Podcasts about droughts

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  • 211PODCASTS
  • 237EPISODES
  • 31mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Oct 14, 2021LATEST
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Best podcasts about droughts

Latest podcast episodes about droughts

Green Screen
Episode 44: 55 Days at Peking

Green Screen

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021


Droughts, floods, rains, peasant revolts and imperialism in late 19th century China are about to go over the wall as we feast on this epic but obscure drama from 1963.

Bill Handel on Demand
The Bill Handel Show - 7a - Wildfires, Droughts and Refunding the Police

Bill Handel on Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 27:37


Bill Handel on whether or not wildfires are really "disasters" or simply something natural. Also, as the drought worsens, California farmers are being paid to not grow their crops. And a year after 'defund the police', police departments are watching their funds return.

The Climate Pod
How Climate Change Worsens Droughts and Wildfires (w/ Dr. Park Williams)

The Climate Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 65:02


This week, we take a deep dive into how climate change is exacerbating extreme droughts and accelerating wildfires with bioclimatologist Park Williams. Dr. Williams is an associate professor at UCLA's Department of Geography. His particular expertise in the causes and consequences of drought guides us through a wide-ranging conversation on the transformative changes we are seeing in the American West as temperatures rise and how we should adapt to a future of more frequent droughts and dangerous wildfires. Dr. Williams is the recent co-author of the paper, "Uncertainties, Limits, and Benefits of Climate Change Mitigation for Soil Moisture Drought in Southwestern North America," and he explains the biggest findings of the research, how bad drought has been over the past two decades, and how this compares to historic megadroughts.  You can learn more about Dr. Williams and his research at his website here. Subscribe to our Substack newsletter "The Climate Weekly": https://theclimateweekly.substack.com/ As always, follow us @climatepod on Twitter and email us at theclimatepod@gmail.com. Our music is "Gotta Get Up" by The Passion Hifi, check out his music at thepassionhifi.com. Rate, review and subscribe to this podcast on iTunes, Spotify, Stitcher, and more! Subscribe to our new YouTube channel! Join our Facebook group. Check out our updated website!

AFL Obsessed
Droughts & Floods

AFL Obsessed

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 27:05


Melbourne's BIG Bang, trials and tribulations, another footy first and a censoring station!   Listen and subscribe wherever you get your podcasts. Chat on twitter @aflobsessed or peep the Instagram page @aflobsessed for more content. Support the pod here. Click on message or + to leave a voicemail for the pod here.

WPKN Community Radio
GaiaGram #69 - Environmental Headlines from around a planet in crisis.

WPKN Community Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 4:24


-Droughts are the leading cause of worlds deaths -Sea-level rise not just coastal -Climate change will significantly alter flooding patterns -California's transition to 100% zero-emission cars moved up to 2030 -Increasing land cover diversity in agricultural is beneficial

The Lead with Jake Tapper
Doctors worry Labor Day travel could fuel another surge; Taliban claim capture of final holdout province; WH pivots to domestic agenda as Biden faces several crises;

The Lead with Jake Tapper

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 38:24


Hospitals face tough choices about who gets ICU beds; Fauci predicts three doses of COVID vaccine may be best; Fauci: Moderna booster may come later than Pfizer; Average of new daily cases is up 800% since Memorial Day; Israeli officials to brief FDA on booster shot data next week; Labor Day travel slows from summer highs amid COID surge & CDC warning to the unvaccinated; 1.63M travelers passed through airports on Sunday; Biden White House defends Afghanistan evacuation efforts; Source: U.S. not aware of Americans held hostage by Taliban, as claimed by GOP Rep McCaul on Sunday; Taliban hope to announce new government in “a few days”; Biden approval rating hits new low after Afghanistan withdrawal; WH: Manchin “very persuadable” on $3.5T reconciliation plan; Unemployment benefit expire today for 7 million Americans; Kinzinger: GOP shouldn't win house majority if it embraces conspiracies; Some GOP wary Texas abortion law could cost seats; Attorney General Garland pledges to protect abortion clinics in Texas that may come “under attack”; Big push by Dems in final days before recall vote; Newsom puts focus on union workers one week before recall; 510K+ in Louisiana still without power one+ week after Ida; Hundreds still displaced in Mamaroneck, NY; Caldor fire evacuation orders lifted for South Lake Tahoe, but new CA fires ignite; Droughts & fires threaten California's sequoia trees; Police identify ex-marine as gunman in rampage that leaves 4 dead; ex-marine charged with killing 4, including mom holding infant son; Sherriff: ex-marine had no known connection to victims of rampage; Sherriff: suspect's girlfriend says he suffers from PTSD; To learn more about how CNN protects listener privacy, visit cnn.com/privacy

On Point
First Person: How Western Droughts Impact Navajo Farmers

On Point

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 4:18


Native Americans communities have been dealing with loss of water since a drought began 20 years ago. One of those communities is Many Farms, Arizona, where Roland Tso lives. Roland Tso is a grazing official on the Navajo reservation. Historically, Many Farms has been an agricultural community, but drought is changing that: "We've been conserving for so long. But at this point, this drought is just going to make it harder to survive out here."

The Hard Ball Gets AFL Show
TWO MINUTE WARNING!!! Finals droughts, Brownlow fancies and who's the real deal?

The Hard Ball Gets AFL Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2021 62:56


Xavier Ellis, footy reporter Ryan Daniels and The West's Sport Editor Nick Rynne put two minutes on the clock for every team. Daniels is (hopefully) on his last day of quarantine in Sydney.  With the coals still hot after a MASSIVE round 23 of footy, the boys recap the weekend and look ahead to the first week of finals!  They also make their call on who will take out the Rising Star and Brownlow. TWO MINUTES FOR EVERY AFL CLUB 22.20 What is happening at Carlton? 35.35 Should Freo make a play for Pendles? 26.50 Are Bombers FINALLY about to win a final?  28.40 Cerra's 'corked thigh' causes controversy  31.40 Danger's doughnuts as Cats cough up top spot  35.25 Hogan's heroes in Giant finals play  39.50 Do Melbourne start building a Max Gawn statue now? 48.05 Cooper Sharmanator is a mid-season draft FIND 50.00 Sam Taylor stands in the way of Buddy 1000 52.00 Where to now for West Coast? Follow the show on Instagram and Twitter @hardballgetsafl and hit up the hosts on Twitter @XaviEllis18, @NickRynne & @FootyRhino. Submit your questions to the HARD BALL GETS Insta. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

China In Focus
An elderly couple drowns in flood; Severe droughts put global hydropower at risk

China In Focus

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2021 20:16


1. CBP seizes fake FBI, DEA badges from China 2. Indiana AG probes CCP's propaganda efforts 3. Beijing: couple drowns in flood 4. Patient: Chinese vax lost efficacy in 90 days 5. China steps up tech scrutiny

Earth Wise
Seeds And Climate Change | Earth Wise

Earth Wise

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2021 2:00


Farmers and agricultural communities around the world are on the frontlines of climate change.  They are among the first to feel the impacts of hotter temperatures as well as more frequent and intense droughts and precipitation. These challenges pose a massive threat to both farmer livelihoods and global food security. As the planet continues to […]

The Chip Franklin Show
August 17, 2021 Chip Franklin: ABC's Alex Stone on California droughts continuing to worsen

The Chip Franklin Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2021 6:21


See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Steve Forbes: What's Ahead
Spotlight: The UN's Climate Warning: Is It Really “A Code Red For Humanity”?

