Podcasts about Library of Congress

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(de facto) national library of the United States of America

  • 1,454PODCASTS
  • 3,988EPISODES
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  • Nov 26, 2021LATEST

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Best podcasts about Library of Congress

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Latest podcast episodes about Library of Congress

The Douglas Coleman Show
The Douglas Coleman Show w_ Donna Conrad and Jocie McKade

The Douglas Coleman Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 48:10


DONNA CONRAD is an award-winning author, journalist, activists, and teacher. Her core values revolve around individual empowerment, a sustaining ideal running through the books she writes, as well as her varied interest in the arts and sciences. Her memoir, House of the Moon; Surviving the Sixties has received critical acclaim. The first of her four-book historical fiction series, The Last Magdalene, is scheduled for publication April 2022. She is represented by Creative Edge Publicity.https://donnaconrad.com/house-moon-surviving-sixties/Jocie McKade worked at several jobs before landing her ideal one as a librarian, a perfect segue to becoming an author. With a soft spot for U.S. Veterans, she chaired her local Veteran's Oral History Project, and her work with the program lead to her speaking before the project committee at the U.S. Library of Congress. She has won several awards for her non-fiction writing on a multitude of subjects. Her fiction writing has received the Author / Ambassador at Library Journal Self-e Authors, Winner Queen of the West Reader Favorite Award, Amazon Bestseller - Historical, Double finalist in the Next Generation Indie Book Awards in the Mystery and Humorous Categories, and her novel Baer Truth received 4.5 stars from RT Book Reviews.Writing romantic comedy and humorous cozy fiction, Jocie can find humor in most everything. She lives in the Midwest on Dust Bunny Farm with her family and Diesel the Wonder Dog. When not writing, she grows ArnoldSwartzaWeeds in her garden and camps whenever the opportunity presents itself.http://jociemckade.comThe Douglas Coleman Show now offers audio and video promotional packages for music artists as well as video promotional packages for authors. We also offer advertising. Please see our website for complete details. http://douglascolemanshow.comIf you have a comment about this episode or any other, please click the link below.https://ratethispodcast.com/douglascolemanshow

Midday
Baltimore Poet Kondwani Fidel and MD's Poet Laureate Grace Cavalieri

Midday

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 32:16


Now, we turn our attention to two of Maryland's most prominent voices in the world of poetry. A little later in the program, Tom speaks with our state's poet laureate, Grace Cavalieri. But we're joined first by Baltimore poet Kondwani Fidel. Last year, he released his debut poetry EP “The Mud Was Made For Us.” He's also the author of the non-fiction book, The Anti-Racist: How to Start the Conversation About Race and Take Action,and he's featured in the short film, Hummingbirds in the Trenches.  He holds a Master's Degree in Creative Writing and Publishing Arts from the University of Baltimore. He's a professor at Coppin State University. Kondwani Fidel joins us on Zoom. Poet, playwright and author Grace Cavalieri has served as Maryland's poet laureate since 2018. She's written 26 books and chapbooks of poetry, and she's had more than two dozen plays produced in theaters across the country. Her latest books are calledGrace Art: Poems and Painting, and The Secret Letters of Madame de Staél .  Grace is also the founder of The Poet and the Poem, a radio show and later, a podcast that she has hosted for 44 years. It's currently available through the Library of Congress. Grace Cavalieri joins us on Zoom from Annapolis. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Commonwealth Club of California Podcast
San Francisco Federal Reserve President Mary Daly: Monetary Policy in Uncertain Times

Commonwealth Club of California Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 70:40


Mary C. Daly is the president and CEO of the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco. She returns to The Commonwealth Club for a much-anticipated discussion on how to approach monetary policy amidst the uncertainty of an economy still struggling to overcome the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic. Since taking office in October 2018, Dr. Daly has committed to making the San Francisco Fed a more community-engaged bank that is transparent and responsive to the people it serves. She works to connect economic principles to real-world concerns and concentrates on monetary policy, labor economics, and increasing diversity within the economics field. Dr. Daly began her career with the San Francisco Fed in 1996 as an economist specializing in labor market dynamics and economic inequality. She went on to become the bank's executive vice president and director of research. She currently serves on advisory boards for the Center for First-generation Student Success and the Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs at Syracuse University. She has also served on the advisory boards of the Congressional Budget Office, the Social Security Administration, the Office of Rehabilitation Research and Training, the Institute of Medicine, and the Library of Congress. Dr. Daly earned a bachelor's degree from the University of Missouri-Kansas City, a master's degree from the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign and a Ph.D. from Syracuse University. She also completed a National Institute of Aging post-doctoral fellowship at Northwestern University. A native of Ballwin, Missouri, Dr. Daly now lives in Oakland, California, with her wife Shelly. SPEAKERS Mary C. Daly President and CEO, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco. Lenny Mendonca Former Chief Economic and Business Advisor, Director of the Office of Business and Economic Development, State of California; Member, Commonwealth Club Board of Governors In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, we are currently hosting all of our live programming via YouTube live stream. This program was recorded via video conference on November 16th, 2021 by the Commonwealth Club of California. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Commonwealth Club of California Podcast
San Francisco Federal Reserve President Mary Daly: Monetary Policy in Uncertain Times

Commonwealth Club of California Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 70:40


Mary C. Daly is the president and CEO of the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco. She returns to The Commonwealth Club for a much-anticipated discussion on how to approach monetary policy amidst the uncertainty of an economy still struggling to overcome the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic. Since taking office in October 2018, Dr. Daly has committed to making the San Francisco Fed a more community-engaged bank that is transparent and responsive to the people it serves. She works to connect economic principles to real-world concerns and concentrates on monetary policy, labor economics, and increasing diversity within the economics field. Dr. Daly began her career with the San Francisco Fed in 1996 as an economist specializing in labor market dynamics and economic inequality. She went on to become the bank's executive vice president and director of research. She currently serves on advisory boards for the Center for First-generation Student Success and the Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs at Syracuse University. She has also served on the advisory boards of the Congressional Budget Office, the Social Security Administration, the Office of Rehabilitation Research and Training, the Institute of Medicine, and the Library of Congress. Dr. Daly earned a bachelor's degree from the University of Missouri-Kansas City, a master's degree from the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign and a Ph.D. from Syracuse University. She also completed a National Institute of Aging post-doctoral fellowship at Northwestern University. A native of Ballwin, Missouri, Dr. Daly now lives in Oakland, California, with her wife Shelly. SPEAKERS Mary C. Daly President and CEO, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco. Lenny Mendonca Former Chief Economic and Business Advisor, Director of the Office of Business and Economic Development, State of California; Member, Commonwealth Club Board of Governors In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, we are currently hosting all of our live programming via YouTube live stream. This program was recorded via video conference on November 16th, 2021 by the Commonwealth Club of California. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Breakthrough Builders
Educating the World: Geetha Murali @ Room to Read

Breakthrough Builders

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 43:53


Geetha Murali, CEO of Room to Read, talks with Jesse about her work in ending illiteracy and gender inequality, the importance of consistent skill building in one's career, reflections on a career shift, and her vision for the future of education. Geetha shares how her mom refused a marriage at 13, leaving home to become a nurse and move to the United States. Geetha shares how her mother's determination and father's affable serenity helped shape her growth and values in ways that helped her become an effective builder. She shares insights into how education changes and benefits children, and their communities, including success stories she has helped build at Room to Read. Geetha shares practical insights on how she collaborates with local leaders, governments, and schools to create sustainable change, and about how Room to Read has scaled with the goal of impacting 40 million children by 2025. She shares her transition from statistician to non-profit leader to CEO and her thoughts on how to have a positive impact no matter where you work. She shares her secrets to success, including how she views the importance of education and relationships. How does education influence your success and the success of the people you care about? How do relationships and cooperation factor into your success? How do you plan your career to include meaningful impact? How do you rethink your strategy to scale into the future?(6:28) How Geetha learned the value of education from her mother's trailblazing journey(16:08) Geetha describes moving beyond achieving goals, to fulfilling her purpose(24:05) How Room to Read grew to impact 40 million children worldwide(33:05) The central role that reading plays in developing empathy(34:44) Advice for anyone pursuing a career in the nonprofit sector(38:51) Jesse asks: Which influential people do you want to meet through your work?Guest BioDr. Geetha Murali is the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of Room to Read, an organization that believes World Change Starts with Educated Children.® Room to Read is creating a world free from illiteracy and gender inequality by helping children in low-income communities develop literacy skills and a habit of reading, and by supporting girls to build skills to succeed in school and negotiate key life decisions. The organization collaborates with governments and other partner organizations to deliver positive outcomes for children at scale. Room to Read has benefitted more than 18 million children across 16 countries and 37,000 communities and aims to reach 40 million children by 2025.As Chief Executive Officer (CEO), Geetha oversees Room to Read's global operations, which include programmatic work in 16 countries, a global network of investors and volunteer chapters, and a worldwide staff of approximately 1,600 employees.Geetha on Twitter: https://twitter.com/gkmuraliRoom to Read Website: https://www.roomtoread.org/Helpful LinksSo Good They Can't Ignore You, a book recommended by Geetha that was seminal to her early in her role as Room to Read's CEO“How to Citizen” podcast by Baratunde Thurston Room to Read success story of KamlaBBC World Radio interview on COVID-19 impact on girls' educationGeetha op-ed on the power of books on our mind“Six Terrific Book Ideas for Getting Girls into Tech” interview with Geetha Murali and Youtube CEO Susan Wojcicki in Wired MagazineGeetha's background and story, shared by the Shakti CollaborativeMichelle Obama & Julia Roberts meet with Room to Read kids in VietnamAward from the Library of Congress for Room to Read's special response to COVID-19

The Health Design Podcast
Mary Donovan, Assistant Dean Georgetown University School of Medicine in Washington, DC.

The Health Design Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 31:49


Mary Donovan is the Assistant Dean for Standardized Patients (SPs) & Experiential Learning at Georgetown University School of Medicine in Washington, DC. She has served at Georgetown as administrative director and educator for the Integrated Learning and Simulation Center since 2007, providing medical students with clinical learning and assessment opportunities through SP education and simulation. These methodologies use professionally trained actors, retired teachers and others to portray specific patients and families in a broad spectrum of healthcare experiences for learners – a safe space to develop clinical and communication skills and receive feedback from the patient perspective. Prior to Georgetown, she held a faculty position as senior SP trainer at Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, and as academic-affairs staff at Johns Hopkins Medical School. Prior to her work in med-ed experiential learning, she managed a forum of women in international trade and diplomacy, taught as adjunct faculty on Georgetown's main campus in the mid-90s, served as marketing manager for a B2B organization, and as chapter liaison for a national trade association. In the early days of online journal search-and-retrieval and library automation, she worked as a researcher at the National Library of Medicine, Library of Congress and other libraries. While in college and beyond, she worked for the UVa Hospital Education system, teaching children with disabilities from birth to age 21. Mary presented (virtually) at the Ottawa Conference in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, as a finalist for the IMU-RHIME Award for Innovation in March of 2020, and won an innovation award for her presentation at the international Association for Standardized Patient Educators in 2011. From 2016-18 she served as Chair for the Mid-Atlantic Consortium of med-school clinical-skills programs. In 2016, GUMC honored her as a “bridge-builder” in the Ongoing Engagement and Consultation initiative. She recently joined the editorial board for the Journal of Health Design, published in Melbourne, Australia. She joined the Screen Actors Guild in 1999; speaking roles to-date have landed on the cutting-room floor, but she (or her old Honda Civic) can be seen as background in various TV and film productions. Mary's artwork has sold in art fairs and hospital exhibitions, and through personal commissions. Her days as a publically performing singer and guitarist are largely in the past, but she dreams of resurrecting half-written original songs someday. Other work that will never retire – writing short stories, children's books, a memoir, a novel and personal essays. Meanwhile, she launched a blog/website in early 2021: marymuffindonovan.com She received her BA in English from the University of Virginia, MA in Liberal Studies from Georgetown University and MFA in Writing from Vermont College of Fine Arts. Twitter: @marydonobird Instagram: @maryfdonz Facebook: /mary.donovan.75457 Website: marymuffindonovan.com

The Sporkful
Will The Library Of Congress Cooking Club Rise Again?

The Sporkful

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 30:49


The Library of Congress is the biggest library in the world. It has 500,000 food books alone. A  library with that many books has a lot of librarians, with expertise in just about every region, culture, and period of history you can think of. Since 1949, the library's cooking club has drawn on that diversity of knowledge to bring together foods from all over the world. But by the 2000s, the club had lost steam and was nearly defunct. Could librarian LaVerne Page and database specialist Shirley Loo save the club? Dan travels to the club's annual holiday luncheon to find out — and to share some of his favorite librarian jokes. // Get 500+ more great Sporkful episodes from our catalog and lots of other Stitcher goodness when you sign up for Stitcher Premium: www.StitcherPremium.com/Sporkful (promo code: SPORKFUL). Transcript available at www.sporkful.com.

