Podcasts about sails

  • 813PODCASTS
  • 1,139EPISODES
  • 40mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Jan 29, 2023LATEST
sails

POPULARITY

20152016201720182019202020212022

Categories



Best podcasts about sails

Latest podcast episodes about sails

Bar Karate - The Sailing Podcast
Bar Karate - the Sailing Podcast Ep196, Abby Ehler, straight from winning Leg 1 of the Ocean Race

Bar Karate - The Sailing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 29, 2023 92:17


Published 29 January 2023We chat to Abby Ehler straight after winning Leg 1 of the Ocean Race. Its an episode where we just geek out on all aspects of sailing the IMOCA's and the first leg of the race. Abby is a long time friend to us all and a lot of fun to be around. We also talk about so many regattas.  505's, 470's, Wazsp's, Moths, 18's, Finns, DN's, Festival of Sails, Cape to Rio, and the Wallys. Enjoy.#barkarate #sailingpodcast #barkaratesailorslarger #barkarateconversations #worldsailingofficial #sailing #boat #ocean #sport #voile #sail #sea #offshore #sailors #sailingworld #extremesailing #foils #yacht #yachts #saillife #instayacht #sailingblog #instasail #theoceanrace #abbyehler #finnclass #505_class #idniyra

Covert Castaway Liveaboard Sailing
Making North Sails - S6E02

Covert Castaway Liveaboard Sailing

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 29, 2023 21:50


We speak to our neighbor Tom who works at North Sails and has the best job in the world. He shares about materials and R&D for 3Di sail building.  Welcome to Covert Castaway, our fully uncut experience making the transition to be sailing liveaboard cruisers. Join us as we share what we are learning as we make the lifestyle change to sell our stuff, quit our jobs, buy a boat and explore the world. Join the conversation on our Sailing AWEN facebook page or drop us a note at sailingawen@gmail.com.

DCL Podcast
346 A DCL loving family sails on the Disney Wish for the first time!

DCL Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2023 67:28


Kevin and Jenica join us this week to discuss their family's experiences sailing on the Disney Wish for the first time. Their family has cruised all over the world with DCL, and we start off by hearing their experiences on the Disney Magic this past summer in Greece. We then turn to the Wish, where … Continue reading "346 A DCL loving family sails on the Disney Wish for the first time!"

R.L. Stine's Story Club
S1E204 - Ivy's Chilling Tales: Bowline Baker Sails Again

R.L. Stine's Story Club

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2023 7:32


Join Ivy, caretaker of peculiar and spooky stories from the hidden vault of R.L. Stine, as she explores some of her favorite chilling tales. This haunted, high-seas account, Story Club members, might make you stay away from the mysteries of the open sea.If you have a spooky story you would like to share, send an email to Ivy at ivy@gokidgo.com.

RNZ: Nine To Noon
Around the motu : Todd Niall in Auckland

RNZ: Nine To Noon

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 22, 2023 9:34


Stuff Senior Auckland Affairs Journalist Todd Niall talks to Kathryn about the main issues facing the Auckland Council and the City of Sails this year under Mayor Wayne Brown. This includes the ongoing decline of public transport with bus driver shortages, current and future disruptive rail track repairs, and ferry woes due to staff shortages and breakdowns of the aging fleet. Also, will the council be able to plug a forecast $295 million deficit in the 2023-24 budget.

Paddling Adventures Radio
Episode 361: Sails for your canoe and kayak; Cliff Jacobson’s canoeing myths; Do you need a kayak dashboard?

Paddling Adventures Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 72:02


Episode 361 ~ January 19, 2023 Podcast Info / Topics Why paddle when you can throw up a sail and let the wind do the work for you? There are a few myths about canoeing that Cliff Jacobson says we need to stop buying into What do you do with your coffee when out for […]

Paddling Adventures Radio
Episode 361: Sails for your canoe and kayak; Cliff Jacobson’s canoeing myths; Do you need a kayak dashboard?

Paddling Adventures Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 72:02


Episode 361 ~ January 19, 2023 Podcast Info / Topics Why paddle when you can throw up a sail and let the wind do the work for you? There are a few myths about canoeing that Cliff Jacobson says we need to stop buying into What do you do with your coffee when out for […]

The Yacht Racing Podcast
Tom Morris – aka 'Mozzy Sails'

The Yacht Racing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 57:00


Tom Morris is a talented British dinghy sailor, who aside from his sailing achievements – that include a national championship victory in the RS800 twin trapeze skiff class and winning the UK's champion of champions Endeavour Trophy last year – is also host of the highly popular YouTube channel Mozzy Sails, where he and some of his sailing friends provide some fascinating and much needed analysis of the technical side of the 37th America's Cup. So far, Morris' channel has racked up close to four million views and has a subscriber base of just short of 22 thousand and counting. You can become a subscriber here: https://www.youtube.com/@MozzySails/

Live 95.5
Joanna & David (Don't Raise The Sails)

Live 95.5

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2023 14:36


Joanna & David (Don't Raise The Sails) by Live 95.5

Brooke and Jubal
Awkward Tuesday: Don't Raise The Sails

Brooke and Jubal

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2023 14:50


The woman in today's Awkward Tuesday Phone Call emailed us for help because she swears her friend is about to make a terrible financial decision and she doesn't know how to tell him.

raise awkward sails awkward tuesday phone call
Risky Business News
Srsly Risky Biz: Carnegie Report Takes Wind Out of Cyber War's Sails

Risky Business News

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2023


In this podcast Patrick Gray talks to Tom Uren about a new Carnegie report that does a really good job examining the interplay of disruptive cyber operations and conventional military action in Russia's invasion of Ukraine. They also examine the trajectory of NSO Group. The US Supreme Court has decided that WhatsApp's court case against the firm can continue, but the political environment has changed so drastically we don't think the court case will make much difference in the end. Show notes Carnegie Report Takes Wind Out of Cyber War Sails

