Podcasts about Petersburg

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Copy link to clipboard
  • 1,922PODCASTS
  • 4,469EPISODES
  • 44mAVG DURATION
  • 3DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Jan 24, 2022LATEST

POPULARITY

20122013201420152016201720182019202020212022


Best podcasts about Petersburg

Show all podcasts related to petersburg

Latest podcast episodes about Petersburg

The Deep Purple Podcast
Episode #145 - BBC Sessions (January, 1969)

The Deep Purple Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 72:08


The Deep Purple Podcast Show Notes Episode #145 January 24, 2022 BBC Sessions (January, 1969) Subscribe at Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Google Podcasts, Overcast, Pocket Casts, Anchor.fm, Breaker, PodBean, RadioPublic, Amazon Music, or search in your favorite podcatcher! How To Support Our Show: Leave us a 5-Star Review on Apple Podcasts Buy Merch at Our Etsy Store! Become a Patron on Patreon Donate on Paypal (Donate one time or click “make this a monthly donation” box) Welcoming Our Newest Patron(s): Joining at the $5.99 “Nice Price” Tier Peter From Illinois Thanks to Our Executive Level Patrons: Show Update: Nate & John (and assorted patrons and listeners) will be in Florida in February, 2022 for the first two Deep Purple shows in nearly two years! February 10, 2022 - Hollywood, Florida - Hard Rock Live Arena. Tickets: https://www.ticketmaster.com/event/0D005B4FDCAFD529 Meet up: TBD February 12, 2022 - St. Petersburg, Florida - Mahaffey Theater Tickets: https://www.ticketmaster.com/event/0D005B52C1FCD2C9 Meet up: TBD Deep Dive Podcast Network: Deep Dive Podcast Network http://deepdivepodcastnetwork.com/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/deepdivepodnet Tracks: 14:40 - Hey Bob A Rebop (Gloria?) Group were invited to play on BBC TV on a show called “Late Night Line Up” to play this new track. Nigel Young, archivist, said this was the show they played. There are no tapes from the show that survived. This song would eventually be reworked into “The Painter.” 18:10 - Emmaretta They would be back in the studio three days later to record this one. 21:18 - Wring That Neck Thanks to Our Core Level Patrons: 26:00 - Interview 27:29 - Hey Joe The first live broadcast had an intro taken from ballet called “The Three Cornered Hat.” 31:31 - It's All Over (version two) Original by Ben E. King from the 1965 album “Seven Letters” Thanks To Our Foundation Level Patrons: Listener Mail/Comments Comments about the show? Things you'd like us to cover? We'd love to hear from you. Send us an email at info@deeppurplepodcast.com or @ us on Twitter, Facebook, or Instagram.

Two and a Half Amigos
152. Jeff Macolino, Florida Comedian and The Jef Macolino podcast

Two and a Half Amigos

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2022 56:48


Jeff Macolino is a comedian, podcaster and writer. Jeff Macolino is born and stayed in St. Petersburg, Florida, He always loved where he lives and found it to be my own personal paradise. As he went to USF for college, he worked for the Tampa Bay Rays, and was awarded a 2008 American League Championship ring. After college, he got and built an impressive career in the insurance industry over the next decade. Jeff's mid-life crisis led him to try to build a career in comedy. The goal of this podcast is to laugh, and maybe learn some things along the way! From drunken ramblings to comedians to conspiracy theories to life experience, Jeff will try to mix things up for a good time. Jeff Macolino Goal: My goal is to get some of the cinematic writings of mine to see the screen. But I also have grown to love standup and podcasting as a way to help find my voice and bolster my writing. Comedy is the thing that might be able to save this upside world; and I hope I'm part of the solution. Outline of the Episode: ● [02:03] Introduction about Jeff Macolino. ● [05:50] How was “The Jeff Macolino Podcast” going? ● [10:41] How Podcast has opened new doors? ● [12:54] Jeff Macolino goals with Standup Comedy? ● [14:32] How did Jeff Macolino start writing off things? ● [16:59] How Jeff Macolino got COVID? ● [19:26] How much money did Jeff Macolino spend in a strip club in 2008? ● [20:26] Progress on Sponsor talks? ● [21:47] Bitcoin Story? ● [32:45] Stripper story of Jasmin and Wonder women? ● [36:22] Worst thing in the strip club? ● [45:02] Alligators and Lake? ● [46:16] Who do you think better, Shark or Alligator? ● [47:16] Can you impersonate anyone famously? ● [48:51] Weird experience in Uber? ● [52:27] Would you ever consider writing a letter in Jail? Catch Jeff Macolino Website: https://jeffmacolino.com/ Podcast: https://anchor.fm/jeffmacolino LinkedIn: https://twitter.com/saintjmac Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/jeffmacolinopodcast/ Connect with AmigosPC! Website: https://www.amigospc.net Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TwoandahalfAmigos Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/amigospc Twitter: https://twitter.com/AmigosPC Check out Official AmigosPC Merch at: https://www.teepublic.com/stores/amigospc?ref_id=24626 Join the conversation with the Amigos by becoming a member of Amigos pc get direct access to our discord and other cool free stuff https://amigospc.supercast.tech/

kicker News
kicker News vom 22.1.2022, 23:00 Uhr

kicker News

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 22, 2022 1:40


Schalke deklassiert Aue, Leverkusen holt Azmoun aus St. Petersburg, City stolpert in Southampton, Dzeko sichert Inter den Last-Minute-Dreier

David Grey Rehab
#7 Jeffrey Wolf on Systems, Stretching & Being ‘The Flexibull’

David Grey Rehab

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 98:24


Here are the fundamentals you NEED to know about stretching, flexibility, and mobility if you're a coach or athlete. We're busting flexibility myths and uncovering the truth behind why people lack strength and move poorly (including yoga teachers!). In this episode of the David Grey Rehab Podcast, I welcome Jeffrey Wolf aka “The Flexibull”, who is the Creator of Strength Culture, where he provides simple and effective online weight loss programs and strength, mobility, and athletic training programs. Tune in as we dive deep into the theories behind stretching and flexibility as well as the practical applications of stretching and flexibility in the coaching and training world. We also talk about why all coaches need to study Dynamic Systems Theory and Jeff shares his favorite flexibility teachers, books, and programs.  “When you say flexibility, people just think extremes and I'm not talking necessarily in extremes, I'm just talking about whatever's needed to accomplish the task that's being asked of your body… If you don't have flexibility in certain areas, your body will figure out a different way to go about it.”                               - Jeffrey Wolf   “The more options that you have to complete a certain task, the more chance of success you have… and that is essentially what we call coordination.”    - Jeffrey Wolf   Episode Timeline | What You'll Learn: 00:13 – Introducing Jeffrey Wolf & The topics of today's episode 02:19 – Challenges in Jeff's career path & How he got the nickname The Flexibull. 17:10 – Jeff's current work: Opening a new gym & Training clients and high school football teams. 18:39 – What's different about Jeff's training methods for young athletes & The importance of stretching and flexibility. 24:52 – What happens when you lose flexibility and range of motion or get injured as a teenager? & The role of hormones in young athletes. 29:43 – Flexibility vs. Mobility: How they're different & The #1 problem with marketing “mobility” products/services. 41:25 – Why many people lack strength and move poorly & Effectively utilizing internal and external rotations. 52:15 – The benefits of studying and using Dynamic Systems Theory. 1:00:16 – Navigating your body's constraints and variability. 1:06:35 – Jeff's flexibility journey: Top flexibility teachers and resources. 1:11:50 – How and when to properly stretch your muscles. 1:16:28 – Our best advice for coaches and practitioners. 1:27:29 – Recommended books and resources on flexibility and stretching. 1:34:02 – Which 3 coaches would you bring to a stranded island and why? “I have to support the athlete for the sport he's playing, I'm not trying to make him a lifter. So, I use things that are the best bang for the buck for whatever purpose that is. And historically, that's going to be a squat or a hinge and some pushes and pulls to just keep it super simple and then you sprinkle in whatever other remedial work or accessory work for whatever that individual needs for specific positions.” Jeffrey Wolf Jeffrey Wolf is a fitness trainer with over seven years of professional experience, helping clients in Clearwater, Tampa, and St. Petersburg, Florida, and around the country. To reach clients across the country, he has developed an effective online training program that offers the best in convenience while also working with clients in person. Whether providing in person or online instructions, Jeffrey's a fitness trainer helping clients transform their bodies and reach their goals. While many coaches/fitness trainers specialize in specific training modalities, he works with several. From bodybuilding and strength training to yoga and mobility/flexibility training, and more, his programs mix it up to help you reach your goals. Jeffrey prides himself on practical and simple applications that improve body composition, quality of life, and confidence.   Connect with Jeffrey Wolf: Follow him on Instagram

The Zest
Conscious Cuisine: Rob Greenfield on How to Live without Grocery Stores and Restaurants

The Zest

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 27:34


For many of us, eating sustainably means remembering to bring our reusable bags to the grocery store. But Rob Greenfield wanted to go further. Much further. The sustainability, equity and justice activist has garnered a huge social media following with self-imposed challenges to raise awareness. Awhile back, he simplified his life down to just 44 possessions. Then there's the time he rode his bike across the U.S. while bathing only in natural water sources like lakes and rivers. In 2019, Rob embarked on what might be considered his most extreme feat yet: an entire year of growing and foraging all of his food in Orlando. No grocery stores, no restaurants, no takeout, no dinners cooked by friends. He says his weight didn't change, and he stayed in good health.Dalia caught up with Rob in Gulfport, just south of St. Petersburg, where he was staying with a friend. We chatted in the backyard over  glasses of homemade kombucha. In this conversation, Rob shares how the yearlong experiment impacted his social life, the kitchen appliance he swears by and advice  for how we can all eat a bit more sustainably. Dalia started by asking Rob why he decided to give up grocery stores and restaurants for an entire year.Related episodes:Why You Should Stop Haggling at Florida's Farmers MarketsAlfresco Dining Tips from “Outdoorsy Diva” Lauren GayYaupon Brothers American Tea CompanyHacks to Help You Eat More VeggiesWhat's the Buzz About Florida Honey Bees?

Welcome to Florida
Episode 82: Florida's state parks

Welcome to Florida

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 51:08


This week's episode begins with a multi-hundred million dollar theft committed by the Florida state legislature.Our guest is recently retired director of the Florida State Parks Eric Draper. Craig Pittman recently featured Draper in his Florida Phoenix column and the threat climate change presents the parks. We discuss our favorite parks, other challenges facing the system and how the parks are funded.If you're interested in helping out at a state park in your area, there are numerous "friends" groups you can contact. The Florida State Parks Foundation is another citizen-run organization dedicated to helping the parks.Exciting news for "Welcome to Florida" as the James Museum of Western and Wildlife Art in St. Petersburg will be coming on as a sponsor this year. Additional thanks go out to Indian River County which hosted Chadd Scott on his first visit to the area last week. Check back through the archives for our Spring of 2021 Indian River County BONUS episode.

The Deep Purple Podcast
Episode #144 - Moxy

The Deep Purple Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 107:26


The Deep Purple Podcast Show Notes Episode #144 January 17, 2022 Moxy Subscribe at Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Google Podcasts, Overcast, Pocket Casts, Anchor.fm, Breaker, PodBean, RadioPublic, Amazon Music, or search in your favorite podcatcher! How To Support Our Show: Leave us a 5-Star Review on Apple Podcasts Buy Merch at Our Etsy Store! Become a Patron on Patreon Donate on Paypal (Donate one time or click “make this a monthly donation” box) Welcoming Our Newest Patron(s): Richard Fusey returns to the $10 tier (from the $9.99 tier) Thanks to Our Executive Level Patrons: The £10 Tier Dr. Jill Breis The Turn it up to $11 Tier Clay Wombacher Frank Theilgaard-Mortensen Alan “Ain't Too Proud To” Begg Mikkel Steen $10 “Some One Came” Tier Ryan M Jeff Breis Gerald Kelly - Paypal Victor Campos “Better Call” Saul Evans Richard Fusey Show Update: Nate & John (and assorted patrons and listeners) will be in Florida in February, 2022 for the first two Deep Purple shows in nearly two years! February 10, 2022 - Hollywood, Florida - Hard Rock Live Arena. Tickets: https://www.ticketmaster.com/event/0D005B4FDCAFD529 Meet up: TBD February 12, 2022 - St. Petersburg, Florida - Mahaffey Theater Tickets: https://www.ticketmaster.com/event/0D005B52C1FCD2C9 Meet up: TBD Deep Dive Podcast Network: Deep Dive Podcast Network http://deepdivepodcastnetwork.com/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/deepdivepodnet Lead Up to the Album: Magazine from Andy Bolton! Personnel: Bass – Terry Juric Drums – Bill Wade Lead Guitar, Rhythm Guitar – Earl Johnson (5) Lead Guitar - Tommy Bolin [Uncredited] Rhythm Guitar – Buddy Caine (2) Vocals – Buzz Shearman Technical: Engineer – Richard Dashut Engineer, Producer – M. Smith* Mark K. Smith. Album Art & Booklet Review Design [Front] – Heiner Geisel Photography By – Larry Nickels Thanks to Our Core Level Patrons: Album Tracks: Side One: Fantasy (Johnson) Sail On Sail Away (Johnson) Can't You See I'm A Star (Johnson) Moon Rider (Johnson, Shearman) Side Two: Time To Move On (Johnson, Shearman) Still I Wonder (Johnson) Train (Johnson, Bonnell) Out Of The Darkness (Johnson, Shearman) Thanks To Our Foundation Level Patrons: Reception and Review For Further Information: https://www.discogs.com/release/3124366-Moxy-Moxy https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moxy_(band) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moxy_(album) Help from the archives of Chris Schild The former tommybolin.com site managed by John Herdt. https://johnbeaudin.com/earl-johnson-of-moxy-explains-being-replaced-by-tommy-bolin-on-debut-lp/ http://bordeldorock.blogspot.com/2011/08/moxy-moxy-canadian-hard-rock-1977-flac.html Listener Mail/Comments Comments about the show? Things you'd like us to cover? We'd love to hear from you. Send us an email at info@deeppurplepodcast.com or @ us on Twitter, Facebook, or Instagram.

