streetscape and $4 million for the second phase. Both required a match of local funding, funding which will now be transferred to a $75 million project to renovate Buford Middle School. This summer, the Commonwealth Transportation Board approved $10.8 million for the third phase of West Main Street, which requires no match. It is unclear if that phase will move ahead. All of the phases were designed as part of a $2.85 million planning study overseen by Rhodeside & Harwell. Construction on the Belmont Bridge finally got underway this summer after many years of planning. There are many other open VDOT projects in Charlottesville that have not gone to construction. Council round-upLast night, Charlottesville City Council voted 4-1 to join a regional board that would administer cigarette taxes generated in outlying counties. Until this year, only cities have been able to levy such a tax, which generated $641,494 for Charlottesville in fiscal year 2020. The city gets $0.55 a pack. Mayor Nikuyah Walker voted against the item partially out of a concern it would penalize people who are low-income. “I know we discuss it from a public health platform but most people are not going to stop smoking because there’s an increased tax on it,” Walker said. The tax board would be administered by the Thomas Jefferson Planning District. David Blount is deputy director.“And right now we have six counties that have so far agreed to establish this board,” Blount said. “We know of one additional county in our region and even one in our town that is showing some interest in participating.” Counties can not charge more than 40 cents a pack. Council also agreed to donate $50,000 to the B.U.C.K. Squad for their community policing efforts on a 3 to 2 vote. Councilor Michael Payne joined Mayor Walker in voting against the measure out of concerns raised by the Public Housing Association of Residents and the Charlottesville Redevelopment and Housing Authority. “The B.U.C.K. Squad program is something really important, that model,” Payne said. “But I would just want to have very clear lockstep assurance that CRHA and PHAR are all on the same page regarding in terms of what they’re doing and not being 100 percent assured of that I’m going to vote no for that reason hoping that partnership can evolve and become successful.”Council also voted to establish a ground lease for the Botanical Garden of the Piedmont to operate in a section of McIntire Park. The group will be responsible for raising the funds to construct improvements called for in their schematic plan. “It’s very important for the nonprofit to obtain a lease so that they can complete their fundraising efforts,” said City Manager Chip Boyles. “The city does not have any funds in the [capital improvement program] for this project and therefore this would not be a project that would go under construction under city management.” The vote was 5-0. Time for another shout-out from a Patreon supporter!WTJU 91.1 FM is a different sort of radio station. It's dedicated to sharing the transcendent experience of music while raising funds from listeners across the world. From October 4th through 10th, WTJU airs its annual Jazz Marathon. Tune in for a deep dive into everything from bebop to blues. WTJU's Volunteer DJs will play the spectrum jazz – from Billie Holiday to Canonball Adderly to Pharoah Sanders. Plus live, local jazz performances throughout the week.  Visit wtju.org to learn more!At the end of their meeting last night, Charlottesville City Council held another lengthy discussion about the termination of Police Chief RaShall Brackney. I may or may not make it back to that item in a future installment of the newsletter. In addition to the police chief, Charlottesville continues to have many high-profile vacancies.  The position for Director of Elections is being advertised through October 15, 2021. Other openings include the director of Parks and Recreation as well as the Director of Public Works. The person who most recently held the latter position is David Brown, who only worked for Charlottesville for a year. Brown was honored by the Rivanna Solid Waste Authority at their meeting on September 28. Here’s the chair, Mike Gaffney.“And what is that old saying? David, we hardly knew ye,” Gaffney said. RSWA seeks tonnage increaseLet’s stick with the Rivanna Authorities for a moment. The Rivanna Solid Waste Authority has been experiencing higher volumes of tonnage received at the Ivy Materials Utilization Center. Material is sorted before sent out to other landfills. As a result, the RSWA is asking the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality to increase the amount it can transfer each day to 450 tons, up from 300 tons. “We believe that by increasing our facility limit to 450 tons per day will not result in a great deal more traffic, but rather allow us to accept the few, large load, customers that are bringing us material from infrequent large projects (like the field turf replacement project or a UVA building demolition project that we’ve seen in the past couple of years,” reads the executive director’s report for the September meeting. RSWA Solid Waste Director Phil McKalips said that many times his agency does not know material is coming until it shows up. “We tend to find out about these projects when they come across the scale, so our ability to impact the planning of a project is usually far down the pipeline by the time we see it,” McKalips said.  McKalips said the RSWA has received a lot of waste material from the Southwood project in recent weeks. Recently an area where household waste had been discarded over the years was cleared and sent to the Ivy Materials Utilization Center. The increase would help on days when they exceed the 300 ton a day limit. “Whoever cleared the site mixed a lot of debris in with the soil so they had to bring it all out to us for disposal,” McKalips said. “We didn’t know that was coming ahead of time and all of a sudden we have 140 tons in a day to deal with.” McKalips said this material is not to be confused with areas that may have been contaminated with oil that leaked from storage tanks under trailers. That will be going through a separate process monitored by the DEQ.RSWA to conduct engineering study on new paper-sort facilityPlanning to reduce greenhouse gas emissions takes many forms. Albemarle County’s Climate Action Plan has a whole chapter on “sustainable materials management” which has multiple strategies to divert items from landfills. Strategy 5.1.3 is to “identify if there is a need to local additional paper/cardboard balers in Albemarle County.” That item is under review by the Rivanna Solid Waste Authority and McKalips gave a briefing.The RSWA operates a facility on Meade Avenue that sorts paper material brought to the Ivy Materials Utilization Center and the McIntire Recycling Center. “People put their recyclable materials in there and we take those back to the paper sort facility and we by and large bale all of those products,” McKalips said. “That allows us to save a lot of shipping costs in getting them to our vendors.”However, there are access issues with the site that have to be addressed. The property on which the facility is located on Meade Avenue is leased from Woolen Mills Self Storage but RSWA can only access it on property leased by Gerdau Metals Recycling. An access agreement has a 90-day termination clause and the bailing equipment is over 20 years old. “The thing has been well used and it’s getting near the end of its service life,” McKalips said. That’s prompted McKalips to see if there’s another option for the future. For instance, there’s not enough covered storage space to keep the material protected from rain and moisture that would make it unusable for recycling. The RSWA also collects paper material from other private collection sites such as at Kohl’s and Wal-Mart. That creates logistical issues with what to bale and when. “So this facility gets a lot of cardboard,” McKalips said. “That cardboard isn’t conducive to pushing that back into a trailer and pulling it out later so we leave it out front and then that’s one of the earliest products to get bailed. Having said that though, we have all [these] materials that need to be pulled back out, driven around the cardboard, and baled.”So with a future need, McKalips presented three options for the future. The first would renovate and expand on site and would have have a $2 million capital cost. The second would be to skip the local baling facility entirely and ship out to other entities. That would include no capital costs, but increase operating costs of $550,000 in the first year and $300,000 each year after. The third would be to build a new paper sort facility with two bailers.  “Obviously this is going to be the most expensive option,” McKalips said. “It was looking to be about $4.3 million in the feasibility study.” If the third option is pursued, McKalips said the next step is to work with Albemarle and Charlottesville to identify a potential site for the new location. They’ll need about three acres of land. Lance Stewart, Albemarle’s Director of Facilities and Environmental Services, said that he is hopeful to be able to work with city government to develop an approach to move forward with a new facility. “I think it’s a complex set of issues that hopefully we can come together on,” Stewart said. The presentation comes just as Albemarle and Charlottesville are about to start their budget cycle. The RSWA Board reached consensus to direct staff to move forward with the engineering study for a new facility. Thank you for reading! Please send on to someone else you think might be interested, and please let me know if you have any questions! This is a public episode. Get access to private episodes at communityengagement.substack.com/subscribe

Stuff You Should Know
Research Bias: Sort It Out, Science

Stuff You Should Know

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 60:46


There's a sticky issue scientists have to deal with – science is carried out by humans. We humans have flaws (and how) and they can end up in our work. Fortunately, science is waking up to research bias. In the meantime, here's what to look out for. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

