Podcasts about Waterloo

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Best podcasts about Waterloo

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Latest podcast episodes about Waterloo

Street Fight Radio
Everyone Tells Monster Truck How To Live

Street Fight Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 110:38


Bryan & Brett are back taking calls and getting your genocide day updates // Bring back iron on letter shirts // Bryans nostalgic style philosophy // Getting in trouble for wearing a Fear Factory shirt // 10 days of in school suspensions for wearing an Eagles “Hell Freezes Over” shirt // Growing up in a non cussing house // Walking 20 miles in 30 degree weather // “I'm in frickin heaven” // The “Shirtless Dad” experiment // Liberal rules but had to deal with shirtless dad // Shirtless dad hates laughing // Only 2 types of mens underwear in the 90's // All children jump // Naked polaroids of your dad // “Why is there pictures of butts on your phone?” // “HOW WAS THAT SEX PARTY” // We need X-Rated phones and Work phones // Snowflake Newsflash // Retweet if you will go to prison before getting the vaccine // Emergency episode of American Podcass // Monster Truck is offended // Canadian American Patriots // Canadians love being told how to live // Brett shamed bryan into not saying “douchebag” // Chicago people are mean // Monster Truck is not an angry person // 1st Caller: Lawrence a Truck driving Teamster from Kansas City // Highlighting how trucking companies take advantage of people // Training for 4 days not a month with a union // Longest drive is 600 miles a day but get to sleep at home every night compared to contractors // Most people won't tell him how to live // It's tough to organize when truckers are on the road all the time // Owner-Operators can be a part of unions // UPS is a shitty work culture // Encouragement to everyone in the trade to join the Teamsters // Cussing philosophy // 2nd Caller: Robin has questions about living an anarchist lifestyle // How do you turn shit down you don't agree with without being seen as an asshole? // Say things in a good humor way // Turning down invites to thanksgiving // Some people will stick around and some won't // Bryan hates consumerism but always wastes money // It won't be fun for me or you with me being there // Be smiling and positive when stating your not coming // Not taking the kid to Disney world // Tell them “ Ain't nobody gonna tell me how to live ” // // 3rd Caller: Seth from Waterloo, Iowa - a former Disturbed fan // “Fire it Up” by Disturbed // David Draiman chin piercings aka pussy hooks // Pussy hooks are not intellectual // A huge disturbed fan // Bryan felt bad for liking weezer so he bought more Korn albums // Feeling bad for not liking Mudvayne anymore // LimpKorn420 // Nobody can tell you shit when your a teenager // Straight up military metal // Kids love repetition // Why did Disturbed kick fuzz out? // disturbed1.com // Stupify song meaning // 4th Caller: William from Council Bluffs, Iowa // Life in a small town next to a big city // Common for people in the big city to shit on smaller towns // 5th Caller : Sasha eating with a friend and dealing with random violence Music - Time Moves Slow - Bad Bad Not Good Street Fight Mail - P.O Box 82306 Columbus, OH 43202 Street Fight Radio Call In Show - (614) 655-3887

The Red Box Politics Podcast
Entente Discordiale

The Red Box Politics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 41:44


Matt Chorley assesses the state of relations between Britain and France with Lord Ricketts, Britain's ambassador to Paris from 2012 until 2016, and Sylvie Berman, France's ambassador to London from 2014-17. One of them rates the relationship as 3 or 4 out of 10, the other thinks it's as bad as anything since Waterloo.Plus Libby Purves and Rachel Sylvester on the politics of pandemic panic and the prospect of a Labour reshuffle. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Current
Making a ‘managed retreat' from areas at high risk of devastating floods

The Current

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 19:59


After devastating floods in British Columbia, we explore the idea of a “managed retreat” — moving homes, or even entire towns, away from flood plains. Matt Galloway talks to Thomas Little, who grappled with that question after floods at his home in Gatineau, Que.; and Jason Thistlethwaite, a professor at the University of Waterloo's School of Environment, Enterprise and Development.

