Podcasts about Sort

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Best podcasts about Sort

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Latest podcast episodes about Sort

Keeping Records
Home to Mama

Keeping Records

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 57:40


Caleb and Shelby are back with their first video episode, which also just so happens to be a Listener Submission episode. Caleb questions the quality of his video, but decides he doesn't care because he looks great on camera. Meanwhile, Shelby's shadows? Sort of going wherever they want. Before diving into your picks, Caleb and Shelby analyze: Caleb's crazy week with the Pope in Tucson Girlies who can have free clout because they're *the* girlies 3rd string NFL tight ends they are both attracted to And Listeners...your submissions for this week are equally alarming and beautiful, welcome bark lil freaks: Your Record Additions "Thrussy" used in jest (Portmanteau) Earnest a cappella music (Audio) The Pope shaming people (Experience) Denver int. airport conspiracy theories (Chronicles) Yelp restaurant reviews (Literature) Getting surprise mail from a friend (Experience) "Uppercut" by Lou Roy (2022 Song) (Listen on Apple Music or Spotify)   Your Deletions “Thrussy” used sincerely (Portmanteau) Caleb being a bully to Shelby (Perception) Finding out via Instagram story that your crush is in a new relationship (Experience) Sleeping in AirPods and waking up with sore ears (Affliction) Baby memorabilia that weirdly sexualizes the kid (Trend)   Watch the video version of the episode Follow the show @keepingrecordspod Advertise on Keeping Records via Gumball.fm See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Mini-Break
The Levee Finally Breaks (Sort Of) [2022 AO Day 4 Recap]

The Mini-Break

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 63:37


Welcome to the Mini-Break podcast powered by Tennis Point. This is your daily podcast for the biggest storylines, results, and controversies from the tennis world. Cracked Racquets Editor-in-Chief Alex Gruskin recaps a surprising day of results on Day 4 of the 2022 Australian Open. He offers his reflections on Clara Tauson earning a signature victory over Anett Kontaveit, contemplates puzzling losses for Muguruza, Murray, Schwartzman, and others, discusses the odds entering Round Three, and so much more!! Don't forget to give a 5-star review on your favorite podcast app! In addition, add your Twitter/Instagram handle to the review for a chance to win some FREE CR gear!! This episode brought to you by: Tennis Point Discounted Tennis Apparel, Tennis Racquets, Tennis Shoes & Equipment from Nike, adidas, Babolat, Wilson & More! Visit their store today and use the code "CR15" at checkout to save 15% off Sale items. Some Exclusions (MAP Exceptions) apply and code will not work on those items. This code will add 1 FREE CAN of WILSON Balls to the cart at checkout.  Lucky Racket The hub for tennis fans, based out of Dayton, OH. Our mission is to make everyone smile when they see our products on and off the tennis courts! Get 15% OFF by using our promo code "Cracked15" at luckyracquet.com. Tennis Channel Podcast Network Visit https://www.tennis.com/pro-game/podcasts/ to stay current on the latest tennis news and trends and enjoy in-depth analysis and dynamic debates. Find Cracked Racquets Website: https://www.crackedracquets.com Instagram: https://instagram.com/crackedracquets Twitter: https://twitter.com/crackedracquets Facebook: https://Facebook.com/crackedracquets YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC12ZE3jU0n52JkeWV1TB21A Email Newsletter: https://www.crackedracquets.comDon't forget to give a 5 star review with your t Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Pulling Tarp Podcast
We Used to Work Together! Kind of, Sort of (w/ Joe Putnam, Director of Communications, State College Spikes)

Pulling Tarp Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 78:51


Joe Putnam and Bobby are remotely reunited once again and chat about working together a long time ago (kind of, sort of), calling and winning three New York Penn League titles, being a contestant on Stump the Schwab, announcing for Penn State athletics, bus breakdowns, and much more!

Stuff You Should Know
Short Stuff: Jaywalking

Stuff You Should Know

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 17:28


Jaywalking is a crime. Sort of. But why? Learn all about this weird law today. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Sort of Brilliant
31. Sort of Doctor Who: Rose, Martha and Donna

Sort of Brilliant

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 95:15


We're back in the TARDIS this week with the women who made Ten better (or tried to, anyway). That's right, it's Ten companion week with Rose, Martha, and Donna! No one knows that brilliant, clever mind better than them, and Ten knows he'd be nothing without them (and proves it by regenerating when he's lost them all). Their stories may end sadly (except Martha's) but we don't think any of them would change a thing. Ten did manage to get rid of all of them though, which clearly means none of them are Slytherins. So take our hand and run with us towards the sorting hat as we tell you what houses Ten's companions get sorted into, and also discuss why it is he only attracts a certain kind of house.

Pop Culture Happy Hour

The slyly innovative HBO Max series Sort Of follows Sabi, a gender fluid millennial in Toronto trying to figure their life out. Sabi, played by co-creator Bilal Baig, nannies for a family whose matriarch winds up in a coma, placing Sabi in a tough spot between living their life and caring for others first. It's a show with good word of mouth that makes for a great Saturday afternoon binge.

Mid-faith Crisis
Episode 184: ‘Sort it Ahhht!’

Mid-faith Crisis

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2022


It's our 2022 themes episode. We reflect on how our themes worked out last year, and look ahead to what we're going to be concentrating on in ZOZZ. (Or 2022 as some call it.) But we start something very serious: our very first Mid-faith Crisis Ministerial Scandal. Resign! Support the podcastContact the podcast through your email machineThe Mid-Faith Crisis week at Lee Abbey - Book Now!Cortex: Your ThemeTheme System JournalEpisode 142: Own Your NicknessEpisode 98: Your new year's theme

The William Hall Show
Biden's Vaccine Mandate Burst Into Flames, Sort Of | Ep. 110

The William Hall Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 33:48


The SCOTUS shuts down a portion of Biden's vaccine mandate, Omicron is proven to be less deadly, and Microsoft plans to use word checker to help you use work terms. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/williamhallshow/support

SRF 3 punkt CH
Von wegen Januar-Loch: Dieser Release-Freitag hat es in sich!

SRF 3 punkt CH

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 55:51


Es ist erst der zweite Release-Freitag des noch jungen Jahres, und trotzdem beschert er uns schon neue Musik von Baschi, Pegasus oder Bastian Baker. Neben den grossen Namen gibt es heute aber auch Neuentdeckungen wie Sort of Sad aus Appenzell oder einen Remix von Sensu, die für den Wow-Effekt und Weekend-Vibes sorgen.

Peddling Fiction Podcast
Blocked...Sort Of

Peddling Fiction Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 74:05


Workers all around the country can breathe a sigh of relief as the supreme court has blocked the OSHA vaccine and testing mandate for companies with 100 or more employees. The health care industry wasn't so fortunate.

Single Smart Female
He Sort Of Made Me Think I Was The Only One. Is He Wrong For This? - Encore Single Smart Female

Single Smart Female

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 16:05


What happens when you meet a man you REALLY like who makes you feel like you are the only one, WHEN WHAM… you find out that you are not. Do the two of you have a chance at all? Find out in this episode of Single Smart Female   LISTEN HERE:   Important Links and […] The post He Sort Of Made Me Think I Was The Only One. Is He Wrong For This? – Encore Single Smart Female appeared first on Have Him Your Way with Jenn Burton.

Scale Your Small Business
98 - Reflect and Review

Scale Your Small Business

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 20:05


Welcome back to the Scale Your Small Business Podcast with your host, Jillian Flodstrom. Today, we're going over the 8th pillar of the Scale Your Small Business System: Review. It's important to recognize that it's crucial to take time to pause, reflect, and evaluate. Otherwise, you may make things much harder than they need to be.    A good rotation of review can happen quarterly, but if you haven't got that sort of time, there are a few things you can do it five minutes through a weekly review.    The first thing is cleaning up your area. If you're surrounded by mess, your work could be impacted. May way for your work.    Next up, put everything in a pile. That way, everything is in one place ready for you to go through it on a weekly basis.    If you find your brain is clogged, brain dumping can be your best friend. When you do this, you're able to get those thoughts out of your head without them being lost to the abyss. Then, you can come back to them when you're ready.  Remember to give yourself time to write down more than the obvious stuff. Dig deep and find things that may be causing you fatigue.    Now, if you have 15 minutes, review your previous calendar and make sure you didn't miss anything along the way.    From there, review your upcoming calendar so you know what's on your plate the week ahead.    Additionally, empty out your voicemail and inbox. This doesn't mean addressing every single item, but do take stock and make sure you know what you have. Form a habit of deleting anything unneeded.    This is the time to make sure you haven't forgotten anything.    Go through your text messages to make sure you don't have any outstanding texts you need to reply to before you start your week. 30 minutes for your weekly review? Do everything up to this point, and add these:   Sort through your pile from earlier. Perhaps some are more urgent, things you need to file, whatever it is, put it where it needs to go. Create piles that make sense to you.    Write your weekly to-do list. Sometimes, this will spark your memory and remind you of items you may have forgotten about. Also, review last week's to-do and move whatever you need to.   If you have an entire 60 minutes to do your weekly review, here are some additional practices to consider:   Review your projects. Especially when you have a larger one, break it down into small chunks. Ensure nothing has been forgotten or fallen through the cracks.    Review your ‘someday maybe' list. This list is for you to remind yourself of what you may have time to take on.    Next, consider creating a ‘43 folder' system, where there are folders for every day of every month of the year. From there, you can put in any items, invitations, or important files based on the day they need to be reviewed.    Schedule next week's weekly review. If you can do this at the same time every week--awesome, but don't let a reschedule stop you from doing this important work.    Update any software you may have waiting. You can perform other tasks on this list at the same time!   Empty your digital and physical trash cans. This seems minor, but this small step makes a huge difference. Something as simple as making sure your desktop and actual desktop will give you a truly fresh start.    Key Takeaways   A weekly review is an essential step to prepare you for your week ahead and prevent tasks from slipping through the cracks Your weekly review can be whenever and for however long works best for you--but make sure you take the steps necessary to give a good look towards your week. Sometimes the smallest tasks make the biggest difference. Don't ignore the little things!

Peanut Butter and Biscuits - A Ted Lasso Fancast
Ted Lasso Season 1 Episode 7 - Make Rebecca Great Again

Peanut Butter and Biscuits - A Ted Lasso Fancast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 53:21


Hello fellow Lasso-holics! We're continuing our rewind journey through season 1 by getting SASSY with episode 7 Make Rebecca Great Again. Jeremy is down south visiting some mouse in a castle, so Craig is joined by returning guest Courtney Enlow. The crew was also supposed to include Lou Hare from Front Row Guilty Pleasures, but you'll hear what happened. This episode is chalk full of story beats and character development that will have repercussions well into the second season. We break it down for you, and of course visit our favorite Tedisms of the week. It's the best part of your week, it's Lasso time! FEATURING: Craig McFarland, Courtney Enlow & Sort-of-kind-of Lou Hare Email the show at frontrowlasso@gmail.com --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/pbbfrn/support

The Bald & The Beautiful
S14 Ep1: MAFS s14, ep 1 Recap--Sort of...

The Bald & The Beautiful

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 69:46


Thank you to our sponsors: Babbel: babbel.com/tbtb Betterhelp: better.com/tbtb Hello Fresh: hellofresh.com/tbtb16 Flex: flexfits.com/tbtb

Cool Story - A Wheel of Time Podcast
Sort of Demonic-y (SIDE QUEST: Prime E07)

Cool Story - A Wheel of Time Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 52:57


In this episode, Matt and Enn discuss the Wheel of Time Amazon Series Episode 07!  This one features lots of new characters including Min! She does not disappoint and neither does Fal Dara - this episode does give us feelings though and features Matt's least favorite scene of the series. Also don't listen to us at the beginning - it's just episode 7; 8 comes next week haha.E07: The Flame of Tar Valon