The Jason & Scot Show - E-Commerce And Retail News

EP277- Holiday 2021 Preview Holiday 2021 will be one of the most uncertain holiday events in modern retail history. Major disruptions to the supply chain, the last mille, and to consumer behavior as a result of covid, will make this year extremely hard to predict and manage for brands and retailers. Will shipageddon 2.0 play out again this year? Will the supply chain become the supply pain? With Amazon and Target starting holiday deals early in October, and consumer still looking for scarce inventory late into January or even February, Holiday 2021 is likely to be 5 months long. In this episode we break down all the potential issues, and make some prediction about how it might all play out. http://jasonandscot.com Join your hosts Jason "Retailgeek" Goldberg, Chief Commerce Strategy Officer at Publicis, and Scot Wingo, CEO of GetSpiffy and Co-Founder of ChannelAdvisor as they discuss the latest news and trends in the world of e-commerce and digital shopper marketing. Episode 277 of the Jason & Scot show was recorded on Sunday October 3rd, 2021. Transcript Jason: [0:24] Welcome to the Jason and Scot show this is episode 277 being recorded on Sunday October third 2021 I'm your host Jason retailgeek Goldberg and as usual I'm here with your co-host Scot Wingo. Scot: [0:40] Hey Jason and welcome back Jason and Scot show listeners, Jason this is a really good time for listeners to pause because we're going to do a deep dive here so that means it can be a little bit of a longer episode. And leave us that five-star review this episode is going to be so good you can go ahead and pre leave us the five star review so we'll wait for second for you to come back. All right thanks for doing that that really helps us out as we get the word out about the show, Jason last year at and I went back and had a one of our many interns look at this and it was exactly this time last year I think was actually October 2nd recording this in October 3rd so it's a pretty darn close. We coined and we were doing our annual holiday preview and we both coined and predicted ship again and that is where we saw pretty early on I think before a lot of the rest of the folks in the industry that there was going to be both a surge in digital adoption due to covid plus the normal holiday increase from e-commerce and that that was going to more than absorb all of the available last-mile demand and that's the why we coined ship again and it happened and it was bad but we all survived and made it through and hopefully the folks listening to this show got in front of that both on their business and personal side. [1:58] Well this year we want to use this episode and do a deep dive into what that's going to look like this year and it's a more complex situation last year was pretty easy to lie to read those tea leaves because you know we were already pretty close to capacity before covid and it was kind of pretty easy prediction to say that we're going to far exceed the ability to deliver the packages. This year we have a lot to unpack for you spoiler alert it's going to be worse than last year much worse because not only is it that last little piece of the whole digital retail chain of events The Last Mile that's going to be a problem but it's all the other pieces leading into it that are going to be a problem something we call the supply chain but this year we are going to call it the supply pain so we're going to peel the onion on this and first we're going to look at the economic setup heading into holiday 21 then we're going to look at the global state of supply chain then we're going to look at some of the holiday trims that are kind of factors we think that are going to tie into this last some of the pontificate errs are out with their forecasts and we're going to go through those and kind of see what we think about those. Jason want it could suck kick it off with the economic setup coming into holiday 21. Jason: [3:15] Yeah awesome Scott so first of all let me start by saying on the macroeconomic picture most of the professional analysts that look at this. Are pretty uniform in feeling like the consumer is generally in a good place that the economy is in a pretty good place and they are all very bullish on the consumers ability to spend this holiday. And I say that because my own personal feeling is that there's a little more uncertainty cooked in there there certainly are some encouraging favorable things. And there's a few worrisome things and I think. What's going to become the theme for all of these sections we talked about today is there's a significant amount of uncertainty there's a lot of things that could swing either way and have a dramatic impact on holiday so. It is what it is but. Sort of giving you how I look at the macroeconomic situation the first thing we'll talk about is inflation and there's a bunch of ways to look at inflation but a simple one is there's this thing called the Consumer Price Index which kind of. Factors in how much of each good consumers purchase and how much prices are raising for that, and the the CPI is it about 5.25% right now so that's pretty significant we more expensive Goods that consumers are having to pay. And ordinarily that inflation can be problematic for the economy a couple of things to know though. [4:43] If you kind of look at the shape of that CPI it actually is going down a little bit from a peak in July and so possible we've seen the. Peak of inflation and it's starting to come back down. Inflation is a mixed bag for retailers and holiday because they get more money for everything they sell they tend to sell less stuff but make more on each in certain circumstances it can be more profitable. Um but you know the goods are costing more we've got this 5.25 percent inflation. We also though have a pretty significant increase in wages so people are getting paid more for their work, particularly low-income people, are getting paid more for work retailers and warehouses and all kinds of companies are having to raise their wages to compete for the for this labor force that's been hard to find right now and so, wages are going up and in general the analysts would call those two things Awash that that consumers. Are getting bigger paychecks and they're having to spend more on their necessities and that at the moment that's about Break Even so two interesting things to know. [5:52] A kind of predictor of future spending is this this huge survey that University of Michigan does every month the consumer confidence index. And when when we were kind of in the peak of recovery from the first wave of covid-19, that index was a leading indicator that said consumers were starting to feel good about the economy and it hit like it's this index it over a hundred today it's sitting at 71, which is the lowest point since January of 2019 it's not, like a historic low or anything like that that you know you go like oh it's way below normal, but it does appear that consumers are in general feeling less good about the economy than they were, um you know just a month or two ago now there's a bunch of political news out right now and there was fear of government shutdown that we've already averted and those kinds of things have a big impact on the consumer index oh. [6:49] Um I that consumer index doesn't have a perfect correlation with spending so I don't spend too much time thinking about it but just to know, that's a number that had been favorable and is kind of shrinking down. A big one we talk about is unemployment because people don't have jobs it's hard for them to spend on Goods obviously at the beginning of the pandemic we had a huge spike in unemployment, unemployment is actually pretty good right now we're at five point two percent. The kind of pre-pandemic average was about four so we're not all the way back to pre-pandemic average but that pre-pandemic. [7:22] Point was a historic low so historically 5.2 percent is pretty decent for unemployment. Um so like most most analysts would say that's a favorable indicator the two things to know there is, that's based on the people that are seeking jobs and not getting it there actually is a ton of people that kind of took themselves out of the workforce we. Fully understand where all those people went but a big chunk of those people were second incomes for household so like a lot of women. That like maybe don't have as good a help childcare as they had before or more school challenges or things and so they haven't gone back to the workforce and many of them are seeking work so they don't show up in the unemployment number so. Just be aware like household incomes are somewhat stressed because of that factor and then as we've talked about before on this show like as of July. People that make over $60,000 a year the unemployment is actually ten percent better than it was before the pandemic so they're doing great. And the low-income people that are making less than $30,000 a year their unemployment is still 21 percent lower than it was. The beginning of the pandemic so so a little bit of a bifurcated recovery on the jobs thing. [8:38] One of the reasons that we historically have that we had high unemployment was because there's all these rich benefits this enhanced unemployment benefits that people got that all expired last week. So if people were staying at home because they could make more and unemployment that that justification probably ended. The bad news is that ended in 26 States over two months ago and in general the data shows that people did not rush back to work when it ended. So there's not necessarily a reason to think a ton more people are going to rush back to work now that that it's ended everywhere but we'll have to see. Um the other macroeconomic things all these natural disasters are negative to the economy so you know when hurricane Ida takes a hundred billion dollars out of the economy that's a bummer. Um [9:25] Another hugely favorable one in the one that most of us are hanging our hats on that are looking for a good holiday is the savings rate and this is the most unprecedented recession of all times. Unemployment you know went way up at the peak of the pandemic but so did savings which has never happened before, and part of that was because we had all this stimulus money we were pouring into the economy but the savings rate normally hovers around 8% it shot up to 32 percent during the peak of the pandemic, it's way off of that Peak it's a nine point six which is still a little higher than it was before the pandemic and that. All that extra money that a lot of household socked away because they got the stimulus and they spent less during the the peak of the pandemic. [10:18] Arguably puts consumers in a good place to spend for this holiday the counter-argument would be all that stimulus. Is mostly over there still are you know very lumpy employment situation and a lot of that savings has dwindled, um so we'll see how it goes, um but then the last fact I'm going to throw up before I go at Scott get a word in edgewise is that the stock market has done phenomenally right and, we're way up from the pre-pandemic level and so the investor class and people that have you know as a meaningful portion of their wealth. Tied to the market. Did terrific right and so if there is economic uncertainty and instability in this economy it's bifurcated and it's the lower-income people that like do not have equity in the stock market. Um there were her but roll all that up and the the professional analysts feel like. Macroeconomic situation all to all in is pretty good and of course when rich people do well that help certain sectors of the economy quite a bit right and at the moment luxury and jewelry are doing phenomenally well for example so. That's kind of my snapshot of the macroeconomy Scott anything you'd violently disagree with or anything you pay particular attention to. Scot: [11:45] I think I think that's right I think you know there's a lot of folks that feel the inflation the CPI isn't the right inflation number it's kind of this old metric. This basket of goods and doesn't capture a lot of things you know there's, I follow a lot of the crypto people and, so there's been a huge wealth creation through crypto and that whole world which is kind of interesting and then you know there's there's a feeling that the FED has pumped so much cash into the system that is just sloshing around and kind of crazy ways which is why you saw that savings rate kind of go up as high as it did and you know they're they're talk track goes that that's why we're not seeing as much employment where folks have taken so those free free dollars and and you know. Done something with it so that they don't need a job now or they're going to be less likely to enter the workforce but I think at all. Yeah I would say I agree with the analysts on that it's going to be a pretty good holiday. [12:51] But I think the problem we'll get into that as I just don't think there's going to be a thing to buy so I don't not sure if it matters. Jason: [12:56] So step one American families probably have some money to spend okay so now as we've already alluded to the next challenges what is the supply chain look like and what could they spend it on and Scott what's your kind of read there. Scot: [13:13] Yes Supply chains from those things we always talk about but then you know in in your mind you have this kind of linkage these things linked together I remember as a kid when you would cut out the little construction paper strips and make the little chain to go around. The holiday tree there II reminds me of that and we kind of vaguely talk about it as this big, big thing and we want to really unpack it on this episode so as a summary you know there's when you make a product let's say it's one time in a million familiar with right now is a vehicle that which is one of the more complex products or even a. You're relatively simple product like an electronic toy or an apparel item or almost anything it's going to have first of all it. It's going to have component parts right so there's going to be some form of pieces that go into that I kind of mentally think of them as the Lego blocks that make up that item so if it's a cool trendy trench coat there's going to be obviously fabric buttons may be a variety of fabrics and things like that so there's generally it's hard to make any product without there being at least 10 inputs and then many times, thousands if not tens or hundreds of thousands as you get into like iPhones and vehicles and stuff like that. [14:33] So that's important to remember is each one of those component parts has a supply chain right and you can't make a widget until its component pieces are all there so what happens is we're seeing this really interesting and it's hard to know the root cause or theirs some of the economic stuff you talked about is part of it we're we're just having labor shortages that cause things but then you know we'll talk about some of this there's we import a lot of our goods from China and they're having all kinds of issues of their own there's covid related things non-covered related things but generally let's think about the supply chain and kind of the broad sense of you have typically the bulk of goods are made offshore some of them are are made on Shore but let's kind of assume in this example A lot of these products are coming from offshore or at least income the many of the components maybe there's some assembly in the US but at least the the components for a any widget are made offshore so that's number one so that has to be made in a factory somewhere and then shipped here so there's the port of origin so it leaves a port in a foreign land and then needs to come on its way to the United States for a consumer to buy it. That Journey can go a variety of different ways will to it can go by boat or air, the standard way that products are moved is through containers so you by everyone seemed these containers there's all these cool. [15:57] We just opened up here a restaurant container Village kind of a thing so you have those containers their specialized boats that carry these and and or you can put them on airplanes. So then they get on a boat let's say the bulk of products do go by boat there is some by are then they have to go over the sea and then they get to a destination port so there's you know there's two ports involved with every product that comes across in a container then it has to be unloaded from that boat you've probably seen these giant cranes somewhere. [16:29] Fun Star Wars fact those are the that's where George Lucas got the idea for at-ats he saw some of the cranes and one of the ports on the west coast and thought of what if you had a giant walking robots that look like that so those have to be unloaded and then typically you're going to put them on either so then when they get to the United States in one of the ports they're going to be offloaded onto either a truck and then part of the truck that's really critical in this is called a chassis so if you've ever seen you've probably driven by a million of these container trucks but if you take the container off that's the chassis part as you've got the front part of the truck, then you've got the chassis which holds the container and then the container sits squarely on there it's pretty clever if you think about how it's all been designed or that same container can be put over on rail so there are specialized railroad cars for carrying containers and then and then the product goes on its way then it makes it to a warehouse and then it goes to from that fulfillment center it gets distributed many times do a couple maybe from a big kind of inbound fulfillment center to some regionals to some locals and maybe even one step closer to kind of hyper local and then it gets into the last mile delivery part of the world so it gets onto the virtual shelves and then is sold and goes into that last month so [17:52] There's there's a lot that has to happen right in there and we're going to go through some of the things that are not working right now and you know like any any chain any. There's at least common denominator problem so all that can work great and if you don't have Last Mile Vehicles then you've got a problem or, the factories aren't making things fast enough then the whole chain is compressed and you've got this other set of problems and you know where we are now is almost every single part of that chain I just walked through is is kind of you know sport or in a bad situation right now and we'll take you through some examples. Jason let's start with factories what's going on there. Jason: [18:34] Yeah well a couple challenges with factories so obviously the we have the most factories in China and the good news with China is. Covid is mostly under control they definitely have had a. A spike from from Delta they almost had had down a zero before Delta. [18:55] Because of their their concerns about the the virus they have China has what's called the zero covid policy and what that means is. If they have a single case of covid they will they will shut down an entire business or. Even a sector of business so while there's not huge outbreaks of covid and factories right now. There have been a bunch of examples where only a few cases of covid showed up and that caused a factory to be closed for two weeks so there there have been some disruptions with the Chinese factories. But the bigger problem has been that it, from before and in the very beginning of covid a lot of manufacturing got Diversified and moved out of China right and so the second biggest manufacturer of apparel behind China right now is Vietnam. Vietnam has had a lot of trouble with Delta and about a third of the factories in Vietnam are shut down right now so a lot of the factories that make goods are not