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Gut Check Project
Brain.FM Dan Clark & Kevin Woods, #64

Gut Check Project

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 79:02


Eric Rieger  0:00  Hello gut check project fans and KB MD health family, I hope that you are having a great day. It is now time for a new gut check project episode and guess what? Brain FM is in the house. That's right. Brain FM ceo dan Clark and chief scientist, Kevin Woods. Join us on the show today to talk about an incredible application of sound improving your life solving anxiety, sleep issues. Focus just an incredible tool that I can personally say I've used now for well over a year so as my family so as kids who has kids family, and so have several of our patients, they love brain FM so I don't want to spoil a single thing is an awesome, awesome episode. So let's get to our sponsors and get straight to talking to Dan and Kevin. We of course are always sponsored by atrantil. My co host Kenneth brown discovered, formulated and created atrantil to give to his patients to solve issues that are similar to IBS to give them all the polyphenols that they need for their daily lives whether they be athletes or they have gut issues or they just want to stay healthy. Go to love my tummy.com That's love my tummy.com Pick up your daily poly phenols today and of course unrefined bakery, let me just say some unrefined bakery. My wife is gluten free eater. She's got celiac disease. So I stopped by there and I picked up from unrefined bakery for my wife's birthday. I nice pumpkin pie. It was delicious. You would have no idea that was a gluten free product. It just tastes like awesome pumpkin pie. So go to unrefined bakery.com If you've never ordered from there before use code gut check and save 20% off your entire first order they deliver to any of the connected 48 and or you can you can just stop by go to unrefined bakery.com If you happen to be in the north Texas Metroplex area, and I think they have four locations. So just check them out and they got awesome stuff cupcakes, breads, various snacks that otherwise you may think I have to remain keto or I have to remain gluten free now. I can't have these awesome foods. That's just not true. Check out unrefined bakery.com today use code gut check for 20% off and last but not least go to KB MD health.com. And soon we will be featuring the signature package of course which includes atrantil CBD and of course you can also get not only CBD and atrantil there you can also pick up so if you're feigns That's right, Brock elite and broccoli pro exclusively available from physicians and guess what my co host he's a physician so we get to sell it and we bring it to a cost that you can't get anywhere else. So check out KB MD health.com Today Alright, let's get to some brain FM right now.Hello Gacek project fans and KB indie Hill family welcome to episode number 64. I'm your host Eric Rinker, joined by my awesome co host, Dr. Kenneth Brown. And honestly you got a an awesome intro to make here for everybody.Ken Brown  3:52  Yeah, so we're super excited. This is something I'm extremely passionate about because we have the CEO and the lead scientist for a product that I believe in. I love I have my patients use. I have my staff use I have all my family use, and it is called Brain FM, this if you have any trouble focusing if you have any trouble sleeping, if you have any trouble with anxiety, there is a really, really cool way to correct this. And we've got the owner and CEO, Dan Clark here, and Kevin JP woods, Ph. D. Super smart, and they're going to explain to us why well quite honestly why it's so effective on me why it's so effective on my patients. And one of the most exciting things we've been trying to do this for quite a while now pre pandemic, we realised Eric and I realised that when we tried this on a few patients at the endoscopy suite, not only did patients have a better experience, they were calm going into it. They woke up quicker and almost you vigorously every patient loved without question. And so I'm so excited because they're here in town visiting from New York because we're going to end up actually doing an official study where I think it's going to be groundbreaking. I think we're going to be able to change how people feel about outpatient procedures like colonoscopies decrease the anxiety. And it's not just anecdotal. It's because there's science behind it. There is a growing movement with this, and I am just absolutely thrilled episode 64 is probably going to be our biggest episode, ever to date.Eric Rieger  5:33  I would imagine so and I don't want to take away time from you all feeding in but just so that y'all know, this is 20 months in the making, I mean, Coronavirus, COVID hit, and derailed all of our effort to really we should, we should be 20 months further down the road of actually implementing this. And it's really for patient benefit, which is what we talk about here all the time. This will enhance the experience, I believe, for people who come through and have procedures. So, Dan, Kevin JP, what's happening?Unknown Speaker  6:02  Yeah, glad to be here. Thanks for having us.Eric Rieger  6:04  Well, thanks for coming all the way down to Texas. How's Dallas, amazing, amazing. NotUnknown Speaker  6:09  my first time in Texas, everything is enormous. The streets are three times as wide as they are in New York. I tried across the street, and I just keep on walking. Keep on walking.Eric Rieger  6:19  Well, awesome. So yesterday was your first time to join us at the GI suite? And for honestly, I don't want to steal anything. But what was your impression that you thought you might see on an application of your technology? And then how do you see it fitting in kind of how Ken and I have been trying to experience it ourselves?Unknown Speaker  6:39  Yeah, sure. So first, let's maybe tell everyone what the technology is. And then we can talk about how we jumped in and started this whole process. The backstory is actually interesting. So basically, brain FM, we make functional music designed to help people focus, relax, or sleep better. And mostly, we have a consumer product, where we have 2 million people that use us to jump into focus or switch into relax, or help them sleep. And we've been having really great success there. We have papers and some things in review in nature, which we're really excited about. So it's evidence and science backed. There's some really novel ways which we use music to basically switch you into that state. And I'll let Kevin, jump into that maybe come back to that and some of the science. But what's interesting is while we're chugging ahead on that, what my girlfriend actually she starts going to get a tonsillectomy. And she's signs her life to me, we're dating for six months, I now know we're in a serious relationship. And, and I realised that I'm terrified, and I'm not even getting surgery. And she's very scared. She's never been under before. And I realised at that point that we can use the same things that we're using science to advance on our consumer angle, we can use it in relax in a medical grade setting. Remember calling up Kevin and saying, Hey, can we do anything? And he starts looking at the literature, he starts looking at other things. He goes, Yes, I actually think we can improve it a lot. I pitched that to you guys. When we met. Yeah, like I think we met probably three months later. Just a coincidence. And you'd love the idea. And that's when we became here. So it's really cool. It's been definitely long time in the making. But it was amazing. When we were doing it some some yesterday. And then one gentleman woke up. And he was so he was so he was almost emotional. He was so happy. He's like, every single time I wake up, this is like the worst or most traumatic thing that can happen. And I was using this music and I woke up. And it was it was it was fine.Unknown Speaker  8:46  And I've done this several times before without music. Yeah.Unknown Speaker  8:49  And that's the thing that we're trying to do is how do we help people relax into surgery, and then wake up, non groggy alert, and in being able to get on with their lives without, you know, making this traumatic, because a lot of people are so scared. And I know for me personally, it was really cool to see you guys doing the art form that you have, because I was able to see that it isn't scary. There's this there's this almost like divider between people that are non medical and medical have and for being able to cross over it and bring a bridge, using some of our music, I think is really what we're set up to do.Eric Rieger  9:27  So it's interesting that that, honestly, it was really awesome. I think that the first person that y'all got to see feedback from was somebody who was so engaged and immediately wanted to tell you all about it. And I only just want to just so the audience understands exactly what Dan's describing because it was awesome. So kid, I saw this multiple times before they even got here when we use brain FM as an experiment, but essentially this particular patient, he wasn't high high anxieties per se for him his singular case, but he had a history of waking up erratic very emotional, hard to console, not very comfortable in his surroundings as he was emerging. He even told you all, he feared how he was going to wake up. Yeah. How would you describe that you saw him wake up.Unknown Speaker  10:12  My goodness, he was he was happy. He looked straight in the eyes. And he thanked us on a personal level. And that meant so much. And just knowing that he had those prior experiences, and that he saw such an enormous difference, and I remember him saying, How can I recommend this to people? How can I tell people? Whoa, hold up, we're not ready for that quite yet. But yeah, he was ready to tell the world he was just so excited. And theEric Rieger  10:38  credit, the greatest thing is, it's non invasive, meaning that I don't have to inject a new drug brand doesn't have to use a new scope tip or something new, gigantic piece of equipment. I mean, this is something that we can apply. It's practical. And it's gave us real results in appreciable results. AndUnknown Speaker  10:57  it's enjoyable to absolutely. And that's the thing about music is it is familiar to people, they understand it. And yet we have this music with a scientific twist on it. Right? We have a dive into the science later. But you know, it's not exactly the music that you know, but it still is entertaining and fun to listen to. And as something that can distract you, while you're you know, lying there maybe worrying about the procedure you're about to undergo. So, you know, it's art and science coming together in a really special way. Yeah,Unknown Speaker  11:25  yeah. And I think what's cool about it is, to Kevin's point, people for 1000s of years have always used music, right to be able to control their environment, right. And, you know, there's been people that have tried with this in medical settings. But it's, it's always lacking some of the results, some of the things that are proven in science that this can make a better experience, what we're really trying to do is combine both worlds between, you know, auditory neuroscience with Kevin's background, and with a product that can be brought into these experiences that isn't, is more than a placebo. It's something that is shown to have an effect, and it makes everything better. So it's a win for the patient. It's a win for the the clinic, it's a win for everyone involved, because everything just becomes a little bit easier with something that everyone's already used to, which is music.Eric Rieger  12:20  Again, I know that whenever you've had to had conversations with patients before they come in for their very first colonoscopy, the level of fear and anxiety for somebody who simply has never even endured a procedure before it can be very real, and oftentimes occupies a lot of the time in the clinic for either you or Megan, or one of the nurses or the MA's to really kind of talk them off the ledge. So what have you seen incorporating something like brain FM so far?Ken Brown  12:46  Alright, so my personal experience, before we even get to the patients, I would say that, but what I really liked is that my day begins. Every every morning, I start my day, I switch from the evening brain FM sleep, because I go to sleep with it. So my day begins was switching it to focus. I come down, I do my French press, which I say French press because Eric gifted me this French class, he's like, dude, quit, quit using drip coffee. It's like French press is the way to go. That's why boil the water, I have my brain FM on, I'm in the focus mode, I put that in focus, because I know within five minutes that my brain is ready to really do this, I'm put the coffee on. I do the French press fire up the computer. And then I start looking at my chart. So within 15 minutes, I am literally ready to roll. Because there's a lot of stuff I have to do. I then go to work to go work out, do whatever I do in my day. And then when I come home, then my wife and kids know this. And everybody has. We all use brain FM we all use it for the exact same things. My kids use it to study, I use it to get my day going, and I use it to put myself down. So I'm such a big believer. And then when we had our first what 30 People that we did at the endo centre, yeah. It's very easy to say, hey, trust me on this. I've experimented with it. All my employees use it. I use it, my family uses it. And what, just like you said being on the other side of this medical experience, even will today Nasreen was talking to these guys. And she said, even though I've scheduled 10s of 1000s of these when it was my turn to do it, I was nervous. And we gave her brain FM to do and she said to you guys, that immediately I calmed down. And now she's had several different procedures since then, and she doesn't care at all. She's like, I know, I'm gonna get in there. I know, I'm gonna wear this, I'm going to calm down. I know I'm gonna go to sleep, and I'm going to wake up and it's going to be refreshing and I'm going to feel good. So she can now tell my patients that she's like, Don't worry about a thing. Because one of the things that really and you and I talk about this all the time and we've had several podcasts, colon cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Colon cancer comes from colon polyps, we have a cure. And you saw that yesterday you are with us, we have a cure. So you and I have this urgency that if you're anxious about having a done, if you're scared, if you know somebody that had colon cancer, if you know somebody that complained about their colonoscopy, anything to get you into the clinic to get those polyps removed, because it saves your life. So now, when we have this opportunity to offer something, to make it a more, a more pleasant experience, not only more pleasant, because we're going to get into the site, we keep saying we're going to get into the science because that's coming the thing, that's the coolest thing. And I'm I want to thank both envision healthcare and and search, that they're being open minded about this. I'm really excited to get all my partners in G IA, looking at this, because I really kind of feel like this is a win win win win. We spoke with Dr. Ackerman, who's been co host, multiple, multiple times, when we spoke with Dr. Ackerman. He said it he's like, yeah, he's like, you just it's it's a no brainer, it's zero risk, potentially might help. And this is somebody who hasn't used it yet. When he realises he's like, Oh, when I said potential, I should have changed that word. He's like, it'll help. And that's what we're gonna end up trying to figure out. So what I love about it is it is just a way to say, look, get it done. Any worries you have, I'm gonna take one layer of that away, the second you show up. And that's what I'm excited about. Because ultimately, it's just a way, if you're worried about it, just make the appointment. We'll handle everything else. Yeah,Unknown Speaker  16:45  I think it's it's interesting, too, because a lot of people that at least from my experience, right, the first time you're going to something like