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Best podcasts about Cue

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Latest podcast episodes about Cue

The Teacher's Tool Kit For Literacy
Part 1: Differentiation: How Do We Achieve It? With Rob Vingerhoets

The Teacher's Tool Kit For Literacy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 41:33


With such limited time and resources, teachers find it difficult to cater for the needs of all students in the class. It can be hard to know where they are at, and to match them with the curriculum for their year level.To talk about differentiation and how to overcome these challenges, Sharon and Phil Callen are joined by numeracy consultant Rob Vingerhoets. Rob is an experienced and highly effective educator and subject matter expert who has worked with teachers and students throughout Melbourne, Country Victoria, interstate and overseas (New York City, Beijing). Prior to this he was a primary school principal, curriculum coordinator and classroom teacher. He is an experienced teacher and author, having written a number of best-selling maths resource books and numerous articles.Over this episode and the next, Sharon, Phil and Rob talk about:How do we differentiate for all students, and get them engaged?How  do we do it without streaming into groups?How do we make sure each student is stretching themselves?How do we cater for struggling learners?How do the high impact teaching strategies play out in this way of working?How do we make sure we are covering the curriculum for all students?How do we keep a record of progress for each student?How does the learning happen - what doesn't work with streaming?What resourcing is needed?What types of schools struggle most?Is it about programs or better PD?What are some things that make the biggest difference - in what teachers or coaches do?What are your favourite ways of working with principals on this?And much more!Enjoy the episode, and let us know thoughts and feedback in our Facebook Group. Subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or your favourite podcast player. JOIN CUE LEARNING'S NEXT LIVE WEBINAR!Find upcoming events here and previous webinars (online video courses) here.Other matching PDF resources can be found at Teachific. RESOURCES RELEVANT TO THIS EPISODETEACHIFIC Maths at Home - Lesson Packs F-6OTHERA Designer Speaks, by Charles Lovitt and Doug ClarkeBOOKTOPIAOpen Ended Maths Activities by Peter SullivanCheck out Teachific here. Connect with us!Join our community on Facebook for exclusive resources, Q and A, discussions, insights and more: https://www.facebook.com/groups/teacherstoolkitforliteracyGot any questions? Feedback? Thoughts? Email Phil: phil@cuelearning.com.auThe Teacher's Tool Kit For Literacy is the free podcast for motivated teachers and school leaders who want the latest tips, tricks and tools to inspire their students and school community in literacy learning. Hear from literacy experts and founders of Cue Learning, Sharon and Phil Callen, and special guests.At Cue Learning, our literacy specialists draw on over 30 years of teaching and international consulting experience to deliver world-class learning solutions. We equip, empower and support teachers to become their authentic selves. To find out about upcoming events, and about how Cue can help you and your school, visit the Cue Learning website http://www.cuelearning.com.au/ and sign up to our newsletter https://cuelearning.com.au/contact/And you can get even more amazing teaching resources, right now, at Teachific https://www.teachific.com.au/.To make sure you don't miss any literacy learning tips and insights, please subscribe to our show on your favourite podcast player. MORE INFORMATION AT A GLANCE:Visit cuelearning.com.auSubscribe to the Teacher's Tool Kit For Literacy podcasts  or join on Apple  Podcasts hereContact Phil  phil@cuelearning.com.auJoin our Teacher's Toolkit facebook groupFind connected resources on TeachificSee upcoming online eventsSee our online video courses hereAnd finally, read our insightful blogs hereProduced by Apiro Media https://apiropodcasts.com

Events from the Brookings Institution
How should we assess children's learning in the COVID era?

Events from the Brookings Institution

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 62:20


On October 20, the Center for Universal Education (CUE) hosted a lively discussion to address all of these issues in what will be the first in a series of three events centered around assessment. This first discussion focused on the assessment goals that are most helpful in supporting high-quality learning for all children, and particularly for children in low- and middle-income countries. CUE shared its insights from collaborative work with six countries across Africa and Asia on assessment strategies that help foster deeper learning and engaging pedagogy in challenging contexts, while also highlighting the complexities of assessment in the era of the pandemic. Panelists debated the merits and trade-offs of different approaches, and discussed how the pandemic is shaping the debate on assessing learning.   Subscribe to Brookings Events on iTunes, send feedback email to events@brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. To learn more about upcoming events, visit our website. Brookings Events is part of the Brookings Podcast Network.

Let's THINK about it
Atomic Habits (optimization pt 2)

Let's THINK about it

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 25:26


Part 1: The Aggregation of Marginal GainsHabits are really about identity change. Behaviour change is simply the means to get there (the feedback loop).What are atomic habits? They are the smallest possible habits, tiny little things that you can begin doing easily for remarkable changes.Example: The British cycling team wasn't doing so well until their new coach, Dave Brailsford, implemented very small, incremental changes: things like trying out different tires or massage lotions to increase recovery time.They did not see immediate results, but the gains accumulate over time. This known as the aggregation of marginal gains.The idea here is if you only get 1% better every day in a specific task by the end of the year you are 37% better. Which is great, but the real magic comes when you multiply the effect across years.“Small habits don't add up. They compound.”James Clear Dave Brailsford and British Cycling, as of 2018, won 5 of the last 6 Tour de France events with 3 different riders, capturing dozens of gold medals, and setting many Olympic and World Records in the process. Their system works.Note: the optimization apparently continued outside of the parameters into the gray zones… and now it's sort of Lance Armstrong all over again.Part 2: Slow Burnit's not about getting what you want, the power of habits is the change who you are. Or who you want to become.James clear's analogy for the challenge of change is the Ice Cube. If the Ice Cube is in a room at 23 degrees, and you heat up the room by 1°, nothing happens. This is like me being on a diet for one week. But you could heat up the room 1 degree eight or nine more times (and maybe you should consider that eight or nine years) but when it hits that magical 32° the ice begins to melt.The lesson that Clear and other authors articulate is that it takes between 5 to 8 years to become an overnight success. And during this time, pretty much no one will see a difference, but suddenly, there will be a state change.To describe this, he introduces The Plateau of Latent Potential & The Valley of Disappointment.We are getting 1% better every day. We expect that arrow on the chart to keep pointing up with steady lineal progress, but Clear says that it is actually more like a plateau before we rise exponentially.He cautions where you place your emphasis: outcome metrics will vary, but if your process is good, such as showing up every day and staying on a schedule, the results will show up. It just might take another 3 or 4 years… If my system is good.“You do not rise to the level of your goals. You fall to the level of your systems.”James ClearHaving big goals is normal… everyone has a dream, but having big passion alone will not get us there. It is the daily systems we put in place that get us there.But to do this, we must also be aware.“Until you make the unconscious conscious, it will direct your life and you will call it fate.”James ClearDo you remember the story about the Elephant and the Rider? Where the rider (ego) thinks they are in control, but the unconscious is an elephant… and if it decides to walk left, we tend to pretend we (as the rider) are in control and rationalize the direction saying “yes, I always wanted to go that direction anyway.”To change your path, you must be aware of your unconscious patterns and behaviors.The insight here is that we tend to think our habits help us achieve a goal… but really, habits are behaviors that determine our identity.your identity feeds your habits, and your habits feed your identity, forming a feedback loop.So, this is not about just collecting hacks or forming odd habits: focus on the big goals, learn to embody your values.One thing you can do when looking for the path to manifest your values is to ask yourself: what kind of person writes a book? What kind of person has success in this space? You hear that Hemmingway started writing at 5:00 AM everyday and wrote for 3 hours no matter how hungover. If you take on this habit, your identity will change: you will become a writer (but hopefully not a heavy drinker.)One way to consider all of this is to both PUSH and PULL yourself.Set the goal and let it PULL you forward: let that dangling carrot inspire you and drive you. Let the habits PUSH you. It may feel odd to enact behaviors (copycat or mimicry) that you do not fully comprehend at first, but sometimes merely performing the action can lead you to the insight and benefits, which over time can manifest a change in interior motivations as well.Part 3: Habit Stackyour habits are just the automated solutions that solve the problems your brain faces regularly.James ClearWe can hack our environmental awareness to stack things together, making a mutually reinforcing chain of behaviors, or habits.To form a new habit, we have a cue that triggers craving, which prompts a response, and then we get our reward.But the “cue” can be developed, we can hack it, according to Time, location, or even by a preceding event, so you can trigger cues to link or stack habits together ~ potentially driving out old bad habits and replacing them with potentially good habits.Simple Habit Stack: Every time you close your laptop, do 10 pushups.Mental Habit Stack: In a more complicated version, [[Tom Bilyeu]] from[[impact theory]] says that after meditating you have just reduced a lot of cognitive distress and anxiety. During this kind of super open and calm state anything you do afterwards should be more focused and your brain should be more receptive. So for instance you would stack meditation and journaling future goals together. Or meditate, then read, allowing your mind to absorb the content without the typical daily cognitive anxiety.Physical habit stacks: When you workout your body becomes super absorptive of protein or anything else you put in your body… for about 20 minutes post workout. This is a peak window that you should take advantage of for gains and decreased soreness and inflammation.This “knowledge of knowledge”, knowing when you can maximize your efforts with a little stack allows habits to interlock and become routines.Part 4: Environment“Sometimes success is less about making good habits easy and more about making bad habits hard.”James ClearBut what about bad habits, temptation, and will power? The latest science shows that will power is like a battery charge: if you use it all up, you have to go to sleep to re-charge and get more of it.I did an episode, Step 19: Breakdown of Will on a book by George Ainslie, where he shows how understanding temptation (and reward paths) can also lead us understanding how willpower functions.We need to change our thinking, we need to consider will-power and discipline as a limited resource, not a character trait. Then we can begin to set up your life to not only avoid temptation, like food or procrastination, but also we can make our environment serve us by limiting bad distractions, and planting good ones.Small behavior hack: if you don't drink enough water, simply put bottles or glasses of water all around you when you start your day, so you no longer need the willpower to walk all the way to the fridge to get water every so often.This is modifying your environment, which can be part of a habit stack: when you enter your office gather the empty water bottles from yesterday and fill them all up again and disperse them, before you let yourself get a cup of coffee. Or if you need a reward habit stack, flip it: every time you drink a cup of water you reward yourself with a cup of coffee, or you get to check Instagram for 5 minutes. whatever your drug is, but be careful of these REWARD Stacks… at the end of the day we don't want to train ourselves to be entitled to a reward for doing something so mundane as drinking water.Clear says, your environment is an “invisible hand” that guides your behavior.“What often looks like a lack of willpower is actually the result of a poor environment.”James ClearRight, but how do you do this? If you know you have limited willpower then early in the day (while you are still fresh and full of discipline vigor) you can set up your environment to aid that weak willed ninny that you become in the afternoons.If you suffer from checking social media, then early in the day you set a software to block it until after work.If you eat too much at lunch, pre-pack your lunch into a smaller Tupperware container. Like Odysseus tied to the mast, take the decision away from the future you.“Winners often win because their environment makes winning easier.”James Clear

Girl and The Gov, The Podcast
WTF is Gerrymandering with Arizona State Director at All On The Line, Kendra Alvarez

Girl and The Gov, The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 51:10


If you've ever had a conversation with Sammy about politics, you KNOW she's mentioned the term ‘gerrymandering.' Thus, it's only appropriate that we dedicated an entire episode to the term and its many siblings. Cue, our conversation with Arizona State Director at All On The Line, Kendra Alvarez, who took us past just gerrymandering to the terms beyond including ‘grid map,' ‘packing,' and ‘cracking.' Terms with silly names perhaps, but ones that are set to play a big role in redistricting underway across the nation. Tune in to learn more about what this means in your area and in states like Arizona. P.S. Ask us all your questions and give us all your feedback on IG @girlandthegovthepodcast or via email at girlandthegovthepodcast@gmail.com.Citizen Power with Nathalia Ramos & Ben Sheehanhttps://www.onecommune.com/a/2147492814/nBoX9mJoPrima:https://www.prima.co/ Use code GIRLGOV for 20% offhttp://chng.it/8CNwdhLT79 Prima PetitionBrand Ambassador Sign Up Form: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSelH0p5KWISaHaBI5-9nKSUItlY_eXiEmvsudpJIcRjKhfgyA/viewformBrand Ambassador Info Sheet:https://drive.google.com/file/d/11WAWLwc9dShbSVxPMcUzc1d5Ua8KNdO2/view 

Hair of the Dog Podcast
Why You Can't Ignore Video with Shelley Paulson

Hair of the Dog Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 35:34


109 - Earlier this year, head of Instagram Adam Mosseri announced that IG is no longer a photo sharing app. Cue the record scratch. Say wut?? If you've spent a minute on social media lately, the pivot to prioritizing video comes as no surprise. Equine photographer Shelley Paulson has been watching the trend develop for years, which is why she started dabbling in video creation back in 2014. This week, Shelley joins me to talk about what's changed in the world of video, and how you can take advantage of video's emotional power—both for increased reach in your marketing efforts and to create a better experience for your clients.   What To Listen For: How standards for video production have shifted in recent yearsThe most challenging part of offering video to clientsIdeas for mixing stills and videoHow to leverage video for commercial opportunitiesWhat Shelley predicts for the future of video and technologyShelley's also teaching a video class in the upcoming Hair of the Dog Summit, happening on November 2-4. Get registered today for just a $10 donation to the HOD Conservation Fund, and you'll get live access to Shelley's course and the entire lineup of educators! Resources From This Episode: Shelley Paulson PhotographyShelley Paulson on FacebookShelley on InstagramAdobe Premiere RushAnimotoRemco Veurink Equestrian on IGHair of the Dog Summit Hair of the Dog Academy Hair of the Dog Facebook groupHair of the Dog Elevate coaching programThe Hair of the Dog Online Summit is returning this November and it's going to be bigger and better than ever! REGISTER HERE!

the Mudroom
How To Not Raise An Entitled Brat

the Mudroom

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 14:29


When we have children, the hope is that we can raise them to be good humans who respect others, persevere, and work hard. So when your toddler tosses the stuffed animal you offered to buy them because they want to $300 dollar playset instead, parents usually stare at them horror struck and think: Holy crap, I'm raising an entitled brat! Cue the overcrictism of what that means about our parenting and our children. This is when we become hypersensitive to when they're being particularly demanding. Or we start counting how many times they say please or thank you (or rather noticing how many times they didn't say it). Suddenly those moments when they refused to share their toy or help their baby brother find his pacifier feel a little more malicious or selfish than we originally thought. It's honestly a tailspin of worry added on top of all the other things parents tend to worry about. If this is you and you're worry that you could be possibly raising a child who grows up selfish and you'll be featured on the next episode of Super Nanny with a miniature tyrant screaming at you between commercial breaks... ...or even if right now your child is super polite and appreciative but you're still concerned about it anyway- I'm telling you, you'll leave the conversation feeling so much better, especially with holidays that can be particularly triggering when it comes to gratitude and “being spoiled”. Grab the Scripts to Manage the Top 10 Crazy-Making Behaviours: prnt.link/scripts Watch the video recording here: Join the Parenting Posse: prnt.link/group the Mudroom is recorded live every Wednesday at 1:30pm ET/ 12:30pm CT/ 10:30am PT on Facebook: facebook.com/arfamilyservices --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/mudroom/message

The Teacher's Tool Kit For Literacy
Part 2: Making Connections - The Literacy Teaching Game Changer

The Teacher's Tool Kit For Literacy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 31:53


In part 2 of this discussion, Sharon Callen continues to reveal the key insights and outcomes from a three day literacy teaching intensive that she recently ran for a group of schools.It's all about making connections. Integrating reading, writing and word work is the most efficient and powerful way to teach literacy. In this episode, Sharon provides more guidance, tips and solutions that you can apply in the classroom today. Enjoy the episode, and let us know thoughts and feedback in our Facebook Group. Subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or your favourite podcast player. JOIN CUE LEARNING'S NEXT LIVE WEBINAR!Find upcoming events here and previous webinars (online video courses) here.Other matching PDF resources can be found at Teachific. RESOURCES RELEVANT TO THIS EPISODETEACHIFIC Reading Workshop: Establishing Routines and Expectations K-7ACARA English Content F-7 (updated version coming in 2022)From last week:Inferring and Drawing Conclusions: Mini Lessons K-8Helping Children to Learn High Frequency Words -  for Teachers by Diane SnowballHelping Children to Learn High Frequency Words -  for Parents by Diane SnowballACARAEnglish curriculumBOOKTOPIAGuiding Readers and Writers: Teaching Comprehension, Genre and Content Literacy by Fountas and PinnellWonder Earth: Exploring Our Living Home by Zanni Louise, Tiff Bollhorn, Sophy Louise Smith6 + 1 Traits of Writing by Ruth CulhamCheck out Teachific here. Connect with us!Join our community on Facebook for exclusive resources, Q and A, discussions, insights and more: https://www.facebook.com/groups/teacherstoolkitforliteracyGot any questions? Feedback? Thoughts? Email Phil: phil@cuelearning.com.auThe Teacher's Tool Kit For Literacy is the free podcast for motivated teachers and school leaders who want the latest tips, tricks and tools to inspire their students and school community in literacy learning. Hear from literacy experts and founders of Cue Learning, Sharon and Phil Callen, and special guests.At Cue Learning, our literacy specialists draw on over 30 years of teaching and international consulting experience to deliver world-class learning solutions. We equip, empower and support teachers to become their authentic selves. To find out about upcoming events, and about how Cue can help you and your school, visit the Cue Learning website http://www.cuelearning.com.au/ and sign up to our newsletter https://cuelearning.com.au/contact/And you can get even more amazing teaching resources, right now, at Teachific https://www.teachific.com.au/.To make sure you don't miss any literacy learning tips and insights, please subscribe to our show on your favourite podcast player. MORE INFORMATION AT A GLANCE:Visit cuelearning.com.auSubscribe to the Teacher's Tool Kit For Literacy podcasts  or join on Apple  Podcasts hereContact Phil  phil@cuelearning.com.auJoin our Teacher's Toolkit facebook groupFind connected resources on TeachificSee upcoming online eventsSee our online video courses hereAnd finally, read our insightful blogs hereProduced by Apiro Media https://apiropodcasts.com

Pfeiffer Pfridays
Dark Shadows (2012)

Pfeiffer Pfridays

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 56:51


This Pfriday, a vampire, a witch, and two Oscar-nominated actresses walk into a dilapidated manor. Cue the werewolf! Welcome to Collinwood as we rise from our coffins to tackle DARK SHADOWS, the Michelle Pfeiffer/Tim Burton reunion that failed to reach the critical, commercial or cultural highs of their previous collaboration. We discuss Michelle's heightened performance and hilarious facial expressions (and revisit the age-old adage: do not underuse La Pfeiffer), the trajectories of Burton and Depp post-Sweeney Todd, the pitfalls of reboots, and the gothic perfection of Eva Green. If you enjoy what you hear, please rate and subscribe on your preferred podcast channel. You can also follow us on Twitter @pfeifferpfriday or on Instagram @pfeifferpfridays.