Screaming in the Cloud
Slinging CDK Knowledge with Matt Coulter

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 37:37


About MattMatt is an AWS DevTools Hero, Serverless Architect, Author and conference speaker. He is focused on creating the right environment for empowered teams to rapidly deliver business value in a well-architected, sustainable and serverless-first way.You can usually find him sharing reusable, well architected, serverless patterns over at cdkpatterns.com or behind the scenes bringing CDK Day to life.Links: AWS CDK Patterns: https://cdkpatterns.com The CDK Book: https://thecdkbook.com CDK Day: https://www.cdkday.com TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: It seems like there is a new security breach every day. Are you confident that an old SSH key, or a shared admin account, isn't going to come back and bite you? If not, check out Teleport. Teleport is the easiest, most secure way to access all of your infrastructure. The open source Teleport Access Plane consolidates everything you need for secure access to your Linux and Windows servers—and I assure you there is no third option there. Kubernetes clusters, databases, and internal applications like AWS Management Console, Yankins, GitLab, Grafana, Jupyter Notebooks, and more. Teleport's unique approach is not only more secure, it also improves developer productivity. To learn more visit: goteleport.com. And not, that is not me telling you to go away, it is: goteleport.com.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Rising Cloud, which I hadn't heard of before, but they're doing something vaguely interesting here. They are using AI, which is usually where my eyes glaze over and I lose attention, but they're using it to help developers be more efficient by reducing repetitive tasks. So, the idea being that you can run stateless things without having to worry about scaling, placement, et cetera, and the rest. They claim significant cost savings, and they're able to wind up taking what you're running as it is in AWS with no changes, and run it inside of their data centers that span multiple regions. I'm somewhat skeptical, but their customers seem to really like them, so that's one of those areas where I really have a hard time being too snarky about it because when you solve a customer's problem and they get out there in public and say, “We're solving a problem,” it's very hard to snark about that. Multus Medical, Construx.ai and Stax have seen significant results by using them. And it's worth exploring. So, if you're looking for a smarter, faster, cheaper alternative to EC2, Lambda, or batch, consider checking them out. Visit risingcloud.com/benefits. That's risingcloud.com/benefits, and be sure to tell them that I said you because watching people wince when you mention my name is one of the guilty pleasures of listening to this podcast.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. I'm joined today by Matt Coulter, who is a Technical Architect at Liberty Mutual. You may have had the privilege of seeing him on the keynote stage at re:Invent last year—in Las Vegas or remotely—that last year of course being 2021. But if you make better choices than the two of us did, and found yourself not there, take the chance to go and watch that keynote. It's really worth seeing.Matt, first, thank you for joining me. I'm sorry, I don't have 20,000 people here in the audience to clap this time. They're here, but they're all remote as opposed to sitting in the room behind me because you know, social distancing.Matt: And this left earphone, I just have some applause going, just permanently, just to keep me going. [laugh].Corey: That's sort of my own internal laugh track going on. It's basically whatever I say is hilarious, to that. So yeah, doesn't really matter what I say, how I say it, my jokes are all for me. It's fine. So, what was it like being on stage in front of that many people? It's always been a wild experience to watch and for folks who haven't spent time on the speaking circuit, I don't think that there's any real conception of what that's like. Is this like giving a talk at work, where I just walk on stage randomly, whatever I happened to be wearing? And, oh, here's a microphone, I'm going to say words. What is the process there?Matt: It's completely different. For context for everyone, before the pandemic, I would have pretty regularly talked in front of, I don't know, maybe one, two hundred people in Liberty, in Belfast. So, I used to be able to just, sort of, walk in front of them, and lean against the pillar, and use my clicker, and click through, but the process for actually presenting something as big as a keynote and re:Invent is so different. For starters, you think that when you walk onto the stage, you'll actually be able to see the audience, but the way the lights are set up, you can pretty much see about one row of people, and they're not the front row, so anybody I knew, I couldn't actually see.And yeah, you can only see, sort of like, the from the void, and then you have your screens, so you've six sets of screens that tell you your notes as well as what slides you're on, you know, so you can pivot. But other than that, I mean, it feels like you're just talking to yourself outside of whenever people, thankfully, applause. It's such a long process to get there.Corey: I've always said that there are a few different transition stages as the audience size increases, but for me, the final stage is more or less anything above 750 people. Because as you say, you aren't able to see that many beyond that point, and it doesn't really change anything meaningfully. The most common example that you see in the wild is jokes that work super well with a small group of people fall completely flat to large audiences. It's why so much corporate numerous cheesy because yeah, everyone in the rehearsals is sitting there laughing and the joke kills, but now you've got 5000 people sitting in a room and that joke just sounds strained and forced because there's no longer a conversation, and no one has the shared context that—the humor has to change. So, in some cases when you're telling a story about what you're going to say on stage, during a rehearsal, they're going to say, “Well, that joke sounds really corny and lame.” It's, “Yeah, wait until you see it in front of an audience. It will land very differently.” And I'm usually right on that.I would also advise, you know, doing what you do and having something important and useful to say, as opposed to just going up there to tell jokes the whole time. I wanted to talk about that because you talked about how you're using various CDK and other serverless style patterns in your work at Liberty Mutual.Matt: Yeah. So, we've been using CDK pretty extensively since it was, sort of, Q3 2019. At that point, it was new. Like, it had just gone GA at the time, just came out of dev preview. And we've been using CDK from the perspective of we want to be building serverless-first, well-architected apps, and ideally we want to be building them on AWS.Now, the thing is, we have 5000 people in our IT organization, so there's sort of a couple of ways you can take to try and get those people onto the cloud: You can either go the route of being, like, there is one true path to architecture, this is our architecture and everything you want to build can fit into that square box; or you can go the other approach and try and have the golden path where you say this is the paved road that is really easy to do, but if you want to differentiate from that route, that's okay. But what you need to do is feed back into the golden path if that works. Then everybody can improve. And that's where we've started been using CDK. So, what you heard me talk about was the software accelerator, and it's sort of a different approach.It's where anybody can build a pattern and then share it so that everybody else can rapidly, you know, just reuse it. And what that means is effectively you can, instead of having to have hundreds of people on a central team, you can actually just crowdsource, and sort of decentralize the function. And if things are good, then a small team can actually come in and audit them, so to speak, and check that it's well-architected, and doesn't have flaws, and drive things that way.Corey: I have to confess that I view the CDK as sort of a third stage automation approach, and it's one that I haven't done much work with myself. The first stage is clicking around in the console; the second is using CloudFormation or Terraform; the third stage is what we're talking about here is CDK or Pulumi, or something like that. And then you ascend to the final fourth stage, which is what I use, which is clicking around in the AWS console, but then you lie to people about it. ClickOps is poised to take over the world. But that's okay. You haven't gotten that far yet. Instead, you're on the CDK side. What advantages does CDK offer that effectively CloudFormation or something like it doesn't?Matt: So, first off, for ClickOps in Liberty, we actually have the AWS console as read-only in all of our accounts, except for sandbox. So, you can ClickOps in sandbox to learn, but if you want to do something real, unfortunately, it's going to fail you. So.—Corey: I love that pattern. I think I might steal that.Matt: [laugh]. So, originally, we went heavy on CloudFormation, which is why CDK worked well for us. And because we've actually—it's been a long journey. I mean, we've been deploying—2014, I think it was, we first started deploying to AWS, and we've used everything from Terraform, to you name it. We've built our own tools, believe it or not, that are basically CDK.And the thing about CloudFormation is, it's brilliant, but it's also incredibly verbose and long because you need to specify absolutely everything that you want to deploy, and every piece of configuration. And that's fine if you're just deploying a side project, but if you're in an enterprise that has responsibilities to protect user data, and you can't just deploy anything, they end up thousands and thousands and thousands of lines long. And then we have amazing guardrails, so if you tried to deploy a CloudFormation template with a flaw in it, we can either just fix it, or reject the deploy. But CloudFormation is not known to be the fastest to deploy, so you end up in this developer cycle, where you build this template by hand, and then it goes through that CloudFormation deploy, and then you get the failure message that it didn't deploy because of some compliance thing, and developers just got frustrated, and were like, sod this. [laugh].I'm not deploying to AWS. Back the on-prem. And that's where CDK was a bit different because it allowed us to actually build abstractions with all of our guardrails baked in, so that it just looked like a standard class, for developers, like, developers already know Java, Python, TypeScript, the languages off CDK, and so we were able to just make it easy by saying, “You want API Gateway? There's an API Gateway class. You want, I don't know, an EC2 instance? There you go.” And that way, developers could focus on the thing they wanted, instead of all of the compliance stuff that they needed to care about every time they wanted to deploy.Corey: Personally, I keep lobbying AWS to add my preferred language, which is crappy shell scripting, but for some reason they haven't really been quick to add that one in. The thing that I think surprises me, on some level—though, perhaps it shouldn't—is not just the adoption of serverless that you're driving at Liberty Mutual, but the way that you're interacting with that feels very futuristic, for lack of a better term. And please don't think that I'm in any way describing this in a way that's designed to be insulting, but I do a bunch of serverless nonsense on Twitter for Pets. That's not an exaggeration. twitterforpets.com has a bunch of serverless stuff behind it because you know, I have personality defects.But no one cares about that static site that's been a slide dump a couple of times for me, and a running joke. You're at Liberty Mutual; you're an insurance company. When people wind up talking about big enterprise institutions, you're sort of a shorthand example of exactly what they're talking about. It's easy to contextualize or think of that as being very risk averse—for obvious reasons; you are an insurance company—as well as wanting to move relatively slowly with respect to technological advancement because mistakes are going to have drastic consequences to all of your customers, people's lives, et cetera, as opposed to tweets or—barks—not showing up appropriately at the right time. How did you get to the, I guess, advanced architectural philosophy that you clearly have been embracing as a company, while having to be respectful of the risk inherent that comes with change, especially in large, complex environments?Matt: Yeah, it's funny because so for everyone, we were talking before this recording started about, I've been with Liberty since 2011. So, I've seen a lot of change in the length of time I've been here. And I've built everything from IBM applications right the way through to the modern serverless apps. But the interesting thing is, the journey to where we are today definitely started eight or nine years ago, at a minimum because there was something identified in the leadership that they said, “Listen, we're all about our customers. And that means we don't want to be wasting millions of dollars, and thousands of hours, and big trains of people to build software that does stuff. We want to focus on why are we building a piece of software, and how quickly can we get there? If you focus on those two things you're doing all right.”And that's why starting from the early days, we focused on things like, okay, everything needs to go through CI/CD pipelines. You need to have your infrastructure as code. And even if you're deploying on-prem, you're still going to be using the same standards that we use to deploy to AWS today. So, we had years and years and years of just baking good development practices into the company. And then whenever we started to move to AWS, the question became, do we want to just deploy the same thing or do we want to take full advantage of what the cloud has to offer? And I think because we were primed and because the leadership had the right direction, you know, we were just sitting there ready to say, “Okay, serverless seems like a way we can rapidly help our customers.” And that's what we've done.Corey: A lot of the arguments against serverless—and let's be clear, they rhyme with the previous arguments against cloud that lots of people used to make; including me, let's be clear here. I'm usually wrong when I try to predict the future. “Well, you're putting your availability in someone else's hands,” was the argument about cloud. Yeah, it turns out the clouds are better at keeping things up than we are as individual companies.Then with serverless, it's the, “Well, if they're handling all that stuff for you on their side, when they're down, you're down. That's an unacceptable business risk, so we're going to be cloud-agnostic and multi-cloud, and that means everything we build serverlessly needs to work in multiple environments, including in our on-prem environment.” And from the way that we're talking about servers and things that you're building, I don't believe that is technically possible, unless some of the stuff you're building is ridiculous. How did you come to accept that risk organizationally?Matt: These are the conversations that we're all having. Sort of, I'd say once a week, we all have a multi-cloud discussion—and I really liked the article you wrote, it was maybe last year, maybe the year before—but multi-cloud to me is about taking the best capabilities that are out there and bringing them together. So, you know, like, Azure [ID 00:12:47] or whatever, things from the other clouds that they're good at, and using those rather than thinking, “Can I build a workload that I can simultaneously pay all of the price to run across all of the clouds, all of the time, so that if one's down, theoretically, I might have an outage?” So, the way we've looked at it is we embraced really early the well-architected framework from AWS. And it talks about things like you need to have multi-region availability, you need to have your backups in place, you need to have things like circuit breakers in place for if third-party goes down, and we've just tried to build really resilient architectures as best as we can on AWS. And do you know what I think, if [laugh] it AWS is not—I know at re:Invent, there it went down extraordinarily often compared to normal, but in general—Corey: We were all tired of re:Invent; their us-east-1 was feeling the exact same way.Matt: Yeah, so that's—it deserved a break. But, like, if somebody can't buy insurance for an hour, once a year, [laugh] I think we're okay with it versus spending millions to protect that one hour.Corey: And people make assumptions based on this where, okay, we had this problem with us-east-1 that froze things like the global Route 53 control planes; you couldn't change DNS for seven hours. And I highlighted that as, yeah, this is a problem, and it's something to severely consider, but I will bet you anything you'd care to name that there is an incredibly motivated team at AWS, actively fixing that as we speak. And by—I don't know how long it takes to untangle all of those dependencies, but I promise they're going to be untangled in relatively short order versus running data centers myself, when I discover a key underlying dependency I didn't realize was there, well, we need to break that. That's never going to happen because we're trying to do things as a company, and it's just not the most important thing for us as a going concern. With AWS, their durability and reliability is the most important thing, arguably compared to security.Would you rather be down or insecure? I feel like they pick down—I would hope in most cases they would pick down—but they don't want to do either one. That is something they are drastically incentivized to fix. And I'm never going to be able to fix things like that and I don't imagine that you folks would be able to either.Matt: Yeah, so, two things. The first thing is the important stuff, like, for us, that's claims. We want to make sure at any point in time, if you need to make a claim you can because that is why we're here. And we can do that with people whether or not the machines are up or down. So, that's why, like, you always have a process—a manual process—that the business can operate, irrespective of whether the cloud is still working.And that's why we're able to say if you can't buy insurance in that hour, it's okay. But the other thing is, we did used to have a lot of data centers, and I have to say, the people who ran those were amazing—I think half the staff now work for AWS—but there was this story that I heard where there was an app that used to go down at the same time every day, and nobody could work out why. And it was because someone was coming in to clean the room at that time, and they unplugged the server to plug in a vacuum, and then we're cleaning the room, and then plugging it back in again. And that's the kind of thing that just happens when you manage people, and you manage a building, and manage a premises. Whereas if you've heard that happened that AWS, I mean, that would be front page news.Corey: Oh, it absolutely would. There's also—as you say, if it's the sales function, if people aren't able to buy insurance for an hour, when us-east-1 went down, the headlines were all screaming about AWS taking an outage, and some of the more notable customers were listed as examples of this, but the story was that, “AWS has massive outage,” not, “Your particular company is bad at technology.” There's sort of a reputational risk mitigation by going with one of these centralized things. And again, as you're alluding to, what you're doing is not life-critical as far as the sales process and getting people to sign up. If an outage meant that suddenly a bunch of customers were no longer insured, that's a very different problem. But that's not your failure mode.Matt: Exactly. And that's where, like, you got to look at what your business is, and what you're specifically doing, but for 99.99999% of businesses out there, I'm pretty sure you can be down for the tiny window that AWS is down per year, and it will be okay, as long as you plan for it.Corey: So, one thing that really surprised me about the entirety of what you've done at Liberty Mutual is that you're a big enterprise company, and you can take a look at any enterprise company, and say that they have dueling mottos, which is, “I am not going to comment on that,” or, “That's not funny.” Like, the safe mode for any large concern is to say nothing at all. But a lot of folks—not just you—at Liberty have been extremely vocal about the work that you're doing, how you view these things, and I almost want to call it advocacy or evangelism for the CDK. I'm slightly embarrassed to admit that for a little while there, I thought you were an AWS employee in their DevRel program because you were such an advocate in such strong ways for the CDK itself.And that is not something I expected. Usually you see the most vocal folks working in environments that, let's be honest, tend to play a little bit fast and loose with things like formal corporate communications. Liberty doesn't and yet, there you folks are telling these great stories. Was that hard to win over as a culture, or am I just misunderstanding how corporate life is these days?Matt: No, I mean, so it was different, right? There was a point in time where, I think, we all just sort of decided that—I mean, we're really good at what we do from an engineering perspective, and we wanted to make sure that, given the messaging we were given, those 5000 teck employees in Liberty Mutual, if you consider the difference in broadcasting to 5000 versus going external, it may sound like there's millions, billions of people in the world, but in reality, the difference in messaging is not that much. So, to me what I thought, like, whenever I started anyway—it's not, like, we had a meeting and all decided at the same time—but whenever I started, it was a case of, instead of me just posting on all the internal channels—because I've been doing this for years—it's just at that moment, I thought, I could just start saying these things externally and still bring them internally because all you've done is widened the audience; you haven't actually made it shallower. And that meant that whenever I was having the internal conversations, nothing actually changed except for it meant external people, like all their Heroes—like Jeremy Daly—could comment on these things, and then I could bring that in internally. So, it almost helped the reverse takeover of the enterprise to change the culture because I didn't change that much except for change the audience of who I was talking to.Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Oracle HeatWave is a new high-performance accelerator for the Oracle MySQL Database Service. Although I insist on calling it “my squirrel.” While MySQL has long been the worlds most popular open source database, shifting from transacting to analytics required way too much overhead and, ya know, work. With HeatWave you can run your OLTP and OLAP, don't ask me to ever say those acronyms again, workloads directly from your MySQL database and eliminate the time consuming data movement and integration work, while also performing 1100X faster than Amazon Aurora, and 2.5X faster than Amazon Redshift, at a third of the cost. My thanks again to Oracle Cloud for sponsoring this ridiculous nonsense.Corey: One thing that you've done that I want to say is admirable, and I stumbled across it when I was doing some work myself over the break, and only right before this recording did I discover that it was you is the cdkpatterns.com website. Specifically what I love about it is that it publishes a bunch of different patterns of ways to do things. This deviates from a lot of tutorials on, “Here's how to build this one very specific thing,” and instead talks about, “Here's the architecture design; here's what the baseline pattern for that looks like.” It's more than a template, but less than a, “Oh, this is a messaging app for dogs and I'm trying to build a messaging app for cats.” It's very generalized, but very direct, and I really, really like that model of demo.Matt: Thank you. So, watching some of your Twitter threads where you experiment with new—Corey: Uh oh. People read those. That's a problem.Matt: I know. So, whatever you experiment with a new piece of AWS to you, I've always wondered what it would be like to be your enabling architect. Because technically, my job in Liberty is, I meant to try and stay ahead of everybody and try and ease the on-ramp to these things. So, if I was your enabling architect, I would be looking at it going, “I should really have a pattern for this.” So that whenever you want to pick up that new service the patterns in cdkpatterns.com, there's 24, 25 of them right there, but internally, there's way more than dozens now.The goal is, the pattern is the least amount to code for you to learn a concept. And then that way, you can not only see how something works, but you can maybe pick up one of the pieces of the well-architected framework while you're there: All of it's unit tested, all of it is proper, you know, like, commented code. The idea is to not be crap, but not be gold-plated either. I'm currently in the process of upgrading that all to V2 as well. So, that [unintelligible 00:21:32].Corey: You mentioned a phrase just now: “Enabling architect.” I have to say this one that has not crossed my desk before. Is that an internal term you use? Is that an enterprise concept I've somehow managed to avoid? Is that an AWS job role? What is that?Matt: I've just started saying [laugh] it's my job over the past couple of years. That—I don't know, patent pending? But the idea to me is—Corey: No, it's evocative. I love the term, I'd love to learn more.Matt: Yeah, because you can sort of take two approaches to your architecture: You can take the traditional approach, which is the ‘house of no' almost, where it's like, “This is the architecture. How dare you want to deviate. This is what we have decided. If you want to change it, here's the Architecture Council and go through enterprise architecture as people imagine it.” But as people might work out quite quickly, whenever they meet me, the whole, like, long conversational meetings are not for me. What I want to do is teach engineers how to help themselves, so that's why I see myself as enabling.And what I've been doing is using techniques like Wardley Mapping, which is where you can go out and you can actually take all the components of people's architecture and you can draw them on a map for—it's a map of how close they are to the customer, as well as how cutting edge the tech is, or how aligned to our strategic direction it is. So, you can actually map out all of the teams, and—there's 160, 170 engineers in Belfast and Dublin, and I can actually go in and say, “Oh, that piece of your architecture would be better if it was evolved to this. Well, I have a pattern for that,” or, “I don't have a pattern for that, but you know what? I'll build one and let's talk about it next week.” And that's always trying to be ahead, instead of people coming to me and I have to say no.Corey: AWS Proton was designed to do something vaguely similar, where you could set out architectural patterns of—like, the two examples that they gave—I don't know if it's in general availability yet or still in public preview, but the ones that they gave were to build a REST API with Lambda, and building something-or-other with Fargate. And the idea was that you could basically fork those, or publish them inside of your own environment of, “Oh, you want a REST API; go ahead and do this.” It feels like their vision is a lot more prescriptive than what yours is.Matt: Yeah. I talked to them quite a lot about Proton, actually because, as always, there's different methodologies and different ways of doing things. And as I showed externally, we have our software accelerator, which is kind of our take on Proton, and it's very open. Anybody can contribute; anybody can consume. And then that way, it means that you don't necessarily have one central team, you can have—think of it more like an SRE function for all of the patterns, rather than… the Proton way is you've separate teams that are your DevOps teams that set up your patterns and then separate team that's consumer, and they have different permissions, different rights to do different things. If you use a Proton pattern, anytime an update is made to that pattern, it auto-deploys your infrastructure.Corey: I can see that breaking an awful lot.Matt: [laugh]. Yeah. So, the idea is sort of if you're a consumer, I assume you [unintelligible 00:24:35] be going to change that infrastructure. You can, they've built in an escape hatch, but the whole concept of it is there's a central team that looks to what the best configuration for that is. So, I think Proton has so much potential, I just think they need to loosen some of the boundaries for it to work for us, and that's the feedback I've given them directly as well.Corey: One thing that I want to take a step beyond this is, you care about this? More than most do. I mean, people will work with computers, yes. We get paid for that. Then they'll go and give talks about things. You're doing that as well. They'll launch a website occasionally, like, cdkpatterns.com, which you have. And then you just sort of decide to go for the absolute hardest thing in the world, and you're one of four authors of a book on this. Tell me more.Matt: Yeah. So, this is something that there's a few of us have been talking since one of the first CDK Days, where we're friends, so there's AWS Heroes. There's Thorsten Höger, Matt Bonig, Sathyajith Bhat, and myself, came together—it was sometime in the summer last year—and said, “Okay. We want to write a book, but how do we do this?” Because, you know, we weren't authors before this point; we'd never done it before. We weren't even sure if we should go to a publisher, or if we should self-publish.Corey: I argue that no one wants to write a book. They want to have written a book, and every first-time author I've ever spoken to at the end has said, “Why on earth would anyone want to do this a second time?” But people do it.Matt: Yeah. And that's we talked to Alex DeBrie, actually, about his book, the amazing Dynamodb Book. And it was his advice, told us to self-publish. And he gave us his starter template that he used for his book, which took so much of the pain out because all we had to do was then work out how we were going to work together. And I will say, I write quite a lot of stuff in general for people, but writing a book is completely different because once it's out there, it's out there. And if it's wrong, it's wrong. You got to release a new version and be like, “Listen, I got that wrong.” So, it did take quite a lot of effort from the group to pull it together. But now that we have it, I want to—I don't have a printed copy because it's only PDF at the minute, but I want a copy just put here [laugh] in, like, the frame. Because it's… it's what we all want.Corey: Yeah, I want you to do that through almost a traditional publisher, selfishly, because O'Reilly just released the AWS Cookbook, and I had a great review quote on the back talking about the value added. I would love to argue that they use one of mine for The CDK Book—and then of course they would reject it immediately—of, “I don't know why you do all this. Using the console and lying about it is way easier.” But yeah, obviously not the direction you're trying to take the book in. But again, the industry is not quite ready for the lying version of ClickOps.It's really neat to just see how willing you are to—how to frame this?—to give of yourself and your time and what you've done so freely. I sometimes make a joke—that arguably isn't that funny—that, “Oh, AWS Hero. That means that you basically volunteer for a $1.6 trillion company.”But that's not actually what you're doing. What you're doing is having figured out all the sharp edges and hacked your way through the jungle to get to something that is functional, you're a trailblazer. You're trying to save other people who are working with that same thing from difficult experiences on their own, having to all thrash and find our own way. And not everyone is diligent and as willing to continue to persist on these things. Is that a somewhat fair assessment how you see the Hero role?Matt: Yeah. I mean, no two Heroes are the same, from what I've judged, I haven't met every Hero yet because pandemic, so Vegas was the first time [I met most 00:28:12], but from my perspective, I mean, in the past, whatever number of years I've been coding, I've always been doing the same thing. Somebody always has to go out and be the first person to try the thing and work out what the value is, and where it'll work for us more work for us. The only difference with the external and public piece is that last 5%, which it's a very different thing to do, but I personally, I like even having conversations like this where I get to meet people that I've never met before.Corey: You sort of discovered the entire secret of why I have an interview podcast.Matt: [laugh]. Yeah because this is what I get out of it, just getting to meet other people and have new experiences. But I will say there's Heroes out there doing very different things. You've got, like, Hiro—as in Hiro, H-I-R-O—actually started AWS Newbies and she's taught—ah, it's hundreds of thousands of people how to actually just start with AWS, through a course designed for people who weren't coders before. That kind of thing is next-level compared to anything I've ever done because you know, they have actually built a product and just given it away. I think that's amazing.Corey: At some level, building a product and giving it away sounds like, “You know, I want to never be lonely again.” Well, that'll work because you're always going to get support tickets. There's an interesting narrative around how to wind up effectively managing the community, and users, and demands, based on open-source maintainers, that we're all wrestling with as an industry, particularly in the wake of that whole log4j nonsense that we've been tilting at that windmill, and that's going to be with us for a while. One last thing I want to talk about before we wind up calling this an episode is, you are one of the organizers of CDK Day. What is that?Matt: Yeah, so CDK Day, it's a complete community-organized conference. The past two have been worldwide, fully virtual just because of the situation we're in. And I mean, they've been pretty popular. I think we had about 5000 people attended the last one, and the idea is, it's a full day of the community just telling their stories of how they liked or disliked using the CDK. So, it's not a marketing event; it's not a sales event; we actually run the whole event on a budget of exactly $0. But yeah, it's just a day of fun to bring the community together and learn a few things. And, you know, if you leave it thinking CDK is not for you, I'm okay with that as much as if you just make a few friends while you're there.Corey: This is the first time I'd realized that it wasn't a formal AWS event. I almost feel like that's the tagline that you should have under it. It's—because it sounds like the CDK Day, again, like, it's this evangelism pure, “This is why it's great and why you should use it.” But I love conferences that embrace critical views. I built one of the first talks I ever built out that did anything beyond small user groups was “Heresy in the Church of Docker.”Then they asked me to give that at ContainerCon, which was incredibly flattering. And I don't think they made that mistake a second time, but it was great to just be willing to see some group of folks that are deeply invested in the technology, but also very open to hearing criticism. I think that's the difference between someone who is writing a nuanced critique versus someone who's just [pure-on 00:31:18] zealotry. “But the CDK is the answer to every technical problem you've got.” Well, I start to question the wisdom of how applicable it really is, and how objective you are. I've never gotten that vibe from you.Matt: No, and that's the thing. So, I mean, as we've worked out in this conversation, I don't work for AWS, so it's not my product. I mean, if it succeeds or if it fails, it doesn't impact my livelihood. I mean, there are people on the team who would be sad for, but the point is, my end goal is always the same. I want people to be enabled to rapidly deliver their software to help their customers.If that's CDK, perfect, but CDK is not for everyone. I mean, there are other options available in the market. And if, even, ClickOps is the way to go for you, I am happy for you. But if it's a case of we can have a conversation, and I can help you get closer to where you need to be with some other tool, that's where I want to be. I just want to help people.Corey: And if I can do anything to help along that axis, please don't hesitate to let me know. I really want to thank you for taking the time to speak with me and being so generous, not just with your time for this podcast, but all the time you spend helping the rest of us figure out which end is up, as we continue to find that the way we manage environments evolves.Matt: Yeah. And, listen, just thank you for having me on today because I've been reading your tweets for two years, so I'm just starstruck at this moment to even be talking to you. So, thank you.Corey: No, no. I understand that, but don't worry, I put my pants on two legs at a time, just like everyone else. That's right, the thought leader on Twitter, you have to jump into your pants. That's the rule. Thanks again so much. I look forward to having a further conversation with you about this stuff as I continue to explore, well honestly, what feels like a brand new paradigm for how we manage code.Matt: Yeah. Reach out if you need any help.Corey: I certainly will. You'll regret asking. Matt [Coulter 00:33:06], Technical Architect at Liberty Mutual. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, write an angry comment, then click the submit button, but lie and say you hit the submit button via an API call.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