this, you focus on these negative thoughts. So you're trying to push out of your head by using music, which we're used to. And again, we'll get on the science last time we hear that, but it's something that we can focus on something else. So instead of the fears or something else, we can focus on the music that we're listening to, and know that we're in really good hands at a centre that's willing to invest in technology, and try new things. For better patient experience.Ken Brown  17:20  I would like to just comment on that right there a centre that's willing to invest in technology. You're exactly right. Because when you've been meeting with people, they're saying, you know, we would like to be the Apple version of delivering health care like this.Unknown Speaker  17:33  Yeah. I mean, well, it's interesting, because if you look at Apple, right, why, why do people want to be Apple, it's because they do things more, they're not the first to do things always. But the first to do things extremely well and extremely thought through. So they take their time. They they're not, you know, first to market sometimes, but other times they are and they when they are they're the dominant factor. And I think it comes down to really finding solutions that truly do work that truly do make a difference. And that are long term solutions rather than the not right. And when we're talking to other people that are looking to be the apple of healthcare, it does take an investment, it does take a chance, like a leap of faith into trying something new. But I think that the the return on that are exponential in patient satisfaction and repeat visitors, people that are actually showing up for appointments because they're less scared because we have a solution for that. But but more with with all the other things that we're learning on as byproducts like efficiency and helping so that's the stuff that we're really exciting, because it's still focused on patient experience first, but there's so many other things that come from patient experience being better. Let meKen Brown  18:49  get your take on this real quick. Since you guys did see this from the other side. Yeah, you saw what happens with me and my partners with the staff with the camaraderie how everyone there really is there for one ultimate goal and that's to take care of people to help in any way we can, meaning that we can fix diseases. I just want your take on the how the patients felt and where they came through. And certainly when we started using the technology, because people do need to hear it's easy for a doctor to say oh go go get this done because you should but I love that you're like this is the first time I've seen this and it's it's it's beautiful to watch how you guys as a team. Yeah, everyone.Unknown Speaker  19:32  Well, I think it really comes shines through that that's true and everyone it has a great teamwork. I went from my perspective, it looks like everyone's there because they're like we have to be a players because we're saving people's lives. And that comes in from the RNs that we saw from the people in the lobby from from how you guys are showing up and and giving great bedside manner joking around everyone's having a good time. because you guys are in a great line of work where you're, again, saving people's lives, and even just talking to some of the the nurses there in our ends, you know, they're not just trying to make the experience where they're processing people, I thought that was really great. Where it's not like, oh, let's get this person with an IV and all these other things as fast as possible. It's like, no, like, Okay, you're sensitive, you've never gotten a needle or an IV or whatever. Let me figure out how to make it. So it's less obtrusive, or less intense. And I thought that was really great. And that's when why we're so excited. We're trying to say, hey, we're gonna add this brain FM thing into it. And they're like, that's gonna make our job even easier. And that was, that was really fun to say,Eric Rieger  20:43  I love the fact that that's what you said, because what I see brain FM being, I know that it's for the patient, but truly, the person who's going to see the benefit repeatedly is going to be the nurse who's already trying to be exactly what you said, to make sure that it's not a cattle call for the GI centre, or really any surgery centre. Yep, that wants to be appealing to the patient, but at the same time, allow their staff to all be really really good at not everybody is great at talking or, or joking appropriately with a patient and make them come down at ease. But if you could have something that was somewhat of an equaliser, yes, yes, that's been proven and tested, etc. That looks to me like something like brain FM could easily fit that mould really decreasing the burden on the staff that's checking.Unknown Speaker  21:31  Absolutely. And we were talking earlier about the fellows that we saw yesterday that had this great experience coming out and said that, you know, in previous cases, that he'd come out crying and distress and you think, not only the stress on him, but the stress on the nurses that would have to, you know, deal with them in that situation and calming down, and how that loads day after day on nurses that have to deal with that. Right. And, you know, to be able to relieve some of that burden is just absolutely enormous. And by the way, and what I saw at the centre yesterday was, you know, not only the nurses clearly care about people, but also just extremely efficient, and how quick the process was people with people going through, you know, and I had never been to a GI centre like that before, did not know what to expect. We were struck out. Yeah, how fast the whole thing was, it was amazing.Unknown Speaker  22:17  Yeah, I think investing, you know, in something like this is investing and also your employees, you know, they see that we were talking to believe it was Alexis. And she's like, this is ice 1000 People wake up a week. And I'm just today I can tell you that those people are waking up faster. And that's, that's something which, when, especially now trying to hire people in the in the world that we live in right now, you want to work at a company that is leading the charge and is something that you can feel really good about working there, because not only are they taking care of you, but they're taking care of everyone else. And I think that that really shone through yesterday as well.Eric Rieger  22:56  I think we're really lucky honestly can have G IA in this position to help us do this. Because it seems to me like this this lot. And we've talked about this on the show before but this company wants to be a an innovator, not just some big Gi Group. They want to help establish what should be some some good norms instead of some of the the throwaway old norms they want to be the ones that emerge southern think this is this is only going to pay a compliment to that.Ken Brown  23:23  Yeah. And I want to point something out when you're talking about the efficiency and all that, you know, let's what you did see is the efficiency in the preoperative and post operative, but you saw in the room that it was consistent, it was Eric and I focused. My technician, Mackenzie, we you guys saw that. It's just it's right there. It's the same process. And so by not worrying about the patient's concerns, or the concerns are alleviated when they come in, and I know that they're going to wake up in competent hands, I get to focus 100% on taking care of what I'm looking at with the endoscope. Eric gets to focus 100% on making sure that that patient is sedated and I work as a team and you saw how that is that the the flow of the room. And that's what's beautiful about the centre there. We're at that, although it's the efficiency sometimes people think oh, well, that that feels like you're moving too fast. No, the spot where we slow down is in that route.Unknown Speaker  24:22  Right? Yep. Yeah, we definitely saw that. Yeah, by efficiency. I just meant as a as somebody coming into the centre for procedure, I would be out of there in less than an hour, which was amazing to me. I always thought that outpatient procedures and you know, my take all afternoon I'd be sitting around all day, did not see any of that. It was really amazing.Eric Rieger  24:41  Yeah, it is a whole nother dynamic. Beyond that and why this is a good setup. But I do think it's a great setup because we huge exposure for something like brain FM so we can really prove this concept. So let's get into it. What in the world is brain FM? How does it work? He's rubbing his hands together.Unknown Speaker  25:00  Here we go, here we go. All right,Ken Brown  25:02  before you even get into this, let's at least can I, I love being around I love being the stupidest person in the room. And yesterday, I'm by far, I just felt like I'm just like playing catch up with Kevin all day long. It's just that you are wicked smart, and certainly have the credentials to prove it. And the way your passion towards this you the whole story. So before we even get into the science, oh, I was out last time.Eric Rieger  25:35  I was trying to follow the flow here.Ken Brown  25:38  How in the world? Did you become a PhD in this? Like, what is the path?Unknown Speaker  25:43  Sure, sure. Well, let's see. I was first interested, I think in the study of consciousness, I want to understand subjective experience. Why it is the case that we should experience anything at all rather than nothing? Why isn't it the case that humans are simply zombies with nothing on the inside, but you know, objects in the world, that kind of thing? Well, it turns out, it's hard to make a living as a consciousness research researcher. But it is possible to make a living as an attention researcher. And of course, attention and consciousness are very closely linked, at least in the sense that you tend to be conscious of what you're paying attention to. So I went into attention research in neuroscience. And within attention, I went into Auditory Research. Being a lifelong musician, just interested in sound in general, there's something magical about sound, right? It's ephemeral, you don't see it, it's in the air. And yet, it's so important to our daily lives, as you're experiencing right now. And so there's this magic about it. And I want wanted to understand, you know, the principles of how do you attend to sound in the world, right. And often, we're in these situations where we're trying to listen to the person talking to us in front of us, but there are other people talking around us, right? Or maybe we're on a busy street corner. Or say we're listening to a piece of music and just trying to hear the guitar part, but ignore the drums. And so there's this notion of a spotlight of attention in listening to things, right. And with the eyes, it's simple to understand how that happens, because you can move your eyeballs around, and you can point your eyes and things right? Well, we don't point our ears at things. We do that with our brain, right? And so if I'm sitting at the dinner table, and I want to listen to the person next to me, instead of the person in front of me, I don't have to turn my head to do that. I do something in my brain, right, that changes the spotlight of my attention so that I'm eavesdropping, right? And what is that process? How does that work? So I became very interested in that. I studied it in undergrad and then then went on to grad school, and did my dissertation on something called The Cocktail Party Problem, which is exactly the problem I've just described. And again, you know that the eyes being a two dimensional sheet, objects already arrived on the retina separated, right, but the eardrum is not a two dimensional sheet that your drum is a one dimensional receiver where you just get pressure over time, sounds mix in the air before they arrive at the ear. And it's the brains problem to unmix those sounds right? This is absolutely fascinating computational problem. So I study that for seven years. And in the process of doing that, I developed some methods to do online auditory experiments, which hadn't been done before. And long story short, you know, the, the old guard in auditory computational neuroscience would have said, Oh, I have have to bring people into my sound attenuated chamber, I have to make you wear my calibrated headphones. And therefore I can only run two subjects a day. Well, it turns out that if you do things online and use the right methods, you can collect 100 participants that day. And the date ends up being roughly the same, you know, with a few more participants, you can even out the noise that's otherwise introduced, but slightly messy online methods. It turns out, it's a massively more efficient way to run experiments. And one day, by chance in the supermarket, I ran into an old colleague of mine, so excited about these methods, I went on and on and on. And she had just hooked up with brain FM. And in that she was a consultant for them. Wow, bright brain FM, this, you know, wonderful company, they're doing functional music. And they really need somebody to, as you know, as a team of one to run lots of lots of experiments, behavioural experiments to figure out, you know, what is the ideal background music for doing, you know, XYZ. And I jumped on that immediately. I started consulting for brain FM, even before I defend what yours is,Eric Rieger  29:27  do you think, Oh, thisUnknown Speaker  29:28  would have been 20? Nothing? No, no, no, no. 1819 2018 Oh, yeah. Yeah, bless. Yeah. Say I defended in 2018. Yep. And so six months before that, I was I was consulting with Brian FM and, and I remember the day that I defended my dissertation, I signed the employment contract with Brian. Nice, very, very happy day.Unknown Speaker  29:49  snagging right out.Ken Brown  29:51  any room at all? And theUnknown Speaker  29:53  rest? Yeah, the rest is history. And it was gone to do some really incredible things. We got a grant from the National Science Foundation to look into music for ADHD. Out of that has come a this beautiful piece of work that has behavioural experiments has fMRI brain scanning and has EEG, and another method of looking at brain physiology. And we combined all of these methods to essentially show how our focus music works. Yeah, the results are really great. The papers currently in peer review at nature. We're really excited to see how that goes. Yeah, so that's currently currently where we're at with brain FM. Super excited to explain how it actually works. But maybe, since Yeah.Eric Rieger  30:41  We have to round out and ask Dan. Dan, you mentioned maybe on this podcast, my memory is already fuzzy, but you didn't found brain FM but you hopped on it. The moment that you saw there was an opening so why don't you to go over how you got here?Unknown Speaker  30:56  Yeah, so I have a very interesting story that's different than Kevin so I, I started making websites when I was 13. I loved it. I thought it was like a nother kind of video game that you could play. And I am a sucker blackbelt. So I made martial arts websites made the first one for my school, and they went from getting 30 leads to 130 leadsKen Brown  31:19  sorry, somebody that's done martial arts his whole life. What second degree and what? Mixed martialUnknown Speaker  31:23  arts so it concentrated in jujitsu? Krav Maga, Muay Thai and Cuba.Eric Rieger  31:28  Sweet. Yeah, Lucinda Drew.Unknown Speaker  31:32  So yeah, so I did that for a while. And I went to make martial arts websites because I made it for one person. He's like, can you make it for all my friends. And before I was out of high school, I had 20 clients were dropped out of high school, ended up having, you know, 40 clients at one time. And so my first business when I was 20, travel the world and came back and I said, I wonder if I can do this again. Maybe I got lucky. And I started working with businesses and bringing them online and building lead generation businesses and started doing more and more complicated things like POS systems, I started doing digital advertising became digital director of a company at a like 24 years old. And from the outside, I made it you know, I was making more money