making as many Goods either because. [19:56] They don't have very good access to vaccines and they're having covid problems or they have really rigid government policies like China. And then forecasting a future problem that's a huge Debbie Downer, is China is actually experiencing a real energy crisis right now and China always has to kind of, ration electricity and they give quotas at the beginning of every year to these factories and factories often have to shut down because they exceed their quotas. Well this year like they have less. [20:31] Energy capacity in China for a variety of reasons in the cost of coal has gone way up. Um there's there's fixed pricing for for energy in China and said the producers can't charge you more even though the cold cost more and so they have less incentive to make it which means there's less energy and so there's a lot of fear that there's going to be a ton more slowdowns of Chinese factories because of this looming energy crisis so all of those things. Our kind of conspiring to make like the amount of product available from the factories like. Significantly inconsistent and hard to. Scot: [21:12] And then say the call thing and because I have read a couple articles on this and I haven't under Center so they're in an attempt to be green they've lowered the price of coal so cold manufacturers have stopped making goals that. Jason: [21:26] So I think that's what the the green thing has a significant impact here but the the communist country they set the the. It's a. [21:37] The energy industry is a tightly regulated industry and so the prices are fixed so that so the government decides the beginning of the year what the price of electricity is going to be. [21:47] So then these factories are only allowed to charge that price or plus or minus 10% of that price, and coal is four hundred percent more expensive so a lot of factories don't want a lot of power plants don't want to make energy electricity from coal right now because they can't do it profitably, they don't have permission from the government to charge for hundred percent for their electricity but they're having to pay 400 percent for their coal so. There is less production because of that it is also absolutely true that China has some, zero emissions by wants a 2060 things and they have concrete milestones in place every year and so even before cover that constrain how much electricity they were going to be able to make this year with current production means. And it meant that factories had a quota, um and and often that means Factories do periodically shut down when they use up their quota factories are rushing to get more efficient so they're all its, it's like everything it creates all these Downstream effects whatever equipment you use to make your stuff there's probably a more energy efficient version of that equipment that you now want to buy. But it's hard to get your hands on so all the factories are competing for the more energy-efficient versions of all this this materials, but the it's likely that more factories are going to be shut down for longer this year than ever before because of energy shortages. Scot: [23:14] And I saw an interesting graphic I forget I think is there Bloomberg or Wall Street Journal where the government then said well if you're going to shut down energy they created these zones and they put like a lot of that Apple manufacturing plants in The Greener zones that we get more power but then they neglected a lot of the input parts so. But the factories that can make the iPhone 13 or operating but they're sitting there idle because the the red zones that aren't getting a lot of power or only able to run like half a shift are. Jason: [23:44] Per your point like even if the Lego factories allowed to make Lego castles if they're not allowed to make red blocks. It's tough to make a lot of weight so castles so that that is yeah. It's a mess and then to give you an idea how cute it is normally they only shut down the the industrial areas there's so much constrained energy now that they're starting to shut down residential areas so people are. Are like having their power in their residences turned off as well. Scot: [24:14] Interesting and then I've been tracking ports here in the US very closely but what are you seeing at ports of origin in other countries. Jason: [24:24] Well this is one we're very publicly this zero covid policy that China has instituted has come into play. So that that all the biggest ports in the world are in China the third largest port in the world is divided into four terminals one of the four terminals was just shut down for two weeks because of a single. Positive test of covid and so that again to the extent that the factories are making stuff and they need to load up all those containers, um if they have to stop loading for 2 weeks that that creates a real lumpiness in the in the supply chain and that is a particularly hard thing to predict right like if you're just saying like oh man of. Factory you know has a bunch of sick workers it's going to shut down you can kind of watch that and see it coming but what you can't see coming is, you know a very small number of cases having a very material impact on the supply chain like these these ports that are shutting down and so the. The those impacts are sort of outsized on the supply chain at the moment. Scot: [25:34] Yeah and then so so now we've got our products you know, if they can make it through this Gauntlet that we've already laid out they're going to get on a boat and they are going to go get packed into a container and there's a fun if you're a business you're trying to get as much of this product into a container as possible because it's pretty much all you can eat once you once you buy a container there's fractional containers whatnot and because of there's a shortage in containers and then the cost to send these containers has gone way up so right now as we record this the cost there's actually an index you can look at this so if you were will put a link to show notes but if you Google Freight Fredo's fre IG HT o s index there's an index that tracks this and we have hit a record of 20500 86 average dollars to send a container and that's twice what it was in July of this year and that was twice of what it was in January so we effectively you know in July it was about ten thousand dollars and in January as about five thousand dollars now another interesting Factor here is depending on how many units you put in a container you divide that that unit cost right so if you're putting I'll keep the math easy a thousand units in one of these containers which would be something relatively big you're going to you know you just added effectively another. Yeah. [26:57] Let's see I should have smelled your $15 to the product just in kind of Landing cost with this with this increase so whatever your cost is on a per unit it's gone up effectively 4X since January so that's a factor to consider. [27:15] And what I'm what I'm hearing from people on the ground is you'll go bid and you kind of get get in front of this number right now so you're actually out there bidding today 30,000 to get a container and then you think you'll have one and then they'll say oh you know we need to re-evaluate that because they can the shipping company I'm talking to is now saying is 33,000 so there's this like running auction to get. Space on these boats that are coming over because of some of the rest of the supply chain that will talk about so. [27:46] So how about are so that's that's what it looks like by boat what are you seeing on the air side. Jason: [27:51] Yeah and obviously the most cost-effective way to get all this stuff here is via boat so you'd prefer to do that but when the boats aren't available or if you you need stuff considerably faster like a, in Good Times it takes about about 40 days to move a container from China to the west coast of the US so. Some Goods do come via air and little known fact 50% of Air Freight that comes into the u.s. comes on the bottom of, passenger airplanes right so it's not it's not FedEx and UPS planes flying from China to the US cargo planes it's, it's the bottom of these passenger planes and guess what is not happening right now is. International so there's just way less flights and said there's way less capacity for this Air Freight and so both, because there's more demand for Air Freight because of all the problems with the ocean Freight and because there's less Supply that the air option has you know been dramatically diminished from where it would normally be. Scot: [28:56] Yep so then so then you decide okay well I've got to put on a boat you do that you wait your 40 days and then what you find out is your delayed for a very long time because the heart problem is the u.s. ports are all pretty much maxed out so we've kind of done this very big under-investing in our ports so one of our our biggest one is in Los Angeles at Long Beach and then we have Savannah New York New Jersey and then there's a lot of secondary and tertiary ports but those are the big ones and there's another index that Bloomberg, puts out which is effectively the number of boats that are anchored offshore and you know what you want to you never want to Anchor these things because effectively they're just sitting there all that product just sitting there you know. Doing nothing waiting and the reason the reason why they're sitting there is the ports are they can't unload the products fast enough. [29:55] There's a million reasons why we'll talk about that in a second but this just actually ticked up over there's over 40 boats, and this is interesting I've read a data point this has 74 Los Angeles and 40 I think there's 40 anchored in 30 actively kind of being done there's these Maps if you look at my Twitter feed I just tweeted one to just show you know the port and the congestion there's just all these boats just sitting there waiting to come on shore I have a friend that lives in LA and they can just as they drive around they can just see the boats out there just fact it's very unusual time frame. Jason: [30:30] One of the supply chain guys I work with suggested that we should start a new company Uber barge where we deliver like In and Out Burgers to all these boats that are stuck offshore. Scot: [30:39] Someone someone tried to actually get a helicopter to go out one to get their container often. You can't do that because if you've ever seen these things are stacked like 50 deeper someone is crazy you can't just say I really need that one right there so this this index just ticked over 70 for the first time ever since has been created which is just just crazy. [31:00] And so why is it taking so long to offload the boats well we have under invested in these things and then we have this discontinued problem with the supply chain. Number one there's not enough people to I think it's longshoreman there's a lot of these Union type jobs that you hear about that do this so there's a longshoreman or the ones that offload products for a long time due to covid they were only running like half the number of shifts that used to so they have actually spun that up, they're running more shifts but now there's a shortage of chassis and then because of that. [31:37] You know if you don't have chassis you can still off load the boat but now you have to put it into kind of medium term or short term storage and then all that is full so there's not enough chassis there's not enough truck drivers if there is chassis and then if there's not chassis all the storage is full and then, the one when a product comes off the boat at the Port it can either go by truck or rail the whole rail system is all jammed up as well the this is interesting I read this one article that. Near you in the Joliet train yard which is one of the biggest ones in middle of the country they're so jammed up they have over 8,000 containers stacked there waiting for more training capacity and then some some days the trains are backed up for 25 miles waiting as they're loading these containers on there to try to do this, normal turnaround for a chassis to go at a port to deliver something to where it's going and come back is three and a half days due to all these various shortages that is extended out to 17 days so that's pretty crazy. A big factor in this port jam up is also the shortage of drivers and I call them CDL Drivers which is a commercial driver's license. [32:49] To drive one of these 18-wheelers that's going to carry a container you have to have a you know a certification for a certain type of vehicle there's It's relatively, no time-consuming to go get the certification and the number of drivers that have this is actually decreasing over time as they age out and enough people are coming into the profession so I read one article and this was by one of the one of the professional groups of CDL drivers that there's about 240,000 shortfall of CDL Drivers compared, kind of where the demand is there's about you call it to and 50,000 fewer drivers than they need so we're seeing you know I think I can remember was you or someone but Amazon and Walmart are ineffectively gunfighter these people where they're charged their they're paying crazy signing bonuses and hourly rates and salaries for any kind of truck drivers and so because they're the biggest. Employers of these things they tend to have the better economics and its really starving out other parts of the market as they absorb all the available CDL drivers. Jason: [33:57] Yeah that Walmart's paying a hundred and for a new driver $160,000 a year and eight thousand dollar signing bonus. Scot: [34:04] Yeah yes it's not uncommon uncommon thing to see out there it's pretty crazy, so that's what's going on at the ports it is a hot mess on this side as well so even if you are fortunate enough to get your product here to the US then you know you're looking at probably an extra 40 days I think is kind of you know what everyone's saying right now and that's average it can take a lot longer the LA Port is so jammed up that people are are they're rerouting you know rerouting boats across the sand getting them to other other ports but there are no like there's one in Georgia and it's the Savannah one and it's getting backed up I just saw they authorized building this this kind of effectively opening up a big giant parking area to put containers and that's going to give them some more storage capacity but you know where if you add up those, here we are you know in October and you start adding these things together the the holidays pretty much baked at this point right there's you maybe have 15 to 20 days of window here for stuff you already ordered. 80 days ago to kind of get here but none of this stuff is going to get fixed fast that's going to be part of the problem. Jason: [35:17] Yeah yeah if you follow the earning calls like Nike for example like dramatically lowered their guidance and they said Hey look it's it's cost four times as much to get a container of shoes here and the container takes twice as long to get here, and so we're just not going to have the supply to hit our original guidance and and Nikes better this than a lot of other people so it's a. [35:41] Pretty prominent problem and then there's all these secondary impacts right so you mentioned the math of the container right like you'd like to fill up that 40-foot container with Goods if your goods only take up 90%. Ordinarily you'd put someone else's Goods in the last 10% to try to make it more. Cost effective and efficient and share those costs but when the unloading is so gummed up what you don't want to do is have a secondary process where that container comes off the boat has to get re packed your stuff goes One Way their stuff goes another way, so people are actually shipping containers less full than they normally would which is entirely counterintuitive for what you would expect. The boats are all slowing down because they can use less gas to come here and 80 days then to come here in 40 days because there's no place to unload them. Um and the the supply chain guys I'm like we've been helping a lot of retailers hire truckers lately and they kind of summarize it real simply like the average commercial truck driver was 55 years old with multiple comorbidities a bunch of them. Retired and all the trucking schools that can teach people to get these licenses shut down for covid so there were no new licenses being issued for like. [36:54] Year and so there's just this this huge acute problem. And then you know without those truck drivers with the train problems and Barge problems of your on the Mississippi there's just like no place to move all those goods. You mentioned people are moving the boats from from some ports to secondary ports. That helps somewhat but the biggest cargo ships can't even fit in these ports right so I Long Beach the one of the most advanced Sports we have certainly the most advanced on the West Coast, um [37:27] Can't take the two biggest class of ships it can only take the third biggest class of ships and then as soon as you divert that ship to Portland instead of Long Beach. The the that class of ships won't won't fit there and so like there's there's a limited option to just move the stuff around so we're just we're gummed up like never before and most scary of all Gap and their earnings call kind of said like Hey we're loading our guidance and we're going to very lumpy inventory and we don't see any alleviation of these inventory challenges until at least 2020 3. Scot: [38:06] Yeah in the Auto World we're having a huge problem here where there's a chip shortage and then. [38:14] Another problem is you spend down these factories they don't just get spun back up because all the component parts are you know they stop ordering them and then those factories and everything so so even as chips are starting to come in a lot of vehicles can't be made because there's some other component that now is stuck in one of these containers that that were talking about I read this other interesting article where Coca-Cola has several of their bottling facilities that are down waiting on replacement parts so they went and basically least 20 or 40 bulk ships they didn't even worry about getting containers and they just jumped onto those ships the pieces they need to make their factories work and and are bring him over in this kind of crazy never done before way for a big company. Jason: [38:58] Yeah and I guess that that's one last point on this supply chain thing. It definitely is favoring the biggest players in every industry right so if you're the you know the biggest receivers of goods in the US. You're still being impacted by all of this but you're first in line for what capacity does exist and you you mentioned the games that the Brokers are playing with the price of containers that's going to happen a lot more to the independent shipper than it is the you know number one or number two shipper for that port and so. Well this this is a pain for every retailer in America it's going to be less painful to Walmart and Amazon then it's going to be to the, the medium-sized specialty retailer for. [39:49] And I was just going to point out I think you saw this as well as got but like Salesforce kind of put together a holiday forecast and they looked at all these supply chain problems and they're estimating, that this is going to add about 233 billion dollars in extra supply chain cost to holiday sales for the US so that's. Going to come like straight out of margins basically or or drive more inflation. Scot: [40:13] Yeah that's for the products to get here there's this another side of that equation where which is the opportunity cost right because you know. There's not gonna be a lot of exciting merchandise on the Shelf so we're what's opportunity cost of that we'll have to