Dan Snow's History Hit
Winston Churchill

Dan Snow's History Hit

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 39:35


Winston Churchill was many things a writer, politician, journalist, painter but the defining aspect of his career was as a war leader. Warfare infused his life from its very beginning due to his relation to the Duke of Marlborough and a childhood re-enacting the Battle of Waterloo in the ground of Blenheim Palace. As a young man, he saw conflict at first hand both as a soldier and a reporter in Cuba, India, Sudan and South Africa. In the political wilderness following the disaster of Gallipoli during the First World War, he undertook service on the Western Front. These experiences were what made Churchill uniquely qualified as Prime Minister in 1940 to lead Britain through its great ever military crisis and onto victory in the Second World War. Joining Dan to discuss how the military experiences of his formative years shaped him for the difficult military decisions he took in office is Anthony Tucker-Jones. Anthony is a former defence intelligence officer, widely published military expert and author of the upcoming book: Churchill, Master and Commander: Winston Churchill at War 1895–1945. They examine Churchill's military career, his role as commander in chief and the decisions he took both good and bad. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Coffee Hour from KFUO Radio
Narcissism, Gnosticism, and Congregational Social Media (Rebroadcast)

The Coffee Hour from KFUO Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 13:00


Rev. Merritt Demski, pastor of Immanuel Lutheran Church in Waterloo, Illinois, joins Sarah to talk about the role of social media in a congregation, some common pitfalls that pastors and congregations can fall into, and examples of how to do social media well while staying focused on Christ crucified. This is a rebroadcast from June 24, 2019.

Talk of Iowa
Nikole Hannah-Jones reflects on her humble roots, growing up in Waterloo and receiving the 2021 Iowa Author Award

Talk of Iowa

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021


Charity Nebbe speaks with the creator of ":The 1619 Project," Nikole Hannah-Jones.

River to River
Iowa cities rebuild after disasters while preparing for the next one

River to River

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021


Natural disasters transform the landscape. Residents of Waterloo, Davenport and Cedar Rapids reflect on work to adapt their towns for a future of more intense, more frequent floods.

College Commons
Rabbi Wayne Allen: Jewish Thinking About Good And Evil

College Commons

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 30:42


Controversy, confusion and confidence in God's goodness, from antiquity to present. After being graduated from New York University with a B.A. in philosophy and Phi Beta Kappa, Rabbi Wayne Allen, Ph.D. attended the Jewish Theological Seminary of America where he earned a Masters degree in Rabbinics and went on to receive rabbinic ordination. He served as a congregational rabbi for 35 years, taking on postings in New York City, Los Angeles, and Toronto. The Jewish Theological Seminary conferred an honorary Doctor of Divinity upon him for his years of dedicated service. Rabbi Allen was awarded a Masters degree in Philosophy from York University in Toronto where went on to earn his Ph.D. He has taught Jews and non-Jews of all ages in formal and informal settings including the American Jewish University, the University of Waterloo, the Community Hebrew Academy of Toronto, and Camp Ramah in California. Along with Harvey Haber he wrote Giving Thanks: Graces for All Occasions. Among his interests has been Jewish Law. As the author of Perspectives on Jewish Law and Contemporary Issues and Further Perspectives on Jewish Law and Contemporary Issues as well as editor of the first two volumes of Tomeikh keHalakhah, the responsa collection of the Union for Traditional Judaism, Rabbi Allen gained recognition as an authority on the application of Jewish legal principles in a modern context. He was a frequent panelist for Jewish Values On-line and has appeared on radio and television. Other interests include cantorial music – leading to the publication of his book on The Cantor: From Mishnah to Modernity – and mediating Judaism to inquiring minds, resulting in his book Prescription for an Ailing World. The most comprehensive book on the topic, "Thinking about Good and Evil: Jewish Views from Antiquity to Modernity" traces the most salient Jewish ideas about why innocent people seem to suffer, why evil individuals seem to prosper, and God's role in such matters of (in)justice, from antiquity to the present.

The Remote Real Estate Investor
These are the top 10 cheapest states to buy a house