than my parents, you know, like travelling around the United States selling million dollar contracts. But I didn't I hit this point where I didn't feel like I was as really like helping people like I did when I was teaching martial arts. Because we used to use martial arts as a vehicle to take a kid from being not really confident or sure of himself into a leader into being someone and I'm I'm an effective that I was really shy, I got bullied on mercilessly in fifth grade. I was a little chubby and, and martial art transformed me. So even though I made success, you know, financially, I didn't really find success success personally. And, you know, I had this life or death situation, which is a whole nother podcast to talk through. And I realised I need to quit my job, quit my job, I came across brain FM, like three months later, when I was looking for what I should do, I knew I wanted to work in tech, again, to help people. I remember using it the first time and being blown away. Because I used to work from 10pm to 4am, because that's where I could find my flow state, right. Like, I could find that magic zone where I could just jump into things. And I remember taking my headphones off the first time and being like, this is too good to be true. This is no way this is working. I was super speculative. And I was I was this is just music, right. And I remember trying I save 24 hours and then used it still worked. My diet still worked. And it was it was perfect. Because it was something that allowed me to switch into focus whenever I wanted to. And from then I was like this is going to be something that changed the world. I called the people that created the company like 12 times, I actually started working for free and absurdly the tech team becoming CEO and then purchasing the company. So wild ride, never never intended to do that. But along the way, you know, obviously Kevin, Kevin and I are together as well as a lot of other great team members. We're really trying to use brain FM as a tool to help people be their best self, their best best version of themselves. And while we are doing that consumer you know now we get to do it in the medical space and help people have best health that they can have. And that's something that's we're really excited about isEric Rieger  34:40  awesome stories it y'all linked by passion, which I find really endearing for the process.Ken Brown  34:46  So we're doing so at at atrantil and certainly with the practice and everything we really like to discuss what is the what is our collective why what is my why? What is the the companies Why if we're all on the same way, what I'm just hearing, I'm just writing little notes here. I'm like, wow, both you guys driven by the Why have you have this knowledge, Kevin, that you are like, wow, this could really, it's so I come from this music background and I understand this and I can do this. And Dan, you have this incredible like, this is where I came from I, I need to I'm it's not a money thing. It's a The why is how do we get everyone else on the same page. And we hooked up because we're in that car that one day, we were being shuttled to the to the meeting we're going to and the why was wow, that sounds like that could really help my patients and you're like, the more I think about I think I can and I like when the y's align. And you can move that forward and get more people doing it. The beauty of brain FM is that you can teach people that they are capable of their Why suddenly they can unleash that. So when I meet with so many people that have irritable bowel syndrome, and which is associated or small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, SIBO, Crohn's, ulcerative colitis where they're kind of consumed by negative thoughts and anxiety. And there's that brain gut access, that Kevin's nodding, because he's like, that's definitely the cool part. So I want to affect the brain by protecting the gut. Kevin knows so much about the brain that we realised we're kind of meeting there were so I think that this collective why if we could expand this circle of why into okay, we now know that am Serge and envision is getting the why they're like, yes, we can do this. And now we can get the why going with the doctors going, we all can have this collective why, which is one thing, how do we get more people to have a better experience in healthcare and ultimately, collectively improve the health of everyone? You guys are doing it to the brain? I'm trying to do it through the budget.Unknown Speaker  36:58  So yeah, well, that's.Ken Brown  37:03  So I love hearing that story. I didn't know that. I mean, we've talked to me for hours and hours. I did not know that's a really, really cool story.Eric Rieger  37:10  Just a brief primer on, on how we all linked up there, because you just barely hinted at it is we you and I had met in snow skiing together, you have snowboarding on snow skiing, had a great time. And then we decided to ride together for the summer meeting. Yep, to the same group and share a shuttle. No pretence at all, we just got hopped into conversation about how are things going. And it probably took about 10 miles or a 70 mile ride. Before we determine, wait a second, there's something there is something here. Yeah. And so anyway, that's that's just my short version on how I showed up here today.Ken Brown  37:49  I love it a lot.Unknown Speaker  37:50  So I guess without further ado, should we talk about what's here and talk about some of the science?Unknown Speaker  37:54  Yeah. Finally, all right,Ken Brown  37:57  now we're gonna get into some cool stuff. All right, this is if you are, if you're listening to this, get a pen and a piece paper out because this is cool, cool, cool stuff. This is not just listening to music, I love that.Unknown Speaker  38:09  And so the trick with this is always to make it you know, straightforward and understandable. And hopefully, you won't need pen and paper to understand what's going on here. So simply put, a lot of neural activity activity is rhythmic, right? These rhythms, slow, fast, everything in between. And the rhythms in the brain support, perception, cognition, and action, essentially, those three things that the brain does. One that you may have heard of, are delta waves when you're sleeping, that's probably you know, the most common widely known one. But their rhythms are all sorts of different speeds that support pretty much you know, anything that you're doing in your daily life. And the idea behind brain FM, is, it's music that's specifically engineered to drive these rhythms in the brain called neural oscillations, or if you'd like brainwaves to drive your brainwaves in targeted ways, right? To support whatever you need to be doing, right. And so for example, we know what brainwaves in the focus brain look like? They're at particular speeds in particular regions. And so what we do is we say, okay, let's use the odd, let's use the auditory system as input for neuromodulation. Right? And so how can we use an auditory input to drive your brainwaves into the state that we know supports focus, right? And so we figured out that out and that's what we have our paper that's coming out shortly on, but because the principle is using the auditory system as a neuromodulator it's not just a one trick pony, right? So we can support focus, we can support relaxation, we can support sleep, and now we're discovering that we can, you know, support people going under and waking up from anaesthesia as well. So it's really it's a delivery method for you know, driving your brain into whatever state you need for, for what you need to be doing. Right. And so again, this is, you know, it's what we call functional music, which we'd like to make the distinction between that and, you know, what you might call art music with a capital A. Right? Which is that, you know, in modern times with artists and albums, there's a conception of music as something that primarily exists for self expression and for beauty and to connect to your audience. Well, things haven't always been that way, right. And if you go back 500 years, 1000 years, it's not about artists and albums. It's about music that is designed to do things for people, for example, you know, a lullaby a lullaby is a perfect example of ancient functional music. Because the point of a lullaby is not to sound beautiful. Maybe you also want that, but the point of a lullaby is to put a baby to sleep. Right? And similarly, you know, you have music that was used to help people do physical labour, right? Or music to march to if you're in an army, right? And the point of marching music is not to sound beautiful is to make people walk in lockstep, right. Another good example is dance music, right? And dance is a perfect example of this principle of rhythms in the brain and rhythms in the world. Which by the way, is called entrainment. That's a concept that you may be familiar with, which is, rhythms in the brain reflect rhythms in the world?Ken Brown  41:22  Yeah, what threw me off a little bit. Sorry.Eric Rieger  41:24  Just to catch up on everyone on on the vocabulary. I want to hear your just brief explanation of neuromodulation Sure, I've entrainment is another might have been one more, but just just to keep everybody on the same? Sure.Unknown Speaker  41:35  Sure. Sure. So neuromodulation is just a broader term that refers to, you know, inducing a change in the brain through an external stimulus, right. It could be a magnetic field, it could be electrical currents. But it could also be sensory stimulation, right? In this case, auditory system. And treatment is a form of neuromodulation, where you're providing a rhythmic input to induce a rhythmic response from the brain, right. And so you have this oscillating system, neural circuits of the resonance frequencies. And so you're basically pushing on this neural circuit in a rhythmic way and a response in a rhythmic, rhythmic way. And because the brain has this property of training to things around it, then you can drive the rhythms in the brain to help support what you need to do. Okay, which is, yeah, we're where I started. Yeah, it's pretty straightforward and simple example of that coming back around as dance, right? That's one that everybody understands. You hear the rhythm and the music and your body moves to that. And that's entrainment and what's called the auditory motor system, right? And also, by the way, if you want to know, how quickly does it take for brain FM to kick in, which is a question that we always get asked, I asked back, Well, how long does it take between when you hear dance music? And when you want to dance? Yeah, right? The answer is, it depends on how closely you're attending to the music, right? It depends on how intense the beats are. And all that's true for brain FM as well. But you know, the real answers, maybe 30 seconds, maybe a minute, if you're not really listening, if you're in the right mood, maybe 10 seconds, right. But that's the sort of timescale and ballpark timescale when you're talking about rhythmic entrainment in the auditory system. And interesting thing about dance music, right, is that the functional properties of dance music are completely dissociated from the aesthetic properties of dance music, right? Yes, you can listen to music that sounds terrible, and still makes you want to dance. And that's a perfect demonstration of functional versus art in music, right? And so what we've done in brain FM is we've said, okay, you know, we know entrainment is the thing, but instead of, you know, relatively slow rates that you will bounce to, you know, you can actually drive the brand very fast rates that support focus, or very slow rates that support sleep. And that's anything in between, and everything in between. And that's the principle.Unknown Speaker  43:47  What's really cool about it as well is in addition to all the things that Kevin is saying, we're also able to do it through sound, where it's something that is not obtrusive, or it stops you from what you're doing. So for example, in focusing, it's it's not something that you have to watch, or like meditation, you meditate, and then you focus this is as long as you are doing the activity. So what's nice about it is usually our work is visual, to why adding music to it, it's allowing us to focus better and work like we normally would. And the same thing in hospitals, right? And in the clinic that we were just at is this is music that you put on top. And it doesn't take away from the experience. People can still you know, hear what you're saying instructions, it's not something that they're putting over their eyes. One interesting thing about music compared or sound compared to light is what like one out of 18,000 people are epileptic,Unknown Speaker  44:47  right, the light can occasionally induce epilepsy, but music will not. Yeah, sound induced epilepsy is not only extremely rare, but it's also not due to rhythms. It's triggered by you know, things that have to do with your past. So the sound of a car crash or something might trigger trigger epilepsy for sound. Whereas with light, it's a very automatic thing where once you hurt once you hit a certain frequency of light flashing, you know, if you have that kind of photosensitive photosensitive epilepsy, it'll set you off. Not so with music, so it's extremely safe. Yeah, so,Unknown Speaker  45:19  so sound is really this perfect medium to apply to things that we're already doing, whether it's relaxing, sleeping, or going through surgery, but it's also something that's incredibly safe. Because we have all of these things that we've evolved to have that protect us from sound, the worst thing that can happen is maybe it's too loud. That that's, you know, very, that's, that's actually not even probably going to happen because of the way commercial headphones are made. You know, it's a very safe thing to add to your regimen.Eric Rieger  45:51  So what do y'all call this particular technology? And then how did you arrive at this technology? Because I know it's not the first iteration of utilising sound, you've even said, you know, it's been years ago from the lullaby to now. So what's this call that we're bringing in uses? Sure.Unknown Speaker  46:06  Well, I think we like to call it brain FM. It's it Yeah, it is. It is unique. We have, you know, patents on the process that we use to make this music because it is so unique, you know. Let's see. There are other methods of training the brain for example, you could flashlights that people like we were just saying, but you can't get your work done. If you're having lights flashed at you. Right? There's there's a conflict there. So Sam is really a great way to do it. Yeah, I don't think we have a really good name for the technologyKen Brown  46:40  there. Let me ask you a quick question. So I'm somebody that I own a different centre someplace else, like, oh, yeah, I heard this podcast you know what we're gonna do? I love Coldplay, so I'm gonna make everybody listen to Coldplay as they get in there. Because Coldplay does it for me. Explain the difference?Unknown Speaker  46:55  Yeah. So before we do that, I think so obviously, brain FM as a company, you know, we do have patents like, like Kevin saying, I would just say that every time we the reason why we call it brain FM is because every time we learn more, we actually grow and build and change brain FM. So it's an ever evolving thing, where brain FM was five years ago, and where it is now. And our understanding of the brain and even the music we produce different. As far as this of what we're making for health care. This is really brain health, that we're really focusing on as a pursuit, and it is different than our consumer product. And Kevin can share some of the things that we arrive to it. And it actually it's funny, because Coldplay was one of the control groups that we did that dimension. So when you when we first started talking about, hey, I think this is something that we could do. I think I share that story of my girlfriend. We were saying, I remember telling Kevin, I was like, Hey, can we make relax? We just play a relaxed music. And he's like, Yeah, we could but let me check to check. And he started finding all this free