Steve Forbes: What's Ahead

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2021 3:22


The UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change just issued a report that triggered apocalyptic headlines about the dire condition of the planet, calling it "a code red for humanity." Steve Forbes on the doomsday headlines plaguing the news and on how climate challenges are actually quite solvable.Steve Forbes shares his What's Ahead Spotlights each Tuesday, Thursday and Friday.

Point Loma Community Church Podcast
Encounters with Water: "Ebb and Flow"

Point Loma Community Church Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2021 24:19


Droughts and floods are old and constant themes in scripture. Here's one version: God shows us a flood of Grace. We love God for it but then we forget our way into a drought. God calls us back to the water and floods us with Grace and Love again. This is a very natural, very human, ebb and flow and God loves us in it. We spend a lot of time in shame and guilt for the drought times but God wants to set us free from that. Passage: Jeremiah 2:1-13 Music clips used in sermon: "Driver's License" - Olivia Rodrigo                                              "Good 4U" - Olivia Rodrigo                                                            “Ironic” – Alanis Morissette                                                    “Respect” – Aretha Franklin                                                          “Lord I Need You” (Instrumental) – Matt Maher We now have TWO in-person worship opportunities. Our Cafe Service meets at 9:00am on the Sanctuary Lawn, and our Traditional Service will meet at 10:30am in the Sanctuary. We would love for you to join us!!  We will also be maintaining our online services at 9:30am & 11am until further notice. We would love to have you attend one of our four services on Sunday! To find and explore the exciting opportunities for people to get involved in what God is doing within our community, please visit our website at www.pointlomachurch.org.  For event happenings: http://pointlomachurch.org/connect/events/ To register for any event: http://pointlomachurch.org/register If you would like to give to the ministry: http://pointlomachurch.org/give/ Music in this podcast by Marc Shaw

Nemos News Network
The Silent War Ep 6067 Vax Holocaust Coverup Evictions Back FOODFLATION Fix for Droughts

Nemos News Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2021 23:21


In this episode of The Silent War,The CDC Continues to rewrite history and disappear the dead and dying from the C19 Vaccines. Unprecedented record submissions of roughly 12,000 Vaccine related deaths SO far this year versus 200-300 for a normal year were not only halved - representing up to 600,000 dead according to the CDC's own VAERS system and Lazarus report - but the ongoing submissions have seemingly been tampered with as this weeks death totals represent a huge decrease in the yearly weekly average.They are playing whack a mole with the truth and rewriting every fact they don't like. And censoring even Presidents who don't go along with it!Where does it end?Meanwhile, Massive food price increases expected before the end of the year. A Federal judge has declared the CDC's moratorium on evictions illegal and a novel solution to solve drought?All of this, and much!All of this, and more.Click here for the best way to keep up with the news and other updates in the face of the censorship:  www.NemosNewsNetwork.com/NewsIf you found this content to be of value, please consider supporting my work with any of the options below!▶️ Subscribe at www.NemosNewsNetwork.com/news▶️ Chat at www.NemosNewsNetwork.com/Chat▶️ Support us at www.NemosNewsNetwork.com/sponsors▶️ www.RedPillLiving.com - Detox the Deep State! - Single AND Recurring Donation Options 

Irrigation Training Series
Episode 116: Use Time Restrictions For Better Water Management During Droughts with Daniel Martinez

Irrigation Training Series

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2021 29:12


It would be remarkable to water every day when it was most beneficial to water. Still, life happens, and water managers are often asked to ensure water sprinklers are not watering during specific days and times. HOA meetings, municipal restrictions, outdoor weddings, and sports tournaments are just a few of the many reasons sprinklers can water at all times of the day. In the past, water managers used block days to ensure no water runs during these critical activities. However, now with strong municipal restrictions, it is more difficult to water. For example, when a city tells us, we can't water after 10 am. Using the block days feature, if we block a day, no watering will occur. The same issue is true if the restriction is before 10 am and after 6 pm. These drought restrictions make it harder to water. Time restrictions, a new feature of Jain Unity, make watering during strict restrictions due to drought easy. A time restriction can span any period from 1 minute to days, months, or years. In addition, you'll can easily configure and set any recurring restrictions, with or without an end date, of repeating events such as mowing day, site maintenance or inspection days, holidays, municipal restrictions, interval watering, and others throughout the season. During this session, you will learn: Where to find time restrictions in Unity Just how easy it is to use time restrictions The best water management strategies to use with time restrictions Additional ways to use time restrictions to save water. Special Guest: Daniel Martinez.

2Loud With Sal and Ryan
Top 10 Iconic Sports Droughts in History

2Loud With Sal and Ryan

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2021 40:56


2loud does their list on the top championship sports droughts in history. Some teams are the Clippers, Jets and Padres! Did your team make this awful list? We follow it up by 2loud minutes! 2loud tracklist: Simple and clean- Hikaru Utada Lost in a supermarket- The Clash Steal my sunshine- LEN Program- Blxst All my life- K-Ci Jo Jo Love like this- Natasha Bedingfield Breath deeper- Tame Impala So young- Portugal the man Hate- Kota the Friend Make it out- Lil Baby How we comin- Migos Batma- LPB Poody Stay high- Childish Gambino Im your boogie man- White Zombie --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/2loud-wsal-and-ryan/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/2loud-wsal-and-ryan/support

The Health Ranger Report
Situation Update, July 21st, 2021 - Collapse convergence: Floods, droughts, famine, biowar and debt bomb detonation