StarTalk Radio
Pool Table Physics with Dr. Dave Alciatore

StarTalk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 37:33


What was Coriolis, of the Coriolis Effect, doing at the pool table? On this episode, Neil deGrasse Tyson and co-hosts Gary O'Reilly and Chuck Nice explore the science behind billiards and pool trick shots with billiard physicist Dr. Dave Alciatore.NOTE: StarTalk+ Patrons can watch or listen to this entire episode commercial-free.Thanks to our Patrons Dylan Elliot, Cody Swayze, Panda Man, Niklas Ekberg, Isaac Lambert, Fortune's Flavor, and Joshua Grose for supporting us this week.Photo Credit: Paul Goyette, CC BY-SA 2.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Land.MBA Podcast
EP 53 Build Relationships to Sell more Land! Land.MBA Podcast

Land.MBA Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 41:50


Hi, my name is Howard. Will you marry me? What you mean you'd like to get to know me first? Well, if you think that's really important. Hey, guys, today on the Land of NBA podcast, David and I are going to go delve into the third of five critical skills that all land investors must master relationship building. You can't ask people to marry you on the first date, and land business relationships are built on the phone. Those who master building, trust and rapport over the phone will be able to go from a ho hum land investor to land closing machines.   Let's Connect  For coaching and courses go here - https://www.land.mba Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/land.mba/ Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/mylandmba   Excellent. Excellent. Dude, I got to tell you the other day I sold a property, but this guy, this customer was so combative when I got him on the phone, I didn't even know why he called me. He was really kind of irritating guy. But you know what? By the end of the call, bada boom, bada bing made the sale and awesome. Just just a matter of doing what God use and what God gave me two years in one mouth and just listened. Asked a few open-ended probing questions here and there and let him talk. And then, you know, after we built some rapport, he trusted me and it was like, Yeah, let's do the deal.   So sweet money in the bank.   Exactly. And that aligns with our topic today.   And what is that relationship building?   So we're talking about this is the second.   Wait a minute. Is this a dating podcast?   What do you have in mind, sweetheart?   Ain't going to happen, buddy. Let's set expectations early.   You broke my heart, Howie.   I'm sorry. We all have our likes and dislikes. I just don't do bald guys.   All right, well, there's there's plenty of women out there who do so, you know. All right. I digress. So we're building on the five bullet points of the the five skills that you need to pay the bills in this business. And the second one in our order is relationship or rapport building. And that is essentially the art of persuasion, its sales, whether you're talking to a seller or a buyer.   Absolutely. It's a really important topic and it's make or break in this business because someone's business is done on the phone with people that you never actually meet. So being able to build a strong rapport with people that you don't even meet face to face is a great great is a great, great skill set to have you got to have it, actually. But before we get too deep into it, I just want to say if you love the land business as much as we do and you want to continue to hear more of the deeper, unadulterated insights we strive to provide on this podcast, please subscribe rate and review on YouTube. Your favorite podcast app or wherever you're hearing is from. It really helps us to provide great content for free. And even if you don't love it, if you're just coming back every week, every week because you just got nothing better to do. My God rate review and subscribe. Leave a comment. Do something I can't tell you how much it means to us, and we are very committed to continue continuing this and providing not just surface level stuff, not just we don't want it. This is not about sales. This is about sharing knowledge. So please help us out. And we certainly are going to do our very best to help you out as well.   It's not about sales ploy. Oversold that one, I'm telling you.   Well, you know, if we provide something you want and you know you, you know, there's a good exchange of value. I'm not above that. But you know, first and foremost, we want to share a great valuable content.   Excellent. All right, Matt. So why is rapport or relationship building important?   Yeah, it's absolutely essential because there's two things that I think are absolutely critical before a sale is even possible. And that is one until somebody knows you and you're still you until you establish a little bit of rapport. There is a lack of trust, and no one is going to do a deal worth hundreds, thousands or tens of thousands of dollars with somebody where they have not established some level of trust. Now, with bigger businesses, it may it may take less because trust is built through the branding process. You know, they know the company, they know the brand, the brand is credible and that their people are going to do what they say they're going to do and that there are ways to deal with it if they don't. But when you're dealing with situations like this, people often worried about being scammed, that's always the big word that they're worried about. So you've got to build trust between yourself and them so that they will feel confident to do the deal with you. But trust isn't always enough. They also need to like you because there's this great saying that says all things being equal, people would rather do business with people they like and all things not being equal. People would rather do business with people they like like. So it's really important that they like you and trust you because now and all that's doing is creating an environment where a sale can happen. I mean, obviously, you still have to provide something they want at a price that they're willing to pay for it. But now you've at least set the stage where a sale can exist without relationship building. The stage is not set.   Yeah, exactly, I mean. And but just a side note, folks, we are intermixing the sales side and the buy side because it's the same thing you're you're persuading someone to sell to you and you have to so and your and your persuading somebody to buy from you. So it's the questions might be a little bit different, but it's the exact same process. So which we're going to get into a little more details. It's essentially a sales process. And so the key to these conversations is, you know, open asking open ended questions. So, Howard, good explanation of why it's important. I totally agree.   When is it important? I guess there's I never really like using superlatives in any conversation like never, always would ever. But this is a case where it actually makes sense. The answer is always. And it doesn't matter who you're working with. I mean, whether you're dealing with sellers, buyers, title companies, county people. At the end of the day, we're always having an engagement with somebody where, you know, we there's an exchange of value or we need something and it's their job to give it to us. But still, the the pace, the quality of of of those conversations is all based upon relationship. You know, they always say you can catch more bees with or more flies with honey bees with honey. I don't know. It's something like that. I feel like George W. Bush right now. It's like I'm screwing up my my clichés. But at any rate, it's true.   At least you don't say nuclear.   So at any rate? No, no. What did he say? He goes, You know, fool me once. Shame on me. Fool me twice. Shame on. Will you get the idea? It's almost actually. That was almost a Biden ism, the way he said.   Yeah. The thing, the thing. The thing. Let's not digress.   So, yes, the answer is always sellers.   Excuse me. All right. Yeah, exactly. So I think now. All right. So let's get into some of the, you know, the questions that we're going to ask. Let's let's let's talk about sellers first and then buyers. But what are some of the questions you might start with to build trust with a seller?   So I think the first thing is sometimes we just answer the phone, sometimes we let everything maybe go to voicemail or to an answering service, so by the time we call them, we're actually calling them, they're not calling us. So the first thing we have to do is we have to introduce ourselves. This is who I am. This is why I'm calling. Well, sometimes they're happy to hear from us, and sometimes they're not, but how we start the conversation kind of sets the tone for everything. So, you know, obviously we want to be positive. We want to be upbeat, but not over the top, because that may not sound sincere. And so I think a clear statement of who you are, why you're calling. But then what I think happens very quickly in these conversations, whether it's on the buy or sell side, is if the other side because you haven't built rapport yet, you haven't built trust yet. They jump right into the facts, you know? Tell me about the property. Tell me the speeds and the feeds in the acreage and you know, the zoning or the price.   We're focusing on sellers right now.   Yeah, yeah. So they're going to they're going to focus on the price that's usually going to be the big thing for them. Now the trick, I think for the way I try to do it is I don't let them control the conversation. I control the conversation, but not in a controlling way. I don't want them to feel like I'm controlling the conversation.   So let me just interject. That would be called leading. You're leading.   Leading. Exactly, yeah, leading leadership is a good thing. So, yeah, so I mean, I get in and I'm like, you know, hey, I definitely understand that price is going to be the big issue here and and we're absolutely going to get to that. But before we do, I just can I ask you a couple of questions and I say, can I ask a couple of questions? Because that gives them the feeling of control, even though I've taken them off their their game and switch the conversation in the direction I wanted it to go. Yeah. And and then and then I'm going to start asking questions what what we really need to do at this stage of the conversation. What we really need to accomplish is we need to not present ourselves as a business, but as a person. I mean, even in large corporations, people don't do business with corporations. They do business with people, right? You know, I bought it because my sales guy was fantastic and I trusted him and I know he was going to make happen on the other side, whatever I needed to do. People want to do business. People do business with people. And so how do we make ourselves more human? I mean, there's so many ways. One is we just ask some questions that really have nothing to do with the property and really just to do with getting to understand each other a little bit. And for me, what I'm really trying to do is as quickly as possible is I'm trying to find something that I can have in common with this person.   These are some crazy times in the real estate field. Demand is high. Inventory is low. If you're a realtor, a wholesaler or house flipper, you've probably noticed how hard it's become to find quality deals. This is why so many in our industry are looking at land as an outstanding way to add new revenue streams to their portfolio.   If you're listening to this podcast, you already know that land is a relatively unknown niche of the multibillion dollar real estate market with huge profit potential. Seriously, what other business delivers 200 300 a thousand percent return on investment deal after deal?   It seems hard to believe, but land really returns 100 to 300 percent commonly and sometimes over a thousand percent deal after deal and in the age of COVID. Demand for land has never been higher.   Many of our students have already created new revenue streams with land and added six figures to their incomes.   We've had clients who have achieved multiple six figures in their first year of business. Another pay for all his coaching and pocketed 15 grand on his first deal. Now, not everybody has these kinds of results, but they're certainly possible if you have the right instruction, the right support and highly experienced mentors.   You don't need another course that promises the moon and then delivers an elementary school education. You need a proven program suitable to your experience and ambition. You need a land MBA. The Land MBA is everything you need to blow it out in the land, business, courseware, mentorship, tools, community and even deal funding. Look, because you're here listening to me, you know that Dave and I don't hold anything back. That's a founding principle we've had from the beginning with the land MBA. You get everything we have to offer. There are no upsells, and now through popular demand, we have transformed our highly regarded one to one coaching program into a small group format at a fraction of the price. If you're ready to build a six figure income with the freedom of being your own boss, go right now to W W W Land MBA Fortune. That's W W W Land MBA Fortune. Let us help you create your next path to wealth. So I might just say, where are you calling from? Maybe it's a location based question or, you know, how's the weather out there? Or, Hey, you know, are you know, oh, you're from New York Giants fan or a Jets fan? Oh, you're you know, I'm just using some places near me. Oh, you're from New Haven Haven. Everything's about pizza. Are you a Pepys fan or a Sallies fan? You know, this is the big two big piece of places, but whatever it is, it doesn't matter. It's about saying something and getting them talking about us to kind of talk about something that they relate to or care about or have an interest in. It's got nothing to do with the land so that we can develop that personal relationship.   Absolutely. It's and and that conversation may lead down another road. It may be may lead to other talking about your family or your kids or your pet. Yeah, you're a dog, guy. I'm a cat guy, but I, you know, whatever. Stuff like that, and you start to build that report. And so it's very important, even though you know you should have a. If you're out and about and you're taking calls or returning calls, you should have your primary script available, you know, print it out if you're in the car. A lot I used to when I was doing this business part time and I was in sales. I would. I was in a car all the time, so I would, you know, I'd have it on my phone, but I always I'd always have printed sheets of my script, so it was ready. But you have to practice so that it becomes conversational. You don't want to sound scripted because then if the conversation goes off your script, you're screwed. It's like, you know, a president. We know when he goes off teleprompter and it can go really bad. But you know you want to you want to practice this, this art, this skill. But yeah, exactly right. Like, you know, where are you calling from a little bit about the weather and things like that start to build, build that trust? And then you can start to bring it into the the facts and the figures. When you're you get to the right part and you feel and it's very much a judgment call on, you know, on how deep you go with questions. But then you might ask them, you know, you might come in and ask them about, you know, what are your goals? What did you what what was the reason that I'm sure you've gotten, you know, have you gotten letters from other people? Why? Why did you call us   Before before we get quite into that part? Can we just explore this front end just a little bit more?   Ok?   There's a quote, and I think the quote belongs to Maya Angelou, the poet. And I'm just going to say it was her because that's how I remember it. And it was. It's something that I've always I heard it once and I've never forgotten it, and it's so important. It said in the end, nobody is going to remember what you said. And very few people will remember what you did, but everyone will remember how you made them feel. And that's really what we're trying to accomplish. So think in your in your own life where you've been in a situation where it's you, maybe you you were in the presence of somebody with a big title or the CEO of your company or whatever it was, and it felt a little bit intimidating. Maybe you felt a little bit nervous. You found just when you spoke that your voice ended up being a little bit higher, your heart was beating a little bit and then other people who just completely put you at ease and you're like, Gosh, I don't know what it is about this person, but I just like being with them, and I just feel like I can be myself. And when people are themselves, they let loose and they talk and they just relax and they say, what's really on their mind? They don't hold back, and that's really where we want to get them. We're trying to get people to relax and feel comfortable. And so the word I would use here is, you want to be accessible, you want to be a person that they can say, I like and trust you and I feel I feel like I can just be myself with you.   I've done this sometimes where like, I'll take a call, I'll be out in my yard and they'll start talking. I'm like, Can you? Can you hold on a second? Oh my God. A squirrel was just going across and my dog just went absolutely nuts like a bad Holly. And he just almost got it. I'll just say something stupid like that. But it it basically humanizes me and my experience into something that they can say, Oh, I can relate to that, you know, I got a dog or I've got squirrels or whatever it is. And all of a sudden now there's an accessibility, and you might ask how much is enough? How much of this little front end banter do you need to do? And I guess the answer is you'll know you'll just you'll just feel it. And then at some point, you know what your what would be really great to hear. On the other end of the phone is a chuckle or a laugh or something like that. And one of the ways that I. Think we can do this week in order to make them feel relaxed and and be willing to share when we get on the phone, we have to be relaxed and we've got to be willing to share. And at least at the beginning, a lot of times when, you know, for people who don't have the, you know, the great experience and just cold calling people, it can be a little bit intimidating.   And so one of the things that I know Dave and I have been really, really I think we've always done it, but we've been really, really trying to improve in this area is before we get on the phone, we just take a moment or two to just think about what our goal is on that phone and especially whether whether it's buying a property. You know, you might say, Gosh, I really want to buy that property or whether it's selling a property is like, Whoa, how much money am I going to make you? You're counting the dollar bills. Both of those are really bad ways, things to have in your mind when you get on a phone call. What what really works? I think for us and what what I think works for most people is to say, You know what, I really think I have something that can help this person, and I want to better understand where they are and what they're trying to accomplish. And I would really love to be able to walk out of this conversation and be able to offer them something of value. And if you put it all on the other person it takes and you really feel that in your heart, then they won't get this nonverbal. Cue that I think you have an ulterior motive. I think you're just trying to get something from me because you don't. You're really trying to help them in a way that's going to make sense for your business. So, yeah, start with that human touch.   Yeah. Sorry, I interrupted you. No, no, no. Yeah, human. I mean, it's such an important principle to think about, right? What's the outcome that I want to create? It's not making money. The goal is to provide, you know, how much value can I provide? And the more value that we can provide in life to the more people, the more money is going to be a byproduct. We're going to make money, the more value we can provide to the more people. So absolutely being human as is a really good way to put that. Talk about some more on that. Like. I mean, there's finding things in common, there's there's you mentioned something earlier about making a mistake. Can you elaborate on that?   Yeah, I funny this. This came up last night on the land speed smart bars. Somebody sent all their offers out and they they sent out arranged offer. So, you know, we typically pay between this price and this price for the property. But they didn't. They made a mistake in their letter. And so what it ended up saying is we typically send out this price per acre and this price per acre for your property. But the numbers reflected the full value not just on a per acre basis. So they were like astronomical offer prices in the phone's ringing off the hook.   And you know, that happened before. I've seen that mistake made   And I've made that mistake. You know, I think at some point, if you send out enough mail, everybody makes that mistake once in a while where their mailers, their pricing is just way too high. And it's a phenomenal opportunity because then you kind of come in and you say, you know, I appreciate the callback and I just want to be really transparent with you right from the beginning because, you know, we price a lot of of a lot of land and send out a lot of mail. You can imagine in order just to be able to buy a few. That makes sense. And well, gosh, sometimes we make a mistake. And unfortunately, on this mailer, we made a mistake and and those prices don't actually reflect the true value. And, you know, if. And I want to first off, just apologize to you for that. That was that's on me. But so the first thing I can say is I'm not going to be able to pay that price. But before we go any further, I guess the question I really want to ask you is, are you really interested in selling your property? Because if you are, I would love to continue to talk and see if we can't find a price that would make sense for both of us and. Yeah, go ahead, go ahead. No, no, no, go ahead. So not only does that set up, hopefully at this point, a quick negotiation because you haven't done the due diligence yet, you don't want to do a final negotiation. You just want to establish the expectation that that price ain't going to be it. But what it also does is say, look at I made a mistake. I own my mistake. I'm human because humans make mistakes. And now I'm not this big, scary company on the other side of the phone with a brand that they don't really know just doesn't know. It doesn't mean we're not a big, an established company. They don't know. So now I'm just a human being like them, and I'm fallible, and that makes me accessible.   Yes, exactly. I've had that same situation happen a couple of times where I was able to reel them in and get the deal. Yeah, that's a great point. It really shows your your human side and breaks down some barriers. And then we get into some open ended questions, you know, in addition, if you need them, I mean, we've already covered several, Oh, you know what? I just want to go back, though. You know, you talked about this is just a when you make that mistake and it's just a point you're building rapport, but you haven't been able to, you know, necessarily look at the property yet. But hopefully if it if it came in, this is slightly off subject. But I just want to drive this point home. Hopefully, it came in through your if it came in through your phone service or or email or whatnot. I mean, if you pick the phone up live, then you're you're just reacting life. But as I always try to say, never let the people off the phone without trying to get a deal, if you can, because people call its people are so busy today and they're getting hammered from so many different pieces of media to get their attention, you know, text messages, email everything.   So sometimes, even if they're really interested, it can take you a couple of weeks to get them back up back on the phone. So I implore anybody if you if, if, unless you're in the car or whatnot. But if you're in front of your computer and you've got them on the phone, maybe you picked up the phone. You'd be like, Hey, look, let me do you have five minutes left and I'll go on and look at some numbers and be able to make you an offer here and there that we can discuss because I always, you know, I don't like the thing. Well, well, send me another offer I I would prefer. I'm happy to send them an official, offer a new letter, but I want to get an agreement first before I waste my time or my staff's time, and even a lot of times what I will. And so, you know, if it's a life phone call, I try to keep them on the phone. You got a few more minutes if you know it came in through the other channels that I should have had an opportunity to look at it and say, Oh holy cow, and then be able to have a number in my mind when I call them up so we can negotiate that and then take it to another level, I'll say, you know, I'm happy to send you an official new fresh, clean offer if that makes you comfortable.   However, if you scratch out the offer in there and write it in and initiate and then sign the document, just take a picture of it. Text it to me. That's all I need to open up escrow and my the title company will clean up the the final contract. I like to have that, you know, that saves time. So if you would just send that to me and then if you want me to, I'll send you another contract. But I can use that that scribbled on piece to open escrow anyway. It's a sidetrack, but I think it's really important because this has happened in my business a lot and and I'm really trying to drive home with my acquisition person nowadays that, hey, you got them on the phone. Let's let's try to get something signed, even if you go into due diligence and realize, Ooh, we still need to offer less because you discovered something well, that would have happened anyway. Get it under contract. Yeah.   Good. Good. Good point. You talked earlier about open ended questions, and I think part of this is, you know, that we really want to get into in this podcast. It's not just the what and the why, but also the how. How do you actually do it? And you know, we've we've talked a little bit about it, but I think there's a little bit of a simple flow, a five step flow. And I would say, you know, don't be don't feel like you've got to go exactly like this in this order all the time, you know, very rigid. I mean, you've got to let conversations flow the way they're going to flow. But I think if you follow these five steps, you really will do a great job and building that rapport. And it's funny because whether it's sales or marketing or team building or, you know, I can think of all of the corporate off sites I've been to in my career. It always feels like group therapy, and I always kind of walk away from those things and I'm saying, Gosh, I could really apply this in my personal relationships to maybe improve my marriage or whatever, whatever it is.   And it's and it's true. I mean, I I think becoming a better communicator, having higher emotional IQ is some of the most valuable lessons we can learn, both in business and personally as well. And one of the things that I've learned, and it took me a long time to learn it. It's that it's really important to validate other people. You know, at the end of the day, what we all want is we all want to feel heard. We all want to feel that you hear me. You understand me. You know where I'm coming from. And at least if we have that, you know, then we can have the basis of a conversation. But if somebody says something and then you counter with what you want to say, but you haven't taken the time to validate them, then they don't feel like you've really heard them. And they're going to dig in their their heels and they're saying, I'm not going to stop until you understand where I'm coming from.   So that's just a really important point on that. Validate does not mean agree, right? You can strongly disagree with them and still validate their position, so they feel heard. And that's all most people want. They don't necessarily want to be agreed with, but yeah, they want to be validated. And I. It's something that as a as a husband and a parent ex-husband now. But you know, you learn, you learn about that stuff. So maybe I wouldn't be divorced if I learned about validation earlier in my relationships. Hey, folks, people often talk about automating and outsourcing your land flipping business. But what does that really mean? Generic solutions leave it to you to figure out how to set up and maintain the automations. I've been running my land business on land speed for over three years because it's a total solution and allows me to focus on being a great land investor. Land speed was built specifically for land investing by land investor and with many of the most successful people in the business using it for years. It's evolved into one of the most feature rich solutions on the market. Some of the key benefits I get are being able to create and manage mail campaigns and neighbor letters. I'm able to automate tasks amongst my team, create contracts and deeds and email text or mail them within a few clicks. I can automatically capture sales leads from any lead source, including Facebook Messenger. Then it automatically pushes those leads into my sales funnel so that I can manually follow up, but they also go into my automated drip campaign. And since Lance Speed's a total cloud based solution, I can run my business from anywhere in the world with a phone, laptop or tablet. So if you want to. Turn your hobby into a professional, scalable business, just go to land speed, techno forward slash Dave to receive one hundred and fifty dollars discount today.   Well, I was working with this guy once and he was gifted in this area and I would he would ask me a question. I'd start talking and he he would just listen, but you know, he'd listen. And he had a great sense of humor. So somehow, no matter what I said and I don't think of myself as a particularly funny guy, but it seemed like from his perspective, everything I said was funny. Mostly, I think he was laughing at me. And then he would say at the end when I finished, he would say, I totally get that. I totally understand where you're coming from, but hear me out. And that he would like present a slightly different view. And those words hear me out. We're basically saying, I validate what you're saying. But let me offer you a slightly different perspective on it than maybe you're coming from just for your consideration, not trying to force anything on you, but hear me out. How about this? And then it just made me listen, and all of a sudden, I, you know, it expanded my my view, and that's really what we're trying to do with people in these sales calls as well. So that model comes down to really five steps. So the first step is ask questions. Open ended questions are better than yes, no questions any day of the week. You'll learn a whole lot more.   And after you're ready until you're ready to close,   Until you're ready to close, we're just on rapport building right here. We're at the beginning of the conversation. So ask questions now where I think most people tend to fall off the bandwagon is in the second step. Listen to the answers   So far is what two ears? One mouth? Just remember that.   So it's not. It's not here. The answer it's listen, actively listen and try to understand. And it's it's so hard. I mean, we're as it's almost built into us, as human beings. As soon as we start hearing something, we start formulating our response. And you really got to try to turn that urge off. It's about let me just listen. And it's not just listening to the words. It's trying to understand what's behind the words. Because really, what we're trying to discern from people is what is their true motivation? Because that's what we need to tap into. So ask questions and then listen, listen really carefully. And then after you've listened. These next two steps can change the order. But maybe you ask that a follow on probing question, you know, take it down, go go deeper, try to understand a deeper understanding of what is their motivation. That's the goal here. Get the motivation. That's three. So ask listen probe. And then the fourth one is validate, which means, say, I hear what you're saying, I totally get what you're saying. And and then the fifth one is sort of taking that validation to a whole nother level. And that fifth is restate what they're telling you. But in your own words. And so   What? Let me let let let me make sure I understand, and I've got this right. And, you know, repeat it back to them.   And everybody knows that my all time favorite business book is never split the difference by Chris Voss, and he he goes into this in great detail. I forget the exact words he put for. I think he calls it tactical empathy. And so the way you want to start that sentence when you restate it in your own words is, well, it seems to me like what you're saying is blah blah blah blah, or I think what you're saying is blah blah blah or what I think I'm hearing is blah blah blah blah blah blah. So you're saying it in a way that that doesn't say, I get what you're saying. It says, I think I get what you're saying and then you feed it back to them, and that gives them an opportunity to say yes, no. Or, you know, let me correct you. And again, going back to that book, what he's what he wants to hear on the other end of that is not your right. Those are not success. That's not a successful conversation. What he wants, what you want to hear after you say, it seems to me blah blah blah blah blah, you want him to hear. That's right. That's right, is not a personal thing, it means that the concept that you've just stated is exactly what it is I'm trying to communicate to you. And when they say that's right, that means you have validated them and they feel validated. And at that point, they are open to whatever you have to say. But just like we many of us know from our personal relationships until they feel validated, it doesn't matter how right you are, doesn't matter how good what you're saying is, does no matter how good your offer is and how much value you're offering them. They can't hear you.   Exactly right, that that wall is up, you got to you got to break that wall down and, you know, sit back and think about the principles that we're talking about right now. It applies to every aspect of your life, your spouse or your significant other. A friend, your children, your parents, siblings, anybody a colleague it. It absolutely applies. And validation is so important because now see, people ultimately always make you make decisions to purchase or to sell on emotion. It's always an emotional decision. But then you back into it and you validate the decision based on facts, but you don't make the decision on the facts. You make it on emotion and then you validate it with the facts. You know, whether you've got to make yourself feel better or, you know, am I doing a good deal? Yeah, I guess it's got this, this and this now. You know, let me just talk about it from on the on the sales side perspective when we're talking to a buyer. You know, what are we doing with when in the marketing of our properties, we are selling the dream in our ad copy.   We're taught to build a dream and that's in our first few paragraphs. And then we start to talk about the facts and the figures, and we got a table below with, you know, acreage and road access and power and all the those specifics. So I have sold properties multiple times when I had a buyer on the phone that had all these specific requirements, you know, about access and power and sewer and water and all that stuff. But focusing on the dream, the emotional part and their goals, what do you want to do with the property? And so that can lead to a really nice conversation. I want Homestead. I want to hunt. I want to do this, this and that. And then that conversation might lead to the point where they realize they really start to fall in love with this property and realize, you know, that that fifth criteria that it doesn't have on my list that was really a nice to have. It wasn't a must, right? Yeah, this this thing checks enough for the boxes. Let's do   It. Yeah. And I want to do business with you because I trust you. And I like you.   Yeah, but you never got to those facts. Those facts and the figures, because they trusted you and they felt validated. They felt like you heard them. You connected on an emotional level. That's why now the X's and the O's, the data wasn't as important as they made it out to be.   Yeah, exactly right. All right. And I promise you, one hundred percent guaranteed. You follow these steps and you will have rapport and make sales. I'm Garrett. Well, I'm not Gary. David is guaranteeing that this will happen as   If an asshole like me can do it. Oh my god, isn't that the truth? All right, man. I think we bored this audience to death. Everybody, thank you for joining us today and without further ado, have an awesome day or week or wherever we catch you. Take care. Bye bye.   We hope you enjoyed this episode. Had a bit of fun and walked away with some actionable insights that you can apply to your business. Dave and I have got some great content in interviews plan, so don't forget to rate and review. And of course, subscribe to this podcast on iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher or wherever you get your podcasts. If we mention any interesting links or tools, you'll find them in, the show notes. To learn more about land on MBA, visit our web site at Wait for it Land Dot MBA. See you next time on the Land MBA podcast.