search, which I'll just like Kevin say, but it was just incredibly exciting. Because from that start, we were able to eventually build a product that blew the wall to off everything that existed so far, we can see that with science.Eric Rieger  48:14  So that's that's kind of where I was going. So I when you and I very first got engaged with this topic and what brain FM was. I think one of the first questions that can ask is how does this compare to some someone utilising binaural? Beats? Yeah, and then that that's really kind of what I was getting at is that that is more or less in, correct me if I'm wrong, but static in where it is. And just as you described, y'all have been evolving and finding new applications for brain FM proprietary applications. Whereas by neuro is a great discovery. However, y'all are evolutionsUnknown Speaker  48:55  on Yeah, I'll start and then I'll give it to Kevin. So you know, this, like we were saying before, it has been tried to be done forever. Sure, functional music lullabies those existed for 1000s of years. And then a lot of people are familiar with music that they they play to elicit a response. So when you go to spas, you hear the waterfalls and the relaxing, you know that because you're trying to have a relaxing experience. What we've done is we've taken that to another level. Now, to your point, binaural beats isochronic tones, those have existed for a long time. And that's when for anyone that hasn't heard about this is when you play one frequency in one year and one frequency in the other. And they basically combined in your brainstem, right? And that creates entrainment in your brain. But it's not as precise as what we're looking for. It still has effects but they're diminishing or they're not. They're not as rigorous as we'd like to know that this is 100% effective. So when we were creating brain FM, it was well this is something that's there but how How could we make it more effective? And Kevin, I'll share in a second, but the difference between is instead of modulating frequencies, we actually modulate amplitude. Mm hmm. Kevin, you want to explain that?Unknown Speaker  50:12  Sure. Yeah. So I can talk about by now binaural beats specifically. And Dan is absolutely right, you have two different frequencies coming in the two different ears. The difference between those frequencies creates beating in the brainstem, essentially, that if you were to take two sine waves of slightly different frequencies, sum them together, what you would end up with is amplitude modulation, basically interference between two very similar assignments. So for example, I've 400 hertz and one year 410 Hertz in the other ear, in the brainstem, I'm creating a 10 hertz amplitude modulation, okay, right dude with some of those things. Now, the issue? Well, there's several issues. One is that the brainstem was limited and how strongly it can pass those modulations up to the cortex, right, the cortex has a high level of the brain where all the interesting stuff happens. So even if you have, you know, it doesn't matter how loud those frequencies are in your two years, the the level of modulation created in the brainstem will cap out at a certain amount. But if you put that modulation directly in in each ear, instead of relying on the brainstem to produce it, you can get a much stronger response from cortex, right. So in terms of the strength of entrainment, and binaural beats is also about entrainment right? It's about producing this modulation, that then in trance cortex, the strength of that entrainment is much less than binaural beats because it is produced, because modulations produced by the brain instead of existing in the sound signal, right? A practical issue is that with binaural beats, you're limited to listening to tones. So when you listen to binaural beats, what you're hearing is, and one year and and the other year, I love that song. Exactly. No one loves that. Right? And so what we've done in brain FM is we found a way to insert modulation into music, right? So that it's enjoyable, and you get those effects as well. Right?Unknown Speaker  52:04  Yeah. And we can we can send over a demo if you want to stitch it to the end of this podcast so people can see here. Well,Eric Rieger  52:11  that's honestly one of the coolest parts is is the fact that y'all can y'all can put the effective portion of brain FM inside the genre that anybody wishes to listen to. That's right. It's one of the coolest things because I was even asking you when you were first describing Oh, is it? Is it country to go to sleep? And is it hard rock to wake up? And he said, actually, it's whatever you want, for anything that you want. And I thought that was the coolest explanation, because you're not limited to some type of genre, just simply because that's how you need to feel.Unknown Speaker  52:42  Absolutely. And to be clear, you know, most music is rhythmic, and therefore most music has amplitude modulation in it. But it's not targeted in the way that brain FM is, right. It's it's a byproduct of the artists doing their thing. So if you're listening to Coldplay, right, they have a mix of whole notes and half notes and whatever, you know, musical things are going on and do that they have amplitude modulation at all sorts of different frequencies happening, right? If they're at, you know, 120 BPM and they're playing whole notes, then they have, you know, one hertz or whatever it is maybe two hertz. But with brain FM, what we're saying is, okay, we know the frequency that we want the brain to hit. So we're going to directly insert amplitude modulations, at exactly 16 hertz, or, you know, whatever it happens to be, and make those the dominant modulation frequency in the brain. Whereas with music, you have all these overlapping frequencies. And you know, the, the target is to make it sound beautiful not to drive the brain into a certain solitary state. Right. And so, by the way, with Coldplay, we did this very large online study, we had 200 participants in this, we gave them a standard questionnaire called the profile of mental states looking at, among other things, tension and relaxation. And we had Coldplay as a control. We had brain FM, we also had another piece of music very fascinating. That was made by music therapists and was hailed as the most relaxing song in the world, it was used in multiple studies, it was shown to reduce blood pressure to similar extent as benzodiazepines to for people undergoing surgery. And we found that we beat that would be called Les by a mile. And we beat that song as well. You know, error bars were small relative to the difference between them highly, statistically significant. So that was very cool to see.Ken Brown  54:21  So the last part again, one more time, because it's based on science. And what I said Coldplay, kind of jokingly because I like Coldplay, and that didn't realise that they actually studied that. And so this was compared to a scientifically or supposedly scientifically derived music considered the most relaxing music in the world and I guess you paid yourself you like you went you just went immediately to the deepest water you could findUnknown Speaker  54:46  that's exactly right. We we did the hardest tests, we always try to give ourselves the hardest test. By the way, it's a track called weightless by Marconi union is extremely Google will you'll find it was CNR CNN article written about it, and we said okay, if this is the king of the hill, We're going to beat it. And we did. Wow.Unknown Speaker  55:03  Yeah. And we do that from some of the things that Kevin was talking about earlier, which were there's online experiments. So think about it, you know, we can actually test 1000s of people, and we know all the knobs to play. So not only are we doing these neural phase locking these amplitude modulation, we actually do other things in music, like 3d sound. So when you're in some of our relaxing music, we actually shift some of the sound from right here to left here, almost like you're in a hammock, sometimes, we have different BPM rates, different kinds of genres specific to make you feel more relaxed. And as we learn more about you, and what you prefer, we can actually have even a better response. And, you know, getting back on track on some of the stuff that we're doing with you guys, and hopefully more people in the future. We started looking at this from a science based procedure and saying, Okay, this is what the world says is the most relaxing music in the world. Let's beat it. And I believe it would be like, like 50 50% or 5%. It's a pretty pretty demonstrable, especially compared to,Ken Brown  56:08  just to clarify that was like, first iteration, you guys continually improve what you're goingUnknown Speaker  56:13  Oh, yep, yep. And now it just comes down to so we have improved sense and now it's comes down to doing clinical trials with real people to say okay, we've improved as much as we can outside the environment. Now let's make it better in the environment and continually testEric Rieger  56:29  one or something else that that you mentioned, Kevin, that I feel like is, is maybe even just glossed over as we're talking about comparing it to Coldplay or or waitlist, is you said benzodiazepines also. So now you're talking about comparing sound to a drug and a bit of die as a pain, of course, is what we use, if you're curious, that's verse said, that's out of and that's value. These are things that people religiously take for, as an analytic try to stop that. So the fact that you didn't just go to the deepest water and sound, you went straight to the heart of what we use and anaesthesia, chemically to allow people to alleviate their anxiety, and that's quite measurable.Ken Brown  57:11  Alright, so let's bring that up because you said religiously tape. But the reality is, is that benzodiazepines have an extremely addictive potential as well. Correct. So people that suffer from anxiety and using those medications to try and get through that there are tremendous rich,Eric Rieger  57:27  so in before we hit on that just just the array of benzo and benzo like drugs. I mean, it doesn't just stop with those three, you're talking also about Xanax, Ambien, senesce, those, all of those fit at some level to be maximum GABA agonist. So when you say that what you have by comparison is something that's effective. We don't know this today. But potentially y'all could be unlocking a way for people not to be dependent upon taking these drugs to to get better sleep to alleviate their anxiety, etc. Yeah,Unknown Speaker  58:02  I mean, this is definitely a road that we see could be possible. Obviously, there's a lot of work to be involved involved right now. But we do have testimonials of users that, like reach out and they say, Hey, I haven't slept well in 10 years. And I tried brain FM a lot last night, and I've been on Ambien, I've been on Lunesta, and I slept better than any drug I've ever taken. Right. And now we're I'm not here saying that this is a cure or treatment. Yeah. But this could be an alternative approach where maybe you can take less trucks, or you can do this before you try drugs, or, you know, whatever. And, you know, I think that gives someone more control and freedom.Ken Brown  58:41  As someone who tries to incorporate different lifestyle modulations to improve my life to try and incorporate these different things with my patients. When we talk about let's talk about benzodiazepine addiction, we can get into the fact that benzos works similar to alcohol. So I work with a lot of patients with liver disease, and we try and get over that. Well, the beauty that I really like about this is that just like you said, when you meditate to try and focus, you are meditating, and then you're going to try and have focus. What I love is I'll actually stack this kind of stuff. I will and Eric's a big sauna fan also. And so I will put my brain FM on I will go into the sauna, and I will do breathing exercises all at once. And I love is absolutely you know, it's I'm, I feel like I'm focusing on my breath. I know that I'm getting that neuromodulation that's going to happen anyways and start stimulating that area to try and do that. And I'm getting the benefits of the sauna that's there. And so just we're not saying that one thing does something or other but when we start on my lifestyle modifications, this is like one of the easiest as the other stuff you need a sauna like when I tell my patients I'm like you know sauna therapy is good. I don't have access to it. Okay, do you let's do some breathing and some meditation. I can't I'm super busy and whatever. Okay, how about just putting some headphones on? Yeah. How about that? Let's start with that and see what happens.Unknown Speaker  1:00:11  And it's something that, you know, one of the reasons why I was so attracted to the company in the beginning was, it isn't just for, you know, people that it is for everyone. It doesn't actually matter if you speak English or not, none of our none of our music is created with lyrics. And one thing I think we glossed over is actually we have in house composers that are makeup, that's gonna be my next question. Yeah. So we have people that have toured with some of the greatest bands ever, which, you know, I don't know if we can disclose, but some really great talented musicians. And they're, they're taking this in making this from a functional approach, where it's music that sounds great, it's music that has all the scientific effects, and all the knobs turned the right way to have the effect we're trying to, you know, get for the user. But it's also not necessarily music, that is going to be your favourite song. Because that's not the goal, right? The goal is to make an effect that can be measured in your brain, and is not just sometimes it's every time, whether you're trying to relax, you're trying to sleep, you're trying to focus,Unknown Speaker  1:01:13  and it's music that will sit comfortably in the background. So for example, with our focus music in particular, you know, a lot of people don't realise that. If I'm a music producer, normally, my job is to grab your attention. My job is to make music punchy, and make you sit up and distract you from whatever you're trying to do. Right. And so we've we've flipped the script on that, and we say, Okay, well, we know the tricks they're using to make music punchy and grabbing your attention. Let's do the opposite. You know, what can we do to make music still sound good and be entertaining, but help you work by not distracting you? Right? And because we have a different target than everybody else who ended up making different music than everybody else.Eric Rieger  1:01:50  So figuring this out, you some people say they're an audio file, I would say that You are the supreme audio file doctor. Yeah, no, no. But not not only that, you also play guitar. And we talked about this briefly yesterday. So when you have when when y'all team up with your composers to come in house to build stuff? Just just how does it happen? How do y'all know what sounds good for it to match together? And you're like that that'll work here? I mean,Unknown Speaker  1:02:19  absolutely well about it. They're much better musicians than I am. For starters, my job is to annoy the heck out of our musicians by saying, that's a bit too good. That's, uh, you know, that that melody that you made, it's too catchy, you know, oh, that that percussive part as normal music, it would be totally awesome. Yeah, right now, you know, we're not trying to grab people's attention. And so just sort of to remind them of the science and the target and that kind of thing. But,Eric Rieger  1:02:47  so what was the session? Like for them? Are they there for like, four hours, and they're cutting one track? Or?Unknown Speaker  1:02:52  Oh, they make enormous quantities of music. They're so good at it. In terms of a session, so they work in Ableton, you know, okay, yeah. So they have DAWs we have proprietary software that plugs into Ableton that helps us layer the science on top of music, essentially, that's what what's happening. And the principles of composition they use from the ground up, are meant meant to support whatever mental state right? So, you