The Health Ranger Report

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2021 74:02


0:00 Intro 3:46 Tomato Soap Chart 32:40 Floods 40:15 Droughts 46:22 Collapse 53:41 Sollutions For more updates, visit: http://www.brighteon.com/channel/hrreport NaturalNews videos would not be possible without you, as always we remain passionately dedicated to our mission of educating people all over the world on the subject of natural healing remedies and personal liberty (food freedom, medical freedom, the freedom of speech, etc.). Together, we're helping create a better world, with more honest food labeling, reduced chemical contamination, the avoidance of toxic heavy metals and vastly increased scientific transparency. ▶️ Every dollar you spend at the Health Ranger Store goes toward helping us achieve important science and content goals for humanity: https://www.healthrangerstore.com/ ▶️ Sign Up For Our Newsletter: https://www.naturalnews.com/Readerregistration.html ▶️ Brighteon: https://www.brighteon.com/channels/hrreport ▶️ Download our app: https://www.naturalnews.com/App ▶️ Join Our Social Network: https://brighteon.social/@HealthRanger ▶️ Check In Stock Products at: https://PrepWithMike.com

Ingrained
Episode 24: Must Add Water

Ingrained

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2021 17:03


What is shaping up as the most significant drought in decades has impacted much of the West. A lack of adequate rain, sizzling temperatures and a snowpack that all but vanished have led to major cutbacks in surface water deliveries, including to Sacramento Valley rice fields. This year's rice acreage is about 20 percent lower than normal as a result.  A massive challenge is fast approaching. There's a growing concern that there will be little water on the landscape after harvest. That water helps break down rice stubble, but most importantly, it is vital to the health and survival of millions of birds that spend their fall and winter in our region. Shallow-flooded rice fields provide more than 60 percent of the fall and winter diet for 7 to 10 million ducks and geese during their annual stay in the Central Valley.  The lack of water for wildlife is a major concern for those who see and appreciate the Pacific Flyway on a regular basis. “My concern is that there isn't going to be any water to put out there,” said grower Kurt Richter of Richter AG in Colusa. “What's so critical to me is all of the surrogate habitat rice fields provide in that time of the year to the Pacific Flyway. You have shorebirds and waterfowl that are migrating from Canada all the way down to South America. We are a stopping point; a truck stop for them so to speak. They need that water out here, to in as a place for shelter and a food source. This is a deep concern to all of us.” “It is super challenging right now,” said Manuel Oliva, Chief Executive Officer of Point Blue Conservation Science, a key conservation partner with California rice growers. “Millions of birds will be arriving. They're going to be tired and looking for a place to rest, looking to refuel or settle in for the winter. There's likely not going to be enough habitat for them. Some are going to try to move, and they're going to use energy they do not have. That makes them more vulnerable to predation or other hazards. As they are squeezed in to reduced habitat, it can increase opportunities for outbreaks of diseases like cholera or botulism.” “What we're seeing is an unfolding disaster right in front of our eyes, from a waterfowl perspective,” remarked Jeff McCreary, Director of Operations for the Western Region of Ducks Unlimited, another longtime conservation partner with rice. “Desperate times call for desperate measures, and we're going to need to do something more than just pray for rain. Typically, when we talk about disaster it's from a social standpoint – people are suffering. This is an environmental disaster in which people and wildlife are suffering.” Currently, our California Rice Commission survey indicates less than 25 percent of the usual acreage will be shallow-flooded. That's insufficient to support our flyway visitors. As a result, a coalition of conservation, water and agricultural groups are seeking $10 million from the Legislature and Governor, to fund groundwater pumping for wildlife later this year. “Hopefully we'll have some opportunities to utilize surface water in those areas where it's available,” remarked Northern California Water Association President David Guy. “We know it will be limited. Hopefully, there'll be some opportunities to pump groundwater in some other areas, to help spread waters out across the region, help the birds spread out across the region to avoid some disease issues that we've seen in the past. Hopefully, we can do our part in this valley to help birds. This fall we want to make sure we do everything we can to help the birds.” Among those concerned about the health of the Pacific Flyway is Senate President Pro Tempore Toni Atkins.  “I think we should all be concerned,” Atkins said. “We've seen the devastating wildfires, the smoke, the strain on our energy supply, and now we're certainly in the middle of another historic drought. We seem to say that more and more frequently. Climate change is here. It's real, and it's challenging our ability to produce food and energy. We have to work together to find solutions that are going to protect vital habitats, while at the same time maintaining a healthy agriculture industry. I think rice farmers know as well as anyone that it's not fish or farms. Protecting ecosystems is just as critical for our own health, our own sense of well-being as it is for wildlife that call California home.” Episode Transcript Eileen Javora: Right now we are seeing an intense drought across the Western United States. Jim Morris: Meteorologist Eileen Javora. Eileen Javora: More than 90% of the land in the west is in drought conditions and nearly 60% or so is in extreme or exceptional drought. Jim Morris: Northern California Water Association President, David Guy. David Guy: Well, it's really an extraordinarily dry year. And is what we're finding is that it almost just keeps getting drier. There's just less water out on the landscape. Than at least we've seen in any of our lifetime. Jim Morris: An immediate focus in the Sacramento Valley is finishing the growing season and harvesting crops, which provide widespread benefits. Next up, averting a potential environmental disaster by seeking creative ways to get water on a parched landscape. David Guy: Hopefully we'll have some opportunities to utilize surface water in those kind of areas where it's available. It's going to be limited this year. We know that, and then hopefully there'll be some opportunities to pump groundwater in some other areas to help spread waters out across the region, help the birds kind of spread out across the region to avoid some disease issues that we've seen in the past. And that hopefully we can just do our part in this valley to help birds. That as we all know this valley is very committed to the Pacific Flyway and both the waterfowl as well as the shorebirds. And I think this fall, we want to make sure that we've done whatever we can to help the birds. Jim Morris: The stakes are high, but many are focused on this critical subject. Welcome to Ingrained: The California Rice Podcast. I'm your host, Jim Morris, proud to have worked with California farmers and ranchers to help tell their stories for the past 30 years. And this is no doubt. One of the most challenging years during that time, a lack of adequate water is a growing problem, and it is getting drier on the landscape. I'm in, Calusa visiting with grower, Kurt Richter. And Kurt, where are you with the growing season? And how's the rice looking? Kurt Richter: The rice looks good. We are coming out of the weed control stage of the season and working our way into heading. Jim Morris: Tell me about heading and what that means? Kurt Richter: Heading is when the rice is what we'd call heading out. That's where the plant goes into the reproductive stage from the vegetative stage and produces its seed. Every grass plant produces seed, rice is technically a grass plant. And when it produces its seed that comes in the form of rice kernels. Jim Morris: And the Sacramento Valley is a good place to grow rice and the warm days and cool nights worked very well for it. It has been extremely hot, but we are into a more mild stretch. How does that help the heading process? Kurt Richter: We have been recently in some pretty extended periods of a hundred plus degree days, and we are trending downward now. You're in the heading stage like we are now, which is followed by the pollination stage. You want temperatures to be a bit more mild, the hotter it is the more devastating it's going to be to the pollination process. And that's going to be difficult for kernels to fill properly in all those little seedlings that the plant produces when it's in high heat. Jim Morris: And it has been a challenging growing season with about 20% of the rice not planted this year in the Sacramento Valley because of the dry conditions. And we're also entering another critical time. So after harvest a shallow amount of water is normally put into the fields which breaks down the rice straw and it times perfectly with the Pacific Flyway migration, but there are serious questions about the availability that water. What concerns do you have about that? Kurt Richter: My concern is that there isn't going to be any water to put out there. Several of the irrigation districts that rice farmers use in this part of the valley have already announced that there will not be any winter water available and that's hugely concerning. I mean, from the farming side of things, that is how we decompose our straw, but that's really secondary to me because we have other methods that we can go about doing that. What's so critical to me is that all the surrogate habitat that rice fields provide in that time of the year to the Pacific Flyway, you've got shorebirds and waterfowl that are migrating, from Canada down to all the way down to South America, we are a stopping point, we're the trucks stopped for them, so to speak. And they need that water out here to have as a place for shelter. And they also, the waterfowl at least, utilize the food source of rice residue that gets left behind in the field. Just little kernels of rice that fall off the plant when you're trying to harvest it, they find those, they root them out in the mud and they eat them. Not to mention the fact that the shorebirds who don't eat rice grain so much as they eat organisms. Well, you have a flooded field, you've got all sorts of bugs and invertebrates swimming around out there. And that's a fueling station for those birds too. So they rely on this area for generations as a place to stop, refuel, rests, nest, all sorts of things like that. But if this is a dry landscape, it's not going to work and I don't know what's going to happen, but it is something that is of a deep concern to all of us. Jim Morris: Millions of ducks depend on the Sacramento Valley for food and arresting place. And the water situation is currently