Richard Skipper Celebrates
Richard Skipper Celebrates Hirschfeld's New Season with David Leopold (11/12/21)

Richard Skipper Celebrates

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 63:00


For Video Edition, Please Click and Subscribe Here: https://youtu.be/4S8qoVnSzVw With a new season of the arts finally happening and audiences back in theaters, concert halls and museums, we wanted to explore how Al Hirschfeld viewed a new season. What did he draw, and what does it tell us about that season? For more than sixty years, Hirschfeld showed us the people and the productions we should look for as the season unfolded. Ten times over twelve years, Hirschfeld produced the faces of the new season as the cover of special sections for the paper that covered, theater, film, dance, television, music and the visual arts. David Leopold is an author and curator who has organized exhibitions for institutions around the country including the Library of Congress, the New York Public Library for the Performing Arts, the Norman Rockwell Museum at Stockbridge, and the Field Museum in Chicago. Internationally, he has curated shows for the Victoria and Albert Museum in London, the Filmmuseum in Frankfurt and Berlin. He organized the archive of Al Hirschfeld's work for the artist, visiting Hirschfeld in his studio at least once a week for thirteen years until the artist's death in 2003. Leopold is now the Creative Director for the Al Hirschfeld Foundation. His latest book, The Hirschfeld Century: A Portrait of the Artist and His Age, published by Alfred A. Knopf to coincide with a major retrospective that Leopold curated for the New York Historical Society has won universal acclaim. He has also authored a number of monographs on under-appreciated artists for various museums.

Poetry Unbound
Elizabeth Bishop — Sestina

Poetry Unbound

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 15:33


This sestina poem considers a scene from Elizabeth Bishop's own childhood through the sounds of six repeating words: house, grandmother, child, stove, almanac, tears. These six words repeat — in different order — as the final words of the poem's lines, creating a kind of contemplation on how those repeated words informed her childhood: a childhood marked by loss, displacement, and a kind grandmother. “Time to plant tears” the poem states, in one of its most famous lines, as if the scene recalled has information about the future.Elizabeth Bishop was an American poet and writer. She served as Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress from 1949 to 1950, was the Pulitzer Prize winner for Poetry in 1956, and won the National Book Award in 1970.Find the transcript for this show at onbeing.org.

Seriously…
How America Learned to Laugh Again

Seriously…

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 58:12


Twenty years ago - in the mind-numbing aftermath of the terrorist attacks on America - the immediate, mind-numbing response of the media was to ban laughter. All laughter, including jokes, chuckles and guffaws. This is the story of what happened next. With contributions from Private Eye to The Onion, via David Letterman, the News Quiz and Have I Got News for You. As well as 9/11 and the death of Bin Laden, Joe Queenan explores the pandemic and the US retreat from Afghanistan. "What a year 2021 has been – from the storming of the capitol in Washington to the fall of Kabul to the Taliban, this has not been a good time in the US. Probably not so great in the UK either. Throw in some riots, add in the climate crisis and the plague – none of this is worth the slightest lame joke. But is it worth a good joke?" With contributions from three US presidents, plus Ian Hislop and Adam MacQueen from Private Eye, Armando Iannuci (creator of The Death of Stalin), Susan Morrison of the New Yorker, and Robert Siegal editor of The Onion in 2001 - the first US publication to break the laughter ban with the headline, US Vows To Defeat Whoever It Is We Are At War With. A copy of that magazine is now in the Library of Congress. Also includes archive from David Letterman, Linda Grant, Michael Rosen, Rich Hall on Have I Got News for You, plus the News Quiz from September 2001. Joe Queenan is an Emmy Award-winning US broadcaster. His previous contributions to Archive on Four include Brief Histories on Blame, Shame and Failure. The producer for BBC Audio in Bristol is Miles Warde.

Mettle of Honor: Veteran Stories of Personal Strength, Courage, and Perseverance
(S1:E61) Final Flight Final Fight: My grandmother, the WASP, and Arlington National Cemetery

Mettle of Honor: Veteran Stories of Personal Strength, Courage, and Perseverance

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 31:23


Erin Miller is the proud granddaughter of Elaine Danforth Harmon, a member of the Women Air-force Service Pilots (WASP) during WWII. Her grandmother's last request was to be laid to rest at Arlington National Cemetery (ANC). After she died in April 2015, this request was denied by the US Army which runs ANC. Erin led a grassroots, social media, and direct lobbying campaign to fight the decision. This campaign was a success. On May 20, 2016, President Obama signed H.R. 4336, the bill introduced in Congress by Representative Martha McSally (AZ-2) in January 2016, which then became a law to officially recognize the service of WASP as eligible for ANC. The funeral was held on September 7, 2016, at ANC. This was followed by a family memorial service at the Women in Military Service for America Memorial, where Erin, her mother Terry, her sister Tiffany, Air Force pilots Lt. Col. Caroline Jensen, and Maj. Heather Penney and Representative Martha McSally spoke to honor Elaine's life and service. Erin is a licensed attorney in Maryland. She has a J.D. from the University of Maryland School of Law, a Master's in International Studies from the University of Leeds (UK), and a B.A. in History from the University of California, San Diego. Credits Written and curated by Sara Collini. Images and sources courtesy of the WASP Archive, The TWU Libraries' Woman's Collection, Texas Woman's University, Denton, Texas. National WASP WWII Museum, Portal to Texas History and IMLS. US Air Force Collection, Record Group 342, National Archives. Betty H. Carter Women Veterans Historical Project, The University of North Carolina at Greensboro. Veterans History Project, Library of Congress. Jacqueline Cochran Collection, Dwight D. Eisenhower Presidential Library, and Museum. US Air Force Official Website: https://www.af.mil/ Bibliography Cornelsen, Kathleen. “Women Airforce Service Pilots of World War II: Exploring Military Aviation, Encountering Discrimination, and Exchanging Traditional Roles in Service to America.” Journal of Women's History 17.4 (2005): 111–119. Hodgson, Marion Stegeman. Winning My Wings: A Woman Airforce Service Pilot in World War II. Annapolis: Naval Institute Press, 1996. Merryman, Molly. Clipped Wings: The Rise and Fall of the Women Airforce Service Pilots (WASPs) of World War II. New York: New York University Press, 1998. Noggle, Anne. For God, Country, and the Thrill of It: Women Airforce Service Pilots in World War II: Photographic Portraits and Text. College Station: Texas A&M University Press, 1990. Rickman, Sarah Byrn. Nancy Love and the WASP Ferry Pilots of World War II. Denton: University of North Texas Press, 2008. Sage, Jenny. “Ladies of Lockbourne: Women Airforce Service Pilots and the Mighty B-17 Flying Fortress.” Ohio History 124 (2017): 5–27. Strebe, Amy Goodpaster. Flying for Her Country: the American and Soviet Women Military Pilots of World War II. Westport: Praeger Security International, 2007. Yellin, Emily. Our Mothers' War: American Women at Home and at the Front During World War II. New York: Free Press, 2004. #YouveGotMettle | #WASP | Nichol Malachowski --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/mettle-of-honor/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/mettle-of-honor/support

Dreams of Black Wall Street (Formerly Black Wall Street 1921)
SE03 EP1: Wilmington, North Carolina Before the Insurrection of 1898

Dreams of Black Wall Street (Formerly Black Wall Street 1921)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 50:43


Journalist, podcast host and producer, Nia Clark, revisits often overlooked but important parts of North Carolina's history that have played a significant part in shaping some of the state's most influential African American communities such as Wilmington, Raleigh, James City, Princeville and Durham. Clark also begins a deep dive exploration of the city of Wilmington before the 1898 Wilmington Insurrection and Coup d'Etat. Guests on this episode include attorney, legal scholar and author of Jim Crow in North Carolina: The Legislative Program from 1865 to 1920, Richard Paschal, as well as North Carolina Central State University Law Professor Irving Joyner. Musical Attribution: 1. Title: African Moon by John Bartmann. License, disclaimer and copyright information: CC0 1.0 Universal (CC0 1.0) Public Domain Dedication https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/ Link to Music: https://freemusicarchive.org/music/John_Bartmann/Public_Domain_Soundtrack_Music_Album_One/african-moon 2. Title: Window Sparrows by Axletree. Licensed under a Attribution License. License, disclaimer and copyright information: Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) Link to music: https://freemusicarchive.org/music/Axletree/Ornamental_EP/Window_Sparrows Several musical selections are also provided by the American Folklife Center of the Library of Congress.

Dreams of Black Wall Street (Formerly Black Wall Street 1921)
Season 3 Introduction: Durham's Black Wall Street in the shadows of the 1898 Wilmington Insurrection and Coup d'Etat

Dreams of Black Wall Street (Formerly Black Wall Street 1921)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 16:46


Journalist, podcast host and producer, Nia Clark revisits often overlooked but important parts of North Carolina's history that have played a significant part in shaping some of the state's most influential African American communities such as Wilmington, Raleigh, James City, Princeville and Durham. Clark also begins a deep dive exploration of the city of Wilmington before the 1898 Wilmington Insurrection and Coup d'Etat. Guests on this episode include attorney, legal scholar and author of Jim Crow in North Carolina: The Legislative Program from 1865 to 1920, Richard Paschal, as well as North Carolina Central University Law Professor Irving Joyner. Musical Attribution: 1. Title: African Moon by John Bartmann. License, disclaimer and copyright information: CC0 1.0 Universal (CC0 1.0) Public Domain Dedication https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/ Link to Music: https://freemusicarchive.org/music/John_Bartmann/Public_Domain_Soundtrack_Music_Album_One/african-moon 2. Title: Window Sparrows by Axletree. Licensed under a Attribution License. License, disclaimer and copyright information: Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) Link to music: https://freemusicarchive.org/music/Axletree/Ornamental_EP/Window_Sparrows Several musical selections are also provided by the American Folklife Center of the Library of Congress.

Ready For Takeoff - Turn Your Aviation Passion Into A Career
RFT 458: Air Force/Airline Pilot J.A. Moad II

Ready For Takeoff - Turn Your Aviation Passion Into A Career

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 37:18


J.A. Moad II is a writer,  performer,  speaker, veteran and  pilot.  Advocate for the stories that cut deep—writing that makes us bleed. Crafting words to remind us that we are all human, struggling to find meaning and acceptance, strength and resilience as we break ourselves against the world, each of us with a hungered yearning for expression and a shared desire for those elusive, indefinable truths conveyed through the art of story. A former Air Force C-130 pilot with over a hundred combat sorties. He wrote and performed his award-winning play, Outside Paducah - the Wars at Home in which he was nominated for Outstanding Solo Performance by the New York Innovative Theater Awards (NYIT).  He was a finalist for the McKnight Fellowship in playwriting and is the recipient of the Consequence Magazine Fiction Award. He has performed at The Library of Congress and The Guthrie Theater in The Telling Project - Giving Voice to the Veteran Experience. He served as an English Professor at the United States Air Force Academy and continues to serve as an editor for their international journal, War, Literature & the Arts (WLA). His short stories, poetry and essays have appeared in a variety of journals and anthologies. He currently resides in Northfield, MN where he writes, lectures, and performs throughout the country while continuing to fly for a major airline.    

Folklife Today Podcast
La Llorona: Looking at a Ghost Story for Día de Muertos and Halloween

Folklife Today Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 54:35


This episode examines the story of La Llorona, the Weeping Woman of Mexican and Latin American ghostlore. Hosts Stephen Winick and John Fenn discuss Winick's research into the legend for the Folklife Today blog, and interview three guests. Camille Acosta, who wrote a thesis about the Llorona legend, talks about her research and the meanings the story has for kids and adults. Allina Migoni, the Latinx subject specialist for the American Folklife Center, talks about the importance of the La Llorona story for Mexican and Mexican American identity, as well as the connections between La Llorona and La Malinche, the enslaved Indigenous woman whose work as a translator helped Hernán Cortés conquer Mexico. Juan Dies speaks about La Llorona songs, as well as the figure of La Llorona in Mexican pop culture. More information on the songs as well as photos of some the singers and links to all the archival sources, can be found at https://blogs.loc.gov/folklife.