The Onside Zone with Big O
Podcast Monday - Wind Is Out Of My Sails 01 02 2023

The Onside Zone with Big O

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2023 4:55


Big O says the wind is out of his sails

Big O Radio Show
Podcast Monday - Wind Is Out Of My Sails 01 02 2023

Big O Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2023 4:55


Big O says the wind is out of his sails

Software Sessions
Victor Adossi on Yak Shaving

Software Sessions

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2023 110:47


Victor is a software consultant in Tokyo who describes himself as a yak shaver. He writes on his blog at vadosware and curates Awesome F/OSS, a mailing list of open source products. He's also a contributor to the Open Core Ventures blog. Before our conversation Victor wrote a structured summary of how he works on projects. I recommend checking that out in addition to the episode. Topics covered: Most people should use Dokku or CapRover But he uses Kubernetes anyways Hosting a Database in Kubernetes Learning technology You don't really know a thing until something goes wrong History of Frontend Development Context from lower layers of the stack and historical projects Good project pages have comparisons to other products Choosing technologies Language choice affects maintainability Knowing an ecosystem Victor's preferred stack Technology bake offs Posting findings means you get free corrections Why people use medium instead of personal sites Victor VADOSWARE - Blog How Victor works on Projects - Companion post for this episode Awesome FOSS - Curated list of OSS projects NimbusWS - Hosted OSS built on top of budget cloud providers Unvalidated Ideas - Startup ideas for side project inspiration PodcastSaver - Podcast index that allows you to choose Postgres or MeiliSearch and compare performance and results of each Victor's preferred stack Docker - Containers Kubernetes - Container provisioning (Though at the beginning of the episode he suggests Dokku for single server or CapRover for multiple) TypeScript - JavaScript with syntax for types. Victor's default choice. Rust - Language he uses if doing embedded work, performance is critical, or more correctness is desired Haskell - Language he uses if correctness and type system is the most important for the project Postgresql - General purpose database that's good enough for most use cases including full text search. KeyDB - Redis compatible database for caching. Acquired by Snap and then made open source. Victor uses it over Redis because it is multi threaded and supports flash storage without a Redis Enterprise license. Pulumi - Provision infrastructure with the languages you're already using instead of a specialized one or YAML Svelte and SvelteKit - Preferred frontend stack. Previously used Nuxt. Search engines Postgres Full Text Search vs the rest Optimizing Postgres Text Search with Trigrams OpenSearch - Amazon's fork of Elasticsearch typesense meilisearch sonic Quickwit JavaScript build tools Babel SWC Webpack esbuild parcel Vite Turbopack JavaScript frameworks React Vue Svelte Ember Frameworks built on top of frameworks Next - React Nuxt - Vue SvelteKit - Svelte Astro - Multiple Historical JavaScript tools and frameworks Underscore jQuery MooTools Backbone AngularJS Knockout Aurelia GWT Bower - Frontend package manager Grunt - Task runner Gulp - Task runner Related Links Dokku - Open source single-host alternative to Heroku Cloud Native Buildpacks - Buildpacks created by Heroku and Pivotal and used by Dokku CapRover - An open source PaaS-like abstraction built on top of Docker Swarm Kelsey Hightower's tweet about being cautious about running databases on Kubernetes Settling the Myth of Transparent HugePages for Databases Kubernetes Container Storage Interface (CSI) Kubernetes Local Persistent Volumes Longhorn - Distributed block storage for Kubernetes Postgres docs Postgres TOAST Everything I've seen on optimizing Postgres on ZFS Kubernetes Workload Resources Kubernetes Network Plugins Kubernetes Ingress Traefik Kubernetes the Hard Way (Setting up a cluster in a way that optimizes for learning) How does TLS work Let's Encrypt Cert manager for Kubernetes Choose Boring Technology A Linux user's guide to Logical Volume Management Docker networking overview Kubernetes Scheduler Tauri - Build desktop applications with web technology and Rust ripgrep - CLI tool to recursively search directory for a regex pattern (Meant to be a rust replacement for grep) angle-grinder / ag - CLI tool to parse and process log files written in rust Object.observe ECMAScript Proposal to be Withdrawn Ruby on Rails - Ruby web framework Django - Python web framework Laravel - PHP web framework Adonis - JavaScript NestJS - JavaScript What is a NullPointerException, and how do I fix it? Mastodon Clap - CLI argument parser for Rust AWS CDK - Provision AWS infrastructure using programming languages Terraform - Provision infrastructure with terraform language URL canonicalization of duplicate pages and the use of the canonical tag - Used by dev.to to send google traffic to the original blogpost instead of dev.to Transcript You can help edit this transcript on GitHub. [00:00:00] Jeremy: This episode, I talk to Victor Adossi who describes himself as a yak shaver. Someone who likes trying a whole bunch of different technologies, seeing the different options. We talk about what he uses, the evolution of front end development, and his various projects. Talking to just different people it's always good to get where they're coming from because something that works for Google at their scale is going to be different than what you're doing with one of your smaller projects. [00:00:31] Victor: Yeah, the context. Of course in direct conflict with that statement, I definitely use Google technology despite not needing to at all right? Like, you know, 99% of people who are doing like people like to call it indiehacking or building small products could probably get by with just Dokku. If you know Dokku or like CapRover. Are two projects that'll be like, Oh, you can just push your code here, we'll build it up like a little mini Heroku PaaS thing and just go on one big server, right? Like 99% of the people could just use that. But of course I'm not doing that. So I'm a bit of a hypocrite in that sense. I know what I should be doing, but I'm not doing that. I am writing a Kubernetes cluster with like five nodes for no reason. Uh, yeah, I dunno, people don't normally count the controllers. [00:01:24] Jeremy: Dokku and CapRover, I think those are where it's supposed to create a heroku like experience I think it's based off of the heroku buildpacks right? At least Dokku is? [00:01:36] Victor: Yeah Buildpacks has actually been spun out into like a community thing so like pivotal and heroku, it's like buildpacks.io, they're trying to build a wider standard around it so that more people can get involved. And buildpacks are actually obviously fantastic as a technology and as a a process piece. There's not much else like them and you know, that's obvious from like Heroku's success and everything. I know Dokku uses that. I don't know that Caprover does, but I haven't, I haven't really run Caprover that much. They, they probably do. Like at this point if you're going to support building from code, it seems silly to try and build your own buildpacks. Cause that's what you will do, eventually. So you might as well use what's there. Anyway, this is like just getting to like my personal opinions at this point, but like, if you think containers are a bad idea in 2022, You're wrong, you should, you should stop. Like you should, you should stop. Think about it. I mean, obviously there's not, um, I got a really great question at an interview once, which is, where are containers a bad idea? That's probably one of the best like recent interview questions I've ever gotten cause I was like, Oh yeah, I mean, like, you can't, it can't be perfect everywhere, right? Nothing's perfect everywhere. So it's like, where is it? Uh, and of course the answer was networking, right? (unintelligible) So if you need absolute performance, but like for just about everything else. Containers are kind of it at this point. Like, time has born it out, I think. So yeah, I always just like bias at taking containers at this point. So I'm probably more of a CapRover person than a Dokku person, even though I have not used, I don't use CapRover. [00:03:09] Jeremy: Well, like something that I've heard with containers, and maybe it's changed recently, but, but something that was kind of holdout was when people would host a database sometimes they would oh we just don't wanna put this in a container and I wonder if like that matches with your thinking or if things have changed. [00:03:27] Victor: I am not a database administrator right like I read postgres docs and I read the, uh, the Postgres documentation, and I think I know a bit about postgres but I don't commit right like so and I also haven't, like, oh, managed X terabytes on one server that you are making sure never goes down kind of deal. But the stickiness for me, at least from when I've run, So I've done a lot of tests with like ZFS and Postgres and like, um, and also like just trying to figure out, and I run Postgres in Kubernetes of course, like on my cluster and a lot of the stuff I found around is, is like fiddly kernel things like sort of base kernel settings that you need to have set. Like, you know, stuff like should you be using transparent huge pages, like stuff like that. But once you have that settled. Containers are just processes with name spacing and resource control, right? Like, that's it. there are some other ins and outs, but for the most part, if you're fine running a process, so people ran processes, right? And they were just completely like unprotected. Then people made users for the processes and they limited the users and ran the processes, right? Then the next step is now you can run a process and then do the limiting the name spaces in cgroups dynamically. Like there, there's, there's sort of not a humongous difference, unless you're hitting something very specific. Uh, but yeah, databases have been a point of contention, but I think, Kelsey Hightower had that tweet yeah. That was like, um, don't run databases in Kubernetes. And I think he called it back. [00:04:56] Victor: I don't know, but I, I know that was uh, was one of those things that people were really unsure about at first, but then after people sort of like felt it out, they were like, Oh, it's actually fine. Yeah. [00:05:06] Jeremy: Yeah I vaguely remember one of the concerns having to do with persistent storage. Like there were challenges with Kubernetes and needing to keep that storage around and I don't know if that's changed yeah or if that's still a concern. [00:05:18] Victor: Uh, I'd say that definitely has changed. Uh, and it was, it was a concern, depending on where you were. Mostly people who are running AKS or EKS or you know, all those other managed Kubernetes, they're just using EBS or like whatever storage provider is like offering for storage. Most of those people don't actually have that much of a problem with, storage in general. Now, high performance storage is obviously different, right? So like, so you'll, you're gonna have to start doing manual, like local volume management and stuff like that. it was a problem, because obviously CSI (Kubernetes Container Storage Interface) didn't exist for some period of time, and like there was, it was hard to know what to do for if you were just running a Kubernetes cluster. I think a lot of people were just using local, first of all, local didn't even exist for a bit. Um, they were just using host path, right? And just like, Oh, it's on the disk somewhere. Where do we, we have to go get it right? Or we have to like, sort of manage that. So that was something most people weren't ready for, especially if you were just, if you weren't like sort of a, a, a traditional sysadmin and used to doing that stuff. And then of course local volumes came out, but I think they still had to be, um, pre-provisioned. So that's sysadmin stuff that most people, you know, maybe aren't, aren't necessarily ready for. Uh, and then most of the general solutions were slow. So like, I used Longhorn (https://longhorn.io) for a long time and Longhorn, Longhorn's great. And super easy to set up, but it can be slower and you can have some, like, delays in mount time. it wasn't ideal for, for most people. So yeah, I, overall it's true. Databases, Databases in Kubernetes were kind of fraught with peril for a while, but it wasn't for the reason that, it wasn't for the fundamental reason that Kubernetes was just wrong or like, it wasn't the reason most people think of, which is just like, Oh, you're gonna break your database. It's more like, running a database is hard and Kubernetes hasn't solved all the hard problems. Like, cuz that's what Kubernetes does. It basically solves a lot of problems in a very generic way. Right. So it just hadn't solved all those problems yet at this point. I think it's got decent answers on a lot of them. So I, I mean, I don't know. I I do it. Don't, don't take what I'm saying to your, you know, PM meeting or your standup meeting, uh, anyone who's listening. But it's more like if you could solve the problems with databases in the sense before. You could probably solve 'em on Kubernetes now with a good understanding of Kubernetes. Cause at the end of the day, it's all the same stuff. Just Kubernetes makes it a little easier to, uh, do it dynamically. [00:07:50] Jeremy: It sounds like you could do it before, but some of the, I guess the tools or the ways of doing persistent storage were not quite there yet, or they were difficult to use. And so that was why people at the start were like, Okay, maybe it's not a good idea, but, now maybe there's some established practices for how you should run a database in Kubernetes. And I, I suppose the other aspect too is that, like you were saying, Kubernetes is its own thing. You gotta learn Kubernetes and all its intricacies. And then running a database is also its own challenge. So if you stack the two of them together and, and the path was not really clear then maybe at the start it wasn't the best idea. Um, uh, if somebody was going to try it out now, was there like a specific resource you looked at or a specific path to where like okay this is is how I'm going to do it. [00:08:55] Victor: I'll just say what I normally recommend to everybody. Cause it depends on which path you wanna go right? If you wanna go down like running a database path first and figure that out, fill out that skill tree. Like go read the Postgres docs. Well, first of all, use Postgres. That's the first tip there. But like, read those documents. And obviously you don't have to understand everything. You won't understand everything. But knowing the big pieces and sort of letting your brain see the mention of like a whole bunch of things, like what is toast? Oh, you can do compression on columns. Like, you can do some, some things concurrently. Um, you know, what ALTER TABLE looks like. You get all that stuff kind of in your head. Um, and then I personally really believe in sort of learning by building and just like iterating. you won't get it right the first time. It's just like, it's not gonna happen. You're get, you can, you can get better the first time, right? By being really prepared and like, and leave yourself lots of outs, but you kind of have to like, get it out there. Do do your best to make sure that you can't fail, uh, catastrophically, right? So this is like, goes back to that decision to like use ZFS as the bottom of this I'm just like, All right, well, I, I'm not a file systems expert, but if I. I could delegate some of that, you know, some of that, I can get some of that knowledge from someone else. Um, and I can make it easier for me to not fail catastrophically. For the database side, actually read documentation on Postgres or the whatever database you're going to use, make sure you at least understand that. Then start running it like locally or whatever. Again, Docker use, use Docker locally. It's, it's, it's fine. and then, you know, sort of graduate to running sort of more progressively, more complicated versions. what I would say for the Kubernetes side is actually similar. the Kubernetes docs are