Ruthless
Ron DeSantis Gets Ruthless

Ruthless

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 39:07


Ron DeSantis and a thousand Floridians join the variety progrum for a major interview in St. Petersburg, FL.

HerbRally | Herbalism | Plant Medicine | Botany | Wildcrafting
Ask an Herbalist with Bob Linde and Renee Crozier

HerbRally | Herbalism | Plant Medicine | Botany | Wildcrafting

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 130:22


Today's episode is with herbalists Bob Linde and Renee Crozier and they're the co-directors of the Traditions School of Herbal Studies based in St. Petersburg, FL.  This audio is from a live video they hosted on social media and graciously allowed HerbRally to share it on the podcast.  Basically, it's just them answering all of your burning questions, hence the ask an herbalist title for the episode.  Big thanks to Bob and Renee for sharing this episode with us!  Learn more about the Traditions School of Herbal Studies Website Facebook Instagram YouTube Thanks for listening! HerbRally www.herbrally.com

The John Batchelor Show
Ukraine: Senior Russian uniforms at NATO. Jeff McCausland @mccauslJ @CBSNews @dickinsoncol

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 13:24


Photo:  Portrait for the article "Mikhail Feodorovich". Military Encyclopedia of Sytin (St. Petersburg, 1911-1915) Ukraine: Senior Russian uniforms at NATO. Jeff McCausland  @mccauslJ @CBSNews @dickinsoncol https://www.ft.com/content/53d64eaa-7303-4321-b09a-6fe0ef5d3272

XYPN Radio
Ep #326: Starting an Equally-Owned Firm with Friends & Transitioning Away from Broker-Dealer

XYPN Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 58:52


Today we hear from the three founders and owners of AVID Planning—a fee-only firm out of St. Petersburg, FL, that opened its doors in 2016. Right out of the gate, Jack, David, and Kevin experienced how much fun running a business can be when you do it alongside friends. The three of them met when they were all working at Edward Jones, had a stint at an independent broker-dealer, and eventually broke out on their own to do things differently. Today, Jack, David, and Kevin talk about what the math looked like as they decided to become truly independent, what it meant to leave the broker-dealer world, and why they are now more fulfilled working as co-owners. They talk about how they structure their business and equity, break down their accountabilities, and how implementing the Money Quotient process has changed the way they work with their clients long term and in what they believe is the fiduciary way. If you're interested in what it's like to start your dream firm with a friend or colleague, then this show is for you. You can find show notes and more information by clicking here: http://www.xyplanningnetwork.com/326

Narativ Live with Zev Shalev (Audio)
Narativ 2022 Premiere: Democracy 911 - Part 1

Narativ Live with Zev Shalev (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 30:32


Premiering one of Narativ TV's big themes of 2022: "Democracy 911". "Laboratories of Autocracy" author David Pepper reveals his strategy for saving our democracy from the clutches of autocrats. Zev Shalev will also give you an update on Madison Cawthorn's wild trip to St. Petersburg that eventually led him to meet his bride and now a divorce. Help us tell the true story of our time through an independent lens. Narativ uses emerging technologies to empower informed action. Support us at https://www.patreon.com/narativ. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Narativ Live with Zev Shalev (Audio)
Narativ 2022 Premiere: Democracy 911 - Part 2

Narativ Live with Zev Shalev (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 34:08


Premiering one of Narativ TV's big themes of 2022: "Democracy 911". "Laboratories of Autocracy" author David Pepper reveals his strategy for saving our democracy from the clutches of autocrats. Zev Shalev will also give you an update on Madison Cawthorn's wild trip to St. Petersburg that eventually led him to meet his bride and now a divorce. Help us tell the true story of our time through an independent lens. Narativ uses emerging technologies to empower informed action. Support us at https://www.patreon.com/narativ. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Real Estate Sessions
Episode 304 – Katie Day, Team Lead, MoveMeToTexas Team, Powered by Real Broker, LLC

The Real Estate Sessions

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 34:46


Real estate is not just grinding content for your online marketing strategies and waiting for people to come knocking on your door. In reality, you have to put in a lot of work and effort to produce engaging materials that resonate with your target market. Joining Bill Risser is https://www.linkedin.com/in/katelynaday/ (Katie Day), Team Lead of http://www.movemetotx.com (MoveMeToTexas), powered by Real Broker, LLC. She looks back on her ups and downs as a college management major who jumped from one business to another until she achieved residential real estate success. Katie talks about how she builds a large following through her YouTube videos, the challenges of marketing in Instagram, and the needed mindset to win now that the real estate competition transcends to digital platforms. --- Katie Day, Team Lead, MoveMeToTexas Team, Powered by Real Broker, LLC Welcome to Episode 304. As always, thank you so much for tuning in and telling a friend. We're going to talk to Katie Day. Katie is the Team Lead of the https://www.movemetotx.com/ (MOVEMETOTX) Team Powered by Real Broker, LLC. We're going to talk to another real operation. I'm excited to chat with Katie. She's doing some great things in the world of technology to help our customers with their marketing and other things. Let's get this thing started. Katie, welcome to the show. Thank you so much for having me. Katie, thanks for being on the show. It's going to be a lot of fun. I'll start at the beginning like I always do. I did some digging, and somehow, I think there's a Florida tie with you. Is it possible that you're a Florida native, or do I have that part of it a little bit wrong? I am not a Florida native. I grew up in Maryland, so I lived there for the first portion of my life through high school. My parents were retiring to Florida when I graduated from high school, so they wanted me down there. When I went to the University of Tampa, toured it, I saw the campus and everything there, I was like, "How could I not go here?" That's where I ended up for college. I live in St. Petersburg, just across The Bay from Tampa, and that University of Tampa campus is spectacular. I think it originally 100 years ago was a hotel. Would you mind sharing your thoughts about that campus and your experience there? The University of Tampa was right on the Hillsborough River. It's an absolutely gorgeous campus and the hotel is now administration buildings, classrooms and stuff like that, but they have these big minarets. It's like the Russian-style architecture minarets. It's a stunning campus. They have Wi-Fi at the pool. It's 30 to 40 minutes from the beach. As an eighteen-year-old that's being told that they are no longer living at home and can do whatever they want, why wouldn't you go live near the beach and have Wi-Fi at the pool? I said it was to study. I never took a computer to the pool, but it was an amazing time. I loved living there. I lived in St. Pete for a little while as well, Orlando, Naples, but as my time in Tampa, especially as a young adult getting out of my parent's home, was an absolute blast. I loved my time in that area of Florida. It probably was the perfect distance away from mom and dad, right? Yeah. They live in Naples. That's where they moved to. I was looking at Florida Gulf Coast, which was like 30 minutes away. I'm like, "That's an unexpected pop-in." Two and a half hours, you've got to put some time and thought into coming to visit. I also looked at the University of Florida and things like that, but that was further away. It was a good happy medium between the two. Being close enough to drive home for the weekend or a meal or two, but far enough away that they weren't popping and I was popping on them on a regular basis. What area of study was your degree in? I got a degree in Management. I didn't know what direction I wanted my life to go in. I knew that business seemed the smart route as far as college...

The John Batchelor Show
1/2: #Kazakhstan: Balancing Russia, China and the future of Central Asia. Frederick Starr, Central Asia Caucasus Institute, American Foreign Policy Council

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 13:17


Photo:  Kazakh sultans with representatives of Russian officials.  St. Petersburg, second half of the 19th century. From the collection of B. L. Modzalevsky 1/2:  #Kazakhstan: Balancing Russia, China and the future of Central Asia. Frederick Starr, Central Asia Caucasus Institute,  American Foreign Policy Council https://www.kazakhstan.com

Narativ Live with Zev Shalev
Narativ 2022 Premiere: Democracy 911 - Part 1

Narativ Live with Zev Shalev

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 33:42


Premiering one of Narativ TV's big themes of 2022: "Democracy 911". "Laboratories of Autocracy" author David Pepper reveals his strategy for saving our democracy from the clutches of autocrats. Zev Shalev will also give you an update on Madison Cawthorn's wild trip to St. Petersburg that eventually led him to meet his bride and now a divorce. Help us tell the true story of our time through an independent lens. Narativ uses emerging technologies to empower informed action. Support us at https://www.patreon.com/narativ.

Narativ Live with Zev Shalev
Narativ 2022 Premiere: Democracy 911 - Part 2

Narativ Live with Zev Shalev

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 32:53


Premiering one of Narativ TV's big themes of 2022: "Democracy 911". "Laboratories of Autocracy" author David Pepper reveals his strategy for saving our democracy from the clutches of autocrats. Zev Shalev will also give you an update on Madison Cawthorn's wild trip to St. Petersburg that eventually led him to meet his bride and now a divorce. Help us tell the true story of our time through an independent lens. Narativ uses emerging technologies to empower informed action. Support us at https://www.patreon.com/narativ.

Microcosmos ChillOut and Ambient
Kaleria Shu — Microcosmos Chillout & Ambient Podcast 083

Microcosmos ChillOut and Ambient

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 55:11


Kaleria is a new name in chillout and psybass music of St. Petersburg. Beautiful and sophisticated, looks like an alien creature, she has an amazing musical flair and includes unique and beautiful compositions in her sets, collecting them in bizarre fantasy stories, combining progressive rhythmic sounds and ancient ethnic motives, paying special attention to tribal and oriental stylistics. Tracklist: 01. Kundalini Project - Water 02. Lil Fish, CloZee - The Lost Voices 03. Pluto Era - Edge of the World 04. Temple Step Project - kamanja 05. Staritsa - Kak Uladilsya Kotok 06. CloZee - Perfect (Of The Trees Remix) 07. Sylph - Labyrinth 08. Emurse - Uncle Iroh 09. Josh Teed, Skysia - Introspection 10. Josh Teed, Lil Fish feat. Gnawbox - Silk Road 11. Josh Teed, Just John - Alive 12. Sylph - Quicksand 13. Savej - One Truth 14. Khanvict - Closer 15. YOY PROJECT - Njord The Garden 16. Skysia - Kailasa 17. Mookee, Skysia, Equanimous - Ensō

Melanie Loves Tampa Bay
Million Dollar Condos on the Horizon | Tampa, Florida Luxury Real Estate

Melanie Loves Tampa Bay

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 15:58


As the Tampa Bay area grows, there are quite a few new condo developments that will be available to new residents in the upcoming years. One of my favorite things about working for Smith & Associates is that we're the exclusive sales brokerage for so many of these luxury projects. Fair warning: this is *not* an episode for those seeking out average priced housing. All of these condominium projects have hefty price tags targeted toward the high-end home buyer. Real estate development companies are focused mainly on downtown St. Petersburg, downtown Tampa, and South Tampa. You can see all of the condos mentioned in the YouTube version: https://youtu.be/I12i3RaTkBM ST. PETERSBURG 400 Central https://www.residences400central.com Saltaire https://saltairestpete.com/ The Nolen https://thenolenstpete.com/ TAMPA Altura https://alturabayshore.com/ Hyde Park House https://www.hydeparkbayshore.com/ The Ritz-Carlton Residences https://theresidencestampa.com/ The Pendry https://www.pendryresidencestampa.com The Edition http://tampaeditionresidences.com Marina Pointe https://marinapointe.com Melanie is a Tampa Bay area Realtor with Smith & Associates. She loves Tampa Bay area area, houses, and helping clients buy and sell real estate. melanielovestampabay.com Email: matkinson@smithandassociates.com Call/text me if you are looking to buy / sell a home in the Tampa Bay area! 813.616.2427 DISCLAIMER: All content provided on melanielovestampabay.com and the Melanie Loves Tampa Bay YouTube channel/social media platforms is for informational/entertainment purposes only. The owner of Melanie Loves Tampa Bay makes no representations as to the accuracy or completeness of any information on this site. Information provided is subject to change.