The Rag Company Podcast
MAIN SHOW #229 | An Intense Sort of Chill

The Rag Company Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 69:24


THIS WEEK: Dane, Levi & Anthony are in the studio to talk about their weekends, detailing & more!   VIDEO VERSION AVAILABLE HERE: https://youtu.be/Ega9ApclAd4   ►RATE & REVIEW the podcast & we'll read it LIVE on the next show! https://itunes.apple.com/.../the-rag.../id1269337267...

Murphy, Sam & Jodi
After The Show PODCAST: A Sort-Of Empty Nest.

Murphy, Sam & Jodi

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 10:37


Why Jodi is enjoying this "sort of" empty nest at home with Murphy.

Hey Bitches Podcast
130: To All The Boys I've Fucked Before: My Feelings on Body Count, Hoe Phases, & More

Hey Bitches Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 38:04


In this week's episode, Karly sits down to chat about... all the boys she's fucked before! Sort of... She chats her feelings on body count in 2022, if it's even important to keep track, hoe phases and when it might be time to stop being a hoe, and so much much. Karly also gives a big shoutout to all the boys who had a hand (and definitely other things) in making her be-cum the person she is today. Make sure to tune into Hey Bitches every single Tuesday & Thursday and subscribe on iTunes, Google Play, & Spotify! If you're feeling extra frisky, screenshot this episode and tag @heybitchespodcast on Instagram to be shared on the story. Bye bye bitch!

Jewish History with Rabbi Dr. Dovid Katz
Some thoughts about the rescue of the Belzer Rav in the Holocaust

Jewish History with Rabbi Dr. Dovid Katz

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2022 51:52


Was there a Divinely Mandated failure of leadership? Sort of like with Pharaoh?

The Rational Reminder Podcast
John 'Mac' McQuown: The Data Will Sort That Out (EP.182)

The Rational Reminder Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 46:30


One of the pillars of our approach at The Rational Reminder Podcast and PWL Capital is the idea of index investing, a concept that is both fundamental and deeply embedded. Today we are very lucky to have John 'Mac' McQuown on the show, who was behind the creation of the first equity index fund. It is hard for us to overstate just how important this contribution has been to the world of finance and any fund managers and investors that share our philosophy. Mac's work back in the 1960s, his position at Wells Fargo, and his contribution to the founding of Dimensional Fund Advisors all speak for themselves, and we are extremely grateful to get some perspectives from this titan of the world of rational and data-driven investing. In our chat, we get to hear about some of the key points in Mac's career and the general arc of the rise of indexing and diversified investing, the key figures that he worked alongside, his thoughts on the future, and the importance of environmentalism in today's world. So, to hear it all from a hero and giant in the space, be sure to listen in with us today.   Key Points From This Episode:   Looking back at the role of data at the beginning of Mac's career. [0:03:00.2] Wall Street in the 1960s, and the amusing experiences Mac had early on. [0:04:20.6] Mac's initial findings when he started analyzing institutional portfolios. [0:07:44.5] Joining Wells Fargo and the team that Mac found himself on. [0:08:28.1] The strong support that Mac and the quantitative approach were given at Wells Fargo. [0:13:36.7] Early tracking of index funds and Mac's memories of the first index they tracked. [0:18:21.3] The initial institutional responses that Mac received to his work with data. [0:20:46.5] How Wells Fargo contributed to the first commercially available index fund. [0:22:24.6] Mac's connection to Jack Bogle and the results of their relationship. [0:27:18.2] The seeds of iShares; Mac traces the beginnings at Wells Fargo. [0:29:57.7] Perspectives on why people still have belief in active investing. [0:33:19.4] Mac's memories of working with David Booth during the founding of Dimensional. [0:34:41.8] Differentiating between Dimensional funds and index funds. [0:36:44.3] Weighing concerns about the growth of indexing and how this may affect pricing and governance. [0:39:52.5] Mac's environmentalist philosophy and his thoughts on practical steps against climate change. [0:42:10.6] How Mac defines success in his life and its relationship to increased curiosity. [0:45:00.2]

Few Who Dare
Few Who Dare Ep. 44

Few Who Dare

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 50:24


WELCOME TO THE DOUBLE DEUCE MY DUDES! Graham and Jake talk about Lisa's good deed and Hugh's bullshit. Also, they freestyle. Sort of.

Mish and Zach's Leguizamarama
76. 90s Breakdown (part 1)

Mish and Zach's Leguizamarama

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 65:00


The 90s was a special time. We had Westlife, Alicia Silverstone, butterfly clips, the planet Pluto, Bill Clinton, TV Hits magazine... but did we have Sexy Luigi?Take a journey with Mish and Zach as they dissect John Leguizamo's acting career during the 90s. Sort of. They basically just have a couple of breakdowns. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Laurent Gerra
PÉPITE - M. Houellebecq sort son nouveau roman et J.-P. Pernault pense à sa galette des rois

Laurent Gerra

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 4:09


Michel Houellebecq est venu sur RTL ce matin. Il revient notamment sur le déroulement de ses fêtes d'années. Et tout ne s'est pas forcément passé comme prévu... Mais l'écrivain compte sur la sortie de son nouveau roman pour se remonter le moral. Quant à Jean-Pierre Pernault, il pense déjà à la galette des rois...

L'After Foot
Tirage au sort des 1/8e et le coup de gueule de Rolland sur le tirage – 04/01

L'After Foot

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 13:06


L'After foot, c'est LE show d'après-match et surtout la référence des fans de football depuis 15 ans ! Les rencontres se prolongent tous les soirs avec Gilbert Brisbois et Nicolas Jamain avec les réactions des joueurs et entraîneurs, les conférences de presse d'après-match et les débats animés entre supporters, experts de l'After et auditeurs. RMC est une radio généraliste, essentiellement axée sur l'actualité et sur l'interactivité avec les auditeurs, dans un format 100% parlé, inédit en France. La grille des programmes de RMC s'articule autour de rendez-vous phares comme Apolline Matin (6h-9h), les Grandes Gueules (9h-12h), Estelle Midi (12h-15h), Super Moscato Show (15h-18h), Rothen s'enflamme (18h-20h), l'After Foot (20h-minuit).

Super Carlin Brothers
Harry Potter: J vs Ben: WE SORT EACH OTHER IN HOGWARTS HOUSES!

Super Carlin Brothers

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 34:39


Visit http://joinhoney.com/jvsb to get Honey for free. Go to http://expressvpn.com/jvsb to get an extra 3 months FREE! Today J and Ben kick off 2022 by doing their annual resorting ceremony but this year with a twist! This year they will be taking the quiz on each other's behalf to find out if they know each other better than they know themselves! #SuperCarlinBrothers #HarryPotter #JvsBen Edited by :: Riley Murtagh

Le jazz sur France Musique
On s'en sort très bien : Adrianne Lenker, Chet Baker, June Christy, Shai Maestro and more

Le jazz sur France Musique

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 59:49


durée : 00:59:49 - On s'en sort très bien - par : Nathalie Piolé - La playlist jazz de Nathalie Piolé. - réalisé par : Fabien Fleurat

Sort of Brilliant
30. Sort of Marvel: Clint, Kate and Yelena

Sort of Brilliant

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 104:17


WE'RE BAAAAAAACK. But, you say, you never went anywhere! Correct we never go anywhere. But it is a new year, and we're back. With more Marvel content. It just doesn't stop, except it will, because now this multibillion dollar corporation is leaving us high and dry until May. And they know we'll be begging for it. Bastards. Anyway. This week we're talking about arguably the best Disney show, Hawkeye (Lauren is very biased at this point as it's the origin Kate Bishop, world's best superhero). Thanks Fraction and Aja. AND THANK YOU FOR BRINGING BACK YELENA. We sort her this week, along with Kate. And Clint I guess. But we care way more about Kate and Yelena and they definitely should be a couple (groans from Rachel based on what their houses are). But they would be a good couple, houses be damned. Make it happen Marvel, you owe us. So there you go. Listen to the episode. And after you do, go back two weeks and listen to our Spider-Man episode, because that one is hella good too.

Voice Over Body Shop
Voice Over Body Shop Episode #220 with Guest, Jon Bailey

Voice Over Body Shop

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 67:36


JON BAILEY TELLS ALL! (Sort of) 2022 is gonna be EPIC! So, Voice Over Body Shop starts off the new year with the EPIC voice over guy, the very witty Jon Bailey! And on this podcast he gets brutally honest about his amazing career, his life and amazing impressions he does for ADR! catch the replay all week on  Facebook @ https://www.facebook.com/voiceoverbodyshop/, our homepage, VOBS.TV, and our podcast, right here for those of you who love to listen on the go!  We love our supporters and donors for your continued support. VOBS can't be here without YOU and our other great supporters: Voiceoveressentials.com,  VOHeroes.com  Sourceelements.com,  VoiceOverXtra.com,  VOICEACTORWEBSITES.com  and JMC Demos jmcvoiceover.com/demo-production

The Hallows Church
Luke 2:25-40 | Jeff Hundley, Edmonds Expression Pastor | "A Savior of a Different Sort"

The Hallows Church

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 48:25


We have in Luke 2:25-40 God revealing another new layer of His plan to Jesus' parents (and you and I). Much of the passage reads like an advent passage with Jesus the Messiah somehow bringing consolation, peace, light, redemption–the warm and wonderful Jesus the world is happy to celebrate at Christmas. However, we have in the middle of this passage the first negative note to the Christmas narrative in verses 34-35: Jesus would be a sign to be opposed, would cause some to rise and some to fall, and He would expose hearts. These are pretty alarming and confusing statements to Mary and Joseph (and us) about the mission of Jesus, so let us take time with Pastor Jeff Hundley to unpack this rich passage and see how Jesus is our Savior who confronts, convicts, and also consoles.