Straight A Nursing
Cardiac Pharmacology PodQuiz – Episode 175

Straight A Nursing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 24:37


Have you tried a PodQuiz before? If not, you are in for a treat! PodQuizzes are a great way to study using auditory learning that's not just passive listening..it's active and super engaged. Here's how it works...I ask a question and then pause to give you time to think of and say the answer. Then, I tell you the answer. It's essentially flashcards for your ears! And, the best part is...you can study while you exercise, fold the laundry, organize a closet or take the dog for a walk. In other words, you don't have to sit at your desk 24/7. Cue the confetti, folks! To get MORE PodQuizzes, check out my members-only podcast, Study Sesh at https://www.straightanursingstudent.com/study-sesh  Use PROMO code SSOCTOBER21 to save $15 off your subscription to Study Sesh! Offer valid until end-of-day, October 17th, 2021. This episode covers cardiac pharmacology...so get up from your desk, pop in those earbuds and let's get to studying!

Changelog Master Feed
A universal deployment engine (Ship It! #23)

Changelog Master Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 59:30


In today's episode, Gerhard is talking to Sam Alba, Docker's first employee, and Solomon Hykes, the Docker co-founder. Together with Andrea Luzzardi, they are the creators of Dagger, a universal deployment engine that trades YAML for CUE, and uses Buildkit as the runtime. Why? Because we should stop rewriting the same application deployment logic in scripts, makefiles or continuous delivery configuration. That's right, this is the YAML vaccine that we have all been waiting for. Gerhard believes that one day, Dagger will become just as meaningful for application delivery, as Docker is today for application code.

Leadership Live
EP 52 - Conversation with Erin Kendall Braun- All about leadership habits and our brain - a neuroscience perspective

Leadership Live

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 42:34


Our brain automates all behaviors so that we can live easier. This means that our behaviors are turned into habits so that we don't need to spend so much energy on actions that we take regularly. So how can you create habits that benefit you in the long term? In today's episode of Leadership Live, Daphna has a conversation with Dr. Erin Kendall Braun who focuses on working with large companies and analyzing human behavior to solve greater problems in the business climate. Tune in to hear Kendall explain the three-step process for creating habits that serve us and more great tips on how to work with leadership habits. Timestamps: 0:50 Patterns and habits 2:00 Keeping it going through tough times 5:02 What happened with Kendall? 7:04 Selfcare habits that our body relies on  9:05 Habits- the journey into neuroscience 13:25 Seeding a habit 16:34 Cue-action-outcome 19:59 Thinking about the barriers & goal-setting 25:22 Reward yourself with something real 29:45 Begin with a cue 32:10 Perfectionism and realism  34:39 We don't want to be thinking about everything all the time 38:40 When we're stressed out, we go in default mode 40:40 Value of habits - even the ones that hold us back   Resources: PODCAST WEBPAGE: www.daphnahorowitz.com/podcastlive   BOOK a coaching session with Daphna Horowitz HERE: https://daphnahorowitz.com/services/#leadership-coaching    Purchase the book on AMAZON:  https://www.amazon.com/Weekly-Habits-Extraordinary-Leaders-Horowitz/dp/B08JDTRK9H/ref=sr_1_1?crid=24SK3E4DFMJMQ&dchild=1&keywords=daphna+horowitz&qid=1605772332&sprefix=daphna+ho%2Cstripbooks-intl-ship%2C379&sr=8-1    Listen to all the previous episodes HERE: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/leadership-live/id1524072573    Get access to your FREE Leadership Toolkit here: https://daphnahorowitz.com/leadershiptoolkit   For more information about the CEO Habits Bootcamp: https://daphnahorowitz.com/ceobootcamp Connect with Kendall: Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/erin-kendall-braun/  Twitter: https://twitter.com/erinkendallb  Connect with Daphna: Official website: www.daphnahorowitz.com  LinkedIn:  https://www.linkedin.com/in/daphnahorowitz/ Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/user/daphna1231 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/PEACSolutions/  

Brand Your Voice Podcast
1 Year Anniversary Episode!

Brand Your Voice Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 43:26


Cue the confetti and obnoxiously loud sound effects: We did it! We officially made it through a year of podcast episodes! This is definitely worth celebrating, considering we kicked around the idea of creating a podcast for years before we actually did it {thanks Brigid, you were right!} That was one of our biggest lessons learned: You don't have to have it all figured out, you just have to start. This imperfect action is what led us to find and serve the audience we most LOVE talking to...you! Our beloved writer community.

Go(o)d Mornings with CurlyNikki
We Have Everything We Need

Go(o)d Mornings with CurlyNikki

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 4:57


Cue "Everything We Need" by Kanye West ... for real, play this song before or after catching up with me, to catch up with and Be Love. "We begin after the storm inside..." - Anthony Clemons (from "Everything We Need")Reflect on the feeling of Freedom.  Then drop the word and stay with that wordless Go(o)d feeling... the presence of Freedom. The "I Am" that I Am, the "I Am" that you are. Feel It, and know It to be all things.  The more you practice being aware of It, the more you love It, the more you trust It, thank It, sing to It, smile to It... the more you'll see It showing up as everything you need and more. Smile. Breathe. Don't leave this knowing, today.Don't forget God, today.    Be Love, now to be free, now.  I Love you, Niknikki@curlynikki.com

Laughter Permitted with Julie Foudy
Episode 65: The Dopies!

Laughter Permitted with Julie Foudy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 26:36


Cue the crowd noise because Laughter Permitted is back! Julie and Lynn share highlights of Season 5 and hand out some Dopie Awards.

The Teacher's Tool Kit For Literacy
Part 1: Making Connections - The Literacy Teaching Game Changer

The Teacher's Tool Kit For Literacy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 46:20


After recently completing a three day literacy teaching intensive for a group of schools, Sharon Callen reveals the key insights and outcomes in this episode.It's all about making connections. Integrating reading, writing and word work is the most efficient and powerful way to teach literacy. Sharon and Phil talk about:'Every Child, Every Day'True classroom practiceThe importance of ACARA as a great place to help us be rooted in the connectedness of English and to curate what reader and writer actions every child, every day, gets to practise, experience and get feedback onHow to read the curriculum with action, as an active learning document rather than a content driverChoosing and usingSequence learningPedagogy and practicesKey questions from teachers on spelling, reading and writingAnd much more!Enjoy the episode, and let us know thoughts and feedback in our Facebook Group. Subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or your favourite podcast player. JOIN CUE LEARNING'S NEXT LIVE WEBINAR!Find upcoming events here and previous webinars (online video courses) here.Other matching PDF resources can be found at Teachific. RESOURCES RELEVANT TO THIS EPISODETEACHIFIC Helping Children to Learn High Frequency Words -  for Teachers by Diane SnowballHelping Children to Learn High Frequency Words -  for Parents by Diane SnowballACARAEnglish curriculumASCDEvery Child, Every Day Allington and GabrielQUOTE"Don't wish it were easier, wish you were better."  Jim RohnCheck out Teachific here. Connect with us!Join our community on Facebook for exclusive resources, Q and A, discussions, insights and more: https://www.facebook.com/groups/teacherstoolkitforliteracyGot any questions? Feedback? Thoughts? Email Phil: phil@cuelearning.com.auThe Teacher's Tool Kit For Literacy is the free podcast for motivated teachers and school leaders who want the latest tips, tricks and tools to inspire their students and school community in literacy learning. Hear from literacy experts and founders of Cue Learning, Sharon and Phil Callen, and special guests.At Cue Learning, our literacy specialists draw on over 30 years of teaching and international consulting experience to deliver world-class learning solutions. We equip, empower and support teachers to become their authentic selves. To find out about upcoming events, and about how Cue can help you and your school, visit the Cue Learning website http://www.cuelearning.com.au/ and sign up to our newsletter https://cuelearning.com.au/contact/And you can get even more amazing teaching resources, right now, at Teachific https://www.teachific.com.au/.To make sure you don't miss any literacy learning tips and insights, please subscribe to our show on your favourite podcast player. MORE INFORMATION AT A GLANCE:Visit cuelearning.com.auSubscribe to the Teacher's Tool Kit For Literacy podcasts  or join on Apple  Podcasts hereContact Phil  phil@cuelearning.com.auJoin our Teacher's Toolkit facebook groupFind connected resources on TeachificSee upcoming online eventsSee our online video courses hereAnd finally, read our insightful blogs hereProduced by Apiro Media https://apiropodcasts.com

Redditor
r/PettyRevenge | My Teacher DESTROYED My $500 Microphone!

Redditor

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 15:55


This teacher borrowed a microphone off one of his students, damaged it, and then gave it back like absolutely nothing had happened. Cue some justified r/pettyrevenge!This is the Redditor podcast! Here you will find all of Redditor's best Reddit stories from his YouTube channel. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Science Friction - ABC RN
What's up Doc? Elmer Fudd meets biological warfare

Science Friction - ABC RN

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 25:44


12 rabbits that turned a nation crazy. Cue: a plague, the founder of immunology, a famous actress, and ten million dollars.

Guides Gone Wild
Seek (and Find!) Sanctuary Where You Least Expect It: Jennifer Klein, PhD, The Trustees of Reservations

Guides Gone Wild

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 64:08


Today I'm joined by Jennifer Klein - make that DR. Jennifer Klein! - the Director of Outdoor Experiences for the Trustees of Reservations, an innovative land trust that shares a Massachusetts home base with 'that other Jen' (yours truly).Whoever is behind the Trustees' lovely web presence deserves a lot of credit for their copywriting skills, because one of the first headings you see does a fantastic job of summing up what the Trustees of Reservations stands for - People. Places. Perpetuity.Before we dive in, a quick history lesson - let's take it back to the late 1800s, when the so called 'robber baron' industrialists were focused on extracting economic value from nature, and gridding out open spaces with railroads and buildings. A landscape architect named Charles Eliot recognized the benefits of preserving natural spaces for use for something other than lining pockets, and ideated and created the country's first land trust, which was then called the Trustees of Public Reservations. As Eliot and others observed at the time, the ‘public' was urbanizing fast, factory jobs were replacing farming, and they believed that the ability to spend time in nature would provide a very necessary respite from hectic, dirty, loud city life.Now let's fast forward back to my new friend, Dr. Klein. She's no small-town-girl-livin'-in-a-lonely-world.... (you're welcome for that brain worm!) Dr. Jen grew up a city girl, spending vacations with her grandmother, enjoying the natural wonders of.... downtown Detroit. Cue record scratch.So how did Jen Klein become interested in nature or outdoor recreation at all? That's why we're here, folks!I hope you'll check out the Trustees at thetrustees.org, and if you're a full-fledged or proximate Masshole, please join me in the HikeTrustees Facebook group so we can get more intel on some fabulous spaces we haven't yet discovered.And speaking of discovery - I just KNOW you'd love to support the Guides Gone Wild podcast, and help more people discover all the cool, amazing women we talk to every week! PLEASE tag a few friends on one of our inspiring Instagram posts, or scroll down right here on your player and share your favorite episode!Some more fun links for your browsing pleasure:Who was Charles Eliot?What is a quinzhee hut?deCordova Sculpture Park and MuseumDoyle Community Park (Leominster, MA)Ashintully Gardens (Tyringham, MA)Ravenswood (Gloucester, MA)Crane Beach (Ipswich, MA)World's End (Hingham, MA)Fruitlands Museum (Harvard, MA)Darn Tough Socks

BBQ RADIO NATION
JOE PEARCE of SLAP'S BBQ on BBQ RADIO NATION

BBQ RADIO NATION

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 44:19


Competitive BBQer and restaurateur Joe Pearce is our guest.  Joe has been featured on TV in BBQ Pitmasters and teamed up with Bobby Flay on the Food Network to compete for the crown of “Master of ‘Cue”.  But probably his biggest achievement was opening Slap's barbecue joint in BBQ heavy Kansas City and recently being proclaimed best BBQ place in Kansas by Food & Wine Magazine. Pretty impressive. Joe is going to talk about competition BBQ and Tailgating. Dan and Dave talk about this year's American Royal. 

The Teacher's Tool Kit For Literacy
Improving School Results Through Coaching With Bobbie Cameron

The Teacher's Tool Kit For Literacy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 62:45


School leaders are always looking for new models and ways to get better teaching results. In the hope of finding a quick and easy fix, some will choose to adopt programs. But many of these 'out of the box' programs come with many limitations and often don't deliver on the promised fast results. Is there a better way?As we explore this, we look to Melbourne where literacy and educational outcomes have been broadly excellent. This is where education consultant Bobbie Cameron has been making an impact. Bobbie began her career in education more than 15 years ago with a Bachelor of Education (Hons) and has a vast array of experience in the public education sector, firstly as a classroom teacher across all year levels, then a Leading Teacher and Assistant Principal.  Bobbie launched her successful consultancy in 2017 and hasn't looked back, and was one of the 2018 Master Literacy Trainers for BASTOW for the Melbourne/Maribyrnong Network.In this episode, Bobbie joins Sharon and Phil to talk about:Victoria's great Naplan gainsTop tips for coaching teachersHow to turn results around in schoolsThe ideal coaching/consultancy model to create great changePrograms vs Professional DevelopmentFavourite ways of working with principalsAnd much more!Enjoy the episode, and let us know thoughts and feedback in our Facebook Group. Subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or your favourite podcast player. JOIN CUE LEARNING'S NEXT LIVE WEBINAR!Find upcoming events here and previous webinars (online video courses) here.Other matching PDF resources can be found at Teachific. RESOURCES RELEVANT TO THIS EPISODE TEACHIFICConsistent Lesson Structure - Planner The Consistent Lesson Structure and Planner are effective literacy block planning tools using the 'Gradual Release of Responsibility' model. They allow for great flexibility when integrating all aspects of literacy - Reading, Writing and Word Work.See the video (8 mins)  to view how a Year 4,5,6 teacher uses it effectively in her classroom: https://youtu.be/LeaaFfL3z5M Connect with us!Join our community on Facebook for exclusive resources, Q and A, discussions, insights and more: https://www.facebook.com/groups/teacherstoolkitforliteracyGot any questions? Feedback? Thoughts? Email Phil: phil@cuelearning.com.auThe Teacher's Tool Kit For Literacy is the free podcast for motivated teachers and school leaders who want the latest tips, tricks and tools to inspire their students and school community in literacy learning. Hear from literacy experts and founders of Cue Learning, Sharon and Phil Callen, and special guests.At Cue Learning, our literacy specialists draw on over 30 years of teaching and international consulting experience to deliver world-class learning solutions. We equip, empower and support teachers to become their authentic selves. To find out about upcoming events, and about how Cue can help you and your school, visit the Cue Learning website http://www.cuelearning.com.au/ and sign up to our newsletter https://cuelearning.com.au/contact/And you can get even more amazing teaching resources, right now, at Teachific https://www.teachific.com.au/.To make sure you don't miss any literacy learning tips and insights, please subscribe to our show on your favourite podcast player. MORE INFORMATION AT A GLANCE:Visit cuelearning.com.auSubscribe to the Teacher's Tool Kit For Literacy podcasts  or join on Apple  Podcasts hereContact Phil  phil@cuelearning.com.auJoin our Teacher's Toolkit facebook groupFind connected resources on TeachificSee upcoming online eventsSee our online video courses hereAnd finally, read our insightful blogs hereProduced by Apiro Media https://apiropodcasts.com

Shaped by Dog with Susan Garrett
Your Dog's Verbal Cues And Hand Signals: How To Effectively Train Both

Shaped by Dog with Susan Garrett

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 18:19


Visit us at shapedbydog.com    Sit, down and come are three cues many people use to prompt their dogs to do something. But what happens when your dog can't hear those words? They might be a distance away or have hearing loss. Enter the physical cue! People can really mess up their hand signals when training their dog, but physical cues can be easy to teach once you know the process.   In the episode you'll hear:   • What a physical cue is and how the training can get messed up. • How physical cues overpower verbal cues. • Why we want our dogs to have some physical cues. • How stimulus creates behaviour and reinforcement sees behavior repeated. • How to train your dog to go to a mat or bed. • About generalizing a behaviour before adding the cue. • When and how to add a cue for your dog. • How I use a finger point as one of my physical cues. • The reason I use "hop it up" for a verbal cue. • Why to remember "new cue, old cue". • The physical cue to use for your dog coming when called. • How to test the cues that you use now for your dog. • Why I don't have a verbal cue for a hand touch.   Resources:   • Podcast Episode 44: Using Coincidences and Positive Associations in Dog Training - https://dogsthat.com/podcast/44/ • Podcast Episode 6: The Art of Manipulation - https://dogsthat.com/podcast/6/ • YouTube Video: Perch Work (Pivots and Spins) - https://youtu.be/O6sj6fTJnFc • Podcast Episode 85: Understanding Your Dog's Sit: LWT - https://dogsthat.com/podcast/85/ • Blog Post: Dog Training Question ~ When Do I Add a Cue? - https://susangarrettdogagility.com/2018/09/when-do-i-add-a-cue/ • Watch this Episode of Shaped by Dog on YouTube - https://youtu.be/QxCwNl3Wpg8

Magical Realness
Practicing Laptop Magic + a Look Inside

Magical Realness

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 21:03


Cue the record scratch, because this is an announcement of an episode. I give you an inside look at our newest offering, Laptop Magic - and we're launching it with an abundance of free resources, guides, and walkthroughs on: dressing for the Universe the podcast creation process working smarter so you can play harder finding the aligned pathway for you building an aligned strategy for your dream biz And another thing - even our newsletter has gotten a huge facelift. If you haven't subscribed, now's the time! Head to our website to get in on the links.◗ ▸ 〄 BlitheMitrals.com | IG: @BlitheMitrals 〆 BrittanyMarie@BlitheMitrals.com ⑆ --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/magical-realness/message