dire. Jeff McCreary is a biologist and director of operations for Ducks Unlimited's Western Region. Jeff, your concerns in this area? Jeff McCreary: We're facing an unprecedented drought. This is not just a drought that's in California. It's a Pacific Flyway drought. It's a Western drought and it's affecting birds all across this part of the country. What we're seeing here is an unfolding disaster, right in front of our eyes from a waterfowl perspective, waterfowl need water, and that water is typically in wetlands and winter flooded rice. This year we're seeing reductions in both of those, in the acres of both of those. Currently I see two issues. There's the ongoing issue in the Klamath Basin, where birds that are breeding in the Central Valley of California are flying to the Klamath Basin, where there is very little water and the risk of a botulism outbreak is imminent. And I would expect that we will see really bad news in the papers sometime soon on that. The second issue is what happens when the rest of the birds and those birds and Klamath Basin come to the Central Valley and the Sacramento Valley to winter. Is there going to be water on the landscape? All signs point to very, very little. Shasta, Oroville, Folsom, record lows. Some small irrigation districts will have water for rice, but really desperate times call for desperate measures. And we're going to need to do something more than just pray for rain. Jim Morris: That something more we'll hopefully include help from the legislature and the governor to get more water for the flyway. A coalition of conservation, water and agricultural groups seeks $10 million to provide water for wildlife. Our California rice commission survey of growers indicates at the present time, less than 25% of the usual shallow flooded winter rice acres will have water on them this year. That is not enough to adequately support a healthy Pacific Flyway during peak migration. Jeff McCreary: Well, there's an opportunity that hasn't existed in California for quite some time with some extra revenue that can be utilized to help with disaster. And typically when we talk about disaster, it's from a social standpoint, people are suffering. This is an environmental disaster in which people and wildlife are suffering. One opportunity and one of the few levers that we have, and it's a desperate lever to pull is to subsidize groundwater pumping, to supplement what little surface water is going to be available for both rice lands and many dwellers. Jim Morris: Our conservation partners are so important for protecting wildlife in rice fields. And I'm in Petaluma at the headquarters of Point Blue Conservation Science, happy to see at the nearby park, some rice birds, a squadron of pelicans this morning, that was really cool. And a visiting with Manny Oliva, Chief Executive Officer of Point Blue. Manny has degrees in mechanical engineering. He's worked at the Foreign Ag Service, at USDA, and his passion for nature was fueled while growing up in Guatemala. Manny, thanks so much for your time. And I know we don't have [Matts 00:08:44] or Scarlet Macaws in our local rice fields, or I haven't found them yet, but what are your thoughts about the Pacific Flyway and the important role rice fields play for habitat? Mani Oliva: We're very lucky here in California to have these amazing birds here as part of the Pacific Flyway and rice fields are mainly important to these species and these birds. One of the things that we have to remember is that the Central Valley has lost over 90% of its wetlands over time. And I think that's a really important number to remember, 90% of the wetlands are gone. And the idea that these birds are a declining species in North America, the Central Valley hosts over 5 million waterfowl and half a million shorebirds. And having this concept are having these rice fields. These flooded rice fields work in tangent or work in width. These natural wetlands provides this amazing habitat for these birds. It's really critical. And we've already proven that flooded rice fields are amazingly powerful wetlands for these birds. I also want to sort of, as a tangent, bring these birds being part of the local areas and local systems brings, is big for the economy, it's big for culture and for producers as these birds are also helping to decompose rice straw and creating that healthy environment that we want. Jim Morris: We have a concern this year because of the drought. And what thoughts do you have as we're going to head into the big migration time, millions of birds depending on rice and some water out there. And it's super challenging right now. Mani Oliva: It is super challenging right now. And millions of birds will be arriving and they're going to be tired and looking for a place to rest or look into refuel or looking to settle in for the winter. And there's likely not to be enough habitat for them. So some are going to try to move, and they're going to be using energy, energy that they do not have, and that makes them more sort of vulnerable to predation or other kinds of hazards. As well as these habitats, also, as they're squeezed in, are opportunities for diseases like cholera or botulism that we have to be careful for. But one of the things that we have to remember, it's not just this one year that we're dealing with, we're dealing multiple dry years, and that has a cumulative effect on these species. So we're all looking also, trying to understand what is the long-term effects of all of these dry years on these species over time. Jim Morris: Through our partnerships and creativity, we're trying to help this drought situation to get a little more water on the landscape. How much do you value these creative partnerships between rice growers and organizations like Point Blue. Mani Oliva: Honestly, none of this work could happen without these partnerships. We all have these gifts to bring, we all have these diversity of thoughts that are really important to solve these complex problems. We really needed this as all of us are the diversity of thought to really think through what are the opportunities and what are the challenges to the solutions that we can offer? Droughts to hard for everyone. They're hard for people. They're hard for birds, fish, even the bugs, all of these in it. What we need to do is we have this diversity of thought around how can we best resolve these issues? And come up with the proper solutions. Point Blue as an organization, we believe in this multiple benefits solutions, how can our natural resources provide multiple benefits? But the challenge is really is, how do we do this in continually growing pressures? And that just puts more emphasis on collaboration and diversity of thought and just working together. And we're proud to offer our science to the community and work together to help make this happen. Jim Morris: Visiting with Senate President pro Temp Toni Atkins. And you've met with rice growers, and you've been out to the fields. There's certainly more to California rice than providing America's sushi rice. What are your thoughts about the important role Sacramento Valley rice fields play for wildlife? Toni Atkins: Well, first and foremost, let me tell you, I love sushi rice, Jennifer and I partake a lot. I think California rice fields make an ideal environment for so many species of fish and birds. I'm proud that our state is home to a long stretch of the Pacific Flyway and millions... We know millions of migratory birds make their way through our skies every fall, every spring, and they need a place to rest and recover on that journey and rice fields support native fish as well. And I think it's important that people know that Chinook salmon, it mimics the floodplains that historically have served as breeding grounds provides a rich source of food for fish and birds alike for thousands of years before even the area being reshaped by development. So there's so many reasons to recognize the role that rice plays in California. Jim Morris: And our ecosystem is very special in California, and it certainly is a challenge this year with the drought. So what concerns do you have specifically for those millions of birds that are traveling through the Central Valley later this year and the potential that there may be little water on the landscape during this peak migration period? Toni Atkins: I'm very concerned. I think we should all be concerned. We've seen the devastating wildfires, the smoke, the strain on our energy supply. And now we're certainly in the middle of another historic drought. We seem to say that more and more frequently. Climate change is here, it's real. And it's challenging our ability to produce food and energy. Particularly as we face immediate climate impacts, we have to work together and we have to work together to find solutions that are going to protect vital habitats, while at the same time maintaining a healthy agriculture industry. I think rice farmers know as well as anyone that it's not fish or farms, protecting ecosystems is just as critical for our own health, our own sense of wellbeing, as it is for wildlife that call California home. Jim Morris: I mentioned about working together. There is a legislative option that could provide additional water to rice fields this fall in case the drought continues. And what are your thoughts about working to ensure that we do not have a collapse of this invaluable ecosystem in the Sacramento Valley? Toni Atkins: I'm really proud that this year, the legislature and governor have made truly historic investments in climate resilience, certainly protecting wetlands and working lands, conserving ag land and advancing historic funds for a drought package to help farmers through these trying times. But I think it's really likely that this drought will continue into the fall. I know that we have some optimism that next year will be an El Nino year, which will bring more rain. But the reality is that we're likely to experience more sustained droughts as the world gets warmer. That's the impact of climate change. I think we're going to face some very difficult decisions ahead because of it. We're going to have to engage the ag industry, even more so than we have in the past. We're going to have to look to science and we're going to have to work with community and my counterparts here in the Capitol to see what we can do to protect farmers and to maintain critical habitat. So I'm committed to that. I remain committed to that. I think it's important. And I really appreciate the time to talk about this things. Jim Morris: Hopefully help for the Pacific Flyway will come from the legislature. Hopefully the drought will end sooner than later. Thankfully, passionate people are committed to do what they can to help wildlife endure this challenge. That we'll wrap up this episode. Thank you to Senate pro Temp Toni Atkins, Manny Oliva, Jeff McCreary, Kurt Richter, David Guy, and Eileen Javora for their comments and expertise. You can find out more at podcast.calrice.org. We also have a special drought page set up at calrice.org, which has a lot of information on impacts to California rice. We appreciate your comments, please subscribe and thanks for listening.