Steve Somers
11-15-21 Steve Somers Final Schmooze: Eddie Scozzare, Mark Chernoff, Steve Levy & Rich Ackerman

Steve Somers

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 21:02


Steve talks with 4 distinguished guests: THE Eddie Scozarre, former WFAN boss Mark Chernoff, former WFAN employee & current play by play voice for Monday Night Football, Steve Levy and update anchor Rich Ackerman.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Sports on a Sunday Morning
NFL Picks, John Mozeliak, College Football Playoff

Sports on a Sunday Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 38:04


NFL picks with Lauren Lovett. Cardinals President of Baseball Operations John Mozeliak joins the show talking prospect success Arizona Fall League, bringing back Skip Schumaker, Paul DeJong, and more. Finally, Ackerman breaks down the College Football Playoff. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

RNZ: Nine To Noon
Sports commentator Sam Ackerman

RNZ: Nine To Noon

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 12:37


The Black Caps will face Australia for the Twenty20 World Cup title on Monday morning - our sports commentator Sam Ackerman looks at what they'll need to do to win it. Plus the All Blacks step up a notch in their never-ending tour and why a victory for gender equality in Australia could mean bad news for New Zealand.

Fresh Air
A Marine Reflects On War, Love & Finding Purpose

Fresh Air

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 45:55


Elliot Ackerman served five tours in Iraq and Afghanistan, during which time, he says, he witnessed the absolute worst — as well as the absolute best — that human beings are capable of. Ackerman is also a journalist, novelist, memoirist and National Book Award nominee. This Veterans Day we talk about the lure of war, how war gave him a sense of purpose, the fear and heartbreak that went along with it, and the search for meaning when he stopped fighting. His Silver Star is for leading a platoon in the Battle of Fallujah in Iraq.

Tracy Crossley's Podcast
Moving On to a Healthy and Thriving Life! with Kirsten Ackerman

Tracy Crossley's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 29:53


Growing up, Kirsten struggled with disordered eating and body image. Although she didn't see the connection at the time, she later realized how much her family environment impacted her relationship with food. Her mom was a chronic dieter who talked negatively about her own body, and most of her extended family was diet-focused, so Kirsten picked up on those cues. In college she studied nutrition because food was such a focal point in her life, and she thought if she could just crack the code on eating, her struggles would be over. Of course that wasn't true, but Kirsten continued down this path, getting her Master's degree and becoming a registered dietician... while sneaking food and feeling like a fraud. "What is causing people to feel out of control around food is the fact that they're engaging in restrictive behaviors." --Kirsten Ackerman In this podcast, Kirsten shares the shift she experienced when she discovered intuitive eating, realizing she was NOT broken. She describes intuitive eating as a healing framework from chronic dieting where you return to your intuitive wisdom around food--before diet culture affected your relationship with food and body image. She is now an Anti-Diet Registered Dietitian and Certified Intuitive Eating Counselor. Her radical shift to "unconditional permission to eat" has helped so many stop the dieting roller coaster and permanently heal their relationship with food. Learn more about Kirsten: Website: www.theintuitverd.com Instagram: @theintuitive_rd Intuitive Bites Podcast: https://open.spotify.com/show/7giKBSPjO9aLktIUWjQOEM?si=ee323e7495c94169

More Than What You Eat
Ep 68 How to Navigate Triggering Diet Talk & Comments During Holiday Season | Kirsten Ackerman, RDN MS

More Than What You Eat

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 56:27


The holiday season is a time when diet culture ramp ups and can be difficult to navigate as an intuitive eater. If you aren't sure how to handle triggering conversations around food and weight or feel nervous to set boundaries with friends and family, this episode is for you.      In today's episode, I'm talking to Kirsten Ackerman, an Anti-Diet Registered Dietitian and Certified Intuitive Eating Counselor. She is the Host of Intuitive Bites Podcast and runs her own virtual private practice helping women heal their relationships to food and body. In our powerful conversation, Kirsten speaks on how growing up her own personal biases and stigma with dieting and weight impacted her choice to become a dietician to heal her own disordered eating patterns.    She explains how to deal with caring, but nosey friends and family who question your eating habits during get-togethers, how to deal with triggering comments, and why it is important to center yourself and check in with your own body during the holidays. What does your body need and how can you honor it today?    In this episode, we cover: Kirsten shares how she became an intuitive eating dietician [3:18] How you can deal with all the different food related scenarios that might pop up at your next holiday party [12:04] Diet culture messaging is much louder during the holidays with an emphasis on substitutions. Kirsten weighs in on what actually matters and what you need to focus on instead [37:21] Kirsten explains how you can reset your “I should have chosen…” and diet culture mindset [42:48] How to set boundaries [50:49]   Links Mentioned:    Episode on not feeling crazy with candy https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/ep88-how-to-not-feel-crazy-around-candy-with-rachel-goodman/id1383888050?i=1000539535740    Episode on exposure to binge eating https://rachelgoodnutrition.com/ep-63-how-to-increase-your-exposure-to-holiday-foods-so-you-stop-feeling-out-of-control/    Episode on handling diet talk https://rachelgoodnutrition.com/ep-42-how-to-handle-diet-talk/    Connect with Kirsten:   Instagram: instagram.com/theintuitive_rd (@theintuitive_rd)   Website: theintuitiverd.com   Podcast: Intuitive Bites Podcast - https://open.spotify.com/show/7giKBSPjO9aLktIUWjQOEM?si=ee323e7495c94169   Connect with Rachel:   Follow Rachel on Instagram: instagram.com/dietitian.rachelgoodman   Get on the waitlist for the IntuEATive Living Group Coaching Program: rachelgoodnutrition.com/group-coaching    3 Steps to Stop Feeling Out of Control with Food Free Guide: https://rachelgoodmanrd.kartra.com/page/7NG39   Rachel's Online Program Living Free: rachelgoodnutrition.com/program   Contact Rachel: rachel@rachelgoodnutrition.com

Sports on a Sunday Morning
NFL Picks, Mo Sports HOF, President's Cup

Sports on a Sunday Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 38:07


NFL picks with Lauren Lovett. Ackerman talks about the new class of the Missouri Sports Hall of Fame which includes our own Mike Claiborne. Tom had the chance to talk with Gov. Mike Parson, Mayor Tishaura Jones  and Bellerive President Rick Walsh after the announcement of the 2030 President's Cup. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

RNZ: Nine To Noon
Sports commentator Sam Ackerman

RNZ: Nine To Noon

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 16:33


Sam gives his take on the head trauma issue resurfacing in rugby amid confirmation that former All Black Carl Hayman's early onset dementia diagnosis.