really good. they're very large. but they're good. So you can actually go through and know all the, like, workload, workload resources, know, like what a config map is, what a secret is, right? Like what etcd is doing in this whole situation. you know, what a kublet is versus an API server, right? Like the, the general stuff, like if you go through all that, you should have like a whole bunch of ideas at least floating around in your head. And then once you try and start setting up a server, they will all start to pop up again, right? And they'll all start to like, you, like, Oh, okay, I need a CNI (Container Networking) plugin because something needs to make the services available, right? Or something needs to power the ingress, right? Like, if I wanna be able to get traffic, I need an ingress object. But what listens, what does that, what makes that ingress object do anything? Oh, it's an ingress controller. nginx, you know, almost everyone's heard of nginx, so they're like, okay. Um, nginx, has an ingress control. Actually there's, there used to be two, I assume there's still two, but there's like one that's maintained by Kubernetes, one that's maintained by nginx, the company or whatever. I use traefik, it's fantastic. but yeah, so I think those things kind of fall out and that is almost always my first way to explain it and to start building. And tinkering iteratively. So like, read the documentation, get a good first grasp of it, and then start building yourself because you'll, you'll get way more questions that way. Like, you'll ask way more questions, you won't be able to make progress. Uh, and then of course you can, you know, hop into slacks or like start looking around and, and searching on the internet. oh, one of the things that really helped me out early learning Kubernetes was, Kelsey Hightower's, um, learn Kubernetes the hard way. I'm also a big believer in doing things the hard way, at least knowing what you're choosing to not know, right? distributing file system, Deltas, right? Or like changes to a file system over the network is not a new problem. Other people have solved it. There's a lot of complexity there. but if you at least know the sort of surface level of what the thing does and what it's supposed to do and how it's supposed to do it, you can make a decision on, Oh, how deep am I going to go? Right? To prevent yourself from like, making a mistake or going too deep in the rabbit hole. If you have an idea of the sort of ecosystem and especially like, Oh, here, like the basics of how I can use this thing, that's generally very good. And doing things the hard way is a great way to get a, a feel for that, right? Cause if you take some chunk and like, you know, the first level of doing things the hard way, uh, or, you know, Kelsey Hightower's guide is like, get a machine, right? Like, so, like, if you somehow were like, Oh, I wanna run a Kubernetes cluster. but, you know, I don't want use necessarily EKS and you wanna learn it the hard way. You have to go get a machine, right? If you, if you're not familiar, if you run on Heroku the whole time, like you didn't manage your own machines, you gotta go like, figure out EC2, right? Or, I personally use, hetzner I love hetzner, so you have to go figure out hetzner, digital ocean, whatever. Right. And then the next thing's like, you know, the guide's changed a lot, and I haven't, I haven't looked at it in like, in years, actually a while since I, since I've sort of been, I guess living it, but it's, it's like generate certificates, right? So if you've never dealt with SSL and like, sort of like, or I should say TLS uh, and generating certificates and how that whole dance works, right? Which is fascinating because it's like, oh, right, nothing's secure on the internet, except that we distribute root certificates on computers that are deployed in every OS, right? Like, that's a sort of fundamental understanding you may not go deep enough to realize, but if you are fascinated by it, trying to do it manually would lead you down that path. You'd be like, Oh, what, like what is this thing? What is a CSR? Like, why, who is signing my request? Right? And it's like, why do we trust those people? Right? And it's like, you know, that kind of thing comes out and I feel like you can only get there from trying to do it, you know, answering the questions you can. Right. And again, it takes some judgment to know when you should not go down a rabbit hole. uh, and then iterating. of course there are people who are excellent at explaining. you can find some resources that are shortcuts. But, uh, I think particularly my bread and butter has been just to try and do it the hard way. Avoid pitfalls or like rabbit holes when you can. But know that the rabbit hole is there, and then keep going. And sometimes if something's just too hard, you're not gonna get it the first time. Like maybe you'll have to wait like another three months, you'll try again and you'll know more sort of ambiently about everything else. You get a little further that time. that's how I feel about that. Anyway. [00:15:06] Jeremy: That makes sense to me. I think sometimes when people take on a project, they try to learn too many things at the same time. I, I think the example of Kubernetes and Postgres is pretty good example, where if you're not familiar with how do I install Postgres on bare metal or a vm, trying to make sense of that while you're trying to into is probably gonna be pretty difficult. So, so splitting them up and learning them individually, that makes a lot of sense to me. And the whole deciding how deep you wanna go. That's interesting too, because I think that's very specific to the person right because sometimes you wanna go a little deeper because otherwise you don't understand how the two things connect together. But other times it's just like with the example with certificates, some people they may go like, I just put in let's encrypt it gives me my cert I don't care right then, and then, and some people they wanna know like okay how does the whole certificate infrastructure work which I think is interesting, depending on who you are, maybe you go ahh maybe it doesn't really matter right. [00:16:23] Victor: Yeah, and, you know, shout out to Let's Encrypt . It's, it's amazing, right? think Singlehandedly the most, most of the deployment of HTTPS that happens these days, right? so many so many of like internet providers and uh, sort of service providers will use it right? Under the covers. Like, Hey, we've got you free SSL through Let's Encrypt, right? Like, kind of like under the, under the covers. which is awesome. And they, and they do it. So if you're listening to this, donate to them. I've done it. So now that, now the pressure is on whoever's listening, but yeah, and, and I, I wanna say I am that person as well, right? Like, I use, Cert Manager on my cluster, right? So I'm just like, I don't wanna think about it, but I, you know, but I, I feel like I thought about it one time. I have a decent grasp. If something changes, then I guess I have to dive back in. I think it, you've heard the, um, innovation tokens idea, right? I can't remember the site. It's like, um, do, like do boring tech or something.com (https://boringtechnology.club/) . Like it shows up on sort of hacker news from time to time, essentially. But it's like, you know, you have a certain amount of tokens and sort of, uh, we'll call them tokens, but tolerance for complexity or tolerance for new, new ideas or new ways of doing things, new processes. Uh, and you spend those as you build any project, right? you can be devastatingly effective by just sticking to the stack, you know, and not introducing anything new, even if it's bad, right? and there's nothing wrong with LAMP stack, I don't wanna annoy anybody, but like if you, if you're running LAMP or if you run on a hostgator, right? Like, if you run on so, you know, some, some service that's really old but really works for you isn't, you know, too terribly insecure or like, has the features you need, don't learn Kubernetes then, right? Especially if you wanna go fast. cuz you, you're spending tokens, right? You're spending, essentially brain power, right? On learning whatever other thing. So, but yeah, like going back to that, databases versus databases on Kubernetes thing, you should probably know one of those before you, like, if you're gonna do that, do that thing. You either know Kubernetes and you like, at least feel comfortable, you know, knowing Kubernetes extremely difficult obviously, but you feel comfortable and you feel like you can debug. Little bit of a tangent, but maybe that's even a better, sort of watermark if you know how to debug a thing. If, if it's gone wrong, maybe one or five or 10 or 20 times and you've gotten out. Not without documentation, of course, cuz well, if you did, you're superhuman. But, um, but you've been able to sort of feel your way out, right? Like, Oh, this has gone wrong and you have enough of a model of the system in your head to be like, these are the three places that maybe have something wrong with them. Uh, and then like, oh, and then of course it's just like, you know, a mad dash to kind of like, find, find the thing that's wrong. You should have confidence about probably one of those things before you try and do both when it's like, you know, complex things like databases and distributed systems management, uh, and orchestration. [00:19:18] Jeremy: That's, that's so true in, in terms of you are comfortable enough being able to debug a problem because it's, I think when you are learning about something, a lot of times you start with some kind of guide or some kind of tutorial and you follow the steps. And if it all works, then great. Right? But I think it's such a large leap from that to something went wrong and I have to figure it out. Right. Whether it's something's not right in my Dockerfile or my postgres instance uh, the queries are timing out. so many things that could go wrong, that is the moment where you're forced to figure out, okay, what do I really know about this not thing? [00:20:10] Victor: Exactly. Yeah. Like the, the rubber's hitting the road it's uh you know the car's about to crash or has already crashed like if I open the bonnet, do I know what's happening right or am I just looking at (unintelligible). And that's, it's, I feel sort a little sorry or sad for, for devs that start today because there's so much. Complexity that's been built up. And a lot of it has a point, but you need to kind of have seen the before to understand the point, right? So I like, I like to use front end as an example, right? Like the front end ecosystem is crazy, and it has been crazy for a very long time, but the steps are actually usually logical, right? Like, so like you start with, you know, HTML, CSS and JavaScript, just plain, right? And like, and you can actually go in lots of directions. Like HTML has its own thing. CSS has its own sort of evolution sort of thing. But if we look at JavaScript, you're like, you're just writing JavaScript on every page, right? And like, just like putting in script tags and putting in whatever, and it's, you get spaghetti, you get spaghetti, you start like writing, copying the same function on multiple pages, right? You just, it, it's not good. So then people, people make jquery, right? And now, now you've got like a, a bundled set of like good, good defaults that you can, you can go for, right? And then like, you know, libraries like underscore come out for like, sort of like not dom related stuff that you do want, you do want everywhere. and then people go from there and they go to like backbone or whatever. it's because Jquery sort of also becomes spaghetti at some point and it becomes hard to manage and people are like, Okay, we need to sort of like encapsulate this stuff somehow, right? And like the new tools or whatever is around at the same timeframe. And you, you, you like backbone views for example. and you have people who are kind of like, ah, but that's not really good. It's getting kind of slow. Uh, and then you have, MVC stuff comes out, right? Like Angular comes out and it's like, okay, we're, we're gonna do this thing called dirty checking, and it's gonna be, it's gonna be faster and it's gonna be like, it's gonna be less sort of spaghetti and it's like a little bit more structured. And now you have sort of like the rails paradigm, but on the front end, and it takes people to get a while to get adjusted to that, but then that gets too heavy, right? And then dirty checking is realized to be a mistake. And then, you get stuff like MVVM, right? So you get knockout, like knockout js and you got like Durandal, and like some, some other like sort of front end technologies that come up to address that problem. Uh, and then after that, like, you know, it just keeps going, right? Like, and if you come in at the very end, you're just like, What is happening? Right? Like if it, if it, if someone doesn't sort of boil down the complexity and reduce it a little bit, you, you're just like, why, why do we do this like this? Right? and sometimes there's no good reason. Sometimes the complexity is just like, is unnecessary, but having the steps helps you explain it, uh, or helps you understand how you got there. and, and so I feel like that is something younger people or, or newer devs don't necessarily get a chance to see. Cause it just, it would take, it would take very long right? And if you're like a new dev, let's say you jumped into like a coding bootcamp. I mean, I've got opinions on coding boot camps, but you know, it's just like, let's say you jumped into one and you, you came out, you, you made it. It's just, there's too much to know. sure, you could probably do like HTML in one month. Well, okay, let's say like two weeks or whatever, right? If you were, if you're literally brand new, two weeks of like concerted effort almost, you know, class level, you know, work days right on, on html, you're probably decently comfortable with it. Very comfortable. CSS, a little harder because this is where things get hard. Cause if you, if you give two weeks for, for HTML, CSS is harder than HTML kind of, right? Because the interactions are way more varied. Right? Like, and, and maybe it's one of those things where you just, like, you, you get somewhat comfortable and then just like know that in the future you're gonna see something you don't understand and have to figure it out. Uh, but then JavaScript, like, how many months do you give JavaScript? Because if you go through that first like, sort of progression that I, I I, I, I mentioned everyone would have a perfect sort of, not perfect but good understanding of the pieces, right? Like, why did we start transpiling at all? Right? Like, uh, or why did you know, why did we adopt libraries? Like why did Bower exist? No one talks about Bower anymore, obviously, but like, Bower was like a way to distribute front end only packages, right? Um, what is it? Um, Uh, yes, there's grunt. There's like the whole build system thing, right? Once, once we decide we're gonna, we're gonna do stuff to files before we, before we push. So there's grunt, there's, uh, gulp, which is like grunt, but like, Oh, we're gonna do it all in memory. We're gonna pipe, we're gonna use this pipes thing to make sure everything goes fast. then there's like, of course that leads like the insanity that's webpack. And then there's like parcel, which did better. There's vite there's like, there's all this, there's this progression, but how many months would it take to know that progression? It, it's too long. So they end up just like, Hey, you're gonna learn react. Which is the right thing because it's like, that's what people hire for, right? But then you're gonna be in react and be like, What's webpack, right? And it's like, but you can't go down. You can't, you don't have the time. You, you can't sort of approach that problem from the other direction where you, which would give you better understanding cause you just don't have the time. I think it's hard for newer devs to overcome this. Um, but I think there are some, there's some hope on the horizon cuz some things are simpler, right? Like some projects do reduce complexity, like, by watching another project sort of innovate so like react. Wasn't the first component, first framework, right? Like