The Remote Real Estate Investor

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 24:25


As a real estate investor, you want to find properties where your investment dollar will go the furthest. To help you do that, we compiled a list of the top 10 cheapest states to buy a house in America in 2021. We analyzed data from several sources to find the least expensive states and the most affordable cities in each of them. In this episode, Tom, Michael, and Emil run through the top ten states. They highlight important metrics and discuss what this means for investors.  --- Transcript Before we jump into the episode, here's a quick disclaimer about our content. The Remote Real Estate Investor podcast is for informational purposes only, and is not intended as investment advice. The views, opinions and strategies of both the hosts and the guests are their own and should not be considered as guidance from Roofstock. Make sure to always run your own numbers, make your own independent decisions and seek investment advice from licensed professionals.   Emil: Hey everyone, welcome back for another episode of the remote real estate investor. My name is Emil Shour and today I'm joined by Tom Schneider and Michael Albaum. In today's episode, we're going to be covering the top 10 cheapest states to buy a house in 2021. So this is from an article off the roofstock blog that I wrote a while ago called the top 25 cheapest ways to buy a house in 2021. We're going to run through some of the numbers like median home value, one year price change five year price change and median rent to give you guys an idea of which markets may be good to target or at least do a deeper dive into So let's hop into this episode   Emil: Alright guys, so this is actually a blog post I helped create on the Roofstock blog, and it's covers the top 25 cheapest states to buy a house. We're going to cover the top 10 And just to give everyone some context, the data here is from Zillow for home values and historic price trends. And that is as of June 2021 So that data is a couple months old but still you know relatively easy for people to kind of compare the top 10 We also have the median rent data is coming from go banking rates and the median rent of a three bedroom place and I'm gonna just run through the top 10 But before I do Tom you look like you have something a burning question…   Tom: I do my mouth is like like half open alright a meal in writing this article states a pretty big area you know a big Is there a reason why it wasn't at like a metro just because like it I think of cheapest I mean you know California is a great example you know you can live in a very expensive area or you can live in a very less expensive area.   Emil: Yes   Tom: Curious. Go ahead.   Emil: Great point Tom. i We don't have an article around the best the cheapest cities I think just because there are so many unique city so look at that it would be very hard to compile the data. So we have cheapest states. I think it's just easier to get 52 data points rather than I don't know 1000s   Tom: Fair fair fair. I think there's I think there's I think there's a middle ground in there as well you know between from from city or whatever to state I dig I'm I'm picking you out a little bit I like I like this let's get into it. Let's get into it.   Emil: Tom just ruined the episode and we'll end it here. So thanks, Tom.   Michael: Timeout you said you said 52 So are we talking territories as well like Guam and Puerto Rico?   Emil: I Have not attended a geography class in quite a long time Michael so I don't even know if I'm correct in saying 52 Or if it's 50.   Michael: 50 states.   Emil: 50 states you know what? I'm just I'm done with this episode. guys. You guys take it from here   Michael: Emil's like enough of this so I don't get fired like enough of this. Just trying to help you out.   Emil: I'm doing you guys a favor. How about that? Alright, so let's let's get into this. I'm curious if you guys can get some states in the top 10 If you had to guess. Pick three each you guys…   Tom: Is Mississippi on the list.   Emil: Ding ding ding Tom one for one.   Tom: All right, Michael, your opportunity to take the lead. Do your two guesses…   Michael: Show me Alabama.   Emil: Alabama? Ding ding ding correct as well. All right, one one here.   Tom: Show me Louisiana.   Emil: Louisiana is a not in the top 10   Michael: Ah, man. All right.   Emil: First incorrect answer. Tom. What do you have?   Tom: I got two guesses here. We're tied one to one. Show me Arkansas.   Emil: Arkansas is ding ding ding in the top 10   Tom: All right. No looking at anything on your on your computer. Michael.   Michael: Keep your hands where I can see them   Tom: Show me Oklahoma.   Emil: Oklahoma in the top 10 Ding ding ding Tom is a liar. For three Mike. Michael you can you can take a consolation swing here and at least try to get two out of three. So   Tom: Earn your blue ribbon or purple.   Michael: That's right. That's right.   Tom: The one they give to the kids.   Michael: Show me, Ohio.   Emil: Ohio is in the top Ding ding ding.   Tom: There you go, Michael.   Emil: Alright, so Michael finishes two out of three. Tom three out of three. Stellar. Perfect.   Michael: Wow. That's what Tom's used to hearing.   Emil: Very impressed, guys.   Tom: That's kind of how I operate. I thrive on positive reinforcement. Thank you Emil.   