The Opperman Report
Justice in Taylor McAllister's Death

The Opperman Report

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 74:51


Taylor was 22-years-old when her body was found in an alley off 63rd Avenue in St. Petersburg on December 22, 2016. The medical examiner ruled her death homicide by asphyxiation. No one has been charged for her death. “She deserves justice for what was done to her. We deserve it, her girls deserve it, our family. Someone has to be held accountable one way or another,” said Bill McAllister, Taylor's father. about 1 year ago #death, #ed, #family, #fights, #for, #intaylor, #justice, #mcallister's, #opperman, #report

The Opperman Report'
Justice in Taylor McAllister's Death

The Opperman Report'

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 74:51


Taylor was 22-years-old when her body was found in an alley off 63rd Avenue in St. Petersburg on December 22, 2016. The medical examiner ruled her death homicide by asphyxiation. No one has been charged for her death.“She deserves justice for what was done to her. We deserve it, her girls deserve it, our family. Someone has to be held accountable one way or another,” said Bill McAllister, Taylor's father.about 1 year ago #death, #ed, #family, #fights, #for, #intaylor, #justice, #mcallister's, #opperman, #report

Alaska News Nightly
Alaska News Nightly: Friday, December 31, 2021

Alaska News Nightly

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2022


Searchers find a New Stuyahok man alive after he spent a night stranded outside. Also, how COVID-19 testing is changing as the omicron variant spreads.

The John Batchelor Show
8/8 A Shot to Save the World: The Inside Story of the Life-or-Death Race for a COVID-19 Vaccine, by Gregory Zuckerman Kindle Edition

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2022 4:55


Photo:  The first anti-plague vaccination in St. Petersburg. The picture shows the moment of vaccination by the doctor of medicine V.M. Tylinsky of Khavkin's lymph to the young paramedic Alexander Katkov. Zolotonoshenskoye isolation shelter, St. Petersburg, Russian Empire. September 1, 1910 8/8   A Shot to Save the World: The Inside Story of the Life-or-Death Race for a COVID-19 Vaccine, by  Gregory Zuckerman   Kindle Edition "An inspiring and informative page-turner." –Walter Isaacson Longlisted for the FT/McKinsey Business Book of the Year Award   The authoritative account of the race to produce the vaccines that are saving us all, from the #1 New York Times bestselling author of The Man Who Solved the Market Few were ready when a mysterious respiratory illness emerged in Wuhan, China in January 2020. Politicians, government officials, business leaders, and public-health professionals were unprepared for the most devastating pandemic in a century. Many of the world's biggest drug and vaccine makers were slow to react or couldn't muster an effective response. It was up to a small group of unlikely and untested scientists and executives to save civilization. A French businessman dismissed by many as a fabulist. A Turkish immigrant with little virus experience. A quirky Midwesterner obsessed with insect cells. A Boston scientist employing questionable techniques. A British scientist despised by his peers. Far from the limelight, each had spent years developing innovative vaccine approaches. Their work was met with skepticism and scorn. By 2020, these individuals had little proof of progress. Yet they and their colleagues wanted to be the ones to stop the virus holding the world hostage. They scrambled to turn their life's work into life-saving vaccines in a matter of months, each gunning to make the big breakthrough—and to beat each other for the glory that a vaccine guaranteed. A #1 New York Times bestselling author and award-winning Wall Street Journal investigative journalist lauded for his “bravura storytelling” (Gary Shteyngart) and “first-rate” reporting (The New York Times), Zuckerman takes us inside the top-secret laboratories, corporate clashes, and high-stakes government negotiations that led to effective shots. Deeply reported and endlessly gripping, this is a dazzling, blow-by-blow chronicle of the most consequential scientific breakthrough of our time. It's a story of courage, genius, and heroism. It's also a tale of heated rivalries, unbridled ambitions, crippling insecurities, and unexpected drama. A Shot to Save the World is the story of how science saved the world.

Dakota Datebook
State Librarian Hazel Byrnes

Dakota Datebook

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 3:01


On this date in 1964 the Bismarck Tribune announced that beloved North Dakota State Librarian Hazel Webster Byrnes was resigning to take a job in California. Born in 1886 in Iowa, she graduated from Iowa State Teachers College in 1910 and earned her Master's Degree in adult education from Columbia University. She married Frank Lloyd Byrnes in 1912. After working for teachers colleges in Nebraska and Iowa she became the first librarian at Mayville State College in 1924. Her husband farmed in Petersburg.

Alaska News Nightly
Alaska News Nightly: Thursday, December 30, 2021

Alaska News Nightly

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021


At-home test kits are in demand as COVID cases rise and drive-thru testing sites fill up. Also, a ballot initiative to win state recognition for Alaska's tribes.

Best Of Neurosummit
Best Of The Aware Show with Rev. Temple Hayes: 8 Steps to Stop Dying Every Day – Part 1

Best Of Neurosummit

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 35:49


When did you “die” inside? When someone told you that you weren't good enough? When you buried who you really are for fear that others would disapprove? Or when you gave up your creative dreams to take a “practical” job? You may not have realized you were dying, but you have been dying a little more each day. How can you stop this and start living to your fullest each day?  Today Lisa talks with author Temple Hayes about her new book, “When Did You Die? 8 Steps to Stop Dying Every Day and Start Waking.” Temple is a powerful, dynamic, and energetic presence — a successful author, life coach, motivational speaker, Unity minister, and practicing Shaman.  Rev. Hayes is currently senior minister and CEO of First Unity Campus, a New Thought center in St. Petersburg, Florida.  Info: templehayes.com

Alaska News Nightly
Alaska News Nightly: Wednesday, December 29, 2021

Alaska News Nightly

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021


Record-setting high and low temperatures over the holiday weekend. Also, Lieutenant Governor Kevin Meyer will not seek reelection. And a look at the future of the Alaska Marine Highway System.

Alaska News Nightly
Alaska News Nightly: Tuesday, December 28, 2021

Alaska News Nightly

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021


Record-setting high and low temperatures over the holiday weekend. Also, Lieutenant Governor Kevin Meyer will not seek reelection. And a look at the future of the Alaska Marine Highway System.

WFO Radio Podcast
Flyin Ryan Oehler previews "Joe vs Pro" with Alan Reinhart and Joe Castello

WFO Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 75:23


Flying Ryan previews the "Joe vs Pro" match race this weekend at Showtime Dragstrip in St. Petersburg, Florida. NHRA announcers Alan Reinhart and Joe Castello breakdown the latest NHRA news between Christmas and New Year.

Daily Kos Radio - Kagro in the Morning
Kagro in the Morning - December 28, 2021

Daily Kos Radio - Kagro in the Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 116:15


Listen to our archived episodes: RadioPublic|LibSyn|YouTube Support the show: Patreon|PayPal: 1x or monthly|Square Cash * David Waldman ponders the question of eternity (and fractional divisions thereof) while we traverse this holiday interstice together: Wait. A Russian honeypot was stupid enough to marry Madison Cawthorn? What was she thinking? Cawthorn nervously laughed his way through the alibi for his visa-less visit to an illegal casino near St. Petersburg. Madison remains nervously laughing through this morning. The January 6 committee is wondering why it took Donald Trump 187 minutes to belch out 1 minute and 7 seconds of love for his very special insurrectionists, as it required only 2/3 of that time for Donald to listen to that morning's KITM. Trump reminds us that nobody can legally make him care about anyone. Trump set his 2016 GOP Convention HQ in a Cleveland hotel owned by Ukrainian/Russian mob boss Ihor Kolomoisky. Kolomoisky does own plenty of Cleveland, as well as probably more than a few Clevelanders. Ihor has the corner on Russian language broadcasting in Ukraine, which is the sad truth. There was some grift behind Trump's months-long voter fraud claims too, believe it or not. President Joe Biden is behind a filibuster carve-out for voting rights, if it is absolutely needed, and it is absolutely needed right now. Biden is confirming judges like there's no tomorrow.

Alaska News Nightly
Alaska News Nightly: Monday, December 27, 2021

Alaska News Nightly

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021


A look at the holiday weekend's stormy weather. Also, how the state minimum-wage law is impacting ski season. And a business owner's efforts to support Alaskan farmers.

The Deep Purple Podcast
Episode #141 - The 2021 New Year's Special

The Deep Purple Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 78:50


The Deep Purple Podcast Show Notes Episode #141 December 27, 2021 The 2021 New Year's Special Subscribe at Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Google Podcasts, Overcast, Pocket Casts, Anchor.fm, Breaker, PodBean, RadioPublic, Amazon Music, or search in your favorite podcatcher! How To Support Our Show: Leave us a 5-Star Review on Apple Podcasts Buy Merch at Our Etsy Store! Become a Patron on Patreon Donate on Paypal (Donate one time or click “make this a monthly donation” box) Welcoming Our Newest Patron(s): Raff Kaff - PATRON UPGRADE Upgrading to (and creating) the $3.33 Halfway to Evil Tier! Thanks to Our Executive Level Patrons: Show Update: Nate & John (and assorted patrons and listeners) will be in Florida in February, 2022 for the first two Deep Purple shows in nearly two years! February 10, 2022 - Hollywood, Florida - Hard Rock Live Arena. Tickets: https://www.ticketmaster.com/event/0D005B4FDCAFD529 Meet up: TBD February 12, 2022 - St. Petersburg, Florida - Mahaffey Theater Tickets: https://www.ticketmaster.com/event/0D005B52C1FCD2C9 Meet up: TBD Deep Dive Podcast Network: Deep Dive Podcast Network http://deepdivepodcastnetwork.com/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/deepdivepodnet Highlights From 2021: Predictions and Speculation for 2022: Thanks to Our Core Level Patrons: Thanks To Our Foundation Level Patrons: Listener Mail/Comments Comments about the show? Things you'd like us to cover? We'd love to hear from you. Send us an email at info@deeppurplepodcast.com or @ us on Twitter, Facebook, or Instagram.

Calvary Chapel St. Petersburg

Pastor Ryan Marr concludes our Christmas series: God's Arrival. His three main points were Faith's Disruption, Faith's Object, and A Life of Faith. Join us in person or online Sunday 9am-11am and Wednesday @ 7pm at: https://calvarystp.org/live/​​​​​​​​​​ Follow us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/calvarystp/​​​​ Subscribe to our channel for more content from Calvary Chapel St. Petersburg: https://www.youtube.com/user/calvarychapelstpete Follow Calvary Chapel St. Pete: https://www.instagram.com/calvarystp/ The gospel of Jesus is what produces faith, hope, and love, and is what allows us to be more like Him. Calvary Chapel St. Petersburg exists as a movement of the gospel of Jesus for all people. We are dedicated to advancing this gospel through gospel centered community, teaching, service, and multiplication. --------------------- All messages http://calvarystp.org/messages/ Visit our website http://calvarystp.org/ Follow us on Instagram https://www.instagram.com/calvarystp/ Like us on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/calvarystp/

Alaska News Nightly
Alaska News Nightly: Friday, December 24, 2021

Alaska News Nightly

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2021


A look back at the long fight over the Tongass roadless rule. Also, a shortage of Alaska crab creates challenges for local restaurants.

Alaska News Nightly
Alaska News Nightly: Thursday, December 23, 2021

Alaska News Nightly

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021


For the first time in 45 years, the Coast Guard will get a new icebreaker. Also, what a decline in caribou means for subsistence and sport hunters.

The Sports Rabbi
Episode 256: Maccabi Tel Aviv hoops crisis worsens, Mladen no magician and the rest of the Israeli soccer news on Episode #256

The Sports Rabbi

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 62:49


The Sports Rabbi and Roye Shelem break down Maccabi Tel Aviv's 7th Euroleague loss in a row, this time to Zenit St. Petersburg in dramatic fashion. What will the Yellow & Blue do now? We have the answers.After talking about the basketball we discuss the latest in Israeli soccer from Maccabi Tel Aviv's troubles to Beitar Jerusalem's struggles plus Beer Sheva and Maccabi Haifa's fine play at the top of the table.Subscribe to The Sports Rabbi Show on iTunes, Spotify or Google Podcasts.

Jewelry Journey Podcast
Episode 142 Part 2: The Language of Jewelry: How the Editor in Chief of JCK Finds Inspiration with Editor in Chief JCK, Victoria Gomelsky.