The Great Trials Podcast
Edward Larson | The State of Tennessee v. John Thomas Scopes | The Scopes Monkey Trial | Part 2

The Great Trials Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 83:55


Part two of our discussion with Edward Larson, Ph.D., J.D., author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning book Summer for the Gods: The Scopes Trial and America's Continuing Debate Over Science and Religion (Ed Larson).   Remember to rate and review GTP in iTunes: Click Here To Rate and Review   New! Watch on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCKdeO4IodggpSLyhWVdcWKw   Episode Details: Edward Larson, Ph.D., J.D., author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning book Summer for the Gods: The Scopes Trial and America's Continuing Debate Over Science and Religion and the Hugh and Hazel Darling Chair in Law and University Professor of History at Pepperdine University, explains the historical significance and societal impact of the landmark "Scopes Monkey Trial." In March 1925, the state of Tennessee passed the Butler Bill, which prohibited the teaching of evolution or anything but Divine Creation in schools. In response, the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) sought a test case and found one in Dayton, Tennessee science teacher John Scopes. During the eight-day trial, John Scopes pleaded not guilty to charges of violating the Butler Bill. He was represented by the ACLU and legendary trial attorney Clarence Darrow, who argued that the Butler Bill was unconstitutional and impeded basic freedom of religion rights. The special counsel for the prosecution was iconic American orator William Jennings Bryan, a political titan, former Secretary of State, celebrated speech maker and acclaimed U.S. Congressman who served as a major force behind the creation of the Butler Bill. The legal battle between Darrow and Bryan was truly an epic showdown, pitting two of the nation's best orators against one another in a court of law. On July 21, 1925, the jury returned a guilty verdict after nine minutes of deliberation, and Judge John Raulston ruled that John Scopes was ordered to pay a $100 fine for violating the Butler Bill. The verdict was overturned on a technicality at the Tennessee Supreme Court on January 15, 1927. In today's episode, learn why the Scopes trial is considered one of the most important cases in 20th century America and how it became the first trial to be broadcast live on the radio. Hear Edward Larson's analysis about the case, the precedents it set for Constitutional law in America and why the topic of evolution vs. creationism in schools is still being debated nearly 100 years later.   Click Here to Read/Download the Complete Trial Documents   Guest Bio: Edward Larson Ed Larson holds the Hugh and Hazel Darling Chair in Law and is University Professor of History at Pepperdine University. Originally from Ohio with a PhD in the history of science from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and law degree from Harvard, Larson has lectured on all seven continents and taught at Stanford Law School, University of Melbourne, Leiden University, and the University of Georgia, where he chaired the History Department. Prior to becoming a professor, Larson practiced law in Seattle and served as counsel for the US House of Representatives in Washington, DC. He received an honorary doctorate in humane letters from Ohio State University but still roots for the University of Wisconsin in football. Recipient of the Pulitzer Prize in History and numerous other awards for writing and teaching, Larson is the author or co-author of fourteen books and over one hundred published articles. His 2015 book, The Return of George Washington: Uniting the States, 1783-1789, was a New York Times Bestseller and resulted in Larson being invited to deliver the 2016 Supreme Court Historical Society lecture in Washington, give the annual Gaines Lecture at Mount Vernon, and serve as a featured presenter for the Library of Congress's Madison Council event. His other books, which have been translated into over twenty languages, include An Empire of Ice: Scott Shackleton, and the Heroic Age of Antarctic Science; A Magnificent Catastrophe: The Tumultuous Election of 1800, America's First Presidential Campaign; and the Pulitzer Prize winning Summer for the Gods: The Scopes Trial and America's Continuing Debate Over Science and Religion. Larson's articles have appeared in such varied publications as Nature, Atlantic Monthly, Science, Scientific American, Time, Wall Street Journal, American History, The Guardian, and dozens of law reviews. His latest book, On Earth and Science, was published by Yale University Press in 2017. A popular lecturer, Larson has taught short courses at universities in China, Europe, and South America; and given addresses at over 80 American universities. He was a resident scholar at the Rockefeller Foundation's Bellagio Study Center; held the Fulbright Program's John Adams Chair in American Studies; participated in the National Science Foundation's Antarctic Writers and Artists Program; and served as an inaugural Fellow at the Library for the Study of George Washington at Mount Vernon. A panelist on the National Institutes of Health's Study Section for Ethical, Legal, and Social Issues of the Human Genome Project, Larson is interviewed frequently for broadcast, print, cable, and internet media, including The Daily Show, The Today Show, and multiple appearances on PSB, BBC, the History Channel, C-SPAN, CNN, Fox News, MNBC, and NPR. Read Full Bio   Show Sponsors: Legal Technology Services - LegalTechService.com Digital Law Marketing - DigitalLawMarketing.com Harris Lowry Manton LLP - hlmlawfirm.com   Free Resources: Stages Of A Jury Trial - Part 1 Stages Of A Jury Trial - Part 2

5 Questions With Dan Schawbel
Episode 159: David Copperfield

5 Questions With Dan Schawbel

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 8:00


My guest today is magician and entertainer, David Copperfield. David is one of the greatest illusionists and most commercially successful magicians in history. He's won 21 Emmy Awards, 11 Guinness World Records, sold over 33 million tickets, and has been named a Living Legend by the U.S. Library of Congress. We talk about the history […]

Growing Bolder
Growing Bolder: Oceanographer and Author Sylvia Earle; Actor and Musician John Stamos; Philanthropist and Hotelier Harris Rosen

Growing Bolder

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 50:46


At the age of 86, Sylvia Earle is considered the most important oceanic eco warrior ever, named a living legend by the Library of Congress. It's a fascinating conversation with a woman who's spent her life studying the oceans and hopes we take steps now to save them.

Autism In Real Life
Episode 10: The Divide in the Autism Community with Russell Lehman

Autism In Real Life

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 37:55


Russell Lehmann: Speaker, Poet, AdvocateRussell Lehmann is an award-winning and internationally recognized motivational speaker and poet contextualizing autism, mental illness, and cannabis use. His words have been featured in the USA Today, LA Times, NPR, Yahoo! News, Success Magazine and archived in the Library of Congress.A graduate of MIT's “Leadership in the Digital Age” course, Russell sits on the national Board of Directors for The Arc and is a council member for the Autism Society of America. Russell has also been the Youth Ambassador for the mayor of Reno, Nevada, and a member of the Nevada Governor's Council on Developmental Disabilities as well as the Nevada Commission on Autism Spectrum Disorders.Russell showed signs of autism as a newborn, however, he was not formally diagnosed until the age of 12 after suffering through 5 weeks in a lockdown psychiatric facility.His new book, “On the Outside Looking In” recently hit bookstores nationwide.In 2018, Russell was named as Reno-Tahoe's “Most Outstanding Young Professional Under 40”.In 2019 & 2020, Russell lectured for the prestigious King's College of London and the Mohammed bin Rashid Center for Special Education in Abu Dhabi, respectively. Russell currently travels the world spreading hope, awareness, and compassion in a raw and dynamic fashion, while also setting his sights on erasing the stigma and stereotypes that come with having a disability. Russell's passion is to be a voice for the unheard, for he knows how difficult and frustrating it is to go unnoticed.Website and TestimonialsInstagramLinkedInFacebookYouTube

Banjo Hangout Newest 100 Songs
Western Country (TOTW)

Banjo Hangout Newest 100 Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021


Calvin Cole, recorded by the Library of Congress in the 1930's, played banjo for Peter Hoover in the 1960's and a CD was released with 37 cuts. It was said that in his 80's, Calvin was still dancing at the local Fancy Gap dances like he was a teenager. And his banjo speed on Western Country was twice mine!

Banjo Hangout Newest 100 Clawhammer and Old-Time Songs

Calvin Cole, recorded by the Library of Congress in the 1930's, played banjo for Peter Hoover in the 1960's and a CD was released with 37 cuts. It was said that in his 80's, Calvin was still dancing at the local Fancy Gap dances like he was a teenager. And his banjo speed on Western Country was twice mine!

How To Love Lit Podcast
Shirley Jackson - The Haunting Of Hill House - Episode 2 - Is Hill House Haunted Or Not?!