Emil: You're welcome, alright, let's start at the let's, let's work our way backwards. So we'll, we'll start at 10. And then we'll go to number one and   Michael: Are these in order of pricing.   Emil: 10 being the least cheap. Exactly, yeah. So it's by median home value. So the cheapest will be number one in terms of median home value according to Zillow data. Alright, so number 10. We have well let's just keep this going. Thing number 10 is   Tom: Indiana   Emil: Jesus Tom, Have you have you read this article?   Michael: He memorized the last night before bed.   Tom: No, that's it that's great. That's good. I mean Michael said Ohio Michael said Ohio so I just figured you know someone who's kind of friends with Ohio   Emil: Tom you need to go make a lot of bets today because you're on it. So please just go like buy some alt coins and stocks and whatever today go buy a rental property till you can't miss today. Alright, so Indiana number 10 median home value comes in at 185,805. Our one year price change so looking at one year ago compared to today? Well this is as of June 2021 13.2% Five year price change 45.3% In the median rent on a three bedroom place I think this looks at apartment and a house from go bank rates $1,052   Tom: Some some gross yield there.   Emil: All right. So that's that's Indiana. All right, who's number nine Michael you get first shot.   Michael: And it's not one of the ones we've already named?   Emil: It is one of the ones you named?   Michael: Oh, shoot.   Emil: I'll give you one further, it's the one you it's one you named?   Michael: Oh, man. So I got a 50/50 shot. I'm gonna say Ohio.   Emil: Bing bing bang Ohio coming in at number nine. So our median home value in Ohio $181,756. Or one year price change 14.4%. And our five year price change coming at 45.3%. And median rents on that three bedroom place is $1,024.   Tom: A price change is so crazy. I mean, all those numbers   Michae: That's unbelievable.   Emil: Oh, actually, ooh, this this article has the cheapest lists like three or four cheapest cities within these states to buy a place. So I don't know where that was pulled. Exactly. Let me see if I can find it real quick from this article. So from Yahoo, cheapest place. So it was an article called The cheapest places to buy a home in every state. So that's where this looks at. All right, so Tom, maybe we get some of the stuff you're looking for. So I'll backtrack a little Indiana. The cheapest cities to buy a house are Gary Anderson, Muncie and Richmond. And then for Ohio. We have Youngstown, Warren, Dayton and Marion.   Emil: Alright, so number eight. I'll go ahead and just dive right in Kansas comes in at number eight. Our median home value is $176,898. Our one year price change not as high as number 10 or nine coming in at 11.3%. And our five year price change coming in at 33.8%. Our median rent comes in at $1,050 on a three bedroom place. Our cheapest cities within Kansas are Hutchinson Kansas City, Topeka and Salina.   Michael: Topeka, capital of Kansas.   Tom: You guys all invest pretty in that around that area. Do you guys have an exposure to Kansas? Or you're more of Missouri?   Emil: I'm Missouri.   Michael: I've invested in Kansas City, Kansas doing a flip out there so that's almost getting wrapped up?   Emil: Are you in the Kansas side or the Missouri side?   Michael: On the Kansas side? I'm like fairly certain I double check. Which sounds ridiculous as I'm saying those words.   Emil: Alright, moving on to number seven. I think you guys guessed this one as well. I don't remember who said it   Michael: Probably Tom because I mean he's flawless.   Emil: So it's Alabama who said Alabama?   Tom: I was gonna I was gonna say it I missed out I was gonna I was gonna guess that was the one.   Emil: Oh my god this guy is just he can't miss that.   Michael: That was me. That was me. Michael had Alabama. Yeah. With the second of my, one of two. Yeah.   Emil: All right. So Alabama median home value coming in at $170,184. Our one year price change 11.9%. Our five year price change. We have 34.6% and our median rent on a three bedroom place coming in at $1060 Cheaper cities within Alabama to buy a house are Gadsden Birmingham, Montgomery and Phoenix city or Phenix City   Tom: Another market Michael has some exposure to   Michael: Yep, yeah. Birmingham Alabama   Emil: Birmingham. Number six Michael is another place you invest in so go for it. What do you got here? What state   Michael: Oh,   Emil: We already covered Ohio so what else could it be? Other side of Ohio. Oh, other side of where you invest in Ohio,   Michael: Tennessee? Kentucky? Kentucky like South. I guess it kind of like like,   Emil: Yeah, Cincinnati right south of Cincinnati. Yeah. Toki See, I know what I'm talking about.   Michael: Geography is tough man.   Emil: Alright, Kentucky median home value we got $168,998 our one year price changes 10.8% or five year price change. We have 36.3% and our median rent on a three bedroom place comes in at $1,025. Our cheapest cities to buy a house within Kentucky are Hopkinsville Covington. Owensboro. And bowling green.   Michael: Oh, Convington made the list man. Covington that's where I heavily invest. Yeah, it's   awesome.   Tom: Kind of related talking about like, you know, West's of states are directional. There was this. I think it might have started on Tik Tok. This guy's like, he said, he's at a there's like a music playing in the background. He's like, Okay, here's the situation. And they're playing like, West Virginia. Take me home.   