Best Hour of Their Day
476. Precision Nutrition | Jason Crowe, VP Partnerships & Business Development

Best Hour of Their Day

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 53:13


In this episode of the Best Hour podcast, Ackerman sits down with VP of Partnerships and Business Development at Precision Nutrition, Jason Crowe. They talk about everything from nutrition to dogs to Canada. Tune in to learn more. So you never miss an episode, subscribe on YouTube and on all major podcasting platforms at Best Hour of Their Day. Check out more information on our sponsors below: Doc Spartan - Use code BESTHOUR at checkout for 15% off and check out docspartan.com for our Best Hour bundle. RX Smart Gear - Use code BESTHOUR at checkout for 10% off. InsideTracker - Visit info.insidetracker.com/coachjasonackerman. WheelPay - An official partner of our podcast. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/jason-ackerman/support

Branch Out - A Podcast from Connection Builders
Standing Out From The Crowd - Emily Ackerman

Branch Out - A Podcast from Connection Builders

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 35:09


In the world of business, one of the biggest favors that you can do for yourself and your firm is to stand out and differentiate what you do from others. Today we are joined by Emily Ackerman, who takes that idea very seriously and who has leveraged it to attain success over the years. Emily is a business development executive at Carr, Riggs, & Ingram, a top 25 CPA firm, and she shares her expertise and wisdom in this fascinating conversation! Emily talks about being memorable and why focusing her energy on her own strengths has enabled her to build a strong network and develop business opportunities. Emily has a staunch commitment to changing the way people think about business development.  Key Points From This Episode:Unpacking Emily's primary thoughts on the meaning of business development.  The types of clients that Emily works with and how to grow a network through referrals.Building real relationships: approaches to a strong foundation with clients.Telling your story and standing out to create a strong brand image and calling card. Keeping it real, investing the time, and getting to know the people you are working with!Finding hidden connections and how relating on deeper levels can impact your work. The processes that Emily has used to stand out: owning what made her different in the world of CPAs. Strategic use of time and why Emily disagrees with the excuses about not having enough of it!Moving on from what you cannot control and focusing on things within your grasp.Emily Ackerman on LinkedInCarr, Riggs & IngramAlex Drost LinkedInBranch Out Podcast LinkedInConnection Builders LinkedInHave thoughts or comments? We want to hear from you. growth@connection.builders

Sports on a Sunday Morning
October 31st, 2021, 11-12, NFL Picks, David Freese, Oli Marmol

Sports on a Sunday Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 36:22


NFL picks with Lauren Lovett. 2011 World Series MVP joined Ackerman earlier in the week on the 10 year anniversary of game 6 to talk about the memories. New Cardinals manager Oli Marmol joined Ackerman n Monday after he was named new manager and hear his philosophies and more. Former Fox 2 anchor John Brown talks about his book “Missouri Legends: Famous People From the Show Me State.” See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Into Tomorrow With Dave Graveline
Weekend of October 29, 2021 – Hour 1

Into Tomorrow With Dave Graveline

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 42:30


Tech News and Commentary Dave and the team discuss wireless earbuds from Palm, Facebook’s earnings call and defense of the company, and more. Alan in Ackerman, Mississippi listens on SuperTalk 100.9 and asked: “How do I get my ISP to keep me from being hacked on a slow speed of less than 2mbps download internet […]

Silver and Black Today Show
10/29/21 - Raiders at the Bye Week, Dennis Ackerman on Raiders at 5-2

Silver and Black Today Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 42:00


The Las Vegas Raiders enter the bye week at 5-2 after a huge win at home against the Philadelphia Eagles. Despite losing their coach Jon Gruden in the midst of a two-game losing streak, the Raiders, under interim coach Rich Bisaccia, are playing their best football of 2021. Hosts Moe Moton and Scott Gulbransen talk about the why and how the Raiders are playing so well despite the cards stacked against them. Veteran broadcaster and host of the Bleav in Raiders podcast Dennis Ackerman joins us and tells us why he thinks this Raiders team is playing so well in the post-Gruden era.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Listen in with KNN
Creating Young Minds with Dr. Shira Ackerman & Mathis Crowder

Listen in with KNN

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 24:28


On this special edition of "Listen in With KNN '' presented by FOX Sports Radio, host Kelsey Nicole Nelson welcomed special guests Dr. Shira Ackerman, CEO & Co-Founder of Creating Young Minds, and Mathis Crowder, President & Co-Founder of Creating Young Minds to the show. The duo joins the show to preview the start of the CYM Undiscovered Basketball League which kicks off October 30th. #LIWKNN #ListenInWithKNN

Best Hour of Their Day
475. RRFF | Helping offenders in their walk down the Redemption Road

Best Hour of Their Day

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 72:39


"Helping offenders in their walk down the redemption road." In episode 475 of the Best Hour of Their Day Podcast, Ackerman talks about his experience at a recent L1 Seminar which took place inside a prison, and he speaks with the Redemption Road team to discuss their foundation and how they make CrossFit accessible to offenders. To learn more about Redemption Road, visit www.rf2.org. So you never miss an episode, subscribe on YouTube and on all major podcasting platforms at Best Hour of Their Day. If you want to learn more about our sponsors, Doc Spartan, WheelPay, and RX Smart Gear, checkout docspartan.com, wheelpay.com, and rxsmartgear.com. At checkout, use the code BESTHOUR to get 15% off all DocSpartan purchases and 10% off all RX Smart Gear purchases. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/jason-ackerman/support

The 'X' Zone Broadcast Network
Rob McConnell Interviews - MIKE ACKERMAN - 3 Paranormal Experiences Made Him a Believer

The 'X' Zone Broadcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 41:27


Mike has had 3 Paranormal experiences and is a believer: 1971, Mike was shaken awake in rooming house, and owner later told him that a ghost was responsible. In 1982, Mike had a short OBE after reading a Carrington Muldoon book. In 2006, Mike visited restaurant built by his grandfather where staff have SEEN a ghost. Description fits his grandfather. - http://mxi.myvoffice.com/chocolateme/index.html *** AND NOW *** The ‘X' Zone TV Channel on SimulTV - www.simultv.com The ‘X' Zone TV Channel Radio Feed (Free - No Subscription Required) - https://www.spreaker.com/show/xztv-the-x-zone-tv-show-audio The ‘X' Chronicles Newspaper - www.xchroniclesnewspaper.com (Free) To contact Rob McConnell - misterx@xzoneradiotv.com

The 'X' Zone Broadcast Network
Rob McConnell Interviews - MIKE ACKERMAN - 3 Paranormal Experiences Made Him a Believer

The 'X' Zone Broadcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 41:27


Mike has had 3 Paranormal experiences and is a believer: 1971, Mike was shaken awake in rooming house, and owner later told him that a ghost was responsible. In 1982, Mike had a short OBE after reading a Carrington Muldoon book. In 2006, Mike visited restaurant built by his grandfather where staff have SEEN a ghost. Description fits his grandfather. - http://mxi.myvoffice.com/chocolateme/index.html *** AND NOW *** The ‘X' Zone TV Channel on SimulTV - www.simultv.com The ‘X' Zone TV Channel Radio Feed (Free - No Subscription Required) - https://www.spreaker.com/show/xztv-the-x-zone-tv-show-audio The ‘X' Chronicles Newspaper - www.xchroniclesnewspaper.com (Free) To contact Rob McConnell - misterx@xzoneradiotv.com

The 'X' Zone Radio Show
Rob McConnell Interviews - MIKE ACKERMAN - 3 Paranormal Experiences Made Him a Believer

The 'X' Zone Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 41:27


Mike has had 3 Paranormal experiences and is a believer: 1971, Mike was shaken awake in rooming house, and owner later told him that a ghost was responsible. In 1982, Mike had a short OBE after reading a Carrington Muldoon book. In 2006, Mike visited restaurant built by his grandfather where staff have SEEN a ghost. Description fits his grandfather. - http://mxi.myvoffice.com/chocolateme/index.html*** AND NOW ***The ‘X' Zone TV Channel on SimulTV - www.simultv.comThe ‘X' Zone TV Channel Radio Feed (Free - No Subscription Required) - https://www.spreaker.com/show/xztv-the-x-zone-tv-show-audio The ‘X' Chronicles Newspaper - www.xchroniclesnewspaper.com (Free)To contact Rob McConnell - misterx@xzoneradiotv.com

Democracy Paradox
Susan Rose-Ackerman on the Role of the Executive in Four Different Democracies

Democracy Paradox

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 43:40


Many of these things that you and I are talking about are simply initiatives put forward by the chief executive or maybe by a cabinet minister. Something they want to do and rather than something that they're required to do. And it seems to me that that's a rather fragile base on which to build a more effective participatory process, which doesn't give up on the role of technocracy and expertise.Susan Rose-AckermanA full transcript is available at www.democracyparadox.com or a short review of Democracy and Executive Power: Policymaking Accountability in the US, the UK, Germany, and France here.Susan Rose-Ackerman joins the podcast to discuss her new book Democracy and Executive Power: Policymaking Accountability in the US, the UK, Germany, and France. Susan is the Henry R. Luce Professor Emeritus of Law and Political Science at Yale University.Key Highlights IncludeHow have executives handled the pandemicDifferences between the executives of Germany, France, UK and USHow different executives make rules to implement public statutesDescription of deliberative democracy used in France to create environmental policiesIs the administrative state democratic Key LinksDemocracy and Executive Power: Policymaking Accountability in the US, the UK, Germany, and France by Susan Rose-AckermanSusan Rose-Ackerman on WikipediaEPuM Interview with Susan Rose-Ackerman on YouTubeRelated ContentLee Drutman Makes the Case for Multiparty Democracy in AmericaWilliam G. Howell and Terry M. Moe on the PresidencyMore from the PodcastMore InformationDemocracy GroupApes of the State created all MusicEmail the show at jkempf@democracyparadox.comFollow on Twitter @DemParadoxFollow on Instagram @democracyparadoxpodcast100 Books on Democracy