Jewelry Journey Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 31:12


What you'll learn in this episode: The history of JCK and the JCK Show How Victoria identifies trends to highlight in JCK Why the line between women's jewelry and men's jewelry has blurred, especially among younger consumers How travel influences jewelry design The most exciting new designers Victoria has her eye on About Victoria Gomelsky Victoria Gomelsky is editor-in-chief of JCK, a New York City-based jewelry trade publication founded in 1869. Her work has appeared in the New York Times, Robb Report, AFAR, WSJ Magazine, the Hollywood Reporter, Escape, The Sun and Waking Up American: Coming of Age Biculturally, an anthology published by Seal Press. She graduated summa cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa from UCLA with a BA in political science in 1995 and earned her MFA in nonfiction writing from Columbia University in 2002. She specializes in jewelry and watch writing but her greatest love has always been travel — 60 countries and counting. Victoria was born in St. Petersburg, Russia and emigrated to the United States in 1978 with her parents and twin sister, Julia. She divides her time between New York City and Los Angeles. Additional Resources:  Victoria's Website Victoria's Instagram Photos: Victoria Gomelsky watches: Transcript: Victoria Gomelsky, editor in chief of esteemed jewelry trade publication JCK, was bitten by the travel bug during her first-ever trip—when she and her family immigrated to the U.S. from the Soviet Union in the late 1970s. Since then, she's visited more than 60 countries, often traveling to visit jewelry shows and report on jewelry trends. She joined the Jewelry Journey Podcast to talk about how her career in jewelry started with a mysterious online job posting; why Gen Z is changing the way we categorize jewelry; and where to find her favorite jewelry destinations. Read the episode transcript here.   Sharon: Hello, everyone. Welcome to the Jewelry Journey Podcast. This is a two-part Jewelry Journey Podcast. Keep your eyes open for part two, which we'll be posting later this week. Today, our guest is Victoria Gomelsky, editor-in-chief of the well-known industry publication JCK. Victoria is an accomplished writer. She's written about jewelry for the New York Times as well as an extensive list of respected publications. She also covers another of her passions, which is travel. She's had a quite a jewelry journey, as she was born in Russia and has been to more than 60 countries and counting. We'll hear all about her jewelry journey today. Victoria, welcome back to the program. Sharon: I have to ask you, why Las Vegas in July or in June? It's hot then.    Victoria: You know it's hot. It was this year that it was actually pushed back to August, which was so much hotter. It was hard to even fathom. I think the timing is such because it works well for the majors, the majors being the signets and the chain jewelers who really need to plan out their holiday buying much earlier than your average small boutique owner. A lot of it has to do with the schedule that makes sense for the industry. It's Vegas because it's hard to imagine another city that is appropriate for a giant tradeshow—   Sharon: That's true.   Victoria: That's easy to get, that has ample hotel room space. There are certainly smaller conferences that have been around the country. The American Gem Society has its annual conclave in a different city every year, but it's much, much smaller. It's convenience and ease of access, and I've gotten used to it. I don't love Vegas, but it does feel like my year is incomplete without my week at JCK. I've been going since 2000, so it's hard to imagine a year without it.   Sharon: How far in advance are you planning your publications? Are you thinking about the December issue in August?   Victoria: Well, if we had a December issue, yes.    Sharon: If it was an issue online?   Victoria: Online we can pull together pretty quickly. If it's a big feature, we like to plan it at least a month in advance, but so much of online is responding to what's happening in the world. Especially with the pandemic, it was really hard to plan because, as did everybody, we hit those walls where we thought, “This may not be relevant in a month.” Things were so changeable and volatile.    Online has a much different pace, but in terms of the print issue, we'll start planning the issue that heads out the door on the eve of JCK Vegas 2022. It'll probably go out in late May, and we'll probably start thinking about that in January in terms of big picture ideas. Just this morning, I was asked to give a sketch of content for a section on colored stones. It's hard to do that really early. You want to be timely. You want to be thoughtful about what people are thinking and what's happening the world.    Especially if an issue's coming out in the spring, I feel like after the holiday makes the most sense, because the holiday in the jewelry industry, as you can imagine or know, is everything. It's still the bulk of sales. The bulk of news comes out of this fourth quarter. To plan content without knowing how the holidays have gone is going to miss the mark, unless you're planning something general and vague. So, I like to wait until early January to start thinking about what makes sense and what people are talking about, what the news is.   Sharon: In terms of the holidays, since they're around the corner right now, you must have some features that are holiday-related that you think about early on, maybe in September or August.   Victoria: We do. If it's not about the holiday, it's about what people might start thinking about for the holiday. We do a lot of trend coverage on JCK, a lot of specific trend coverage, whether it be men's jewelry or something else. I'm actually working on a series of special report newsletters that go out every Monday in November all around the men's jewelry theme. We've covered colored stones, pearls, bridal. We tackle everything with a slight angle towards the holiday, questions like: Is this worth stocking? What are the trends? What kinds of things might retailers keep in mind as they prepare?    JCK is very much a style and trend publication, but it's also a business publication for people who happen to own jewelry businesses. We do a lot of marketing coverage, technology, social media apps that people need to know that might make them more efficient in their business. You could take jewelry out of a lot of what we cover and put in another field, whether it's fashion or home good or anything, and it might apply in terms of the strategies people might want to use to target customers, what they need to know. We try to cover it from all facets. It's always been a publication for businessowners in the jewelry space, so there's a lot of general business information we try to make sure our readers are aware of.   Sharon: If you're looking at trends, I'm thinking about the non-jewelry person that would go to Vogue or Harper's Bazaar or something like that—I'm dating myself, I realize—who can go online. I still think in terms of putting it online, like everybody else. Tell us about men's jewelry. Are men wearing more jewelry than before?   Victoria: Yes, they really are. It's funny, because I've been 20 years covering jewelry, and every four or five years, I'm either asked to or I initiate a story about the men's jewelry renaissance. There's always been something to say over the last 20 years. I do a lot of freelance writing for the New York Times. I did a piece for the Times about seven years ago, and there was a lot to say. There were a lot of jewelers introducing new men's collections and different takes on the subject, but no time has felt quite as relevant to that topic as now.    I think if you look to some of the most famous pop artists we see today, whether it's Harry Styles or Justin Bieber, the Jonas Brothers, Lil Nas X, any of these pop culture personalities, they are draped in jewelry, and not just any jewelry. A lot of them are draped in pearls, which for many of us are the most feminine gem around. There is this great, very interesting conversation about genderless or gender agnosticism in jewelry. Should we even define jewelry as a men's piece versus a woman's piece? Why not just make jewelry? Maybe it's a little more masculine/minimalist. Maybe it's a little more feminine/elaborate or diamond-set, but let it appeal to who it appeals to. Why do you need to tell people who it's for? It's a conversation.    I also write about watches quite a bit, and it's a conversation the watch world is grappling with, more so this year than any other year. Do we need to tell women that this is a “lady's watch”? Why don't we just market a watch, whether it, again, has feminine design codes or masculine design codes. Let whoever is interested in it buy it. We don't need to tell people what categories they are allowed to be interested in. It's been a very interesting conversation. I think fashion is embroiled in this conversation too, and it's been exciting to see.    When I talk about men's jewelry, I think what happens is that much of the industry still needs these categories because at retail, for example, a retailer might get a bunch of jewelry and they need to know how to merchandise or how to display it. For those kinds of problems, you still want to say, “O.K., well, this is my men's showcase,” but I think slowly things are changing. I don't know if in five years or 10 years, we'll even need those topics anymore. I think we'll just have a showcase of jewels. Again, they might be more minimalist or plainer, and they might appeal to men or women or people who consider themselves nonbinary.    Sharon: That's interesting, especially with watches, because when women wear men's watches, that's a fashion statement today.   Victoria: Very much so. I did a huge piece on female collectors for the Times in early 2020, and all of them wore men's pieces and felt a little grieved that they were being told what a woman's watch is. A woman's watch is a watch worn by a woman; that's it. I think the same might be true for jewelry. A men's jewel is a jewel worn by a man and so on. It's been an interesting thing to see evolve, and certainly there's a lot of momentum behind it. I think we'll slowly see these categories dissolve.   Sharon: There's a lot. I haven't seen men wearing brooches. Some of what you're talking about, to me, still has a way to go.   Victoria: A lot of it is being driven by Gen Z, Millennials, younger generations who look to their style icons like Harry Styles, as I mentioned. They're draped in a feather boa and necklaces. As that generation comes up they're going to age, and they're eventually going to be 30 or 40 and they'll be quite comfortable with jewelry because, 20 years later, they've been wearing it all these decades. But yeah, today, if you ask your average guy if he's going to wear a pearl necklace, I'm sure the answer's no, but I think these things do change. They change quicker than we expect them to. It's so much of what we see and what seems O.K. A lot of men might want to do that or might think they would look good in a pearl necklace.    I keep coming back to it because pearls are, again, the most feminine of gems, at least in terms of the lore we talk about, how we talk about them. Yet you see them on people like the Jonas Brothers or, for that matter, big, beautiful, iced-out Cuban chains. You see those on rappers or on hip hop stars. There is this communication out in the world where if you're just a regular guy and you're cruising through your Instagram and seeing these images, it all says to you, “This is O.K. This is right. Go for it if you're feeling it.” I think there is a lot more leeway in today's society to express yourself the way you want to. I think it's wonderful. It's quite exciting to see those barriers break down and have these conversations. It's been cool to write about.   Sharon: It would be interesting to have this conversation in 20 years. You reminded me of a conversation I had recently with an antique jewelry dealer about cufflinks. I said to her, “Cufflinks? Who wears cufflinks? I'm in Los Angeles.” Well, you're in Los Angeles too. Even the most staid businessperson, you don't see him with a cufflink, ever. I don't know.   Victoria: Maybe about a month ago, my boyfriend and I were invited to the opening of the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures, which just opened in September in the heart of Miracle, right next to LACMA. It was a big gala affair sponsored by Rolex, which is a huge supporter of the Academy and the Oscars and now the museum. It was wonderful; it was like a little Oscars event, except it wasn't televised. It was black-tie glamor. Hollywood glamor was the theme, so my boyfriend rented a tux; he doesn't own one, of course, because we're in L.A. and it's a pandemic. Who needs a tux? But he got a tux, and I was gutted that I didn't have cufflinks for him or that he didn't have his own. He rented some, I think; he had a few shirt studs he was able to get from the rental place, but it was the first time. I thought, “Oh my God, cufflinks!” and we had a wonderful time. It was really exciting to be back in the world in such a fabulous way. It really felt special.   Sharon: I didn't realize it had opened. I was at LACMA, the L.A. County Museum of Art, this weekend and there was a big crowd around the Academy Museum, but I didn't realize it had opened. My antique jewelry dealer friend was also saying that she has collectors who collect antique cufflinks. I thought, “That's interesting.” I didn't know that was a collector's item in some circles, I guess.   Victoria: Yeah, when I think about it, there are a lot of great ones in London. If you ever go through Mayfair or Old Bond Street and you find those antique dealers there—there's Deakin & Francis, an old U.K. firm that specializes in cufflinks. I've never owned any, but now that we're talking about it, I feel I need to buy my partner some.   