kind of. We'll get to that I guess we talked about forecast so what what holiday behaviors are feeding into this. Jason: [40:34] Yeah so tricky this one is there wild swings both ways right so you think if you remember at the beginning of covid there. Fundamental changes that happen people spend a lot less on travel they spend a lot less on restaurants they spend a lot more on their homes and they spent a lot more grocery stores right and so then as, people got more comfortable as people start getting vaccinated as infection rates are going down we started seeing all those things swing back right and you started seeing, a lot more bookings that are being be you saw a lot more Airline reservations you saw a lot more traffic coming to stores and you certainly saw a lot more people going back to restaurants. Then Delta hit. And we saw a dip again and people started returning to the the the kind of earlier covid behaviors not as dramatically as the first wave. [41:25] You kind of had a second wave and so predicting which of those, behaviors are going to be at the at the peak for holiday is really hard right now so retailers are looking at consumer sentiment and Doug mcmillon in his investor call he's like hey. Our consumer has told a strongly they want to have a normal holiday that they want to sit down with their family and have a meal, they want to travel they want to do the normal things and there's a strong desire and that if it is remotely safe they will do it and Doug's I kind of under his breath comment was. [42:05] Even if it's not safe they're probably going to do it right so, his viewing is there's there's so much fatigue in all of these like covid change behaviors that were going to see a significant return, you know closer to pre covid behaviors but you know we are we are seeing some signs go the other way, in the u.s. store traffic never fully recovered we are still down about ten percent versus pretty covid levels in China store traffic totally recovered and then Delta hit and store traffic drop back down, 30% below pre-pandemic levels and so since China has historically been about 4 months ahead of us. That that would predict that we're going to see another drop in. Um store traffic which again doesn't mean people won't spend it means they're going to buy more online instead of in store and that exacerbates all of The Last Mile problems that we talked about last year and we're going to talk about it. [43:09] Again this year so it's really risky to predict. What's going to happen with the coded behaviors people were starting to buy a lot of clothes again after having not buying clothes in here and now the closed sales are slowing down and then we talked about. Apparel is one of the categories most impacted by all these supply chain issues so there just may not be close to buy and so really hard to predict that stuff. Um but what I can tell you is retailers now have a couple of reasons to desperately get you to shop earlier right one reason is they're not going to have very much stuff and they don't want to be the Grinch that caused you to miss Christmas so they desperately want you to come in early, and give yourself the best chance to get the stuff you want so, the every retailer is more loudly than ever before trying to incentivise and entice customers to shop early. [44:03] Also if this ends up being another digital Christmas where people shop a lot more online than they do in stores, we have a huge problem with the last mile we don't have enough capacity in FedEx ups and u.s. post office to deliver twice as many packages over holiday, and so we need to spread that those those orders out over more days and so for all of those reasons we're seeing retailers start their sales earlier than ever so. To kind of paint you a promotional picture Amazon Prime day normally is in summer it historically celebrated Amazon's birthday which is in July. So then the pandemic kids they can't have a July sale so they have an October sale and it went really well. So this year they went back to Summer but they went to earlier summer they had the sale in June and a lot of us think they did it earlier in June for one of two reasons either they hate their own C fo and wanted him to have to talk. On earnings calls about the sale being in a different quarter every year for the last three years or. They were having a sale earlier to make room for a second big sale they intend to have this year during holiday to kind of repeat the success of. [45:11] Of holiday Prime Day last year and we haven't seen any all the announcements yet but Amazon has already announced a 30 day. Beauty and personal care sale starting in October of this year Target match that and said hey we're going to start our deal days in October, and we're price-matching for the whole holiday so if if you don't believe us and you think we're just making a joke about these early sales and you think there's going to be better sales waiter know if you buy it early will guarantee you, that will match any lower prices that you see anywhere for the rest of holiday so targets leaning heavily into that. And we think most retailers are going to launch their sales. Earlier than ever before to try to pull in these these early Shoppers because of all the supply chain and inflation issues. The sales aren't going to be as good as they usually are like that what used to be 40 percent off is going to be 25% off but what deals they do have are going to be earlier in the year to try to drive those, those sales earlier. [46:21] And people aren't going to get everything they want they're going to be limited inventory and so what's going to happen people are going to get more gift cards people are going to celebrate the holiday later and we're going to sell more stuff in January January is always a good holiday month anyway but January is going to be disproportionately large this year because of the lumpy supply chain think so, if you think of holiday as generally like being a strong peak in October between that that the kind of turkey five, this holiday more than ever before that spending starting in October and is going to last all the way through January. Scot: [46:58] And then as we get to the last mile we're definitely have another ship again so we've got we haven't increased our capacity hardly any because you can't really buy Vans and the everyone's renting Vans and there's just this fixed number of biliary vehicles and if we're going to have this Less store traffic even more e-commerce than last year even if you throw you know maybe. [47:23] Low middle digit low single digits on there like five or 7% or something well we effectively had 98, we can only deliver like 97% of the packages last year so it's going to make it a now will only be a little deliver maybe 90% of the packages so it's going to be really tough delivery, set up coming into the holiday. Jason: [47:46] I think the like some data points I saw the that are alarming like so number one. All the Fulfillment centers have an average turnover rate of like four hundred percent a year right so they're having a hard time hiring people and keeping people. FedEx in their earnings call said that like we just can't staff some of our distribution hubs so we're having to reroute packages in a less efficient manner, because for example we only have sixty percent of our labor force in our Portland Hub right so ordinarily they would try to, be at a hundred and twenty percent of their labor in these hubs for holiday with all this seasonal labor and this year. [48:24] They can't even fulfill all the permanent jobs they have so there's not going to be a seasonal Flex. For the main carriers you know the Retailer's do a lot of seasonal hiring for stores but they're prioritizing the seasonal hiring for their fulfillment centers over the stores because they're so. Worried about enough labor to fulfill all these packages and then you know when when FedEx and UPS have less capacity. What do they do they smartly charge more for it so we've seen gas surcharges we've seen holiday surcharges and and they're now announcing their rate hikes for January and FedEx announced the largest rate hike they've had in the last ten years so on average, it's almost six percent as 5.9 percent rate hike it varies wildly depending on the class of service so some kinds of shippers are going to get hit much harder. Um and just like last year all of the the big shippers have a quota and they're not going to be allowed to ship more more packages. The maybe one silver lining in this is that. Because readers are likely to be more successful in spreading the demand out this year than last year that's going to help a little bit and. [49:37] As a as challenges everyone's going to be with the capacity last year there were political challenges that that particularly got the US Post Office sideways which is a big part of this whole chain. And they don't anticipate that that will be as bad this year and so there is absolutely going to be ship again in 2.0 this year with the, the The Last Mile but the most of the analysts I'm talking to are saying the first mile is going to be so disrupted this year that the last mile is going to seem. Less severe in comparison whereas last year the the holiday challenges were all about the last mile. Scot: [50:16] Yeah and you know the double-edged sword of there not being enough product is maybe there just won't be enough product and it won't you should be getting but if whatever there is is going to get jammed up I think. Jason: [50:29] Yeah so that's a great transition to so like that's a lot of Doom and Gloom what's going to happen for Holiday should we all be shorting the retail stocks like what's. What's going to happen. And spoiler alert I don't know well we'll talk a little bit about our educated guesses but maybe before we do we can walk through some of the the forecast from the the brave souls that have been willing to share their holiday forecast. Scot: [50:56] Yeah the one the one I saw was from Salesforce and they, they say that e-commerce is going to be up 7% versus kind of that huge surge last year which was like you know fifty percent so they're coming in kind of with a moderate 7% growth which which is done yeah I think that would be the probably the slowest e-commerce growth since 2008-2009 yeah. Jason: [51:24] 2008. Scot: [51:26] Yeah that's that's the one I was tracking and you know when I read through the bullet points it made sense they're definitely putting a pretty wet blanket on things due to the this kind of quote-unquote Supply pain. Jason: [51:38] Yeah and it is tricky so they were the only one I've seen that's done an e-commerce forecast right and I would say that's the most uncertain because. Of we just don't know whether people are going to go back to stores or whether they're going to be worried about health and ordering online when they start having constrained. Um supplies is that gonna. Push them to online more because they can hunt more places or is that going to entice them to go to the store because they can use their eyes to see the inventory for themselves like there's, there's a lot of variability in that e-commerce number but I would remind people even as low as 7 percent sounds its. 7% on top of the huge bases from last year right so it's it's that's not a decline in e-commerce by any means that's a slowing of the increase just as a reminder for. People. But then I did see several like of the other the kind of traditional Consultants put together an overall holiday forecast right so beIN predicted that they were going to they thought holiday was going to be up seven percent from last year. [52:45] Deloitte said that they thought holiday was going to be up between seven and nine percent from last year. And MasterCard said they think holidays going to be up 7.4 percent from last year so. To put all three of those numbers in context those are all huge numbers. Um last year was the best holiday year in 10 years and sales were up 10% but the average is about 6% so saying we're going to grow if. You know these three things kind of all averaged out to about seven percent growth if we're here we go. If all holiday store an e-commerce gross 7% on top of the ten percent from last year, that's a phenomenal holiday and so that says, that these guys are pretty confident that the consumer is going to spend even if they can't find exactly what they want right that the supply chain is going to be painful but that the all the macroeconomic stuff we talked about at the beginning is going to win out and consumers are going to spend a lot of money this holiday I. [53:49] I want to believe this I'm going to be pleasantly surprised if it plays out like that right and my um, the the one caveat I'll say is that us retail is incredibly Diversified right and so for every category that's going to get shellacked by the supply chain or by changes in covid behaviors. Some other category is going to benefit right and so. It is true that the holiday could absolutely hit these numbers like I'll remind people that cars are 25 percent of retail sales gas is another huge chunk of retail sales. Some of these forecasts have those things in some don't some of these forecasts are for November and December some are for November December and January like everybody has a different definition of retail and a different definition of holiday so, you can't really apples-to-apples any of these but I pulled all the US Department of Commerce data and again last year November through January 10 percent growth, average of the last ten 10 years is about 6% growth so 7% growth is a. A terrific number and. I don't know I could see it happening if it happens it's going to be because there was a we had the most Monster January ever because I just don't think there's going to be enough Goods on the Shelf in November and December to do. Scot: [55:17] Yeah I'll take a so I think the winners are going to be the companies that have the most power and smartest supply chain operators so I think Walmart and Amazon. Maybe Target I don't know them as well do they have a you think they feel like they have a pretty dialed in. Jason: [55:33] They Walmart and Target both in their earnings said like look our inventory isn't going to be isn't where we want it it's not going to be where we want it but we we in general are feeling good and neither one lowered its guidance for holiday in their last earnings call so they both felt that they were going to weather the storm but you know below that you go look at like a Bed Bath and Beyond and they're like look there's no way we can hit our numbers with the supply we're gonna get. Scot: [56:00] Will they miss this quarter and if you miss this quarter you're just going to get worse the next quarter Seth. Jason: [56:04] Exactly exactly. Scot: [56:06] It's a poop storm now and it's gonna be a bloodbath and in 90 days yes I think I think if I kind of do the calculus on that I think those three guys win I think everyone else is net negative and. You know I don't think those three are big enough let's say they represent Amazon's kind of half of e-commerce only think about e-commerce the rest of retail is. That's your bailiwick yeah Amazon's half, yeah I could see it being flat to down five percent because. Amazon Walmart and Target doing decent isn't it be enough for to make up for the whole that it's created there so yeah so that's kind of, where I see it it's going to be the big get bigger and stronger and because they you know they have Prime, they have more technologies that this has been on their radar longer they have more containers they have more trucks they have more dollars to spend on solving these problems they're going to be the winners so that's going to be you know it is going to be I think a bad year for the small medium sized business the incumbent brands that are just getting their legs under them and you know having to kind of have a Miss effectively miss a holiday because you couldn't get a bunch of product it's going to be be a rough rough year for everybody. Jason: [57:25] Yeah no I in a way it's going to be the exact opposite of last year when covid first hit nobody obviously had Advance warning or was prepared for this and so a secondary impact was a bunch of eCommerce sites that didn't traditionally get a lot of consumer visits, got a lot of Trials because Amazon constrained FBA in Amazon head supply chain problems right and so suddenly you were looking to get your instant pot from Bed Bath & Beyond suddenly a bunch of people are looking to see what eBay had, that hasn't shopped eBay in five or ten years right so a lot of those kind of second-tier eCommerce sites got extra visits as people were. Trying new address the supply chain shortages this year I think we're going to have exactly the opposite there's going to be a ton of supply chain shortages there's going to be a lot of, news stories every day about supply chain shortages and the big players with the best infrastructure in the most advanced supply chain planning, like the Amazons and Walmarts of the world and and targets, are going to be the winners and it's going to be a lot harder for those specialty retailers and Regional retailers to compete unfortunately. Scot: [58:41] Yeah I think that that is the setup and we will continue so that hopefully that gives everyone an idea of the big talk in the industry and you were just at an industry event is this what everyone was talking about Jason. Jason: [58:55] Yeah yeah slightly less than I would have expected I mean it was a huge topic everyone understands the supply chain thing. I do think it was the first conversation a lot of you know customer experience folks and people that you know we're kind of had their head down in their own in their own Silo you know we're suddenly getting their eyes open to the fact that like. Yeah your customer experience is going to stink at there's no products on the. Scot: [59:20] Mix the CX person's job a lot easier they just you know just take the holiday off. Jason: [59:26] Yeah and so you know it is interesting though again like. [59:31] You know we may we may hit the top line numbers and it may be from a lot less items that sold more expensively. The you know category there's going to be winning and losing categories by far and again because of the consumer health and the supply chain issues, the supply chain for diamonds is looking a lot better than the supply chain for Budget shoes and so you know you just may see what jury where you know you say you sell a few things for a while, do better you know where there's extra scarcity then you know some of these low-margin high-volume consumer goods and so I think. [1:00:08] My key takeaways for everyone is it's going to be a very lumpy like the averages will be interesting we should all follow them but but every. Um retailer and every category is going to experience a very different holiday and there just is more uncertainty than there has been in the last 30 years of retail so like for anyone, to definitively say this is how it is going to play out I think is super risky because there's so many things that could go either way at this point, will consumers you know by another toy when they can't get their first choice will consumers go to a restaurant you know or not will consumers take a vacation or not. You know all of these these will they pay 5% more for something or not like there's just so much uncertainty that you know this is going to be. Holiday that really rewards people that do good scenario planning and are prepared for any eventuality. Scot: [1:01:06] Absolutely and we will keep you posted here on the Jason Scott show but hopefully this gives everyone kind of a framework to work within and we'll be updating various components of the supply pain as we get closer to Holiday. Jason: [1:01:22] And until next week happy commercing!