In Sumter with Sarah Jane
Kipper Ackerman, The Sounds of Grace and Amedysis Hospice

In Sumter with Sarah Jane

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 43:28


We've got THE Kipper Ackerman on this week's epsiode of In Sumter with Sarah Jane.If you don't know Kipper Ackerman, you're going to want to after this. By day, Kipper works with Amedysis hospice, caring for patients across Sumter county, but she is also classically trained harpist and just all-around fantastic person. With The Sounds of Grace, Kipper and her fellow musicians are able to combine those two worlds, bringing beautiful melodies and harmonies to those in need. Don't miss this episode and don't miss The Sounds of Grace Homegrown concert at the Opera House on Nov. 11!Tix available here: https://www.sumteroperahouse.com/homegrowntixBe sure to follow Sarah Jane Sumter Realtor on Facebook and @Sumter_SarahJane on Instagram for more updates on the show!In Sumter with Sarah Jane is a part of The Item Podcast Network proudly presented by SKF Sumter — Welcome to the world of reliable rotation. To apply today, go to SKF.com

Sports on a Sunday Morning
October 24th, 2021, 10-11, Blues, Steve Kelly, Travis Ford, NFL Picks

Sports on a Sunday Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 39:40


Tom Ackerman talks Blues hockey with Brian Kelly. Steve Kelly, Host of the Illini Sports Network joins Ackerman talking about the crazt nine OT game for Illinois at Penn State. SLU Basketball Coach Travis Ford talks about the upcoming Billiken season. Finally, NFL picks with Lauren Lovett. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Off The Wall Podcast
10/22 HR 2 – Dylan Ackerman, Coby Pope, Glide football / Pac-12 preview / MLB playoffs

Off The Wall Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 47:29


On this episode of Off The Wall, Joey Keeran shares an interview he did with Glide football players Dylan Ackerman and Coby Pope. Joey shares his thoughts on matchups for the Beavers, Ducks and the Pac-12. Plus he chimes in with some thoughts on the MLB Playoffs.

4th and JAWN
4th and Jawn - Episode 238 - Dennis Ackerman Helps Us Breakdown the Raiders

4th and JAWN

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 59:07


Gayle, Evan and Prime talk with BLEAV reporter Dennis Ackerman ahead of the Eagles/Raiders game. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

RNZ: Nine To Noon
Sports commentator Sam Ackerman

RNZ: Nine To Noon

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 13:54


It's been a sad week for New Zealand Rugby with the death of Sean Wainui, Sam Cane returns to the All Blacks after injury ahead of the USA test and the Black Caps are up against Pakistan in the T20 World Cup.

RNZ: Nine To Noon
Sports commentator Sam Ackerman

RNZ: Nine To Noon

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 13:54


It's been a sad week for New Zealand Rugby with the death of Sean Wainui, Sam Cane returns to the All Blacks after injury ahead of the USA test and the Black Caps are up against Pakistan in the T20 World Cup.

Off The Wall Podcast
DC Sports Spotlight: Coby Pope, Dylan Ackerman, Halli Vaughn, Cydni Dill, Samantha McDowell

Off The Wall Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 47:50


This week on DC Sports Spotlight, Joey Keeran talked with Coby Pope and Dylan Ackerman from Glide football (10:30) and seniors Halli Vaughn, Cydni Dill and Samantha McDowell from North Douglas volleyball (21:30). DC Sports Spotlight is broadcast live at Mountain Mike's Pizza in Roseburg. About DC Sports Spotlight: DC Sports Spotlight is a one-hour...

The 'X' Zone Broadcast Network
Rob McConnell Interviews - MIKE ACKERMAN - Paranormal Experiences

The 'X' Zone Broadcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 41:27


Mike has had 3 Paranormal experiences and is a believer: 1971, Mike was shaken awake in rooming house, and owner later told him that a ghost was responsible. In 1982, Mike had a short OBE after reading a Carrington Muldoon book. In 2006, Mike visited restaurant built by his grandfather where staff have SEEN a ghost. Description fits his grandfather. - http://mxi.myvoffice.com/chocolateme/index.html Now listen to all our XZBN shows, with our compliments go to: https://www.spreaker.com/user/xzoneradiotv or www.xzoneuniverse.com *** AND NOW *** The ‘X' Zone TV Channel on SimulTV - www.simultv.com The ‘X' Zone TV Channel Radio Feed (Free - No Subscription Required) - https://www.spreaker.com/show/xztv-the-x-zone-tv-show-audio The ‘X' Chronicles Newspaper - www.xchroniclesnewspaper.com (Free) To contact Rob McConnell - misterx@xzoneradiotv.com

The 'X' Zone Broadcast Network
Rob McConnell Interviews - MIKE ACKERMAN - Paranormal Experiences

The 'X' Zone Broadcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 41:27


Mike has had 3 Paranormal experiences and is a believer: 1971, Mike was shaken awake in rooming house, and owner later told him that a ghost was responsible. In 1982, Mike had a short OBE after reading a Carrington Muldoon book. In 2006, Mike visited restaurant built by his grandfather where staff have SEEN a ghost. Description fits his grandfather. - http://mxi.myvoffice.com/chocolateme/index.html Now listen to all our XZBN shows, with our compliments go to: https://www.spreaker.com/user/xzoneradiotv or www.xzoneuniverse.com *** AND NOW *** The ‘X' Zone TV Channel on SimulTV - www.simultv.com The ‘X' Zone TV Channel Radio Feed (Free - No Subscription Required) - https://www.spreaker.com/show/xztv-the-x-zone-tv-show-audio The ‘X' Chronicles Newspaper - www.xchroniclesnewspaper.com (Free) To contact Rob McConnell - misterx@xzoneradiotv.com

Best Hour of Their Day
470. "Adapting is not scaling." | Jenna Muri-Rosenthal, Fit to Function

Best Hour of Their Day

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 50:49


Adapting a workout is not the same thing as scaling a workout. In this episode of the Best Hour of Their Day Podcast, Ackerman sits down with Speech-Language Pathologist, Certified Brain​ Injury Specialist, and CF-L2 Trainer at Invictus Boston, Jenna Muri-Rosenthal, to discuss the impacts of exercise on brain health - specifically with individuals who have sustained a bran injury. So you never miss an episode, subscribe on YouTube and on all major podcasting platforms at Best Hour of Their Day. If you want to learn more about our sponsors, Doc Spartan, WheelPay, and RX Smart Gear, checkout docspartan.com, wheelpay.com, and rxsmartgear.com. At checkout, use the code BESTHOUR to get 15% off all DocSpartan purchases and 10% off all RX Smart Gear purchases. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/jason-ackerman/support

Train Happy Podcast
72: Binge Eating Disorder with Kirsten Ackerman RD

Train Happy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 69:53


cw: We will be discussing Binge Eating Disorder. ⁣ If this episode resonates with you please get the help & support you deserve. ⁣ UK: https://www.beateatingdisorders.org.uk/⁣ US: https://www.nationaleatingdisorders.org/help-support/contact-helpline⁣ ⁣ This week I am joined by Kirsten Ackerman, an Intuitive Eating Dietitian who helps people heal their relationship with food. ⁣ We discuss what Binge Eating is, the role of restriction and how Intuitive Eating principles can help those going through recovery. ⁣ ⁣ Follow Kirsten Ackerman here: ⁣ @theintuitive_rd⁣ https://linktr.ee/theintuitive_rd⁣ ⁣ TRAIN HAPPY GREECE 2022 RETREAT:⁣ https://tallyrye.co.uk/events/the-train-happy-retreat-greece-2022/⁣ ⁣ Train Happy Trouper of the Week: ⁣ DM @trainhappypodcast ⁣

War College
How 9/11 Led to a 'Reign of Terror'

War College

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 39:19


The Forever War. It may be gone from Afghanistan but it's not gone from our hearts. Our minds. Our souls. The body politic is riddled with the consequences of the last twenty years of conflict. The Department of Homeland Security is my go to. The first half of my life it didn't exist. Now I am faced with the consequences of its disastrous policies on a daily basis.With us today is Spencer Ackerman. Ackerman is a journalist and war correspondent who has spent his entire career reporting one the Forever War. His new book is Reign of Terror: How the 9/11 Era Destabilized America and Produced Trump. It's an excellent book. It has the feel of a journalist stopping midway through a career turning behind them and asking “What the fuck just happened?”Angry Planet has a substack! Join the Information War to get weekly insights into our angry planet and hear more conversations about a world in conflict.https://angryplanet.substack.com/subscribeYou can listen to Angry Planet on iTunes, Stitcher, Google Play or follow our RSS directly. Our website is angryplanetpod.com. You can reach us on our Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/angryplanetpodcast/; and on Twitter: @angryplanetpod. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

RNZ: Nine To Noon
Sports commentator Sam Ackerman

RNZ: Nine To Noon

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 15:07


Sam wonders if two of Team NZ's biggest names, Peter Burling and Blair Tuke will part ways with the America's Cup syndicate. They're essentially keeping their options open and not committing until they know more about how the competition will play out. Sam also talks to Kathryn about a Commonwealth Games revamp and Sonny Bill Williams memoir.

RNZ: Nine To Noon
Sports commentator Sam Ackerman

RNZ: Nine To Noon

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 15:07


Sam wonders if two of Team NZ's biggest names, Peter Burling and Blair Tuke will part ways with the America's Cup syndicate. They're essentially keeping their options open and not committing until they know more about how the competition will play out. Sam also talks to Kathryn about a Commonwealth Games revamp and Sonny Bill Williams memoir.

The Marc Cox Morning Show
10-14-21 Hour 2: Tom Ackerman

The Marc Cox Morning Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 27:57


Could the NFL award St Louis an expansion team to settle the lawsuit over the St Louis Rams?  Ackerman doubts it. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Fundraising Superheroes
Sybil Ackerman-Munson Dicusses the 3 Types of Donors

Fundraising Superheroes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 23:50


We all know how important segmentation is, but how can you use donor segments to create more meaningful communication with our supporters?  Sybil Ackerman-Munson is a philanthropy professional with over two decades of experience working with donors to establish the best fundraising practices that will help them to avoid costly mistakes. She helps them make a true impact and meaningful difference in the world through their donations. She joins the show to share her top 3 donor segments and how you can shape your communications to match these 3 types of donors. Connect With Sybil https://www.doyourgood.com/ https://www.doyourgood.com/blog https://www.facebook.com/doyourgood https://www.linkedin.com/in/sybil-ackerman-munson-847b428/ https://www.instagram.com/doyourgood/ https://twitter.com/MunsonSybil Crack the Code Course: https://www.doyourgood.com/crack-the-code Learn More About Driven trustdriven.com

None of the Above
Episode 14: Insecure

None of the Above

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 31:39


Although President Biden has ended the war in Afghanistan, America's twenty-year global war on terror has not yet drawn to a close. Initiated by the Bush administration, and waged in various forms under four presidents, the war on terror has shaped not just US foreign policy, but many aspects of American life. This week, the Eurasia Group Foundation's Mark Hannah is joined by Spencer Ackerman, whose new book, Reign of Terror: How the 9/11 Era Destabilized America and Produced Trump contends that the Trump administration was no aberration. Charting the war on terror through the Bush, Obama, and Trump administrations, Ackerman shows how this war inflamed America's nativist impulses  and spurred authoritarian tools of domestic surveillance.  To listen to more episodes or learn more about None Of The Above, go to www.noneoftheabovepodcast.org. To learn more about the Eurasia Group Foundation, please visit www.egfound.org and subscribe to our newsletter.  Spencer Ackerman is the author of Reign of Terror: How the 9/11 Era Destabilized America and Produced Trump and the Substack, Forever Wars. He is also a contributing editor at the Daily Beast, where he was a senior national correspondent from 2017 to 2021.