Two Ewes Fiber Adventures
Ep 175: Falling for a Sweater

Two Ewes Fiber Adventures

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 60:28


Happy New Year to our listeners! Mother Nature had other ideas for how Two Ewes would spend the holidays but we still had fun. Listen as we discuss project updates and planning for future projects. Full notes with photos, and links can be found in the podcast section of  our shop website: TwoEwesFiberAdventures.com Join the community on Ravelry or become a patron and support the show on our Patreon Page. We have a full transcript at the bottom of the show notes.  Subscribe on Apple Podcasts or Subscribe on Android or Subscribe on Google Podcasts Marsha's Projects Nanny Meier's Tea Cozy by Amelia Carlsen. I finished the tea cozy for Susannah in time for Christmas. I used Cascade 220 Yellow (9463) and Orange (9668) and she loved it.  Nanny Meier's Tea Cozy by Amelia Carlsen. I am using Cascade 220 Heather in Red Wine Heather (9489) and green Irelande (2429). Brian left his teapot with me so I can properly fit the cozy. I have finished the first side and knit about an inch of the second side. Meadow Stripe Socks using Patons Kroy Sock in the colorway, Meadow Stripes and Lang Yarns Jawoll Superwash fingering for the heels and toes. I'm knitting the second sock. Quick Switch Hat by AbbyeKnits. My son liked the hat so much I cast on another for him using Meeker Street Olives Outerwear DK in the colorway Sage. Phrancko Designs crew neck. I'm using my green and brown handspun merino. I measured Ben and submitted the information on Phrancko.com and printed the pattern. This is a top down pullover that looks like it has set in sleeves. I'm really interested to see how this sweater will turn out. Embrace Octopus Sweater This is the sweater that so distracted me that I slipped on the ice and took a tumble. My first knitting related injury. ;-) Kelly's Projects Dark Green Forest by Christina Korber-Reith is now finished! All ends are woven in and it is ready to be washed and blocked. The yarn really does need to relax into the stitches.  Pebblebrook Beanie by Wish Upon a Hook (Ravelry link). I've now made a total of 9 of these. And I decided to start a new one today with some of my Invictus club yarn from last year. It's a green and gray and yellow variegated yarn so this will be my first variegated version of this hat.  I'm still working on a pair of socks (Ravelry link) in Bob Ross Happy Little Mistakes yarn from Weird Sisters Wool Emporium in Aberdeen. I've finished the first sock and have started on the second. I'm using the stitch pattern from Blueberry Waffle socks.  So just two active projects.  Crochet Crochet Along Dates: November 1 through Jan 10. There is one thread for chatter and FOs. We'll draw prizes at our next episode.  There is a crochet bundle in the Ravelry group.  Winter Weave Along Starts October 15 and goes through the end of March. Full Transcript Marsha 0:03 Hi, this is Marsha and this is Kelly. We are the Two Ewes of Two Ewes Fiber Adventures. Thanks for stopping by. Kelly 0:10 You'll hear about knitting, spinning, dyeing, crocheting, and just about anything else we can think of as a way to play with string. Marsha 0:17 We blog and post show notes at Two Ewes Fiber Adventures dot com. Kelly 0:22 And we invite you to join our Two Ewes Fiber Adventures group on Ravelry. I'm 100 projects Marsha 0:29 and I am betterinmotion. We are both on Instagram and Ravelry. And we look forward to meeting you there. Both 0:36 Enjoy the episode. Marsha 0:43 Hi, Kelly. Kelly 0:44 Hi, Marsha. Marsha 0:46 Well, Kelly 0:47 yes, we are not together. We thought we would be together for this episode. But Mother Nature had other ideas. Marsha 0:56 Yes. So we did not announce this to people. But I was planning on going to visit you and Robert for New Years. My plan was to leave December 26 and drive to California. But yeah, Mother Nature had other plans. We were hit with a big storm here in Seattle, and very, very cold temperatures. And so I had the car packed on the 26th. And I got up and I went to get gas at eight o'clock in the morning to get onto the freeway. And I never even got onto the freeway! I went on to the on ramp and saw that there's cars just sitting there and people out of their cars looking at something and I... there's nobody behind me. So don't do this if there's people behind you, but I just backed up on the on ramp and turned down a side street and went home. Yeah. And, and I was had been looking at the weather and I knew there were storms in southern Oregon and northern California. And we talked and then I decided I was going to leave dry and go the next day. Monday the 27th and I got in the did the same... got in the car and I went out there and I just thought I can't do it. Kelly 2:16 Yeah, Marsha 2:17 Yeah, I don't want to do it. So I called you and I said I'm not coming down. So I'm really bummed. Kelly 2:23 I know. Yeah. But Robert was really glad you decided not to come. He was worried about driving in all that. Yeah. Marsha 2:34 Yeah, I was worried too, that I was gonna be doing it on my own and having spent time going to college going over passes to go after Christmas break to go to school and being stuck 10 hours at the pass. I can't I can't make myself do it. You know, well, my car's really good in the snow. But I just... it was too much. So I did miss Robert's last day of work he now has retired and I missed New Years and I missed... What I was really looking forward to is your co-workers did the tamale making party. Kelly 3:06 Oh, yeah, that was fun. Marsha 3:08 Yeah, so don't tell me how fun it was Kelly because it's just gonna upset me. Okay. [laughing] Kelly 3:12 I know, But the good news is... the good news is while it is a lot of work, and while there is, in certain circles, a lot of judgment about tamales, and how well you make them and how thin you get them and all of that... Oh, it is kind of a myth that it's so difficult. It's a lot of work. It's not difficult. And if you don't care, you know that you're making stained glass masa that you can see through when you hold it up. Marsha 3:47 Yeah, Kelly 3:48 You know and you don't have you don't have your, your grandma giving you rules about how the tamales need to be. According to my friends, you you know you can make them thick. You can pile on the masa, you can make them thin, you can make them inconsistent. Or some parts of them are thick and some parts of them are thin. It's not something... it's not like like... I had this idea that they were really hard to make. And that it was sort of like I don't know making one of those things on the Great British Baking Show where you know you're you're in danger of the whole thing just going awry and it doesn't taste good. It doesn't look good. It's just a mess. And it turns out that tamales are not like that. Marsha 4:38 No. I have watched people make them on cooking shows and I... you know I have cookbooks with how to make them. But what I was really seemed to me is one of those things that you have to make the commitment to make them because it is a bit labor intensive and you make large amounts of it and you you don't make just 12 tamales you make 100 tamales, is that right? Maybe that's an exaggeration. Make a lot because, yeah, Kelly 5:03 There is a lot of, there's a lot of prep work to do. And if you're going to it's kind of like weaving. You know, if you're going to do the prep work, if you're going to wind a warp and thread all those threads through the heddles, you know, people think to themselves, well, I'm going to put on a long warp and make multiples of whatever I'm making. But even that you don't have to do. I mean, I just made a baby blanket where all I put on the loom was just the yarn for that one baby blanket. Might not be the most efficient way to go, but it was...it was certainly okay, you know. So anyway, they don't seem as daunting to me anymore. They're delicious. Delicious. Marsha 5:49 So when I come down-- so next next time! Kelly 5:55 I've only had reheated tamales, I've never had them right out of the pan, you know, the pot. And oh my gosh, delicious. So well, next time you come down, well, maybe we'll even save some because I have some in the freezer that are not cooked. That's the other thing you can do that I found out. You don't actually need to steam them when you make them. So you know, I've had them frozen that you then reheat. But these are frozen in my freezer but not even cooked. Marsha 6:31 So you would just steam so they'll be steamed and they'll be freshly steamed? Kelly 6:36 Now, I don't know what the freezer...you know what being frozen does? Does that change? You know, is it different from the fresh ones just made? But anyway, it was a fun day. And I can definitely... we can definitely reproduce that. Next time you're here, you're here for long. Yeah. Marsha 7:00 Yeah, yeah. So that was a bummer. And I, but I thought to myself, I guess better to stay home. So I can go another time, right, than start out and have something bad happen so Kelly 7:15 Or even just be stuck. I mean, if you're going to be stuck, right? If you're going to be snow bound, better to be snow bound, surrounded by all your own yarn and, and food and drink, then to be snow bound in some motel somewhere. Right, right or snowed in your car on the side of the road... Marsha 7:36 Well, yeah, on the mountain pass. Well, and I'll tell you another reason. There was many, many reasons why I made the decision that I made. But one of them was you know, I had lighting that I was bringin down. Some was for the house and some was going in the trailer. And I thought, oh my gosh, what if I got like rear ended or in an accident and the car's totaled? It would total all the lighting. And I was like, yeah, so that was another reason why I thought, you know,I'm just gonna wait, just gonna wait. So, yes, but anyway, I've been home and I did take your advice, because you remember what you said to me is that the time that I would have been with you in California, what we had planned on doing was just sitting in the either your living room or the sunroom or someplace warm and just knitting and talking and eating and drinking. And then that was going to be speckled with trips to the beach, taking the dogs to the beach. So you said I had to sort of take this time to just hang out in it. So that's what I've been doing. And I've cast on some projects, and I've been working on projects and I didn't take the tree down. I did... and you told me I was not allowed to entertain anybody. Kelly 8:52 I did tell you that. Yes. Marsha 8:54 You did tell me that. And I didn't follow that. Not exactly. I had my friend Kim and Joanne momdiggity over for knitting. Kelly 9:05 Oh, that's good. I approve of that. Marsha 9:10 Okay, so that was fun. And and then last night, I was planning on spending New Year's Eve on my own. And then Kim and my brother just came by and we just ate leftovers. It was very, very simple. Nice New Year's Eve. Yeah, it was at the last minute they just decided to come over. So but yeah, it's been a good good time here at home too. So Kelly 9:33 Well good. Yeah, I've actually I mean, it would be nicer if you were here, but I have actually been enjoying myself with Robert home. Because he usually works the holidays, you know, when he works. So his last day of work was the 28th. And then Wednesday and Thursday are his normal days off. So Wednesday and Thursday he kept saying, Well, I'm not really retired. This is just like my normal day off. And then when the 31st came that was like his first actual...that was his actual retirement date and the first actual day that he would have had to be at work. But then he's like, well, but this is a holiday. So you know, I could have had the holiday off. So I'm not sure when he's actually going to start to feel like it's really retirement, not just days off. Marsha 10:21 Yeah. Kelly 10:22 But it's been... Yeah, we've been just kind of sitting. We went for a walk yesterday and took the dogs out and did six miles. And Beary was... he did great. It was on hills at Fort Ord and and he didn't have a sit down strike or anything. He went the whole way. He was. He was a lively the whole way. So yeah, so he's really, he's really come along. So anyway, we've been having a good holiday week. So with all your sitting and knitting, what have you been knitting on Marsha? Marsha 10:56 I will tell you what I've been knitting on. I finished something! Kelly 10:59 Yay! Marsha 11:00 I finished one of the nanny Meyer tea cozies the one I was making for my friend Susanna out of the yellow and orange. I finished that and I think I brought it over to her the day before Christmas Eve. So the 23rd I think I dropped it off and she made a pot of tea. We put it on the tea pot. Kelly 11:18 Oh, nice! Marsha 11:18 And do you remember I was talking about should I sew it up? Or should I not sew it up? When I got to her house, what I did is I sewed up what I thought was going to be the right size. And I left the ends loose. I didn't knot it or weave in the end. So when I got there, I could fit it on the tea pot. And it was pretty good. I think I just made a couple extra little stitches. And then I wove in the ends. So that worked really well. That's good. Yeah, so I delivered that. And then the other Nanny... to give everybody an update on other Nanny Meyer tea cozy that I'm making, the one for Brian. Because there's been all this discussion about Brian, like if you if you can't give me the measurements, you know, don't work on it, don't do anything. Don't call him. I have not called him and then he came. We got kind of..we've been sort of fouled up on our dates. It's been a while, you know, between episodes, but he came at some point he came and had dinner and he brought his teapot. And he left the teapot. So I have it and I today I finished the first side and I cast on I've knit about inch and a half of the second side. So I'm hoping to finish that in the next couple of days. Kelly 11:42 That's good is that the red and green one? Or the burgundy and green one? Marsha 12:34 Yeah, yeah. So I'm glad he finally brought that tea pot. I was I thought it was his only teapot. But he says he has another one. So that's good that I can just keep it for a while. Yeah, fit it on there. So and then what else I still working on my socks, the metal striped socks. And I got sort of, you know, involved in other projects. So it's kind of gone by the wayside a little bit, but I pick it up periodically and work on it. And then I did cast on another Quick Switch hat by Abby Knits. Kelly 13:15 I say that that's as bad as Garter Squish. Marsha 13:18 I know. In fact, I have to tell you, I was listening. Kelly 13:22 Garter Squish. Marsha 13:23 I was listening to our last episode when I was walking Enzo the other day. And I was trying to say, garter stitch blanket. And I couldn't say it and then I went to correct myself and I said... I listened to myself carefully. And when I'm trying to correct myself, I said garter switch. Even when I corrected myself, so garter stitch, and quick switch hat! Anyway, Kim and I had gone hiking, I guess it was the Wednesday before Christmas, I can't remember. Anyway, we afterwards we were near Issaquah and that's where there's a yarn shop called Nifty Knitter there and that's where I had seen the pattern for this hat. And so I went in there and I bought three skeins of yarn because my Ben he wanted a hat and then his friend, Ben, who also named Ben, I think I mentioned this... that I always refer to my... when they're together it's... my son is Ben the younger, and his friend Ben is Ben the elder because he's 31 and my son is 24. That's not his name. His last name is not Elder, but I always refer to them as Ben the younger and Ben the elder. Anyway, both Bens like the hat and want one of them. So I got yarn for both of them. And then my brother really liked the hat and I so I've got a color for him. So the one I'm making for Ben is Meeker St. Olives Outerwear DK in the colorway Sage, and let me grab the other two. I'm making... the one for my brother is Meeker St., the same yarn, and it's called Dragon's Breath. And it's like an orange. It's a very cool color. I love it. And then the other Ben, Ben the elder, I bought Dye House DK. It says here Serial Knitters Underground, and I didn't know what the color is called. Oh, Reindeer. And it looks sort of like, no, it's funny. My brother looked at it and says he sees purple. I think it's like fig. Marsha 15:36 Oh, Reigen Marsha 15:37 You know that...It's like it's brown, it's not really purple? Kelly 15:39 Yeah, that figgy, purpley brown Marsha 15:41 It's really nice. Kelly 15:42 Puce [laughing] Marsha 15:44 Puce I guess, yes. Kelly 15:47 I only say that because all those years that I had an Irish Water Spaniel. That's what they say in the in the breed standard. Something about puce as their as the color. It's kind of like... none of these dogs are puce. But then that yarn, the one I like that's been discontinued that I really want to get. Marsha 16:10 Oh, right Kelly 16:12 Druid Hill, right? Druid Hill, from neighborhood fiber company. It's that same that same kind of color that purpley brown Yeah, Marsha 16:24 You first think it's brown. But the more you look at you realize it has a little bit of purpley mauve tones to it because I made a sweater out of that colorway. Kelly 16:34 Oh, that's right. Yeah, it's not a golden brown at all. Yeah. Marsha 16:41 And I have to say, too, do you remember, and I was talking about this hat, when you are to create this pattern of the stitches leaning to the right. And then to leaning to the left, you knit through the second stitch on the left needle first, either through the front or the back, depending on which way the stitch is going to lean and then through the first stitch. And, and then you just keep going around. But when you get to your end of row marker, you keep moving it. You knit to one stitch before the marker, and then you move the marker, one stitch to the left, or excuse me to the right. And then that's when you start your new row. And remember, I was saying in the first hat, I could not wrap my head around that. It's like now it seems really simple to me, and I understand it. But the first hat I could not understand. It was so funny. And so now I understand. So this hat looks a lot better than the one I did. But the one I did is okay, but I can tell there's somewhere, that beginning of row, there's a little kind of funky stitches. I always put that in the back. But this one I'm making for Ben now is is much better. So I've learned what I'm doing. Kelly 17:53 That's cool. Yeah, sometimes, sometimes you have to, I don't know, you have to actually go through the process before you kind of understand the logic and the stages. And I feel the same way about weaving too. It takes me a few inches, at least, of weaving till I'm like, Okay, I see the system or the logic, the rhythm, the pattern of what's happening. Good. Marsha 18:17 I think I think my first hat is sort of like in sewing you do... you make a dress or something out of muslin first. Kelly 18:25 Right. Marsha 18:26 You know, I think that's how I'm considering my hat is the muslin. Kelly 18:29 Your muslin. That's cool. Marsha 18:33 So anyway. And then but the other thing I cast on, and I'm really excited about this, because I've been talking about this for a while. But the handspun, the green and bitter sweet chocolate that kind of barber pole handspun that I did. I want to start a sweater for Ben. And I've been searching because I didn't have enough of the green and brown. I bought more the brown and I spun that as a solid. And so I was going to make stripes to extend that yarn. So I've been looking at patterns. And I think I talked about this in the last episode that I went to phrancko.com. And that's P h r a n c k o.com. And Frank Jernigan is the designer, and he does a really interesting pull over where it looks like it has set in sleeves. But they're they're not they're all... it's knitted top down. And you just shape those quote unquote set in sleeves with increases. So it's like a raglan. It's basically a raglan sleeve really is the technique but the way he's designed it, it ends up looking like a set in sleeve. And I thought... I was having difficulty finding a pattern for the gauge of the yarn. And so I thought, this is great because you just you measure, I measured Ben. His site is is similar to Amy Herzog's site. The custom fit site is like that concept. And I don't think she's doing that anymore, I heard. But it's the same idea. So you just take these certain measurements of, you know, chest and arm length and neck and all this stuff. And then you do a swatch, and figure out your row height, and your gauge, or your stitches per inch, and your rows per inch. And you enter all of that into the the website. Also, if it's a standard yarn, say, for example, if it was Cascade 220, it has, as people have been putting in their yarn, he saves all that information. So if I had made the sweater out of Cascade 220, or think of another brand, and it was already in there, it can, it adds it, has the calculation about yardage. You can put all that in there. Otherwise, if you don't, then you have to put in your... if it's not in the system, you put in your own yardage. So this is nice, I could put in the, the, the number of ounces of yarn, I have either ounces, or grams, and then you put in the number of yards you have, or meters that you have, and then it will... And then with all of this information, it prints out the pattern for you. So I cast on I started it and I first I have to say I love knitting with my handspun. There is something about handspun. Yeah, that is very, very satisfying to knit with. And I can't explain what it is. Kelly 21:46 Maybe this is not the the part of it that's so satisfying. But it just has a life to it. That handspun yarn just has a vitality to it that, you know, a commercial skein doesn't have. Marsha 22:03 Yeah. And also, I guess, too, because I am... I'm not a very... What would I say, even spinner or something? It has a little... I mean, I can see where there's parts where it's a little thin and thick. You know, as we've talked about, once you knit it up, you know, it's not really a huge deal. Right? But it does give it some sort of textural interest, I think. Yeah, I like yeah, like I don't think it's a bad thing. Kelly 22:28 No, I agree with you. Yeah, yeah. Marsha 22:32 So anyway, but I was knitting along and I thought to myself, gosh this thing, it looks so small. I mean, it's supposed to fit him right. And I'm.. and I should also say, what I should say too is that you can pick if you want, like slim fitting, regular fitting, roomy, extra, like, how it's going to fit and how much ease you're going to have. And so for an extra dollar, you just get all three. You can get all the sizes. So I just thought I'll just do that. So I'm making the the size, the largest size, the roomiest size I can make with the amount of yarn I have, which should give him about four inches of positive ease because Ben's a skinny guy, right? So Kelly 23:20 That'll be nice. Marsha 23:22 So but I thought to myself, it looks so small. So and then on New Year's when my brother and Kim are they're, like it's too small Marsha. I'm like, but you know, math doesn't lie. Right? I'm going by the math. It has to be right. So, but Frank does... on Saturdays he does a Zoom meeting with all of these people. So anyway, I went today. Just before we recorded I went I showed up at the meeting and I said to him, I have to ask you a question because it looks like it's too small and two people last night said this is too, it looks too small. And everybody on the Zoom call started laughing. Kelly 24:02 Oh, really? Marsha 24:03 Yes. Because apparently, this is what everybody says. It's too small. It looks too small. And he said it will be fine. He... you know that it's because what I'm doing is he said you have to remember this is not like a like a raglan sleeve. Because the technique is like a I don't want to say that the technique is like a raglan because it's making it look like a set in sleeve. But the technique is basically a raglan sleeve, you just start making increases, right and that's what forms the shape. But that doesn't have a line on the top of your shoulder where the second sleeve is right right. Like where is the top of the shoulder there's no demarcation really where the on a raglan sleeve. This one actually has kind of a demarcation. I can't really explain it the right way. But he said that's actually further up on your shoulder and so as you start making the increases for the so called, he calls the sleeve cap at that top part over your that's where all your increases are going in. And he said it will work. They all were like, sort of not laughing at me. Not at all. But they're laughing with me like, no, they all have been through this. The first one they made like, small. So I'm really, really interested in seeing how this sweater turns out. Its fascinating. It's just a fascinating process, you know that. Kelly 25:23 Yeah. A custom design pattern is really a cool idea. Mm hmm. And his patterns are primarily for men, correct? Marsha 25:34 Yes. And I have to learn more. And I did not have a lot of time to stay in the on the call, because we were getting ready to record. I want to ask them, because on his Instagram account, he shows people who've made cardigans. And I don't know if it's from the website, if you can design a cardigan from the, the website, or if someone's just made a pullover and steeked it, you know Kelly 26:02 Interesting! Marsha 26:03 I don't know, And then he was showing us, too, he's working on a sweater that has cables going down the front like... Cuz, you can either pick a crew collar or a V neck, and the one that he was working on was a V neck with cables going, like around the neck and then down the front of the sweater. And I'm not sure how you I'm not sure how that works? How you get cables in there, how you design that? Or does he do that? Or is it something you get the basic pattern and then you figure out the cables? Or could you use this pattern for a color work project? Kelly 26:38 I think in the custom fit, the custom fit site, you could add cables, you could say you were adding the cable, and then you'd have to give some... I think you had to give some information about them. But there was like a formula for for how the gauge changed because of you know, pulled in because of the cables. There was something embedded in the embedded in the... how to make it. So I would imagine he has a similar thing. Yeah, Marsha 27:11 Yeah, I have to do.. I'm really talking about too soon because I need a little bit more research. And I'll find out more on the next call and kind of peruse around on the website. But I do remember with Amy Herzog's site, I made two sweaters, I believe, with her site. And the first one we made together. Remember, it was the Acorn Trail? Kelly 27:31 Yeah. Marsha 27:32 And that one is that she had the pattern, but then she would custom fit that pattern to you and it had the cables in it. And then I did another custom fit cardigan, like an open front cardigan kind of thing that had no cables in it. But I remember you could select the length, you could select the the