Screaming in the Cloud
Corey Screws Up Logstash For Everyone with Jordan Sissel

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 43:34


About JordanJordan is a self proclaimed “hacker.” Links:Twitter: https://twitter.com/jordansissel TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by “you”—gabyte. Distributed technologies like Kubernetes are great, citation very much needed, because they make it easier to have resilient, scalable, systems. SQL databases haven't kept pace though, certainly not like no SQL databases have like Route 53, the world's greatest database. We're still, other than that, using legacy monolithic databases that require ever growing instances of compute. Sometimes we'll try and bolt them together to make them more resilient and scalable, but let's be honest it never works out well. Consider Yugabyte DB, its a distributed SQL database that solves basically all of this. It is 100% open source, and there's not asterisk next to the “open” on that one. And its designed to be resilient and scalable out of the box so you don't have to charge yourself to death. It's compatible with PostgreSQL, or “postgresqueal” as I insist on pronouncing it, so you can use it right away without having to learn a new language and refactor everything. And you can distribute it wherever your applications take you, from across availability zones to other regions or even other cloud providers should one of those happen to exist. Go to yugabyte.com, thats Y-U-G-A-B-Y-T-E dot com and try their free beta of Yugabyte Cloud, where they host and manage it for you. Or see what the open source project looks like—its effortless distributed SQL for global apps. My thanks to Yu—gabyte for sponsoring this episode.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at VMware. Let's be honest—the past year has been far from easy. Due to, well, everything. It caused us to rush cloud migrations and digital transformation, which of course means long hours refactoring your apps, surprises on your cloud bill, misconfigurations and headache for everyone trying manage disparate and fractured cloud environments. VMware has an answer for this. With VMware multi-cloud solutions, organizations have the choice, speed, and control to migrate and optimize applications seamlessly without recoding, take the fastest path to modern infrastructure, and operate consistently across the data center, the edge, and any cloud. I urge to take a look at vmware.com/go/multicloud. You know my opinions on multi cloud by now, but there's a lot of stuff in here that works on any cloud. But don't take it from me thats: VMware.com/go/multicloud and my thanks to them again for sponsoring my ridiculous nonsense.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. I've been to a lot of conference talks in my life. I've seen good ones, I've seen terrible ones, and then I've seen the ones that are way worse than that. But we don't tend to think in terms of impact very often, about how conference talks can move the audience.In fact, that's the only purpose of giving a talk ever—to my mind—is you're trying to spark some form of alchemy or shift in the audience and convince them to do something. Maybe in the banal sense, it's to sign up for something that you're selling, or to go look at your website, or to contribute to a project, or maybe it's to change the way they view things. One of the more transformative talks I've ever seen that shifted my outlook on a lot of things was at [SCALE 00:01:11] in 2012. Person who gave that talk is my guest today, Jordan Sissel, who, among many other things in his career, was the original creator behind logstash, which is the L in ELK Stack. Jordan, thank you for joining me.Jordan: Thanks for having me, Corey.Corey: I don't know how well you remember those days in 2012. It was the dark times; we thought oh, the world is going to end; that wouldn't happen until 2020. But it was an interesting conference full of a bunch of open-source folks, it was my local conference because I lived in Los Angeles. And it was the thing I looked forward to every year because I would always go and learn something new. I was in the trenches in those days, and I had a bunch of problems that looked an awful lot like other people's problems, and having a hallway track where, “Hey, how are you solving this problem?” Was a big deal. I missed those days in some ways.Jordan: Yeah, SCALE was a particularly good conference. I think I made it twice. Traveling down to LA was infrequent for me, but I always enjoyed how it was a very communal setting. They had dedicated hallway tracks. They had kids tracks, which I thought was great because folks couldn't usually come to conferences if they couldn't bring their kids or they had to take care of that stuff. But having a kids track was great, they had kids presenting. It felt more organic than a lot of other conferences did, and that's kind of what drew me to it initially.Corey: Yeah, it was my local network. It turns out that the Southern California tech community is relatively small, and we all go different lives. And it's LA, let's face it, I lived there for over a decade. Flaking as a way of life. So yeah, well, “Oh, we'll go out and catch dinner. Ooh, have to flake at the last minute.” If you're one of the good people, you tell people you're flaking instead of just no-showing, but it happens.But this was the thing that we would gather and catch up every year. And, “Oh, what have you been doing?” “Wow, you work in that company now? Congratulations, slash, what's wrong with you?” It was fun, just sort of a central sync point. It started off as hanging out with friends.And in those days, I was approaching the idea of, “You know what? I should learn to give a conference talk someday. But let's be clear. People don't give conference talks; legends give conference talks. And one day, I'll be good enough to get on stage and give a talk to my peers at a conference.”Now, the easy, cynical interpretation would be, “Well, but I saw your talk and I figured, hey, any jackhole can get up there. If he can do it, anyone can.” But that's not at all how it wound up impacting me. You were talking about logstash, which let's start there because that's a good entry point. Logstash was transformative for me.Before that, I'd spent a lot of time playing around with syslog, usually rsyslog, but there are other stories here of when a system does something and it spits out logs—ideally—how do you make sure you capture those logs in a reliable way so if you restart a computer, you don't wind up with a gap in your logs? If it's the right computer, it could be a gap in everything's logs while that thing is coming back up. And let's avoid single points of failure and the rest. And I had done all kinds of horrible monstrosities, and someone asked me at one point—Jordan: [laugh]. Guilty.Corey: Yeah. Someone said, “Well, there are a couple of options. Why don't you use Splunk?” And the answer is that I don't have a spare princess lying around that I can ransom back to her kingdom, so I can't afford it. “Okay, what about logstash?” And my answer was, “What's a logstash?” And thus that sound was Pandora's Box creaking open.So, I started playing with it and realized, “Okay, this is interesting.” And I lost track of it because we have demands on our time. Then I was dragged into a session that you gave and you explained what logstash was. I'm not going to do nearly as good of a job as you can on this. What the hell was logstash, for folks who are not screaming at syslog while they first hear of it.Jordan: All right. So, you mentioned rsyslog, and there's—old is often a pejorative of more established projects because I don't think these projects are bad. But rsyslog, syslog-ng, things like that were common to see for me as a sysadmin. But to talk about logstash, we need to go back a little further than 2012. So, the logstash project started—Corey: I disagree because I wasn't aware of it until 2012. Until I become aware of something it doesn't really exist. That's right, I have the object permanence of an infant.Jordan: [laugh].That's fair. And I've always felt like perception is reality, so if someone—this gets into something I like to say, but if someone is having a bad time or someone doesn't know about something, then it might as well not exist. So, logstash as a project started in 2008, 2009. I don't remember when the first commits landed, but it was, gosh, it's more than ten years ago now.But even before that in college, I was fortunate to, through a network of friends, get a job as a sysadmin. And as a sysadmin, you stare at logs a lot to figure out what's going on. And I wanted a more interesting way to process the logs. I had taught myself regular expressions and it wasn't finding joy in it… at all, like pretty much most people, probably. Either they look at regular expressions and just… evacuate with disgust, which is absolutely an appropriate response, or they dive into it and they have to use it for their job.But it wasn't enjoyable, and I found myself repeating stuff a lot. Matching IP addresses, matching strings, URLs, just trying to pull out useful information about what is going on?Corey: Oh, and the timestamp problem, too. One of the things that I think people don't understand who have not played in this space, is that all systems do have logs unless you've really pooched something somewhere—Jordan: Yeah.Corey: —and it shows that at this point in time, this thing happened. As we start talking about multiple computers and distributed systems—but even on the same computer—great, so at this time there was something that showed up in the system log because there was a disk event or something, and at the same time you have application logs that are talking about what the application running is talking about. And that is ideally using a somewhat similar system to do this, but often not. And the way that timestamps are expressed in these are radically different and the way that the log files themselves are structured. One might be timestamp followed by hostname followed by error code.The other one might be hostname followed by a timestamp—in a different format—followed by a copyright notice because a big company got to it followed by the actual event notice, and trying to disambiguate all of these into a standardized form was first obnoxious, and secondly, very important because you want to see the exact chain of events. This also leads to a separate sidebar on making sure that all the clocks are synchronized, but that's a separate story for another time. And that's where you enter the story in many respects.Jordan: Right. So, my thought around what led to logstash is you can take a sysadmin or software IT developer—whatever—expert, and you can sit them in front of a bunch of logs and they can read them and say, “That's the time it happened. That's the user who caused this action. This is the action.” But if you try and abstract and step away, and so you ask how many times did this action happen? When did this user appear? What time did this happen?You start losing the ability to ask those questions without being an expert yourself, or sitting next to an expert and having them be your keyboard. Kind of a phenomenon I call the human keyboard problem where you're speaking to a computer, but someone has to translate for you. And so in around 2004, I was super into Perl. No shocker that I enjoyed—ish. I sort of enjoyed regular expressions, but I was super into Perl, and there was a Perl module called Regexp::Common which is a library of regular expressions to match known things: IP addresses, certain kinds of timestamps, quoted strings, and whatnot.Corey: And this stuff is always challenging because it sounds like oh, an IP address. One of the interview questions I hated the most someone asked me was write a regular expression to detect an IP address. It turns out that to do this correctly, even if you bound it to ipv4 only, the answer takes up multiple lines on a screen.Jordan: Oh, for sure.Corey: It's enormous.Jordan: It's like a full page of—Corey: It is.Jordan: —of code you can't read. And that's one of the things that, it was sort of like standing on the shoulders of the person who came before; it was kind of an epiphany to me.Corey: Yeah. So, I can copy and paste that into my code, but someone who has to maintain that thing after I get fired is going to be, “What the hell is this and what does it do?” It's like it's the blessed artifact that the ancients built it and left it there like it's a Stargate sitting in your code. And it's, “We don't know how it works; we're scared to break it, so we don't even look at that thing directly. We just know that we put nonsense in, an IP address comes out, and let's not touch it, ever again.”Jordan: Exactly. And even to your example, even before you get fired and someone replaces you and looks at your regular expression, the problem I was having was, I would have this library of copy and pasteable things, and then I would find a bug, and edge case. And I would fix that edge case but the other 15 scripts that were using the same way regular expression, I can't even read them anymore because I don't carry that kind of context in my head for all of that syntax. So, you either have to go back and copy and paste and fix all those old regular expressions. Or you just say, “You know what? We're not going to fix the old code. We have a new version of it that works here, but everywhere else this edge case fails.”So, that's one of the things that drew me to the Regexp::Common library in Perl was that it was reusable and things had names. It was, “I want to match an IP address.” You didn't have to memorize that long piece of text to precisely and accurately accept only regular expressions and rejects things that are not. You just said, “Give me the regular expression that matches an IP.” And from that library gave me the idea to write grok.Well, if we could name things, then maybe we could turn that into some kind of data structure, sort of the combination of, “I have a piece of log data, and I as an expert, I know that's an IP address, that's the username, and that's the timestamp.” Well, now I can apply this library of regular expressions that I didn't have to write and hopefully has a unit test suite, and say, now we can pull out instead of that plain piece of text that is hard to read as a non-expert, now I can have a data structure we can format however we want, that non-experts can see. And even experts can just relax and not have to be full experts all the time, using that part of your brain. So, now you can start getting towards answering search-oriented questions. “How many login attempts happened yesterday from this IP address?”Corey: Right. And back then, the way that people would do these things was Elasticsearch. So, that's the thing you shove all your data into in a bunch of different ways and you can run full-text queries on it. And that's great, but now we want to have that stuff actually structured, and that is sort of the magic of logstash—which was used in conjunction with Elasticsearch a lot—and it turns out that typing random SQL queries in the command line is not generally how most business users like to interact with this stuff, seems to be something dashboard-y-like, and the project that folks use for that was Kibana. And ELK Stack became a thing because Elasticsearch in isolation can do a lot but it doesn't get you all the way there for what people were using to look at logs.Jordan: You're right.Corey: And Kibana is also one of the projects that Elastic owned, and at some point, someone looks around, like, “Oh, logstash. People are using that with us an awful lot. How big is the company that built that? Oh, it's an open-source project run by some guy? Can we hire that guy?” And the answer is, “Apparently,” because you wound up working as an Elastic employee for a while.Jordan: Yeah. It was kind of an interesting journey. So, in the beginning of logstash in 2009, I kind of had this picture of how I wanted to solve log processing search challenges. And I broke it down into a couple of parts of visualization—to be clear, I broke it down in my head, not into code, but visualization, kind of exploration, there's the processing and transmission, and then there's storage and search. And I only felt confident really attending to a solution for one of those parts. And I picked log processing partly because I already had a jumpstart from a couple of years prior, working on grok and feeling really comfortable with regular expressions. I don't want to say good because that's—Corey: You heard it here first—Jordan: [laugh].Corey: —we found the person that knows regular expressions. [laugh].Jordan: [laugh]. And logstash was being worked on to solve this problem of taking your data, processing it, and getting it somewhere. That's why logstash has so many outputs, has so many inputs, and lots of filters. And about I think a year into building logstash, I had experimented with storage and search backends, and I never found something that really clicked with me. And I was experimenting with Leucine, and knowing that I could not complete this journey because that the problem space is so large, it would be foolish of me to try to do distributed log stores or anything like that, plus visualization.I just didn't have the skills or the time in the day. I ended up writing a frontend for logstash called logstash-web—naming things is hard—and I wasn't particularly skilled or attentive to that project, and it was more of a very lightweight frontend to solve the visualization, the exploration aspect. And about a year into logstash being alive, I found Elasticsearch. And what clicked with me from being a sysadmin and having worked at large data center companies in the past is I know the logs on a single system are going to quickly outgrow it. So, whatever storage system will accept these logs, it's got to be easy to add new storage.And Elasticsearch first-day promise was it's distributed; you can add more nodes and go about your day. And it fulfilled that promise and I think it still fulfills that promise that if you're going to be processing terabytes of data, yeah, just keep dumping it in there. That's one of the reasons I didn't try and even use MySQL, or Postgres, or other data systems because it didn't seem obvious how to have multiple storage servers collecting this data with those solutions, for me at the time.Corey: It turns out that solving problems like this that are global and universal lead to massive adoption very quickly. I want to get this back a bit before you wound up joining Elastic because you get up on stage and you talked through what this is. And I mentioned at the start of this recording, that it was one of those transformative talks. But let's be clear here, I don't remember 95% of how logstash works. Like, the technology you talked about ten years ago is largely outmoded slash replaced slash outdated today. I assure you, I did not take anything of note whatsoever from your talk regarding regular expressions, I promise. And—Jordan: [laugh]. Good.Corey: But that's not the stuff that was transformative to me. What was, was the way that you talked about these things. And there was the first time I'd ever heard the phrase that if a new user has a bad time, it's a bug. This was 2012. The idea of empathy hadn't really penetrated into the ops and engineering spaces in any meaningful way yet. It was about gatekeeping, it was about, “Read the manual fool”—Jordan: Yes.Corey: —if people had questions. And it was actively user-hostile. And it was something that I found transformative of, forget the technology piece for a second; this is a story about how it could be different. Because logstash was the vehicle to deliver a message that transcended far beyond the boundaries of how to structure your logs, or maybe the other boundaries of regular expressions, I'm never quite sure where those things start and stop. But it was something that was actively transformative where you're on stage as someone who is a recognized authority in the space, and you're getting up there and you're sending an implicit message—both explicitly and by example—of be nice to people; demonstrate empathy. And that left a hell of an impact. And—Jordan: Thank you.Corey: I wound up doing a spot check just now, and I wound up looking at this and sure enough, early in 2013, I wound up committing—it's still in the history of the changelog for logstash because it's open-source—I committed two pull requests and minutes apart, two submissions—I don't know if pull requests were even a thing back then—but it wound up in the log. Because another project you were renowned for was fpm: Effing Package Manager if I'm—is that what the acronym stands for, or am I misremembering?Jordan: [laugh]. We'll go with that. I'm sure, vulgar viewers will know what the F stands for, but you don't have to say it. It's just Effing Package Management.Corey: Yeah.Jordan: But yeah, I think I really do believe that if a user, especially if a new user has a bad time, it's a bug, and that came from many years of participating at various levels in open-source, where if you came at it with a tinkerer's or a hacker's mindset and you think, “This project is great. I would like it to do one additional thing, and I would like to talk to someone about how to make it do that one additional thing.” And you go find the owners or the maintainers of that project, and you come in with gusto and energy, and you describe what you want to do and, first, they say, “What you want to do is not possible.” They don't even say they don't want to do it; they frame the whole universe against you. “It's not possible. Why would you want to do that? If you want to make that, do it yourself.”You know, none of these things are an extended hand, a lowered ladder, an open door, none of those. It's always, “You're bothering me. Go away. Please read the documentation and see where we clearly”—which they don't—“Document that this is not a thing we're interested in.” And I came to the conclusion that any future open-source or collaborative work that I worked on, it's got to be from a place where, “You're welcome, and whatever contributions or participation levels you choose, are okay. And if you have an idea, let's talk about it. If you're having a bad time, let's figure out how to solve it.”Maybe the solution is we point you in the right direction to the documentation, if documentation exists; maybe we find a bug that we need to fix. The idea that the way to build communities is through kindness and collaboration, not through walls or gatekeeping or just being rude. And I really do think that's one of the reasons logstash became so successful. I mean, any particular technology could have succeeded in the space that logstash did, but I believe that it did so because of that one piece of framework where if a new user has a bad time, it's a bug. Because to me, that opens the door to say, “Yeah, you know what? Some of the code I write is not going to be good. Or, the thing you want to do is undocumented. Or the documentation is out of date. It told you a lie and you followed the documentation and it misled you because it's incorrect.”We can fix that. Maybe we don't have time to fix it right now. Maybe there's no one around to fix it, but we can at least say, “You know what? That information is incorrect, and I'm sorry you were misled. Come on into the community and we'll figure it out.” And one of the patterns I know is, on the IRC channel, which is where the logstash real-time community chat… I don't know how to describe that.Corey: No, it was on freenode. That's part of the reason I felt okay, talking to you. At that point. I was volunteer network staff. This is before freenode turned into basically a haven for Nazis this past year.Jordan: Yeah. It was still called lilo… lilonet [crosstalk 00:20:20]—Corey: No, the open freenode network, that predates me. This was—yeah, lilo—Jordan: Okay.Corey: —died about six years prior. But—Jordan: Oh, all right.Corey: Freenode's been around a long time. What make this thing work was that I was network staff, and that means that I had a bit of perceived authority—it's a chat room; not really—but it was one of those things where it was at least, “Okay, this is not just some sketchy drive-by rando,” which I very much was, but I didn't present that way, so I could strike up conversations. But with you talking about this stuff, I never needed to be that person. It was just if someone wants to pitch in on this, great; more hands make lighter work. Sure.Jordan: Yeah, for sure.Corey: And for me, the interesting part is not even around the logstash aspects so much; it's your other project, fbm. Well, one of your other projects. Back in 2012, that was an interesting year for me. Another area that got very near and dear to my heart in open-source world was the SaltStack project; I was contributor number 15. And I didn't know how Python worked. Not that I do now, but I can fake it better now.And Tom Hatch, the guy that ran the project before it was a company was famous for this where I could send in horrifying levels of code, and every time he would merge it in and then ten minutes later, there would be another patch that comes in that fixes all bugs I just introduced and it was just such a warm onboarding. I'm not suggesting that approach and I'm not saying it's scalable, but I started contributing. And I became the first Debian and Ubuntu packager for SaltStack, which was great. And I did a terrible job at it because—let me explain. I don't know if it's any better now, but back in those days, there were multiple documentation sources on the proper way to package software.They were all contradictory with each other, there was no guidance as to when to follow each one, there was never a, “You know nothing about packaging; here's what you need to know, step-by-step,” and when you get it wrong, they yell at you. And it turns out that the best practice then to get it formally accepted upstream—which is what I did—is do a crap-ass job, and then you'll wind up with a grownup coming in, like, “This is awful. Move.” And then they'll fix it and yell at you, and gatekeep like hell, and then you have a package that works and gets accepted upstream because the magic incantation has been said somewhere. And what I loved about fpm was that I could take any random repo or any source tarball or anything I wanted, run it through with a single command, and it would wind up building out a RPM and a Deb file—and I don't know what else it's supported; those are the ones I cared about—that I could then install on a system. I put in a repo and add that to a sources list on systems, and get to automatically install so I could use configuration management—like SaltStack—to wind up installing custom local packages. And oh, my God, did the packaging communities for multiple different distros hate you—Jordan: Yep.Corey: —and specifically what you had built because this was not the proper way to package. How dare you solve an actual business problem someone has instead of forcing them to go to packaging school where the address is secret, and you have to learn that. It was awful. It was the clearest example that I can come up with of gatekeeping, and then you're coming up with fbm which gets rid of user pain, and I realized that in that fight between the church of orthodoxy of, “This is how it should be done,” and the, “You're having a problem; here's a tool that makes it simple,” I know exactly what side of that line I wanted to be on. And I hadn't always been previously, and that is what clarified it for me.Jordan: Yeah, fbm was a really delightful enjoyment for me to build. The origins of that was I worked at a company and they were all… I think, at that time, we were RPM-based, and then as folks tend to do, I bounced around between jobs almost every year, so I went from one place that—Corey: Hey, it's me.Jordan: [laugh]. Right? And there's absolutely nothing wrong with leaving every year or staying longer. It's just whatever progresses your career in the way that you want and keeps you safe and your family safe. But we were using RPM and we were building packages already not following the orthodoxy.A lot of times if you ask someone how to build a package for Fedora, they'll point you at the Maximum RPM book, and that's… a lot of pages, and honestly, I'm not going to sit down and read it. I just want to take a bunch of files, name it, and install it on 30 machines with Puppet. And that's what we were doing. Cue one year later, I moved to a new company, and we were using Debian packages. And they're the same thing.What struck me is they are identical. It's a bunch of files—and don't pedant me about this—it's a bunch of files with a name, with some other sometimes useful metadata, like other names that you might depend on. And I really didn't find it enjoyable to transfer my knowledge of how to build RPMs, and the tooling and the structures and the syntaxes, to building Debian packages. And this was not for greater publication; this was I have a bunch of internal applications I needed to package and deploy with, at the time it was Puppet. And it wasn't fun.So, I did what we did with grok which was codify that knowledge to reduce the burden. And after a few, probably a year or so of that, it really dawned on me that a generality is all packaging formats are largely solving the same problem and I wanted to build something that was solving problems for folks like you and me: sysadmins, who were handed a pile of code and they needed to get it into production. And I wasn't interested in formalities or appeasing any priesthoods or orthodoxies about what really—you know, “You should really shine your package with this special wax,” kind of thing. Because all of the documentation for Debian packages, Fedora packages are often dedicated to those projects. You're going to submit a package to Fedora so that the rest of the world can use it on Fedora. That wasn't my use case.Corey: Right. I built a thing and a thing that I built is awesome and I want the world to use it, so now I have to go to packaging school? Not just once but twice—Jordan: Right.Corey: —and possibly more. That's awful.Jordan: Or more. Yeah. And it's tough.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Jellyfish. So, you're sitting in front of your office chair, bleary eyed, parked in front of a powerpoint and—oh my sweet feathery Jesus its the night before the board meeting, because of course it is! As you slot that crappy screenshot of traffic light colored excel tables into your deck, or sift through endless spreadsheets looking for just the right data set, have you ever wondered, why is it that sales and marketing get all this shiny, awesome analytics and inside tools? Whereas, engineering basically gets left with the dregs. Well, the founders of Jellyfish certainly did. That's why they created the Jellyfish Engineering Management Platform, but don't you dare call it JEMP! Designed to make it simple to analyze your engineering organization, Jellyfish ingests signals from your tech stack. Including JIRA, Git, and collaborative tools. Yes, depressing to think of those things as your tech stack but this is 2021. They use that to create a model that accurately reflects just how the breakdown of engineering work aligns with your wider business objectives. In other words, it translates from code into spreadsheet. When you have to explain what you're doing from an engineering perspective to people whose primary IDE is Microsoft Powerpoint, consider Jellyfish. Thats Jellyfish.co and tell them Corey sent you! Watch for the wince, thats my favorite part.Corey: And this gets back to what I found of—it was rare that I could find a way to contribute to something meaningfully, and I was using logstash after your talk, I'd started using it and rolling it out somewhere, and I discovered that there wasn't a Debian package for it—the environment I was in at that time—or Ubuntu package, and, “Hey Jordan, are you the guy that wrote fpm and there isn't a package here?” And the thing is is that you would never frame it this way, but the answer was, of course, “Pull requests welcome,” which is often an invitation to do free volunteer work for companies, but this was an open-source project that was not backed by a publicly-traded company; it was some guy. And of course, I'll pitch in on that. And I checked the commit log on this for what it is that I see, and sure enough, I have two commits. The first one was on Sunday night in February of 2013, and my commit message was, “Initial packaging work for Deb building.” And sure enough, there's a bunch of files I put up there and that's great. And my second and last commit was 12 minutes later saying, “Remove large binary because I'm foolish.” Yeah.Jordan: Was that you? [laugh].Corey: Yeah. Oh, yeah, I'm sure—yeah, it was great. I didn't know how Git worked back then. I'm sure it's still in the history there. I wonder how big that binary is, and exactly how much I have screwed people over in the last decade since.Jordan: I've noticed this over time. And every now and then you'd be—I would be or someone would be on a slow internet connection—which again, is something that we need to optimize for, or at least be aware of and help where we can—someone would be cloning logstash on an airplane or something like that, or rural setting, and they would say, “It gets stuck at 76% for, like, ten minutes.” And you would go back and dust off your tome of how to use Git because it's very difficult piece of software to use, and you would find this one blob and I never even looked at it who committed it or whatever, but it was like I think it was 80 Megs of a JAR file or a Debian package that was [unintelligible 00:28:31] logstash release. And… [laugh] it's such a small world that you're like, yep, that was me.Corey: Oh, yeah. Oh, yeah. Let's check this just for fun here. To be clear, the entire repository right now is 167 Megs, so that file that I had up there for all of 13 minutes lives indelibly in Git history, and it is fully half of the size—Jordan: Yep.Corey: —of the entirety of the logstash project. All right, then. I didn't realize this was one of those confess your sins episodes, but here we are.Jordan: Look, sometimes we put flags on the moon, sometimes we put big files in git. You could just for posterity, we could go back and edit the history and remove that, but it never became important to do it, it wasn't loud, people weren't upset enough by it, or it didn't come up enough to say, “You know what? This is a big file.” So, it's there. You left your mark.Corey: You know, we take what we can get. It's an odd time. I'll have to do some digging around; I'm sure I'll tweet about this as soon as I get a bit more data on it, but I wonder how often people have had frustration caused by that. There's no ill intent here, to be very clear, but it was instead, I didn't know how Git worked very well. I didn't know what I was doing in a lot of respects, and sure enough in the fullness of time, some condescending package people came in and actually made this right.And there is a reasonable, responsible package now because, surprise, of course there is. But I wonder how much inadvertent pain I caused people by that ridiculous commit. And it's the idea of impact and how this stuff works. I'm not happy that people are on a plane with a slow connection had a wait an extra minute or two to download that nonsense. It's one of those things that is, oops. I feel like a bit of a heel for that, not for not knowing something, but for causing harm to folks. Intent doesn't outweigh impact. There is a lesson in there for it.Jordan: Agreed. On that example, I think one of the things… code is not the most important thing I can contribute to a project, even though I feel very confident in my skills in programming in a variety of environments. I think the number one thing I can do is listen and look for sources of pain. And people would come in and say, “I can't get this to work.” And we would work together and figure out how to make it work for their use case, and that could result in a new feature, a bug fix, or some documentation improvements, or a blog post, or something like that.And I think in this case, I don't really recall any amount of noise for someone saying, “Cloning the Git repository is just a pain in the butt.” And I think a lot of that is because either the people who would be negatively impacted by that weren't doing that use case, they were downloading the releases, which were as small as we can possibly get them, or they were editing files using the GitHub online edit the file thing, which is a totally acceptable, it's perfectly fine way to do things in Git. So, I don't remember anyone complaining about that particular file size issue. The Elasticsearch repository is massive and I don't think it even has binaries. It just has so much more—Corey: Someone accidentally committed their entire production test data set at one point and oops-a-doozy. Yeah, it's not the most egregious harm I've ever caused—Jordan: Yeah.Corey: —but it's there. The thing that, I guess, resonates with me and still does is the lessons I learned from you, I could sum them up as being not just empathy-driven—because that's the easy answer—but the other layers were that you didn't need to be the world's greatest expert in a thing in order to credibly give a conference talk. To be clear, you were miles ahead of me and still are in a lot of different areas—Jordan: Thanks.Corey: —and that's fine. But you don't need to be the—like, you are not the world's greatest expert on empathy, but that's what I took from the talk and that's what it was about. It also taught me that things you can pick up from talks—and other means—there are things you can talk about in terms of technology and there are things you can talk about in terms of people, and the things about people do not have expiration dates in the same way that technology does. And if I'm going to be remembered for impact on people versus impact on technology, for me, there's no contest. And you forced me to really think about a lot of those things that it started my path to, I guess, becoming a public speaker and then later all the rest that followed, like this podcast, the nonsense on Twitter, and all the rest. So, it is, I guess, we can lay the responsibility for all that at your feet. Enjoy the hate mail.Jordan: Uhh, my email address is now closed. I'm sorry.Corey: Exactly.Jordan: Well, I appreciate the kind words.Corey: We'll get letters on this one.Jordan: [laugh].Corey: It's the impact that people have, and someti—I don't think you knew at the time that that's the impact you were having. It matters.Jordan: I agree. I think a lot of it came from how do I want to experience this? And it was much later that it became something that was really outside of me, in the sense that it was building communities. One of the things I learned shortly after—or even just before—joining Elastic was how many folks were looking to solve a problem, found logstash, became a participant in the community, and that participation could just be anything, just hanging out on IRC, on the mailing list, whatever, and the next step for them was to get a better paying job in an environment they enjoyed that helped them take the next step in their career. Some of those people came to work with me at Elastic; some of them started to work on the logstash team at some point they decided because a lot of logstash users were sysadmins.And on the logstash team, we were all developers; we weren't sysadmins, there was nothing to operate. And a lot of folks would come on board and they were like, “You know what? I'm not enjoying writing Ruby for my job.” And they could take the next step to transition to the support team or the sales engineer team, or cloud operations team at Elastic. So, it was really, like you mentioned, it has nothing to do with the technology of—to me—why these projects are important.They became an amplifier and a hand to pull people up to go the next step they need to go. And on the way maybe they can make a positive impact in the communities they participate in. If those happen to be fpm or logstash, that's great, but I think I want folks to see that technology doesn't have to be a grind of getting through gatekeepers, meeting artificial barriers, and things like that.Corey: The thing that I took, too, is that I gave a talk in 2015 or'16, which is strangely appropriate now: “Terrible ideas in Git.” And yes, checking large binaries in is one of the terrible ideas I talk about. It's Git through counter-example. And around that time, I also gave a talk for a while on how to handle a job interview and advance your career. Only one of those talks has resulted in people approaching me even years later saying that what I did had changed aspects of their life. It wasn't the Git one. And that's the impact it comes down to. That is the change that I wanted to start having because I saw someone else do it and realized, you know, maybe I could possibly be that good someday. Well, I'd like to think I made it, on some level.Jordan: [laugh]. I'm proud of the impact you've made. And I agree with you, it is about people. Even with fpm where I was very selfishly tickling my own itch, I don't want to remember all of this stuff and I also enjoy operating outside of the boundaries of a church or whatever the priesthoods that say, “This is how you must do a thing,” I knew there was a lot of folks who worked at jobs and they didn't have authority, and they had to deploy something, and they knew if they could just package it into a Debian format, or an RPM format, or whatever they needed to do, they could get it deployed and it would make their lives easier. Well, they didn't have the time or the energy or the support in order to learn how to do that and fpm brought them that success where you can say, “Here's a bunch of files; here's a name, poof, you have a package for whatever format you want.”Where I found fpm really take off is when Gem and Python and Node.js support were added. The sysadmins were kind of sandwiched in between—in two impossible worlds where they are only authorized to deploy a certain package format, but all of their internal application developer teams were using Node.js and newer technologies, and all of those package formats were not permitted by whoever had the authority to permit those things at their job. But now they had a tool that said, “You know what? We can just take that thing, we'll take Django and Python, and we'll make it an RPM and we won't have to think a lot about it.”And that really, I think—to me, my hope was that it de-stresses that sort of work environment where you're not having to do three weeks of brand new work every time someone releases something internally in your company; you can just run a script that you wrote a month ago and maintain it as you go.Corey: Wouldn't that be something?Jordan: [laugh]. Ideally, ideally.Corey: Jordan, I want to thank you for not only the stuff you did ten years ago, but also the stuff you just said now. If people want to learn more about you, how you view the world, see what you're up to these days, where can they find you?Jordan: I'm mostly active on Twitter, at @jordansissel, all one word. Mostly these days, I post repair stuff I do on the house. I'm a stay-at-home full0 time dad these days, and… I'm still doing maintenance on the projects that need maintenance, like fpm or xdotool, so if you're one of those users, I hope you're happy. If you're not happy, please reach out and we'll figure out what the next steps can be. But yeah. If you like bugs, especially spiders—or if you don't like spiders and you want to like spiders, check me out on Twitter. I'm often posting macro photos, close-up photos of butterflies, bees, spiders, and the like.Corey: And we will, of course, throw links to that in the [show notes 00:38:10]. Jordan, thank you so much for your time today. It's appreciated.Jordan: Thank you, Corey. It's good talking to you.Corey: Jordan Sissel, founder of logstash and currently, blissfully, not working on a particular corporate job. I envy him, some days. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, along with an angry comment in which you have also embedded a large binary.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