technically, I, I think, I think you, you might have to give that to like, to maybe backbone because like they had views and like marionette also went with that. Like maybe, I don't know, someone, someone I'm sure will get in like, send me an angry email, uh, cuz I forgot you Moo tools or like, you know, Ember Ember. They've also, they've also been around, I used to be a huge Ember fan, still, still kind of am, but I don't use it. but if you have these, if you have these tools, right? Like people aren't gonna know how to use them and Vue was able to realize that React had some inefficiencies, right? So React innovates the sort of component. So Reintroduces the component based model component first, uh, front end development model. Vue sees that and it's like, wait a second, if we just export this like data object, and of course that's not the only innovation of Vue, but if we just export this data object, you don't have to do this fine grained tracking yourself anymore, right? You don't have to tell React or tell your the system which things change when other things change, right? Like you, you don't have to set up this watching and stuff, right? Um, and that's one of the reasons, like Vue is just, I, I, I remember picking up Vue and being like, Oh, I'm done. I'm done with React now. Because it just doesn't make sense to use React because they Vue essentially either, you know, you could just say they learned from them or they, they realize a better way to do things that is simpler and it's much easier to write. Uh, and you know, functionally similar, right? Um, similar enough that it's just like, oh they boil down some of that complexity and we're a step forward and, you know, in other ways, I think. Uh, so that's, that's awesome. Every once in a while you get like a compression in the complexity and then it starts to ramp up again and you get maybe another compression. So like joining the projects that do a compression. Or like starting to adopting those is really, can be really awesome. So there's, there's like, there's some hope, right? Cause sometimes there is a compression in that complexity and you you might be lucky enough to, to use that instead of, the thing that's really complex after years of building on it. [00:27:53] Jeremy: I think you're talking about newer developers having a tough time making sense of the current frameworks but the example you gave of somebody starting from HTML and JavaScript going to jquery backbone through the whole chain, that that's just by nature of you've put in a lot of time right you've done a lot of work working with each of these technologies you see the progression as if someone is starting new just by nature of you being new you won't have been able to spend that time [00:28:28] Victor: Do you think it could work? again, the, the, the time aspect is like really hard to get like how can you just avoid spending time um to to learn things that's like a general problem I think that problem is called education in the general sense. But like, does it make sense for a, let's say a bootcamp or, or any, you know, school right? To attempt to guide people through the previous solutions that didn't work, right? Like in math, you don't start with calculus, right? It just wouldn't, it doesn't make sense, right? But we try and start with calculus in software, right? We're just like, okay, here's the complexity. You've got all of it. Don't worry. Just look at this little bit. If, you know, if the compiler ever spits out a weird error uh oh, like, you're, you're, you're in for trouble cuz you, you just didn't get the. get the basics. And I think that's maybe some of what is missing. And the thing is, it is like the constraints are hard, right? No one has infinite time, right? Or like, you know, even like, just tons of time to devote to learning, learning just front end, right? That's not even all of computing, That's not even the algorithm stuff that some companies love to throw at you, right? Uh, or the computer sciencey stuff. I wonder if it makes more sense to spend some time taking people through the progression, right? Because discovering that we should do things via components, let's say, or, or at least encapsulate our functionality to components and compose that way, is something we, we not everyone knew, right? Or, you know, we didn't know wild widely. And so it feels like it might make sense to touch on that sort of realization and sort of guide the student through, you know, maybe it's like make five projects in a week and you just get progressively more complex. But then again, that's also hard cause effort, right? It's just like, it's a hard problem. But, but I think right now, uh, people who come in at the end and sort of like see a bunch of complexity and just don't know why it's there, right? Like, if you've like, sort of like, this is, this applies also very, this applies to general, but it applies very well to the Kubernetes problem as well. Like if you've never managed nginx on more than one machine, or if you've never tried to set up a, like a, to format your file system on the machine you just rented because it just, you know, comes with nothing, right? Or like, maybe, maybe some stuff was installed, but, you know, if you had to like install LVM (Logical Volume Manager) yourself, if you've never done any of that, Kubernetes would be harder to understand. It's just like, it's gonna be hard to understand. overlay networks are hard for everyone to understand, uh, except for network people who like really know networking stuff. I think it would be better. But unfortunately, it takes a lot of time for people to take a sort of more iterative approach to, to learning. I try and write blog posts in this way sometimes, but it's really hard. And so like, I'll often have like an idea, like, so I call these, or I think of these as like onion, onion style posts, right? Where you either build up an onion sort of from the inside and kind of like go out and like add more and more layers or whatever. Or you can, you can go from the outside and sort of take off like layers. Like, oh, uh, Kubernetes has a scheduler. Why do they need a scheduler? Like, and like, you know, kind of like, go, go down. but I think that might be one of the best ways to learn, but it just takes time. Or geniuses and geniuses who are good at two things, right? Good at the actual technology and good at teaching. Cuz teaching is a skill and it's very hard. and, you know, shout out to teachers cuz that's, it's, it's very difficult, extremely frustrating. it's hard to find determinism in, in like methods and solutions. And there's research of course, but it's like, yeah, that's, that's a lot harder than the computer being like, Nope, that doesn't work. Right? Like, if you can't, if you can't, like if you, if the function call doesn't work, it doesn't work. Right. If the person learned suboptimally, you won't know Right. Until like 10 years down the road when, when they can't answer some question or like, you know, when they, they don't understand. It's a missing fundamental piece anyway. [00:32:24] Jeremy: I think with the example of front end, maybe you don't have time to walk through the whole history of every single library and framework that came but I think at the very least, if you show someone, or you teach someone how to work with css, and you have them, like you were talking about components before you have them build a site where there's a lot of stuff that gets reused, right? Maybe you have five pages and they all have the same nav bar. [00:33:02] Victor: Yeah, you kind of like make them do it. [00:33:04] Jeremy: Yeah. You make 'em do it and they make all the HTML files, they copy and paste it, and probably your students are thinking like, ah, this, this kind of sucks [00:33:16] Victor: Yeah [00:33:18] Jeremy: And yeah, so then you, you come to that realization, and then after you've done that, then you can bring in, okay, this is why we have components. And similarly you brought up, manual dom manipulation with jQuery and things like that. I, I'm sure you could come up with an example of you don't even necessarily need to use jQuery. I think people can probably skip that step and just use the the, the API that comes with the browser. But you can have them go in like, Oh, you gotta find this element by the id and you gotta change this based on this, and let them experience the. I don't know if I would call it pain, but let them experience like how it was. Right. And, and give them a complex enough task where they feel like something is wrong right. Or, or like, there, should be something better. And then you can go to you could go straight to vue or react. I'm not sure if we need to go like, Here's backbone, here's knockout. [00:34:22] Victor: Yeah. That's like historical. Interesting. [00:34:27] Jeremy: I, I think that would be an interesting college course or something that. Like, I remember when, I went through school, one of the classes was programming languages. So we would learn things like, Fortran and stuff like that. And I, I think for a more frontend centered or modern equivalent you could go through, Hey, here's the history of frontend development here's what we used to do and here's how we got to where we are today. I think that could be actually a pretty interesting class yeah [00:35:10] Victor: I'm a bit interested to know you learned fortran in your PL class. I, think when I went, I was like, lisp and then some, some other, like, higher classes taught haskell but, um, but I wasn't ready for haskell, not many people but fortran is interesting, I kinda wanna hear about that. [00:35:25] Jeremy: I think it was more in terms of just getting you exposed to historically this is how things were. Right. And it wasn't so much of like, You can take strategies you used in Fortran into programming as a whole. I think it was just more of like a, a survey of like, Hey, here's, you know, here's Fortran and like you were saying, here's Lisp and all, all these different languages nd like at least you, you get to see them and go like, yeah, this is kind of a pain. [00:35:54] Victor: Yeah [00:35:55] Jeremy: And like, I understand why people don't choose to use this anymore but I couldn't take away like a broad like, Oh, I, I really wish we had this feature from, I think we were, I think we were using Fortran 77 or something like that. I think there's Fortran 77, a Fortran 90, and then there's, um, I think, [00:36:16] Victor: Like old fortran, deprecated [00:36:18] Jeremy: Yeah, yeah, yeah. So, so I think, I think, uh, I actually don't know if they're, they're continuing to, um, you know, add new things or maintain it or it's just static. But, it's, it's more, uh, interesting in terms of, like we were talking front end where it's, as somebody who's learning frontend development who is new and you get to see how, backbone worked or how Knockout worked how grunt and gulp worked. It, it's like the kind of thing where it's like, Oh, okay, like, this is interesting, but let us not use this again. Right? [00:36:53] Victor: Yeah. Yeah. Right. But I also don't need this, and I will never again [00:36:58] Jeremy: yeah, yeah. It's, um, but you do definitely see the, the parallels, right? Like you were saying where you had your, your Bower and now you have NPM and you had Grunt and Gulp and now you have many choices [00:37:14] Victor: Yeah. [00:37:15] Jeremy: yeah. I, I think having he history context, you know, it's interesting and it can be helpful, but if somebody was. Came to me and said hey I want to learn how to build websites. I get into front end development. I would not be like, Okay, first you gotta start moo tools or GWT. I don't think I would do that but it I think at a academic level or just in terms of seeing how things became the way they are sure, for sure it's interesting. [00:37:59] Victor: Yeah. And I, I, think another thing I don't remember who asked or why, why I had to think of this lately. um but it was, knowing the differentiators between other technologies is also extremely helpful right? So, What's the difference between ES build and SWC, right? Again, we're, we're, we're leaning heavy front end, but you know, just like these, uh, sorry for context, of course, it's not everyone a front end developer, but these are two different, uh, build tools, right? For, for JavaScript, right? Essentially you can think of 'em as transpilers, but they, I think, you know, I think they also bundle like, uh, generally I'm not exactly sure if, if ESbuild will bundle as well. Um, but it's like one is written in go, the other one's written in Rust, right? And sort of there's, um, there's, in addition, there's vite which is like vite does bundle and vite does a lot of things. Like, like there's a lot of innovation in vite that has to have to do with like, making local development as fast as possible and also getting like, you're sort of making sure as many things as possible are strippable, right? Or, or, or tree shakeable. Sorry, is is is the better, is the better term. Um, but yeah, knowing, knowing the, um, the differences between projects is often enough to sort of make it less confusing for me. Um, as far as like, Oh, which one of these things should I use? You know, outside of just going with what people are recommending. Cause generally there is some people with wisdom sometimes lead the crowd sometimes, right? So, so sometimes it's okay to be, you know, a crowd member as long as you're listening to the, to, to someone worth listening to. Um, and, and so yeah, I, I think that's another thing that is like the mark of a good project or, or it's not exclusive, right? It's not, the condition's not necessarily sufficient, but it's like a good projects have the why use this versus x right section in the Readme, right? They're like, Hey, we know you could use Y but here's why you should use us instead. Or we know you could use X, but here's what we do better than X. That might, you might care about, right? That's, um, a, a really strong indicator of a project. That's good cuz that means the person who's writing the project is like, they've done this, the survey. And like, this is kind of like, um, how good research happens, right? It's like most of research is reading what's happening, right? To knowing, knowing the boundary you're about to push, right? Or try and sort of like push one, make one step forward in, um, so that's something that I think the, the rigor isn't in necessarily software development everywhere, right? Which is good and bad. but someone who's sort of done that sort of rigor or, and like, and, and has, and or I should say, has been rigorous about knowing the boundary, and then they can explain that to you. They can be like, Oh, here's where the boundary was. These people were doing this, these people were doing this, these people were doing this, but I wanna do this. So you just learned now whether it's right for you and sort of the other points in the space, which is awesome. Yeah. Going to your point, I feel like that's, that's also important, it's probably not a good idea to try and get everyone to go through historical artifacts, but if just a, a quick explainer and sort of, uh, note on the differentiation, Could help for sure. Yeah. I feel like we've skewed too much frontend. No, no more frontend discussion this point. [00:41:20] Jeremy: It's just like, I, I think there's so many more choices where the, the mental thought that has to go into, Okay, what do I use next I feel is bigger on frontend. I guess it depends on the project you're working on but if you're going to work on anything front end if you haven't done it before or you don't have a lot of experience there's so many build tools so many frameworks, so many libraries that yeah, but we [00:41:51] Victor: Iterate yeah, in every direction, like the, it's good and bad, but frontend just goes in every direction at the same time Like, there's so many people who are so enthusiastic and so committed and and it's so approachable that like everyone just goes in every direction at the same time and like a lot of people make progress and then unfortunately you have try and pick which, which branch makes sense. [00:42:20] Jeremy: We've been kind of talking about, some of your experiences with a few things and I wonder if you could explain the the context you're thinking of in terms of the types of projects you typically