Michael: Country Road, right?   Tom: And he's like, here's the situation. This song is not about West Virginia. It's about the western part of Virginia. And that, like, closes and then opens them just like super hungover the next day. It's like, is there something like that's just like, so perfect about that. Here's the situation. I mean, I hope this stays in the episode because people who've seen this will be like, Yeah, that's   Michael: Really relatable.   Tom: But the western part of Virginia, not West Virginia. Anyways, continue.   Emil: I've seen tic tock videos I've ever actually been on tick tock. It just sounds like a black hole of silly videos.   Tom: Yeah,   Michael: I think that's a fair assessment.   Tom: Yeah, yes. Me too.   Emil: Is there other types of videos? Or is it just silly videos? It's only thing I've seen like silly tick tock video clips.   Tom: I think that's it. But it's funny all like a lot of it does ends up going on to other platforms too. So.   Emil: Right, right. I think I've seen them on YouTube. Anyway, moving on. Number five, we've got Iowa our median home value in Iowa we have $165,955 or one year price change coming in at 6.8%. Five year price change 23.1% And our median rent $1,021. Something interesting that I'm noticing as we climb up the list in cheapness is that the percentage price change so appreciation is getting lower and lower so far.   Tom: Huh? Interesting,   Michael: Seemingly, and also that the median rent is fairly consistent.   Emil: That too, yeah, median rent is hovering around 1000 bucks a little over 1000. All right, cheapest cities within Iowa to buy a house. We got Waterloo, Sioux City, Davenport and Council Bluffs.   Michael: Okay,   Emil: All right. Number four, Oklahoma, which I think you guys I think somebody mentioned   Michael: Tom mentioned   Michael: Tom!   Tom: Windy City, Mr. Three for three   Emil: Windy City. Man somebody is worse that geography than me. All right, Oklahoma. median home value $150,754. One year price change 10.4%. So stepping up a little bit from our Iowa numbers. Five year price change coming in at 29.1% in our median rent on a three bedroom place $1,015 Or cheapest cities to buy a house within Oklahoma or Muskogee, Muskogee Lawton Shawnee and Enid. I probably butchered every single one of those.   Michael: Yeah, if anybody knows the proper pronunciation, please feel free to leave us a comment.   Emil: Spell it phonetically for us. Alright, number number three we get into top three good stuff. All right. I think someone mentioned Arkansas as well or console comes in number   Michael: Tom again.   Tom: Mr. Three for three did.   Emil: Alright Arkansas.   Tom: T for T for short. TFT   Emil: Our median home value on Arkansas $149,120 our one year price change 10.4%. Our five year price change 30% And the median rent falling below $1,000 For the first time $926. Our cheapest cities within Arkansas to buy a house are Pine Bluff. Texarkana North Little Rock and Fort Smith.   Tom: I like Oh, I like all these areas anyways, just having like visited and I don't know,   Michael: Have you visited all those areas?   Tom: I pretty much most of them yeah.   Michael: Like every single one that a meal is listed so far or just physically in Arkansas,   Tom: I haven't I haven't visited a lot in Iowa but I mean, Alabama, I've visited lots of Alabama. I had that. I don't know that we mentioned a weird deal where I played football in college at UC Berkeley at Cal and then I got hurt my senior year and then found a weird loophole that I couldn't play D one because my eligibility was expired, but I found a loophole allow me to play D two. So in the best D two football is like in the south, so I lived in Muscle Shoals, Alabama and we like traveled around a bus and like went to tons of these like spots in Mississippi or Kansas. Arkansas. Yeah. Hello. Ours are in Texarkana. I That's just proving me as a you know, not as a novice if by calling it that anyways, go ahead. Pass the mic.   Emil: Such a west coast dude   Michael: This is the situation this is a podcast is not about Arkansas.   Michael: It's about the western part of Ar…   Emil: Alright, number two, I think you somebody mentioned Mississippi did someone mention Mississippi?   Michael: Yep. TFT did   Tom: TFT, yours truly.   Emil: Median median home value in Mississippi we've got $140,818 One year price change 8.4% Or five year price change 24.7% In our median rent coming in at $989   Tom: This just my last derailing on that on living out there. So I had like mentally prepared for the heat. I was just ready right dog days and it was hot. But I ready. I had mentally said I'm going to sweat a lot. There's going to be kind of hot but I honestly I honestly kind of enjoy it like you know give me a sauna give me whatever steamroom what I was not prepared for is come wintertime it snowed a little bit there. And I was not ready. Yeah, right. It snows there.   Emil: I had no idea it snowed there.   Tom: It's not like feet, but you know, you'll get dustings every once in a while and Alright, number one, go ahead and do it. Interrupting cow, mooo!   Emil: Before you before you come in, we gotta we got to talk about our cheapest place to buy a house within Mississippi. Okay, those are Jackson Greenville Meridian Gulfport, so now.   