Best Hour of Their Day
467. "You can't be "fit" unless you are healthy first." | Royi Metser, InsideTracker

Best Hour of Their Day

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 48:51


There is a reason nutrition is at the bottom of the pyramid for the theoretical hierarchy of an athlete - the only way to build a house with a strong foundation is from the ground up. Start from inside your body and work your way out. Learn more about how to successfully accomplish this by listening in to Ackerman's interview with Royi Metser with InsideTracker (www.insidetracker.com). So you never miss an episode, subscribe on YouTube and on all major podcasting platforms at Best Hour of Their Day. If you want to learn more about our sponsors, Doc Spartan, WheelPay, and RX Smart Gear, checkout docspartan.com, wheelpay.com, and rxsmartgear.com. At checkout, use the code BESTHOUR to get 15% off all DocSpartan purchases and 10% off all RX Smart Gear purchases. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/jason-ackerman/support

InsideAuto Podcast
Creating Supply Chain Harmony and Encouraging Innovation with Neil Ackerman

InsideAuto Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 29:43


Neil Ackerman is the Head of Global Supply Chain Innovation Hubs in the Americas, Europe, Middle East, and Africa for Johnson & Johnson. He is an industry expert in supply chain fulfillment, integrated business planning, and marketplaces. Because of his extensive knowledge, he's been featured in numerous best-selling books including, Amazon Unbound, Always Day One, Behemoth Amazon Rising, and AI in The Wild. Before joining Johnson & Johnson, Neil worked in Israel as the Managing Director for global supply chain innovation in the Middle East and Africa. He also held various positions at Amazon, including as the Senior Manager for Business Development and Strategic Planning and the General Manager and Inventor of the Amazon Small and Light program. He holds 11 US patents with Amazon.com and has appeared in The Wall Street Journal, Forbes, and numerous international publications. In this episode… Recent disruptions in supply chain management have had a major impact on the production and provision of goods and services — and innovation hasn't been left untouched, either. These issues have caused friction among manufacturers, suppliers, retailers, and customers. However, when handled well, such disruptions can help bring about better changes and great improvements in the way things are done.  In the case of Amazon, the company caused a lot of friction when it spearheaded online sales innovation and disrupted the normal supply chain in the market. However, it also brought about harmony by shifting the focus to delighting their customers. All of this applies to any kind of business, including dealerships, where the most successful dealers are those that are fully committed to delighting their customers. In this episode of the InsideAuto Podcast, Aharon Horwitz is joined by Neil Ackerman, the Head of Global Supply Chain Innovation Hubs at Johnson & Johnson, to find out how creating harmony in a disrupted supply chain can lead to innovations and customer delight. Neil talks about common challenges faced by businesses due to delayed deliveries, the importance of partnerships, and how disruptions in the supply chain can impact innovation. Stay tuned.

RNZ: Nine To Noon
Sports commentator Sam Ackerman - Benji Marshall retires

RNZ: Nine To Noon

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 13:18


Sam looks back on Benji Marshall's remarkable rugby league career and says he is easily the most admired NZ player ever in the eyes of most Australians. He also talks to Kathryn about the demise of Manu Vatuvei, women's rugby, and the NPC.

Wings Of...Inspired Business
642 Do Your Good: Philanthropic Entrepreneur Sybil Ackerman-Munson on How Your Company Can Make a Difference

Wings Of...Inspired Business

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 46:18


Sybil Ackerman-Munson, with decades of experience in philanthropy, has helped businesses large and small contribute over $45 million. Founder of Do Your Good, she offers guidance to individuals, entrepreneurs, and businesses seeking to “give back”, redistribute wealth, address the planet's most intractable problems, all while building their financial legacy. Listen today as we talk about how entrepreneurs can be a force for social good, and how to transform your company with a social impact model.

Burning the Couch
Community Mental Health with Kristen Ackerman, LMFT

Burning the Couch

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 56:17


Pim & Micaela discuss working in community mental health with guest speaker Kristen Ackerman, LMFT. Kristen has worked with underserved populations in both clinical and administrative roles. Tune in to this episode for the pros and cons of working as a community therapist, and a special shoutout to other helpers in the field!

Best Hour of Their Day
464. "CrossFit can change the course of healthcare." | Robb Wolf, Paleolithic Nutrition Expert

Best Hour of Their Day

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 60:32


"Fitness is a rounding error in the ledger of medicine, and CrossFit can change the course of healthcare." In today's episode of the Best Hour Podcast, Ackerman sits down with a CrossFit OG, Robb Wolf to talk about nutrition, the importance of salt, jiu-jitsu, and some other fun and interesting topics. So you never miss an episode, subscribe on YouTube and on all major podcasting platforms at Best Hour of Their Day. If you want to learn more about our sponsors, Doc Spartan, WheelPay, and RX Smart Gear, checkout docspartan.com, wheelpay.com, and rxsmartgear.com. At checkout, use the code BESTHOUR to get 15% off all DocSpartan purchases and 10% off all RX Smart Gear purchases. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/jason-ackerman/support

The AI Podcast
Maya Ackerman on LyricStudio, an AI-Based Writing Songwriting Assistant - Ep. 153

The AI Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 23:14


Lennon and McCartney. Ashford and Simpson. Many of our all-time favorite tunes have come from songwriting duos. Now, anyone can find a snazzy compositional partner in AI. Maya Ackerman is the CEO of WaveAI, a Silicon Valley startup using AI and machine learning to, as the company motto puts it, “unlock new heights of human creative expression.” She spoke with NVIDIA AI Podcast host Noah Kravitz about WaveAI's LyricStudio software, an AI-based lyric and poetry writing assistant. https://blogs.nvidia.com/blog/2021/10/06/lyricstudio-ai-podcast/

Wine, Women and Words
Unpacking "Radar Girls" with Sara Ackerman

Wine, Women and Words

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 25:13


Sara Ackerman discusses her latest novel,"Radar Girls." We discuss the real-life inspiration behind the novel, her writing process with a new novel and how she approached creating her cast of supporting characters. Be sure to check out our shop on Bookshop.org to be able to help support independent bookstores and this podcast. You can find "Radar Girls" under "Featured Books;" our book of the month, "The Collector's Daughter" in our 'Book of the Month' shop. 

Love Your Bod Pod
#122 Restriction for Medical/Health Issues and Binge Eating with Kirsten Ackerman, The Intuitive RD

Love Your Bod Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 61:44


In today's episode, we talk extensively about restriction and binge eating specifically as it relates to medical and health issues, including PCOS, Diabetes, IBS, Weight Loss Surgery, and more. This is in response to my viral TikTok video about the 4 types of restrictions that lead to binge eating. If you have health issues or medical reasons to restrict food but find yourself binge eating this episode is for you. Kirsten Ackerman MS, RD, CDN The Intuitive RD Instagram: @theintuitive_rd Podcast: Intuitive Bites Podcast Find Cara Instagram: @Caraskitchen Join Food Body Soul

Madam Athlete
Communicating Your Vision with Sports Medicine Physician Kate Ackerman

Madam Athlete

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 40:04


On today's episode, I'm talking with Dr. Kate Ackerman, a sports medicine physician and endocrinologist.Kate is an incredible force in sports medicine research, specifically helping to close the gap in knowledge on female athletes.She shares her journey, from a collegiate rower who didn't become interested in medicine until later on in college to a leader in the field of sports medicine. Studying what interested her, Kate completed not one, but two fellowships in endocrinology and sports medicine in addition to a masters of public health. Her unique background set her up to be chosen as a leader of the Wu Tsai Human Performance Alliance. A former national team lightweight rower herself, Kate now serves as a team doctor for USRowing and is the chair of the USRowing Medical Commission.We talk about: Communicating your vision to help get others on boardHaving hard conversations for the health of an athleteBuilding support systems for the times you feel like you're in it aloneTo get the latest tools to help you build your own career right now, check out these FREE resources at Madam Athlete:Negotiation: Grab your worksheet to prepare yourself for your next negotiationGoal-Setting Mini Course:  Get started in the FREE Goal-Setting mini-course today!Managing Perfectionism:  Download my 3 favorite exercises to fight off perfectionismBook Club:  Sign up here to join the book clubKeep an eye out for new content or let us know what you'd like to see next by following us on social:Instagram:  @theMadamAthleteFacebook:  @MadamAthleteTwitter:  @MadamAthlete

Best Hour of Their Day
461. "Set performance goals and never stop learning." | Brent Fikowski, "The Professor"

Best Hour of Their Day

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 66:39


How you do one thing is how you do anything. Brent Fikowski, Games athlete and entrepreneur, knows a little something about goal setting. And we bet you did not know how much he loves to listen to and talk about music. Check out episode 461 of the Best Hour of Their Day Podcast to hear Ackerman's interview with Fikowski. So you never miss an episode, subscribe on YouTube and on all major podcasting platforms at Best Hour of Their Day. If you want to learn more about our sponsors, Doc Spartan, WheelPay, and RX Smart Gear, checkout docspartan.com, wheelpay.com, and rxsmartgear.com. At checkout, use the code BESTHOUR to get 15% off all DocSpartan purchases and 10% off all RX Smart Gear purchases. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/jason-ackerman/support

Intercepted with Jeremy Scahill
The Long-Lasting Consequences of the War on Terror

Intercepted with Jeremy Scahill

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 45:23


The United States flew its last military flight out of Afghanistan, ending the 20-year war in the country — the longest in U.S. history. This week on Intercepted: Journalist Spencer Ackerman discusses his new book, "Reign of Terror: How the 9/11 Era Destabilized America and Produced Trump." In 2001, the George W. Bush administration used the 9/11 attacks to launch the war on terror — an era that led to two massive wars, countless lives lost, mass domestic surveillance, the rounding up of immigrants and people of color, a strengthened security state, drone assassinations, and human rights abuses. And it's far from over, says Ackerman. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes
The War on Terror with Spencer Ackerman

Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 52:45


Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Spencer Ackerman joins to discuss catalysts for the War on Terror, inflection points, recent developments in Kabul, and the role of U.S. hegemony in continued global combat. Ackerman also talks about his new book, “Reign of Terror: How the 9/11 Era Destabilized America and Produced Trump,” which tells the story of how the weaponized bigotry that fueled the war on terror after 9/11 created the conditions for Trumpism and increased threats to American democracy.