Sharon: I stopped buying my husband them 20 years ago when they just sat on his dresser not worn. I said, “O.K., I tried.” You're a traveler. You've been to how many countries?   Victoria: I lose track. It depends a little on how you count countries. I think I've counted Macao separately from China, even though it's a special administrative region of Hong Kong. Somewhere around 60. It might be about 61 or 62. A lot of countries I've been to—I mean, I've been to Switzerland at least 20 times, Brazil five times, Russia four times. I keep going back to places even though it's always very exciting to take another country off my list. As I mentioned earlier, I was a backpacker after college. My first trip was to Central America with some girlfriends with backpacks on. We took off for three months. We went to Costa Rica and Panama and Venezuela, and I ended up in the Caribbean for a couple of weeks.    I had already started a little bit of traveling. Initially, we came from Russia as a kid. I think when we left Russia in late 1978 as part of the exodus of Soviet Jews from the Soviet Union, we were allowed to seek asylum in the States. We took this journey via Vienna and then Rome and ended up in Cherry Hill, New Jersey, of all places, because that's where we had an invitation. We had to have a formal invitation because we were political refugees.    I think very early on, even though it was never articulated to me—it was something I felt in my bones—I thought that travel was a way to lead a better life. It was a road to a better life, as it was for us. Early on that knowledge imprinted on me, on my soul. In high school, I started saving money to go to an exchange program in Spain. That was my first real trip outside—I'd gone to Mexico with my family, but I had never traveled outside of that. So, I had the bug. After college, I was always interested in slightly more offbeat places.    One of my favorite places in the whole world—and I dream about going back all time—is India. I love places that still feel like they're not discovered. Clearly, India's very discovered, but it's not as easy to travel there as it might be to go to Europe. I love Europe and Paris and London as much as the next person, but there's always something that feels a little easy in those spots. I love Southeast Asia. I went to Vietnam in the 90s a couple of times. I loved it. I love Malaysia. I love the food there. I love the smells and the culture. I love things that feel different. India couldn't be more different than our lives. A lot of the same people go between the two, between L.A. and India, for example, and you'll find a lot of creature comforts in places like Mumbai. The culture and the heritage and the history, the way of life and the way people look at life is so, so different, and I'm really drawn to that. I like going places that test me a little bit.   Sharon: How do your jewelry and travel intersect? I'm sure you're traveling to the shows like Basle. India must be a great place for jewels. I don't know about the shows there.   Victoria: My first trip to India was for a show. There's a famous show—famous, I guess, depending on the circles you move in—in Mumbai called the India International Jewelry Show. That was my first reason to get to India in 2004. I ended up going back to do some reports on the diamond trade there. Mumbai is a real hub of diamonds, so I was going back to do research and then Jaipur in the north. Rajasthan is famous for its colored-stone industry. There are tons of colored-stone dealers and cutters and jewelers there, including the very famous Gem Palace, which I visited a couple of times.   My most recent trip to India was in 2017 to Jaipur to attend a conference on colored stones. It happened to intersect with a fair I had always wanted to go to called the Pushkar Camel Fair. Nothing to do with jewelry, although of course you see lots of jewelry in India. Jewelry's a ubiquitous thing there. When I went to this conference in Jaipur, my partner ended up meeting me. We spent a few days in Jaipur together, went down to Udaipur, which is a wonderful town in the south of Rajasthan, just stunning in terms of its history and heritage and hotels and palaces. Then we finished off in Pushkar, also in Rajasthan, at this camel fair. My entrée was for jewelry, but I try to explore as much as I can around it.    India's just remarkable. I'm very pleased that jewelry has such a natural and obvious connection to India because anytime I can have a work trip, take me there. Then if I can add on to it, I do. My son is only three—he's not even three; he's three in November, but I'm thinking, “How old does he have to be to go to India? What is too young to take a young, little guy to India?” Maybe when he's seven, hopefully.    Sharon: That's an interesting question. It could be three. There are people who are 33 who won't go because they're too afraid. It's on my list, but you're so adventurous.   Victoria: I wouldn't have pegged myself as the adventurous sort, at least not in high school. I was very type A. I was student body president. I was a cheerleader. I was very on track at least to go to college and who knows what after that, but I never really thought of myself as a risktaker and an adventure seeker. After spending time in Southeast Asia—I went to backpack there in the 90s, through Vietnam and Cambodia and Malaysia and Singapore—it just settled in my bones. I wanted more and more and more. Those places feel adventurous, but once you get there, they're not as challenging—well, they are challenging in that there's a lot of poverty; the heat is oppressive; it's hard sometimes to figure out your way around if the signage isn't clear and you don't speak the language, but I genuinely feel like the world is full of very good people. Maybe a few bad apples in there, but most people are very kind. So, it's easier than it seems.   Sharon: Do you think if somebody is a jewelry designer or looking at the field or profession, that travel would inform what they do?   Victoria: Oh, 100 percent yes. There are some jewelers who very much look to other cultures or travel. I think of Lydia Courteille, who's a Parisian jeweler who does insanely elaborate, beautiful gem-set pieces usually after a trip somewhere. She's done pieces based on the Mayan heritage. I believe she traveled to Guatemala. She's done pieces based on myths from Russia and India, and a lot of her collections really are inspired by travel she's taken.    There's another jeweler who's part Mexican, part French, named Colette. She has incredible jewels, a lot of them takes on various places she's visited. I think if I were a jeweler, I would certainly use travel as a jumping-off point to create a collection. I can't think of anything more evocative than a jewel that reminds you of a place you've been or the color of the ocean. A lot of people go to Greece and create a beautiful blue jewel that reminds them of the Aegean. Why not?    Sharon: I'm thinking of Thierry Vendome, where he goes and finds rusted pieces on his travels and then he'll come back and incorporate them. One piece had a grenade—   Victoria: An exploded grenade.   Sharon: An exploded grenade, yeah. Tell us who we should keep our eyes on, the top three you think of we should keep our eyes on.   Victoria: I just wrote about a jeweler that I only saw in person recently in Las Vegas at the Couture show, but I had Zoomed with them. They are Mumbai-based. It's a company called Studio Renn. It's a husband and wife named Rahul and Roshni Jhaveri, and they create jewelry for art lovers that really does live at the intersection between art and jewelry, philosophy, design. Sometimes you have to talk to them to hear the inspiration, but for example, one of them—they had stumbled across an object on a walk around Lake Tansa, which is a lake on the outskirts of Mumbai. There was this conversation they had about what it means to give something attention. Does that put value on the piece? And for them, it was this exploration of the meaning of value. They took this piece that was an organic object. They didn't tell me what it was. They cast it. They 3D scanned the whole thing and then encased it in precious metal, put rubies inside it in a way that you could only see them if you shone a light on the piece. There was this written source of very layered, complicated but also beautiful jewelry. They're just very interesting. They're really thoughtful.   Sharon: How do you spell Renn?   Victoria: R-e-n-n.   Sharon: I have to say it's the second time this week that somebody has mentioned them as somebody to keep your eye on.   Victoria: Yeah, I was thrilled to speak to them, and I ended up doing a piece for the New York Times on them. An Up Next Profile is what the column is called, because even though they've been around for a few years and they're not brand new, they're obviously new to people in the States. They are exploring this market. They worked a tour for the first time. They're really lovely and interesting and do beautiful work.    Another jeweler that's gotten a ton of attention—I know her pretty well personally. She is a client of a very good friend of mine. Her name is Lauren Harwell Godfrey, and her collection is called Harwell Godfrey. She's gotten a ton of attention over the last year. In fact, I just saw that she was nominated for a GEM Award, which is like the Oscars of the jewelry industry. The ceremony takes place in January in New York. She was nominated in the design category. Really fantastic use of color, lots of interesting motifs that feel very signature to her, lots of geometric work. We ended up commissioning a piece for my mom for her 75th birthday that my dad gifted to her this last summer. it wasn't a super bespoke piece, but there were bespoke elements to it. It was by Harwell Godfrey. She's a really lovely woman, super-talented designer based in Marin in Northern California.   I'll name one more. He's a really interesting guy. He does a ton of work with AI, artificial intelligence, in a way that scares a lot of people that are used to jewelry as this handmade, soulful object. His point is that there's no less soul in it, even though a computer helped to generate an algorithm that created a pattern that he inputs into this machine. His name is Nick Koss. His company is called Volund Jewelry. He's based in Canada and has a very interesting background that I cannot even attempt to encapsulate because it's rich and complicated, but he does really interesting jewelry. A lot of it is using 3D modelling software, AI, but in a thoughtful way. Again, there is lots of meaning baked into the way he sees things. He could talk about it very intelligently. He does custom work. You can go down a real rabbit hole with him. Check him out on Instagram. It's V-o-l-u-n-d.   I have a soft spot for one jeweler because I wrote a whole book on them that was published by Assouline probably six or seven years ago. It's a company called Lotus Arts de Vivre. They're based in Bangkok. They've been around since the early 80s, I want to say. It's a real family business. The patriarch is originally from Germany. He moved to Bangkok in the 60s and fell in love with a woman who had been born in Thailand but was the product of many years of intermarriage. Her grandfather was a Scottish captain who fell in love with a tribeswoman from north Thailand. Her other grandfather was an Englishman who married a woman from Malaysia. So, she was the distillation of generations of inner marriage between European and Asian backgrounds. They have this huge compound in Bangkok, and they have two sons that now help run the business.    They do extraordinary objects in jewelry. They started out as jewelers, but they do everything from home goods to accessories for people's cars. They use a lot of natural materials in addition to the finest gemstones. They use Golconda diamonds or emeralds from the Panjshir Valley in Afghanistan combined with snakeskin and buffalo horn and different woods. They're huge on different exotic woods from across southeast Asia. They find the finest craftspeople across Asia, whether it's lacquer artists from China or Japan to carvers from Indonesia. They will employ those crafts in their work, and it's just stunning.    They used to be with Bergdorf Goodman for many, many years. They are still available in the States. In fact, they won at the recent Couture show for some of their work. So, they're still here and they're everywhere. They have boutiques in different hotels, especially in Asia, like the Peninsula in Hong Kong or Raffles in Singapore. They have a presence, but they're not as well known, I would say, in the States.   Sharon: I'll check them out, especially if you wrote a whole book about them.    Victoria: The family is beyond interesting. It's the von Bueren family. He's a raconteur, somebody who you could listen to for hours. He's very, very interesting and has seen a lot, and their clients are very interesting. They appeal to a lot of high-society people across Asia, so they have these events. They have a space, a showroom, at their factory in Bangkok right on the river, and they host these soirées that are just magnificent.   Sharon: Wow! I'm sure you know all the ins and outs. You can go down a long list of jewelers and manufacturers. You could tell me about all of them. Victoria, thank you so much for being here today. This is so interesting. I'm sure our audience will enjoy hearing what you have to say about JCK since it is such a stalwart. Thank you very much.   Victoria: Thank you, Sharon. This is lovely. Thank you for giving me such an opportunity to talk about myself.   Sharon: So glad to have you.   We will have images posted on the website. You can find us wherever you download your podcasts, and please rate us. Please join us next time, when our guest will be another jewelry industry professional who will share their experience and expertise. Thank you so much for listening.   Thank you again for listening. Please leave us a rating and review so we can help others start their own jewelry journey.  