Cowboy State Politics
Morning Reload - Hageman: Mea Culpa, Sort Of

Cowboy State Politics

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 10:44


There have been several articles recently about Harriet Hageman supporting Liz Cheney in 2016.  How did she defend that?  Her response really shouldn't surprise you.

The Nathan Barry Show
050: Dave Pell - Lessons From Two Decades of Publishing Online

The Nathan Barry Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 62:22


Dave Pell has been writing online for almost as long as the internet has existed. His popular newsletter, NextDraft, has over 140,000 subscribers. NextDraft covers the day's ten most fascinating news stories, delivered with a fast and pithy wit.Dave has been a syndicated writer on NPR, Gizmodo, Forbes, and Huffington Post. He earned his bachelor's degree in English from U.C. Berkeley, and his master's in education from Harvard.Besides being a prolific writer, Dave is also the Managing Partner at Arba, LLC. For more than a decade, Arba has been angel investing in companies like Open Table, GrubHub, Marin Software, Hotel Tonight, Joyus, and Liftopia.In this episode, you'll learn: How Dave merged his two writing passions into a successful product The key to building a strong relationship with your audience How Dave dramatically increased signups to NextDraft Links & Resources Flicker Unsplash Fareed Zakaria Jim Rome The Skimm Morning Brew The Hustle Spark Loop Sam Spratt Dave Pell's Links Dave Pell on Twitter NextDraft newsletter Dave's new book: Please Scream Inside Your Heart NextDraft app PleaseScream.com Episode Transcript[00:00:00] Dave:If you have something to say in one way or another, the internet is a great place for people to figure out a way to receive it. So, that's pretty powerful and still excites me. I still press publish with the same enthusiasm now than I did when the internet first launched.[00:00:23] Nathan:In this episode I talk to Dave Pell, who has been writing for basically as long as the internet has been around. He's been an investor since the early days. He's been writing since the.com bust, and even before then. He writes his popular newsletter with 140,000 subscribers called Next Draft.We have this really fun conversation about writing. His writing process. How he grew the newsletter. Bunch of other things that he cares about. Even a few things that I was interested in, like he doesn't have his face in photos on the internet very much. He has his avatar instead. So, just getting into why that is.He also has a book coming out soon. It's called Scream Inside Your Heart, which is a fun reference to some memes from 2020. So, enjoy the episode. There's a lot in there.Dave. Welcome to the show.[00:01:12] Dave:Thanks a lot for having me on.[00:01:14] Nathan:Okay. So you've been doing this for a long time. You've been writing on the internet since the .com era. So, I'm curious maybe just to kick things off, what have you seen—I realize this is a giant question.What have you seen change? What are some of those trends that you've seen, that you either really miss from the early days, or some of those things that you've held onto from the early days of the internet, that you're really still enjoying?[00:01:46] Dave:Yeah, that is a pretty huge question, but I'll give it a shot. The thing I miss from the early days of the internet is that our democracy was not being destroyed by the internet in the early days of the internet. So, everything we thought we were building, basically it turned out to be the opposite of what actually happened.The part about the internet that I still feel is there, although a little bit less so because of the big companies have sort of taken over all the platforms and stuff, is just the idea that someone can have a passion or a creative output that they want to share with the world, and they can mold internet tools to fit their skills, and then use the internet to broadcast that out, and still become sort of pretty popular withour the “OK” of some gatekeeper at a publication, or at a television studio, or whatever.The indie spirit of the internet still lives on. It ebbs and flows, and has a lot of different iterations. But that was the thing that excited me the most when I first played with the internet. And that's the thing that continues to excite me the most now.[00:02:57] Nathan:I always think of the newsletter, and your newsletter in particular, is that indie spirit. Is that what you see most commonly in newsletters? Or are you seeing it in other places as well?[00:03:10] Dave:I see it in podcasts. I see it in newsletters. I see it in people sharing their art, sharing their photography on Flicker, and up through the more modern tools. I go to a site called Unsplash all the time to look at images, and it's just basically regular people sharing their images.Some of them are professional photographers, some aren't, and they're getting their work out there, and then some of them probably get jobs out of it and stuff like that. So, just the idea that you can have some kind of creative output and have a place to share it. And try to get an audience for that is really inspiring.It's a lot harder than it used to be because there's a few billion more people trying to get attention also, and because there are more gatekeepers now. So, you have to, hope that your app meets Apple's guidelines, or that different products you might want to share on the internet have to meet certain classifications now, whereas they might not have in the very early days of the internet. But in general, if you have something to say in one way or another, the internet is a great place for people to figure out a way to receive it.So, that's pretty powerful, and, still excites me. I still press published with the same enthusiasm now that I did when the internet first launched.[00:04:32] Nathan:Yeah. So let's talk about the main project that you have right now, which is Next Draft. Give listeners the 30-second pitch on Next Draft, of what it is.[00:04:46] Dave:Sure. Basically I call myself the managing editor of the internet. What I basically do is a personality-driven news newsletter where I cover the day's most fascinating news. I cover 10 stories. A lot of times in each section there's more than one link. I give my take on the day's news, each individual story, and then I link off to the source for the full story.When I first launched it, I called it Dinner Party Prep. I provided enough information for you to sort of get the gist of the story. And if there's topics you want to dig deeper, you just click and, you know, go get the story yourself. So that's sort of the overview of it.[00:05:27] Nathan:Nice. And you said that you're obsessed with the news maybe in a somewhat, even unhealthy way. why, where did that come from?[00:05:36] Dave:Yeah. Well, nothing, nothing about my relationship with the internet is only somewhat unhealthy. it's all extremely unhealthy, but, both my parents are Holocaust survivors and, when I was growing up, news was just a very big part of our daily lives, especially when my three older sisters moved out and it was just the three of us, that was sort of our mode of communication.We talked about the news. We watched the news together. Fareed Zakaria is basically the sun my parents always wanted. but so I got really into the news and being able to connect the news to, our everyday lives, which of course my parents had experienced as children and teens and Europe during world war II.And also reading between the lines about why certain politicians might be saying something, why stories are getting published a certain way. So I just got really into that and I've always been into a and college, you know, I, I majored in English, but if we had minors at Berkeley, I would have minored in journalism.I took a bunch of journalism courses. I've always been really into the media, but not so much as quite an insider where I go to work for a newspaper, but more observing, the news and providing sort of a lit review of what's happening and what has momentum in the news. So I sorta got addicted to it and, Also as a writer.My favorite thing to do is counter punch. I like to have somebody give me a topic and then I like to be able to quickly share my take, or make a joke or create a funny headline about that content. So I sorta took those two passions of the way I like to write. I like to write on deadline. I like to write fast and I like to counter punch and the content that I like, which is news, and I sort of merged those two things and created a product, and a pretty cool suite of internet tools to support that.[00:07:35] Nathan:Yeah. So that makes sense that you've identified the constraints that match your style and made something exactly that fits it. the deadline, like having, he, you know, coming out with something on a daily basis, is more than a lot of creators want to do. so what's your process there?[00:07:55] Dave:Yeah. I mean, I should emphasize that I do it every day. Not because I think it's some incredible draw for readers to get Daily Content. I do it every day because I'm addicted to it. If my newsletter had five stories in it, instead of 10, it would do better. If my newsletter came out three days a week instead of five days a week, I'm sure it would do better.If it came out once a week, it would do even better then you know, also if I had a more marketable or not marketable, but a more, business-oriented topic that was more narrow, it would do better. I used to write a newsletter that was just on tech and it was. Really popular in the internet professional community back in the first boom, I had about 50,000 subscribers and there were probably about 52,000 internet professionals.So I just like writing about what I want to write about and I'm addicted to pressing the publish button and I'm just addicted to the process. So I do it because of that. I'm not sure that would be my general advice to somebody trying to market or promote a newsletter.[00:09:01] Nathan:Yep. Are there other iterations, either ever before or things that you tried that you realized like, oh, that's not a fit for your personality, your writing style?[00:09:09] Dave:Yeah. When I first started it, I actually, I'm an angel investor also and have been since, probably right after Google and Yahoo launched. so a while, and I used to, my passion has always been writing, so I wanted to mix writing into that, process. So I would send out 10. Daily stories, but they were all tech news related to the CEOs of the companies I worked with and a few of their employees, so that they wouldn't have to spend their time reading the news or worrying about competitors or worry about what the latest trends in tech, where I would give it to them.And they could focus on doing their jobs and that sorta got shared and got out. so I did that for a few years. really, that was my iteration. I should've kept the brand. It was called David Netflix. not that it was a great name, but I've shifted brands about 40 times in my life. Cause I love branding and naming.I that's another, maybe this is more of a cautionary tale than a lesson and newsletter marketing. I would stick with a brand if anybody has the possibility of doing that, that was a big mistake I've made over the years is having multiple brands. But when the bus came, the first internet bust, I basically was writing an obituary column every day and about companies that had failed.So I just decided, I wanted to expand it and I knew I was interested in much broader topics than just tech news. So I expanded it to all news, a critical point that, really changed Next Draft and got it to catch on and become more popular was when I decided to focus on making it more personality driven and less, less overwhelmingly, providing an overwhelming level of coverage.I used to think that I had to provide all the news in the day because people would sort of, depend on me to provide their news. I was sort of selling myself as your trusted news source. So I would include a lot of stories that I didn't have anything to say about because they were huge news, you know, an embassy closed in Iran or whatever.That was huge international news, but I didn't necessarily have anything to say about that that day. So after a while I decided, no, I'm not going to do that. I'm just going to limit it to 10 items. And I'm going to focus that on what I think is the most fascinating and think of it less like a curation tool and more like, a, modern day column.I think if the column newspaper column were invented today, it would look a lot like Next Draft people would sort of share their takes and then provide links off for more information. once I did that, it was a big change. People started signing up much more readily and, once I stopped trying to be exhaustive.[00:11:56] Nathan:That makes a lot of sense to me. I think that that's something you see from a lot of creators is that they're, they're trying to find some model. That's like, this is my idea of what people should want, you know, rather than what they end up doing, eventually it's coming to, it's like, okay, forget all of that.This is what I want. And I'm going to make that. And then people like me can find and follow it. And people who don't can, you know, do their thing. Can you go find one of the other million sources on the internet?[00:12:21] Dave:Yeah. When I think of the people that I like to follow or have followed forever on the internet, all of them are that ladder. They just do it their way. They have a design, they want, they stick to their guns. They say what they feel like saying. they decide. what the personality of the product is.And, they move within that. I always find that to be the most interesting thing, especially when it comes to something like newsletters. I really think newsletters are more like a radio talk shows than they are like other internet content, podcasts to a certain degree as well. But I always feel like I listened to are used to listen a lot to this radio, sports caster named Jim Rome.And whenever he would have a new city that he was launching and he would always give the same speech on the Monday that they launched saying, just give me a week. You might not.Get the vibe of what we're doing today. You might think it's okay, but not great, but just give it a week and listen, and then decide if you like it or not.And I sort of feel like that's how newsletters are your relationship with your readers sort of creates this, sort of insider-y voice and communication that, you, it takes a little while to get into the rhythm of getting it. But once you do, then it's like this familiar voice or this familiar friend that you feel like, even if you didn't read it for a few weeks, you can start a conversation with that person right away easily.That's how I think the voice of a newsletter is most effective. So that's why I've always thought of it. More of what I do is sort of a textual talk radio, more so than a blog or some other format[00:14:01] Nathan:What do you think, or what would you say to someone who maybe had 10 or 20,000 subscribers and felt like their newsletter had gone a bit stale and maybe their relationship to it had gotten a bit stale or they're in this, this position of writing things that no longer have their voice, how would you coach them through like bringing their voice and personality back into it?[00:14:22] Dave:I mean, it's definitely hard. it's hard doing something that you do alone and, something that is often hard to really get off the ground or get to grow, especially when you're on a platform like the internet, where every day, somebody does something and 10 seconds later, they're like internet famous and you're trying day after day.So, I mean, the first thing. Is that you really have to be interested in what you you're passionate about. and focus in on that, because that will alleviate a lot of that stress. Like, do I feel like sending it today? I'm a too burnt out. What's the point? I mean, not that those feelings don't happen. I had those feelings as recently as an hour ago, when I press publish, I have those feelings and disappointments constantly, you know, that's part of being a creator of any kind.Maybe that word is sort of, sort of goofy, but anybody who's putting themselves out there and putting content out, you know, you have that feeling all the time. If you're an indie, and you're doing it all day in front of the computer by yourself, then that's even more powerful because, you know, if you work at a big company or everybody's working on the same goal, or even in a small group, you can sort of support each other and, maybe even bullshit each other at some cases where, oh, no, this really matters.You know, where, if you're by yourself, that has to be pretty self-sustaining or self-sustaining. I do have a friend or two that I always share blurbs with who, one of my friends Rob's, he proves almost all of my blurbs, so it's nice to have that virtual office mate. He's not really officially part of Next Draft, but you know, I don't think I would do it as easily or as, for as long if it weren't for him because he's like my virtual friend on the internet that says, oh, come on, let's get it out today or whatever.So I think that's helpful to have a support team or a couple people you can count on to sort of give you a boost when you need it. But the key really is, is that it's gotta be something that you are passionate about, both in terms of the product and in terms of what you're focusing on, because if you feel strongly about it, then it really.I don't want to say it doesn't matter if people enjoy it, you should take cues from your readers. What are they clicking on? What are they reading? What are they responding to? But at the core, it's gotta be you because that's what gets you through those down points? you know, I had a weird thing because I write about news.The general news, world basically benefited dramatically from the Trump era because everybody was habitually turning on their news, 24, 7, and refreshing and Whitey and Washington post and checking Twitter every two seconds to see what crazy thing happened next. And we're all poor sorta,[00:17:01] Nathan:Wreck to watch.[00:17:02] Dave:So everybody was really into it and it created.Unbelievable platform for people to become media stars. You know, Trump was bad for democracy, but he was great for media. Great for creating new voices out there. whether we like it or not. for me, it was different because I wrote about all news. I wouldn't say I was apolitical, but I wasn't heavily political.The Next Draft had plenty of readers from both sides of the aisle. when Trump came around, it was like one story every day, basically. So it really limited. I would get emails from longtime readers all the time that said, Hey, can't you cover something other than Trump every day?And I say, Hey, if you can find the story for me, I'll cover it. This is what every journalist is on. Now, the people who used to cover the secret service around Trump, the people who used to cover sports are not talking about Trump because of a pandemic relation ship to it. The people who aren't entertainment are talking about Trump because they can't believe that anybody voted for him, whatever the issue was, every dinner party was about Trump.So it was really a bummer for my brand and my product. Actually, it became boring in some ways to me to have the same story every day. And it became, I think frustrating to my readers.But during that era, when it was happening, I had to make a decision. Do I become more political and go full on with this?Or do I sort of try to. Do what I would call a falsely unbiased view or a, you know, false equivalence view that we saw in the media where there's both sides to every story. And you have to pretend they're both accurate, including one guy saying to put disinfectant into your veins. And the other person's saying to wear a mask and take a vaccine, but those things get treated as equal somehow because the president said it.And I really decided, you know, more important than keeping readers is that I'm true to my own sort of ethical standards. In a moment that called for it, at least for me. So I became more political. went into it and I said, what I believe and still believe is the truth, you know, about what was happening with Trump and Trumpism and our slide towards authoritarianism.And I know that this is a podcast more about newsletterish than it is about politics or news, but I'm just sharing that because that's the kind of thing that kept me going. and the people who really cared about what I was writing, appreciated it and would email me and say they got something out of that.And most importantly, my mom would say, yeah, you made the right call. Or my dad would say, yeah, you got that. Right. And ultimately, When it became a sort of a bummer period for me, which I would say 2020 was because of all the horrible news. And, I was writing a book about the year. So I was like living, July of 20, 20, well writing about March of 2020, which I don't recommend for anybody's emotional health.And I just had to think like, what's really important to me. Yes. I want to be funny, which I try to be in my newsletter every day. I want to be read my narcissism is as strong as ever, but ultimately I want to be able to look myself in the reflection of the, darken screen on the rare times that it is dark and say like, yeah, you told the truth and that kept me going there.So I think whatever your brand is, you know, it can be a newsletter about guitars, but if you have that sort of passion, And you have something you want to say, and you think is important to say it sort of gets you through those levels and your motivation. And if it's not getting you through the lows and the motivation, there's nothing wrong with saying, Hey man, this is not worth it.I'm going to go try to make something else. You know, it doesn't have to be, you don't have to beat a dead horse.