work on like what are they what's the scale of them that sort of thing. [00:42:32] Victor: So I guess I've, I've gone through a lot of phases, right? In sort of what I use in in my tooling and what I thought was cool. I wrote enterprise java like everybody else. Like, like it really doesn't talk about it, but like, it's like almost at some point it was like, you're either a rail shop or a Java shop, for so many people. And I wrote enterprise Java for a, a long time, and I was lucky enough to have friends who were really into, other kinds of computing and other kinds of programming. a lot of my projects were wrapped around, were, were ideas that I was expressing via some new technology, let's say. Right? So, I wrote a lot of haskell for, for, for a while, right? But what did I end up building with that was actually a job board that honestly didn't go very far because I was spending much more time sort of doing, haskell things, right? And so I learned a lot about sort of what I think is like the pinnacle of sort of like type development in, in the non-research world, right? Like, like right on the edge of research and actual usability. But a lot of my ideas, sort of getting back to the, the ideas question are just things I want to build for myself. Um, or things I think could be commercially viable or like do, like, be, be well used, uh, and, and sort of, and profitable things, things that I think should be built. Or like if, if I see some, some projects as like, Oh, I wish they were doing this in this way, Right? Like, I, I often consider like, Oh, I want, I think I could build something that would be separate and maybe do like, inspired from other projects, I should say, Right? Um, and sort of making me understand a sort of a different, a different ecosystem. but a lot of times I have to say like, the stuff I build is mostly to scratch an itch I have. Um, and or something I think would be profitable or utilizing technology that I've seen that I don't think anyone's done in the same way. Right? So like learning Kubernetes for example, or like investing the time to learn Kubernetes opened up an entire world of sort of like infrastructure ideas, right? Because like the leverage you get is so high, right? So you're just like, Oh, I could run an aws, right? Like now that I, now that I know this cuz it's like, it's actually not bad, it's kind of usable. Like, couldn't I do that? Right? That kind of thing. Right? Or um, I feel like a lot of the times I'll learn a technology and it'll, it'll make me feel like certain things are possible that they, that weren't before. Uh, like Rust is another one of those, right? Like, cuz like Rust will go from like embedded all the way to WASM, which is like a crazy vertical stack. Right? It's, that's a lot, That's a wide range of computing that you can, you can touch, right? And, and there's, it's, it's hard to learn, right? The, the, the, the, uh, the, the ramp to learning it is quite steep, but, it opens up a lot of things you can write, right? It, it opens up a lot of areas you can go into, right? Like, if you ever had an idea for like a desktop app, right? You could actually write it in Rust. There's like, there's, there's ways, there's like is and there's like, um, Tauri is one of my personal favorites, which uses web technology, but it's either I'm inspired by some technology and I'm just like, Oh, what can I use this on? And like, what would this really be good at doing? or it's, you know, it's one of those other things, like either I think it's gonna be, Oh, this would be cool to build and it would be profitable. Uh, or like, I'm scratching my own itch. Yeah. I think, I think those are basically the three sources. [00:46:10] Jeremy: It's, it's interesting about Rust where it seems so trendy, I guess, in lots of people wanna do something with rust, but then in a lot of they also are not sure does it make sense to write in rust? Um, I, I think the, the embedded stuff, of course, that makes a lot of sense. And, uh, you, you've seen a sort of surge in command line apps, stuff ripgrep and ag, stuff like that, and places like that. It's, I think the benefits are pretty clear in terms of you've got the performance and you have the strong typing and whatnot and I think where there's sort of the inbetween section that's kind of unclear to me at least would I build a web application in rust I'm not sure that sort of thing [00:47:12] Victor: Yeah. I would, I characterize it as kind of like, it's a tool toolkit, so it really depends on the problem. And think we have many tools that there's no, almost never a real reason to pick one in particular right? Like there's, Cause it seems like just most of, a lot of the work, like, unless you're, you're really doing something interesting, right? Like, uh, something that like, oh, I need to, I need to, like, I'm gonna run, you know, billions and billions of processes. Like, yeah, maybe you want erlang at that point, right? Like, maybe, maybe you should, that should be, you know, your, your thing. Um, but computers are so fast these days, and most languages have, have sort of borrowed, not borrowed, but like adopted features from others that there's, it's really hard to find a, a specific use case, for one particular tool. Uh, so I often just categorize it by what I want out of the project, right? Or like, either my goals or project goals, right? Depending on, and, or like business goals, if you're, you know, doing this for a business, right? Um, so like, uh, I, I basically, if I want to go fast and I want to like, you know, reduce time to market, I use type script, right? Oh, and also I'm a, I'm a, like a type zealot. I, I'd say so. Like, I don't believe in not having types, right? Like, it's just like there's, I think it's crazy that you would like have a function but not know what the inputs could be. And they could actually be anything, right? , you're just like, and then you have to kind of just keep that in your head. I think that's silly. Now that we have good, we, we have, uh, ways to avoid the, uh, ceremony, right? You've got like hindley Milner type systems, like you have a way to avoid the, you can, you know, predict what types of things will be, and you can, you don't have to write everything everywhere. So like, it's not that. But anyway, so if I wanna go fast, the, the point is that going back to that early, like the JS ecosystem goes everywhere at the same time. Typescript is excellent because the ecosystem goes everywhere at the same time. And so you've got really good ecosystem support for just about everything you could do. Um, uh, you could write TypeScript that's very loose on the types and go even faster, but in general it's not very hard. There's not too much ceremony and just like, you know, putting some stuff that shows you what you're using and like, you know, the objects you're working with. and then generally if I wanna like, get it really right, I I'll like reach for haskell, right? Cause it's just like the sort of contortions, and again, this takes time, this not fast, but, right. the contortions you can do in the type system will make it really hard to write incorrect code or code that doesn't, that isn't logical with itself. Of course interfacing with the outside world. Like if you do a web request, it's gonna fail sometimes, right? Like the network might be down, right? So you have to, you basically pull that, you sort of wrap that uncertainty in your system to whatever degree you're okay with. And then, but I know it'll be correct, right? But and correctness is just not important. Most of like, Oh, I should , that's a bad quote. Uh, it's not that correct is not important. It's like if you need to get to market, you do not necessarily need every single piece of your code to be correct, Right? If someone calls some, some function with like, negative one and it's not an important, it's not tied to money or it's like, you know, whatever, then maybe it's fine. They just see an error and then like you get an error in your back and you're like, Oh, I better fix that. Right? Um, and then generally if I want to be correct and fast, I choose rust these days. Right? Um, these days. and going back to your point, a lot of times that means that I'm going to write in Typescript for a lot of projects. So that's what I'll do for a lot of projects is cuz I'll just be like, ah, do I need like absolute correctness or like some really, you know, fancy sort of type stuff. No. So I don't pick haskell. Right. And it's like, do I need to be like mega fast? No, probably not. Cuz like, cuz so I don't necessarily don't necessarily need rust. Um, maybe it's interesting to me in terms of like a long, long term thing, right? Like if I, if I'm think, oh, but I want x like for example, tight, tight, uh, integration with WASM, for example, if I'm just like, oh, I could see myself like, but that's more of like, you know, for a fun thing that I'm doing, right? Like, it's just like, it's, it's, you don't need it. You don't, that's premature, like, you know, that's a premature optimization thing. But if I'm just like, ah, I really want the ability to like maybe consider refactoring some of this out into like a WebAssembly thing later, then I'm like, Okay, maybe, maybe I'll, I'll pick Rust. Or like, if I, if I like, I do want, you know, really, really fast, then I'll like, then I'll go Rust. But most of the time it's just like, I want a good ecosystem so I don't have to build stuff myself most of the time. Uh, and you know, type script is good enough. So my stack ends up being a lot of the time just in type script, right? Yeah. [00:52:05] Jeremy: Yeah, I think you've encapsulated the reason why there's so many packages on NPM and why there's so much usage of JavaScript and TypeScript in general is that it, it, it fits the, it's good enough. Right? And in terms of, in terms of speed, like you said, most of the time you don't need of rust. Um, and so typescript I think is a lot more approachable a lot of people have to use it because they do front end work anyways. And so that kinda just becomes the I don't know if I should say the default but I would say it's probably the most common in terms of when somebody's building a backend today certainly there's other languages but JavaScript and TypeScript is everywhere. [00:52:57] Victor: Yeah. Uh, I, I, I, another thing is like, I mean, I'm, of ignored the, like, unreasonable effectiveness of like rails Cause there's just a, there's tons of just like rails warriors out there, and that's great. They're they're fantastic. I'm not a, I'm not personally a huge fan of rails but that's, uh, that's to my own detriment, right? In, in some, in some ways. But like, Rails and Django sort of just like, people who, like, I'm gonna learn this framework it's gonna be excellent. It most, they have a, they have carved out a great ecosystem for themselves. Um, or like, you know, even php right? PHP and like Laravel, or whatever. Uh, and so I'm ignoring those, like, those pockets of productivity, right? Those pockets of like intense productivity that people like, have all their needs met in that same way. Um, but as far as like general, general sort of ecosystem size and speed for me, um, like what you said, like applies to me. Like if I, if I'm just like, especially if I'm just like, Oh, I just wanna build a backend, Like, I wanna build something that's like super small and just does like, you know, maybe a few, a couple, you know, endpoints or whatever and just, I just wanna throw it out there. Right? Uh, I, I will pick, yeah. Typescript. It just like, it makes sense to me. I also think note is a better. VM or platform to build on than any of the others as well. So like, like I, by any of the others, I mean, Python, Perl, Ruby, right? Like sort of in the same class of, of tool. So I I am kind of convinced that, um, Node is better, than those as far as core abilities, right? Like threading Right. Versus the just multi-processing and like, you know, other, other, other solutions and like, stuff like that. So, if you want a boring stack, if I don't wanna use any tokens, right? Any innovation tokens I reach for TypeScript. [00:54:46] Jeremy: I think it's good that you brought up. Rails and, and Django because, uh, personally I've done, I've done work with Rails, and you're right in that Rails has so many built in, and the ways to do them are so well established that your ability to be productive and build something really fast hard to compete with, at least in my experience with available in the Node ecosystem. Um, on the other hand, like I, I also see what you mean by the runtimes. Like with Node, you're, you're built on top of V8 and there's so many resources being poured into it to making it fast and making it run pretty much everywhere. I think you probably don't do too much work with managed services, but if you go to a managed service to run your code, like a platform as a service, they're gonna support Node. Will they support your other preferred language? Maybe, maybe not, You know that they will, they'll be able to run node apps so but yeah I don't know if it will ever happen or maybe I'm just not familiar with it, but feel like there isn't a real rails of javascript. [00:56:14] Victor: Yeah, you're, totally right. There are, there are. It's, it's weird. It's actually weird that there, like Uh, but, but, I kind of agree with you. There's projects that are trying it recently. There's like Adonis, um, there is, there are backends that also do, like, will do basic templating, like Nest, NestJS is like really excellent. It's like one of the best sort of backend, projects out there. I I, I but like back in the day, there were projects like Sails, which was like very much trying to do exactly what Rails did, but it just didn't seem to take off and reach that critical mass possibly because of the size of the ecosystem, right? Like, how many alternatives to Rails are there? Not many, right? And, and now, anyway, maybe let's say the rest of 'em sort of like died out over the years, but there's also like, um, hapi HAPI, uh, which is like also, you know, similarly, it was like angling themselves to be that, but they just never, they never found the traction they needed. I think, um, or at least to be as wide, widely known as Rails is for, for, for the, for the Ruby ecosystem, um, but also for people to kind of know the magic, cause. Like I feel like you're productive in Rails only when you imbibe the magic, right? You, you, know all the magic context and you know the incantations and they're comforting to you, right? Like you've, you've, you have the, you have the sort of like, uh, convention. You're like, if you're living and breathing the convention, everything's amazing, right? Like, like you can't beat that. You're just like, you're in the zone but you need people to get in that zone. And I don't think node has, people are just too, they're too frazzled. They're going like, there's too much options. They can't, it's hard to commit, right? Like, imagine if you'd committed to backbone. Like you got, you can't, It's, it's over. Oh, it's not over. I mean, I don't, no, I don't wanna, you know, disparage the backbone project. I don't use it, but, you know, maybe they're still doing stuff and you know, I'm sure people are still working on it, but you can't, you, it's hard to commit and sort of really imbibe that sort of convention or, or, or sort of like, make yourself sort of breathe that product when there's like 10 products that are kind of similar and could be useful as well. Yeah, I think that's, that's that's kind of big. It's weird that there isn't a rails, for NodeJS, but, but people are working on it obviously. Like I mentioned Adonis, there's, there's more. I'm leaving a bunch of them out, but that's part of the problem. [00:58:52] Jeremy: On, on one hand, it's really cool that people are trying so many different things because hopefully maybe they can find something that like other people wouldn't have thought of if they all stick same framework. but on the other hand, it's ... how much time have we spent jumping between all these different frameworks when what we could have if we had a rails. [00:59:23] Victor: Yeah the, the sort of wasted time is, is crazy to think about it uh, I do think about that from time to time. And you know, and personally I waste a lot of my own time. Like, just, just rec