Alaska News Nightly
Alaska News Nightly: Wednesday, December 22, 2021

Alaska News Nightly

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021


How Anchorage is handling a backlog of domestic violence cases. Also, a tribal government's plans to bring broadband Internet to Southeast. And how e-sports are changing the way students compete at the University of Alaska Fairbanks.

Charlottesville Community Engagement
December 22, 2021: Council seeks floodplain info before Nassau Street rezoning vote; Today is highest one-day COVID count since late January

Charlottesville Community Engagement

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 19:37


There are days in the past and days in the future, but there’s only one day at a time. This edition of Charlottesville Community Engagement is specifically tied to December 22, 2021, a particular 24-hour period filled with equal parts anticipation, dread, potential, and other pensive emotions as the holiday of Christmas approaches. Stay safe! Charlottesville Community Engagement is free to read or listen to and it’s my hope that you’ll sign-up. In today’s edition:Governor-elect Youngkin appoints a veteran banker to serve as his finance secretaryA trade publication names Virginia as having the best business climate in the nationA bridge in western Albemarle is shut down before repairs begin A study is underway on where to locate a train station in the New River ValleyCharlottesville City Council holds first reading on the use of a $5.5 million surplus, defers action on Lewis, Clark and Sacagewea statue and a rezoning on Nassau Street Today’s first Patreon-fueled shout-out: Code for Charlottesville is seeking volunteers with tech, data, design, and research skills to work on community service projects. Founded in September 2019, Code for Charlottesville has worked on projects with the Legal Aid Justice Center, the Charlottesville Fire Department, and the Charlottesville Office of Human Rights. Visit codeforcville.org to learn about those projects. COVID updateThe Virginia Department of Health reports another 5,972 new cases of COVID-19 today, and the percent positivity for PCR has risen to ten percent. Today’s case number is the highest it’s been since the last week of January. The highest one day total of the pandemic to date is 9,914 recorded on January 17. On this day a year ago, there were 3,591 cases reported. A hundred and nine of today’s cases are in the Blue Ridge Health District. Virginia reports another 50 COVID deaths today, with one of those in the Blue Ridge Health District. The University of Virginia will require students, faculty, and staff to receive booster shots in order to be on Grounds next semester. According to a page on the Human Resources website, faculty and staff must get the shot by February 1 if they are eligible. If not, they must demonstrate proof of a shot 30 days after eligibility. Students must upload their proof by February 1. Visit that website for more information. Bridge closureA small bridge in western Albemarle County that carries about 560 vehicles a day has been closed due to significant deterioration. Engineers with the Virginia Department of Transportation have been inspecting the bridge on Burch’s Creek Road across Stockton Creek due to known concerns and have decided to close the road until repairs are made. “VDOT bridge inspectors determined today that its condition was not safe for continued use,” reads the statement. “During the closure, traffic should detour around the bridge from U.S. 250 to Route 824 (Patterson Mill Lane) to Route 688 (Midway Road) and back to Route 689.” Repairs will take place between now and January 7 when the bridge is expected to reopen. Virginia business awardA trade publication that writes about economic development and site selection has named Virginia one of its states of the year. Business Facilities named Virginia, Tennessee, and Massachusetts in their annual contest. Specifically, Virginia was named the Overall Business Climate. Massachusetts was honored with Best Workforce / Educational System. Tennessee was given the Best Dealmaking award. A press release in advance of their next publication states that Virginia was selected “because of the steps many economic development councils in the commonwealth, both local and statewide, are taking to make the area more attractive.” The release cites the state’s low unemployment rate, successful workforce development programs such as the Virginia Talent Acquisition Program and Fast Forward Virginia. According to an article on Virginia Business, Virginia last won this award in 2018. New Finance SecretaryFor the third day in a row, Governor-elect Glenn Youngkin has named a member of his cabinet. Stephen Emery Cummings will be the next Secretary of Finance. Cummings is a veteran of several financial institutions, including a tenure as global head of corporate and investment banking at Wachovia. According to a release, he has recently served as the President and CEO of Mitsubishi UFJ Financial Group. “Steve shares my vision of respecting Virginians’ hard-earned tax dollars and ensuring the Commonwealth’s budget is managed effectively and efficiently, and he has the skill set and leadership qualities that our team needs to make Virginia the best place to live, work, and raise a family,” said Youngkin said in a statement. Yesterday Youngkin announced Caren Merrick will serve as Secretary of Commerce and Trade. Several outlets report that Youngkin founded the nonprofit Virginia Ready Initiative that Merrick  has run since it was formed last summer during the pandemic. On Monday, data consultant Aimee Rogstad Guidera was named Education Secretary. Inauguration Day is January 15.NRV Train StationThe Virginia Passenger Rail Authority has launched a website for a feasibility study for where to locate a train station to serve the New River Valley. Earlier this year, outgoing Governor Ralph Northam announced an agreement with Norfolk Southern to extend passenger service from Roanoke to the valley for the first time since 1979. The state of Virginia will purchase 28.5 miles of track from Norfolk Southern. The feasibility study is examining four locations. A community meeting will be held sometime this winter and an initial survey is available. Go back and listen to the May 6, 2021 installment of this newsletter and podcast to hear a segment from when Northam signed legislation authorizing an authority to raise funds for the future station. (May 6, 2021: Green Business Alliance forms to advance emissions reductions; Northam signs legislation for New River Valley train station)There’s also another study underway to determine if Amtrak service should stop in Bedford. That town is between Roanoke and Lynchburg and on the route of the Northeast Regional service that will eventually be expanded to the New River Valley. You can go back and listen to that, too. (October 30, 2021: DRPT report states Bedford train stop won’t delay freight; a briefing on the hotel industry in Albemarle/Charlottesville)In today’s second Patreon-fueled shout-out: The Plant Northern Piedmont Natives Campaign  an initiative that wants you to grow native plants in yards, farms, public spaces and gardens in the northern Piedmont. Winter is here, but spring isn’t too far away. This is a great time to begin planning for the spring. Native plants provide habitat, food sources for wildlife, ecosystem resiliency in the face of climate change, and clean water.  Start at the Plant Northern Piedmont Natives Facebook page and tell them Lonnie Murray sent you!Public hearing held for FY21 surplus, transfers Council has held the first of two readings and a public hearing on a mandated review of the city’s budget for fiscal year for 2021, which ended on June 30 of this year. There’s a $5.5 million surplus as well as a $6.7 million reserve fund of cash set aside for COVID. The latter was not tapped. Christopher Cullinan is the city’s Finance Director. “The audit has been completed and to close out the city’s financial records for fiscal year 2021, several year-end adjustments require City Council action,” Cullinan said. “These adjustments are to carry over unspent funds from the last fiscal year to the current fiscal year.” Cullinan said one the two main recommendations are to put the COVID reserve into the city’s Capital Improvement Program contingency fund. The other is to put the $5.5 million toward employee compensation. That includes both a bonus and an across-the-board salary increase of six percent for all employees with benefits. “This is a market adjustment that recognizes the need for the city to retain and recruit qualified employees,” Cullinan said. This would happen before the results of a study on compensation is completed. Ashley Marshall is one of two deputy city managers currently running the city. “But what we do know is that the six percent is inadequate to raise us up to where we should be for equitable and appropriate pay,” Marshall said. “So we know that we’re not going to find out later on nine months from now that six percent was too much. That’s not going to be the answer.” Five people spoke at the public hearing.“I just want to say that I would like to see a lot of this money, a good portion of it, be used toward the affordable housing fund to shore that up and get that going toward the goal you indicated previously that you’d like to have ten million dollars [a year],” said Mark Kavit. Both Kimber Hawkey, Martha Smytha and Tanesha Hudson agreed with that position, and said the city should spend money for housing on more than just Charlottesville Redevelopment and Housing Authority. “I think that there’s things the city could also do with purchasing land space and building things themselves as well,” Hudson said. “That’s something that they need to work towards.” Hudson said the cost of living adjustment should also extend to hourly employees as well. Rosia Parker, a newly appointed member of the Charlottesville Redevelopment and Housing Authority, said more of the funding should go to affordable housing, especially for programs to address homeless. “There are a lot of homeless people that are out here,” Parker said. “You see them when you sit in front of City Hall. You see them as you walk up and down the mall. You see them as you drive up and down the different corridors of Charlottesville. Homelessness is a very threatening danger to people’s lives. Mentally, physically and emotionally.” Capital discussionAfter the hearing was closed, outgoing Charlottesville Mayor Nikuyah Walker said she wanted the $6.7 million to be used for a different purpose than putting it in the CIP contingency fund. The next Council will decide how that funding would be used, but Walker will not get a vote. “If we just simply transfer it to the CIP and then we have those asks that are just presented to Council randomly based on whatever’s on the funded or what makes it from the unfunded to the funded list, I don’t think that serves us,” Walker said. Vice Mayor Sena Magill supported the transfer to the CIP due to a long list of capital needs. “Because if we don’t work on some of the basic infrastructure needs of our city as well,” Magill said “That’s where we pay for a lot of the affordable grants is through the CIP and we’re looking at $75 million for just one school.” Cullinan said the idea of a contingency fund is to be ready for unforeseen events or cost over-runs.“I think the the critical thing is that it gives you choices and its cash which is easily accessible and you can make fairly quick decisions as opposed to a bond issue which takes time and effort,” Cullinan said. Council would have to approve any use funds from the CIP contingency. The second reading will be held at the next City Council meeting on January 3. Nassau Street rezoningA proposal to rezone land on the eastern half of Nassau Street in the Belmont neighborhood did not move forward on Monday. Developer Nicole Scro and engineer Justin Shimp are seeking a rezoning from R-2 to R-3 on about a half acre of land. Several members of the public asked Council to deny the request due to the property being located within a floodplain as governed by the Federal Emergency Management Agency. Magill said she wanted more information from staff about the issue. “I am concerned about the floodplain issue and I am concerned about the design that is being submitted in a flood plain,” Magill said Several other buildings have been constructed on that side of the street in recent years including structures built by the Piedmont Community Land Trust. That project received $240,000 in funding from the Charlottesville Affordable Housing Fund. City Councilor Lloyd Snook also said he wanted more information about the floodplain. “We’re not required to act on this tonight,” Snook said. “I would like to defer it and ask the staff to give us real feedback on what the flood danger is. The one thing I don’t want to do is end up saying we’re going to put in affordable housing but we’re going to put it in the floodplain.”In recent years, Shimp successfully petitioned FEMA to lower the elevations shown in the floodplain map by four feet. Tony Edwards is a development services manager in the city’s public works department. The foundation must be above the where FEMA establishes the 100-year floodplain. “This is the basis that we need to use because we follow the same methodology that FEMA provides and this is what’s been approved through FEMA,” Edwards said. James Freas, the city’s director of neighborhood development services, also weighed in.“We know the flood plain legally has been defined where it is now based on the amended flood maps in the process that Mr. Edwards described,” Freas said. “So that’s legally the location of the floodplain and defines the elevation at which the building has to be built. In terms of what can happen in an actual flood? We can be less clear about that. That’s less predictable.” Freas said the question before Council was the appropriate density at the location. By-right structures could be built. One in the 900 block constructed in 2018 is built on stilts to raise it out of the floodplain. Snook wanted more information.“I’d like to have more expertise than I can bring to bear and take a look at it and tell me whether I’m all wet,” Snook said. “Pardon the expression.” Shimp said any further review would prove his assertion that building in the location would be safe. The item will be deferred until the second council meeting in January. Outgoing Mayor Nikuyah Walker said she would have voted against the request. Lewis, Clark, and Sacagawea statue decision deferredCouncil spent nearly an hour and a half discussing the terms on how a statue removed from West Main Street will be treated in the future. Several parties agree that the Lewis and Clark Exploratory Center should receive the statue for its continued display at their location in Darden Towe Park. However, details about how the story of Sacagawea’s involvement were not resolved during the conversation. Center officials and descendants of Sacagawea will continue negotiations. “We are definitely willing to do that,” said Alexandria Searls, the center’s director. “We are invested and no matter what, even without the statue, we want relationships with them. The relationships are more important than the statue. We’re willing to walk from the statue if we have to.” The hiring of the Robert Bobb Group to run the cityAs mentioned at the top of yesterday’s newsletter, Council has hired the Robert Bobb Group to perform the functions of the city manager. Council spent their closed session negotiating with the two firms that responded. Lisa Robertson is the city attorney. “The fact that using an outside firm on a contract basis to provide these types of services, while it’s not the normal manner in which the services are delivered, it’s not unheard of,” Robertson said. “This type of contract has been used on occasion in other places including other places in Virginia.” The contract still has to be finalized after being written up. There was no little discussion of the merits of either proposal. In the resolution, Councilor Hill said “the firm made the best proposal and offer” with regards to price and quality. Walker abstained based on a sense that Council should not vote to award the contract until it is written. Update!According to City Council Clerk Kyna Thomas, Council will not need to vote on the contract as it can be signed by the Mayor. However, Council will interview specific individuals that will be suggested by the firm. There is no public knowledge yet about how much the Robert Bobb Group will be paid. Here are some other news articles about other work the firm has done:Robert Bobb back in business with new venture, Washington Business Journal, December 9, 2011Robert Bobb Group outlines goals for Petersburg, WRIC, October 26, 2016Cash-strapped Petersburg spent about $1 million on turnaround services from Bobb Group, forensic audit, Richmond Times-Dispatch, October 4, 2017 Durham leader calls criticism of consultant a lynching, a charge with political history, Raleigh News and Observer, North Carolina, March 10, 2021Black community questions motives behind some Durham commissioners rejection of minority-owned firm proposal, ABC 11, March 25, 2021Firm being paid $16K a month to provide city with financial services, Rocky Mount Telegram, North Carolina, August 13, 2021Charlottesville hires firm to perform interim city manager duties, Walker and Hill bid farewell, Daily Progress, December 21, 2021Support the program!Special announcement of a continuing promo with Ting! Are you interested in fast internet? Visit this site and enter your address to see if you can get service through Ting. If you decide to proceed to make the switch, you’ll get:Free installationSecond month of Ting service for freeA $75 gift card to the Downtown MallAdditionally, Ting will match your Substack subscription to support Town Crier Productions, the company that produces this newsletter and other community offerings. So, your $5 a month subscription yields $5 for TCP. Your $50 a year subscription yields $50 for TCP! The same goes for a $200 a year subscription! All goes to cover the costs of getting this newsletter out as often as possible. Learn more here! This is a public episode. Get access to private episodes at communityengagement.substack.com/subscribe

Alaska News Nightly
Alaska News Nightly: Tuesday, December 21, 2021

Alaska News Nightly

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021


What we know about the earthquake that shook Southcentral Alaska this afternoon. And how COVID relief funds could help address housing shortages in Western Alaska.

Jewelry Journey Podcast
Episode 142 Part 1: The Language of Jewelry: How the Editor in Chief of JCK Finds Inspiration with Editor in Chief JCK, Victoria Gomelsky.