the Mudroom
Are You Struggling With Daycare Drop Offs?

the Mudroom

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 13:08


It's a heart wrenching situation, believe me- I understand. You drive up to school/daycare, your child gets out with their little lunch box and water bottle with a bright smile that lights up your world. You walk up to the teacher at the gate and give them a sympathetic smile because you both know what's about to occur... And that's when you see your child's expression change and it clicks. They're going to leave me here! Cue the tears, the painful pleads for you to stay, you promising you'll come back as you pull little fingers off of you while they wail for you not to go. It makes it all the more dramatic when the teacher has to come and literally pry your crying child off of you and they lurch forward like they've been doomed to imprisonment. You bounce back and forth between trying to decide if you should leave your child shrieking and make a mad dash for the car, or if you should try and console them some more. The teacher's looking at you with a tight lipped smile while they wrestle with your squirming kid, at least 3 other parents have successfully shoved their kiddo's in the door and are already in their car leaving. Here you are wondering how many more days will it take before they can get used to drop-off and pick-up without such an emotional upheaval. On this episode we´ll discuss: - How to react to intense emotions - How to help your kids adjust to changes - The right way to handle your kids emotions Grab the Scripts to Manage the Top 10 Crazy-Making Behaviours: prnt.link/scripts Watch the video recording here: Join the Parenting Posse: prnt.link/group the Mudroom is recorded live every Wednesday at 1:30pm ET/ 12:30pm CT/ 10:30am PT on Facebook: facebook.com/arfamilyservices --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/mudroom/message

The Teacher's Tool Kit For Literacy
Celebrating Literature With Heart

The Teacher's Tool Kit For Literacy

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2021 63:45


In this week's episode, literacy experts Sharon and Phil Callen talk about how to identify and utilise literature on complex issues to enrich student experiences.This is important for teachers for a range of reasons.Helping students to appreciate literary texts and to create their own literary texts enriches their understanding of human experiences and the capacity for language to deepen those experiences.It builds students' knowledge about how language can be used for aesthetic ends, to create particular emotional, intellectual or philosophical effects.Students learn to interpret, appreciate, evaluate and create literary texts such as short stories, novels, poetry, prose, plays, film and multimodal texts, in spoken, print and digital/online forms.It is important for students to recognise texts as having enduring artistic and cultural value drawn from the world and Australian literature. These include the oral narrative traditions of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples, texts from Asia, texts from Australia's immigrant cultures and texts of the students' choice.In this episode, Sharon focuses on picture books for F-3 students, identifying key authors and illustrators with a background in psychology. They unpack complex issues in a relatable way for young readers, and cover categories including:Raising WritersCoping With ChangeEnvironmental EmpathyCreativityEnjoy the episode, and let us know thoughts and feedback in our Facebook Group. Subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or your favourite podcast player. JOIN CUE LEARNING'S NEXT LIVE WEBINAR!Find upcoming events here and previous webinars (online video courses) here.Other matching PDF resources can be found at Teachific. RESOURCES MENTIONED IN THIS EPISODE BOOKTOPIARaising WritersThis is Not a Book by Kellie ByrnesThe Art of Words by Robert Vescio and Jianna BartelCoping with ChangeUpside Down Friday by Lana Spasevski and Nicky JohnstonPear of Hope by Wendy ShuretyEnvironmental EmpathyGrowing Pains by Alison McLennanWhere the Heart Is by Irma GoldCreativityThe Box Cars by Robert VescioUp To Something by Katrina McKelvey Connect with us!Join our community on Facebook for exclusive resources, Q and A, discussions, insights and more: https://www.facebook.com/groups/teacherstoolkitforliteracyGot any questions? Feedback? Thoughts? Email Phil: phil@cuelearning.com.auThe Teacher's Tool Kit For Literacy is the free podcast for motivated teachers and school leaders who want the latest tips, tricks and tools to inspire their students and school community in literacy learning. Hear from literacy experts and founders of Cue Learning, Sharon and Phil Callen, and special guests.At Cue Learning, our literacy specialists draw on over 30 years of teaching and international consulting experience to deliver world-class learning solutions. We equip, empower and support teachers to become their authentic selves. To find out about upcoming events, and about how Cue can help you and your school, visit the Cue Learning website http://www.cuelearning.com.au/ and sign up to our newsletter https://cuelearning.com.au/contact/And you can get even more amazing teaching resources, right now, at Teachific https://www.teachific.com.au/.To make sure you don't miss any literacy learning tips and insights, please subscribe to our show on your favourite podcast player. MORE INFORMATION AT A GLANCE:Visit cuelearning.com.auSubscribe to the Teacher's Tool Kit For Literacy podcasts  or join on Apple  Podcasts hereContact Phil  phil@cuelearning.com.auJoin our Teacher's Toolkit facebook groupFind connected resources on TeachificSee upcoming online eventsSee our online video courses hereAnd finally, read our insightful blogs hereProduced by Apiro Media https://apiropodcasts.com

Trustees and Presidents- Opportunities and Challenges In Intercollegiate Athletics
How A Bill Becomes A Law--Inside One State's NIL Process of Crafting State Legislation

Trustees and Presidents- Opportunities and Challenges In Intercollegiate Athletics

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 36:21


As states have rushed to deal with legislation surrounding names, images and likenesses, there are a lot of folks involved to help state legislators understand the industry. Its important to state governments that they have a working partnership with higher education institutions in order to factor in their perspectives. As the NCAA's July 1 deadline approached, the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania worked to get their law in place. In fact, PA became the FIRST to allow NIL, as their law went into effect on June 30. (Cue the School House Rock classic song, "I'm just a bill") I am joined today by two Penn State University staff members who worked tirelessly behind the scenes to help the Commonwealth create and pass this landmark legislation. My guests are Zach Moore and Bob Boland. Zack Moore serves as the Vice President for Government and Community Relations for Penn State, communicating to elected officials the value that Penn State provides to the people of Pennsylvania as the Commonwealth's flagship public university. Zack came to Penn State from Washington, D.C., in 2007 with lobbying and senior legislative experience in both the U.S. House and Senate. He brings his extensive legislative, policy development, and lobbying experience to the role of chief lobbyist for his alma mater, with responsibility over federal, state, and local relations efforts. In his time with Penn State, Zack has been a passionate advocate for the value of Penn State's land-grant mission. Bob Boland joined Penn State University as Athletics Integrity Officer in July 2017. In this role, he works to ensure the Athletics Department is meeting all University standards related to integrity, ethics, staff and student conduct and welfare, as well as NCAA and Big Ten standards. The position, the first of its kind, was created in August 2012 in an agreement with the NCAA, Big Ten and Penn State. The officeholder is charged with oversight and reporting of internal and external investigations into athletics. With that agreement expiring in August 2017, the University maintained the position as part of its own broader Athletic Integrity Program. Boland chairs the University's Athletics Integrity Council, a group that brings together senior administrators and faculty to review matters related to athletics and reports to the Chief Ethics and Compliance Officer and the Board of Trustees. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/karen-weaver/message

Kourting Happiness
52. Let's Celebrate You and the One Year Anniversary of the Kourting Happiness Podcast

Kourting Happiness

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 33:32


Cue the confetti! It's time to celebrate you and the one-year anniversary of the Kourting Happiness Podcast.  Our Host, Dr. Kortni Alston, shares her journey with becoming a podcaster and creating a show fueled by positive psychology.  She also helps you savor your accomplishments and inspires you to take a leap for any goal that is living inside of you. Let's celebrate! 

Beauty Wisdom Podcast
Rhonda Noordyk - Financial Empowerment for Women

Beauty Wisdom Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 21:45


How to prepare for major life transitions Formulas for Financial Assertiveness Negotiation's strategies Rhonda Noordyk, CDFA®, CDS™ | Founder & CEO Understanding that divorce can be a complicated and painful journey, Rhonda Noordyk left the financial industry in 2014 to pursue her passion of helping women achieve financial justice in their divorce. She hoped to offer a different kind of divorce experience; one that lead to empowering moments and living a happy and fulfilled life, post-divorce.' Cue the Women's Financial Wellness Center! Designed to help women find a better way to maintain financial wellness throughout and after a woman's divorce, Rhonda uses her knowledge, passion, and experience to build leading-edge strategies that help her clients stay three steps ahead at all times. With the intention to create a safe place for women - especially those in a vulnerable position - to find their paths, their voices, and the financial confidence they need to lift themselves out of seemingly hopeless situations, Rhonda works to change the narrative of her clients' divorce experiences. You can find Rhonda at: https://www.wfwcdivorce.com    

Respect The Crit
Fallout: Evergreen - Ep. 03

Respect The Crit

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 98:22


Enter to win official Fallout RPG prizes in our Fallout Episode 4 giveaway - Enter To Win Here! Also, check out our custom URL and visit Modiphius - modiphius.net/respectthecrit   Memories and moos. The wastelanders leave the locked down settlement of First Hill and head into the Evergreen to search for a missing pair of lovers.   Social and scheduling - @RespectTheCrit Sunny Takase & Host - Ian Duncan @iduncs Lance Burnett - Xavier Trudeau-Deschênes @xavierTD Gerry - Susan Spenader @sueslalues Overseer - Alex Herrera @aeherrera   Whatever the system, whether it's a miss or a hit, you always gotta respect the crit!   Original music provided with license or permissions by: "Some Things Never Change" by Miracle of Sound Purchase tracks and pay what you can at Bandcamp "Fallout 4 Theme Guitar Cover" by Ubaldo B Purchase tracks and pay what you can at Bandcamp   Music from Cyro Chamber: "Markland" by Northumbria "AVA" by Keosz Find more dark ambient at cryochamber.bandcamp.com or on YouTube     "Ambush" & "Assault" music from Nir Shor and the Musical Lore Fallout Mod   Music from the Fallout: Cascadia project "Swan Song" by Sylwester Faustmann "Fatal Hunt" by Sylwester Faustmann   Music from Free Music Archive "End of Winter" by Rest You Sleeping Giant Link: https://freemusicarchive.org/music/Rest_You_Sleeping_Giant/Songs_for_a_Sad_Guitar/Rest_You_Sleeping_Giant_-_Songs_for_a_Sad_Guitar_-_07_End_of_Winter License: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/legalcode "Cue 1-Sad-Forlorn-Gentle-Piano reverb (A Beautiful Death) by Soulaflair Link: https://freemusicarchive.org/music/Soularflair/Solo_Piano_or_primarily_piano/Cue_1_-_Sad-Forlorn-Gentle-Piano_reverb_A_Beautiful_Death_1766 License: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/legalcode Performance by Cedro Willie Band Link: https://freemusicarchive.org/music/The_Cedro_Willie_Band/Live_at_KBOO_for_Movin_On_June_16_2017 License: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/legalcode "Shady Grove" by Shake That Little Foot Link: https://freemusicarchive.org/music/Shake_That_Little_Foot/Shake_That_Little_Foot/Shady_Grove_vbrmp3 License: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/legalcode   Music from Filmmusic.io "Impatient" by Sascha Ende Link: https://filmmusic.io/song/3006-impatient License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license "Stalker" by Rafael Krux Link: https://filmmusic.io/song/5413-stalker- License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license   "D&D Ambience | Haunted Forest" by Michael Ghelfi - Support this artist on Patreon "Post Apocalyptic Wastelands" by Juhani Junkali Additional sound from Freesound.org Additional music from MusicFilmStudio via Audio Jungle Additional music and sound by TableTop Audio Additional music and sound by Syrinscape Additional music and sound by Pro Scores from Video Copilot Additional music and sound by Monument Studios   Special thank you to our friends at Modiphius Entertainment and the Fallout: Cascadia project for their donations and collaboration!

The Parenting Clubhouse Podcast
Is It Normal for My Toddler to Refuse to Get into the Car?

The Parenting Clubhouse Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 20:21


There may be lots of little situations that your toddler or preschooler struggles in the day-to-day ongoings of life.  Getting dressed. Stepping away from the TV. Eating dinner. Coming inside from outside playtime. Not splashing in the bathtub.  Your child may even struggle with refusing to get into the car or having a very difficult time getting into the car. Cue the tantrum.  So today on the show I want to talk about how you can respond when your child is refusing to get into the car AND how you can parent smarter and not harder by preventing this situation from happening in the first place… Because hey, you got your kid dressed, bags backed, shoes on, and everyone out the door, so why make getting into the car any harder than it needs to be?  Let's go to the show.  IN THIS EPISODE: Laura Lynn shares the different reasons for why a child may have a difficult time getting into the car;  She explains specific preventive strategies you can use to help prevent this refusal to getting into the car before it becomes a problem; and She coaches you on how to respond in the moment if your child does refuse to get into the car.  SHOW NOTES Schedule a one-on-one coaching session to learn how to get a bigger picture of your child's unwanted behaviors and learn how to make parenting easier at www.bit.ly/behaviorsession.   Let's connect!  On Facebook: www.fb.me/lauralynnlapointe  On Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/lauralynnlapointe

All the Books!
E329: New Releases and More for September 21, 2021

All the Books!