Pickens First Baptist

Ecclesiastes 11:1-6 Cast Your Bread upon the Waters 11 Cast your bread upon the waters,     for you will find it after many days. 2 Give a portion to seven, or even to eight,     for you know not what disaster may happen on earth. 3 If the clouds are full of rain,     they empty themselves on the earth, and if […] The post Hoist Your Sails appeared first on Pickens First Baptist.

Sails Podcast
Sails Podcast 番外編 with 夫 2022年もありがとうございました

Sails Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2022 30:34


昨年末に引き続き、夫にPodcastに出てもらった番外編です。夫はかなり酔っ払っているので、暴言吐きまくりですが、まぁ、いつも通りです。今年もこれが録れる夫婦で良かったなとしみじみ思います。     […] The post Sails Podcast 番外編 with 夫 2022年もありがとうございました first appeared on Sails | 山道 志帆 Official Web Page .

The Writer's Room; A 7th Sea Podcast
Article 34; By Blood Undone

The Writer's Room; A 7th Sea Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2022 46:16


“T'ings happen for a reason, even if dat reason ain't known yet.” -Mama Coco, Quartermaster of La Rosa Blanca A Note from the Narrator This podcast is proudly endorsed by Chaosium Inc. Visit www.chaosiuminc.com/7thsea for more information. Use the code WRITER10 for 10% off your next site-wide purchase! [Limit one per customer] Check out Tabletop Radio Hour! https://soundcloud.com/tabletopradiohour?utm_source=clipboard&utm_medium=text&utm_campaign=social_sharing To support the podcast directly, visit https://linktr.ee/writersroom7thsea. Got a question for us? Ask us in our Discord in the NWTNQuery channel and we'll answer you on a special episode! Cast Zoé Jackson (Narrator) Evan Ackley (Jesse Nkansa) Patrick Keeffe (Wayland Greywall) Sponsors Ten Quills Dice (https://tenquillsdice.com/) Crafty Gamer (https://www.thecraftygamer.com/?ref=WR7th) Music Arcane Anthems (https://www.patreon.com/arcaneanthems) [The Writer's Room, Rising Tide] ASKII (https://askii.bandcamp.com/) [Sails, Reach, Tension] Adrian Von Ziegler (https://adrianvonziegler.bandcamp.com/) [Darkness, Lost, The Candle Burns Down, Deathless {Jonah's Theme}] SFX Epidemic Sound (https://www.epidemicsound.com/) Motion Array (https://motionarray.com/) Fusehive Interactive Media LTD (http://www.fusehive.com/) --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/writersroom7th/support

Lovecraft ASMR
ASMR | PIRATE SHIP AMBIENCE + Waves Crashing, Ocean Sounds, Sails & Ropes - For Anxiety, PTSD, & Sleep

Lovecraft ASMR

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2022 59:56


ASMR soundscape ambience with pirate ship sounds, waves crashing, ocean sounds, sails snapping and ropes. Listen with headphones for the best experience. ASMR atmospheres are useful for people who have difficulty sleeping, studying, or relaxing. The peaceful sounds have been carefully created for easing tinnitus and symptoms of ptsd and anxiety. If you like what you hear, please consider supporting or donating: Support me: https://paypal.me/TomeByTome Best way to keep in touch: http://twitter.com/TomeByTomeASMR YouTube: http://youtube.com/TomebyTomeASMR Patreon: http://www.patreon.com/TomeByTomeASMR Business inquiries: tomebytomeasmr@gmail.com Also on Spotify, Google Podcasts, and wherever you listen to podcasts #asmrambience #asmrforanxiety #pirateshipsounds #asmrambienceforsleep --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/lovecraft-asmr/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/lovecraft-asmr/support

Smash Accept Dynasty Trades
Episode 116: Pay Up before the Ship Sails Away

Smash Accept Dynasty Trades

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2022 44:28


listen as John & Dad break down how to win your Title and at what cost --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/dynastydad/support

Dan & Joe Sports Show
Leach Sails off Into the Sunset

Dan & Joe Sports Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2022 26:13


In this December 14, 2022, episode we @Dan_N_JoeSportsShow give a salute and ode to the memory of the great Mike Leach aka "The Pirate" and share our favorite of his "Piratisms". RIP Coach Leach, you and your one of kind personality will be sorely missed! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/dan-n-joesportsshow/support

First Light Devotionals
Power Comes from Setting Your Sails to the Truth

First Light Devotionals

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2022 10:03


Acts 4:1

DCL Podcast
337 A long time Disney Family sails on the Wish for the first time

DCL Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2022 63:04 Very Popular


DCL Podcast
337 A long time Disney Family sails on the Wish for the first time

DCL Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2022 63:04


Inside Treasures
How beliefs are the wind in your sails

Inside Treasures

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2022 17:34


Rational beliefs are the type of beliefs that enable us to operate in an empowered way. We all have them.Would you like to find out:How you can identify them?How to reawaken them?How you can strengthen them?How to apply them in a different area of your life?Then this episode is definitely for you.0:07 How empowering beliefs help me in life2:27 Intro2:57 Recap4:20 Empowering beliefs exist within you5:12 Your beliefs might be dormant7:43 Examples of empowering beliefs8:23 Creating empowering beliefs12:54 Rational Beliefs brings good results13:02 Conclusion16:40 Outro

A Fighter's Story
James the sailor sails the world.