Strait Talk
Prolonged Droughts Pose Threat to Turkey's Agricultural Sector

Strait Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 16, 2021 10:00


Turkey's agricultural sector is a major contributor to its GDP and is the nation's biggest employer. But a warming climate is posing threats to its food production. With declining water levels and prolonged periods of drought, the climate crisis could affect farmers the most, who make up to about 20 percent of the country's total workforce. Now Turkey is coming up with ways to mitigate the effects of climate change. Guests: Seda Sevim Yamac Assistant Professor at the Konya Food and Agriculture University Sharon George Senior Lecturer at Keele University

Between The Rows
Cattle producers feeling the heat, past vs. present droughts, growing canola production

Between The Rows

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2021 28:31


This week on Between the Rows we talk with Tyler Fulton, president of Manitoba Beef Producers, about the impact of the drought on the cattle sector; weather specialist Bruce Burnett of MarketsFarm offers his take on how the current drought on the Prairies stacks up against others in history; we […]

Earth Wise
Climate Change And Heat-Related Deaths | Earth Wise

Earth Wise

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2021 2:00


According to a new study recently published in the journal Nature Climate Change, more than one-third of the world's heat-related deaths each year are attributable to human-induced climate change.  Researchers from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine in the UK  and the University of Bern in Switzerland analyzed data from 732 locations in […]

FreightCasts
The Stockout EP11 Droughts and recalls pressure food supply chains

FreightCasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2021 26:09


In this episode of The Stockout, Mike Baudendistel discusses the latest CPG news including the Tyson frozen chicken recall, grocery stockpiling items, the impact of the drought, Molson Coors changing its portfolio and Dole and Chobani which have both filed to go public.Follow The Stockout on Apple PodcastsFollow The Stockout on SpotifyMore FreightWaves Podcasts

Start Here
Droughts Are Getting Worse. Has Climate Change Poisoned the Well?

Start Here

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2021 28:08


Californians are being urged to conserve water, as heat waves and droughts intensify. Haitian police describe a spine-chilling plot in which a gang was unwittingly assembled by a company located in the US. And as Texas legislators debate how much access voters should have to the polls, other states are trying to expand the right to vote online.