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 48:01


This week, Liberty and Tirzah discuss All These Bodies, The Body Scout, The Book of Form and Emptiness, and more great books. Pick up an All the Books! shirt, sticker, and more right here. Follow All the Books! using RSS, Apple Podcasts, or Spotify and never miss a beat book. Sign up for the weekly New Books! newsletter for even more new book news. This content contains affiliate links. When you buy through these links, we may earn an affiliate commission. BOOKS DISCUSSED ON THE SHOW: All These Bodies by Kendare Blake The Body Scout by Lincoln Michel When Things Get Dark: Stories inspired by Shirley Jackson edited by Ellen Datlow The Book of Form and Emptiness by Ruth Ozeki Under the Whispering Door by TJ Klune The Sleeping Beauties: And Other Stories of Mystery Illness by Suzanne O'Sullivan  Beasts and Beauty: Dangerous Tales by Soman Chainani and Julia Iredale The Rib King by Ladee Hubbard WHAT WE'RE READING: The Secret History by Donna Tartt Four Aunties and a Wedding by Jesse Q. Sutanto The Cabinet of Curiosities(Pendergast Book 3) by Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child MORE BOOKS OUT THIS WEEK: Kissing the Wind by A. E. Hotchner Cooking for Wizards, Warriors and Dragons: 125 unofficial recipes inspired by The Witcher, Game of Thrones, The Broken Earth and other fantasy favorites by Thea James, Isabel Minunni, et al. Dance or Die: From Stateless Refugee to International Ballet Star: A Memoir by Ahmad Joudeh  The N'Gustro Affair (New York Review Books Classics) by Jean-Patrick Manchette and Donald Nicholson-Smith Rogues' Gallery: The Birth of Modern Policing and Organized Crime in Gilded Age New York by John Oller  A Dream of a Woman by Casey Plett Stolen Earth by J.T. Nicholas The Other Merlin by Robyn Schneider App Kid: How a Child of Immigrants Grabbed a Piece of the American Dream by Michael Sayman  When We Make It by Elisabet Velasquez  The Right to Sex: Feminism in the Twenty-First Century by Amia Srinivasan  Dune: The Lady of Caladan (The Caladan Trilogy) by Brian Herbert and Kevin J. Anderson  Last Words on Earth by Javier Serena, Katie Whittemore (translator) The Other Talk: Reckoning with Our White Privilege by Brendan Kiely True Raiders: The Untold Story of the 1909 Expedition to Find the Legendary Ark of the Covenant by Brad Ricca  The Scholars of Night by John M. Ford  Lean Fall Stand by Jon Mcgregor On Location by Sarah Echavarre Smith As If on Cue by Marisa Kanter She Who Rides the Storm by Caitlin Sangster The Awakening Storm: A Graphic Novel (City of Dragons #1) by Jaimal Yogis and Vivian Truong Yellow Rain: Poems by Mai Der Vang  Pump: A Natural History of the Heart by Bill Schutt The Cause: The American Revolution and its Discontents, 1773-1783 by Joseph J. Ellis The Secret of Life: Rosalind Franklin, James Watson, Francis Crick, and the Discovery of DNA's Double Helix by Howard Markel Our Biggest Experiment: An Epic History of the Climate Crisis by Alice Bell To Break a Covenant by Alison Ames The Wrong End of the Telescope by Rabih Alameddine The Moon, the Stars, and Madame Burova by Ruth Hogan  In the Shadow of the Empress: The Defiant Lives of Maria Theresa, Mother of Marie Antoinette, and Her Daughters by Nancy Goldstone Amira & Hamza: The War to Save the Worlds by Samira Ahmed The Bronzed Beasts (The Gilded Wolves 3) by Roshani Chokshi Sidelined by Kara Bietz Iron Widow by Xiran Jay Zhao  The Insiders by Mark Oshiro How to Save a Life: The Inside Story of Grey's Anatomy by Lynette Rice  The Wolf's Curse by Jessica Vitalis Maybe We're Electric by Val Emmich When Sparks Fly by Helena Hunting Darkness by Christopher Krovatin Gutter Mage by J.S. Kelley The Vanderbeekers Make a Wish by Karina Yan Glaser When Ghosts Come Home by Wiley Cash Olga by Bernhard Schlink, Charlotte Collins (translator) This Is Why We Lie by Gabriella Lepore My Darling from the Lions: Poems by Rachel Long United We Are Unstoppable: 60 Inspiring Young People Saving Our World by Akshat Rathi The End of Bias: A Beginning: The Science and Practice of Overcoming Unconscious Bias by Jessica Nordell A Man Called Horse: John Horse and the Black Seminole Underground Railroad by Glennette Tilley Turner  Things We Couldn't Say by Jay Coles Praying to the West: How Muslims Shaped the Americas by Omar Mouallem The Ghost of Midnight Lake by Lucy Strange Bewilderment by Richard Powers Milk Teeth by Helene Bukowski, Jennifer Calleja (translated) The Stolen Lady: A Novel of WWII and the Mona Lisa by Laura Morelli  Room to Dream (A Front Desk Novel) by Kelly Yang Yours Cruelly, Elvira: Memoirs of the Mistress of the Dark by Cassandra Peterson Dog Park by Sofi Oksanen, Owen Frederick (translator) Maya and the Return of the Godlings (Maya and the Rising Dark) by Rena Barron  The Tensorate Series: (The Black Tides of Heaven, The Red Threads of Fortune, The Descent of Monsters, The Ascent to Godhood) by Neon Yang The Forgotten First: Kenny Washington, Woody Strode, Marion Motley, Bill Willis, and the Breaking of the NFL Color Barrier by Keyshawn Johnson and Bob Glauber City of Thieves (Battle Dragons #1) by Alex London Kaleidoscope by Brian Selznick The Trees by Percival Everett See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Pro Motion U
Taking an Honest Snapshot

Pro Motion U

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 48:46


On this week's episode, Heidi and Tyler break down different ways that you can check yourself. Sometimes we convince ourselves that "Things aren't that bad" or we are doing better than we think or on the other end of the spectrum maybe we aren't giving ourselves enough credit for the work we are putting in. Cue the honest snapshot, we break down the ways that we can take an honest unbiased look at how we are doing in the realm of fitness, nutrition, and mental health. If you like what you hear don't forget to drop a rating and review!

MIKE'D UP! with Mike DiCioccio
Releasing the Power of Laughter Into Your Life With Pete Cann The Laughter Man

MIKE'D UP! with Mike DiCioccio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 46:34


Pete Cann joins #MikedUp to add positivity and laughter into your day by showcasing the power of Laughter Yoga! Yes, you read that right! Tune in to hear Pete explain it's benefits and you'll have the opportunity to join in on the laughter and feel its amazing benefits first hand! Pete is a committed innovator and risk-taker, and rarely takes the easy route to success, often finding himself following roads less travelled. Cue the laugh track and welcome to the show, Pete Cann, The Laughter Man! Follow Pete: Website: https://PeteCann.com Laughter and Positivity with Pete Podcast: https://petecann.com/podcast/ IG: https://www.instagram.com/petecannthelaughterman/ LI: https://www.linkedin.com/in/thelaughterman/ FB: https://www.facebook.com/thelaughterman Follow Mike: IG, FB, LI, Clubhouse: https://linktr.ee/mikedicioccio 7 Tips to Launch Your Podcast by Social Chameleon: https://www.socialchameleon.us SUBSCRIBE, SHARE & LEAVE A REVIEW!

The Teacher's Tool Kit For Literacy
The Value Of Independent Reading with Mark Macleod

The Teacher's Tool Kit For Literacy

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2021 66:48


Independent reading is crucial to literacy learning but schools and teachers can still struggle to bring it to its full potential. Mark Macleod joins the show to share his insights.Mark has been involved with children's publishing for over 25 years as a lecturer, publisher, freelance editor, President of the Children's Book Council and now as an author.Mark published books for young readers and for adults under his own name imprint at Hodder Headline and was Project Manager of 'My Favourite Book' for ABCTV.Mark is well known as a television and radio presenter, and has won the CBCA Lady Cutler Award and the Australian Publishers Association Pixie O'Harris Award for distinguished services to children's literature.Mark joins Sharon and Phil to talk about:His role in research and practice in literacy and educationDefining independent reading and why it is importantIndependent reading success storiesHow and when to do itHow to support special needs studentsHow to resource and coordinate independent reading in schoolsAnd much more!Enjoy the episode, and let us know thoughts and feedback in our Facebook Group. Subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or your favourite podcast player. JOIN CUE LEARNING'S NEXT LIVE WEBINAR!Find upcoming events here and previous webinars (online video courses) here.Other matching PDF resources can be found at Teachific. RESOURCES MENTIONED IN THIS EPISODEBOOKTOPIAThe Read Aloud Handbook by Jim TreleaseAnthem for Doomed Youth by Wilfred OwenDeath Sentence: The Decay of Public Language by Don WatsonWatson's Worst Words by Don Watson Connect with us!Join our community on Facebook for exclusive resources, Q and A, discussions, insights and more: https://www.facebook.com/groups/teacherstoolkitforliteracyGot any questions? Feedback? Thoughts? Email Phil: phil@cuelearning.com.auThe Teacher's Tool Kit For Literacy is the free podcast for motivated teachers and school leaders who want the latest tips, tricks and tools to inspire their students and school community in literacy learning. Hear from literacy experts and founders of Cue Learning, Sharon and Phil Callen, and special guests.At Cue Learning, our literacy specialists draw on over 30 years of teaching and international consulting experience to deliver world-class learning solutions. We equip, empower and support teachers to become their authentic selves. To find out about upcoming events, and about how Cue can help you and your school, visit the Cue Learning website http://www.cuelearning.com.au/ and sign up to our newsletter https://cuelearning.com.au/contact/And you can get even more amazing teaching resources, right now, at Teachific https://www.teachific.com.au/.To make sure you don't miss any literacy learning tips and insights, please subscribe to our show on your favourite podcast player. MORE INFORMATION AT A GLANCE:Visit cuelearning.com.auSubscribe to the Teacher's Tool Kit For Literacy podcasts  or join on Apple  Podcasts hereContact Phil  phil@cuelearning.com.auJoin our Teacher's Toolkit facebook groupFind connected resources on TeachificSee upcoming online eventsSee our online video courses hereAnd finally, read our insightful blogs hereProduced by Apiro Media https://apiropodcasts.com

The Countdown: Movie and TV Reviews

No, the guys are not reviewing your friend, Kate. That would be gross and inappropriate.  They're reviewing the Netflix movie, Kate. (Though if your friend looks like the Kate in this movie, hit Wayne up. He'd like to know how she's doing.) Mary Elizabeth Winstead stars in the latest John Wick wannabe, as an assassin who has 24 hours to live and wants to find those responsible. Like, badly. Cue stylish fight scenes, violence, a terrible CGI-fused car chase, and more neon than you've seen - even on the streets of Tokyo - and you have yourself a film. But is it any good? Wayne was over the line as soon as MEW walked on screen, but Paul will take more convincing. Shock, horror. Find out if Kate is worth your time (I know, she's your friend, of course she is, but are we still playing out that joke?) as The Countdown continues ... Time Stamps Kate NON-SPOILER review: 0:00 - 8:57 Kate SPOILER-FILLED Discussion: 08:57 - 17:33 Final Thoughts Including Potential Spoilers: 17:33 - 18:22   Hit up the CC Radio Network that The Countdown is a proud part of and follow the headers to the other great shows. Want to gain access to all manner of additional Countdown content?   Head on over to the show's Patreon to see what you're missing!   Join The Countdown Podcast Listener Community on Facebook so you can interact more directly with Paul and Wayne and vote in the weekly poll for who has the best list!

Metal Nerdery
108: Helmet Betty Album Dive

Metal Nerdery

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 62:16


There's entirely too much happening at Metal Nerdery's 33rd Floor Inverted Bunkerpoon Studios!!! Just know we made liberal use of our speak-holes to discuss HELMET's third album, BETTY, and the multitude of things we love about them/it (including a tangentional tie-in to Black Sabbath!).   Fire up the grill, throw on some road lobster, porn dogs and hamburgers, and try out some of those fancy stoner banjo riffs as you prepare to JOIN US for a snort laugh or three, because the hills are alive and thriving with the sound of HELMET's BETTY!   Visit www.metalnerdery.com/podcast for more on this episode   Leave us a Voicemail to be played on a future episode: 980-666-8182 Metal Nerdery Tees and Hoodies – metalnerdery.com/merch and kindly leave us a review and/or rating on the iTunes/Apple Podcasts - Spotify or your favorite Podcast app Listen on iTunes, Spotify, Podbean, Google Podcasts or wherever you get your Podcasts. Follow us on the Socials: Facebook - Instagram - Twitter   Email: metalnerdery@gmail.com Can't be LOUD Enough Playlist on Spotify   Show Notes: (00:01) - #veryhardintro #aboutthehardness #trexclinky #nineeleven #neverforget #alwaysremember #Slayer and #GodHatesUsAll #verySlayer and #Repentless (***HAIL and R.I.P. to the fallen***) / #lightanesthesia / #thisepisodes #beeroftheepisode #ohh #thisepisodesbeeroftheepisode #duclawbrewingcompany #sourme #unicornfarts #sourell #sourale #glitter #brilliantname   (03:28) – Reminiscing to the recent concert experience with #TheSword at the #GeorgiaTheater (and some associated #showmemories #tangentionally connected with that venue) ***And NOW, a snippet from #RickshawBilliesBurgerPatrol #somuchfuzz #PeppyStonerDoom (a #killeropener for #TheSwordASMR) #SativaStonerMetalASMR and the #legendary #impression of #RussellsBurp #preforeshadowingbackshadowingASMR / ***CHECK OUT OUR METAL NERDERY PLAYLISTS ON THE SPOTIFY!!!*** #cantbeloudenough    (08:30) - #grandslam and the #sourcreamandarchives / HELMET's #sophomoreslam #Betty (#thesecondnewalbum) and a #perfect #metalogy with #BlackSabbath #markthetime #itsmarked / Feedback regarding Betty vs. Meantime (as a follow-up) #whatiloveaboutthehelmet / ***Cue the #ridiculousness #STFUASMR***  / A #Facebook #Messenger #messenge  #warmedcockles relative to the #MetallicaPodcast #hahahaha #nomnomnom #morehahahahahahahaha / ***IF YOU'D LIKE TO LEAVE US A VOICEMAIL, GIVE US A CALL AT 980-666-8182***#TheVoicemailSegment #toomanyrelaxers #feedbackpositivity #highroad #always #hail and #thankyou for the #positivefeedback  ***EMAIL US AT metalnerdery@gmail.com *** #9806668182ASMR   (15:41) – 06-21-1994 and #TheCrow / #KCQF / The Personnel on “Betty” / #shittyvision #killeropener WILMA'S RAINBOW #readthoselyrics (It's either a Q or a K and some #qlarification #noteven) / The #covergirl on the #albumcover for #Betty #thehillsarealive #ilovethehelmetcore I KNOW #groovemetal #bigly #genre (Borderline #stonermetal with a #straightedge look) / The difficulty of singing over something you're playing that's also in a strange time signature (or #complexicated #syncopated structure).  #burpimpressionASMR    (24:42) – BISCUITS FOR SMUT (#smut #thedog #tangentionalalityismness #thankyouforthat) #adifferentfeel #sickbass #grandpabones / MILQUETOAST #rightontime ***See also #TheCrowSoundtrack*** #BuildingDynamics Also of note…a #killerending #layers #lockedin #killergroove #usethoseheadphonesASMR    (31:58) - #incaseyouforgot TIC #cantbeloudenough #workyourpitch / #notasong #acoustramental ROLLO  #funky and #technical #groove / STREET CRAB ( #nottobeconfusedwith #roadlobster) #biggulps and #jazz and #theblackdogbrigade #maybe / ***The #PageHamilton vocal style relative to each song*** /  #Helmet #showmemory and #flashback to the #OldMasquerade prior to being #regentrificationized #downstairs from #Heaven (in #Hell) ***980-666-8182!!!*** CLEAN #fishfeed and #moodrings #readthoselyrics #boomerang / #gumrage and #TridentVibesWithdrawal   (45:18) – VACCINATION (#canyoufollowthebouncingballs?) #Math and #hamburgers #thehamburgersong #givingcredit (#listentofindout) / See also #TheJerkyBoysMovie for more #Helmet #tangentionalality to #BlackSabbath and #SymptomOfTheUniverse and #waittiltheend #ramjamalamb / BEAUTIFUL LOVE #jazziness and #jazzASMR #soundcheckjazzcore #what #okayturnitoffnow / SPEECHLESS (#heaviness in the #groove) / THE SILVER HAWAIIAN #relaxers #newstrainofrelaxer #BettyGood #comedygenius #noteven #snortlaugh    (54:10) – OVERRATED #ihavenoideawhatyoujustsaid #girlfriend / #dangole SAM HELL #stonerbanjocore #goodgravyandcat #weirdending / *** #ILoveTheHelmet doesn't follow the same #hashtagbag #rules as #TheBlackAlbum / (#thankyou) ***THANK YOU ALL FOR LISTENING TO METAL NERDERY PODCAST!!!*** #IlovetheHelmetASMR #ILoveTheHelmetExtendedDanceMixASMR #untilthenext #staytuned #WhatILoveAboutTheHelmet ***SYMPTOM OF THE UNIVERSE*** #tangentionalality to #Sabbath / #letitringout #itsallbullshit #theresnomoon    

The Whatever, Buddy?! Podcast
The Whatever, Buddy?! Podcast - Ep. 19: "The Boys Are Back in Town?!"

The Whatever, Buddy?! Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 55:19


Welcome to The Whatever, Buddy?! Podcast In Episode 19 some news hits the podcast...Jonny lost a friend so we talk about it. Ryan tries to cheer him up with his latest dumbass show to binge. Sometimes when you gotta talk real before you can be loosey-goosey like we tend to be. Later they welcome best bud and bandmate Sonny Remlinger to the podcast! Sonny is a midwest fella who can sing a dang song like no other....as you will see. Why is the episode called "The Boys Are Back in Town?!" Well, cuz we all love Thin Lizzy and we also love Sonny! So, go grab some shitty take-out and your Jimmy-Beats and listen up! It's Whatever, Buddy?! Wednesday?! and we're happy to see you again! Cue the music.... --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/whateverbuddy/support

The Shine Show
121. Amy Porterfield Shares What The Future Holds For Online Course Creators

The Shine Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 26:43


I've been waiting sooo long to share this with you……   I am THRILLED to tell you, my friend, mentor, and phenomenal human Amy Porterfield, joins me as a guest on The Shine Show this week!   *Cue breathing into paper bag*   When it comes to building your online course, do you ever feel a sense of overwhelm?   You have a game-changing idea, but what next?   "Where do I even start? How will I know if this works? Will people even like what I have to say?"   It feels like this BIG HUGE THING, and sometimes it's easier to fill your day with other tasks instead of sitting down and taking the first action steps to get the ball rolling.   Well, if you've been hanging out with me for a while, you would have heard about Amy's Digital Course Academy because it's the cornerstone for online course creation!   DCA completely changed how I built my business and made online course success possible for me.   And I am confident it can do the same for you!   In this week's episode of The Shine Show, Amy Porterfield, the queen of online courses herself, joins me to share her incredible insights on the future of online courses. If you've been thinking about taking the leap and starting your own course, or if you just need a little midweek inspiration, this episode is for you!   Click here to tune in! ▶️   XXX Salome

The Teacher's Tool Kit For Literacy
Information Books in My Classroom with Giselle Pulford