[00:20:51] Nathan:On the political side. Are there specific things that you felt like it costs you opportunities that it lost you? Because I think a lot of creators, whether they talk about, you know, finance or photography or whatever, I'll see these things. And they're like this either directly relates to me and my audience and I feel like I should take a stand on it.Or it's like a broader macro issue that I feel like we should talk about. And when you do, then there's immediately, you know, somewhere between three and 300 responses of like, we didn't follow you for the politics, you know, or like something like that. And your Instagram, DMS, or newsletter replies or whatever.[00:21:24] Dave:Yeah. it costs me a lot. Definitely it costs me readers or subscribers. It costs me, psychic pain because I was locked into a story that was just overwhelmingly, emotionally painful, really, and shocking and difficult to understand all the things that cause you sort of emotional exhaustion. We're in the Trump story, especially in 2020, when it became a story about our own health and our kids' health.And the frustration level just went through the roof. for me, professionalizing that content actually helps create a bit of a barrier to the feelings about it. Some of my good friends were probably more bummed during 2020 than I was because when the latest crazy story or depressing story would happen, I felt I had to. Ingest that content and then come up with, something cogent to say about it. And maybe hopefully funny to make it a little bit of sugar to take the medicine and then get it out to people. So I've always felt that being able to do that, sorta created a barrier between myself and actually feeling something.So that's another thing I like about the newsletter probably at least unconsciously. but yeah, there was a lot of costs in terms of readers, for sure. Hate mail. but there always is, you know, Today. I would say I get much more hate mail from the far left. If that's what you want to call them. People who feel like every joke is like an incredible triggering a front to their existence or any hint that you mentioned somebody as attractive.I've gotten hate mail because I implied that Beyonce is appearance was part of her brand. I mean, it's totally crazy, but, It's those extremes. You have to be able to turn off. You know, a friend of mine used to work at a major, be the editor of a major American newspaper. And he said every Friday they would get together and they would play the craziest, calls to the editor.They had a call line. In addition to, you could send a letter or you could call, leave a voicemail about something you were upset about in the coverage. And they would just gather around and have drinks on Friday. Listen to this because of course the people who are calling this line are almost self-selecting themselves as a little bit wacko and their takes were usually pretty extreme.The internet, Twitter, social media, Provides, greases the wheels for those people to be more prevalent in our lives. But I think it's really important to know that that's a real minority of people, somebody who sent you a hate mail, that your joke was so offensive, or they can't believe you mentioned that people ever watch pornography on the internet or any of these other things, it's this tiny minority of people.And then it's one step crazier that they felt like they had to contact you. So that's a really hard thing. I think about being split, particularly the newsletter game, because anybody can hit reply and you're going to get many more replies from people with crazy complaints, than you are from people with really thoughtful responses.Not that those don't come and those are valuable and I love getting those, but you get many more from people that just have really bizarre. I mean I could list probably for hours to crazy things that people send me that they're mad about, you know,[00:24:50] Nathan:Is there something specific that you do? Like one thing when I get those replies, if they're just like completely off the wall or abusive or something like that, I just scroll down and then click their unsubscribe link because, you know, they're never going to know, and then I just have to show up in their inbox[00:25:07] Dave:Right.[00:25:08] Nathan:There's something that you do.[00:25:09] Dave:That's not a bad strategy. I like that. I do do that occasionally for sure. occasionally I'll just go to Gmail and just, create a filter for that email to automatically go to my trash. if it's like a hardcore right-winger, that's telling me how stupid I am about ivermectin and that, you know, people should be taking horse dewormer and I'm just not getting the truth.And that Trump is awesome and that, Whatever. I usually just delete, honestly, because I don't see a big benefit to replying to somebody, especially if it's like a rabbit email, you know, they're looking for a reply, they want the conflict. A lot of people sleep easy with conflict. That's one of the lessons of the internet that I learned when I was first starting on the internet, you know, David edix sort sorta became popular because somebody that had a blog with a similar name, that I hadn't heard of, complained that I sort of stole his name because his name was also Dave.And I had got like, probably about three or 400 emails saying, you know, with expletive saying what a horrible person I was. And I also got about 3000 subscribers and at the time I had about 30, so. I didn't know how to respond. I felt like, wow. Number one, I didn't know that guys had the product with the same name.Number two. My name was different enough. Number two or three were both named Dave. I mean, who cares? You know, and plus I don't want to be attacked by anybody. So your first reaction is to respond and a slightly older, although not noticeably these days with my gray beard, slightly older friend of mine who had been in tech a little longer, said, don't respond.This guy lives for conflict. You guys are going to fight. There's going to be this public thing. You're going to be up all night and he's going to never sleep so easy. So, I took that to heart and didn't respond. And I, I think about that a lot when I get rabid emails from people, Mike exception, actually probably my weak point really is from, more my side of the political spectrum, where people who are generally liberal, but are just so extreme for me.In terms of being triggered or having a joke, be every joke, be inappropriate. That those people, I actually do feel like I want to respond to because, I, I don't think I can really motivate or move, somebody who was on the opposite end of the spectrum and is sending me hate aggressive, hate mail, but maybe I can move somebody who's just a little bit different than me, or a little bit more extreme.I will respond to those, although I'm usually sorry. The one other thing I always respond to is if people have been reading, they say, oh, I've been reading you for years. And, I wanted to ask you a couple of questions about this book that you wrote before ordering it. And I'm like, just order the damn book. that's probably my most common email to people these days. It's actually remarkable how many people says, wow, I I've been reading you for years. I share you with all my friends. something, when my sons come home from college where it's always talking about, Dave said this, Dave said that, before I buy your book, I just wanted to ask you a couple of questions to make sure it's going to be for me.I'm like I worked on something for an hour and it's like, your family is talking about it. What, just by the thing I worked on for a year, you know? So those kind of things, personal frustration, I respond.[00:28:37] Nathan:Yeah, that makes sense. okay. I'd love to talk about the book some more, but before we get into that, there's two things I want to talk about. The first one is like, how do you measure success for the newsletter? What's the thing that you'd like to, cause I don't think it's, you're pursuing the monetary side for this.It sounds like the monetary side comes from investing and, and then what's success for the newsletter.[00:28:59] Dave:I mean, I have had right now, I I'm just marketing my, my own stuff. And during the pandemic I marketed non-profits, but, that had to do with either the pandemic or, the democracy issues that we were facing. but I have made decent money from selling straight sponsorships. Year-long sponsorships to people, which I highly recommend.I think some of the ads that people put into his letters that go by clicks or whatever, unless you have a massive audience, it's hard to make much money, but if you pitch to some company that is a like-minded brand, Hey, you're going to be my only brand for a year. And anytime you have special events, I'm going to mention it.Then you can say, okay, you have like, you know, 20,000 readers or a hundred thousand readers that can make a difference to a brand to say, yeah, it's like a rounding air show. We'll give you 20 grand or a hundred grand or wherever it comes in there that you can actually make a decent. Living in terms of writing.So that always worked better for me, but no, my, my internet life is really all about narcissism and, clicks, you know, the dopamine, I just want reads. I'd rather you subscribe to my newsletter than pitch me your startup company. I just, that's what I want the most. So more numbers, more opens, more reads, more subscribers.And unfortunately that's probably the hardest thing to get also, especially in a product that is sort of viral. I think newsletters are sort of viral, but it's better if you have a team and some tools to really get it going. That's, you know, sites like the Skimm morning brew and the hustle. They have teams that are really growth hacking and focusing on that and having rewards programs and ambassador programs.The reason you see that is because.Newsletters themselves are not really inherently that viral. Yes. Somebody can forward it to one person or whatever, but it's not as viral as a lot of other forms of content where you can click a button and share it with all of your followers, like a Facebook post or a tweet.So yeah, the thing that matters to me most is probably the hardest to get in the newsletter game, but that's the truth[00:31:10] Nathan:Yeah. Well, I think the, the point on like newsletters don't have a distribution engine. There's no Facebook newsfeed, YouTube algorithm equivalent for newsletters. And so it really relies on either you posting your content somewhere else, whether it's Twitter or YouTube or medium or something that has an algorithm or your readers saying like, oh, I read Next Draft.You should too. There's not really something else in there. Have you looked at, or I guess if you have thoughts on that, you comments on it, but then also have you looked at launching an ambassador program or, or an actual referral program?[00:31:44] Dave:Yeah, I've thought about him. And now over the last year, there's been a few tools that have come out a few. I think X people from sites like morning view Ru, and some other sites that have sort of perfected some of these marketing programs have, sort of come out with these tools. I've messed around with them a little bit.Some of them still require I find, some technical ones. so I, I have like an engineer who works with me on Next Draft, like as a freelance basis every now and then, but it's not always easy for me to launch stuff that requires a lot of a moment to moment technical support, and management, because it's just me using a lot of, they're customized, but they're over the counter tools.So I've thought about a lot of them, but I really haven't tried it that much.I want to though I do want to do that. I would like to do one of those programs, especially where you get credit for referrals. I think that's the best kind of model. So there's one called spark loop.[00:32:51] Nathan:Yeah, we actually, I invested in spark loops, so we[00:32:54] Dave:Okay.[00:32:55] Nathan:Decent portion of that business, so good.[00:32:58] Dave:Oh, nice. Yeah. That one, if it was just slightly easier, I know that it's probably difficult to make it easier because, there's so many pieces. They have to have your subscribers. I have to have my subscribers, but that is, does seem like a good product. And especially if they can, I think expand into like letting a person sell a product or whatever, get credited for sharing products that can be even bigger.But yeah, that kind of stuff is really powerful for sure. And I, I do want to get into that. it's more just inertia that I it's just a matter of sitting there for the, an amount of hours that it requires to get it going.But I do think that's a great thing for newsletter writers to do, and I'm pretty surprised that more newsletter platforms don't build it right in.I think that'll probably change over time too. Maybe you guys will get acquired by.[00:33:48] Nathan:Yep. No, that makes sense. I know for convert kit, we wanted to build it in, it looks at the amount of time that it would take and then said like let's invest in a , you know, and then roll it into our offering.[00:33:59] Dave:Yeah, it's hard. It's hard not to take that stuff personally, too, you know, for people that do newsletters, you think you're going to put a thing on there and say, Hey, you know, it's just me here and you always read my newsletter and click. I know you love me so much. Can you just do this to get a free whatever?And it's, you know, sometimes not that many people click, you know, or other times like they click just as long as there's the free item. So there's a lot of ways to get depressed. Like I had things where I say, Hey, the first a hundred people who do this, get a free t-shirt or whatever next strap t-shirt.And those hundred people will literally do what I asked them to do in like 34 seconds, you know? And then it like stops after that. The next time you ask them, if there's not a t-shirt. But it's not you, you know, if you go to a baseball game or a lawyer game or whatever, you know, people sit there, they don't even cheer as much for the team as they cheer when the guy comes out with the t-shirt gun.So it's like, people love t-shirts more than they're ever going to love you. And you have to go into these things with that in mind. there's no way, even if it's, even if you're XX large and the t-shirt is, you know, petite, it's still worth more than you are. And the average mind of the average person.So you have to go into all of these things thinking, I hope this works like crazy, but if it doesn't tomorrow, I open up the browser and start writing.[00:35:19] Nathan:Yeah. That's very true. I want to talk about the growth of the newsletter. I was reading something, which I realized later was back in 2014, that you were at around 160,000 subscribers. I imagine it's quite a bit larger than that now. And then I'd love to hear some of the inflection points of growth.[00:35:35] Dave:Yeah, I'm not, I'm not sure. I might've, I don't know if I lied in 2014, but now I have about,[00:35:41] Nathan:Quoted it wrong.[00:35:42] Dave:No, you might've got it right. I might've exaggerated. Maybe that was a including app downloads and a few other things. Yeah. I have about 140,000 or so now, so that would be making that a pretty horrible seven years now.You're depressing me.Your listeners should just stop, stop writing newsletters. It's not worth the depression[00:36:02] Nathan:Just give up now[00:36:03] Dave:Yeah. And by all means if Nathan goals do not pick up. no, yeah, I probably have it 140,000 on newsletter. Made my newsletter. It's hard to believe in this era of newsletters actually, but when I first launched Next Draft, I noticed that even people who would send in testimonials or that I would ask for testimonials would say, basically something to the extent that even though email is horrible, this is the one newsletter I I'd sign up for whatever.And I kept thinking, man, that's a bummer that I'm starting out at this deficit, that people have a negative feeling about the medium. So I, since then I've always made it my goal to. Have the content available wherever people are. So the newsletter is certainly the main way that people get next job, but there's an app for the iPhone and the iPad there.That's the first thing I launched because I wanted to have an alternative for people who just hate email too much. So now you go to the landing page, it's like, Hey, if you don't like email, here's another version. I have a blog version. I have an apple news version. I have an RSS version. I'm lucky enough to have a really good, WordPress custom WordPress install that I just push one button and it pushes it out to all of those things.But I am, I'm a big proponent of just meeting people where they are. even, as an example, I recently launched a sort of a substance. Version of my newsletter under the radar. but when I redo my site, I'm going to make that more clear because if people already subscribed to like 10 sub stacks and they're using their aggregator and they already have their email saved and they can just click a button, it's like, I don't care.You know, it takes me five extra minutes to paste my content into sub stack. So I just want the reads. I don't really care about how they read it or whether they read it.[00:37:55] Nathan:Yeah. That's fascinating. So then let's shift gears a little bit. I want to hear about the book. first I wanna hear about the title. Would you have it on your shirt?[00:38:03] Dave:Yeah. That's pretty embarrassing. I swear. I didn't know it was video today, but I do have a shirt[00:38:06] Nathan:You're good.[00:38:07] Dave:Otherwise I wouldn't have worn. This would have worn my Nathan Barry's shirt.[00:38:12] Nathan:That's right. It's in the mail actually. It's[00:38:15] Dave:Oh, good, good.[00:38:16] Nathan:Big photo of my face.[00:38:17] Dave:Yeah. Convert kit. My wife converted to Judaism before we got married. So I have my own convert kit.[00:38:23] Nathan:There you go. Exactly. so I want to hear like what the book is about and then particularly where the title came from,[00:38:30] Dave:Sure.[00:38:31] Nathan:It made me laugh a lot when I heard it.[00:38:33] Dave:Oh, cool. That's good. That's a good start then. yeah, the title comes from, in July of the, of 2020 when the pandemic was really setting in and becoming a reality for everybody. this amusement park outside of Tokyo in the shadow of Mount Fuji called the Fuji queue. amusement park reopened.And they found that even though everybody w everybody was wearing masks, people were screaming so much on some of the rides, especially the Fujiyama roller coaster, which was their scariest ride, that they were worried about germs spread. So they sort of put signs around the amusement park saying, no screaming, you can come, you can ride and have fun, but keep your mask on adults scream.And it sort of became a little minor social media thing in Japan, where people were sort of making fun of them like, oh, they're telling us not to scream. How can anybody not scream on the Fujiyama roller coaster? So in response, the, park management had to have their executives with perfectly quaffed hair and tie and colored shirts and masks on ride the roller coaster with a webcam facing them the whole time without moving a muscle.Cracking a smile or grimacing or screaming. And then at the end of the ride, when the rollercoaster stops, it says, please Scream Inside Your Heart.And that was always my favorite meme of, 2020. It went really viral. There was like t-shirts. aside from mine, there were posters memes. It sort of went crazy for about a week or two, which by 2020 standards is a pretty long time for a meme to last.And I just thought that made sense as a title for the book, because that's sort of how we felt, all year that I dunno if we were screaming in our heart, but we were certainly screaming into a void. Like no matter what we sat or yelled on social media or complained to our family members or friends, it just kept getting worse.The year just kept getting worse. And, so the idea is that this book sort of, now you're free to sort of let out the scream. And the book is it's about 2020, certainly, but it's really about the issues that led us to 2020. There's a ton about our relationship to media and including my own relationship to media and how that got us into trouble.Some of the stuff we're talking about today, how, technology has impacted our lives stuff. I've been sort of thinking about it, writing about for the last few decades, and a lot of the political hate that emerged. and, but it's all within this time capsule of the craziest year.