length of the sleeves, the shape of the sleeves, because I did kind of like a bell shaped sleeve. Kelly 27:55 Yeah, interesting. Yeah. My second one, too, was freeform. It wasn't a pattern that she already had that was converted to the custom fit. It was, what kind of sweater do you want? What kind of features do you want? Kind of like yours? And I did something wrong and ended up with a pattern that was way too small. And then I had to end up recalculating, Marsha 28:22 And both of mine the sleeves were too tight. Yeah, right. We've talked about that. You know, Kelly 28:27 I think that's, that's a feature. I just really think that's a feature of women's pattern grading right now. Oh, well, maybe not right now. Because bigger sleeves are more in fashion. I'm seeing patterns with wider, with more puffier sleeves, wider sleeves. But I think there for a while. I mean, it was kind of like well, if you're doing this size, this is how many inches around you need your sleeve to be in. And to me, they were just too tight. Because I want I mean, I want a sweater to go over the top of something. And I don't want to have to like do the opposite of peel myself into it. You know, whatever that word is that's the opposite of peeling it off, where you're, you know, getting yourself into the sweater. Yeah, I have a few Marsha 29:18 You don't want to grease up your arms to get your sweater. [laughing] Kelly 29:20 Yes, I have a few sweaters that are like that. I feel like I practically have to grease my arms to put them in. Oh my gosh. [laughing] And then we've we've talked on it. I won't go on and on about this. But we've talked on and on about the depth of the I think it's called the armscye. And it's like okay, that is just unrealistic. But I also think I'm more sensitive to that feeling of having my arm my sleeves tight around my around the top of my arms too. So anyway, we won't go into my little... Marsha 29:57 Moving on! Well, anyway, I will report in how this turns out how this sweater turns out because I am really interested. Yeah. And I will join the group next time and, and talk to them. So that was really fun. Anyway, I have another story to tell you though. I have a... I found a sweater that I want to make someday. But I have to tell you about the sweater because I had a knitting related injury. Kelly 30:30 So that sounds ominous! Marsha 30:33 I'm fine, everybody's fine. But you know we have all this snow. And so I took Enzo for a walk. And I'm walking down the street and there's a young couple getting out of their car. And they're unloading some boxes, and this woman has on this most amazing sweater. And I started looking at the sweater and then slipped on the ice and fell down on my hip and my elbow. Marsha 30:56 Oh, no! Marsha 30:58 Because I was so... what is the sweater she's wearing? It's so cool. Anyway, it's called Embrace Octopus sweater. And it's... How would you...? Because you looked at it Kelly. It's very... it's so... it has an octopus that's like up on the right shoulder. Like the head? Is that what you call it? The bulbus part of the octopus? And then all the tentacles come down around the chest and they wrap around the back and they wrap around down the arms. And if you if you look at the projects, there are 599 projects. It's amazing. And it's really interesting to look at the projects because also the octopus is very much it looks like like a pen and ink drawing. Right? Kelly 31:47 Yeah, there's lots of detail, lots of little pixels of stitches that make it look... It kind of reminds me of, what is it, 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea? Like that style of drawing. And I don't I don't know what type of drawing it would be. I don't know that the book even has drawings, but kind of that era, you know, that the movie was set? Marsha 32:12 Yeah. Kelly 32:13 In that era. You know? Sort of old times, and the sweater in the pattern page is black and white. It looks it really does look like a black and white, a black and white drawing of an octopus. Marsha 32:24 Yeah, so it's really so a lot of a lot of people have done the octopuses in the light color and then the bodies in like black or navy. But then other people have done other ones. Like okay, there's one here that she's done that the octopus is like white or cream. But then the body of the sweater is a brown kind of a chocolatey brown. That is really beautiful. There's one where the sweater's blue but the octopus is in like a gold. Kelly 32:53 Oh, I see that one, yeah, that's pretty. Marsha 32:56 CandyAndy did one. It's two shades of green. That's beautiful. Another one. MissMay. Hers is like teal and then the octopus is in orange. Do you see that one? Kelly 33:10 Yes. Marsha 33:11 Further down. Yeah, there's one where it's like a blue but a pink octopus. I mean, they're just really really what it looks like. It's a dark gray with an orange octopus. I just think it's a fantastic sweater. Yeah, Kelly 33:23 No, it is a fantastic sweater. You need to this sweater. Marsha 33:28 You need to make this sweater. You've got an octopus right? Kelly 33:32 Yes, I do. I yeah, I do. Marsha 33:36 I love it. I think this is just a fantastic sweater. If I get good at color work then I think I want to make this sweater so... Kelly 33:41 This would be is this like intarsia? it's probably... like it might be intarsia? Marsha 33:49 I don't think it is really. Kelly 33:55 There's quite a bit of patterning so I guess oh here it says it's stranded Marsha 34:02 Yeah, I'm looking at the details. It says it's worked straight up in the round using stranded colorwork on circular needles. Kelly 34:08 So there's enough detail all around the sweater and then at the back you've got tentacles on the back and tentacles on the arms and wow that's really something that would be akin to the detail of the the bee blanket that I want to make. Yes. With all the patterning. Oh, very cool, Marsha. Marsha 34:32 But it made me fall! But then I have to tell you something about this. So I fell and then this young woman she came over and she said to me, are you okay? And I said yeah, I'm fine. I said, I was looking at your sweater. And anyway, she said she had knit it and so that's why I went on Ravelry and found it and I thanked her for checking on me and everything. But the funny thing is I got home and I thought, Where's Enzo's poo bag? Anyway, I think when I fell it must have just gone flying. And then I just got up and walked off. So somewhere over there is this poo bag. [laughing] I, I went a different route today. I'll need to go retrace my steps and collect his bag. But anyway, that was kind of funny. So, but anyway, I think it's just a very cool pattern. Yeah, someday. But anyway, Kelly 35:27 Like one of the fantasy patterns I have in my queue. I have in my queue a tag called fantasy, all the things that I have illusions of making. But, but, but also know, I probably won't. You know. Marsha 35:40 I just realized I didn't say the name of the designer. It's must be Maiae-- M A I A E. Sirnes S I R N E S. In fact, I'd never... this is also really bad podcasting. I never looked...Oh, she only has one design. And it's this pattern. Yeah, and actually, if you click on her on the one of the photographs of her sweater, you could see the chart with the octopus design on it. And it's kind of amazing. Kelly 36:12 Oh, yeah, that's kind of scary. Look at the chart. Marsha 36:17 That's intense. But anyway, wow. Kelly 36:23 That's cool. Marsha 36:25 Anyway, how about you? Kelly 36:27 Well, right now I have in my on my project page, I was in a finishing binge. And the one thing I didn't finish was weaving in the ends of my pullover that's been done for months. It I called it finished a long time ago. But I still need to weave in the ends of that green striped Rachel pattern. That was the only thing that I was trying... thinking I would finish before the end of the you know, before the end of 2021. My sort of finishing frenzy that I didn't get done, but I got, I got all the ends woven in on a whole bunch of hats and I got my sweater, my handspun, the terracotta CVM handspun sweater that I've been making using the Dark Green Forest pattern. I got it finished! Marsha 37:25 Woohoo! Yay! Kelly 37:27 Finally! It's been lingering, lingering, lingering for a while. I think when I last spoke about it, I had tried to even up the sleeves and actually made the sleeve that was too short too long. Marsha 37:40 Mm hmm. Kelly 37:41 And so finally I just I didn't even bother blocking it. I just put it on I looked at it. I kind of said okay, I think it needs to go here. And I ripped it back to there. And then I just put in the ribbing. So it's great. It came out good. I definitely need to wash it and block it. The one I finished last year the the Targhee lamb, that Dark and Stormy? I never blocked it. I just started wearing it because I finished it and it was cold and I was out in the trailer. And so I just put it on and I've been wearing it ever since. So I never blocked that sweater. And it kind of didn't need it. It was kind of already you know, bouncy and relaxed. But this one is... it feels a little... You know how you say my sweaters are so light? Marsha 38:31 Mm hmm. Kelly 38:32 It feels a little dense to me. I think some parts of the yarn were a little thicker than what I used to make my gauge swatch. So there's parts of the sweater that feel a little dense, and they... So they feel a little tight like it just needs a little water to kind of go ahhhhh, you know and all the all the yarns kind of settle in with each other and Marsha 38:56 It needs a spa day! Kelly 38:57 It does! [laughing] It needs a spa day. There's a little bit of tension in that sweater that needs to be released. So it's sitting here right now but I'm really happy with it. I like the pattern. I like the size of it. I like the length of it. I like the pockets. So I you know had to sew the backs on the pockets and I've done pockets before but not like this. I like the pockets. They're really not large. Robert said, well do your hands even fit in there and I said these are not pockets for my hands. These are pretty much not pockets for anything. Because it looks frumpy, you know? If you... well, because what I stuff into pockets are my keys and Kleenex and then yes, big lump on the side of your body. So I don't think I'm going to use the pockets. And also, if you do use keys in your pockets in a knit sweater like this you wear a hole in the bottom of the pocket. So I don't intend to use these pockets very much at all, but they do look nice. There's nice detail on the front of the sweater. I love the square collar, the cable detail on the sleeves is nice. And it's just enough. You know it's not like... the Dark and Stormy had cable detail on the back and this one doesn't. It's just solid on the back. But it's nice. I like the cable down the sleeves and then a little touch of that same cable at the pockets. So yeah, I finished it. Very excited. Yeah, so that's done. And then I've also been... I just kind of gone...I've just kind of gone crazy on that Pebblebrook Beanie by Wish Upon a Hook. I made nine of them total, I think, Marsha 40:49 Oh, wow. Kelly 40:49 You know, I had started making them out of the leftovers from Faye's blanket the last time we talked and then I went on to use some of that German town. Super yarn Mart! with an exclamation point, German Town worsted. I used up... I had a I had a skein, like a skein and a half of that, maybe two more skeins. Anyway, it takes more than one skein to make a hat so so I had a skein and a little, at least a little bit more than that. So I made one hat in that solid. I made another hat with the yarn from the Dark and Stormy that's leftover. I have so much leftover handspun. So I did that. I found singles yarn that I had spun and dyed in this kind of ice blue color and I finished that hat. And then yesterday I just decided I was going to make one last one. And so I cast on. Actually I guess it was the day before yesterday. I cast on the one last hat of 2021 and it's out of the color, and my project page doesn't show it, but it's that teal green Chickadee that I have that I got from NoCKRs destash. I think I got it from Julie JChant. Yeah. So I used that up. I just was kind of going to town using up using up scraps. So I got a lot of those done and I'm now currently knitting on one more... Marsha 42:30 You're knitting? Kelly 42:30 Or crocheting, crocheting rather Yeah, crocheting one more out of a skein of Invictus worsted weight yarn that I got from the the yarn club that I was in. It's a gray and kind of teal, green, and yellow. Pretty color. And it's the first one that I've made out of a variegated yarn. So I've done solids, I've done stripes. I've done small stripes. I've done big stripes. Now I'm doing variegated. So yeah, I'm a big fan of this, of this hat pattern. And I just I mean, it takes about a skein to make one hat depending on the size of the skein. It takes about a skein, yeah, to make one hat and, and I've just been going to town! So I've got only two active projects right now. One is this hat that I just started today as we were getting ready to record and then I have a pair of socks that I'm working on that's out of that Bob Ross happy little mistakes yarn from the Weird Sisters Wool Emporium in Aberdeen. So those are my only two active projects that I have. Yeah, I pretty much cleaned out the project page. By the end of the by the end of the year, which was kind of fun. Marsha 43:48 Yeah, well, that's it for projects. We need to talk about our, our alongs we're having. Kelly 43:56 So yeah, Marsha, you're right, we do need to talk about our alongs. For example, our crochet along. It's ending on the 10th of January. Marsha 44:07 Yes. I better get going. [laughing] Kelly 44:15 I've knit, er, I've crocheted enough of these pebblebrook hats for the both of us I think. [laughing] Marsha 44:22 Well, my plan was that when I arrived--but my plan was to be down there in California to have you help me with the the mitts, the paving mitts but that didn't happen Kelly 44:34 And I didn't dig out my Tunisian crochet, double ended Tunisian crochet hook which I'm not sure where it is. But I will talk about this in our next episode -- I am doing sort of a tossing of the stash and reorganizing of all the bags with bits and bobs from previous projects and stuff. So I will find them at some point. But I don't even know where they are. So even if you were here, I'm not sure I would have been able to help you with the with double ended hooks because I don't know where I put them Marsha 45:10 The next crochet along, maybe then I'll get those mitts done, because I do like them. But anyway, okay. So shall we let's talk about the crochet along. Yeah, that's so that actually it started in November. And as you said it ends January 10. And should we talk about some of the things people have been doing? So yeah, because people have been doing some pretty interesting things. Kelly 45:35 Some kind of inspiring things too. I've got some ideas for after the crochet along is over of things that might do with some of my stash. There's been a couple of really interesting baskets. So SuperKip, she made a crochet basket. And then JoyLaine also made a crochet basket. She used scraps in hers and I was thinking, Oh, that might be kind of nice. A nice way to use them. A lot of my spirit yarn. So that might be something in my future, one of those crochet baskets. Marsha 46:13 Did you see PurpleDogwood and all the Santa hats? Kelly 46:17 Oh my gosh, yes. And she also made pumpkin hats. Yes, all those baby hats for the hospital! That was very cool to see her project. Yeah, the Santa and pumpkin has are super cute. Quite a lot of toys. We had KnitnAround make a rabbit toy. And the vbirdflies, she made a hedgehog. Super cute hedgehog and a dinosaur. Triceratops maybe? I can't remember now which kind of dinosaur but so that was cute, to see those toys. You know, I'm a sucker for crochet toys. In fact, on Christmas day, my my brother-in-law, he thanked me again and told me how much he appreciated the Star Wars characters that I made that one year. All those little Star Wars characters. So yeah, he... and and the funny thing is he he said, I don't think he listens this far into the show, but he did say that he likes to listen to our banter at the beginning. Marsha 47:25 Oh, yeah? Kelly 47:25 So Ron, Ron listens to the first like 10 or 15 minutes of our podcast. Enough time. He doesn't stay for the knitting, but he likes to hear the little, all the stuff that's going on. So anyway, I thought that was fun. But yeah, crochet toys are a lot of fun. And, and we got a few of them in the in this crochet along. So that was kind of cool to see. Marsha 47:51 Well, and super Kip also made the really cute activity cube. Did you see that? Kelly 47:56 Yes, yes. In fact, when she first started and she said she was making the Moses basket, and she was gonna make a baby toy. I'm like, Oh, is there an announcement? Do you have an announcement for? But, no, it's a friend's baby. But yeah, that's a really cute idea. With the little things hanging down and a little... like a little ring crocheted onto it and little rattle crocheted into it. It's very... Yeah, when she first talked about it, the activity cube, I've seen like puzzle cubes. That's what I was thinking she was making till I saw the the finished, the finished result. I've seen they have these like three dimensional puzzles, where all the pieces fit together into something you know. That like they make a circle or, or maybe they make a cube. I don't know. I just I when I was looking at baby toy at one point I saw all of these baby toys. Crochet baby toys where the pieces all fit together into a like a puzzle into a different shape. And I thought, Oh, that'd be kind of fun to to make, but I haven't ever attempted anything like that. And then yeah, Mary, she made a dog bed. Marsha 49:19 Mm hmm. Kelly 49:20 It ooked really super soft and cuddly. Oh, maybe Minnie would like that. Our cat would like that. Marsha 49:28 Yeah, there's a really cute things. Kelly 49:32 Oh, you know what else I need to mention. It's a Misnim. She's making a crochet cocoon, which is like a sweater. Kind of like my Habitat sweater. I don't even know how to describe it? As kind of like a big shrug? I guess it's a good way to describe it. Full size, you know, full sweater size shrug. Anyway, she's making it but she's making it out of the Stonehedge Crazy yarn. She has all the skeins in the picture and it just made me think of when we were in Eugene. And we had all that yarn all over. [laughing] Marsha 50:22 Yeah those... they were so sweet to us because they didn't... they said they knew that because no two skeins are alike. So everybody just basically pulls everything out of the shelf and lays it on the floor, which is what we did so. So I saw her picture, but I didn't realize that's what she was made. Yeah, so, Oh, yes. Very cool. Nice colors, too. I love that yarn. Kelly 50:24 I know, it kind of made me think about... kind of me think about going and buying some more of that yarn. Because that was really, that was really fun yarn to knit with. And then MimiFan, she made a bathroom mat that she's actually not sure she likes. I don't know, she was threatening to rip it out. And, I said, Well, you know, if you decide you don't like it, you could always just give it to the dog as , you know, a dog bed. To stick it on like a little blanket on the dog bed or a pad inside the crate if she crates her dog. Anyway, yeah, it was, um, it was kind of funny because she was like, I'm not sure I like it but I finished it. Not sure I like it. But at least it's finished. So that's good. Yeah, you can decide if you like it enough to keep it or if you want to do something else with it. But I have had projects like that. Not too many. But I have had projects like that where it's like, okay, I'm just glad this is finished. And I don't think I even... Marsha 51:48 I'm gonna, I'm actually gonna quote from her. She says, I've been working on this bathmat for 11 months. I hate it so much. That's more dramatic than the way you described it. [laughing] Kelly 52:03 I was trying to be gentle. [laughing] Marsha 52:09 She says I hate it so much. But it's done except for weaving in ends. And I used up every bit of yarn that I bought. My bathroom is small, and it's a weird shape. So many errors. I may just end up throwing it away. But I'll give it a few weeks since it took so long to make. It needs some ends woven and some washing to flatten it out. I'm so happy it's done. Anyway, that's funny to me Kelly 52:33 Yeah, I think everybody can relate. Everybody's got one of the projects that like just became an albatross, you know, after a while. And it really, yeah, it's so funny. I had a weaving project, a linen weaving project. And I forgot how furry the linen was because it's a real rustic linen. And so you know, there's a technique where you, you soak it in gelatin to kind of make all that stick down. Marsha 53:05 Oh, right. Kelly 53:05 So it doesn't rub on the heddles and stuff. And I had forgotten about that technique. So I got it all threaded. Now starting to wind on and the little threads were catching everywhere. And I thought oh yeah, I need to do this technique. Well, I didn't want to unthread it, right? So I soaked it in gelatin while it was on my loom. But I also didn't look up the real recipe for the gelatin that you make. I just use the gelatin packet like gelatin. And so when I got done and I like squeezed it all out, it became like these like solid... You know, like each group of maybe 20 or 30 threads became like this solid rope of stuck together. Marsha 53:54 Yeah. Yeah. Kelly 53:55 And so then it sat on my loom like that for about four months, maybe longer. And it's like, well, I have to do something with it because it was destash I mean, it was you know, it was spirit yarn. But like it's linen, you know. And finally I forget what whose project I read about, but it was like... I was like okay, yeah, I need to soak it in water. Get some of that extra gelatin out. Let it dry again. I don't want to pull it out because it's all threaded on the loom. Oh you know, so I'll just try to do it around my loom and then finally I thought you know what? I'm just done. I cut the thing off. I threw it all away and I felt so good. I felt... I didn't even try to salvage it. I just cut the thing off and threw it in the garbage or threw it in the compost. I don't know, probably the compost because it was linen but like, I felt so good. It was so such a relief to get that dog off my loom. I mean, it was terrible. That project was a terrible thing. And I was dumb. I should have, you know, I could have... I thought I was saving time by not taking it off and redoing it. I could have redone it 17,000 times in the time that it sat on my loom preventing me from working other projects. So anyway, I can feel for for you, MimiFan. I don't know what the status of your bathmat is now but I do understand the sentiment. Marsha 55:30 You have permission to throw it away if it'll make you feel right! Kelly 55:33 Exactly. It does feel good sometimes. Yeah. So yeah, the crochet along is going really well. I have to say, I miss Amy. We lost her last year. She died. And she's really missed in the the thread, GreenHook. She was always a big poster in the crochet along thread and just in the in the Morning Coffee and different threads, she would post her crochet projects. And that loss is... It was a year, a little over a year ago that she died. And yeah, I miss her right now. Marsha 56:05 That loss is felt. Kelly 56:15 Yeah, yeah. So, but our crochet along ends January 10. We'll be drawing prizes in our next episode. So you still have time to get a project in. So get out your hook and make a project. There's one thread. here's a chatter thread and I just I just added the FOs to that chatter thread. So if you've been waiting for a finished object thread to post in, you can just post in your pictures and your information in the chatter thread and we'll draw prizes from from that. It's small enough that... you know the the number of participants is small enough that I think it will just be better to draw from the from the chat thread. Yeah, so make sure you post your your finished object pictures in there. And come chat about people's crochet in the next couple...week and a half or so. Marsha 57:11 Yeah. And then we just have to mention that the winner weave along is still going on and ends the end of March. Okay, well, I think that's about it. Is there anything else we need to talk about? Kelly 57:23 i don't think so. Marsha 57:25 We could go on another hour. Kelly 57:27 knowing we could next episode, I'm going to talk a little bit about my sort of reviewing last year. And then some things that I want to do. Because I just started today with that tossing of my stash, you know, going through my yarn and coming to realizations about what I do have and the real truth about the yarn I have as opposed to what I think in my head when I'm not looking at it all. So so that'll be next. Now I'll, I'm going to do some reflection on that. And we'll talk a little bit about that next time. So I don't know you've, you've looked at your yarn recently and gotten rid of a whole bunch of stuff, so I don't Yeah, Marsha 58:17 I did a big I did a big tossing of the stash and that's another reason why I've been kind of fun to be down there is to help you do the tossing of the stash. Kelly 58:25 The possible tossing out of of the stash [laughing] Yeah, we'll see. We'll see. But right now I just... we'll talk more about it. But you know, you get inspiration when you look at it. So I've got it out so I can look at it all and see if I come up with some inspirations. And then I'm some of my inspirations might be similar to that bathroom mat and my gelatin weaving my gelatin linen weaving project. We will see! Marsha 58:58 You have permission to put it in the compost pile. [laughing] Kelly 59:01 Well, I will report. I will report back in two weeks what the status is of some of that. Of some of that stuff. I've already started throwing away the little like, you know, you have a walnut sized ball of yarn. Marsha 59:18 Oh, right. Kelly 59:19 Yeah, really? Do I need to save a walnut sized ball of yarn? Marsha 59:24 I don't know. Kelly. I have a whole box of walnut sized bits of yarn. [laughing] Kelly 59:30 Bits of string to small to use. Marsha 59:33 Yes. And and they're actually in a box labeled "too small to use." [laughing] Kelly 59:38 Yes. Okay. Marsha 59:42 All right. All right. We're gonna go. I really have to go now because Enzo is now sitting here at nudging me. It's dinner time. Yeah, it's dinner time. So all right. Okay. We'll talk in two weeks about what's going on with that stash. Okay. Kelly 59:55 And Happy New Year to you and Happy New Year to everyone listening! Marsha 1:00:01 Yes, Happy New Year. Alrighty. Bye! Kelly 1:00:03 Bye bye. Kelly 1:00:04 Thank you so much for listening. To subscribe to the podcast visit Two Ewes Fiber Adventures dot com. Marsha 1:00:11 Join us on our adventures on Ravelry and Instagram. I am betterinmotion and Kelly is 1hundredprojects. Kelly 1:00:19 Until next time, we're the Two Ewes Both 1:00:22 doing our part for world fleece! Transcribed by https://otter.ai    