The Teacher's Tool Kit For Literacy

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2021 82:34


Many teachers are constantly searching for great information books to fit their mini lessons in English and other learning areas.Finding the right books is one thing, teachers also want to know how to make these texts a central part of their teaching, Teachers need to give students access to ‘just right' information books for independent reading and writing and connect it to reading, writing and word work.Upper primary school teacher Giselle Pulford joins Sharon and Phil Callen to share key insights, including:What do you search for to find great information books?How do students access these books easily in the classroom?How can students find ‘just right' information books?What are some successful ways you use these types of books in Mini Lessons? How have the books supported the students in independent reading and writing?How to explore the three text features of informational texts (see blog https://cuelearning.com.au/explore-the-three-text-features-of-informational-texts/ and podcast episode https://the-teachers-tool-kit-for-literacy.simplecast.com/episodes/reading-like-a-writer-informational-texts)And much more!Enjoy the episode, and let us know thoughts and feedback in our Facebook Group. Subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or your favourite podcast player. JOIN SHARON CALLEN'S NEXT LIVE WEBINAR!Find upcoming events here and previous webinars (online video courses) here.Other matching PDF resources can be found at Teachific. RESOURCES MENTIONED IN THIS EPISODETEACHIFIC Non Fiction Poster: Graphic Feature - Cutaway, Yrs 3-6Non Fiction Posters - full range, Yrs K-2 and Yrs 3-6Tally Charts: Non Fiction Text FeaturesReading Tools: Good Reader Poster - Non Fiction Set, Yrs K-6Reading Journal Prompts: Non Fiction - Did You Know? Yrs 3-4BOOKTOPIAAdvertiser: Olympic posters 2000 SydneyDK: The Sports Book A Seed is Sleepy, An Egg is Quiet, A Rock is Lively This is Our World: From Alaska to the Amazon, Meet 20 Children Just Like You by Tracy Turner and Asa GillandAmazing Treasures: 100+ Objects and Places That Will Boggle Your Mind by David Long Britannica All New Children's Encyclopedia The Street Beneath My Feet, The Skies Above My Eyes, The Wonder of My WorldShine a Light books: Secrets of the Vegetable Garden, The Human Body, On The Space Station, Secrets of the Sea Shore, Secrets of the Rainforest, Secrets of Animal Camouflage, Wonders of Our World, At The HospitalGlow In The Dark Books: Animals at Night, Voyage Through Space, Nature's Light Spectacular Amazing Animal Adventures Eye Spy: Wild Ways Animals See the WorldActual Size by Steve JenkinsWhat's Out There: Amazing Plants, Rocks, Creatures and Cultures That Make Australia Extraordinary by Nicole StewartGISELLE'S TEACHING TOOLSLabels, magnifying glass, sticky notes, torch, dark spot, paper table, Sticky notes with rewriting of info in an easier form Enjoy the episode, and let us know thoughts and feedback in our Facebook Group. Subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or your favourite podcast player. JOIN SHARON CALLEN'S NEXT LIVE WEBINAR!Find upcoming events here and previous webinars (online video courses) here.Other matching PDF resources can be found at Teachific. RESOURCES MENTIONED IN THIS EPISODETEACHIFICMini Book, Lined and Blank: ‘My Favourite Books' . Choose from a variety of Mini-Books for your students to practise using high frequency words and phrases and writing conventions as they write extended text. Different prompts, word cards and page designs (lined and blank sections) enable the students to get their ideas down on paper more easily.BOOKTOPIAThe Book Chook by Amelia McInerneyMy Bird, Bertie by Amelia McInerneyBad Crab by Amelia McInerneyWho Fed Zed? by Amelia McInerneyMary Had a Little Lamb, What Really Happened by Amelia McInerney Connect with us!Join our community on Facebook for exclusive resources, Q and A, discussions, insights and more: https://www.facebook.com/groups/teacherstoolkitforliteracyGot any questions? Feedback? Thoughts? Email Phil: phil@cuelearning.com.auThe Teacher's Tool Kit For Literacy is the free podcast for motivated teachers and school leaders who want the latest tips, tricks and tools to inspire their students and school community in literacy learning. Hear from literacy experts and founders of Cue Learning, Sharon and Phil Callen, and special guests.At Cue Learning, our literacy specialists draw on over 30 years of teaching and international consulting experience to deliver world-class learning solutions. We equip, empower and support teachers to become their authentic selves. To find out about upcoming events, and about how Cue can help you and your school, visit the Cue Learning website http://www.cuelearning.com.au/ and sign up to our newsletter https://cuelearning.com.au/contact/And you can get even more amazing teaching resources, right now, at Teachific https://www.teachific.com.au/.To make sure you don't miss any literacy learning tips and insights, please subscribe to our show on your favourite podcast player. MORE INFORMATION AT A GLANCE:Visit cuelearning.com.auSubscribe to the Teacher's Tool Kit For Literacy podcasts  or join on Apple  Podcasts hereContact Phil  phil@cuelearning.com.auJoin our Teacher's Toolkit facebook groupFind connected resources on TeachificSee upcoming online eventsSee our online video courses hereAnd finally, read our insightful blogs hereProduced by Apiro Media https://apiropodcasts.com

Quarantings
Body ody ody ody Count

Quarantings

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 71:11


Kristen and Lume are here with a rambunctious studio audience that's ready to get into it. After a "roster" update, they highlight a couple new "reckless" dating profiles they've come across on the apps as of late. They present the long awaited and much debated updated definition of "simps", and why Kristen likes them. Cue a mini rant- WHY are so many of Kristen's matches taking this as a personal attack??? Having somebody of the opposite sex in your dating profile app pic, yay or nah? (25:30) Finally the crew gets to the main topic... BODY COUNT. Important or irrelevant? Kristen has strong feelings on the type of individual who is worried about other people's body count. Should you "need" to know bae's exact number? Could you date someone with a much higher or much lower body count than yourself? Is virginity relevant... or even real? Keeping a list, weird or normal? Kristen breaks down the list of "bodies that do not count". Ladies, don't count that man if he didn't finish the job! Lume shares the only reason he would care about a woman's body count. (49:51) QQH: Of course you know we couldn't go any longer without discussing Drake's new album "Certified Lover Boy", along with Kanye's "Donda" and the "beef" between those two. Lume highlights what is deemed the best wedding he's been to in 2021, which included a near death experience and a Chingy cameo. Lastly the return of college football is here and crew is all the way here for it!

Dr Nurse F Show
Dr. Nurse F Show Episode 60 Mario Porn Smells

Dr Nurse F Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 25:56


Time for some Mario YouTube porno. In Studio with the Dr. and Nurse this week are Kid A.G. and L.B. from the Goin' Deep Show. Topics include stinky crotch smellers, fingers in buttholes, poo covered hands in grocery stores and how to attempt at impressing someone when you smell to high hell. DETAILED TIMELINE 1:00 Curvey bitches are curved bitches 2:00 Cue up your shit so we can see it 3:00 Fat makes it sink in - move the flesh back 4:00 Whipped his dick out 5:00 What you said is retarded 6:00 Mario thirsty 7:00 Mario porn 8:00 Hearing it for the 6th time 9:00 Blue Pie Number 1 10:00 I don't know how it slid in there 11:00 Mom and Dad's Chevette 12:00 Mini Fiona 13:00 Push the drooling fucks around 14:00 What's next - 15:00 She's just itching her asshole in public 16:00 I don't lick buttholes 17:00 Its going to smell the same way - Endo loves asshole 18:00 The stench slaps you in the face 19:00 Rotting Jew foot 20:00 Italians live with the grand parents 21:00 Does he have one leg now? 22:00 Allegedly button 23:00 Cleaning up shit 24:00 Bye! 25:00 Because we're awesome --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/drnursef/support

Light After Trauma
Episode 59: Living With Your Head Detached From Your Body with Amy Guerrero

Light After Trauma

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 37:40


Amy Guerrero is a trauma-informed recovery coach helping people on their journey of sobriety and healing from trauma. In this episode, she talks with Alyssa about why it can be dangerous to tell people struggling with addiction to “just quit”. She also shares about her own battle with addiction and how addiction actually saved her life - at first! Tune in to hear Amy's incredible story as well as her unique approach to helping others heal via a fully somatic experience.  Support the Podcast Light After Trauma website Amy's Website:https://www.thriveinrecoverywithamy.com    Transcript: Alyssa Scolari [00:23]: [singing] Alyssa Scolari [00:23]: Hello, everybody, welcome. On the day that we are recording this, it is Friday and I am in a really good mood. Why? I don't know, because things are hectic, but I am, so we're going with it. I am really excited for today's episode. I am really excited for our guest today. We have with us Amy Guerrero. I'm just going to tell you a little bit about Amy before we get into it. Alyssa Scolari [00:55]: "When we stay curious together, we can experience unimaginable freedom." I love that quote. "On a journey to heal from my trauma, I stumbled, pun intended, into a conscious sober lifestyle and my deeper purpose to support people. Today, I support sober people to heal past traumas, to feel more freedom, pleasure, and purpose, and create healthy relationships and thrive. Alyssa Scolari [01:22]: I was confident no single approach to healing and living a conscious sober life would work for me, so why would it work for anyone else? I got busy educating myself, training and working with people in somatic experiencing, attachment theory and other trauma-informed modalities and relating it to living a conscious sober lifestyle. Alyssa Scolari [01:44]: What I discover is missing for my clients, who include all adults ready to create healthier relationships, is when we unravel the root causes of the addictive escape, such as grief, trauma, and painful events from the past, they discover the safety to live with purpose and thrive in all of their relationships. Alyssa Scolari [02:06]: Outside of running my coaching business, Thrive in Recovery, you can find me practicing what I teach, cooking healthy, delicious food, practicing yoga, playing outdoors, and strengthening my connection to myself to serve others." Alyssa Scolari [02:22]: I love that. Hi, Amy. Welcome. Amy Guerrero [02:26]: Thank you so much. It's so delightful to be here and all of our good moodiness is jiving off of each other because I too am having a great Friday. Alyssa Scolari [02:36]: Oh, that makes me so happy to hear that. Amy and I are moving buddies. Amy has just moved so we were talking about the process of moving before we started recording. Yeah. We're both vibing. Amy Guerrero [02:50]: Yeah. Alyssa Scolari [02:50]: Is there anything you want to add to that bio, or can I just get rolling? Amy Guerrero [02:56]: It's just- Alyssa Scolari [02:56]: Can I just start with my 21 questions? Amy Guerrero [02:58]: Just get started with your 21 questions. You said it all. Yeah. Alyssa Scolari [03:04]: Can you define, for the listeners, what is somatic experiencing? What does that mean? Because I love that technique, but I don't think a lot of people really know what that means. Amy Guerrero [03:19]: Absolutely. I like to put things in very user-friendly words, so I'm not going to define it as maybe the Somatic Experiencing Institute would define it. I'm going to define it as Amy Guerrero defines it. Alyssa Scolari [03:31]: Of course. Amy Guerrero [03:31]: It's really, for me, as a conscious sober woman, before I became conscious I was really feeling my way through life. I was experiencing a lot of life through all of the sensation in my body, and everyone in the world doesn't experience that, or stops the sensation from happening. Then just tries to analyze and analyze and think and think and think. Amy Guerrero [03:57]: What somatic experience is, is really a bottom-up approach to mental health, mental wellness, and overall wellness. It's really going into the body to allow the body to complete things that happened, whether unconscious or conscious. For instance, with traumatic events or with grief, oftentimes we stuff it down and we put it away and we promise we're going to go back for it later. Amy Guerrero [04:26]: Then some kind of chronic inflammation shows up and it just won't go away. Often that's the body keeping the score, as Bessel would say, or telling us like, "Hey, there's something in here." So often it's an emotional piece. The somatics that I really practice in somatic experiencing that I practice for myself and my clients is like, "Hey, let's listen to what your body wants to tell us and then listen to what your mind is telling us about that." Amy Guerrero [04:52]: Really slowing it down. So often people who've experienced any escapism with drugs or alcohol, or even just the behaviors that are just highly palatable on the GABA receptors and the feel-good transmitters, they don't remember that they have a body because it's been drowned out by the heavy use of other things outside of themselves. That's my story too. Alyssa Scolari [05:18]: Yeah. That was going to be my next question, is, this is something that I feel like many people who struggle with addiction, and I also believe eating disorders, this is something that we do. We almost, metaphorically of course, are walking around with our heads detached from our bodies when we're in our addiction. Would you agree with that? Amy Guerrero [05:46]: Absolutely. Our heads get very manipulative and wise at the same sense, because it's all a protective mechanism. Our brains start to create all of the story that becomes so intense and it just won't stop. Amy Guerrero [06:03]: When I was working in eating disorder clinics, I was always just really watching the room instead of listening to every single word, because what I could see in their bodies would tell me the story in which they had calculated such a beautiful story in which most of it their body was telling me wasn't true. Right? Amy Guerrero [06:25]: Their head was like, "Oh, no, this is exactly what's happening." It's so true. It's a protective mechanism. I don't think there's anything wrong or right about it. It makes sense. Alyssa Scolari [06:39]: Absolutely. I think that for some people that's truly where they need to be, because it's one of those things where maybe if we were fully in tune, we would lose it. It is, as you said, a protective measure. I believe it's a survival mechanism. Amy Guerrero [06:54]: Absolutely. Alyssa Scolari [06:55]: It keeps us alive. Amy Guerrero [06:57]: Yep. Alyssa Scolari [06:58]: In a way ... And this might sound like a twisted sentence, but sometimes our addiction is what keeps us alive. Amy Guerrero [07:05]: Oh, if I didn't start using drugs and alcohol when I did, I think I would have been suicidal much sooner in my life than when I was. I mean, my first MDMA experience was a life-changer. I believe I used it in this very beautiful way where I had journals and all of the things and just really got to the matter of what was really bothering me. Amy Guerrero [07:27]: I believe that those experiences, although then I would use them in ways that weren't necessarily therapeutic for me, but if I didn't use the way I did, I don't think I'd be here now. Because at the end of my using, when that coping mechanism was taken away from me, I tried to kill myself for almost 18 months. Alyssa Scolari [07:46]: Yes. I am so appreciative of the fact that you shared that, because not only are you speaking some really hard and wise truth about addiction, but in saying what you just said, which is drugs and alcohol essentially helped to keep me alive, you are taking the shame off of it and the guilt and the stigma as well, because there's such a stigma, right? We know about stigma. Alyssa Scolari [08:15]: We could talk about that all day, but when you look at it as like, "I needed this to survive." There are so many people who carry so much guilt and shame from years when they had addiction and they struggled, but when you reframe it and you look at it as what it was, which was you just trying to survive, I feel like it takes a lot of that guilt and shame away. Amy Guerrero [08:39]: A hundred percent. That was what I struggled with at first, because I wasn't being met where I was at. The people that were trying to support me ... I had started working on my trauma before I became physically dependent on alcohol. About halfway through my journey, I met my birth mom and then that's when my alcohol use just went up and up. Amy Guerrero [09:04]: My coping mechanisms, I really leaned into them, but I was on this journey to heal all my trauma by the time I was 40 and I just giggle at myself now because that's so my personality. Like, "I'm going to figure all of this out before I'm 40 because I'm going to walk into my 40 totally freaking healed and have it all figured out." Amy Guerrero [09:24]: Instead, I'm waking up shaking and going, "Wait, you cannot take away my favorite coping mechanism. What the actual fuck is going to happen now?" People were trying to tell me that everything that I was saying was untrue and to not trust my body and that I was powerless and all of these things. I was like, "Ah, no, I hear you. Maybe this works for some people, but please listen to me and meet me where I'm at." I wasn't really receiving that kind of support. Alyssa Scolari [09:56]: When you say people were telling you, do you mean professionals, healthcare professionals were telling you ... In what aspects were they telling you to not listen to your body? Amy Guerrero [10:07]: The first treatment center that I went to, I mean, beautiful humans that knew what they knew. They were a 12-step modeled treatment center. Everything was modeled off of the 12 steps. They really believed in everything that the book said and didn't take into account the body and the trauma and the deeper underlying things. It was like, "Oh, yeah, okay, sure, but right now you're powerless over alcohol and that's all we need to focus on." Amy Guerrero [10:38]: I'm like, "Maybe, but all day long I can tell you what you want to hear, but my body's still telling me, 'I'm not safe here. I'm not safe here. I'm not safe here.'" That extra ... You know? I think coping with food or by not really choosing food in the ways to nurture the body, right? Amy Guerrero [11:00]: That's something that's so similar where the people that are there just don't feel like they're being met where they're at and they're being told how they feel rather than actually being listened to on how they feel. I feel like that was something that was really missing. Amy Guerrero [11:15]: No fault of the practitioners. Just not trained in the same things that I had already been studying for a long time, because I was into my body's going to tell me what's right and what's wrong. Alyssa Scolari [11:29]: Yeah. Absolutely. As I think back to my eating disorder treatment days, because I had a whole host of anorexia, bulimia and then binge eating, and by the time I was in treatment, I was in full-blown binge eating. It's exactly like you said, they know what they know and they don't know what they don't know. What they didn't know was how badly I needed food to be able to survive with what I was going through. Alyssa Scolari [12:00]: What they didn't know was how deeply and horribly traumatized I had just been. I have a group of people sitting here telling me like, "You have to stop eating. You have to stop." Then I would get those weekly weigh-ins and they would be like, "You gained more weight this week. You're not being compliant." Ultimately they kicked me out. I got kicked out. Cue guilt and shame. Alyssa Scolari [12:29]: I mean, please. I mean, I understand. I feel completely what you're saying, because people are in a way telling you not to listen to your body. Amy Guerrero [12:43]: Yeah. I don't know about your experience and I really don't ... This is such an important conversation because I felt shame from childhood and I was really good at feeling shame. As a matter of fact, I felt more comfortable in my shame than I did in my power, so when people would tell me to not listen to my body or basically that what I was doing was wrong, again, it confirmed that I had to stay in the shame spiral. Amy Guerrero [13:14]: I had to ... I call it a blanket. I stayed underneath the blanket of shame and walked through my life with not good enoughness, with compromising my body with men, with work, with overworking, overdoing over everything, over, over, over, really led by my masculine energy. Amy Guerrero [13:32]: Because I was more comfortable feeling ashamed of who I actually was than empowered to be the confident woman that ... I exhibited all the traits of it on the outside, but inside I was like, oh, just awfully, awfully, awfully shameful of everything and always asking for permission to take up any freaking space in any room that I was in. Alyssa Scolari [13:59]: Absolutely. Absolutely. It's like, we have trauma that contributes to us feeling very disconnected from our bodies and then we try to seek help. Then we get this message from people who aren't meaning to give us this message, but again, they don't know what they don't know. Then we get this message that's like, "Well, yeah, you really don't. You really don't know what's going on." This is really bad. Alyssa Scolari [14:31]: Then we further detach from ourselves and we just sink into the shame. I mean, yeah, absolutely. I mean, to the point where I remember being a kid and if somebody ever told me ... I would get the comment a lot, because I think by nature, I'm a loud person. I do have a lot of confident energy, and if somebody would tell me like, "Shh." Just that, if you shush me, done. Done. Alyssa Scolari [15:04]: Shame attack, right? You call it a shame blanket. I call it shame attack. I'm done. Hiding under a rock, shame spiral into suicidality. Amy Guerrero [15:15]: Yeah. Oh, gosh. Yeah. I think again, it's something that we don't spend enough time naturalizing. It's just like, "Oh, it's totally a natural response based on the fact that we weren't being met where we were." No one was just looking in our eyes going, "Hey, that's okay. What you're feeling's totally natural." Instead, it was like, "Oh my God, it's my fault again." You know? Amy Guerrero [15:42]: I can remember even, especially with my partners, how I would just shut down, and because I have such a big presence in a room as well, when I shut down, I shut down the whole room because of my energetic [inaudible 00:15:53]. Like a manifesting generator, utilitarian. I am an energy source and a- Alyssa Scolari [15:58]: You're a manifesting generator? Amy Guerrero [16:00]: Yeah. Alyssa Scolari [16:01]: Okay. I'm a projector. Amy Guerrero [16:03]: Oh, beautiful. Alyssa Scolari [16:04]: To the listeners out there, look this shit up. I am telling you, your life will be changed by human design. Go to Jovianarchive.com. Find your human design. You will be forever changed. That's a side note. Amy Guerrero [16:16]: Yeah. Totally. My best friend is a projector as well, and so I've learned so much about projectors. Yeah. Yeah. Our energy levels are so different, and so it's so beautiful to have this information so that we can navigate our relationship in such a different way. Alyssa Scolari [16:32]: It's a truly beautiful thing. I think my husband is a manifesting generator and it is like reading about manifesting generators I'm like, "Wow." It's so cool. Anyway, I digress because I could talk about human design all day too. I want to ask you, what was that turning point for you? Alyssa Scolari [16:53]: Because you're describing the Amy who was walking around feeling detached, getting this message from treatment facilities that you shouldn't trust your body, right? Then you're trying to give up this addiction that you actually need to survive. How did you get from that Amy to the Amy who's like, "Oh, I needed this and it's okay that I needed this." Amy Guerrero [17:20]: Yeah. That's a great question. It took about 18 months. First it took me like just trying to take my life. I always tried to drink enough and take enough Xanax to just not be here. I was so frustrated because it just wouldn't work. Somehow some way, I would end up in the hospital and somehow I would wake up. I started writing this program, the Thrive in Recovery methodologies, I call it Regroovin', in 2014 when I was first in treatment. Amy Guerrero [17:48]: By 2016 I was unsuccessful again and I was just like, "Enough is enough." I went to a treatment center and I said, "Please, let me do it my way. Hold space for me. I have a plan. I just need a safe environment to get out of this. I will be the client that I need to be, if you give me space to study and do my own thing during groups." They did. I did exactly what I was told to do and got out of there. Amy Guerrero [18:19]: Then I chose to move into sober living. When I moved into sober living, I immediately started creating the coursework and teaching it three months later and then started my business. It's like, I knew that if I wasn't going to die, that I needed to live like I was never going to live before. Amy Guerrero [18:38]: Exactly like you said, I needed to go through this experience to be here now to bring this into the world. It wasn't really this super empowered decision. It was just like, "Oh, okay. I didn't die again so I'm going to live like I've never lived before." Alyssa Scolari [18:55]: That's realistic, right? I so appreciate that because that's what it's like. That's recovery. It's not like I think the way they make it fucking look in movies where you wake up one day and the sun shines fucking brighter and the birds are chirping. The birds are singing that you're meant to be alive. That's not the shit that happens. Alyssa Scolari [19:22]: It's like, we wake up and we're like, "Well ..." I know for me, it was like I had an attempt and then it didn't work and I was like ... It's very similar. I was like, "Well, fuck. I'm here. I guess I'm fucking here. What am I going to do about this shit?" Amy Guerrero [19:43]: Yeah. A hundred percent. It wasn't this beautiful oh. It was like, "I'm fucking here and I'm going to fucking make this decision and everyone just ..." Then I think there was a bit of like, "I'm going to prove the haters fucking wrong." Alyssa Scolari [20:01]: Yes. That anger that you make productive instead of self-destructive. Amy Guerrero [20:05]: Absolutely. Yeah. I was still really involved in the 12-step communities and the things that I knew that people told me they worked and I was like, "You know what, I'm going to study them. I'm going to go into why these things were developed and why it works. Then study SMART Recovery and then study LifeRing, and then study all of these different modalities and figure out something. What's the throughline for all of them? Why does this work?" Amy Guerrero [20:30]: I was. I was fucking angry at first, and so I wanted to prove everybody fucking wrong. Then I also wanted the answer to be through the body. What I first started with my gateway in was actually through nutrition and wellness and just understanding instead of eliminating things from people's diet, because we already eliminated so much, how can we add in things to support them? Amy Guerrero [20:53]: I started making essential oil blends and I started teaching yoga classes and just really encouraging everyone in ... Because I was working at treatment centers. Encouraging them to go to sound baths and to go into the somatics. It's like, let's just get to know that you have a body that's meant to do more than take you out in so many different ways. Amy Guerrero [21:14]: Because that detachment, that head that's not attached to the body, just felt like their body was in their way and then therefore abused it. All of the sex that happened in there, I was just like, "Ouch, that does not feel good for you." You know? Alyssa Scolari [21:30]: Yeah. Amy Guerrero [21:30]: For many of the women, they weren't even having orgasms, but they were sleeping with everyone at treatment. I was just like, "Let's stop that and let's add in some yummy oils and some yummy practices and let's go to the beach every day. Then let's acquaint yourself with your sensuality in a different way." Alyssa Scolari [21:48]: Yes. I love that. Operating from the approach of, what can we add, right? What can we add? Because you clearly are lacking, right? We're already lacking in something if we are caught up in addiction and eating disorders. It's like, let's not take anything away right now because that's not safe. Then in my private practice, I tend to be very slow with that. Alyssa Scolari [22:20]: I actually get a lot of ... In working with kids because I work with kids and adults, but the parents of kids are often on my ass about like, "Why is my kid still binge eating? Why? This isn't working." I'm very slow. I'm never like, "Well, why don't you just stop?" Because you don't know what's on the other side of that. Nine times out of 10, it's deep, intense suicidality. Amy Guerrero [22:49]: Yeah. Oh, gosh. I don't know how many times you were told that, "Oh, God, Amy you're so smart. Why don't you just stop?" Alyssa Scolari [23:00]: You have such a bright future. Just stop. Amy Guerrero [23:04]: Oh my God. I just remember when ... I mean, at one point I remember I did try to kick someone in the face when they told me that. I was just like, "It's so insulting." I was drunk but, "It's so insulting to hear that. I know I'm fucking smart. I know I've accomplished all of this shit. I know that it's not a wise decision. My prefrontal cortex is not online right now. Get the fuck out of my face. If you ever told me to just stop again." Really listen to what that means. Alyssa Scolari [23:36]: Right. Amy Guerrero [23:37]: It is so condescending. Alyssa Scolari [23:38]: You're only problem won't be my foot if you ever fucking tell me to stop again. We're going to have much bigger problems than my foot in your face. Amy Guerrero [23:49]: Yeah. I get it because the parents want to control that so badly. Then that's their unhealed emotional trauma. Alyssa Scolari [23:57]: Totally. Totally. A thousand percent. For you, this is the approach that you're taking and you work individually with people? Amy Guerrero [24:08]: And in groups. Yeah. Yeah. Alyssa Scolari [24:10]: And in groups. Yeah. Tell me a little bit about the business that you have because you've taken, what I feel is like a newer approach and a highly effective approach to recovering from addiction and trauma because, right? The biggest thing is, "Okay. Now what, right? After I'm no longer an alcoholic or I no longer am using drugs, now what do I do?" Alyssa Scolari [24:33]: I feel like you have found a really beautiful way of helping people through that. How do you do that? If you can answer that and in a few sentences, I don't know if you can. Amy Guerrero [24:42]: I can actually. I mean, that's exactly what it was. It was like, you're sober now what? Right? Now maybe for the first time we're learning how to do life, right? The first thing that I do when I'm working with people one-on-one is we usually start with something like a three-month commitment to one another and really just decide like, yes, we're in it. Amy Guerrero [25:06]: That first month is all about teaching regulation and really helping them understand that they have a nervous system and the three parts of the nervous system and really teaching polyvagal. Then understanding their attachment patterns and then not going too deep into the trauma, but just touching on the things that we know, what I call them they're anchors of trauma, right? Amy Guerrero [25:28]: Like, "Oh, that's the incident that started this and that's the incident that started this." We build that connection to take away the shame and the guilt and the blame, right? Because I believe that once we understand that we have a nervous system and we really get to know it and map it out, then we're like, "Oh, yes, it all makes sense. It wasn't my fault." Amy Guerrero [25:51]: Then we can start actually doing a life and setting up a plan to repair, to reconnect and to build that trust from within so that people can start to trust from without as well. Just depending ... High-level mentorship. We are talking every day and there's just a lot, a lot that happens in that one-on-one work, that most of my clients now are starting their own businesses. Amy Guerrero [26:19]: It's so beautiful to watch this ripple out and then they have 10 or 15 clients that are learning this work. Then those 10 or 15 clients, a couple of them start and I'm like, "Yes, this is how we're going to change the world." Right? Is the more people that understand this. Alyssa Scolari [26:35]: Yes. Amy Guerrero [26:36]: It starts with that deep one-on-one, depending on where they are in their journey. Sometimes people are coming to me with 10 or 15 years of sobriety, but not that real deeper ... As you said earlier, that real fucking recovery, right? They're still just scratching the surface and they've been sober for 10 or 15 years and they're ready to do their deeper work. They've heard something in me that they're just like, "Oh, yeah, girl, please help me get there." Amy Guerrero [26:59]: That's really fun because things happen so quickly because we have a lot of sober time, but we don't have a lot of time that they went into their trauma. They're often very resistant and very blocked by their 12-steppedness. Y'all, I do not have anything against 12 step at all, but there's some deconditioning that has to happen from any place that we spend a lot of time. Alyssa Scolari [27:21]: Oh, yeah. Amy Guerrero [27:23]: There's nothing right or wrong with it. Alyssa Scolari [27:25]: Absolutely. Absolutely. Then if I understand this correctly, you don't work with people who are active in their addiction or you- Amy Guerrero [27:35]: Depending. Depending. Alyssa Scolari [27:36]: Depending. Amy Guerrero [27:36]: Yeah. I have several people right now that I'm working with that are still having a little bit of going back to that coping mechanism every now and again. Safety is everything for me. If someone's really in their stuff and I know that I'm not going to be able to keep them safe because I'm not with them physically, then I will suggest that they go someplace else just because safety is so important. Again, they're not going to get well if they don't feel safe with me. Alyssa Scolari [28:07]: Yeah. I think that that is so important. I'm really glad you brought that up because I was going to say, "I think that we should clarify that there's a certain level here where it's simply not safe." I don't want for the listeners for it to come off as like I'm being like, "Oh, yeah, just let people run hog-wild into the arms of addiction and we just watch people waste." No, right? That's not what we're doing here. Amy Guerrero [28:37]: Oh, no. No, no, no, no. Yeah. Alyssa Scolari [28:38]: It's, there's certainly a level of assessment there where we're like, "Is it safe? Is it not safe?" I've had people who come to me with an eating disorder and I'm like, "This isn't safe. I'm not trying to tell you, you have to give up the thing that's kind of keeping you alive, but now the thing that's keeping you alive is nearly killing you." That's where it's like, I feel unsafe. Amy Guerrero [29:02]: Absolutely. Yeah. I mean, fortunately I'm usually able to tell that within the first conversation. Alyssa Scolari [29:08]: Absolutely. Amy Guerrero [29:08]: Then I'm able to make lots of recommendations in places that I really trust and that I've built relationships with, that I know that they have some of these modalities in place to keep them safe. Then we can work together after that initial ... Maybe just a little time out away from their coping mechanism and just understanding it at a higher level. Alyssa Scolari [29:31]: Totally. Yeah. Totally. Thrive in Recovery is your program, but you also recently have Bridge to Trust. Amy Guerrero [29:42]: Yeah. Yeah. Alyssa Scolari [29:43]: Can you talk a little bit about that? Because I think that's really neat. Amy Guerrero [29:46]: Oh, yeah. Oh, it's so neat. Yeah. What I found was that people were working with me for three months and then six months sometimes and then they just didn't know how to connect to their friends and family. They had this understanding of their nervous system. They had this understanding of their attachment system and they were just like, "Ah, no one understands me and they just keep taking me back to my old patterns and my old behaviors." Amy Guerrero [30:10]: The Bridge to Trust experience is all about learning to trust what you know, to come back to that intuition, to come back to that trust, and then to invite your friends and family from that place to learn with you, right? Not about the addiction, not about the recovery, but like, "Hey, how can we connect more deeply as humans here and have yummy or healthier communication with each other and really bridge this trust so that we can recover the trust that maybe was broken when we were heavily into our patterns?" Amy Guerrero [30:44]: Because I know for me, I broke a lot of trust out there in the world and it took time for me to build that bridge within myself. Then I felt safe to offer it to others. Like, "Oh, you can come closer to me and here's how." I can show you without guilt and shame an amends process of me going, "Oh my God, I'm so sorry." It was more like, "Hey, I get it. What can I do to make this right? How can we move on from here?" Alyssa Scolari [31:09]: That is a beautiful thing. I think probably hugely helpful, because one of the things that I have seen lead to relapse is a lack of those protective factors, i.e. relationships. You're not just saying, "Okay. Great. You've worked through your trauma. We've been working together. Good luck. Have fun. Catch you on the other side." Alyssa Scolari [31:40]: What you're doing is taking it a step further and then going, "Hey, let's also now build some really healthy and trusting relationships in your life so that you can continue on this path." Oh, that's so cool. I love that. Amy Guerrero [31:54]: Yeah. Because isolation and the loneliness, it's like we can learn all of this shit, but if we're not practicing it with someone that we trust, then we're not- Alyssa Scolari [32:03]: We fall right back into ... Yeah. Amy Guerrero [32:06]: Very quickly. Alyssa Scolari [32:07]: Yeah. Amy Guerrero [32:08]: It's so cool because the Bridge to Trust events have led to a community and just watching this community just grow with each other and feel that like, "Oh my gosh." And practicing with each other, and then going and practicing with their friends and their family and then going, "Oh, wait, this works." Then inviting their friends and family to come join the community and then all of a sudden we've got parents and their children and partners and their partner. Amy Guerrero [32:36]: Their partners are like, "Oh, shit, I need this stuff. I always thought it was them. I always thought it was their fault." You know? And I'm pointing my finger. There's a lot of that. The finger-pointing starts to go like, "Oh, shit, we're in this together. We both have nervous systems. How can we really understand this at a deeper level?" Yeah. Alyssa Scolari [32:57]: Yes. Because it becomes so easy to blame the person with the addiction or the person with the 'mental health', right? It's them, they're sick. They're not well. I'm just like, "Man, I wish I could bring my whole family to one of these Bridge to Trust." Because I'm the outcast in my family, even doing what I do. It's like, "Oh, she's the weird one. We don't talk to her." It's like ... Right? Alyssa Scolari [33:28]: I'm sure in this event you have family members that then their eyes are open to, "Oh, right. Multiple nervous systems. We're all trying to regulate. I did play a part in this. I did have a role to play in this as well." I think that's really important. Amy Guerrero [33:49]: Yeah. Another virtual Bridge to Trust event is coming up at the end of July. It's so exciting because exactly what you said happens. I have many parents that come without their children at first and then they're like, "Oh, shit. Thank you." Because I don't make it about the coping mechanisms. It's all about the solution and the root cause of what keeps us stuck intergenerationally and that trauma. Then just some ... I like to bring fun. I call everything I do a regrooving method. We're regrooving- Alyssa Scolari [34:24]: I love it. Amy Guerrero [34:24]: ... our nervous systems to just ... And I bring a lot of fun and breath, sound and movement into things. It's like, "Oh, we're not just going to sit still and learn a bunch of shit." We're going to interact and have some fun together and not take this so seriously that they're like, "Oh, she's the weird one." We're all weird together, y'all. Alyssa Scolari [34:43]: We're all weird. We're all a little dysregulated. Amy Guerrero [34:46]: Absolutely. When you learn to come back to regulation and giggle about it, then we can really embrace that dysregulation and it becomes regulated. Alyssa Scolari [34:55]: Yes. It's a beautiful thing. Amy Guerrero [34:59]: Yeah. It's freedom. Alyssa Scolari [35:01]: It is. It truly is. Now, if people would like to find you, because you're speaking some really innovative treatment approaches, what you're doing is so important, so important, how can people find you? Amy Guerrero [35:16]: Yeah. I think the easiest thing is Instagram, Facebook and my website is Thrive in Recovery with Amy. There's no secret there. It's how do you thrive in recovery and with Amy? Right? It's all there. Instagram is a great place to get to know me. There's tons of videos. I go live three times a week. I'm there for Q&As. Alyssa Scolari [35:39]: So cool. Amy Guerrero [35:40]: Facebook is the samesies, I do a weekend wellness hack every Sunday night on Facebook and I have been for years. I'm really consistent in my practices and I invite you to come closer to check it out, and then we go from there. Alyssa Scolari [35:54]: So cool. For the listeners out there, I will ... Well, A, I'm going to be following you myself because I really think that's ... I love what you're doing. I really, really do. B, for the listeners out there, I will link everything in the show notes. You know the deal, you by now. Head over to the show notes and you will find everything that you need. All things Amy. Alyssa Scolari [36:20]: Amy, thank you so much for coming on today. This has been truly a delightful conversation. You're a delightful human being and you are really kicking ass in the world, so thank you. Amy Guerrero [36:35]: Thank you. It's so great to be here with you today and I will talk to you soon. Good luck on the rest of your move too. Alyssa Scolari [36:42]: Thanks for listening, everyone. For more information, please head over to lightaftertrauma.com, or you can also follow us on social media. On Instagram, we are @lightaftertrauma and on Twitter it is @lightafterpod. Alyssa Scolari [36:59]: Lastly, please head over to at patreon.com/lightaftertrauma to support our show. We are asking for $5 a month, which is the equivalent to a cup of coffee at Starbucks. Please head on over again. That's patreon.com/lightaftertrauma. Thank you and we appreciate your support. Alyssa Scolari [37:27]: [singing]