[00:41:12] Nathan:Yeah. Yeah. And so that's coming out early in November, November 2nd. so you're, it looks like you're just starting the, you know, mentioning the promotion tour and all of that. is there a big, big push that comes with it or are you kind of, I, I'm always curious with people's book launches, what strategy they take.[00:41:30] Dave:Yeah. I mean, I'm a newbie, so it's, the whole process has been interesting to me working with a publisher, working with others, is not my forte. so I got used to that or I'm getting used to that and they're probably getting used to it also because working with grouchy 50 something in these is probably not ideal, but, yeah, I've just been promoting it so far in Next Draft, but I've been doing, I have a PR company that's helping me and I've been doing a ton of podcasts and I'm marketing it to my own readers.And then as it gets a little bit closer to the November 2nd date, I have a lot more stuff planned rut, a lot of influencers have early copies of the book, and hopefully they'll promote it. And, I'll call out a few favors from bloggers and hopefully newsletter writers. I feel like that should be my in theory.That should be my secret weapon because, in addition to being fun and creative, nothing moves traffic, except maybe Facebook, nothing moves traffic more than newsletters. I know a lot of people who run e-commerce companies and newsletters are always second, if not first, in terms of traffic drivers.So, I really think that, if some of my friends out there at morning brew in the hustle and the scam and all these other sites that sort of, have surpassed my size by quite a bit, put the word out that, one of their fellow warriors is, has a book out. That'll probably move the needle even more. The media, I'm hoping to get stuff like that, but I really don't know. I'm trying not to get my hopes up too much because, unlike a newsletter, it's not just one day's work, you know, you like worry about one word or one sentence in a book for like three weeks and then you put it out there and people are like, oh yeah, I'll check it out sometime.Thanks. So, you know, that's, you know, whatever that's life as a, you put yourself out there, that's how it goes. So I'm hoping it sells well. And, the more people that get it, I think some people, their first reaction is, oh my God, 2020. I don't want to relive that again. But, hopefully people who know my brand and those that they share it with, know that it's, you know, there's a lot of humor and there's, it's probably 30 pages before we even get into the first event of 2020.So it's, there's a lot more to it and it's sort of fun and crazy and tries to have the pace of a roller coaster. that was the other thing I took from the Fujiyama roller coaster.[00:43:59] Nathan:Yeah. So one thing that I'm always curious about with people who have like a prolific newsletter, you know, in your case of writing every day, and then like, for a lot of people, that would be a lot to handle of staying on top of a daily newsletter. And then you're writing a book on top of that. How did you schedule your time?Were you blocking off like, oh, these afternoons are specifically for book, book writing. Cause you turned it around relatively fast.[00:44:24] Dave:Yeah. the newsletter is sort of like a full-time job. People always ask me, you know, when do you work on, or how many hours do you spend on it? I mean, I'm, I'm always looking for news, whether it's on Twitter or friends, emailing me stuff or texting me stories, or just in conversations with people to see what they're into or what stories are interesting them or what I'm missing.In terms of actual time spent like where I'm dedicating time. I probably do like about an hour every night, because the story has changed so quick. So I'll do an hour of looking for stories every night. And then the next day I sort of lock in from about nine to one, usually, or nine to 12, where I'm finding stories, saving those stories, choosing what stories I want to go with and then actually writing the newsletter.All of that takes about anywhere from like two and a half to four hours, depending on the day I go pretty fast. When it came to the book, that was tricky. It was actually more emotionally tricky because like I said before, I was like, had to go back and write about, you know, Briana Taylor while I'm living another horrible act, you know, or even more so the Trump, you know, one crazy Trump thing and another crazy Trump thing and seeing the pandemic getting worse and worse.So that was stressful. But I found at the beginning I would try to write a lot at night and that was okay. But I found actually if I just kept going, in the day when I was already rolling and had written the newsletter and I was already in the group just to add on an hour or two to that was actually easier and more effective for me than trying to get going.But that's just me. I mean, I just go by my it's almost like my circadian rhythm or something like that, I almost never eat or consume anything before I'm done with next job except for coffee. I would keep that going, you know, once I would like, sort of have a sandwich or whatever, then it's like, oh, let me just take a quick nap and then whatever.So, yeah, I tried to just keep it going. I always find the more consistently busy I am, the less I procrastinate. And if I take a day off or I take a few hours off, even then, between writing, it just, it takes me longer to get going.[00:46:37] Nathan:Yep. That makes sense. The habit that I'm in right now is starting the day with 45 minutes to an hour of writing and that's working much better for me than like slotting it in somewhere else. So I think like w what I hear you saying is like, experiment and find the thing that works well for you.[00:46:54] Dave:Yeah. I mean, if you're going to start experimenting almost every writer, I know not like newsletter writers, but just general writers, all do what you just described. They sort of pick a time in the morning and they get their output done. then the rest of the day, if ideas come to them or whatever, they jot it down, but they're sort of powering in that morning hours.[00:47:13] Nathan:Yeah.[00:47:14] Dave:That's probably a good one to try. Although, you know, some people just do it better at different hours. I'm sure.[00:47:19] Nathan:Yeah. another thing I realized, I've always you for years, and until we got on this video call, I had no idea what you looked like. and which is kind of an interesting,[00:47:28] Dave:Well, I'm sorry.It's by design. I have a face for Panda.[00:47:32] Nathan:Tell me more about, well, I guess two sides, one, has there ever been an interesting interaction? You know, because you're like, Hey, I'm, I'm Dave and people are like, I wouldn't have ever recognized you. Or has there been any other benefits and thought behind, you know, why it have an avatar?[00:47:49] Dave:If by interesting you mean horrible? Yes. There's been many interesting interactions with people. I mean, before, before I had my current, avatar, which is, pretty awesome, actually, a guy named Brian Molko designed it. I had this incredible drawing of a character that looked like me that, had sort of ether net, Machinery and cord going into his head and it was like me, but my head was actually lifted.The top of my head was lifted off and you could see all this machinery and it was an incredible graphic, by this guy named Sam Spratt. Who's now done, album covers and book covers. He's like a super talent. If you want to follow somebody fun on Instagram, he's just incredible. And it was a drawing, even though it looked photo realistic.And I used that for a while and then I would go places and people would be like, you are so much fatter and grayer than I imagined. And so instead of having Sam sort of ruin his artwork, I went back with the more, cartoonish or animated, avatar. So since then I don't get too much of that, but, that was a good move.Although that's the best thing about avatars and the internet is that your avatar never ages. It always looks the same. It stays the same weight. My avatar never overeats he exercises right here. Angie really gets along well with others and doesn't have any kind of social anxiety either. So he's pretty cool.Yeah, it goes a little downhill with me in person. So[00:49:21] Nathan:Yeah. So is it, that's something that like, it gives you some distance between you and readers, or it gives you some anonymity that, you know, you don't want to be recognized in the streets?[00:49:32] Dave:No, no, it's, it's, basically just what I described. It's like, I literally prefer the, the attractiveness of my avatar versus me, but also actually my avatar is really awesome. my logo, so it's also iconic and scalable. so it looks awesome on t-shirts even people who don't know what Next Draft is when they see, by son wearing his t-shirt, whatever, it just looks awesome.So that that's that's as much of it as anything. I thought your response was going to be mad. You seem perfectly attractive to me. I don't know what the issue is, but no, you went with, am I doing that for some other reason? Yeah. So, I get this all the time.Cause my wife is a very attractive person also. So when people meet me, they're always like, whoa, we were once a very famous celebrity came up to me and I said, oh, I'm Gina's husband. And she was like, wow, you did well. Oh, you know? So I'm like, thanks a lot. That helps. So just gave her a picture of my, my icon and walked away.[00:50:31] Nathan:Then that worked. I'm sure that she has it framed in her office, from now on. it's just interesting to me. You're you're sort of at this intersection between personal brand and, like media brand. And I think the avatar helps push you over into the media brand side. and I don't have any real commentary on it other than I find it interesting.[00:50:53] Dave:Yeah, no, I think there probably is some of that. I I've never really been a fan of using my actual face, or my actual person as a logo. I love the process of designing or working with people to design logos and taglines and all that. But yeah, probably at some point there was a, a goal with Next Draft to make it seem bigger than it is.I know a lot of people that are solo operators. They regularly say we, when they're talking about their brand to make it seem bigger, I actually think that's sort of been flipped on its head though. in the last few years where so many people are coming into the space, it's very clear that what they're doing is leaving a big brand, leaving a we and going to an eye.And I think it's actually a selling point in a lot of ways. So, I mean, I, I still get a lot of emails that say, I don't know if anybody at Next Draft is going to read this email, you know, or if you do, can you get this message to Dave? He's an asshole or whatever. And it's like, I'm the only one here, you know, or the other one I always get is when I email back to people that go, oh, I can't believe you actually emailed back.I didn't think this would get to anybody. It's like, you hit reply. And it had my email, like where else would it go? Exactly. You know? But I think actually having people thinking of you as a person, instead of a brand, Is a benefit today. Whereas if you would ask me when I was younger, I probably would have said, make it seem like you have a big company behind you.[00:52:24] Nathan:Yeah. And I think that that indie shift overall, like people are looking for that.[00:52:29] Dave:Yeah,[00:52:29] Nathan:Want to ask about the intersection between your investing and the newsletter. like, are you still actively investing today and doing author.[00:52:38] Dave:Yeah, yeah, no, I, I still invest a ton. I usually follow along with people who are a little more in tune with today's companies than I am. I don't really go out there and brand myself as an investor much, but I've been really lucky. I have very little intersection actually, if any, with my newsletter and my investing and I definitely want people to. To think of me as a writer first, for sure. Not as an investor who has this hobby, because that's definitely not in terms of time or passion, the reality. but I've been really lucky over the years that, I've invested with people or co-invested with them that were cool with me. branding myself as a writer first, but still looking at deals that came through their brands because they were branded as BCS or investors or angels.That's probably a bigger deal now than when I first started. There were like five angel investors, basically. Nobody really did small, early stage seed deals. you know, I mean, we all knew each other that did it and now there's like thousands of them. So you really have to be either a really pretty well-known entrepreneur or you have to. Sort of attach yourself to our organization or two who are really branding themselves well, getting out there and building a stable of companies,[00:53:58] Nathan:Yeah.[00:53:59] Dave:It's pretty different, more, much more has changed about that than the newsletter game, actually, which is pretty much the same as it was the day I started actually.[00:54:07] Nathan:Are there a few of those I'm curious who are a few of those, people that you would tag along with, you know, when they're investing where like, oh, this person puts money into something I'd like to be right there with them.[00:54:19] Dave:I mean, I have some people that are like entrepreneurs and former entrepreneurs that do it, and if they like it I'll do it. but generally I co-invest with, at any given time, a different group of people, used to be a larger group. When I first started out, my whole investing career, I've co-invested with this guy named Bob zip who's much smarter and much wiser than I am about all things business and.Startup world. So that was really great. And he used to work at a company called venture law group in the first boom, and they represented Google, Hotmail. eGroups all the big, huge, early internet companies, and so he really knew the space well. And when he became, I used to get deals from him.That's how you used to get deals actually was by a couple of law firms that focused on startups. I've been co-investing with him all along and he's been generous enough to, he left the law firm a long, long time ago and became an investor primarily. And he had a fund and was well-known guy and well-respected guy.So I got to sit in when he would hear pitches. and we sort of, we weren't investing together out of the same fund, but we would sort of make our decisions together. And we still do that a lot. these days, I almost always follow along with a guy named run-on barn Cohen and a really good friend of mine.He was for many years at WordPress, basically, most of the things that make money at WordPress, he did. and now he's a investor at a VC called resolute. If anybody's looking for a good VC, he's like incredible, like Bob zip much, much smarter than I am about this stuff. Unbelievably ethical, great business sense.Great technical sense. so I mostly just follow him. So if he does something that's usually good enough for me. And if I see something that I think it's good, I'll pass it along to him, but it's mostly that, but I've been really fortunate. I can't express that enough, that I've been able to invest in companies without having to spend all of my time, branding myself as an investor.That's just been unbelievably lucky. So, I've been able to focus a ton of my energy on my six.[00:56:31] Nathan:That's right. I'm writing a newsletter about the news. I guess, as you're looking to grow and continue on, right? Like the next phase of readers and, and all of that, since we can just say directly that we're all narcissists and we do this for the attention. what's what's sort of that next thing that you're looking for, it's going from 140,000 subscribers to say 200,000 and beyond.[00:56:54] Dave:Yeah, well, I'm, I'm hoping that, I'm not just trying to sell my book here. I'm hoping that the book and the newsletter will sort of have, a coexistence with them because the new the book is really an extension of the brand and the brand is that icon to Next Draft. So I'm hoping that the tricky part about writing about marketing a newsletter, like we discussed earlier, there's not really a natural virality to them.So. You Have this piecemeal growth from people telling each other or their friends or forwarding it to somebody or maybe occasionally tweeting or sharing a Facebook link. Oh, you should check this out. But it's all sort of small little blips. If you get a news story or a big blog story about it, or another newsletter recommending you, that's probably the fastest way people grow these days is by, co-sponsoring each other's newsletters or co-promoting them.Those big hits are more rare and they usually require like, I've had a ton of stories written about Next Draft, but most of them a long time ago, because it's basically a similar product to what it was when they wrote about it the first time. So they're like, Hey, I'd love to write about it, but what's the hook.What's the new thing, you know? so I'm hoping that the book provides that emphasis. It's like, we're doing now a ton of people who may by either been on a podcast in the past, or they've wanted to do a podcast with me say, okay, now's a great time. I'd probably want to move your book and, we can set something up.So it's sort of as an impetus. So I'm hoping that that will be the next big newsletter thing that most, most people who write about the book will also write about the newsletter and the two things can sort of grow together.[00:58:35] Nathan:I think that's spot on.[00:58:36] Dave:That's in terms of, you know, marketing and promotion, otherwise, I do want to try, one of these referral programs because people definitely do like products.And, I am lucky that my icon looks really good on shirts so that people actually really want them. And I have a great designer named Brian Bell who makes all of my shirts.[00:58:58] Nathan:There's something like when creators thinking about products, often if you spread yourself too thin, you're like into the newsletter, the book, the podcast, and like the 14 other things that you could make all at once you sort of hinder the growth of each thing, but then if you really build one of them up to a significant level, then at that point it can start to stall out and by shifting to another medium or have it like launching another product in this case, the newsletter to a book, then that book can have a bunch more momentum that feeds back into it.And so there's just sort of this interesting balance of like, no, When to like, keep pushing on the thing that you have versus when to add the next thing that like, then they feed off of each other and go from there. So I think you're doing it with good timing.[00:59:45] Dave:Hopefully it'll work. All that kind of stuff is the tricky part of doing this stuff. Especially stuff like podcasts and newsletters that are—it's really a ton of word of mouth, unless you get lucky and get some press, and word of mouth is just slow.There's some point where you're going to hit a tipping point where you're going to go from five or 10,000 to like 50,000 much quicker, more quickly because instead of three people going home and saying, “Hey, did you ever hear of this newsletter?” there's like 30 people going home and saying that. But, even with that they hit a plateau, and then you figure out what's the next thing. That's why doing something you're into is so important.And I don't think it's bad to try those other mediums or stretch yourself out, because you never know you might've been writing a newsletter three years, and then you do a podcast and it catches on. For some reason, you're like awesome. Less typing, more talking, let's go. So, but it's tricky. I wish I was better and had better advice for people on promotion and marketing.I'm not awesome at it, and it's not in my nature. So, begging for favors or telling people, even in my own newsletter, to buy my own book is very painful for me. I'm very sensitive to criticism about it. So, if people just all bought it and then made everybody else buy it, that would be a huge relief for me.[01:01:13] Nathan:That would be great. Well, along those lines, where should people go to subscribe to the newsletter, and then follow you on your preferred channel, and then ultimately buy the book?[01:01:24] Dave:I don't want like two or 300,000 people taking my site down. So let's go with if your last name starts between A and M you can start by going to NextDraft.com and sign up for the newsletter there. Or, you can also just go to the App Store and search for Next Draft. If you're N through Z, you can start with the book, and that's at: PleaseScream.com.It has links to all the various audio, and Kindle, and hardcover versions.[01:01:50] Nathan:That's good. I liked how you split the traffic, that way there's no hug of death, and we'll do well there.[01:01:57] Dave:I don't want to get fireballed.[01:01:58] Nathan:That's right.Dave. Thanks for coming on. This was really fun.[01:02:01] Dave:Yeah, thanks a lot for having me.