How To Love Lit Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 48:17


Shirley Jackson - The Haunting Of Hill House - Episode 2 - Is Hill House Haunted Or Not?!   I'm Christy Shriver and we're here to discuss books that have changed the world and have changed us.    And I'm Garry Shriver, and this is the How to Love Lit Podcast.     Read the first paragraph of chapter 2.    That is the first paragraph of chapter 2 of The Haunting of Hill House by Shirley Jackson.  This is episode 2 as we explore this haunted space- and Christy, haunted it is.  Last week, we spent a lot of time talking about Shirley Jackson and her relationship with her mother.  It was our argument that a lot of the terror she creates springs originally from the dysfunction of living with a toxic mother.  We introduced the idea of reality versus illusion and the difficulty of knowing one from the other- especially in these toxic relationships.  We introduced the idea of feeling trapped and alone.  All of these feelings metaphorically expressing themselves not just in the characters who populate the story, but also in the physical space- the haunted house itself.      And Jackson borrowed from every gothic trope she could find to build for us a very relatable creepy house-  it's so stereotypical, we have to wonder if that in itself is part of her strategy- which of course, it very much is.   But, why?  What is she expressing? Of course, we know that haunted houses do express evil and fear and always have. We, also know that houses, in and of themselves, occupy a very important place in our psyche.  As people, we have an incredibly powerful psychological attachment to the physical spaces that populate our lives.  Physical spaces can bring us memories; as in favorite vacation destinations, they can be sacred as in a church, and they can also be haunted.  Let me quote Dr. Montague as he explained the origins of haunted houses to his assistants in chapter 3     Page 50-51    Jackson, herself, was always interested in houses- and for good reason.  Her grandfather had been a very important architect  in San Francisco, and she brought all of that family interest into her own life.  Jackson wanted to write a ghost story and then she set out to write Hill House, so, I guess it just made sense for her to research a bunch of different houses in order to create the one for her story.  She even enlisted her mother to help her get some research about a famous haunted house in San Jose, California, the Winchester Mystery House- one that still attracts millions of visitors visit every year.      I also happened to notice that Dr. Montague directly references this very famous house.  I wish I can say I had heard of it, but I hadn't, so I looked it up.  A woman by the name of Sarah Winchester inherited $20 million in 1881 from her dead husband and his family who had made their money selling firearms.  She was said to have moved to California to build a home for the spirits of the dead people who had been killed by the firearms made by her husband's family.  The Winchester house is really bizarre and worth Googling.  I can see why it has so many visitors.  It is enormous: 24,000 square feet; it has 10,000 windows, 47 stairways and fireplaces, 160 rooms, and 17 chimneys among other things.      It's weird looking too with all those turrets that remind us of what a proper haunted house should look like,  and Jackson studied it and her house has turrets, but Hill House isn't just one house, and it's not near as large as the Winchester House.  It's funny how many theories there are about what all inspired Hill House.  Stanley, Shirley's husband worked as a professor at a woman's college, I'm not sure we got to that last episode, but he worked at Bennington College in Vermont.  Well the Music building on campus is called Jennings Hall, and it is apart from the other buildings.  It's made from gray stone and stands against the hills, kind of like the opening of Hill House.   Lots of people see that connection. Ruth Franklin, Jackson's most recent biographer and probably the leading expert on all things Jackson, talks about a file she found in Jackson's archive at the Library of Congress when she was researching Jackson's life.  She found a collection of pictures and newspaper clippings about all these different places and events that inspired Hill House.  One was a newpaper article about a poltergeist incident in Long island, there were pictures of a couple of castles, there was the Winchester house stuff, but then she found one called the Edward H Everett Mansion- which is also in Vermont, and actually very near Bennington where Jackson and her family lived.  Franklin and her husband went there when she was researching for her book on Jackson and were basically shocked at how evil that house looked.  She and her husband both got chills just being on the property, so Franklin believes a lot of Hill House is inspired by that place.      At the end of the day, Hill House is the invention of Shirley Jackson's mind- not a specific place on earth.  It is also a creepy ole' metaphor for something- and when you're reading the book by chapter 4 where we go to in this episode - you don't know what it could be- but you intuitively feel it has to have something to do with a home- but definitely not a happy home- but maybe a place that should have been happy but is twisted, but maybe it is even a place that promised to be happy or to be something- but it lied about that.  I think when we read novels, especially the ones we like, sometimes we don't really know what we identify with- we just feel some sort of connection.  I think that's the big question in this book- especially at the beginning.  What am I supposed to make of this house?  Why am I compelled to read about it?   If it's so creepy why does Eleanor stay there?  What compels her to go inside? What's attracting her there?  Is it just that it's not her sister's house so anything is better than that?  Is she looking for a home?  As we read further on, we will come to understand that that is exactly what it is all about.  Of course, for all of us- having a home is important.  Wouldn't you agree, with Bing Crosby, Garry, that there's no place like home for the holidays?    Homes and thus families are important, there's a lot of psychological research to support that, of course.  But let's just narrow in on the idea of that physical space we associate with our home- where we currently are living and hopefully nesting.  For many of us, if we are going to make it our home- and not just a place where we sleep and maybe eat, a home is part of our self-definition- it is that physical space that expresses who we really are.  That's why decorating a home in your own way and making it beautiful to YOU is so important.  It's why I encourage people, even if you're wealthy enough to hire professional decorators, to be involved in that process in a personal way.  Most of us, however, don't have that problem, but we should make our home reflective of our interests, our passions, our tastes.  We should let it reflect OUR identity- in a positive way.  It's also true and I quote Robert Frost here, “Home is the place that, when you have to go there, they have to take you in.”  That's another very important idea.  It is a place where you feel safe, and you can be oriented in space and time.  It's a place where you can be vulnerable without being exploited.  But that's where the dangers reside, right?  If you are vulnerable, then by definition, you can be exploited- and of course, that happens, and it definitely happened to Shirley Jackson.    For me, a house really does has a spirit to it.  As strange as that sounds, especially if someone has lived in the same place for a while.  In some sense, a physical space has to develop its own energy and personality.  This is what I mean, Garry and I got married when my oldest daughter was a junior in college.  When she entered our new house- her new home, even though we put her things in a room, put her pictures on the wall, and tried to make her feel “at home”, she just didn't bond with the physical space.  She was living at college in a house of her own, and she was spending just a few days a year with us.  Her room at our house was nice; it was beautiful; but the house just wasn't her friend yet.  A full year later, we had a house fire, and I was in tears as things burned, thankfully just one room truly burned before we stopped the fire, but Anna was very stoic about the whole thing.  She just couldn't be sad.  She told me, point blank, I don't feel anything.  I don't feel like this is my space.  This isn't my home.  Of course this made me sad because I wanted her to feel at home there in our space with her sister and step-father, but it wasn't something I had any power to create.   There were no memories in that space for her at that time, and the only that that would ever change that is creating memories for that space in that space- of course, the fire ironically was a memory for us all- but it really is about the passing of time and what we do with the passing of time.  Living there- bringing friends there, filling up the air with the smell of food and the fire place, sharing meals together- playing games around the table- the house has had to develop a spirit of its own- and hopefully a positive safe and welcoming one and hopefully one that is still being developed.    Of course you're right.  That is why it's important to be intentional about that sort of thing because just as a space can be positive, it can also be negative.  And just as it can have a positive effect on a person, it can have a negative one as well- obviously.     William Sax, Professor of anthropology, says it this way: People and places where they reside engage in a continuing set of exchanges; they have determinate, mutual effects upon each other because they are part of a single, interactive system.”  Listen to what he means- people and places engage with each other- they interact with each other and have effects on each other- they are part of one single interactive system.  It's a very interesting way of looking at how we engage the world.  This is true.  It's originally a Southeast Asian concept, but it really nails a universal truth.     Of course it's that very idea that I also see Jackson taking and running wild with it in her book- physical space interacting actively with the people who occupy its space.      Reading here how Jackson plays around with the concept of this house is really a hyperbolized version of spaces interacting with people- and in her case, she builds an entire 80 year history of negative memories in this house.  Here, crazy enough, the house actually is a villain- although I know that's not totally obvious by the end of chapter 4- but even early on before the house spooks a single person when we read the history of the house, we can see how much negative emotions and hurt are a part of the spirit of this house.     For sure, Jackson makes Hill House into a literal character in the story.  This house has emotions.  She tells us explicitly this house is without kindness and has no concession to humanity- not unlike her own mother (as we saw last episode).  She goes on to say Hill house is not fit for love or for hope- that's how Jackson literally describes it.  But unlike a real house in the real world, what makes this fictional story creepy is that we are going to see that the house has agency- or it at least appears to.  The house does stuff- or maybe it does stuff- that's the big unanswered question.  Who's doing the stuff in the house.  Either way, Of course, this is all the opposite sort of things we want in our physical home, and I'm sure almost everyone would agree with that.   And let's be mindful here.  Shirley Jackson spent a lot of time thinking about her house.  She spent a lot of time, in fact, most of her time, thinking about her home.  She was first and foremost a homemaker. And she was extremely intentional about what she invested her time in.  She did a lot of cooking- and neglected a lot of cleaning opting to make her space a fun liveable one, contrary to popular standards and practices of her time.  She, probably better than most writers or any genre at any time, knew exactly how powerful a home was and could be and how a person could frame it.  Heck, she financed her entire life out of humorously discussing hers.  Her house was famously vibrant, full of life, full of energy, full of visitors- both celebrated literary friends of hers, as well as the dozens of childhood playmates that continuously bounced between the walls.  She clearly knew how to make a happy home, but here in this book, she strips all of that positive away and we see she also knew what a house without kindness could be like.       So interesting.  What's also interesting to me is that historically, this haunted house archetype goes back hundreds of years, well before Jackson came on the scene.  We all know this, I mean who hasn't seen pictures of those gloomy castles in old Gothic stories.  We all know those houses that wreaked havoc on Victorian readers, on Scooby Doo readers, on all of us.  I've read several of these to my own kids over the years, And now that I think about it, all these haunted houses kind of look like Hill House, they usually have two stories maybe a turret or tower, but for sure a black cat on a porch, bats coming out a window, and full moon somewhere behind it.      So true,  I think I've even mailed one or two Halloween cards with those very images on them, but literary haunted houses are slightly differently than the Scooby Doo thing.  In literary fiction authors use these Gothic tropes, and I'm going to put Jackson in this group, to create some sort of metaphor, to flesh out something moral or psychological- and this makes the inside of the house much scarier than the outside- as creepy as these pictures are.  The house represents something inside that is scary and that really exists in our world.  So the question is, what about this house scares us?  What are we really afraid of?  What are the ghosts?    And for me, although, I know this is totally a non-literature way of looking at things, to answer that question I find myself looking at Shirley Jackson as a person and the world she lived in.  Shirley Jackson was a woman of the 1950s, she was a writer and commentator and a deep thinker about that world.  She was a daughter, as we discussed last week, but she was also a mother herself.  And the definition of motherhood in the 1950s was very unique in American history because, and I talked about this a little last episode, but there was a giant shift after WW2 for the American family and especially for women.  Last episode, I talked about that second wave of feminism and Jackson as a professional woman may have looked at all of that, but today I want to bring up another important and that is this idea of the postwar rush to the suburbs and America's cult of the family- that is a very big distinctive historically about this time period. And it in fact, it is still very much a part of our American identity, even to this day.  After WW2, life changed for almost everyone in a positive way.  Life wasn't as hard as it had been before the war.  People could own a home; everyone seemed to want a family.  It was a status symbol.  We all wanted a particular kind of family- the nuclear family with a mom and a dad and children who were the product of that marriage.      That's not just an American thing- isn't that what everyone aspires to all over the world even today.      Of course- but for America, in this post World War 2 era, everything was changing and prospering in a new way and so this was not a pipe dream- it was attainable in a way that had NEVER been possible before.  Think about Of Mice and Men and how destitute things were during the depression.  That was all over.  Now- People had time to think about things like competitive living.  Before that we all were just trying not to starve.  We also had mass media that was projecting what prosperity looked like, or at least should look like.  This kind of atomic family was the picture of happiness.  This social framework was on the covers of all the magazines, in all the movies, in all the tv shows.  It was sanctioned by our churches, and how good or successful we were as humans depended on how well we created this particular family.  If your family wasn't this kind of family, we used the word “broken”.  You came from a broken home.  I know this very personally because this was my reality.  I was raised in a “broken” home.  My parents were divorced- although I'm not from the 50s, but even during my childhood this was a very shameful thing for a child- something was wrong with you, with your family, with your home.  Shirley Jackson's home wasn't physically broken at all- at least not in the way that mine was, but the appearance of perfection haunted her from her earliest memories.  Her parents were in hot pursuit of that perfection.  And as an adult when she was homemaking she was very aware of all of these family and social dynamics at work.  Almost all of her writings center around these ideas in one way or another, the fiction and the non-fiction.      So, back to Hill House, if we look at a home your way, as a place where individuals are supposed to belong- let's look at these characters from that perspective of why they might be showing up at Hill House.  Because the characters in this story are definitely not coming from that background.  They are all broken, if we pay close attention.  We see that Eleanor doesn't have a father or now a mother.  Theo is very vague about her identity, even about who she lives with- we don't even know if her roommate is a man or  a woman, the only thing she lets out in her introductory comments is about spending her vacations alone at boarding school which is kind of dark, and Luke will claim later on to not having a mother.  So, I guess, none of them really have a place to go for the holidays, to use the language from Bing Crosby's song.  When they get to Hill House, although the house itself is creepy, they seem happy to have found each other.  The lure of having what this house may be offering is greater than the risk of what could be scary about it being haunted.  The girls even wear bright colors to brighten up the dreary home; they run outside, the house is in a valley and kind of covered up, but they also claim it's a “place for picnics”, something happy families do- and of course, we'll see at the end of the book that this parody of the picnic will come back to haunt both girls. In the beginning, Eleanor and Theo claim to be cousins and the last sentence of chapter 2 is, “Would you let them separate us now?  Now that we've found out we're cousins?”.      When they meet Luke in chapter 3, Eleanor very quickly asks, “Then you're one of the family? The people who own Hill House? Not one of Doctor Montague's guests?”  Of course, she doesn't mean her own family- but for Eleanor- in some ways that is what she is fantasizing about- this notion of family- a place to call home.      Let me also point out that by this point in the story, even though, we're still in the very beginning, the house has already played a benign trick on Eleanor and Theo- there was an incident about a rabbit frightening them.  It's cute and funny but odd none the less.  Hill House, for Eleanor, although is obviously ugly, vile and haunted, is not an unhappy place.  It holds promise.  When they come in and meet Dr. Montague, he pours drinks for everyone and Eleanor comments, “Everything's so strange, I mean, this morning I was wondering what Hill House would be like, and now I can't believe that it's real, and we're here.”  She struggles to believe it, but as she sits with the other three and the thought she has is this and I quote, “I am the fourth person in this room; I am one of them; I belong.”    And of course, all of the conversation between the four of them is fun-loving.  They make jokes about what they do in the other world.  Almost all of it is non-sense.  Eleanor talks about being the talk of café's, Luke says he is a bullfighter, Theo claims to be clad in silk and gold.      Yes, and Dr. Montague assumes the role of a a traditional father-figure.  He calls them children and tells them stories.  Let's read that part.  They all sit around, and he tells the story of Hill House.    Page 54-      It's definitely a creepy story and the Crain family is definitely a miserable group of people, but getting to the current moment if Mr. Montague is the father-fugure, Luke, Theo and Eleanor are the kids, then in some sense the house is the mother- there's no one else.  But from the history of the house, there was never really a real mother that ever lived here.    Yes- and that brings me back to my discussion of the 1950s.  Before the 50s, life in the United States was more difficult.  Many people we're struggling to exist- mostly fighting mother nature on a farm or a ranch.  When wealth came to the United States in that post war era, like we already said forming an ideal family and an ideal home was at the heart of that- but at the heart of the home were the children.  A new word showed up in the Webster dictionary in 1958 that had never existed in English before- that is the word, “parenting”.  And whatever it meant, parenting was about the responsibility of making perfect kids or at least making a perfect growing up experience for kids, and how to do that was naturally- again in very American form- supercontroversial and divisive.  There was this book that came out in 1944 by a doctor by the name of Dr. Benjamin Spock.  This book took America by storm.  In his book, he claimed parents should not discipline their children.  They should be permissive.  The idea before this was that humans were evil, and children were humans, so they needed to be disciplined or tamed into doing right- if you indulged them you would “spoil” them- that was the word.  Dr. Spock took the opposite approach, his theory was that all of us are good and it is not possible to spoil a child.  A child who is loved will never be spoiled by things you give him/her or do for him/her.  If they had everything they needed, they didn't need to act out or misbehave.  In either case, no matter which side of the argument you fell on- one thing both camps had in common was the child was the center of the home. Everything was about the children.     And this was where Shirley Jackson, the mother, fit in.  Look at the titles of her two books of essays about her children, Life Among the Savages and Raising Demons. Jackson took seriously this debate about “parenting”.  In 1960 she wrote a book titled “Special Delivery, a Useful Book for Brand-New Mothers”.  Let me read a small quote from an essay in there called, “Whos' the Boss?”    “After Careful study it is going to be clear to the earnest mother that the enormous propaganda on child raising in books, magazins, and even adverstisments is being largely written by babies.  Baby is the boss, the articles point out flatly; first you are waiting for him, an dthe you are waiting on him.  Perhaps this is because 20 or 25 years ago the going rage in baby care was exactly the opposite.  Children who were allowed a little freedom of choice were going to be ‘spoiled' and the worse possible thing an anguished mother could do was pick up a crying baby. In our family there is a sharp division of opinion on the question of the authority of the child.  Our four children ardently support he cause of absolute indulgence, warmly seconded by their grandparents on both sides.  My husband and I, bolstering one another secretly with reminders that we are firm, righteous, fair, stem although impartial, band beyond all else the heads of the family, have managed to fight the issue to a standstill somewhere between the two camps.”    She is funny.      She definitely is, and even in Hill House, there are parts of the dialogue that are really funny- especially when we get to the parts about Mrs. Montague who is absolutely absurd.  But here's where I want to land.  Eleanor is our central character- no doubt.  We are wedded to her point of view.  There is no doubt that the allure of Hill House is also her desire for a family- to not be alone- one of the creepier elements for me in this book is Eleanor's constant revisiting the phrase “Journeys end in lovers meeting”.  I think it's repeated 14 times, maybe more than that.     Yeah- what is that about.    Well, of course, we never really know.  It's actually a quote from Shakepeare's play 12th Night.  Which is a comedy about a girl named Viola.  12th Night is very typical Shakespeare, I actually just watched it at a Shakespeare in the park this summer in Nashville.  It's a happy play and after a lot of misteps and misidentities Viola finds true love at the end.  The Journey for Viola ended in a lovers meeting.  But the way Jackson uses it isn't like the way Shakespeare uses it at all.  It really is not used in any kind of romantic sense.  Eleanor wants to meet love, but I'm not sure she's very particular as to the kind of love she meets.  It doesn't have to be sexual, for sure.  Although there's a little bit of flirtation with Luke, it definitely ends poorly. This is a very asexual book.  In fact, the most graphic sexual part has to do with the demented Hugh Crain and his abusive relationship with his daughters.  Eleanor is looking for a family- she wants to be the center of someone's world, and that is normal and understandable, but she's also a bratty kid in many ways.  She's judgmental of everyone else, we will see.  Jackson is going to create every member of this family of Hill House to be dysfunctional and self-orbiting.  Every member of the family is tyrranically trying to be in control- and notice that is what Dr. Montague pointed out in the history of the house.  Hugh Crain, who built the house, is a horrible father- he parented his daughters as we find out late in the book- through sheer terror.  The house is a horrible mother, it's oppressive and vile and deceitful- but the Crain kids were terrible too.  They were competitive and hurtful.  And now we get these “kids” – if that is what we're going to call Luke, Theo and Eleanor- are going to all three be portrayed as self-centered and competitive.  Dr. Montague in this playful exchange at dinner says this and notice Jackson's carefully chosen words, “You are three willful, spoiled children who are prepared to nag me for your bedtime story.”  Jackson uses the loaded language of her generation- words everyone in the 1950s would recognize.      So are you saying, Jackson is saying, children are tyrranical as well as mothers?  Is everyone tyrranical?      Well, I really don't know if I'm ready to comment on that yet but maybe.  I want to point out something though that IS interesting.  Both Theo and Eleanor were selected to come to the house because they supposedly have powers, Theo has telepathic power and Eleanor can create these poltergeist experiences where we can move things around- maybe subconsciously even.  This, I think is an important detail to include.  They are not powerless, and Jackson leaves room we will see to see both of them exercising their powers at various places in the book, maybe.      What do you mean by that?  That they may be using their powers or maybe they aren't, we can't be sure?    That's it exactly- and we're not even sure if they know if they are using their powers- they seem not to really understand that they have them. Now, let's go back and think about the HOUSE itself- As the story sets itself up in the exposition, four very different people have moved into the house.  The only thing they have in common is that they all have some sort of brokenness in the background, even Dr. Montague as we will find out when we meet his hideous wife, but they all are willing to move into a house that is supposedly haunted- but how and by whom?  And what are they going to do in the house.  Of course this question comes up in their evening together- their first bonding experience sharing food and drink together- and Dr. Montague confesses that he has no idea what will happen to them.  They will take notes, but that is all he can offer. They will drink brandy- as Luke points out- they are there to drink spirits- pardon the pun.  And they most certainly will.   Before they go to bed that first night, Theo and Eleanor share the stories of where they come from.  Let's read this part.    Page 64    What is interesting about that exchange is that we, as readers, already know Eleanor is lying.  None of what she just told them is true.  Things at Hill House are not what they appear to be.  In chapter 4 when they tour the house, Dr. Montague makes a point of pointing that out.      Page 77     Much of chapter 4 is describing the house- and the house is off- you can't see it at first- but it's off center.  There is a fairly large distortion because so much is off. There's also the marble statue of Mr. Crain, the veranda that's crooked, the cold spot in front of the nursery ironically which is symbolically in the middle of the house, and then the chapter ends with noises. This is the first really scary part in the book.  Eleanor apparently wakes up with someone calling her.  She thinks it's her mother at first before she remembers she's at Hill House.  When she goes to Theo's room Theo is scared out of her mind because she's heard someone knocking, plus it's terribly cold.  The noise gets louder until Eleanor shouts wildly, “Go away, go away!”  The door trembles and shakes against the hinges and ultimately they hear a little giggle and a whisper and a laugh before the Dr. and Luke get to them.    That is all very creepy and very definitely the stuff scary movies are made of.      Yes, and chapter 4 ends with Dr. Montague's observation.    - read  ending pg 99    Whatever is pressuring the house- is pressuring this little make shift family to break up.      But then again, no one ever knows what forces  are at work in any family dynamic. Do we?  What kind of subversive forces are at work in a house, in a home… in a home that is haunted?    Ha!  Good point Jackson.  I guess we often never do.      Well, that's terrifying enough for one episode.  We will pick up with chapter 5 next time and see just what exactly Jackson is doing with our minds.  Thanks for spending time with us as we explore the terrifying world Jackson has created at Hill House.  As always please tell your friends about us, push out an episode on your twitter account, or your Facebook account.  Text an episode to a friend.  If you're a teacher and want to use podcasts for instruction, go to our website and download a listening guide for your students to fill out as they listen.  We want to support learning around the world, and helping us share the world is how you can help us grow.  Thank you     Peace out.        