Elk Talk
EP73: Hunting Elk in Fires, Smoke, and Droughts

Elk Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 9, 2021 87:52


In this Episode (73) of Elk Talk Podcast, Corey and Randy are taking listener questions and reciting some experiences of recent elk seminars.  Topics covered include Alaska elk hunting, smoke and elk, hunting new areas, food scarcity, what is the best elk forage, elk dispersal, calling for elk is not for turkeys, making elk hunting simple, eliminating where elk "ain't", most archery seasons are a food pattern, every elk movement is with intention and purpose, same elk on different landscape, thermo-regulation, and many other tangents.

SBS Dari - اس بی اس دری
خشکسالی امسال ممکمن بیش از ۳ میلیون افغان را متاثر سازد

SBS Dari - اس بی اس دری

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2021 7:51


گزارش هیئت ناروی برای مهاجرین نشان میدهد که خشکسالی امسال نسبت به خشکسالی سه سال قبل "ویرانگرتر" است.

Water Nerds
How Droughts Impact Drinking Water

Water Nerds

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2021 10:35


Join Analies, Hydroviv's Head of Policy & Perspectives and Emily, Hydroviv's Science Communication Intern as they discuss how droughts impact drinking water.

SBS Punjabi - ਐਸ ਬੀ ਐਸ ਪੰਜਾਬੀ
ਆਸਟ੍ਰੇਲੀਆ ਦੇ ਮਾਣਮੱਤੇ 'ਰੇਜ਼ੀਲੀਐਂਟ ਐਵਾਰਡ' ਦੇ ਫਾਈਨਾਲਿਸਟ ਵਜੋਂ ਚੁਣੀ ਗਈ ਹੈ ਇਹ ਸਿੱਖ ਸੰਸਥਾ

SBS Punjabi - ਐਸ ਬੀ ਐਸ ਪੰਜਾਬੀ

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2021 11:00


ਬੁਸ਼ਫਾਇਰ, ਸੋਕੇ ਅਤੇ ਕਰੋਨਾ ਮਹਾਂਮਾਰੀ ਦੌਰਾਨ ਨਿਸ਼ਕਾਮ ਸੇਵਾ ਲਈ 'ਆਸਟ੍ਰੇਲੀਅਨ ਸਿੱਖ ਸਪੋਰਟ' ਸੰਸਥਾ ਨੂੰ 'ਰੇਜ਼ੀਲੀਐਂਟ ਆਸਟ੍ਰੇਲੀਆ ਐਵਾਰਡ' ਦੇ ਫਾਈਨਾਲਿਸਟ ਵਜੋਂ ਚੁਣਿਆ ਗਿਆ ਹੈ। ਪੂਰੀ ਜਾਣਕਾਰੀ ਲਈ ਸੁਣੋ ਇਹ ਖਾਸ ਆਡੀਓ ਰਿਪੋਰਟ।

The John Batchelor Show
1476: #PacificWatch: Summer season wildfires, droughts, heat and brownouts. @JCBliss

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 3, 2021 10:55


Photo: U.S. Marines with Marine Medium Helicopter Squadron (HMM) 364 and Marine Medium Helicopter Training Squadron (HMMT) 164, Marine Aircraft Group 39, 3rd Marine Aircraft Wing (MAW) from Marine Corps Base (MCB) Camp Pendleton assist in the efforts to combat the Tomahawk fires on MCB Camp Pendleton, Calif., May 16, 2014. 3rd MAW partnered with the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection to conduct aerial firefighting against several wildfires ablaze in San Diego County. (U.S. Marine Corps photograph by Sgt. Keonaona C. Paulo, 3rd MAW COMCAM/RELEASED) . CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow #PacificWatch: Summer season wildfires, droughts, heat and brownouts.  @JCBliss As Lava fire grows, another fire in Northern California explodes overnight -- As the lightning-sparked Lava fire in Northern California continues to grow, another blaze is spreading in the Shasta-Trinity National Forest amid bone-dry vegetation, scorching temperatures and gusty winds. Los Angeles Times Grocery stores are pulling perishable food, covering aisles in plastic sheets, and running sprinklers on their roofs as they battle a record heat wave - Grocery stores in Washington have been forced to pull perishable goods from shelves and turn off entire refrigerated sections as the state experiences record-shattering temperatures. On Monday, several areas in Oregon and Washington broke records as temperatures rose to as high as 116 degrees. The heat has caused several power outages throughout the region and taken a toll on local businesses. Business Insider Intense heat from Northern California fires have created multiple pyrocumulus clouds -- Plumes of superheated air rising from some of the major wildfires burning across Northern California — including the Lava and Tennant fires — formed multiple pyrocumulus clouds this week, formations that can help fires spread more rapidly. San Francisco Chronicle  California pleads for more power as summer blackout threat grows, hydro supplies fade - Acknowledging the increasing threat of rolling blackouts this summer, managers of California's electricity grid issued a rare call for additional power supplies Thursday. Sacramento Bee Fire season in Northern California: Here are the major blazes burning now -- Three significant wildfires are collectively burning across nearly 32,000 acres of Northern California. Fueled by billowing wind, hot weather and dangerously dry conditions, the blazes are among a constellation of fires that have sprouted up and down the state in recent days. San Francisco Chronicle Bracing for wildfires, California's inmate firefighters still denied visitors -- Hundreds of California inmates will charge to the front lines of rapidly spreading wildfires this summer, risking injury and death in exchange for shorter sentences and a few dollars a day. inewsource  Evacuations being ordered for new wildfire burning in Northern California north of Redding -- The blaze, burning north of Redding, is being called the Salt Fire. U.S. Forest Service officials said the fire is burning east of Interstate 5 near the Salt Creek exit south of Lakehead. Sacramento Bee Fires: Biden raises firefighters' pay, Newsom slams Trump's wildfire management -- With California and much of the West facing serious drought, record heat and wildfire risk, President Biden on Wednesday announced he is raising the pay of federal firefighters, expanding the use of the National Guard to help fight fires and broadening efforts to use federal satellites to detect fires as soon as they start so crews can more quickly limit their spread. San Jose Mercury California's rain year just ended - and the data shows we're in trouble -- Data shows that for many of the major regions of California, the July 2020-June 2021 rain year was one of the top 10 driest ever. Even more troubling is that the extreme dry spells are starting to stack up, especially in the Sierra Nevada watersheds that supply so much of the state's water. San Francisco Chronicle

KGO 810 Podcast
July 1, 2021: ABC Washington Correspondent Elizabeth Schulze tells Nikki about Biden's efforts to raise federal firefighter pay to $15/hour as droughts plague the West. Bidens visit Florida to get briefing on condo collapse and meet with families