A Fighter's Story

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2022 32:33


I ran into this guys YouTube channel https://www.youtube.com/@SailorJames and fell in love. He essentially bought a cheap boat, fixed it up and decided to sail around the world. I gotta say this is an amazing man with an amazing story. Follow along and find James on instagram @ https://www.youtube.com/@SailorJames and check out his amazing journey circumnavigating the world. @iamrobchilds A Fighters Story. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/afightersstory/support

the moonshyne Jones podcast
Episode 400 - The Pirate Sails Off Into The Sunset- Mike Leach Passes Away At The Age Of 61- Head Football Coach Mississippi State Bulldogs

the moonshyne Jones podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2022 13:42


In this episode I talk about the quirky pirate that really took personality to another level. His legacy will be ups and downs but overall a brilliant mind and apparently a good father and husband.

Paddling The Blue Podcast
#75 - Douglas Wilcox - Stories, Sails, and Scary Knees in Scotland

Paddling The Blue Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2022 61:52


Todays's guest is Douglas Wilcox.  You may be familiar with Douglas' work testing boats and equipment. You can find his test results and trip reports online through Facebook, his website, and in magazines like Ocean Paddler over the years. He brings a natural curiosity to kayaking and that shows in today's interview.  Douglas is a storyteller in every sense of the word, so get ready for us to cover a lot of ground. Also, thank you to listeners who have taken the time to support the show by visiting our website at www.paddlingthebue.com  and clicking the Buy Me A Coffee link on the bottom right of the page. I really appreciate your support. Thank you! Enjoy today's episode with Douglas Wilcox! Connect: SeaKayakPhoto.blogspot.com   Special offer for Paddling the Blue listeners from Online Sea Kayaking Our friend Simon Osborne (episode 41),and James Stevenson, have created an online coaching resource with 14 different courses and over 30 hours of high-quality video in onlineseakayaking.com.  They've agreed to offer a special deal for Paddling the Blue podcast listeners.  If you're not already a subscriber, here's your chance.  Visit onlineseakayaking.com and use the coupon code PTBPODCAST at checkout and you'll get 10% off up to 12 months or the first year of an annual subscription investment.   

RNZ: Nine To Noon
Around the motu : Todd Niall with a spotlight on Auckland

RNZ: Nine To Noon

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 12:42


There's plenty going on in the City of Sails under new Mayor,Wayne Brown, Stuff's Senior Auckland Affairs Journalist Todd Niall talks to Kathryn about the financial challenges facing the council, replacing directors and relationship building.

RNZ: Nine To Noon
HomeGround: the life changing building in the city of sails

RNZ: Nine To Noon

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 13:55


HomeGround opened earlier this year and it is the new home of the Auckland City Mission in Hobson Street in the central city. Urban and social issues witer Simon Wilson's new book HomeGround and tells the story of the new building, all it contains and the people who it serves.

Northstar Pulaski Podcast
RAISING THE SAILS WK 8

Northstar Pulaski Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2022 29:13


CSC Talk Radio
SAILS SET TOWARDS JOY

CSC Talk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 53:59


2998 – November 23, 2022 – SAILS SET TOWARDS JOY – Devotional, Out of Work vs. Unemployed, and Talk like a Quaker to avoid the violence of misusing a persons pronouns.   The post SAILS SET TOWARDS JOY appeared first on CSC Talk Radio.

Forward Observer Dispatch
U.S. Navy Sails through Taiwan Strait Again

Forward Observer Dispatch

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 19:30


606
Sutton says England sails, Wales fails

606

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2022 74:14


Your World Cup football calls with Robbie Savage and Chris Sutton. Phone 08085 909693 free from mobiles and landlines. Text 85058 at your standard message rate.

The Music Authority LIVE STREAM Show
Pop Radio UK Show #214

The Music Authority LIVE STREAM Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2022 60:01


Pop Radio UK Show #214!!! The most important thing you can do to help me help these great artists is to download and share!  YOU ARE MY SHOW SYNDICATOR!  Please, keep downloading and sharing the podcast version of this show!  All the usual download spots.  Can you help me help these artists? Please and thank you!  If the songs, the show resonates with you, if the vibrations mesh properly, please do what you can, do what you might! The Music Authority LIVE STREAM Show & Podcast...listen, like, comment, download, share, repeat…heard daily on Podchaser, Deezer, Amazon Music, Audible, Listen Notes, Google Podcast Manager, Mixcloud, Player FM, Stitcher, Tune In, Podcast Addict, Cast Box, Radio Public, and Pocket Cast, and APPLE iTunes!  Follow the show on TWITTER JimPrell@TMusicAuthority!  Please, are you listening? Please, are you sharing the show & podcast?  Please, has a show & podcast mention been placed into your social media?  How does and can one listen in? Let me list the ways...*Listen LIVE here - https://fastcast4u.com/player/jamprell/ *Podcast - https://themusicauthority.transistor.fm/   The Music Authority LIVE STREAM Show & Podcast!  Special Recorded Network Shows, too!  Different than my daily show! *Radio Candy Radio Monday Wednesday, & Friday 7PM ET, 4PM PT*Rockin' The KOR Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday at 7PM UK time, 2PM ET, 11AM PT  www.koradio.rocks*Pop Radio UK Friday, Saturday, & Sunday 6PM UK, 1PM ET, 10AM PT!   Pop Radio UK Show #214…SUPER 8 Music - Music-Authority-Theme-SUPER-8The Harmony Motel - 08 - Topical Depression [Topical Depression]Psychotic Youth - 06 - You [New Wonders 1996-2021] (koolkatmusik.com)The Sails - 11 - Wild & Free [Brighter Futures] (koolkatmusik.com)Ellen Foley - 03 I'm Just Happy To Be Here [Fighting Words]The Foreign Films - 07_The Mystery Of Love [Starlight Serenade]@SoulBird - The Music Authority Jingle@Jennels - 01 Biggest Fan [Once Upon A Time I Was More Fun] (@Legion Records)Cold Comforts - 12 Drift Away [Living In Relative Obscurity]The Sorels - 07 School Girl Blues [Do The Rumbar Rumble] (Rum Bar Records)CousteauX - 07 So Long, Marianne [Stray Gods]On The Runway - Stuck On You [All We Have Is Ourselves - EP]Nolan Voide- The Music Authority JingleKen Lintern Singer/Song Writer - 06 - Wave Goodbye [Saying Goodbye]Lonely Leesa & The Lost Cowboys - 16 - The Reckoning Is Here [XOXOXO Vol.1] (Rum Bar Records)The Speed Of Sound - 09 Leaf Blower [Museum Of Tomorrow] (Big Stir Records)Indonesian Junk - 08 Tracy [Living In A Nightmare (Rum Bar Records)Papa Schmapa- 7. Love Reaction [Where Are You Now?]Red Spot Rhythm Section - 01 - Tainted Love (feat. Claire Liparulo Music)

The Music Authority LIVE STREAM Show
Radio Candy Radio Show #88

The Music Authority LIVE STREAM Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 60:01


Radio Candy Radio Show #88!!!!  The most important thing you can do to help me help these great artists is to download and share!  YOU ARE MY SHOW SYNDICATOR!  Please, keep downloading and sharing the podcast version of this show!  All the usual download spots.  Can you help me help these artists? Please and thank you!  If the songs, the show resonates with you, if the vibrations mesh properly, please do what you can, do what you might! The Music Authority LIVE STREAM Show & Podcast...listen, like, comment, download, share, repeat…heard daily on Podchaser, Deezer, Amazon Music, Audible, Listen Notes, Google Podcast Manager, Mixcloud, Player FM, Stitcher, Tune In, Podcast Addict, Cast Box, Radio Public, and Pocket Cast, and APPLE iTunes!  Follow the show on TWITTER JimPrell@TMusicAuthority!  Please, are you listening? Please, are you sharing the show & podcast?  Please, has a show & podcast mention been placed into your social media?  How does and can one listen in? Let me list the ways...*Listen LIVE here - https://fastcast4u.com/player/jamprell/ *Podcast - https://themusicauthority.transistor.fm/   The Music Authority LIVE STREAM Show & Podcast!  Special Recorded Network Shows, too!  Different than my daily show! *Radio Candy Radio Monday Wednesday, & Friday 7PM ET, 4PM PT*Rockin' The KOR Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday at 7PM UK time, 2PM ET, 11AM PT  www.koradio.rocks*Pop Radio UK Friday, Saturday, & Sunday 6PM UK, 1PM ET, 10AM PT!  Radio Candy Radio Show #88…SUPER 8 Music - Music-Authority-Theme-SUPER-8The Harmony Motel - 08 - Topical Depression [Topical Depression]Psychotic Youth - 06 - You [New Wonders 1996-2021] (koolkatmusik.com)The Sails - 11 - Wild & Free [Brighter Futures] (koolkatmusik.com)Ellen Foley - 03 I'm Just Happy To Be Here [Fighting Words]The Foreign Films - 07_The Mystery Of Love [Starlight Serenade]@SoulBird - The Music Authority Jingle@Jennels - 01 Biggest Fan [Once Upon A Time I Was More Fun] (Legion Records)Cold Comforts - 12 Drift Away [Living In Relative Obscurity]The Sorels - 07 School Girl Blues [Do The Rumbar Rumble] (Rum Bar Records)CousteauX- 07 So Long, Marianne [Stray Gods]On The Runway - Stuck On You [All We Have Is Ourselves - EP]Nolan Voide - The Music Authority JingleKen Lintern Singer/Song Writer - 06 - Wave Goodbye [Saying Goodbye]Lonely Leesa & The Lost Cowboys- 16 - The Reckoning Is Here [XOXOXO Vol.1] (Rum Bar Records)The Speed Of Sound - 09 Leaf Blower [Museum Of Tomorrow] (Big Stir Records)Indonesian Junk- 08 Tracy [Living In A Nightmare (Rum Bar Records)Papa Schmapa - 7. Love Reaction [Where Are You Now?]Red Spot Rhythm Section - 01 - Tainted Love (feat. Claire Liparulo Music)