Sermons by the Monte Vista church of Christ

As we've already seen at the beginning of 2 Peter 3, the day of the Lord is coming! But so what? Is it merely an academic exercise to learn about God's great day of judgment? “But the day of the Lord will come like a thief, and then the heavens will pass away with a […]

The Fellowship of the Geeks Podcast
Trip Your Ass Off and Watch - Week of 10/6/21

The Fellowship of the Geeks Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 123:08


The Fellowship is pleased to present Horror Month for 2021. This year we're talking about horror for all ages, and we start it off with Frankenweenie and Vincent, both from Tim Burton's early years. Sort of - Burton remade Frankenweenie years later, and this confused us a bit. Plus our usual tangents galore and our comics picks of the week.   Announcements: We found a way to do our monthly meetups - on Discord! Come hang out with us in the voice channel on the 3rd Saturday of the month; details on Facebook & Twitter & the Events tab on our website We're super excited to announce our partnership with ComicBooks For Kids. Details on the website (and you should be listening to hear more, too

Random Thoughts From The Road - A Motorcycle Podcast
Lake of the Ozarks Bikefest… Sort of.

Random Thoughts From The Road - A Motorcycle Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 20:52


In this episode Randy and I head to the Lake of the Ozarks Bikefest and have a big time. But, as occasionally happens when you're having a great time, Gremlins sometimes have the final say… Little Bastards!

Dj's Aviation Podcast
Australia's Borders Opening Again (Sort Of)

Dj's Aviation Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 30:10


Australia has announced the progressive re-opening of its international borders. Today I take a look at what this means! Dj's Transport - www.youtube.com/channel/UCXYRdWd9a1rrKpIKYrwt5UA Join the Official Discord Server - discord.gg/aviation​ Support Dj's Aviation on Patreon - www.patreon.com/djsaviation​ Dj's Aviation Merchandise Store - bit.ly/DjsMerchandise​ Social Media: Twitter - twitter.com/DjsAviation​ TikTok - www.tiktok.com/@djsaviation​ Facebook - www.facebook.com/djsaviation​ Instagram - www.instagram.com/djsaviation/​ Flight Radar - my.flightradar24.com/DjsAviation​ Flickr - bit.ly/DjsAviationFlickr

Ride the Lightning: Tesla Motors Unofficial Podcast
Episode 322: The Cyberquad Is Back...Sort Of

Ride the Lightning: Tesla Motors Unofficial Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 74:48


The Cyberquad resurfaces (but not like you think), Giga Shanghai ramps up production yet again, Elon Musk is confident that the chip shortage is almost over, and more! If you enjoy the podcast and would like to support my efforts, please check out my Patreon at https://www.patreon.com/teslapodcast and consider a pledge. I'd be grateful. Every little bit helps! And don't forget to leave a message on the Ride the Lightning hotline anytime with a question, comment, or discussion topic for next week's show! The toll-free number to call or Skype is 1-888-989-8752. P.S. Get 15% off your first order of awesome aftermarket Tesla accessories at AbstractOcean.com by using the code RTLpodcast at checkout. And if you're ordering a Jeda Wireless Charging Pad or USB hub for Model 3/Y (coupon code RTL), please use my referral link: https://getjeda.com/ref/8/ Grab the SnapPlate for any of the four Teslas at https://everyamp.com/RTL/. Finally, pick up a 128gb or 256gb Sentry Mode/Dashcam kit at http://www.puretesla.com/rtl 

Recovery (Sort Of)
103: Working in Recovery - Where to Start (Sort Of)

Recovery (Sort Of)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 66:42


Where do we start when we are ready to enter the workforce? Do we look for a career, or start with just any old job? How do we stay motivated to keep looking for a job after we already have one? What about criminal background checks, how do we approach those on applications? And further, what about for those of us that have felonies? Are felonies completely limiting to what we can do, or is there room for pursuing our interests no matter our criminal history? How do we address work history gaps on our applications? Is honesty always the best policy? Or are there times we might want to use a little discretion? We explore the work world for people entering the workforce from a perspective of those of us finding recovery and getting back into society. Join the conversation by leaving a message, emailing us at RecoverySortOf@gmail.com, or find us on Twitter, Facebook or Instagram, or find us on our website at www.recoverysortof.com. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/recoverysortof/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/recoverysortof/support

L'After Foot
Rennes solide, Monaco s'en sort bien – 30/09

L'After Foot

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 16:00


L'After foot, c'est LE show d'après-match et surtout la référence des fans de football depuis 15 ans ! Les rencontres se prolongent tous les soirs avec Gilbert Brisbois et Nicolas Jamain avec les réactions des joueurs et entraîneurs, les conférences de presse d'après-match et les débats animés entre supporters, experts de l'After et auditeurs. RMC est une radio généraliste, essentiellement axée sur l'actualité et sur l'interactivité avec les auditeurs, dans un format 100% parlé, inédit en France. La grille des programmes de RMC s'articule autour de rendez-vous phares comme Apolline Matin (6h-9h), les Grandes Gueules (9h-12h), Estelle Midi (12h-15h), Super Moscato Show (15h-18h), Rothen s'enflamme (18h-20h), l'After Foot (20h-minuit).

L'After Foot
Rennes solide, Monaco s'en sort bien – 30/09

L'After Foot

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 16:00


L'After foot, c'est LE show d'après-match et surtout la référence des fans de football depuis 15 ans ! Les rencontres se prolongent tous les soirs avec Gilbert Brisbois et Nicolas Jamain avec les réactions des joueurs et entraîneurs, les conférences de presse d'après-match et les débats animés entre supporters, experts de l'After et auditeurs. RMC est une radio généraliste, essentiellement axée sur l'actualité et sur l'interactivité avec les auditeurs, dans un format 100% parlé, inédit en France. La grille des programmes de RMC s'articule autour de rendez-vous phares comme Apolline Matin (6h-9h), les Grandes Gueules (9h-12h), Estelle Midi (12h-15h), Super Moscato Show (15h-18h), Rothen s'enflamme (18h-20h), l'After Foot (20h-minuit).

No Dunks
Fast Friends | 'Hobbs & Shaw' Rewatch

No Dunks

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 107:00


Saving the world is easy; working together is a real pain in the ass. This summer, Skeets, Trey, and JD are watching every movie from the 'Fast & Furious' franchise. Up next: 2019's 'Hobbs & Shaw' starring The Rock, Jason Statham, and Idris Elba. Vroom, vroom? Sort of. Subscribe to No Dunks on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/NoDunksInc Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Shipping & Handling
Episode 79: Sort By Kudos

Shipping & Handling

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 55:32


or: Now Kiss! In which Bridget and Jen talk about Bridget's return to fandom after a decade away, and also have a full meltdown about how long this podcast has been going on.  Spoilers for The Magicians from 12:21 onwards Note: Jen's audio is a little off in this because she used airpods like a dumb dumb, so our apologies for that. You can listen to the episode here. Thank you to everyone who has ever donated on Ko-Fi! Like the podcast? You can support us through a donation on ko-fi, by subscribing to us on iTunes, or by leaving a review! Discussed in This Episode: The Magicians (SyFy) A Marvelous Light by Freya Marske The Untamed (Netflix) The Robber Girl by Frannie Billingsley The Elemental Logic series by Laurie Marks A Memory Called Empire by Arkady Martine Romancing the Beat by Gwen Hayes

The Letters Page
Editor's Note #48

The Letters Page

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 82:48


We're back to regular time! Sort of! Don't worry about it! Show Notes: Run Time: 1:22:58 We're about to get a couple months of spooky! Here's the upcoming schedule for October AND November! Tuesday, October 5th: Episode #190 - Writers' Room: Post Oracle of Discord Tuesday, October 12th: Episode #191 - Writers' Room: Witches and Werewolves: Harpy and Alpha Tuesday, October 19th: Episode #192 - Writers' Room: Daybreak Halloween Special Tuesday, October 26th: Editor's Note #49 Tuesday, November 2nd: Episode #193 - Writers' Room: Disparation: Oni Mr. Fixer Tuesday, November 9th: Episode #194 - Writers' Room: A Mr. Jitters story Tuesday, November 16th: Episode #195 - Creative Process: Underworlds — hells, demon dimensions, and more! Tuesday, November 23rd: Editor's Note #50 Tuesday, November 30th: Episode #196 - Writers' Room: Haunted Fanatic Wow! That's a lot of topics! And how many of them will be scary? Only time will tell! We hope you enjoy the next several weeks as much as we will! As we mention near the end of the episode, we're coming up on some big episode-type number landmarks... exciting to be heading there with all of you, dear listeners! Looking forward to what the future may bring.

City Cast Denver
Legal Weed Delivery Exists in Denver... Sort Of

City Cast Denver

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 16:15


The first legal weed deliveries happened in Denver last month. But like many aspects of the weed business, the actual implementation of legal delivery hasn't been easy. Currently, only six dispensaries are permitted for delivery and so far just one, Strawberry Fields, has launched, in partnership with a delivery service called doobba. City Cast Denver host Bree Davies talks with journalist and podcast host Ann Marie Awad about what makes the delivery process so cumbersome for local companies, what it means for those impacted by the war on drugs, and how accessible — or inaccessible — cannabis delivery really is for the average Denverite.  If you want to see how the City of Denver is soliciting applications for cannabis deliver licenses, here's their site explaining the process: https://www.denvergov.org/Government/Agencies-Departments-Offices/Business-Licensing/Business-Licenses/Marijuana-Licenses/Delivery-Permit Want more local news every weekday? Sign up for the City Cast Denver newsletter here.  Say hello on Twitter! @citycastdenver