Composers Datebook
Rorem's "Nantucket Songs"

Composers Datebook

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 2:00


Synopsis “From whence cometh song?” asks the opening lines of a poem by the American writer Theodore Roethke… That's a question American composer Ned Rorem must have asked himself hundreds of times, while providing just as many answers in the form of hundreds of his original song settings. About his own music, Rorem tends to be a little reluctant to speak. “Nothing a composer can say about his music is more pointed than the music itself,” he writes. On today's date in 1979, Rorem himself was at the piano, accompanying soprano Phyllis Bryn-Julson in the premiere performance of a song-cycle he called “Nantucket Songs,” a cycle that began with Rorem's setting of Roethke's poem. “These songs,” wrote Rorem, “merry or complex or strange though their texts may seem, aim away from the head and toward the diaphragm. They are emotional rather than intellectual, and need not be understood to be enjoyed.” Speaking of personal enjoyment, Rorem said at the premiere performance of his “Nantucket Songs ,“ which was recorded live at the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C. that “Phyllis Bryn-Julson and I, unbeknownst to each other, BOTH had fevers of 102 degrees.” Music Played in Today's Program Ned Rorem (b. 1923) — Nantucket Songs (Phyllis Bryn-Julson, soprano; Ned Rorem, piano) CRI 670

With the Bark Off: Conversations from the LBJ Presidential Library
"Mark Twain was the first stand-up comedian." A Conversation with Cappy McGarr on the Mark Twain Prize

With the Bark Off: Conversations from the LBJ Presidential Library

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 31:29


Mark Twain once said “Humor is mankind's greatest blessing.” If so, as the greatest humorist of his day, Twain himself blessed our country throughout much of his life. How appropriate then, to name our nation's highest award for comedy in his honor.  Cappy McGarr co-created the John F. Kennedy Center's Mark Twain Prize for American Humor, which launched in 1998. Appointed to the Kennedy Center board of trustees by Bill Clinton in 1996 and Barack Obama in 2011, McGarr continues to serve as Executive Producer of the Mark Twain Prize and also helped established the Library of Congress' Gershwin Prize for Popular Song.  His new book, The Man Who Made Mark Twain Famous: Stories from the Kennedy Center, the White House and Other Comedy Venues, recounts his history with the Mark Twain Prize and what he has learned about comedy—and our most famous comedians—along the way.

Mother Forking Podcast
Sex, Open Marriage, and Essential Taboo: Parenting as Humans with Jordan Claire McCraw| Ep. 66

Mother Forking Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 52:10


We are thrilled to have a special returning guest speaker with us! We welcome back Jordan Claire McCraw, author of “American Rapture: Poems from a Heartscape”, who has become a dear friend to us through this podcast! Jordan is a television, film, and commercial actress (represented by Shushu Entertainment and VOX Inc.), audiobook narrator for HarperCollins and the Library of Congress, and mother. Our last episode with her was incredible and there was just too much to unpack for one episode, so here we are with part two!  Jordan dives in on her marriage and experience with an attempt at an open marriage. She chats with us how her relationship has changed over the years, what online dating was like, and so much more. Tune in to hear how this experience saved Jordan's marriage and family and how they found healing. Don't miss out on this beautifully imperfect, raw, intimate, and hilarious episode!  Connect with Jordan McCraw: Website: https://www.jcmccraw.com/ Instagram:  https://www.instagram.com/jcmccraw/ Buy your copy of American Rapture here:  https://bookshop.org/books/american-rapture-9781735335629/9781735335605 Connect with Us Mother Forkers: Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/motherforkingpodcast/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/motherforkingpodcast/?hl=en

The Quarantine Tapes
The Quarantine Tapes: 213 Maria Popova Part 2

The Quarantine Tapes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 22:24


Maria Popova is a reader and a writer, and writes about what she reads on The Marginalian, formerly Brain Pickings (themarginalian.org), which is included in the Library of Congress's permanent digital archive of culturally valuable materials. She hosts The Universe in Verse—an annual celebration of science through poetry—at the interdisciplinary cultural center Pioneer Works in Brooklyn. She grew up in Bulgaria immersed in music and mathematics.

Every Day's A Holiday
October 27 is Navy Day ⚓️

Every Day's A Holiday

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 2:40


Today's holiday comes exactly two weeks after this armed forces branch's birthday. Both celebrate something quite special for those who served in the Navy - it's October 27 and today is Navy Day.https://todayaholiday.com/navy-day/Photo by Library of Congress on Unsplash

Artifactual
Sanborn Fire Insurance Maps

Artifactual

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 17:38


How did something as boring as maps for insurance companies become one of the highest-traffic items on the Library of Congress's website? Because these insurance agents were accidentally telling the stories of the cities they were mapping -- cities that were growing, changing, and sometimes withering away...You can look for Sanborn maps of your town or city in digital collection of the Library of Congress here.You can find more information about the history of the Sanborn collection at Cal State Northridge here.For more information on this episode and more Artifactual podcast content, visit artifactualpodcast.com.Artifactual is a content partner of Peter Hamilton's Documentary Business newsletter and Sunny Side of the Doc.

The Quarantine Tapes
The Quarantine Tapes: 213 Maria Popova Part 1

The Quarantine Tapes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 24:15


Maria Popova is a reader and a writer, and writes about what she reads on The Marginalian, formerly Brain Pickings (themarginalian.org), which is included in the Library of Congress's permanent digital archive of culturally valuable materials. She hosts The Universe in Verse—an annual celebration of science through poetry—at the interdisciplinary cultural center Pioneer Works in Brooklyn. She grew up in Bulgaria immersed in music and mathematics.