The Music Authority LIVE STREAM Show
Rockin' The KOR! Show #230

The Music Authority LIVE STREAM Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 60:01


Rockin' The KOR Show #230!  The most important thing you can do to help me help these great artists is to download and share!  YOU ARE MY SHOW SYNDICATOR!  Please, keep downloading and sharing the podcast version of this show!  All the usual download spots.  Can you help me help these artists? Please and thank you!  If the songs, the show resonates with you, if the vibrations mesh properly, please do what you can, do what you might! The Music Authority LIVE STREAM Show & Podcast...listen, like, comment, download, share, repeat…heard daily on Podchaser, Deezer, Amazon Music, Audible, Listen Notes, Google Podcast Manager, Mixcloud, Player FM, Stitcher, Tune In, Podcast Addict, Cast Box, Radio Public, and Pocket Cast, and APPLE iTunes!  Follow the show on TWITTER JimPrell@TMusicAuthority!  Please, are you listening? Please, are you sharing the show & podcast?  Please, has a show & podcast mention been placed into your social media?  How does and can one listen in? Let me list the ways...*Listen LIVE here - https://fastcast4u.com/player/jamprell/ *Podcast - https://themusicauthority.transistor.fm/   The Music Authority LIVE STREAM Show & Podcast!  Special Recorded Network Shows, too!  Different than my daily show! *Radio Candy Radio Monday Wednesday, & Friday 7PM ET, 4PM PT*Rockin' The KOR Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday at 7PM UK time, 2PM ET, 11AM PT  www.koradio.rocks*Pop Radio UK Friday, Saturday, & Sunday 6PM UK, 1PM ET, 10AM PT!    Rockin' the KOR! Show #230…SUPER 8 Music - Music-Authority-Theme-SUPER-8The Harmony Motel - 08 - Topical Depression [Topical Depression]Psychotic Youth - 06 - You [New Wonders 1996-2021] (koolkatmusik.com)The Sails - 11 - Wild & Free [Brighter Futures] (koolkatmusik.com)Ellen Foley - 03 I'm Just Happy To Be Here [Fighting Words]The Foreign Films - 07_The Mystery Of Love [Starlight Serenade]@SoulBird - The Music Authority Jingle@Jennels - 01 Biggest Fan [Once Upon A Time I Was More Fun] (Legion Records)Cold Comforts - 12 Drift Away [Living In Relative Obscurity]The Sorels - 07 School Girl Blues [Do The Rumbar Rumble] (Rum Bar Records)CousteauX - 07 So Long, Marianne [Stray Gods]On The Runway - Stuck On You [All We Have Is Ourselves - EP]Nolan Voide - The Music Authority JingleKen Lintern Singer/Song Writer - 06 - Wave Goodbye [Saying Goodbye]Lonely Leesa & The Lost Cowboys - 16 - The Reckoning Is Here [XOXOXO Vol.1] (Rum Bar Records)The Speed Of Sound - 09 Leaf Blower [Museum Of Tomorrow] (Big Stir Records)Indonesian Junk - 08 Tracy [Living In A Nightmare (Rum Bar Records)Papa Schmapa - 7. Love Reaction [Where Are You Now?]Red Spot Rhythm Section - 01 - Tainted Love (feat. Claire Liparulo Music)

The Wayfarer's Compendium
Silver Sails

The Wayfarer's Compendium

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2022 21:19


Tales of ghost ships abound throughout the coastal villages of southern Celdrúin. If you sailed along the archipelago to the island's south, you would likely hear myths of damned sailors ferrying the dead to the afterlife, while the northern isles in the chain tell equally impossible tails of elven ships. However, sometimes events transpire that lend a certain credibility to the legends - or at least muddy the waters, making it difficult to discern reality from fantasy.

WBBM All Local
JB Pritzker sails to second term as Illinois governor

WBBM All Local

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 5:52


Also in the news: 41.3% of Chicago turned out to vote yesterday; Jonathan Jackson, son of Rev. Jesse Jackson, announces win in Illinois' 1st District; Attorney General Kwame Raoul has won another term in office and more.

WBBM Newsradio's 4:30PM News To Go
JB Pritzker sails to second term as Illinois governor

WBBM Newsradio's 4:30PM News To Go

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 5:52


Also in the news: 41.3% of Chicago turned out to vote yesterday; Jonathan Jackson, son of Rev. Jesse Jackson, announces win in Illinois' 1st District; Attorney General Kwame Raoul has won another term in office and more.

The Xbox Drive
The Xbox Drive 264: Game Pass Sails to Monkey Island! | New Game Pass Games | Star Ocean The Divine Force

The Xbox Drive

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 57:49


This week on The Xbox Drive, Ryan is joined by Kevin Ainsworth as they talk about all the new games coming to Game Pass in November! We also talk Star Ocean The Divine Force, Resident Evil 8's 3rd person mode and more! -- Congratulations to Johnathan Brown for the launch of "In My Element". We will feature Johnathan's music on We the GamerCast for all of January! LinkTree: https://distrokid.com/hyperfollow/pme... -- Join the Phoenix Overdrive Extra Life team Website: https://www.phoenixoverdrive.com/ -- Support Tony Baker and the Quest 4 Pixels Crew Subscribe on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/Quest4Pixel... -- The House of Mario Podcast with Drew Agnew Listen: thehouseofmario.captivate.fm/listen -- Skinny Matt is hosting Community Gaming Nights Follow on Twitch: https://www.twitch.tv/skinnymattk -- Check out The Blame Game with Dallas Ford and ARGO Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCgtW... Plugs iTunes: https://goo.gl/CMv4fr Spotify: https://goo.gl/Vh4DH4 YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/carpoolgaming Sean: http://twitter.com/seancapri http://twitch.tv/seancapri http://patreon.com/carpoolgaming Ryan: http://twitter.com/ryanturford http://youtube.com/ryanturford http://twitch.tv/ryanturford

Guys Games and Beer
G2B at GameHole Con 2022: David Lapp talks about 7th Sea City of Five Sails

Guys Games and Beer

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022


Audio Only Version BelowThis is the first in a series recorded at GameHole Con 2022 in Madison, WI. Join the Gutter Geeks as they chat with David Lapp about 7th Sea: City of Five Sails Expandable Card Game by Pine Box Entertainment. City of Five Sails is an evolving tabletop card game set in the 7th Sea world of swashbuckling and intrigue, exploration and adventure, for 2-4 players Web: https://pineboxentertainment.com/ Kickstarter: https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/pineboxllc/7th-sea-city-of-five-sails #boardgames #gameholecon #indiegames

Wilde & Tausch
10AM: Do It Before That Ship Sails!

Wilde & Tausch

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 44:38


PrizePicks of the Weekend for Packers-Bills. The debut of a new Titletone Singers-inspired game: "Do It Before That Ship Sails!" Also, selections for the Steinhafels Sleepers of the Week. And is Jim Leonhard campaigning to be named full-time head coach of the Badgers sooner than we all thought he might be?

Scrapbook Your Way
SYW193 - The Wind in My Sails

Scrapbook Your Way

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 56:02 Very Popular


Peggy Collins works with me at Simple Scrapper to plan programs for our community and this is the time of year when things really get interesting! In this episode we're catching up with our personal adventures and welcoming in our new theme of Planning for November and December. Our conversation covers The Finishing Project, Peggy's wedding date, and in the best news of all... the return of the Planning Party.  See the full show notes for this episode at simplescrapper.com/syw193. ♥ Love the podcast? Join our creative community today. 

Sailing Doodles Podcast
Precision Sails and Break Waves Youtube show

Sailing Doodles Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 36:36


I interview Darryl from Precision Sails and Ben from the Youtube show Breaking waves. Visit SailingDoodles.com to find out more information about us!

TechStuff
Tech News: Supreme Court to Weigh In on Section 230

TechStuff

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 30:52 Very Popular


The US Supreme Court agreed to look at a case that involves Section 230, a rule that protects internet platform from being held liable for stuff posted by users. Plus news about Google Translate in China, a supertanker that is using sails to offset fuel consumption and whether a deepfake company really did purchase the likeness rights of Bruce Willis. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

How Not To Sail
Ep. 43: Hurricane Irma and Jacie Sails

How Not To Sail

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 15:27


Strange how much this podcast parallels this week's events...and how little I learned from my experience. RSVP to the Zoom Party Reserve your spot for the Season 2 Party at HowNotToSail.com/party Join the Patreon Crew before the Boat Show (and the Zoom Party) for More Perks! Yes, you can join the Patreon crew and help keep How Not To Sail afloat (plus get way cool perks) for as little as $3 a month. And right now is a great time to join, what with the meetup in Annapolis and the VIP Pre-Party with Capt. Bob Bitchin before the Zoom party. Welcome aboard! HowNotToSail.com/Patreon Music Special thanks to Lobo Loco and these talented creatives…! Lobo Loco's music appears regularly in my Dad's podcast. Calm Under Joekull- B (ID 685) Lobo Loco – www.musikbrause.de Creative Commons License (BY-NC-ND 4.0) Unity Kevin McCleod Creative Commons License (BY 4.0) Shiny Podington Bear Creative Commons License (BY-NC 4.0) Beneath Dark Clouds The Pangolins Creative Commons License (BY-SA 4.0) Groove Drum & Bass, via Audio Jungle

Engines of Our Ingenuity
Engines of Our Ingenuity 2322: The Steam Navy

Engines of Our Ingenuity

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 3:50


Episode: 2322 Civilians and the making of the steam-powered U.S. Navy.  Today, pruning hooks into spears.