Boomer & Gio
Craig Comes Clean, Sort Of

Boomer & Gio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 2:58


Boomer was not happy to learn that the missing teleprompter he has been looking for is in the trunk of his former radio partner, Craig Carton.  After getting wind of the news, Craig joined the Booms & Gio to come clean, as only Craigie can.   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Triumvir Clio's School of Classical Civilization
Greek Myth XXXV: Pseudo-Apollodorus's Bibliotheca Book II, Chapter VII – Heracleidae, or Heracles Seeks Revenge

Triumvir Clio's School of Classical Civilization

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 15:27


Heracles kills some more people and finally gets his comeuppance. Sort of. To join the discussion, visit the blog at Triumvir Clio's School of Classical Civilization. If there's no hyperlink showing up here, you can go to triumvirclio.school.blog to find a feed of recent episodes as well as discussion pages for every episode. Join me on Patreon at www.patreon.com/triumvirclio to get early access to ad-free episodes and bonus content. References Apollodorus. The Library. Translated by Sir James George Frazer. Loeb Classical Library Volumes 121 & 122. Cambridge, MA, Harvard University Press; London, William Heinemann Ltd. 1921. Available online at https://www.theoi.com/Text/Apollodorus1.html and http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/text?doc=Perseus:text:1999.01.0022. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/bethany-banner/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/bethany-banner/support

Blind Abilities
iPhone101 QuickByte: Speeding Up a YouTube Video Just like Speeding Up an Audio Book, Sort Of, Kind Of

Blind Abilities

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2022 5:03


In this iPhone101 Quickbyte, Pete Lane takes us through the Messages App and shows how to speed up a YouTube Video if you so desire.   Are you wondering why you can't speed up the playback speed of a YouTube video like you can with one of your audio books? Well you can, and it's simple and fast.    Here's how to do it:     Open the YouTube app. Flick to the search field, and type in your search command  for the video you wish to view. Perform a single-finger double-tap to play the video. Once in the video screen, flick to the right until you find the “more actions“ button. Perform a single finger double tap to open the list of menu options. Flick to the right with a single finger until you find the option that says, “playback speed“. Perform a single-finger double-tap. Flick through the choices until you find your desired playback speed , (i.e. from .25x to 2x). Perform a single-finger double-tap to select. Now you are back on the play screen. Flick to the right until you land on the Play button. Perform a single-finger double-tap to resume the video.  

Recovery (Sort Of)
115: David Poses - The Weight of Air (Sort Of)

Recovery (Sort Of)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2022 57:58


We sit down with David Poses, author of The Weight of Air, to talk about his book and the world of science as it applies to opioid addiction. David's, through the story of David's life and trying to find recovery from heroin and pill abuse, tackles many of the tough topics around medication assisted treatment and the many misperceptions our society has. We talk about harm reduction and how our practices have not caught up with the science. David tells us how alcohol is not legal because it's safer, it's safer because it's legal and regulated. We investigate the science that is showing how much safer it is to use assistance in recovery as opposed to the old ideals of complete abstinence which are based entirely on a moral belief. We debate the old belief systems versus the new scientific evidence. Listen in and then go check out David's book, The Weight of Air. The Weight of Air --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/recoverysortof/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/recoverysortof/support

The Basic Witch
Happy New Year! Setting Intentions (Mini Episode)

The Basic Witch

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2022 49:48


Making Resolutions for the New Year can be a bit cliché but not to witches! We set intentions and make them happen!! (Sort of a mini episode) --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/kassie-godfrey/support

Podcast for Two People
The One Where We Sort Of Talk About Deadly Prey (1987) Plus A Bunch Of Other Bullshit

Podcast for Two People

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2022 103:18


Gonna be real with you guys, this episode is all over the place. There is talk about the film mentioned in the episode title. There is! There is also a bunch of bullshitting in this one. It's basically like a send off to the year of our lort Two Thousand and Twenty One.

ScreenPeople Podcast
Kelly - The sort of holiday special

ScreenPeople Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 36:38


In this episode Kelly and Alejandro speak for the first time since they were both college kids.Lots of things have changed since then but their love of movies and shows have thankfully remained. But what do Godspell, Sesame Street, Game of Thrones and Elf have in common? And how does one of these put her on the path towards her future, as a pastor? Join us for this often silly and sweet conversation. 

Me Reading Stuff
Episode 353: Jameson O'Hara Laurens - Spell for a Drowning Man

Me Reading Stuff

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 47:45


"Dear Everyone, Let me disappoint you." - Sort of Jameson O'Hara Laurents, sort of me. LINKS:Buy Medaeum by James O'Hara Laurens here: https://henrymiller.org/2016/11/01/announcing-the-publication-of-medaeum-by-jameson-ohara-laurens/Listen to "Once Upon a Time at Bennington College": http://www.lilianolik.com/once-upon-a-time-at-bennington-collegeWarm your mug: https://www.mrcoffee.com/accessories/mug-warmers/mr.coffee-mug-warmer/SAP_MWBLKPDQRB.htmlHop Your John: https://www.simplyrecipes.com/recipes/hoppin_john/Me on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/robyn_oneil/?hl=enHandwritten Notes: https://www.instagram.com/handwrittennotesontv/Me on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Robyn_ONeilMy website: www.robynoneil.com

C dans l'air
LA CHINE RECONFINE… ET SORT SES GRIFFES ! - 30/12/21

C dans l'air

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 65:20


FRANÇOIS CLEMENCEAU Rédacteur en chef international - « Le Journal du Dimanche » PIERRE HASKI Chroniqueur international - « France Inter » et « L'Obs » MARY-FRANÇOISE RENARD Économiste - Université Clermont-Auvergne Auteure de « La Chine dans l'économie mondiale » NICOLE BACHARAN Historienne et politologue spécialiste des États-Unis Les mauvaises nouvelles s‘accumulent pour Pékin. Sur le plan sanitaire tout d'abord. La ville chinoise de Xi'an, où 13 millions d'habitants sont actuellement confinés, a annoncé dimanche une désinfection "totale" et durci les restrictions, au moment où la Chine enregistre un nombre record de contaminations au Covid-19 depuis 21 mois. Plusieurs foyers sporadiques apparaissent ces derniers mois, comme à Xi'an, où malgré de très fortes restrictions sanitaires 175 nouveaux cas de Covid-19 ont été enregistrés dans la ville lundi 27 décembre. Le pays applique pourtant depuis l'an passé une stratégie « zéro Covid » qui consiste à tout faire pour limiter au maximum la survenue de nouveaux cas. Les autorités redoublent même de vigilance pour éviter tout foyer d'envergure alors que les Jeux Olympiques d'hiver de Pékin doivent débuter le 4 février prochain. Des JO auxquels n'assistera aucun responsable américain, anglais, canadiens ou australiens. Conséquence du boycott diplomatique décidé par ces pays. Une décision qui a provoqué une réponse grinçante de la diplomatie chinoise, elle-même confrontée ces derniers mois à de nombreux défis. Les bras de fers se durcissent en effet avec les Etats-Unis, mais pas uniquement. Les tensions s'accroissent également avec l'Australie. Une passe d'armes avait déjà eu lieu quand Canberra avait critiqué Pékin sur sa gestion de la crise sanitaire. Mais les relations se sont encore dégradées alors que le pays a rejoint Londres et Washington au sein de l'alliance AUKUS, dont l'objectif apparait clairement de contenir la montée en puissance de la Chine dans la région indopacifique. A ces vents mauvais s'ajoute un problème de taille, qui lui n'est pas nouveau : la démographie. C'est le talon d'Achille du géant chinois. Le pays s'apprête à dévoiler les résultats de son recensement de 2020. Selon le Financial Times, celui-ci révèlerait que pour la première fois depuis la fin des années 1950, la population du pays serait en déclin. Une telle baisse signerait l'échec de la politique nataliste du président Xi Jinping. Ce dernier avait opéré un revirement stratégique dans ce domaine, en mettant notamment fin à la politique de l'enfant unique en 2015. Prendre en charge les aînés, tout en préparant sa retraite accentue encore la tendance des Chinois à mettre de l'argent de côté, alors que l'épargne est déjà à un niveau très élevé, au détriment de la consommation. Et c'est là que le bât blesse le plus. Le repli de la population, associé à son vieillissement, vient directement contrecarrer le grand dessein de Xi Jinping de développer le marché intérieur afin de réduire la dépendance de l'économie chinoise aux exportations. Alors quelle est la situation sanitaire en Chine ? Peut-elle répondre aux défis diplomatiques qui lui sont lancés ? Le pays le plus peuplé du monde va-t-il entrer dans une phase de déclin démographique ? DIFFUSION : du lundi au samedi à 17h45 FORMAT : 65 minutes PRÉSENTATION : Caroline Roux - Axel de Tarlé REDIFFUSION : du lundi au vendredi vers 23h40 RÉALISATION : Nicolas Ferraro, Bruno Piney, Franck Broqua, Alexandre Langeard PRODUCTION : France Télévisions / Maximal Productions Retrouvez C DANS L'AIR sur internet & les réseaux : INTERNET : francetv.fr FACEBOOK : https://www.facebook.com/Cdanslairf5 TWITTER : https://twitter.com/cdanslair INSTAGRAM : https://www.instagram.com/cdanslair/

Educational AD Podcast
New Year's Eve (Sort of ...) Team Building Tip - Be Grateful from Jake von Scherrer

Educational AD Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 6:13


It's the day before New Year's Eve and I've noticed a lot of "End of the Year" conversations on having an Attitude of Gratitude. This has been one of my themes over the year as I was sometimes the AD or Coach at a school that was financially challenged! I wanted us to be Grateful for the opportunities and for the resources that we HAD, but always strive to do more (and get more!) to help our kids! This year I also want to try and show MY gratitude by THANKING everyone who has supported The Educational AD Podcast! Thanks to YOU for continuing to listen and support our promotion of Athletic Directors and Educational Athletics! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/educational-ad-podcast/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/educational-ad-podcast/support

WhatCulture Wrestling
AEW Dynamite Review - Tension Between Undisputed Era And The Young Bucks!! Mercedez Martinez Debuts (Again)!! CM Punk Sort Of Challenges MJF!! Jim Ross And Chris Jericho Return

WhatCulture Wrestling

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 63:43


Adam Clery and Michael Hanflett (now known collective as the "End Of The Y-Era Boys") review last night's AEW DynamiteINCLUDINGTension Between Undisputed Era And The Young Bucks!! Mercedez Martinez Debuts (Again)!! CM Punk Sort Of Challenges MJF!! Jim Ross And Chris Jericho ReturnAND MORE!!Follow us on Twitter@AdamClery@MichaelHamflett@WhatCultureWWE See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Solar Panel: A Phoenix Suns Show
DA Finally Gets the Bag ... Sort of

The Solar Panel: A Phoenix Suns Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 46:02


COVID-19 is like Thanos for the Suns, it's inevitable. But how much has it impacted the team so far without Deandre Ayton, Jae Crowder and Monty Williams and what has it taught us about the Suns? Plus, DA gets the bag ... but it's from PUMA. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Indie Film Review
Episode 145: Bullied

Indie Film Review

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 29:22


Film: Bullied (2021) This week, Jared and Dan watched another Christmas movie! Well... Sort of. Tune in and find out how bullies and Christmas go together. See you next year! Subscribe to us on Apple Podcasts and leave us a 5 star review!  Please consider joining our Patreon! www.patreon.com/indiefilmreview Twitter: @IndieFilmPod Instagram: @IndieFilmReviewPod Email: theindiefilmreview@gmail.com

Invasion of the Remake Podcast
Ep.321 Invasion of the Remake Rarities Vol.1

Invasion of the Remake Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 50:28


This is not a clip show! Sort of. For this holiday season we present to you rare segments that were produced for our podcast friends over the years. Shows like Flicks XRayed, Bad Reception, 2 Girls on a Bench, All The Horror and many more. Plus Trish's unedited rant on Sky Sharks! Sit back, grab some eggnog, and enjoy some of our favourite segments that have never been heard on Invasion of the Remake. Support independent podcasts like ours by telling your friends and family how to find us at places like Apple Podcasts, iTunes, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, PlayerFM, Tune In Radio, PodChaser, Amazon Music, Audible, Libsyn, iHeartRadio and all the best podcast providers. Spread the love! Like, share and subscribe! You can also help out the show with a positive review and a 5-star rating over on iTunes. We want to hear from you and your opinions will help shape the future of the show. Your ratings and reviews also help others find the show. Their "earballs" will thank you. Follow us on Twitter: @InvasionRemake Like and share us on Facebook & Instagram: Invasion of the Remake Email us your questions, suggestions, corrections, challenges and comments: invasionoftheremake@gmail.com Buy a cool t-shirt, PPE masks and other Invasion of the Remake swag at our TeePublic Store!

Brand Champion Marketing Network
Episode 106- Cattleman's Sort Bred Female Sale....Dec 29 2021

Brand Champion Marketing Network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 14:57


This episode features Doug Steele representing The Cattleman's Sort "Maternal in the Making" Bred Female Sale on SC Online sales December 29th, 2021.

Monster Fuzz
Mini Fuzz: Its a sort of Christmas special!

Monster Fuzz

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 68:40


Join us on this weeks Mini Fuzz as we tell ghostly Christmas tales. WoOoOoOoOoSupport us:https://www.patreon.com/monsterfuzzOur links:https://linktr.ee/monsterfuzzMonsterfuzzpodcast@gmail.comYour Call by Kevin MacLeodLink: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/5018-your-callLicense: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license

The Propaganda Report
Biden Coughs Out New COVID Plan, Kyrie Irving Is Back...Sort Of & Where Is Chuck Grassley's Constitution (DNB)

The Propaganda Report

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 36:57


Listen, Subscribe, Share the Show, Donate. Help us keep this train rollin! Notes & Links from Today's Show https://news.yahoo.com/manchin-killing-build-back-better-is-devastating-to-climate-change-action-experts-say-194208325.html https://abcnews.go.com/Politics/wireStory/congress-oks-bill-giving-capitol-police-power-call-81777120 https://www.nytimes.com/2021/07/06/us/politics/capitol-police.html https://christianobserver.net/what-are-chemtrails-and-how-are-they-harming-our-food-and-water/ https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6429616/ https://spectrum.ieee.org/solar-geoengineering https://www.republicworld.com/technology-news/science/study-reveals-devastating-15-year-effect-of-nuclear-explosion-on-ozone-layer.html https://www.thejournal.ie/ozone-layer-damage-depletion-nuclear-testing-danny-healy-rae-3057410-Nov2016/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operation_Argus https://www.foxnews.com/politics/grassley-demands-briefing-dhs-doj-smash-grab-attacks https://www.foxnews.com/us/cnn-john-griffin-child-trafficking-devices-seized-september-2020 https://www.cnbc.com/2021/12/19/what-the-us-government-does-with-its-secret-bitcoin-stockpile.html https://spectrum.ieee.org/carbon-engineerings-tech-will-suck-carbon-from-the-sky https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-10331413/Pentagon-finds-highest-number-active-service-members-engaging-extremism-ever.html Google's Year in Search - Google Trends   Kyrie Irving's planned return to Nets complicated by COVID (nypost.com)   Biden was in close contact with aide who later tested positive for covid-19, White House says - The Washington Post   Walmart Apologizes After Black Mom Noticed Price Difference Between White And Black Dolls (msn.com)   The Propaganda Report on Rokfin The CFR Plots To Shut Up Critically Thinking Americans | Rokfin The Propaganda Report on Patreon The Propaganda Report Store Support Our Sponsors! Donate… If you find value in the content we produce and want to help us keep this train rollin, drop us a donation via Paypal or become a Patreon. (links below) Every little bit helps. Thank you! And thank you to everyone who has and continues to support the show. It's your support that enables us to continue producing shows. Paypal Patreon Subscribe & Leave A 5-Star Review… Subscribe on iTunes Subscribe on Google Play Music Listen on Google Podcasts Listen on Tunein Listen on Stitcher Follow on Spotify Like and Follow us on Facebook Follow Monica on Twitter Follow Binkley on Twitter Subscribe to Binkley's Youtube Channel https://www.paypal.me/BradBinkley https://www.patreon.com/propagandareport https://twitter.com/freedomactradio https://twitter.com/MonicaPerezShow https://www.youtube.com/bradbinkley https://www.youtube.com/monicaperez