The Great Trials Podcast
Edward Larson | The State of Tennessee v. John Thomas Scopes | The Scopes Monkey Trial | Part 1

The Great Trials Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 77:49


This week, your hosts Steve Lowry and Yvonne Godfrey interview Edward Larson, Ph.D., J.D., author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning book Summer for the Gods: The Scopes Trial and America's Continuing Debate Over Science and Religion (Ed Larson).   Remember to rate and review GTP in iTunes: Click Here To Rate and Review   New! Watch on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCKdeO4IodggpSLyhWVdcWKw   Episode Details: Edward Larson, Ph.D., J.D., author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning book Summer for the Gods: The Scopes Trial and America's Continuing Debate Over Science and Religion and the Hugh and Hazel Darling Chair in Law and University Professor of History at Pepperdine University, explains the historical significance and societal impact of the landmark "Scopes Monkey Trial." In March 1925, the state of Tennessee passed the Butler Bill, which prohibited the teaching of evolution or anything but Divine Creation in schools. In response, the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) sought a test case and found one in Dayton, Tennessee science teacher John Scopes. During the eight-day trial, John Scopes pleaded not guilty to charges of violating the Butler Bill. He was represented by the ACLU and legendary trial attorney Clarence Darrow, who argued that the Butler Bill was unconstitutional and impeded basic freedom of religion rights. The special counsel for the prosecution was iconic American orator William Jennings Bryan, a political titan, former Secretary of State, celebrated speechmaker, and acclaimed U.S. Congressman who served as a major force behind the creation of the Butler Bill. The legal battle between Darrow and Bryan was truly an epic showdown, pitting two of the nation's best orators against one another in a court of law. On July 21, 1925, the jury returned a guilty verdict after nine minutes of deliberation, and Judge John Raulston ruled that John Scopes was ordered to pay a $100 fine for violating the Butler Bill. The verdict was overturned on a technicality at the Tennessee Supreme Court on January 15, 1927. In today's episode, learn why the Scopes trial is considered one of the most important cases in 20th century America and how it became the first trial to be broadcast live on the radio. Hear Edward Larson's analysis about the case, the precedents it set for Constitutional law in America, and why the topic of evolution vs. creationism in schools is still being debated nearly 100 years later.   Click Here to Read/Download the Complete Trial Documents   ABOUT EDWARD LARSON'S BOOK: https://www.pulitzer.org/winners/edward-j-larson https://www.amazon.com/Summer-Gods-Americas-Continuing-Religion/dp/046507510X   Guest Bio: Edward Larson Ed Larson holds the Hugh and Hazel Darling Chair in Law and is University Professor of History at Pepperdine University. Originally from Ohio with a Ph.D. in the history of science from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and law degree from Harvard, Larson has lectured on all seven continents and taught at Stanford Law School, University of Melbourne, Leiden University, and the University of Georgia, where he chaired the History Department. Prior to becoming a professor, Larson practiced law in Seattle and served as counsel for the US House of Representatives in Washington, DC. He received an honorary doctorate in humane letters from Ohio State University but still roots for the University of Wisconsin in football. Recipient of the Pulitzer Prize in History and numerous other awards for writing and teaching, Larson is the author or co-author of fourteen books and over one hundred published articles. His 2015 book, The Return of George Washington: Uniting the States, 1783-1789, was a New York Times Bestseller and resulted in Larson being invited to deliver the 2016 Supreme Court Historical Society lecture in Washington, give the annual Gaines Lecture at Mount Vernon, and serve as a featured presenter for the Library of Congress's Madison Council event. His other books, which have been translated into over twenty languages, include An Empire of Ice: Scott Shackleton, and the Heroic Age of Antarctic Science; A Magnificent Catastrophe: The Tumultuous Election of 1800, America's First Presidential Campaign; and the Pulitzer Prize-winning Summer for the Gods: The Scopes Trial and America's Continuing Debate Over Science and Religion. Larson's articles have appeared in such varied publications as Nature, Atlantic Monthly, Science, Scientific American, Time, Wall Street Journal, American History, The Guardian, and dozens of law reviews. His latest book, On Earth and Science, was published by Yale University Press in 2017. A popular lecturer, Larson has taught short courses at universities in China, Europe, and South America; and given addresses at over 80 American universities. He was a resident scholar at the Rockefeller Foundation's Bellagio Study Center; held the Fulbright Program's John Adams Chair in American Studies; participated in the National Science Foundation's Antarctic Writers and Artists Program; and served as an inaugural Fellow at the Library for the Study of George Washington at Mount Vernon. A panelist on the National Institutes of Health's Study Section for Ethical, Legal, and Social Issues of the Human Genome Project, Larson is interviewed frequently for broadcast, print, cable, and internet media, including The Daily Show, The Today Show, and multiple appearances on PSB, BBC, the History Channel, C-SPAN, CNN, Fox News, MNBC, and NPR. Read Full Bio   Show Sponsors: Legal Technology Services - LegalTechService.com Digital Law Marketing - DigitalLawMarketing.com Harris Lowry Manton LLP - hlmlawfirm.com   Free Resources: Stages Of A Jury Trial - Part 1 Stages Of A Jury Trial - Part 2

de Erno Hannink Show | Betere Beslissingen, Beter Bedrijf
Man’s search for meaning #boekencast afl 38

de Erno Hannink Show | Betere Beslissingen, Beter Bedrijf

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 39:36


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QhxM1VEnMEk Man's Search for Meaning van Viktor E. Frankl is een boek dat iedere ondernemer gelezen zou moeten hebben. Het is geen management- of strategieboek, maar een boek over het ontdekken van de zin van het leven. Hoe kun je een bedrijf bouwen als je niet weet wat de zin van je eigen leven is? “Trotzdem Ja zum leben sagen...” – Ein Psycholog erlebt das Konzentrationslager is de oorspronkelijke titel van het boek. De titel van de Duitstalige versie komt uit het Buchenwaldlied en heeft een diepere lading dan de Engelse titel. Tom las de Duitse versie en ik las de Engelstalige versie. De Engelstalige versie bestaat uit 2 onderdelen: Herinneringen aan de Holocaust van FranklUitleg hoe logotherapie werkt Viktor Emil Frankl was een Oostenrijks neuroloog en psychiater, maar werd bekend als overlever van de Holocaust. Frankl was de grondlegger van de logotherapie, een vorm van existentiële analyse, ook wel de Derde Weense School der psychotherapie genoemd. Frankl is in 1997 overleden en heeft zijn hele leven in Oostenrijk gewoond. De bedenker van logotherapie; logos, λόγος, is Oudgrieks voor 'woord, reden, principe'; therapie komt van het woord Θεραπεύω, dat 'ik genees' betekent. Het boek een Man's Search for Meaning staat in de Library of Congress in de top 10 belangrijkste boeken in de VS. Het boek werd eerst niet goed verkocht in Europa, maar toen de Engelstalige versie in de VS veel aandacht kreeg en er miljoenen van verkocht werden, kreeg het boek in Europa ook meer aandacht. In 1946 werd het origineel uitgegeven en in 1959 de Engelse versie in de VS. Volgens de resultaten uit een enquête is dit een van de tien meest invloedrijke boeken in de VS. Dit boek is geschreven door een neuroloog die zijn zin van het leven ontdekt aan het begin van de Tweede Wereldoorlog en dat niet meer loslaat tot aan zijn dood. Het eerste deel gaat vooral over hoe hij de kampen overleeft. De omstandigheden waarin hij en de anderen in de kampen leven, de keuzes die ze iedere dag weer maken die soms verkeerd uitpakken. Overleven van een holocaust Opvallend aan het begin van het boek is dat Frankl niet naar de VS gaat terwijl hij alle papieren heeft om Oostenrijk en de nazi's te ontvluchten. Hij vertelt over het moment – dat hij zag als een teken – waarop hij besluit om bij zijn ouders te blijven en ze niet achter te laten en te vluchten voor de nazi's naar de VS. Alle elementen in het eerste deel van het boek nemen je mee naar die verschrikkelijke tijd. De keuzes die mensen maken. De goede mensen die het niet overleven. Wat mensen doen om te overleven. De omstandigheden in het kamp en vooral in de barakken. Door het lezen van dit deel in het boek kom ik weer dichter bij mezelf en ben ik me meer bewust van hoeveel geluk ik heb. De belangrijkste reden waarom ik ben waar ik nu ben heeft grotendeels te maken met geluk. Logotherapie In het tweede deel van mijn boek (ontbreekt in de Duitse versie) gaat het over de logotherapie. Frankl legt uit wat logotherapie is en toont met verschillende voorbeelden uit se praktijk aan wat het kan opleveren.  Logotherapie, in tegenstelling tot de psychotherapie, gaat uit van de reden van het bestaan. Door vragen te stellen aan de patiënt gaat zij op zoek naar de reden van haar bestaan. Hierin help je de patiënt alleen door vragen te stellen en geen richting of beperkingen mee te geven. Door de zin van het bestaan krijgt de mens weer zin in het leven. Alcohol- of drugsverslaafden geven vaak aan dat ze niet weten wat de zin van hun leven is en dat ze daarom in hun verslaving zijn terecht gekomen. Het leven had geen zin zonder. Door zelf actief op zoek te gaan naar de zin van het leven heb je iets om voor te leven. Zo had Frankl als missie dat logotherapie met de wereld gedeeld moest worden. Zijn manuscript van het onderzoek dat hij had gedaan voor de oorlog moest verschijnen. Dat manuscript dat hij mee had genomen op weg naar het ...

Steph's Business Bookshelf Podcast
Feck Perfuction by James Victore: be more weird

Steph's Business Bookshelf Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 8:29


Hey, have you subscribed to the bookmark newsletter? A fortnightly email with book reviews and ideas of what you should be reading next. Click here to subscribe.   About the author Highly regarded for his provocative style, James Victore is a graphic designer, art educator and dynamic high in-demand speaker on creativity. He lectures and teaches regularly around the globe, inspiring people to illuminate their individual gifts in order to achieve personal greatness. Raised in upstate New York, James moved to New York City when he was 19 years old and by age 23, after dropping out of two different colleges, he became an apprentice to noted book-jacket designer Paul Bacon. It was with Bacon that Victore found his voice as a designer and he began to take charge of his own education and career as a self-taught artist and designer. Described as “part Darth Vader, part Yoda,” James is widely known for his timely wisdom and impassioned views about design and it's place in the world. As well as founding his own design studio in 1990, James taught at the School of Visual Arts in New York City. Victore's posters have been exhibited at the Museum of Modern Art in New York, and are in the permanent collections of the Palais du Louvre in Paris, the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C., the Design Museum in Zurich, and the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam. Source: https://www.jamesvictore.com/about   About the book “Feck” is the creative tool kit that you need in your life. It is about living and creating freely, without the stress of others expectations or even your own thoughts about being perfect. 80 chapters of inspiration and thoughtful practices. Order more copies! You need this book, but so do your co workers or your partner or mom or your college kid, heck, buy one for your boss! Source: https://www.jamesvictore.com/get-inspired   Big idea #1 — Be weird There's a whole section of this book about being yourself about embracing your childhood weirdness, using creativity, having an opinion, and not fitting in. James uses the analogy of ‘letting your light shine', like in the gospel song ‘this little light of mine', but we often don't do that because it's both too easy and too hard. We forget how to be creative as we get older and how at some point the weirdness that we have as kids becomes a target rather than an asset. And so the hiding and the morphing into the being the same as everyone else begins.  For most of us, this starts at home (chapter one is actually called ‘your parents were wrong', a strong way to start any book).We're often presented with predefined pathways as options of what we can be when we grow up, which is obviously a horrible question to ask anyone, never mind a child. And these offered pathways are usually quite narrow. James says that whatever we want to be, be it an accountant or an artist, or a songwriter or an engineer, you should be yourself, have an opinion, and do it your way.   Big idea #2 — The first rule of business: fun  Without fun, you are merely one of the working dead. Without the fun, all of the hard work will be much more painful, and longevity will be much harder to maintain. Fun allows us to test innovate, make mistakes and stay curious. It allows us to bring our personality into our products and services, which ultimately is what people love. People are drawn to products and services that have some character and some personality to them. This doesn't mean it won't be hard. James isn't painting this overly perfect or overly saccharin view of what life or work will, or should, be like. He talks a lot about quality and skill, there's a whole section on sharpening the axe and building and maintaining your skillset. He talks about doing the work, even when you don't feel like it, and the importance of having a plan. But having fun and making yourself happy first makes all of this possible. After all excitement breeds, excitement.   Big idea #3 — Feck Perfuction Nobody's perfect, even you, and it's easy to make a myriad of excuses or ‘big buts' as James calls them to slip into comparisonitis, have shaky boundaries, or underselling ourselves by not asking for enough or by too much self-deprecation. Building solid habits and embracing an action focused approach to work, experimentation, and mistake making means we can make things happen. He mentions a Buddhist parable, that the second arrow comes from our own hands. The first arrow that hits us might be something going wrong; your car breaking down, the train being delayed, someone criticizing you. But the second arrow comes from our own hands; we then berate ourselves, we let that thing that happened to us ruin our whole day or a whole week, rather than just letting it go and choosing to react in a way that's more productive. We get to choose whether to fire that second arrow into ourselves. James says we need to embrace the flaws. We need to turn them into features or strengths, and let go of the judgment of ourselves and others and get on and make something happen.   Let's connect LinkedIn Instagram   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Keen On Democracy
W. Ralph Eubanks on a Journey Through the Literary History of Mississippi

Keen On Democracy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 36:58


In this episode of “Keen On”, Andrew is joined by W. Ralph Eubanks, the author of “A Place Like Mississippi”, to discuss how the South has produced some of America's most celebrated authors, and no state more so than Mississippi W. Ralph Eubanks is the author of A Place Like Mississippi, which will be released on March 16, 2021 by Timber Press. A Place Like Mississippi takes readers on a complete tour of the real and imagined landscapes that have inspired generations of authors. This is a book that honors and explores the landscape of Mississippi—and the Magnolia State's history—and reveals the many ways this landscape has informed the work of some of America's most treasured authors.  Eubanks is the author of two other books: Ever Is a Long Time: A Journey Into Mississippi's Dark Past (Basic Books) and The House at the End of the Road: The Story of Three Generations of an Interracial Family in the American South (HarperCollins). Washington Post book critic Jonathan Yardley named Ever is a Long Time as one of the best nonfiction books of 2003. Richard Ford wrote that The House at the End of the Road  “finds its truth in between conventional wisdom and sociological presumption, in between lies and faulty history. It is a story of race, of family, of place itself, and it tells us that compassion and the stirring force of individual human endeavor finally mean more than anything.”  Eubanks has contributed articles to the Washington Post Outlook and Style sections, WIRED, The Hedgehog Review,The Wall Street Journal, The American Scholar, The New Yorker, and National Public Radio. A graduate of the University of Mississippi (B.A.) and the University of Michigan (M.A., English Language and Literature), he is a recipient of a 2007 Guggenheim Fellowship from the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation and has been a fellow at the New America Foundation. Ralph lives in Washington, DC, with his wife and three children. From 1995 to 2013 he was director of publishing for the Library of Congress and is the former editor of the Virginia Quarterly Review at the University of Virginia. Currently he is the Carl and Lily Pforzheimer Foundation Fellow at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University. Visit our website: https://lithub.com/story-type/keen-on/ Email Andrew: a.keen@me.com Watch the show live on Twitter: https://twitter.com/ajkeen Watch the show live on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/ankeen/ Watch the show live on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/lithub Watch the show on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/LiteraryHub/videos Subscribe to Andrew's newsletter: https://andrew2ec.substack.com/ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Beyond The Fame with Jason Fraley

WTOP Entertainment Editor Jason Fraley chats with Eduardo Sanchez, co-director of "The Blair Witch Project" just in time for Halloween. They spoke in 2018 when the Library of Congress celebrated the film's 20th anniversary, examining how this low-budget horror flick pioneered the “found footage” subgenre to become one of the most profitable indie films ever made.