Jewelry Journey Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 24:30


What you'll learn in this episode: The history of JCK and the JCK Show How Victoria identifies trends to highlight in JCK Why the line between women's jewelry and men's jewelry has blurred, especially among younger consumers How travel influences jewelry design The most exciting new designers Victoria has her eye on About Victoria Gomelsky Victoria Gomelsky is editor-in-chief of JCK, a New York City-based jewelry trade publication founded in 1869. Her work has appeared in the New York Times, Robb Report, AFAR, WSJ Magazine, the Hollywood Reporter, Escape, The Sun and Waking Up American: Coming of Age Biculturally, an anthology published by Seal Press. She graduated summa cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa from UCLA with a BA in political science in 1995 and earned her MFA in nonfiction writing from Columbia University in 2002. She specializes in jewelry and watch writing but her greatest love has always been travel — 60 countries and counting. Victoria was born in St. Petersburg, Russia and emigrated to the United States in 1978 with her parents and twin sister, Julia. She divides her time between New York City and Los Angeles. Additional Resources:  Victoria's Website Victoria's Instagram Photos: Victoria Gomelsky watches: Transcript: Victoria Gomelsky, editor in chief of esteemed jewelry trade publication JCK, was bitten by the travel bug during her first-ever trip—when she and her family immigrated to the U.S. from the Soviet Union in the late 1970s. Since then, she's visited more than 60 countries, often traveling to visit jewelry shows and report on jewelry trends. She joined the Jewelry Journey Podcast to talk about how her career in jewelry started with a mysterious online job posting; why Gen Z is changing the way we categorize jewelry; and where to find her favorite jewelry destinations. Read the episode transcript here.   Sharon: Hello, everyone. Welcome to the Jewelry Journey Podcast. This is a two-part Jewelry Journey Podcast. Keep your eyes open for part two, which we'll be posting later this week. Today, our guest is Victoria Gomelsky, editor-in-chief of the well-known industry publication JCK. Victoria is an accomplished writer. She's written about jewelry for the New York Times as well as an extensive list of respected publications. She also covers another of her passions, which is travel. She's had a quite a jewelry journey, as she was born in Russia and has been to more than 60 countries and counting. We'll hear all about her jewelry journey today. Victoria, welcome to the program.   Victoria: Hi, Sharon. It's so great to be here. Thank you so much.   Sharon: I will go into my normal questions, but my first question is—and it seems like a silly one—but you speak Russian, then?   Victoria: I do. It's actually not that silly. I came here when I was five with a twin sister. We arrived at JFK in December of 1978, pretty much the height of the Cold War. So, my sister and I really did not want to be Russian, as we were five, six years old. We didn't want to be different from our classmates. So, we started speaking quite quickly in English, and that's how my language developed.    I could understand Russian, but in terms of speech, I am not a great speaker. Those are really two different centers in the brain, as I realized. I can be a very good tourist. I can go to St. Petersburg or Moscow, ask for directions, order food at a restaurant, but if you want to have a deep conversation with me about business or anything that requires an extensive vocabulary, it's not going to be me. But I can understand pretty well.   Sharon: It always fascinates me. Did you speak any English when you came here?   Victoria: No, but having a twin sister and being five, you're a little bit of a sponge. I've read that before age seven, if you pick up another language before that age, that's more or less the cutoff. You can learn to speak quite fluently very quickly, and we did. We didn't know any words. We stopped in Vienna on the way out of the Soviet Union, and then we lived outside of Rome for a few months, so I probably picked up some Italian then, too, come to think of it, not that it stuck. But when we got to the States, it all happened very quickly. I really don't remember learning English. It was almost as if I picked it up by osmosis.   Sharon: Wow! It's a great way to learn, in terms of thinking about how it is to learn a language. Your English has solidified in a sense.    Victoria: Exactly.   Sharon: Were you artistic then? Were you already artistic? Do you consider yourself an artistic person?   Victoria: It's a good question. I don't know. I consider myself creative. My sister—again, I have a twin sister; she's really the artist of the family. She's much more visual. She's a graphic designer, an artist. She creates collages and all kinds of things with her hands. I'm not dexterous at all, so my creativity is on the page, what I write and how I see the world. So, I don't consider myself an artist, but I do consider myself a creative.   Sharon: Does she call you up sometimes and say, “What were you thinking about that layout on the page?”   Victoria: Oh yeah, she's super-critical. Trust me, I do not design or do anything around the home that doesn't get her buy-in, because if I don't get her buy-in on it, she'll come over and say, “Oh my God, I can't believe you put that on the wall.” She'll never let me hear the end of it. So, I make sure to get her buy-in on any artistic or design-oriented decision I have to make.   Sharon: She must be a great resource for you in terms of what you do. Did you come to jewelry through writing, or did you have a love of jewelry? How did that work?   Victoria: I came through writing. It was all quite random. I'll share the story because it's really my story; it's my original tale, I guess you would say.   Sharon: It's a journey.   Victoria: My journey. This was the beginning. I was in living in L.A. I was 25. I really wanted to move to New York, and I was too scared to move without a job or without knowing anybody. I really wanted to continue my writing career. I had been a journalist. Even though I majored in poli-sci at UCLA, I had always worked for the Daily Bruin. I had done internships at various news organizations, some of them in the television field; some of them were written publications.    I applied to one MFA program in total, and that was the Columbia University Master of Fine Arts program in their non-fiction writing department, specifically. That's the only school I applied to, because I wanted to move to New York and I wanted to continue writing, and that felt, to me, like the only possible way for me to do that.   I moved to New York in August of 1998, did two years of this Master of Fine Arts program, and then didn't want to leave. I was still working on my thesis and finishing my degree when I started applying for jobs that were in the writing field. Mind you, this was 2000, so it was the very first wave of web jobs. It was Web 1.0. I didn't realize it yet, but it was on the verge of crashing. That crash we had in 2001 was coming, but I didn't see it then. There were a lot of jobs; a lot more jobs than people to fill them.    I happened to go on Monster.com. I'm not sure if it's around anymore. It was a job search site. I had a profile on the site, and I happened to come upon a posting that said, “Luxury goods website seeks writer/editor with two to three years' experience. Click here to forward your profile to this employer.” I had no idea what that meant. It was very vague. At the time, you faxed people your résumé. I guess you could email, but a lot of times it was still faxed. There was just no information at all. It was literally a button. I clicked it and thought, “O.K.” and I forgot about it promptly.   A few days later, I heard from a woman named Lisa at a company called Gemkey.com. I had no idea what that was, but it turns out Gemkey was a startup in the jewelry space. It was meant to be a website where retailers would go on and source their inventory online, which was laughable because 20 years later, that's still something that most retailers don't do. It was way, way, way ahead of its time. It was founded by Fred Mouawad, whose father is Robert Mouawad. Robert Mouawad is a Lebanese businessman who donated a ton of money to GIA. His name graces their campus in Carlsbad. GIA being the Gemological Institute of America.   Sharon: That's why it sounded familiar. I was going, “Where do I know that from?”    Victoria: Yeah. Anyway, Fred was the son. He was an entrepreneur. He was based in Bangkok, and he had this website that had an office in New York. They were looking for some editors to fill out the news section of their site. I was hired as their pearl and watch editor, and I had no idea about either category. I didn't even know pearls were cultured. I really had no language to describe them. I knew what a watch was, but I knew nothing. I could have named Rolex, Cartier maybe, and maybe Timex.    I had been backpacking around the world in the late 90s prior to going to grad school, so I was living very scrappily and was quite frugal. I was in my early 20s, not really in the jewelry scene. One of my first trips was to a pearl farm in Australia to see the Paspaley farm located off the coast of Northern Australia. On the way there, I stopped in Bangkok to visit Fred Mouawad's main headquarters and meet some of my colleagues. On the way out, I stopped in Hong Kong to go to the pearl auctions, and I was hooked. It was a wonderful introduction to the world of jewelry, quite literally the world of jewelry. I had loved travel until then, and here was a way to combine my love of it with a way to explore this new category, this new universe. So, I came to jewelry through writing and then through travel.   Sharon: That must have been so exciting, to be writing about something you found you loved as opposed to—I don't know. I'm trying to think of some of the things I've had to market over the years where it's like, “You've got to be kidding me.”   Victoria: Yes, I think that was one of the things I learned quite early. My job with Gemkey didn't last long because it got bombed not that long after. I think I was employed with them for eight months or so, and then I got laid off because the company was losing money. I ended up getting hired almost right away by National Jeweler, which at the time was close to a hundred-year-old publication. It's still around, not in print form, but it's around in digital form. It was founded, I believe, in 1906. It's really an industry trade like JCK, one of the stalwarts of the business.    I got hired as their gemstone editor. I got to National Jeweler, and I realized the company—National Jeweler at the time was owned by a bigger corporation that owned lots of different publications, everything from the Hollywood Reporter to Billboard Magazine to a publication called Frozen Food News. I realized there are so many different niches in the world, and as a writer, I was grateful I didn't slip into the frozen food world, but the music world is great. If you enter music via Billboard, what a great way to learn about music.   I happened to enter through the trade of jewelry, and that was a wonderful way to get down into the trenches of an industry that is quite esoteric, quite hard to penetrate, and it still is. All these years later, there's still so much to learn about jewelry, but starting out through a trade was the key. When you're a trade reporter, you get to talk to dealers; you go to tradeshows; you learn from a very ground-up level, as opposed to being an editor of Vogue, where you don't get to see the real world. You spend your time in the limelight. You get to see all kinds of topical designers, but you don't always get the nitty-gritty details, that insight into the supply chain and insight into how a gemstone might emerge from the ground and the steps it takes to become a beautiful jewel. That all came through the trade, so I was very grateful to have that experience and the years and years I spent going to the Tucson shows to research the world of gems, to Basle to speak to high-end jewelers in Europe. There were all kinds of events. I have had a very unique perspective on this trade and the world at large through the lens of jewelry.   Sharon: Do you find that writing about jewelry has its own language, in a sense? It's like writing about sports. I couldn't write about sports.   Victoria: Very much so. The lingo takes a long time to understand. People think of jewelry as a very superficial subject. I think people who don't know about jewelry will perhaps think, “Well, it's just a bauble. It's just something you put on to sparkle, to add a little or to show off your status, whatever it is.” But there are so many layers to jewelry, and the way you talk about it gets ever more complicated the more you know.    There's a whole language around diamonds and gemstones and the ways you describe color, not to mention all the ways you talk about the fabrication of jewelry. That's always eluded me a bit. I've been to factories, and I've been to places where jewelry is made, and that still feels like a topic that's difficult for me to access because I don't have a brain to understand mechanics or engineering. When people are sitting there at the bench trying to tell me the steps of the process, I always get a bit lost. It does feel like a very complicated venture, but I have been fortunate enough to see a lot of that.   Sharon: No, I can understand. I was at some design show, and there was a jeweler talking about how much of jewelry is engineering. He was talking about getting the piece to balance, but it's also when you're talking about extrusions when a piece of jewelry is being manufactured.    So, you went into nonfiction. Was that something where you said, “I'm not a fiction writer”?   Victoria: Yeah, pretty much. I love fiction and I love poetry, but it never felt like a natural pursuit for me. I was always interested in telling stories, and the stories that really compelled me or held my attention were always nonfiction. I think we all know that truth is stranger than fiction. We've all had the epiphany many times throughout lives, I'm sure, where we realized that the stories in front of us are as compelling as anything made up.    My entrée into that world was initially through The Daily Bruin, which was a huge college newspaper at UCLA. I learned the basics of being a reporter and a journalist and hunting down sources and doing interviews, but at the same time I didn't love the grind of a daily journalism beat. It was good training, but when I applied to Columbia, I specifically did not apply to the journalism school. I applied to the arts program, to the Master of Fine Arts program, and I was drawn to the writings of, say, a Joan Didion or a Tom Wolfe or polemicists or memoirists—a lot of fiction authors who write beautifully in nonfiction or have beautiful examples of nonfiction in their repertoires. I was drawn to the kind of writing that was true, that was honest, but that still held all the same elements of a good fiction tale. It had characters, dialogue, a plot.    I probably don't do as much of that kind of writing as I hoped I would, or as much as I wish I could, because I'm making a living. I write journalism; I write stories, but in all the stories I write, I really try to spend a lot of time with the people who are my sources and get their stories. I really try to convey a sense of story, even if it's a short piece that's running in a newspaper. I do as best as I can in that limited word space with a storyline.   Sharon: Tell us about your job as editor. Are you pulling together all the departments, like you see on TV editorial meetings?   Victoria: It's a little bittersweet, because JCK—for those of you who aren't familiar, I'll tell you a little bit about what that stands for, because it's a mouthful. JCK goes back to 1869. It wasn't always JCK, which, by the way, stands for Jewelers' Circular Keystone. Jewelers' Circular was a publication in the 30s that merged with another jewelry publication called Keystone. From then on, they were called Jewelers' Circular Keystone, until the 70s when they shortened it to JCK. So, that's what those three initials stand for, but initially, it goes back to 1869 in Maiden Lane, New York, where the fledging jewelry district was growing up. There were watchmakers and jewelers who needed a publication to help them source their materials, help them sell. Various publications formed around them, and they eventually merged and aligned. What we know as JCK today really comes out of Maiden Lane in the 1870s. It's pretty stunning to think about.    I joined the magazine in 2010. I had moved back to Los Angeles after nearly a dozen years in New York because I was ready to move. I moved back in late 2009. I had lost my job with National Jeweler after the financial crisis, and that was fine. I had been there for eight years or so, so it was time to move back to California where I grew up. About six months after I landed back in L.A., I ended up getting asked by a friend of mine who was the publisher of JCK if I'd be willing to take a temporary job with JCK as their editor. They were looking for a new editor. They were looking for somebody in New York, but they needed somebody to get them over the hump of a few issues. I thought, “Great, this is a perfect bridge job as I find my footing back in L.A.”    Well, as it turns out, it was not that hard to manage a publication from L.A. because I knew the industry. I had my contacts. I even knew my colleagues because I had worked with them. They were editors at JCK, but I had met them many years ago, as I was one of their cohorts in the jewelry media space. So, I knew the people I was working with. After six months or so, everybody thought, “Hey, this is actually going pretty well,” so they brought me on full time. Luckily, I had an apartment in Brooklyn Heights that I had sublet out and hadn't gotten rid of, so I was able to come back to New York once a month for about a week. For about six years, I was truly bicoastal, from 2010 to about 2016.   In that time, JCK continued to be—its tagline is “the industry authority.” It's been reporting on this business for so long, and it was exciting. At first, we started out with 10 print issues a year. We had contributors; we had staff writers; we had a whole publishing team. Slowly over the years, that print frequency has shrunk. It became seven issues a year. Then it shrunk down to four print issues a year; mind you, with a robust website and a very strong daily news presence online, but print has always continued to shrink in this environment. As of this year, we went down to one print issue a year. That harried newsroom where people are running around and there are photoshoots happening, that did happen and still does happen, but just not to the frequency and level that you might imagine of a busy magazine publishing schedule.    The good thing is that we're published by a company called Advanced Local that is based at One World Trade Center in New York. Of course, nobody's been in the office for a good long while now, but when we are in the office, it's the same parent company, Condé Nast, so we use the same studios to do our photography. We rely on the same talent in terms of photographers and stylists that Vogue and GQ do. So, we have a really good team of people. They're not directly staffed. They're not members of the JCK staff, but they are people that are available to us.    We have a wonderful creative director, again, somebody who's a freelancer, but works with top magazines, a wonderful photo editor. When we do get back to being in the office, I'll certainly fly out to New York and partake, or at least be a witness to the photoshoots we do for our covers and our jewelry still lifes. But the hectic, frenzied nature of that has certainly calmed down. We do have, like I said, a robust online presence. We have a well-known news director named Rob Bates. He's covered the world of diamonds and jewelry news for 23 years, coming on 30, I think. We're staffed by some of the best in the business, but it definitely is a small, very scrappy operation.    Sharon: So, during Covid, you've been doing this through Zoom, I take it.   Victoria: Yeah, everything is through Zoom. We managed to get a bunch of photoshoots in right at the very beginning of March of 2020 that luckily saved us in terms of what we could produce through 2020. Then we did a photoshoot in May. There was that lull where things were looking pretty promising before the Delta variant, so we were able to do a photoshoot then. Like I said, now we're looking to 2022.    We have a big issue coming out. It always comes out on the eve of the JCK Show. The JCK Show is the big Las Vegas tradeshow. It shares our name. I don't want to get too complicated with this, but the show was founded in 1992 as a spinoff from the magazine. The magazine existed for all these decades, and the team involved thought, “Hey, isn't it time we use our clout in the industry to form a tradeshow?” And so they began this tradeshow in Las Vegas that then grew to be such a big presence in such an important industry meeting place that the tradeshow ended up being bought by different exhibition companies, and it eventually landed with Reed Exhibitions, which is a big company headquartered in the U.K. with U.S. headquarters in Connecticut. They run a lot of tradeshows and exhibitions, and they ended up buying the magazine and then hiring a different company to publish it. That may be more than your listeners want to hear. It's kind of complicated, but the point is we are related to JCK, this big tradeshow, but we're also an independent editorial voice, so we aren't bound to only write about JCK.   Sharon: That's interesting. What about Couture, which is part of the JCK Show, isn't it?   Victoria: It's a separate company. In fact, National Jeweler, when I worked there, was owned by the company that—it's gone through many iterations. The company that runs Couture is called Emerald Exhibitions, and they're headquartered in New York. That was the company that owned National Jeweler at some point. There's a lot of overlapping relationships in this world. Couture and JCK are separate companies, separate entities, but they happen at the same time in Las Vegas to make it easy for members of the jewelry industry to shop the shows.    There are different points of view. Couture is very much focused on couture-level, high-end designer jewelry. JCK has that, but it also has everything else you might imagine, everything from packing to loose diamonds, loose gemstones, dealers from Hong Kong, Turkey, China when the Chinese are able to visit. JCK is much more a mass marketplace for the entire industry, and Couture is much more focused on high-end design. They're complementary and I love going to both. 