RAD Radio
Rob's Soapbox - Emblem Of Now

RAD Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 6:29


With a plethora of possible topics, I found myself struggling for a tone or direction this week. It's the 20th anniversary of 9/11 and there are endless things to be said, especially with the backdrop of America's disastrous Afghanistan pullout last week. Countless false stories are being written about how America “pulled together,” after 9/11, and how different we've acted in the face of Covid. Obviously, those writers didn't actually live through the events in 2001, lest they'd remember that less than a month after the Towers fell, we were back at each other's throats. Absolutely nothing about America's reaction and response to Covid is surprising nor dissimilar to 20 years ago. Additionally, the entire world is at each other's throats disagreeing over the virus; let's not pretend we're special.https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2021/09/03/911-vs-covid-19-us-responses-unity-divison/5695433001/ Speaking of Afghanistan, the Taliban is going door-to-door hunting for Americans to slaughter. Good times. https://news.yahoo.com/taliban-soldiers-door-executions-110701194.htmlhttps://nypost.com/2021/09/05/california-woman-in-kabul-says-taliban-hunting-americans/ Covid remains never-ending and divisive. More and more Americans are obediently wearing masks again for no rational reason, especially since cases of the delta variant have peaked. Not to worry, though, there's plenty of doom and gloom to come as we head towards another dark winter. The flu will miraculously make a comeback, and we have multiple more variants lined up ready to scare the living shit out of all of us prone to such fear porn, which seems to be about 70% of America. https://www.newsweek.com/mu-covid-variant-that-may-evade-vaccines-found-46-countries-territories-1626462https://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-9947233/COVID-infections-driven-Delta-appear-peaked-analysis-two-month-pattern.html The NFL is back…yay. That about covers that subject for now. Within less than two weeks, the nation's largest state will either have a new governor, or the same one. While a recall of Gavin Newsom would be a huge national story for a day or two, and assuming Republican Larry Elder were to become the new governor, California would see a sea change in regards to how it responds to Covid on a statewide level, it's neither likely to happen nor much more of an event than a paragraph deserves. Job done. As has become the norm over the last few years, the news is endlessly negative and divisive. I thought it would be nice to offer a positive message in light of that reality, but I just couldn't muster the words necessary. Not because I'm in a bad place personally, but rather, it seems, too many others are…and they want to stay there. I could key in on that, I suppose; here we are, a year later, in the exact same space we were 365 days ago. Americans are endlessly on edge with no end in sight and very little hope of things changing anytime soon…or maybe anytime at all. Well, that's uplifting. And then I stumbled on dueling stories about the exact same thing, which perfectly represent our national mindset today. Both sides needlessly celebrating non-victories and preaching to their respective choirs about why they are on the right team and the “other side” is endlessly wrong, and of course, stupid. The subject of the anti-parasite drug for animals known as Ivermectin has been a hot one over the last few weeks, especially since Podcaster Joe Rogan made it known that he had taken it once he contracted Covid. On one side of the argument, conservatives, including Doctor and Senator Rand Paul, have claimed that because former President Trump took Ivermectin and touted it, liberals refuse to even study its' possible uses as a treatment for Covid. Paul's position is that the drug is approved for use in humans to treat infections caused by some parasitic worms, head lice, and skin conditions such as rosacea, and should at least be researched to combat Covid, not discarded solely because Trump said it might work. On the other side of the debate, liberals argue that some studies have been conducted to evaluate the drug's efficacy against COVID-19, however, the data has been inconsistent, inconclusive, and too small to be considered high quality. And that there is simply no reliable evidence that ivermectin should be used for COVID-19. Not to mention, misusing it can lead to very dangerous outcomes. https://www.courier-journal.com/story/news/politics/rand-paul/2021/08/30/rand-paul-ivermectin-senator-undecided-on-drug-to-treat-covid/5652636001/https://www.hackensackmeridianhealth.org/HealthU/2021/09/03/3-reasons-not-to-use-ivermectin-for-covid-19/ Cue the phony overreactions and false celebrations! Hungry to show how stupid anyone who voted for or still listens to President Trump is, the traditional media breathlessly and excitedly reported that Oklahoma hospitals were overwhelmed with patients having overdosed on the drug Ivermectin. In fact, the situation was so bad that gunshot victims were being neglected. "The ERs are so backed up that gunshot victims were having hard times getting to facilities where they can get definitive care and be treated,” said the story repeated by dozens of American and overseas news outlets. https://www.foxnews.com/media/rachel-maddow-liberal-figures-false-story-hospitals-ivermectin-overdoses It was 100% false, and Fox News and conservative pundits from coast to coast reveled in the fact that the “mainstream media,” got it wrong…of course they neglected to report that while the Oklahoma story was false, it is undeniable that hundreds of Americans are, in fact, overdosing on Ivermectin to the tune of a 245% increase in just one month as word spreads throughout social media. https://www.npr.org/sections/coronavirus-live-updates/2021/09/04/1034217306/ivermectin-overdose-exposure-cases-poison-control-centers?ft=nprml&f=1003 It's the most deliciously emblematic story of the weekend. We are now so far gone to polarly opposite ends of the Earth that we literally misreport and celebrate the exact same story. Liberals are disgustingly excited to see Americans making themselves sick…so much so that they report anything they hear that they want to be true, making fools of themselves and furthering our mistrust of anything we see, hear or read. Conservatives, meanwhile, are so hell-bent on not believing anything said by anyone associated with science and medicine, and so desperate to find ways to prove that there's a sliver of truth in anything ever uttered by Trump, that they celebrate when their liberal counterparts misreport, and then they, themselves ignore the fact that hundreds of people are, in fact, falling gravely ill, engaging in the very behavior their orange leader led them to. Come to think of it, I should have said more about the NFL season starting…it will be fun to be reminded that there was a time when the people that made the biggest fools out of themselves were sports fans, making up truly asinine arguments to defend and justify their team, as opposed to now…a time when health professionals, political leaders, and media members now makeup news and twist themselves into pretzels to defend and justify their team.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Girl and The Gov, The Podcast
Untold Truth of Afghanistan with Veteran & Congressional Candidate for NY-11, Brittany Ramos DeBarros

Girl and The Gov, The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 74:49


The last few weeks have been headline city as it relates to the US's longest war -- the war in Afghanistan. A departure from the past 20 years, where the war received little to no press coverage, the past few weeks had many of us constantly at a loss for words and left with many questions as to how on earth we got to this place. Cue, this week's episode where we were honored to be joined by Veteran and Congressional Candidate for NY-11, Brittany Ramos DeBarros. Brittany, in our conversation, walked us through the many realities of this war, from how we ended up there in the first place to what being on the ground actually was like, the corporate interests involved, and so much more. If you've had questions on Afghanistan, this is the episode for you. P.S. Ask us all your questions and give us all your feedback on IG @girlandthegovthepodcast or via email at girlandthegovthepodcast@gmail.com.Citizen Power with Nathalia Ramos & Ben Sheehanhttps://www.onecommune.com/a/2147492814/nBoX9mJoCatalyst20 Resources:https://docs.google.com/document/d/13hoZWC7tsbkwP2fSyt8E-5oQkA9EL7tjXyfRDZZCet4/edit Donate to Brittany's Campaign:https://secure.actblue.com/donate/brittany-social-mediaPrima:https://www.prima.co/ Use code GIRLGOV for 15% offhttp://chng.it/8CNwdhLT79 Prima PetitionBrand Ambassador Sign Up Form: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSelH0p5KWISaHaBI5-9nKSUItlY_eXiEmvsudpJIcRjKhfgyA/viewform

My Simplified Life
How Consistency Equals Success In Business, Health & Life with Lisa Herrington

My Simplified Life

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 38:34


Cue the confetti and pop the champagne because we've made it to episode 100!!!! First, a big thank you for listening and all of your support! Today the tables are turned and my friend and fitness trainer, Lisa Herrington is interviewing me! For the past year I've been on a health journey but haven't shared much about it, but Lisa knows the behind the scenes because she's been by my virtual side for a year now. I had no idea what questions Lisa was going to ask me but I knew she was excited for this interview to happen and so was I.    Michelle Talks About My COVID Fitness Journey Why Being Consistent Is Key Trying New Workouts & New Foods Finding Confidence Through Fitness Links Mentioned Lisa Herrington Thistle  

Todd N Tyler Radio Empire
8/23 2-1 RIP Tom T. Hall

Todd N Tyler Radio Empire

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2021 23:35


Cue up "I Love"!!!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Rob Has a Podcast | Survivor / Big Brother / Amazing Race - RHAP
Survivor All-Time Top 40 Rankings | #7: Winners At War

Rob Has a Podcast | Survivor / Big Brother / Amazing Race - RHAP

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2021 250:56


Cue the Winners at War theme song, because we're hungry for more Survivor with Rob, Taran, and Shannon! The post Survivor All-Time Top 40 Rankings | #7: Winners At War appeared first on RobHasAwebsite.com.