Listen, Learn & Love Hosted by Richard Ostler
Episode 489: Benée Larsen and Heidi Peterson Dutson, Suicide Prevention

Listen, Learn & Love Hosted by Richard Ostler

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2021 86:36


n this episode, Benée and Heidi share their experience to help us better understand the resources available in Utah to help those struggling with suicide ideation. In particular, they explore resources that can help faith climates develop a culture of safety, help-seeking and hope. Research shows that talking about suicide reduces stigma and risk associated with suicide ideation. QPR Training in faith settings is a great way to help others understand their role in suicide prevention, especially how to have these crucial and needed conversations in our congregations and families. Benée and Heidi and also share practical insights for all of us to help those who are considering suicide and for those who are currently experiencing suicide ideation. If you have lost a loved one to suicide, know your not alone and hear some tips on how to cope. Please listen to this podcast. I learned so much from these two remarkable women. We need to have these conversations and be unified in our efforts to better support those who are considering suicide. Resources mentioned in this podcast can be found on the following websites: NAMI: National Alliance on Mental Illness ttps://www.namiut.org/) NAMI Utah's Peer Mentor Line: 801-323-9900 Monday-Friday 9 am-4 pm Live On Utah (https://liveonutah.org/) LiveOn: Finding a mental health professional Search for treatment and services at the SAMHSA Treatment directory – https://findtreatment.samhsa.gov/ or https://findtreatment.gov/ Psychology Today – find a therapist, treatment, etc. Sort resources by zip code, race, ethnicity, mental or substance use need, and more. https://www.psychologytoday.com/us Suicide Prevention for Faith Leaders: (https://liveonutah.org/faith/) Utah Suicide Prevention Coalition: If you are interested in joining the Utah Suicide Prevention Coalition, which meets on the 2nd Monday every other month beginning January 10th from 1 pm-2:30 via Zoom. If interested, reach out to me via email to be added to our email list. (https://liveonutah.org/contact/) QPR Training (https://liveonutah.org/resources/trainings/), (https://www.namiut.org/our-programs/for-families-caregivers/qpr-suicide-prevention-training) Utah Prevention Coalition Association: www.utahprevention.org Grief Support: Caring Connections support groups