Composers Datebook
A quirky piece by Marga Richter

Composers Datebook

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 2:00


Synopsis Let's face it. Brevity and wit are not always qualities one associates with new music. But today we offer a sample: this comic overture is less than 5 minutes long, and opens, as you just heard, with a Fellini-esque duet for piccolo and contrabassoon. The overture is entitled “Quantum Quirks of a Quick Quaint Quark,” and is a rather burlesque celebration of modern theoretical physics. Its alliterative title evokes those subatomic particles known as “quarks” that, we're told, make up our universe. And, since this music changes time signature so often, perhaps Heisenberg's “uncertainty principle” is thrown in for good measure. The music is by Marga Richter, who was born on this date in 1926 in Reedsburg, Wisconsin. Richter received her early music training in Minneapolis, and then moved to New York's Juilliard School. By the time of her death in 2020, she had composed over 75 works including an opera and two ballets, as well as two piano concertos and a variety of solo, chamber and symphonic works. "Composing,” said Richter,” is my response to a constant desire to transform my perceptions and emotions into music … Music is the way I speak to the silence of the universe." Music Played in Today's Program Marga Richter (b. 1926) — Quantum Quirks of a Quick Quaint Quark (Czech Radio Orchestra; Gerard Schwarz) MMC 2006 On This Day Births 1879 - French composer, pianist, and writer Joseph Canteloube, in Annonay (near Tournon); 1885 - Austrian composer and musicologist Egon Wellesz, in Vienna; 1921 - English composer (Sir) Malcolm Arnold, in Northampton; 1926 - American composer Marga Richter, in Reedsburg, Wisconsin; 1949 - Israeli composer Shulamit Ran, in Tel Aviv; Deaths 1662 - English composer Henry Lawes, age 66, in London; Premieres 1784 - Gretry: opera, "Richard Coeur de Lion" (Richard the Lionhearted), in Paris; 1858 - Offenbach: comic opera, "Orphée aux enfers" (Orpheus in the Underworld), in Paris; 1900 - Rimsky-Korsakov: opera "The Tale of Tsar Saltan," at the Solodovnikov Theatre in Moscow, with Mikhail Ippolitov-Ivanov conducting (Gregorian date: Nov. 3); 1921 - Third (and final) version of Sibelius: Symphony No. 5, in Helsinki under the composer's direction; Sibelius conducted the first performances of two earlier versions of this symphony in Helsinki on Dec. 8, 1915 and Dec. 14, 1916; 1926 - Nielsen: Flute Concerto (first version), in Paris, conducted by Emil Telmányi (the composer's son-in-law), with Holger Gilbert-Jespersen the soloist; Nielsen revised this score and premiered the final version in Oslo on November 9, 1926, again with Gilbert-Jespersen as the soloist; 1933 - Gershwin: musical "Let 'Em Eat Cake," at the Imperial Theater in New York City; 1941 - Copland: Piano Sonata, in Buenos Aires, by the composer; 1956 - Menotti: madrigal-fable "The Unicorn, the Gordon and the Manticore," at the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C.; 1984 - Ellen Taaffe Zwilich: Double Quartet for strings, at a concert of the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center, by the Emerson Quartet and friends. 2004 - Danielpour: "Songs of Solitude" (to texts of W.B. Yeats), at the Kimmel Center's Verizon Hall in Philadelphia, by baritone Thomas Hampson and the Philadelphia Orchestra, with Daniel Robertson conducting; Others 1739 - Handel completes in London his Concerto Grosso in D, Op. 6, no. 5 and possibly his Concerto Grosso in F, Op. 6, no. 9 as well (see Julian date: Oct. 10). Links and Resources On Marga Richter An interview with Richter

CMQ Investing Presents: Compound Money Quietly
9 Major Investing Mistakes Every Investor Should Know About

CMQ Investing Presents: Compound Money Quietly

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 18:07


In episode #39 of the CMQ Investing podcast, we review the Library of Congress's 2010 report that identifies 9 common investing mistakes that can crush your investment performance. If you learn something from this episode, please share and subscribe. 

CABLE BOYS PODCAST
Fortress

CABLE BOYS PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 47:04


What a truly wild story about a deranged kidnapping plot that has absolutely no basis in reality... right? Totally fictional? Find out this week when we discuss the under-the-radar Australian "gem" Fortress. We cover everything from Post's inability to care for children, to Justin's thing for older women, to the insatiable Australian need to snack.This episode deserves to be considered for preservation by the library of congress, so make sure to subscribe to the podcast and rate us 5 stars if you haven't already. I hear Helix gives hosts they sponsor free mattresses and I'm pretty sure Kevin currently sleeping on a pile of hoodies abandoned at his place by ex-girlfriends. Help get Kevin a mattress.Follow us on Instagram and Twitter at @cableboyspodYou can find Post, Justin, and Kevin at:Post:InstagramKevin:InstagramJustin:InstagramTwitterProduced, edited, and mixed by Kyle Neal (@kylemneal)Theme by Casey Trela (@caseytrela) Get bonus content on Patreon See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Politics and Poetry
Politics& Poetry: Episode 4

Politics and Poetry

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 34:58


We're excited to launch our fourth episode of Politics & Poetry, where we work to understand the opportunities for poetry to serve as a bridge between policy and purpose, and as James Dickey, U.S. Poet Laureate and writer of acclaimed novel, Deliverance,  shared, "The goal of the poet is to make the world more available.”  In this month's episode, we're exploring the role of the Poet Laureate.  Jaki Shelton Green: https://jakisheltongreen.com/Joy Harjo: https://www.joyharjo.comBobby LeFebre: https://www.bobbylefebre.comChelsea Rathburn: http://chelsearathburn.comReferences:Colorado Humanities. (n.d.). Colorado poet laureate. https://coloradohumanities.org/programs/colorado-poet-laureate/Emory University. (n.d.). Agnes Cochran Bramblett papers, 1904-1974. https://findingaids.library.emory.edu/documents/bramblett506/Evans, S. (2020). Georgia poet laureate Chelsea Rathburn explores struggles of motherhood and childhood in new book of poems. WABE. https://www.wabe.org/georgia-poet-laureate-chelsea-rathburn-explores-struggles-of-motherhood-and-childhood-in-new-book-of-poems/Harden, L. F., (2020). Meeting GA's poet laureate: Here's why you need to know her. The Atlantan.  https://atlantanmagazine.com/ga-poet-laureate-chelsea-rathburnGeorgia Center for the Arts. (n.d.). What we do. https://gaarts.org/what-we-do/programs/literary-arts/Internetpoem.com. (n.d.). Biography of Frank Lebby Stanton. https://internetpoem.com/frank-lebby-stanton/biography/J. Poet, Rock & Roll Globe.com (2020). Jaki Shelton Green: Poetry for the Pandemic https://rockandrollglobe.Library of Congress. (n.d.). About the librarian. https://www.loc.gov/about/about-the-librarian/Library of Congress. Living nations, living words. (n.d.). https://www.loc.gov/ghe/cascade/index.html?appid=be31c5cfc7614d6680e6fa47be888dc3&bookmark=IntroductionPoets.org. (n.d.). About Robert Frost. https://poets.org/poet/robert-frostPoets.org. (n.d.) About Jaki Shelton Green. https://poets.org/poet/jaki-shelton-greenPoets.org. (n.d.). United States poet laureate. https://poets.org/united-states-poet-laureateRathburn, C. (2013). A raft of grief. Autumn House Press. Rathburn, C. (2019). Still life with mother and knife, a New York Times “New & Noteworthy.” Louisiana State University Press. Soulspazm. (2021, April 27). Joy Harjo - This morning I pray for my enemies [Video]. YouTube. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NGXp8DGSj_c 

Book Vs Movie Podcast
Book Vs Movie "Invasion of the Body Snatchers" (1956)

Book Vs Movie Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 66:09


Book Vs. Movie: Invasion of the Body  The 1955 Novel by Jack Finney Vs the 1956 Classic Film Our “Spooky Movies in October” continues with Invasion of the Body Snatchers, a novel by Jack Finney, and the movie starring Kevin McCarthy (who also made a cameo in the 1978 remake!) The story of aliens invading earth and creating “pod people” to take over the human race was (probably) an allegory for the House Unamerican Activities that was looking for Communists in the U.S. during the 1930s-1950s. The author would go on to even greater success with his novel Time and Again in 1970 which dealt with time travel.   The 1956 movie was directed by Don Siegel (Escape from Alcatraz, Dirty Harry) and produced by Walter Wanger who was starting his career over after a 1951 scandal when he shot his wife's (Joan Bennett) agent and lover. (Check out Karina Longworth's podcast Love is a Crime to learn more!) The film made a few changes to the source material and was made with mostly a group of unknown and character actors to become a huge hit. The story here takes place in fictional Santa Mira in the mid-1950s (unlike 1970s Mill Valley, CA in the novel.) Our lead, played by McCarthy, is a psychiatrist and not a physician and in the end--well, you need to listen to our show to find out! In 1994, the film was selected for preservation by the National Film Registry by the Library of Congress. There have been several remakes and similar stories told over the years but the 1956 version remains a classic.  So, between the novel and the movie--which did we prefer?  In this ep the Margos discuss: The biography of Jack Finney The political atmosphere in the 1950s about space & science The main differences between the novel & film.  Starring: Kevin McCarthy (Dr. Miles Bennell,) Dana Wynter (Becky Driscoll,) King Donovan (Jack Belicec,) Carolyn Jones (Teddy Belicec,) and Richard Deacon (Mel from The Dick Van Dyke Show!) as Dr. Bassett.  Clips used: Kevin McCarthy in the first scene of the film Invasions of the Body Snatchers  trailer The last scene with Dana Wynter The group finds the first pod Music by Carmen Dragon Book Vs. Movie is part of the Frolic Podcast Network. Find more podcasts you will love Frolic.Media/podcasts .  Join our Patreon page to help support the show! https://www.patreon.com/bookversusmovie  Book Vs. Movie podcast https://www.facebook.com/bookversusmovie/ Twitter @bookversusmovie www.bookversusmovie.com Email us at bookversusmoviepodcast@gmail.com Margo D. @BrooklynFitChik www.brooklynfitchick.com brooklynfitchick@gmail.com Margo P. @ShesNachoMama https://coloniabook.weebly.com/  Our logo was designed by Madeleine Gainey/Studio 39 Marketing Follow on Instagram @Studio39Marketing & @musicalmadeleine 

The Past, the Promise, the Presidency
Season II, Episode II: James and Dolley Madison and the Burning of Washington

The Past, the Promise, the Presidency

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 72:56


This week on The Past, The Promise, The Presidency: Presidential Crises we examine how James and Dolley Madison responded to The War of 1812, often referred to by both contemporaries and historians as the "Second War of Independence."  Upon arriving at the White House, British troops thoroughly enjoyed a feast and fine wine before systematically setting fire to the building. They then turned their attention to the Capitol building, the Library of Congress, and every other public building in the city. Before long, most of the city was ablaze. It was only saved by the fateful intervention of a hurricane level storm that doused the flames.By any definition, having your capital burned by foreign troops ranks as a crisis. So, how did the United States get into another war with Britain so soon after establishing its independence? How did President Madison, the third president and the first to lead the country during a full-fledged war, respond to this crisis? How did the country and the world respond to the outcome of the crisis and the war? And finally, what was First Lady Dolley Madison's role in the crisis? These are just some of the questions we tackled in this episode. To learn more about this crisis we spoke to two fantastic guests. First, we spoke with Dr. Troy Bickham, a professor of history at Texas A&M. He is an expert on Britain and its empire in the Atlantic world. We then spoke with Dr. Catherine Allgor, a historian of gender, women, and political culture, as well as the president of the Massachusetts Historical Society. To learn more, visit www.pastpromisepresidency.com.