Alaska News Nightly
Alaska News Nightly: Monday, December 20, 2021

Alaska News Nightly

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021


What the infrastructure bill means for airports across the state. Also, melting ice could reveal new ecosystems over the next several decades. And a new approach for ending homelessness in Nome.

The Deep Purple Podcast
Episode #140 - The Deep Purple Christmas Special (2021)

The Deep Purple Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 100:07


The Deep Purple Podcast Show Notes Episode #140 November 29, 2021 The 2021 Christmas Special Subscribe at Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Google Podcasts, Overcast, Pocket Casts, Anchor.fm, Breaker, PodBean, RadioPublic, Amazon Music, or search in your favorite podcatcher! How To Support Our Show: Leave us a 5-Star Review on Apple Podcasts Buy Merch at Our Etsy Store! Become a Patron on Patreon Donate on Paypal (Donate one time or click “make this a monthly donation” box) Thanks to Our Executive Level Patrons: A Christmas Message from a Patron's Family: Show Update: Nate & John (and assorted patrons and listeners) will be in Florida in February, 2022 for the first two Deep Purple shows in nearly two years! February 10, 2022 - Hollywood, Florida - Hard Rock Live Arena. Tickets: https://www.ticketmaster.com/event/0D005B4FDCAFD529 Meet up: TBD February 12, 2022 - St. Petersburg, Florida - Mahaffey Theater Tickets: https://www.ticketmaster.com/event/0D005B52C1FCD2C9 Meet up: TBD A gift from Merry England Jerry Bloom sends Issue #35 of “More Black Than Purple.” Deep Dive Podcast Network: Deep Dive Podcast Network http://deepdivepodcastnetwork.com/ Nate to John Satellite link - thankfully due to spotty internet at cabin Invited the whole Deep Dive Podcast crew over for Christmas party Bad winter storm Let's see how it is out there Hang tight and see if any messages trickle in Greetings from our Deep Dive Podcast Brethren: Scott Haskin of The Magician's Podcast BLACKMORE'S NIGHT - Hark the Herald Angels Sing / O Come All Ye Faithful (Live from Minstrel Hall) Christmas drink of choice Ry of Sabbath Bloody Podcast and North by South Glenn Hughes - O' Holy Night Favorite Christmas album George of Metal Gods Podcast Tom of Metal Gods Podcast Raskasta Joulua - The First Noel feat. Joe Lynn Turner (Live Hartwall Arena 2017) OFFICIAL Favorite Christmas movie Clay of Skynyrd Reconsydyrd and North by South Christmas 1974 feat. Bernie Marsden - by The Circuit Symphony Thanks to Our Core Level Patrons: Terry “T-Bone” Mathley of T-Bone's Prime Cuts on the Other Side Cartier: A Celebration of Love What are you doing Christmas Eve/Day Ben and Sam of Universally Speaking: The Red Hot Chili Peppers Podcast Eddie Hardin Band - Peace Must Come Again Invite was sent to Jon “Douglas” Mottola! Least favorite Christmas song? Matt from the Hawkbinge Podcast Ritchie Blackmore playing Jingle Bells Least favorite Christmas movie? Erik and Jonatan from Maiden A-Z Joy To The World - Steve Morse Do you hear sleigh bells? Nick from Pod of Thunder Rockin' Around The Xmas Tree Featuring Joe Lynn Turner, Bruce Kulick, Bob Kulick, Rudy Sarzo, and Simon Wright. Thanks To Our Foundation Level Patrons: Well, it looks like I'm on my own. Listener Mail/Comments Comments about the show? Things you'd like us to cover? We'd love to hear from you. Send us an email at info@deeppurplepodcast.com or @ us on Twitter, Facebook, or Instagram.

Alaska News Nightly
Alaska News Nightly: Friday, December 17, 2021

Alaska News Nightly

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 18, 2021


A proposal to cut back on the per diems paid to Juneau legislators. Also, how real estate donations keep the capital right where it is. And private vessels could help supply communities in Southeast.

Alaska News Nightly
Alaska News Nightly: Thursday, December 16, 2021

Alaska News Nightly

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021


St. George struggles with fuel, power and water shortages in the dead of winter. And how genetic genealogy is solving cold case murders in Alaska.

History Goes Bump Podcast
Ep. 414 - Haunted Petersburg, Virginia

History Goes Bump Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 37:58


Petersburg, Virginia is about 21 miles south of Richmond. Not many people know that this city has been thought of as the graveyard of the Confederacy. Anyone who has seen the movie Cold Mountain is familiar with the horrific scene of Union soldiers being slaughtered in a pit that is surrounded by the Confederates. That really happened. And Petersburg was the scene. The town still carries the residual energy from that moment in history. Join us as we explore the history and hauntings of Petersburg, Virginia! The Moment in Oddity features the Highest Court in the Land and This Month in History features the Dissolving Bathing Suits Hoax. Both were suggested by John Michaels. Check out the website: http://historygoesbump.com Show notes can be found here: https://historygoesbump.blogspot.com/2021/12/hgb-ep-414-haunted-petersburg-virginia.html Become an Executive Producer: http://patreon.com/historygoesbump Music used in this episode: Main Theme: Lurking in the Dark by Muse Music with Groove Studios (Moment in Oddity) Vanishing by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/4578-vanishing License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license (This Month in History) In Your Arms by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/3906-in-your-arms License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license Outro Music: Happy Fun Punk by Muse Music with Groove Studios All other music licensing: PODCASTMUSIC.COM License Synchronization, Mechanical, Master Use and Performance Direct License for a Single Podcast Series under current monthly subscription.

Marked Safe: A Disaster Podcast
Sweet Summer Scientist: Spontaneous Human Combustion

Marked Safe: A Disaster Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 47:30


SHOW NOTESThis week, we break some news too terrible even for a bat dress, two yummy sandwiches go head to head, Melanie adds to the Quicksand Irrational Fears Hall of Fame and gets aggressive about pancakes.Content warnings: second trimester loss, grief, funeral planning, death by burning, alcoholism, animal experimentation.Links:06 Jul 1951, 1208 Jun 1805, 313 Jan 1819, 215 Feb 1828, 120 Apr 1822, 231 Oct 2019, T6A fire withinBurn, Baby, Burn: Understanding the Wick EffectDeath of Michael Faherty'First Irish case' of death by spontaneous combustionHOT TOPIC Spontaneous human combustion is REAL and burns you ‘like an incendiary bomb', top scientist claimsIs spontaneous human combustion real?New light on human torch mysterySpontaneous combustion in St. Petersburg? The curious case of Mary Reeser. Spontaneous human combustionSpontaneous Human Combustion: Facts & TheoriesTemperance movementThe Anatomy of Drunkenness

Ringer FC
Suffering, in the Champions League, Is Necessary | Stadio Podcast

Ringer FC

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 54:02


Musa and Ryan begin by recapping Wednesday night's Women's Champions League results (04:45), before getting into the final round of the men's group stages. They start in Porto, where Atleti ended up victorious in a fiery encounter that saw three red cards (06:33), then talk PSG, Man City, and Chelsea's wild result in St. Petersburg (15:16), and round up some key points from the final match day before letting the questions guide them. They talk which is more tasty, the Europa League or Champions League knockout stages (25:31), how far Ajax can go (27:23), Chelsea's defensive wobble (31:24), Manchester United being a dark horse (33:03), Red Bull Salzburg outshining their Leipzig counterparts (35:17), and much more. Hosts: Musa Okwonga and Ryan Hunn Producer: Ryan Hunn Additional Production Assistance: Isaiah Blakely Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Men In Blazers
Men in Blazers 12/08/21: Spotify Greenroom Live Pod

Men In Blazers

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 59:13


Rog and Davo go deep on the Demarai Gray winner heard 'round the world in Everton's 2 - 1 victory over Arsenal. Plus, Chelsea allow three goals for the second straight game against Zenit St. Petersburg. And LIVE GFOP Q&As.

True Crime Binge
62: Lauren Samples

True Crime Binge

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 42:41


In this week's episode, Bob sits down with one of the hosts of the “Paradise After Dark” podcast, Lauren Samples. A Florida native, Lauren hosts the show with her husband, Ken, where they tell the stories of what happens in “paradise” after the sun goes down. Bob and Lauren discuss her background as a Navy police officer, exchange quotes from “King of the Hill,” and laud the impressive research skills of True Crime Binge's Production Manager. They then discuss the case of Taylor McAllister. In December 2016, Taylor's murdered body was found in an alley in St. Petersburg, Florida. Quickly, three men were implicated in the case, including Taylor's boyfriend at the time, though all three deny having anything to do with her death. Originally covered in a three-part series on “Paradise After Dark,” Taylor's case eventually went cold and, to this day, no charges have been brought in relation to her murder. To suggest a guest or request an interview, please visit us at TrueCrimeBinge.com   Follow us on all forms of social media @TrueCrimeBinge   Today's Sponsors: betterhelp.com/binge - Get 10% off your first month.  zocdoc.com/binge - Download the Zocdoc App to sign-up for free and book a top-rated doctor.