The Marketing Secrets Show
Geeking Out on Story with Josh Forti, Part 2

The Marketing Secrets Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 37:28


In this second installment of this special interview, Russell and Josh go super deep on ‘the master story' and the attractive character…and what happens when you have tons of followers and NO ONE buys! Hit me up on IG! @russellbrunson Text Me! 208-231-3797 Join my newsletter at marketingsecrets.com ClubHouseWithRussell.com Magnetic Marketing ---Transcript--- Russell Brunson: What's up, everybody? This is Russell Brunson. Welcome back to the Marketing Secrets Podcast. So, today's episode is probably from most of my conversations with Josh, might have been one of my favorites. It was really, really fun. We started talking about expert secrets and storytelling and how they work, and attractive character profiles, which one you should be using, and how they work, and can you change them? And then also he started going into his concept of the master story, which is something I talk about in Perfect Webinar, but he goes really, really deep in it. And anyway, we geeked out. This was a really fun episode. I hope you enjoy it. With that said, let me cue up the theme song. When we get back, you'll have a chance to listen to this exciting conversation with me and Josh talking about story and attractive character, and a bunch of other really cool things. JoshForti: I got to ask this. Are you not on Twitter? Like I see you on Twitter a lot, and I see you posting stuff on Twitter. But is it not you that's engaging on Twitter? Russell: No, I don't know how to tweet. Josh: You don't know how to tweet? Russell, I tweeted you a lot. Or not a lot, but I tweeted you quite a bit. Russell: Oh, hey. Josh: And then sometimes you like my tweets. Dang it. Russell: I do like all your tweets. They're awesome. Josh: Yeah. Oh, man. Russell: I personally, I enjoy Instagram, probably my favorite. And then Facebook's probably number two. But that's the two social platforms I spend my personal time on the most. So, if it's from either of those two platforms, it's usually me. If it's other places... Josh: Do you have it like broken up? Like are you like, "Instagram, I do this type of content and stuff on. And Facebook, I do this type of content on." Or is it kind of like a mixture of both? Or... Russell: Um. Josh: For you personally. I know your team posts stuff, but... Russell: The only place I really post/do stuff typically is Instagram, like stories. That's where I kind of, like me personally, do stuff. And then Facebook and my personal page, probably once, every once in a while, I drop stuff there. And everything else, that's my team. Josh: Yeah, that's rare though, not often. Russell: Yeah. Josh: You're not like me who's like, "What? It's been 48 hours without some form of controversy? What can I say? Oh my God." All right. Well, actually, I kind of want to talk about that though. Not so much controversy, but creating content specifically around storytelling, because I think this is probably one of the biggest... Let me give backstory, a little context around this. I came into the world completely backwards of what most people do, right? So I was the guy that came into the world, and most people have no following and no followers, and they can't get leads to happen. Right? And they don't get anybody to show up to their webinar. And then they're super depressed because nobody showed up and nobody bought. I had the exact opposite problem. I had everybody show up and nobody bought. And let me tell you, that's way more depressing. You know why? Because when everybody shows up and nobody buys, you're like, "Crap. Now I really am screwed because I have no idea what's going on." Right? Russell: It was me, and not the… whatever, yeah. Josh: Right. It's not because nobody's hearing it. It's because I actually suck. And I remember the first time I ever did a webinar, we actually... I don't know if you remember this or not. I actually sent you a Snapchat. This is right when you first got Snapchat. This is way, way back in the day. I've told this story before. And I went and I was like, "Russell, what's up, man? I'm trying to build this webinar. How much would you charge me to build out a webinar for me or whatever?" Right? And you sent me a little video, a Snapchat video back. You're in the Jeep, and you were like, "Man, I don't really do that. I don't really do that anymore." So I like snapped you back, and then you snapped me back, and you're like, "It'd probably be like $250,000 or something like that. But I don't really do that." I'm like, "Man, I really wish I would've hired you for 250 grand." But anyway, so I go and we do this huge webinar, and everyone told us... We were like, "We're going to have all these people sign up." And everyone's like, "No. No, you're not. Nobody gets people to their webinar that easy. You maybe have a hundred registrants." We had 2000 people register, and we had a thousand people... We maxed out the room with a thousand people on live. At the pitch, there was like 982 people in the room. I go through, I do my pitch. No one buys, not a single person. And then we hung up, and like an hour goes by, and one person had bought. And most miserable, depressing... Russell: That's the worst because then you're like, "Crap. I thought there was no sound or something. Maybe they didn't hear me." Josh: Right, right, right. But I sat there and it was a bad webinar. We had like dozens, probably hundreds of emails and comments of like, "Can I have my money back for a free webinar? This totally sucks. Worst experience ever." It was awful, right? And what was interesting is that really scarred me for a while, from doing presentations and from doing anything where I pitched live. And so I basically went and I just did sales from that point on. I did lots of presentations. I did lots of content. But I did not actually go and pitch because really, it was like PTSD almost. Right? It was like, "I don't want to go back there." And what was interesting is I went and I would do sales, and I got good at sales, but sales is hard, man. Sales is just a different game. It's just like pushing and pushing and pushing and pushing. Right? And then my brother died, and out of just sheer not knowing what to do, I just started sharing my story because at that point you're like, "What do you do? My whole life is messed up at this point. I'm so confused." And so I just start sharing what I was going through, and I start sharing things of like the emotions and what I'm learning and what I'm going through. And I remember people just started buying, and it was like the weirdest thing, because I wasn't selling anything. Right? But I would go through and I'd be like, "I'm super grateful and thankful to have an audience right now because I'm able to go through and have a business that allows me to go and like be mobile and go to my brother's funeral or whatever." And then people started buying my programs. And I was like, "What in the world?" And then I would share other things, and then people would start buying. And I'm like, "I'm not actually selling these things. I'm just talking about my life." And what was interesting is I went back eventually later that year, and I went back to all these different people, and I was like, "Why did you buy this product?" And they're like, "Well, because you told such and such a story." Oh, that's interesting. So then I went over here and I was like, "Why did you buy that product?" And they're like, "Well, you guys told such and such story." And it was a completely different story. And it was like they were buying because they would hear a story, and they would associate that story with a product that I was selling, and they would go buy it. And so I had all these different products and all these different stories, and I was like, "Okay, well, I got to figure out what's the one story that I want people to figure out?" Right? So I could sell the one product. And so that's what I've really been focused on recently. But that lesson taught me that storytelling was everything, because I had heard that from you a million times. Right? Russell: Yeah. You didn't believe it. Josh: Story, story, story, story. Right? And I'm like, "I'm telling stories, Russell. What more do you want me to do?" But I wasn't. I was telling facts and I was going out there and trying to sound smart. And when I just let go of it all and was like, "This is the story, like the real, the raw, the genuine. I'm not trying to sell you anything. This is legitimately what's going on in my life." I made more money and more sales than I had before. And so I would love for you to talk about... Like I know in Expert Seekers you go through like storytelling and all the different, the core four stories, and the change of false beliefs. But what's the key? And maybe that's it, like going back through that. And that's fine. But like what's the key to telling a good story? Because I think not only do people... And there's a follow-up question to this, which I'm not going to tell you what it is yet. But what are the elements that make a good story? What actually makes a story work? And how do you tell one effectively? Russell: Yeah. First off, it's fascinating because I went through a very similar journey when I got in this world too. I remember going to my very first event. I saw people selling from stage, and seeing the numbers and doing the math, I was just like, "This is crazy. There's no way this actually works." And then I remember getting invited to speak at a seminar, and it was different because webinars are painful, but man, standing on stage and doing a pitch, and then it bombing was even worse. Because it's just like all these people, nobody moved, and it was just like... In fact, I remember I was like, "I'll never, after the first one, I'll never do this again." That was the worst experience ever. And that's when I joined the Dan Kennedy world, and they had this public speaking course. It was like 40 CDs. I remember the pack was like this thick of CDs. And I bought it because I was like, "I want to figure this thing out." I started listening to him. And I don't remember the course at all, other than this feeling of just like it's not teaching. Teaching is not what gets people to buy when you're on stage. It's telling these stories that connect with people. And it shifted my mindset, and so it shifted to the point where I went and tried again. And the next time I tried, I tried to weed these things in, and I got like six sales, a thousand bucks apiece. And I was like, "Oh, okay." Like I got the reward of like this actually worked. And then I was like, "Okay, do it again and do it again." And then you start getting obsessed with it. And then for me, most of my education for the next five years... Because there wasn't a lot of people that had courses on public speaking or things like that. There were a couple, but there wasn't a lot. I just went... And from a timeline, it was before the big 2000 whatever, the big crash in 2008 or whatever. And so there were events happening every single weekend. So I'd go to an event every weekend, and I would sit there and I would just watch the people speak. And I would watch what they were doing and then see how people would buy at the end. And people, the ones that had the big table rushes and stuff, I was like, "Okay, what did they just do? What'd they do to me? How did they do it? What did they say?" And I was like trying to dissect what they were doing. And then I would model that for my presentations. I'd be like, "Oh, I like how they did that part, how they told the story or how they got emotional." Sort of like just studying. McCall Jones calls it charisma hacking. I didn't know that's what it was at the time. But I was just watching how they did stuff and how it made me feel. And it wasn't just like selling from stage. I started watching religion people as well. Like some of the best presenters in the world are preachers and pastors and things like that. And I was watching just people speak and how they got me to feel and move, and how they told stories in a way that was exciting. And then so that's like this study I started going on. Then I met Michael Hague. I started learning about story structure. I was like, "This isn't just made up. There's actual structures and there's things in place. And this guy's way easier," because now I'm not just guessing. There's actually a pathway. Anyway, so that's kind of my history with it too, but it's fascinating. But I think that if I was to break it down into something for people to understand that's not complex but simple... Because you can go to the Expert Secrets book and it can get really complex. But the simplest form is that if somebody's coming to you, it's because they're looking for something different, right? They want change. They want more. There's some result. And I always think about this like on a mountain because Dan Kennedy used to talk about this. He's like, "You need to become the guru on the mountain. And people are going to come to the base of the mountain, and the closer they get to you up the mountain, the more they're going to pay." Right? So, the base of the mountain, they're paying a hundred bucks a month for a newsletter. And then they want to get closer, they pay 500 bucks a month, then a thousand bucks a month. And for whatever, for 50 grand, they can sit at your feet and talk to you." And he used to always talk about that guru on the mountain thing. And back when I was first studying this, the way people sold was different. It was much more like that. It was more of a status play like, "This is how successful and why you should come up here. And if you want to be like me, you got to come to me, pay me more money." And I never really resonated with that, partially because I'm awkward and I always felt awkward like positioning myself. So I never liked that, and so I started learning about story structure. It was cool because I realized that the positioning of you on the mountain, it's essential, right? But it's not like you sell from the top of the mountain, yelling down to the people. It's like people see you on the top of the mountain, and they're down here like, "I want to be up there." You're like, "Cool." And then it's you coming down off the mountain, running down to where they're at, and being like, "Okay, I know exactly where you're at. Let me tell you my story, because I was in your same spot at one time." Right? And that's the power. So, if you look at the way I do my presentations, I usually drop like one slide or one thing like, "Hey, this is the thing you want." Right? Like, "Cool, I've made whatever." Like I'll do my quick posturing just so they know that I've been to the top of the mountain they're trying to get to. But then I don't stay there. But again, if you watch the old-time speakers from the nineties and early 2000s, they would spend the 90-minute presentation talking about them on top of the mountain the whole time. And I just hate it. So I drop real quick, so you know that I know I've been where we're trying to get to, but I got to come back very, very quickly. And the story I'm telling you is the story, my story, of them. Right? I have to put myself in their spot. Like where was I when I went through the same thing? Because all of us, if you got to the top of the mountain, somewhere you had to start hiking. And you went through that journey to be the guru on the top. Right? And so it's like coming back and remembering where are they at or where were you at, telling your story. And if you tell it the way that they connect, they're like, "Oh my gosh, they are me. I was Russell. Russell went through this. He understands." And there's empathy. Then they trust you. Then they want to go on that journey with you. That's like when you came out and you started telling your story, it wasn't you posturing a position of how great you were. But it's like, "Hey, I've done this thing you're trying to figure out. But let me tell you my story and how I'm struggling, how I'm still struggling, the struggles I went through, and the pain and the fear." And all of sudden they're like, "Oh, I feel that too. I feel the pain. I feel the fear. I understand those things. This person understands me. I can trust them to take me on this journey because he's not going to be the person who's just positioning how great they are. It's someone who I have empathy with. They understand me." And that's the key. Because if they feel like you understand them, then they're going to go on that journey with you. And you do that by telling the story, like your version of their story. Because they're living it right now, and you've lived it the past. You've got to tell that in a way where they connect and now they're going to want to go on that journey with you. And that's kind of the key to it all. Josh: That's super, super interesting. Yeah. Because when I think about story structure, because I've like tried to simplify things down in my own head... Because it's always interesting, because I'll watch everything that you do, and so it's funny whenever I do presentations, people are like, "You're a mini Russell." I'm like, "Well, that makes sense actually. Right?" Like I've watched all this stuff, right? So, but for me, man, going through Expert Secrets, I don't know, it was probably the third or fourth or maybe even fifth time through before I finally actually was like, "Oh yeah, you actually do know what you're talking about." Because every step of the way I'd be like, "But my story doesn't fit in. That doesn't work." Or like, "Mine doesn't have that." Or like, "It's not that systematic." Or, "Russell, it's too much of a science. There's more of an art to it." And then I'd read about it and I'd be like, "This is so scientific." And then I'd watch you do it and I'm like, "That's so artistic." And I'm like, "But they're the same." Right? And so I would try to figure out ways to simplify it down to a way I can understand it. And then once I would understand it, I would plug it into yours, and then it would work. Right? And so for me, it was always like, okay, there's four parts. It's, "How did I get here?" Right? That's backstory. Like, "How did I get to right here right now?" That's like that. And then it's, "Where am I going?" Right? So, the goal, the desire. And then it's, "How am I going to get there?" New vehicle, new opportunity, right? And then it's, "What's it going to look like?" The vision, like what's it going to look like in the process of all that, so we can paint this thing and we get people emotionally attached? And so for me, in my brain... And they don't always happen in that sequential order. Like sometimes you start with the desire, and then you go back, but it has to have all four of those parts. And then I would take that and I would go, and then I would apply it to the Expert Secrets, and then it would start working. Right? I was like, "Oh my gosh, that's what Russell's doing here and here and here." And then you actually have this whole framework out about it, right? And I think one of the things for me is I always go... Because we've done book clubs on Expert Secrets. I teach stories in marketing. I teach stories in personal development. Like stories and storytelling is a big part of what I do now, especially over the last six months and moving forward. One of the questions that continues to come up is... Well, there's two parts. Let me start with the first one. "Hey, Russell, that's all great, but I'm not a leader. I'm not the attractive character that's the leader." Right? "I'm not the person that figured it out and am living my customer's journey." And there's actually a lot more of those people than I thought. I thought most people were leaders because that's what I was when I first got started. So my question is, do you tell this story a different way? Or how is the story different, how is it positioned differently, if you are not the leader? Because I know you're not in your story. You're the reluctant hero, right? And so I tell people, I'm like, "Before you start figuring out your story, you got to figure out what attractive character you're going to be." Right? And we go through the four inside of Expert Secrets. It's like there's the leader, there's the adventurer, there's the reporter, and then there's the reluctant hero. And what's interesting is early on in my journey, I was the hero. Right? I was the one, I was like, "Guys..." I was literally this broke kid, freaking living in a $500-a-month apartment with duct tape windows. And now I'm not, right? And Instagram was the thing, and social media, and here we go. Right? But as I evolved, then the podcast came. And without even realizing it, I became the reporter. Right? And so how does, based on your attractive character, how does that change the story or how you tell it? Russell: Yeah. And it's funny because mine's transformed, not only just throughout time, but in different situations as well. Right? Like sometimes I'm the attractive... You know, when I got started, say when I was an interviewer, so I interviewed people. So I was a reporter for a long time. But then I transitioned to like a reluctant hero. But there's other times, like if I'm on Hockey Live, I'm not the reluctant hero, right? At that time I've got to be the hero. Like I'm coming in and I'm setting authority because I've got a whole group of alphas in the room. And if I don't come there as like the head alpha, they will run me over. If you're like in a situation with Tony Adib, like if I'm that situation, I'm transitioning more back to reporter because I'm leveraging Tony's expertise and things like that. And so I'm going back as a reporter. Same thing with Dan Kennedy right now. You look at... It's fascinating. Like we just bought Dan Kennedy's company, right? We just launched the first Dan Kennedy new offer. By the way, if you're listening, go to NoBSLetter.com and go sign up. But yeah, like... Josh: By the way, make sure you go through my link. Russell: Yeah. But look at like how I've... It's /JoshForti, yeah. Josh: Yeah. Russell: But if you look at like how I'm positioning this offer, it's not me coming as like Russell's the alpha. Right? I'm coming back here as like, "This is my mentor. Boom. And I had this chance to acquire, but I'm going to go through 40 years of his stuff, and I'm bringing it back to you." And I'm pulling these things out, and this is what I learned from Dan and what I learned from Dan here." Right? And it's me coming back in a reporter role with my mentor, and that's how I'm introducing the world to him. So, it shifts, right? It shifts based on the story and the situation. Like what are you using it for? Right? Like I could've come in and be like... Because there's different posturing. Like I could've come in and been the hero and like, "I bought Dan's company. We bringing it back from the dead. Da, da, da." Like put it on me. But that story, first off, didn't feel good. But second off, it's not the story that needs to get people to move. The stories to get people to move is me giving homage to this guy who's changed my life, and now I'm going to be having the chance to bring these things back to you. Like me becoming the reporter back in that phase, in that business and that side, is a more powerful story to use. Right? And so it's all coming down to figuring out what's going to be the best story, right, in this situation and where you're at, and thinking through that. Because right now you're in a reporter role, but other times I still see you, you shift back over where you're running different things. So it's just trying to figure out what's... Again, these are all tools. I was talking to the Two Comma Club X members this week. And part of the group's doing challenges, part are doing webinars, part are doing different things. And they're like, "Which one should I do? Which one's the best?" I'm like, "No, it's not which one's best. These are tools. Like this is a hammer, this is a saw, and different jobs and different tools." And so it's like if I'm coming in here, I want a hammer, but over here I want a saw, and here I want a hammer and a saw, because I'm going to do this thing. Right? And same thing with stories, understanding that. Like your attractive character can shift. Mine's shifted more throughout time, but also situationally it shifts where it's like, okay, this is the role I need to be here, and it's okay to shift back to reporter. I've seen people, in fact... Well, can I drop names? Yeah. Who cares? So like Grant Cardone's a good example. I love Grant. Grant is like the leader, right? And at 10X, after we set all these sales records, Grant was going to shift to the interviewer and he was going to interview me. And it would've been a really fascinating thing for him to pick my brain and ask. And we sat down and we got in the thing, and he sat there for a second, and all of a sudden he was like, he didn't want to. He thought like shifting to the interviewer was a decrease in status. And he literally stopped before he started and said, "Actually I don't want to interview you. I'm going to have somebody else do it." And he got off the little thing, had somebody else come in, and that person interviewed me. And I was like, "Ah, dang it." It would've been so powerful for him. Josh: Come on, Grant. Russell: It would been so powerful for him, for his positioning, for people to connect with him better, if he would've come off like, "I'm Grant Cardone." You know, trade, come down for a second, and done the reporter, and been excited. Because he genuinely was excited. He, backstage, was freaking out. He was like, "I've never seen what you just did. That was amazing." Like it was this cool thing. And it humanized him for a minute. And he could have had that moment where he did it, and he didn't. Whereas me right now with Kennedy, I'm paying all homage to Dan. He's amazing. And it, first off, makes the offer better, makes the story better, but it also makes me more... People connect because now it's like they're the same thing. Like, "Oh my gosh. I have mentors. I can be excited about what they're learning." I don't have to posture all the time where I'm the only person. You know what I mean? Josh: Yeah. Well, it's super interesting that you say that because studying influencers has been something that I've kind of geeked out about. And one of the things you talk about in there, in Expert Secrets or whatever, is the attractive character has flaws. Right? And when the attractive character owns those flaws, it actually makes their supporters love them more. And what's interesting is that I've looked at people like Trump, and we're not trying to get political here in any way, shape or form, but one of the big criticisms of Trump, even from his own people, and I being one of those, is he never admits when he's wrong. He never will step down and even give the idea that somebody else could be right. And because of that, that actually hurts him a lot more in the long run than in the short, than it gains him in the short term. Right? And so it's that same concept. And then I look at someone like a Dave Portnoy, right? And do you follow Dave at all? Dave Portnoy? Okay. So he's the founder of Barstool Sports, and he's the one that did the Barstool Fund and everything like that or whatever. Here's a dude who, I mean, his fan base is not as large as Trump's, but as far as like fans and fans, people love Portnoy. Right? Like, I mean, there's his fans. But he makes fun of himself constantly, right? And he's constantly coming back and being like, "Yeah, I messed up." All of his bets are public because he owns like a gambling or a sports betting company. So you go to his Twitter and it's nothing but all of his wins and then all of his losses. Right? And so you can see both, and people just love it. And anytime people are trying to bash up on him, all of his supporters come and they're like, "Yeah, we know he's an idiot. Right? But he's an amazing idiot. Yeah." Right? And so it's like when you show that other side, people connect to you even better. And it's such a fascinating concept because it's opposite of what our brains think. You know what I mean? Russell: A hundred percent. It's counterintuitive. Like we want to always posture position, thinking that's the... It's just like the guru on the mountain we talked about, right? Like in the eighties, nineties, every expert wanted to be the person, the infallible expert up here at the top. But man, that's not what gets people to connect. It's the coming down and like, "Dude, I struggle too. I remember the pain. I remember the pressure, the fear, the scare, like all those things." And that's what connects people. People crave connection now. Maybe there was a time in history where people just wanted the other thing. But nowadays it's not that way. People connect with vulnerability. But it's hard, it's scary, because it's like... In fact, Natalie Hodson, I think she quoted Brene Brown, but she's the one that told me this. She's like, "When you're vulnerable, you feel small, but people looking at it, it feels makes you feel big to them." So it's a weird thing where you're like, "I feel horrible," but it makes them look at you and like, "Oh my gosh, this person's willing to say things I'm thinking in my head and I don't dare to talk about because of my own fear and anxiety and status, and all those kind of things." And it gives them that thing, and that's what gets people to connect with you. It's really fascinating. Josh: Yeah, for sure. For sure. Okay. Last piece on this, which will take up the rest of the time for sure, is the number one question that I get hands down when it comes to stories... I'm sure you've heard this a million times, but in the odd case that you haven't, Russell, your people want to know this. Okay? The number one question is: How do I know which story to tell? Russell: Ooh, that's good. Josh: Right? It's the hardest thing because people are like... And it's always hilarious because I'll sit down and I'll be like, "Well, what story are you trying to tell?" And they're like, "I don't know." And I'm like, "Well, here's your life story." And I will tell them because I'm like their coach and I've been around them for six weeks or whatever it is. And I'll go, "Here's your story. Boom, boom, boom." And I'll summarize their entire life in 30 seconds. And they're like, "How did you do that?" And I'm like, "Because it..." Well, anyway, I want to know the answer to their question. How do you know what story to tell? Because everybody has these. We're so close, right? And for me, I'm about to turn 28, right? My 28th birthday, we'll do a big birthday bash. Russ is coming on. It's going to be great. We're going to want to do podcasts. It's going to be so cool. Right? But it's like I've got 28 years worth of experiences. How do I know what to tell? Russell: Yeah. It's fascinating. When I wrote the first version of the Expert Secrets, I didn't know that was the question people had. I didn't even know how to answer. It never crossed my mind. And anyway, I wrote the second version of the Expert Secrets and I'd seen it, so I'd updated it. But no one ever commented. And it wasn't until... Actually, you came to it. You came to the most recent FHAT event I did, right? The expert one? Yes, okay. Josh: Yeah, not the e-com one, but yeah. Russell: Yeah. So the first time I shared that publicly was at that event, and I remember it was fascinating because Steven Larson is probably one of the people that have studied me the most. And he raised his hand like, "Oh my gosh." He's like, "I finally understand what story I'm supposed to tell." And that was coming from Steven who like... And I was like, "Interesting." So, this is the problem I think that... And I always tell people, "Tell your backstory. Tell the origin story." So they're like, "Okay. I was born in Provo, Utah, March 8th, 1980. It was a cold night." And they, they go back to there, right? Because they think that's the story, because I tell them, "Tell your origin story." And it wasn't until at that event... Again, I think, I'm pretty sure in the second version, the hardbound version of DotCom Secrets, it's in there. But it was that event where I really said, "The story you're telling is not like your origin story. It's your origin story of how you came upon or created or figured out your framework. It's your interaction with the framework you're sharing." That's the key, right? So, when I'm talking about the perfect webinar, for example, the origin story I'm telling is not my origin story. It's my origin story discovering this framework. So, for example, I went to Armand Morin's event and I saw people speaking on stage. I did the math, and then I spoke on stage, and I looked like an idiot. And I went back home, and then I bought Dan Kennedy's course. I realized it was wrong, and then I went through the thing. And so it's that story, it's how I learned or I earned this framework. Like how did I come up with... What was the things I went through to discover this gem that I'm bringing now from the top of the mountain down to them, saying like, "This is the thing I found out, and this is the story about how I found it. Let me share it with you." And be like, "Ooh, I want that gem. I want that gold nugget." And then they come with you on the journey to go and get that with you. So, that's the most simple way I've figured out how to explain it. I'm curious on your side, because you've explained versions of this as well, would you add to that or change it? Or what are kind of your thoughts on it? Josh: Well, so let me start by telling you the biggest struggle that I had. Like I'm talking for over a year of reading Expert Secrets, I struggled with one specific thing that I could not figure out, and it was the question that I wanted to ask you for the longest time. And then like right before we got an interview, I figured it out. I was like, "Oh my gosh." But it was I didn't understand the difference between the backstory and secret number one. And what I meant mean by that is like, to me, I'm like, "First you discover funnels, and then you teach them the framework for funnels. It's the same thing." But then you would say they're different. And I'm like, "How?" Right? Like I don't understand the difference between those two things. Now, at first I didn't understand it at all. And then kind of my first epiphany or my first breakthrough was, "Oh, wait, wait, wait, wait. First the backstory introduces the thing. And then secret number one has the framework for the thing." Right? And so then that was kind of my first realization of like, "Okay, these are separate. It's one, it's the thing. And then the framework for the thing." But then I would look at your webinar and I would go, "Russell, Russell, what's your framework? Like what's the framework to build a funnel?" I'm like, "It's hook, story, offer." That's what I thought, right? I'm like, "In order to build a good funnel, it's hook, story, offer." And then I was like, "Well, maybe that's not the framework. Maybe it's add all the upsells and break the beliefs, and then go through." And I was like... But no matter what it was, it was never... Like the framework for building a successful funnel was never to go and model somebody else's funnel, and then build all the up. I'm like, that's a thing, but that's not the parts of a funnel. Right? And so I got confused because I thought the framework that I was supposed to teach in secret number one was the parts of the thing, not the framework for how to build the thing. Right? And so I think one of the biggest 'aha' moments for me is like each part of the webinar that you're doing is its own separate section, and they build off of one another, but they're also each standalone. Right? And so I thought that the backstory or that the story that I told in the backstory was the story through the entire webinar, and it's not. Right? And so whenever I would hear you say, "Well, tell the backstory about how you learned it and how you earned it," I thought it was like that was the story for the webinar, and then I had to go through and tell each thing. And then I realized that there's a separate story for each thing. Right? There was a separate story for the backstory. And by the time you're done with the backstory... And I think it was you that said it. I go back and forth. I really like how Dan Henry explained some of the things specifically when selling courses, because that was the other problem, was you were selling a software and I was like, "Well, what happens if I'm not selling a software? Oh, crap. Where does it fit in?" Right? But I think it was you that said by the time you're done with the backstory, there's a percentage of your people that are ready to buy. And I'm like, "Whoa. That's the story that I've got to figure out." And so for me, I was like, "What is the story that I have to tell, that if I were not allowed to tell secret one, secret two or secret three, people just took me at my word that what I said was the solution to their problem? What's that story that I have to tell that people would go and buy?" And I became obsessed with that, and that's what I call a master story. Because I'm like, to me... And that's why I was telling you where I was geeking out about it. I'm like, to me, once I figure out that, and I've gone through and taught all these students how to teach stories, if I focus all of my time on the three secrets, we never get anywhere. Like literally. It's ridiculous. We'll spend so much time, and then they'll do the presentation and it won't work. But if I spend 80% of my time on just the backstory and we get that right, they basically figure out the other three secrets like that. And I spend 20% of my time in the other three secrets. Russell: That's fascinating. Josh: Yeah. Russell: Because I spend both of my time doing the three secrets, because that's where people get stuck on my side. But man, the way you frame that's really cool, because I always think about... There's different markets I go after, right? So if I'm going after like a beginner market, my first thing is telling the potato gun story, because it's like, "I had a potato gun, we had an upsell, da, da, da." And for beginner, like... Josh: Which 100%, by the way, 100% of what I've done... The last like six, three months I've been doing sales calls like crazy. Whenever I mention the master story, I go, "Hey guys, do you know Russell?" They're like, "What's the master story?" I'm like, "Do you know who Russell Brunson is?" They're like, "Yeah." I'm like, "Do you know the potato gun story?" 100% of the people say yes, every single time. There's not been a single person... I'm like, "That's his master story when it comes to funnels." Anyway. Russell: That's always interests me because I have a different master story if I'm going over like a more advanced audience, which is the master story of no VCs. Right? So it's like, "We're competing against InfusionSoft and all these things. They had a hundred million dollars in funding. We didn't have any money. We were broke. And so we put this thing together. Da, da, da." And they're like, "Now we get customers for free, and then they buy software." And that master story is what sells it to more of like the corporate, like the business owners who think through the world of like investing. So, that's story that I lead... If I talk about potato guns with them, they're lost, right? So again, it's like, people are like, "But I only have a story." It's like, "No, you have different stories. What are the stories that fit the audience?" Dan Kennedy 101, message to market match. Like how do you connect these things? Right? It's like here's the market I'm talking to. In fact, I think you know this. We bought Doodly.com and we bought like Brad Callen's whole company. And these people, I didn't realize at the time, I thought they were internet marketers using software to make sales videos. But no, they were actually course creators who don't know anything about marketing. And so I went and did my webinar pitch to these people and it bombed, and it was like the worst thing ever. And I was like, "What?" And it was like, "Oh my gosh. I didn't understand the market." And so I had to change. So we rewrote it, changed the story, changed the thing to match the market we're going after. And now it's converted really well. But it was like, it's just understanding that in every situation, like figuring out, "Okay, who am I actually speaking to? So there's the market. And what's the message, the story I think I have that's going to match that to then bring them into our world?" Because I'm selling the same product, no matter what, but there's different stories that's going to hit different markets as you go through. You'll probably hear me quote a lot more Dan Kennedy in your future, as I'm going through all his courses again right now, and having the time of my life with it. So... Josh: Yeah. Well, it's just interesting, just going back to that one concept of like the first core story, the master story, the backstory of it all. I think one of the big problems that I know I ran into this is, once again, I thought the whole webinar was designed to teach and educate. Like that's when I would introduce and teach it, the whole entire process. But it's not. Like secret one, secret two, secret three are designed to educate on the thing that you introduce in the backstory. Right? And for me, with the people I work with on a pretty consistent basis, it's like they don't understand that either. And so when I go in and I'm like, "No, no, no, no, no. Forget about teaching them about it. You have to teach them what it is, why it's so important." And I always go back to that story when you were like no one was buying it and then you're like, "Do you understand what I went through then?" I'm like, "That! That's what you're trying to create." It's like forget the framework for it. Forget how it works. Forget why it worked for them. Forget the external objections for a second or whatever. Like what do you have to do that, if you didn't get to do anything like that, how would you convince somebody that this is the most greatest, amazing thing, and then be like, "And just take my word for it that it's going to work for you." Like, what's that story that you would tell? And for me, once I identified that was what it was, and I started working on my students with that, all the rest of the webinars and find new challenges and everything became easy. Whether it was Catherine Jones when we worked with her, whether it was Brad Gibbon, casual tactics, like all of them, it was like, once we figured out that, then all the rest of the things fell into place. Russell: Yeah. It's fascinating because the reason why I bombed when I first started versus why I started studying dance stuff, is that realization of just like, "They haven't bought into the fact that they want to funnel yet or that they want weight loss or whatever the thing is." Like your only goal during the webinar or the challenge or whatever is to convince them that this is the vehicle that's going to be the most likely successful to get up on that mountain and get the result that they've been looking for. Because they've been looking for the result for a long time, right? I think Katlyn said the average woman goes on eight diets a year. Right? So it's like, now that they're like, "Oh my gosh, I'm going to lose weight." It's not like this, "Oh my gosh, I'm going to make money. Oh my gosh, I'm going to..." Like, they already want the result. They tried three or four other things. You're trying to convince them that your presentation or your challenge or whatever is to convince them that of all the different potential opportunities, that your new opportunity is the one that's most likely to get them success. And if they buy into that, then you can take them on the journey. But you start teaching around the gate. You're trying to take them on this journey, and they're like, "Wait, but there's like 10 other options. I don't think you're the right... I don't even know if you're the right option. I have no idea." So your job and your role is 100% only there to convince them that this is the most likely thing that's going to give them the success they're looking for. And yeah, then you won. Then you can bring them into world. Now you can serve them. Now you can change their life. But until you've sold them on the fact that your vehicle is the one that is most likely to give success, you can't serve them. You can't change their life. You can't do anything. And so that's what we got to become really good at is that transition. So, anyway, so fun. Josh: All right. Well, that'll wrap up the story episode there. I think that was really, really good. I think we got a lot accomplished. Russell: We should go, another time, or next time you're a voice, we should do like a half-day live with everybody on like the master story. That'd be fascinating to go deeper just on that, without the context of having to have all the rest of the webinar things. I'd love to geek out with you deeper on that. So, there's the thought. If you guys want more of that, you got to let me and Josh know, and maybe next time we're around some UFC fight or some fake YouTube boxing fight, we'll plan something fun like that. Because that'd be really cool to go deep on that. Josh: That fake YouTube boxer fight, that's 5 and 0, right? Oh, man. All right. Russell: All right. Thanks, you guys, for listening. If you enjoyed this, please let us know. Tag us on social. Tweet us out. Instagram us. YouTube... I don't know. All the different places. Josh: Don't tweet us. Russell won't tweet at you. He'll just fake like your tweets. Instagram? Instagram. Russell: Tweet at Josh, and then I'll share it. Josh: Yeah. Russell: My team will share it. Anyhow, let us know. We're enjoying doing these, and hopefully you guys love them as well. And the last way, if you want to help grow this podcast, please just tell other people about it. And yeah, that's all I got. Thanks, everyone. Thanks, Josh.