KGO 810 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2021 19:11


The Morning Show with Nikki Medoro welcomes ABC Crime/Terrorism Analyst Brad Garrett to share insight on how Bill Cosby was able to sleep in his own bed at home last night. What message does this send to other rape victims? See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Morning Show with Nikki Medoro Podcast
July 1, 2021: ABC Washington Correspondent Elizabeth Schulze tells Nikki about Biden's efforts to raise federal firefighter pay to $15/hour as droughts plague the West. Bidens visit Florida to get briefing on condo collapse and meet with families

The Morning Show with Nikki Medoro Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2021 19:11


The Morning Show with Nikki Medoro welcomes ABC Crime/Terrorism Analyst Brad Garrett to share insight on how Bill Cosby was able to sleep in his own bed at home last night. What message does this send to other rape victims? See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Stratfor Podcast
Essential Geopolitics: Climate Change, Mega Droughts and Business Costs

Stratfor Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2021 7:07


In this episode of the Stratfor Essential Geopolitics podcast from RANE, Emily Donahue speaks with Rebecca Keller, Director of Analysis for Stratfor's geopolitical analysis team at RANE. The ongoing megadrought in the western US and the recent heatwave in its Northwest have prompted concerns about new norms of climate change. Keller talks about how these growing climate change risks will influence decision-makers. moving forwardMore From Stratfor, a RANE company:Follow Stratfor on TwitterFind Stratfor on LinkedInConnect with Stratfor on FacebookSign Up for the Free Stratfor Newsletter from RANE

All IN
Droughts and Investing

All IN

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2021


On today's show we talk about whether Indiana is also in danger of droughts like the ones we're hearing about in the West Coast, as well as learning about trading and investing with a professor of finance.

The Hunt Backcountry Podcast
MM 107 | Archery vs Rifle Elk, Side Sleeping, Droughts & Fires

The Hunt Backcountry Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2021 30:34


Mark & Steve help a listener think through choosing between an archery vs rifle elk hunt for this fall. They then answer questions on how to get and stay comfortable while sleeping on a backpack hunt, specifically for side-sleepers. They also discuss how to monitor wildfires for upcoming hunts, as well as how to adapt elk hunting strategies based on fires, and for very dry conditions in general. Wildfire Tracking: https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/ Share your question for the show: podcast@exomtngear.com View & Search the Podcast Archive: https://exomtngear.com/podcast

UN News
News in Brief 17 June 2021

UN News

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2021 3:18


Debt suspension call for countries hit worst by COVID: Guterres Drought on verge of becoming the 'next pandemic' COVID-19 cases surge by more than 20 per cent week on week

All Up In Your Business with First Union Lending
054 - Let's talk about everyone's favorite topic; droughts!

All Up In Your Business with First Union Lending

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2021 37:35


Follow UsLinkedin https://www.linkedin.com/company/firstunionlending/Facebook https://www.facebook.com/firstunionPinterest https://www.pinterest.com/firstunionlend/Instagram @firstunionlending CNBCTwitter @firstunionlending Email your questions or small business stories to podcast@firstunionlending.com

The John Rothmann Show Podcast
June 14, 2021: Are we taking this seriously?

The John Rothmann Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2021 41:32


Droughts are now a part of our lives in California, or have they always been? See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Airtalk
Climate Change Exacerbates Drought In Western United States

Airtalk

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2021 10:20


Each year Lake Oroville helps water a quarter of the nation's crops, sustain endangered salmon beneath its massive earthen dam and anchor the tourism economy of a Northern California county that must rebuild seemingly every year after unrelenting wildfires. But the mighty lake — a linchpin in a system of aqueducts and reservoirs in the arid U.S. West that makes California possible — is shrinking with surprising speed amid a severe drought, with state officials predicting it will reach a record low later this summer. While droughts are common in California, this year's is much hotter and drier than others, evaporating water more quickly from the reservoirs and the sparse Sierra Nevada snowpack that feeds them. The state's more than 1,500 reservoirs are 50% lower than they should be this time of year, according to Jay Lund, co-director of the Center for Watershed Sciences at the University of California-Davis. Over Memorial Day weekend, dozens of houseboats sat on cinderblocks at Lake Oroville because there wasn't enough water to hold them. Blackened trees lined the reservoir's steep, parched banks. At nearby Folsom Lake, normally bustling boat docks rested on dry land, their buoys warning phantom boats to slow down. Campers occupied dusty riverbanks farther north at Shasta Lake. Droughts are a part of life in California, where a Mediterranean-style climate means the summers are always dry and the winters are not always wet. The state's reservoirs act as a savings account, storing water in the wet years to help the state survive during the dry ones. Last year was the third driest on record in terms of precipitation. Temperatures hit triple digits in much of California over the Memorial Day weekend, earlier than expected. State officials were surprised earlier this year when about 500,000 acre feet (61,674 hectare meters) of water they were expecting to flow into reservoirs never showed up. One acre-foot is enough water to supply up to two households for one year. “In the previous drought, it took (the reservoirs) three years to get this low as they are in the second year of this drought,” Lund said. Today on AirTalk, we're learning more about drought conditions and wildfire risks ahead of the summer. Questions? Give us a call at 866-893-5722. With files from the Associated Press Guest: Lauren Sommer, correspondent covering climate change for NPR; she tweets @lesommer

SportsRage Late Night
6/9 Hour 3: Title droughts and more...

SportsRage Late Night

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2021 46:24


Gabe Morency discusses the title droughts among the NBA teams in the playoffs, and which ones have the best odds of ending them. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Straight Outta Vegas with RJ Bell
06/08/2021 - NBA Championship Droughts and MVPs

Straight Outta Vegas with RJ Bell

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2021 44:20


RJ Bell, Jonas Knox, and Mackenzie Rivers react to Nikola Jokic winning the MVP and discuss how Giannis Antetokounmpo is viewed across the league. The guys dive into the numbers for the remaining 8 teams in the NBA Playoffs and highlight the teams with the longest championship droughts. The guys give their picks as they preview the two playoff games on Tuesday night! Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Sharper Iron from KFUO Radio
A Drought for Repentance

Sharper Iron from KFUO Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2021 55:14


Rev. Andrew Jagow, pastor at Bethany Lutheran Church in Alexandria, VA joins host Rev. Timothy Appel to study Jeremiah 14:1-22. Jeremiah preaches to the people of Judah in the midst of a horrific drought. Droughts were common in the history of Israel. Theologically, a drought was one of the covenant curses from Deuteronomy 28, by which the LORD intended to call His people to repentance. In response to the drought, Jeremiah offered a prayer of confession on behalf of the people of Judah, calling upon God to deliver them as their Savior. The LORD's response reminded Jeremiah of the utter unfaithfulness of His people, promising that they would be punished. Jeremiah also prayed concerning the false prophets in Judah. The LORD condemns them for their lies by which they have led the people astray. Jeremiah again prays in confession to the LORD, calling upon Him to be true to His promises. “A Time to Destroy and a Time to Build” is a mini-series on Sharper Iron that goes through the book of Jeremiah. The prophet calls the people of Judah and Jerusalem to repent of their faithless idolatry and warns them of the destruction that is coming in the Babylonian exile. Yet Jeremiah does not leave us without hope in the midst of such dark days. Jeremiah and all who believe the Word of God he preached survive because of hope that is found in the righteous Branch from the line of David, Jesus Christ.