Old School Lane
Arun and Patricia Episode 54: The Lovers, The Dreamers, and an Afternoon Well Spent

Old School Lane

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 71:00


Arun and Patricia talk about: Amazon claims peeing in bottle is fake news. AOC tweets a leaked Amazon message asking employees not return “poop bags.” Georgia Rep. Park Cannon arrested for knocking on a door. Boris Johnson claims UK government claims it “did everything it could” in COVID-19, New Zealand went back to normal and hosted concerts and sporting events. Kermit the Frog's ‘The Rainbow Connection' has been added by the Library of Congress to the National Recording Registry. Happy Birthday Super Metroid. NickRewind's “An Afternoon Well Spent”. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/old-school-lane/support

Stitch Please
A Sewing Chat with Rita Dove

Stitch Please

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 27:09


Thank you to volunteer sound designer for her work on this episode including the following music: “Chill Lo-Fi Hip Hop” by Skilsel; “News Corporate” by Skilsel; “Hip Hop Lo-Fi” by John Sib; “Hip Hop Funk” by John Sib and “African Percussion” by SofraMore about Rita DoveWhether she is crafting a line of poetry or stitching together her husband's lavender velvet wedding suit, Rita Dove is a master of storytelling. In this episode of Stitch Please, Lisa talks with former US Poet Laureate, Rita Dove, about her introduction to sewing, the relationship between poetry and sewing, and how to walk along the seam sewn by those who have come before us. After graduating from Buchtel High School as a Presidential Scholar, Dove went on to graduate summa cum laude with a B.A. from Miami University in 1973. In 1974, she was awarded a Fulbright Scholarship from the University of Tübingen, Germany and later completed her MFA at the Writers' Workshop at the University of Iowa in 1977 where she met her husband, Fred Viebahn. In 1987, Dove received the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry. In 1992, Dove was named US Poet Laureate and served as Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress—a position she would later hold again as a Special Bicentennial Consultant in 1999. In addition to being the youngest individual and the first African American to hold the position of Poet Laureate, Rita Dove is the recipient of 28 honorary doctorates and numerous awards, some of which include: Poet Laureate of Virginia, the National Humanities Medal presented by President Bill Clinton, the National Medal of Arts presented by President Barack Obama, several lifetime achievement awards, and the Gold Medal in poetry from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. Dove has published the poetry collections The Yellow House on the Corner (1980), Museum (1983), Thomas and Beulah (1986), Grace Notes (1989), Selected Poems (1993), Mother Love (1995), On the Bus with Rosa Parks (1999), American Smooth (2004), Sonata Mulattica (2009), Collected Poems: 1974-2004 (2016) which was a finalist for the National Book Award, and her most recent work, Playlist for the Apocalypse (2021).  In addition to poetry, Dove has published a book of short stories, Fifth Sunday (1985), the novel Through the Ivory Gate (1992), and the play The Darker Face of the Earth (1994). Rita Dove is currently the Commonwealth Professor of English at the University of Virginia. When she's not writing timeless literary gems, Dove might be found thumbing through High Fashion Sewing Secrets and creating her own wearable works of art.

Sharon Says So
39. Sharon Answers Your Questions #2

Sharon Says So

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 24:31


In this episode, Sharon sits down to answer your burning questions about the American government. From state secession and immigration to the Library of Congress artifacts and city council, Sharon fields questions that are piquing the interest of the Governerd community. Have a question for Sharon? Visit sharonmcmahon.com/podcast to record a voice memo with your question for consideration in the next Sharon Q&A episode. For more information on this episode including all resources and links discussed go to https://www.sharonmcmahon.com/podcast

National Day Calendar
October 2, 2021 – National Cookbook Month | National Name Your Car Day

National Day Calendar

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2021 2:30


You Won't Believe The Recipes In This 15th Century Cookbook! Welcome to October 2, 2021 on the National Day Calendar. Today we celebrate culinary adventures and man's best mechanical friend.  No matter how crazy or inventive recipes from today's top chefs seem to be, they'd have a hard time rivaling anything in the Libro de arte coquinaria. This 15th-Century cookbook was compiled by the chef of an Italian cardinal and is housed in the Library of Congress. So what makes this particular book so special? Well, for starters, it is the first known cookbook to list both ingredients and instructions. And it's also full of wild recipes like “How to Dress a Peacock With All Its Feathers, So That When Cooked, It Appears to Be Alive and Spews Fire From Its Beak.” That's literally the title of the recipe. Try to top that, Food Network. During National Cookbook Month, take a walk on the wild side and try a new adventure. If you've ever named your car then you are not alone.  Movies and TV shows give top billing to everything from Herbie the Love Bug to Kit from Knight Rider and Smokey in Smokey and the Bandit.  But perhaps the most loved car in today's world is Lightning McQueen from the movie Cars.  This animated feature film banks on our natural affinity to consider our car as something more human than machine. Maybe it's been awhile since you played with matchbox cars or thought of your set of wheels as a trusty companion. But chances are good that giving your car a name will inspire you to give it some extra TLC.  On National Name Your Car Day celebrate man's other best friend and keep your engine purring. I'm Anna Devere and I'm Marlo Anderson.  Thanks for joining us as we Celebrate Every Day.

The John Batchelor Show
1730: Scandinavia's less-successful experiment with subsidizing child raising. Veronique de Rugy

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 11:25


Photo:  Svenska Socialisten, December 12, 1918. Library of Congress. Scandinavia's less-successful experiment with subsidizing child raising. Veronique de Rugy https://www.econlib.org/should-paid-leave-programs-be-public-or-private/ https://www.econlib.org/poverty-isnt-just-about-money-expanding-the-child-tax-credit/

Once Upon A Time: A Storytelling Podcast
"Do The Right Thing" with Fabrice Nozier

Once Upon A Time: A Storytelling Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 54:55


We're back! This week, Fabrice Nozier of the "Filmagra" podcast and Filmagra.org joins us for a discussion about film and social justice via Spike Lee's classic, Do The Right Thing! Stay tuned for some exciting discourse, analysis, and some general movie trivia.Show Linktree: https://linktr.ee/onceuponatimepod Guest Host: Fabrice NozierInstagram: Filmagra.org Listen here!Tiktok: @jpicadegallo,…Do The Right Thing(1989)Fight the Power By Public Enemy With 'Do the Right Thing,' Spike Lee Changed Cinema Forever by Mekeisha Madden TobyWhy ‘Do the Right Thing' and “Fight the Power” Are Eternal by Stephen KearseSpike Lee's Long Journey to Becoming Cannes' Unabashed and Adored Jury President by Anne ThompsonDo the Right Thing, Library of Congress by David Sterritt Films on Race Matters and Social Justice, CUNYThe Social Justice Film InstituteSupport the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/OnceUponATimePC)

All Of It
Rita Dove's 'Playlist for the Apocalypse'

All Of It

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 18:09


Rita Dove, Pulitzer Prize Winner for Poetry and former Poet Laureate to the Library of Congress and the State of Virginia, joins us to discuss her newest collection of poems, Playlist for the Apocalypse.

Science Magazine Podcast
Earliest human footprints in North America, dating violins with tree rings, and the social life of DNA

Science Magazine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 42:45


Contributing Correspondent Lizzie Wade joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss fossilized footprints left on a lake shore in North America sometime before the end of Last Glacial Maximum—possibly the earliest evidence for humans on the continent. Read the research. Next, Paolo Cherubini, a senior scientist in the dendrosciences research group at the Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research, discusses using tree rings to date and authenticate 17th and 18th century violins worth millions of dollars. Finally, in this month's installment of the series of book interviews on race and science, guest host Angela Saini interviews Alondra Nelson, professor in the School of Social Science at the Institute for Advanced Study, about her 2016 book The Social Life of DNA: Race, Reparations, and Reconciliation After the Genome. Note on the closing music: Violinist Nicholas Kitchen plays Johann Sebastian Bach's Chaconne on the violin “Castelbarco” made by Antonio Stradivari in Cremona, Italy, in 1697. Courtesy of the U.S. Library of Congress.  This week's episode was produced with help from Podigy. [Image: Bennet et al., Science; Music: Jeffrey Cook] [Alt text: human footprints preserved in rock] Authors: Sarah Crespi; Lizzie Wade; Angela Saini See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The John Batchelor Show
1683: Five foreign policy lessons not learned in Afghanistan debacle. Peter Berkowitz, @HooverInst HFN

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 12:36


Photo: This photograph of a pile of military "trophies" after the Battle of Peiwar Kotal in November 1878 is from an album of rare historical photographs depicting people and places associated with the Second Anglo-Afghan War. Peiwar Kotal was the site of a battle in late 1878, between British forces under Sir Frederick Roberts (1832–1914), who outmaneuvered Afghan forces under an unknown commander.* CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow Five foreign policy lessons not learned in Afghanistan debacle. Peter Berkowitz, @HooverInst HFN https://www.realclearpolitics.com/articles/2021/09/05/lessons_of_freedom_from_20_years_of_war_against_jihadism_146358.html?utm_source=Hoover+Daily+Report&utm_campaign=00fd9ba5d2-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2019_09_05_04_36_COPY_01&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_21b1edff3c-00fd9ba5d2-72527561.. * The result was a British victory and seizure of the Peiwar Kotal Pass. A young boy is perched atop the pile; he leans against a huge bass drum and sits on a fur-lined sheepskin coat, called a poostin in Dari. He is surrounded by an assortment of military items that were abandoned during the battle or removed from the bodies of slain soldiers. They include swords and scimitars of both British and Afghan design, scabbards, rifles, and a helmet in the center. The Second Anglo-Afghan War began in November 1878 when Great Britain, fearful of what it saw as growing Russian influence in Afghanistan, invaded the country from British India. The first phase of the war ended in May 1879 with the Treaty of Gandamak, which permitted the Afghans to maintain internal sovereignty but forced them to cede control over their foreign policy to the British. Fighting resumed in September 1879, after an anti-British uprising in Kabul, and finally concluded in September 1880 with the decisive Battle of Kandahar. The album includes portraits of British and Afghan leaders and military personnel, portraits of ordinary Afghan people, and depictions of British military camps and activities, structures, landscapes, and cities and towns. The sites shown are all located within the borders of present-day Afghanistan or Pakistan (a part of British India at the time). About a third of the photographs were taken by John Burke (circa 1843–1900), another third by Sir Benjamin Simpson (1831–1923), and the remainder by several other photographers. Some of the photographs are unattributed. The album possibly was compiled by a member of the British Indian government, but this has not been confirmed. How it came to the Library of Congress is not known..

On the Media
Organizing Chaos

On the Media

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 49:36


A debate has been raging among the librarians of the world, and it's all about order. The Dewey Decimal System became our way of managing information long ago, but it may be time to reassess. Plus, how one man's obsession with ordering the natural world took a very dark turn. 1. Lulu Miller [@lmillernpr], author of Why Fish Don't Exist and co-host of WNYC's Radiolab, charts the quest of taxonomist David Starr Jordan to categorize the world. Listen. 2. On the Media producer Molly Scwartz [@mollyfication] takes a deep dive into one imposition of human order so commonplace most of us never notice: the library. But the famed Dewey Decimal System is not an unbiased ordering machine. Featuring: Jess deCourcy Hinds [@HindsJess] librarian at the Bard High School, Early College library in Queens, New York, Wayne A. Wiegand a library historian and author of Irrepressible Reformer: A Biography of Melvil Dewey, Caroline Saccucci, the former Dewey Program Manager at the Library of Congress, and Emily Drabinski [@edrabinski] interim chief librarian of the Mina Rees Library at CUNY. Listen. Music from this week's show: Nocturne For Piano in B flat minor- Frédéric Chopin  Il Casanova di Federico Fellini Tomorrow Never Knows - Quartetto D'archi dell Orchestra Sinfonica Songs of War - US Army Old Guard Fife and Drum Corps  The Dewey Decimal System - Jason Munday