We're Doomed!
We're Doomed | Episode 41 | RECAP: "Praise Jupiter"

We're Doomed!

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2021 71:27


The doom boys take a trip down memory lane and revisit old episodes to see if we have any updates on previous topics like Animal Uprising, Droughts, Alien Invasions, Volcanoes, Solar Storms, Asteroids and COVID-19 (have you heard about the last one?). We also talk about good and bad insects, Brandon's hatred of the birthday song and, as always, a UFO update.

Take Two
State of Affairs: Congress Votes to Investigate January 6th Capitol Attack, What Do Droughts Mean for California Wineries?, First All Black High School Rowing Team

Take Two

Play Episode Listen Later May 21, 2021 49:23


State of Affairs: Congress Votes to Investigate January 6th Capitol Attack, What Do Droughts Mean for California Wineries?, First All Black High School Rowing Team

News & Views with Joel Heitkamp
Droughts across the area

News & Views with Joel Heitkamp

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2021 10:04


05/17/21 : Burdell Johnson is a farmer and rancher from Tuttle, ND and founder of the insurance agency, Food and Fiber Risk Managers. Burdell is a fourth generation livestock  producer and former President of the American Sheep Industry Association. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Morning Joe Rant Show Podcast
A rant about the current times we are in, There is no drought (because it's the new normal), Broadband ISP's paid for 8.5M fake net neutrality comments, Why can't companies find workers (for low pay).

The Morning Joe Rant Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2021 26:02


A rant about the current times we are in, There is no drought (because it's the new normal), Broadband ISP's paid for 8.5M fake net neutrality comments, Why can't companies find workers (for low pay). A rant about the current times we are in - Capitalism, all "isms", the unemployed, underemployed, wealth, corporations, and shitty politicians. There is no drought (because it's the new normal) - source "Droughts come for a year, or two, or even 10 — and then end. Seasonal crops are fallowed, lawns are ripped out, car washing stops — and then life, lawns, crops and car washing all return to the way they were before. That's not what we've got. Drought does not erase the coastal fog that once was commonplace in the Bay Area, or suck all moisture from the ground even after flood winters the way it has done not just in Sonoma and Mendocino but also in Topanga, Malibu and the Santa Susana Mountains, as was the case before 2018's Woolsey fire. Droughts are deviations from the norm. What we have now is no deviation. It is the norm itself. Our climate has changed. As much water falls from the sky as before, but at different times and in different ways." Broadband ISP's paid for 8.5M fake net neutrality comments - source "The Office of the New York Attorney General said in a new report that a campaign funded by the broadband industry submitted millions of fake comments supporting the 2017 repeal of net neutrality. The proceeding generated a record-breaking number of comments — more than 22 million — and nearly 18 million were fake, the attorney general's office found. It has long been known that the tally included fake comments." Why can't companies find workers (for low pay) - source "Fueling the labor-market imbalance is the fact that many workers, particularly women, find it difficult to work outside the home. Only 60% of the 200 largest U.S. school districts were fully reopen the week of April 27, according to Georgetown University's FutureEd think tank, and many child-care centers continue to operate at reduced capacity." Produced by The Wild 1 Media. Check out our other podcasts- https://darksidediaries.sounder.fm https://anchor.fm/ttmygh https://crypto101.sounder.fm/ --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Earth Wise
The Potential For Solar Canals In California | Earth Wise

Earth Wise

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2021 2:00


California’s network of almost 4,000 miles of aqueducts is the world’s largest water conveyance system.  It serves the state’s Central Valley which produces a quarter of America’s food.  About 20% of the nation’s groundwater demand is pumped from Central Valley aquifers. A recent study by the University of California Santa Cruz and UC Merced has […]

CONNECTED Adventist
There's Hope

CONNECTED Adventist

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 18, 2021 34:52


Droughts and dry spells drain the life out of most things. Animals lack food, the trees loose their foliage and the grass becomes brown and it looses all its softness, but what happens when a Christian is going through a spiritual drought? We're told there's hope no matter how lifeless our spiritual life is and to "not give up", but how long do we have to wait before we finally get a 'spiritual downpour'? And is it too late for some?

The Fast Lane
Matt Holliday on Arenado's swing, outfield chemistry and how to get through offensive droughts

The Fast Lane

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 15, 2021 18:47


info@podcastone.com13f6f8e7-4394-4f79-b91d-4183e25f36ecThu, 15 Apr 2021 14:33:30 PDT

Conversations@KAFM
National Weather Service - Runoff & Droughts

Conversations@KAFM

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 31, 2021 13:46


Recorded: 03/24/21   Host: Coach Guests: Megan Stackhouse

Windows & Mirrors
Day 196 (Jeremiah 13-16) - Dirty Drawers, Droughts & Disobedience

Windows & Mirrors

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 25, 2021 9:12


Recap of Jeremiah 13-16. For more information on our year-long journey through the Bible, visit cornerstoneatl.org/windows

Lamniformes Radio
Lamniformes Radio Episode 40 - Joseph Klomes (Droughts, Mush, unprdctv)

Lamniformes Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 8, 2021 74:58


Today's guest is one that will be familiar to anyone who has looked at the art for an episode of Lamniformes Radio. I am joined by Joseph Klomes, who in addition to being a professional graphic designer, plays in the bands Droughts, Mush, and his new solo project unprdctv. I've always enjoyed working with Joseph, so I was psyched to talk to him about his origins in the pop punk scene of Chicago's suburbs, his duel path through music and graphic design, and his ambitious plans for unprdctv in 2021. Thanks for listening! https://linktr.ee/unprdctv https://linktr.ee/Lamniformes