Michael: All right  All right. All right.   Emil: One. I don't think anyone guessed it. It was West Virginia.   Michael: This is a situation.   Tom: Wait  the western part of Virginia?   Emil: How ironic and perfect could that have been   Michael: That is so good.   Tom: TFT.   Emil: See, you can't miss today I'm telling you. Take every dollar you have and you'll make any investment that you possibly desire to get good day for you. That's West Virginia. Number one. median home value. We're dropping off a bit from number two. So 117,768 is our median home value one year price change at 7.1%. Five year price change 19.3% In our median rent for a three bedroom place, coming in at $912 our cheapest cities within West Virginia to buy a house Bluefield, Clarksburg, Beckley and Huntington. And there you go top 10 cheapest states to buy house in 2021.   Michael: So what are each of your biggest takeaways from this?   Emil: I think I already mentioned mine, I was surprised that the percentage change didn't like, I would think the cheaper the house is, you know, a $5,000 increase on 117,000 versus 160,000 is gonna be a higher percentage. I was expecting the percentage to be higher in price changes when it wasn't so that was surprising to me.   Tom: My surprising is in some of the states it's like they're like It's like bigger cities that are the least expensive one so like Arkansas, like Little Rock is I think might be the capital I love like in like capital cities and just in that there's like kind of like a natural draw for like economy and, and all that kind of stuff. So it's cool in some of these less expensive in some less expensive states like you can buy, you know in that whatever Capitol Corridor, whatnot city or like around the suburbs and still have less expensive so I thought that was an interesting tidbit.   Michael: Nice.   Emil: How about you, Michael?   Michael: MIne was just you could go to the 10 cheapest cities and over the last five years. Get A 20% increase on your value by doing literally nothing. And so it's crazy when we talk about the power of real estate and all of the great benefits that it has, like, if you bought a property there, for 100, grand five years ago, it'd be worth 120 grand today, like, that's unbelievable for the fact that you were getting paid probably that whole time, too, with a tenant in place. So like, it's just, it just speaks volumes to the power of real estate and how the multiple ways that it pays you even in like, less expensive markets is pretty profound   Emil: Ya true.   Tom: Yeah. I think also, Michael and I, we've done a bunch of webinars together, and one of them, we were going through some assumptions around building a passive income flow of $100,000. And within the assumptions, I think we had the purchase price, like somewhere north of $100,000. And like, someone had commented, like, Hey, you can't buy a house for 120,000 or 100 and whatever it is, like, yes, you can like that. You definitely can. And yeah, these are all 10 states in which that is very doable.   Michael: Yeah. And it was funny, I was like, I'm pretty sure I just bought two of them not to like shame that person. But I was like, guy, you just like incorrect with your facts, like I literally just bought two of them. So   Tom: I think it's a good exercise of like, kind of taking blinders off. Like perhaps that is your strategy only to buy in these really large cities. And that's great. And then you know, you can't buy $100,000 house or $150,000 house. But if you know, you're kind of open to moving around and shifting your strategy to meet specific goals, like there, there definitely are markets to do that.   Michael; I think even in some like in some of these bigger markets, and even capital cities, if the median home price is 100, you know, is $300,000, I'm sure you can still find properties for 150k. They just need a bunch of work. So depending on what your investment thesis is, and what you're prepared to do, I think that there are opportunities in every market, you just have to be willing to uncover them or be willing to do what it takes to then profit from those opportunities.   Emil: I've seen that a lot of like, like Midwest cities, like I invest in St. Louis, and there are their homes that sell for a million plus still even in St. Louis, and their homes that sell for 50k. Like there's a huge, huge, huge disparity. You know, one home was probably built 120 years ago and is fully dilapidated and needs need some love and the other one is like a mansion but still like there. You can same city, you can have a huge disparity.   Tom: Hey, guys, I think we're going full circle from the very beginning of the episode, when I was kind of teasing a meal about, Hey, why did you guys do states? Why don't you do like a little bit, you know, not like the largest possible, you know, where even within each city like there's just, you know, really dramatic range. I mean, here in the Bay Area where I live in Northern California, you know, there's much smaller cities like not smaller, but less expensive, right. You know, perhaps Richmond or Vallejo or like Stockton and then you have areas like Piedmont and Menlo Park and all of these spots. So you know, even at every, every level, there's just really dramatic range.   Emil: Yep. But in California there there is definitely no $100,000 properties, that's for sure. Maybe a shed in someone's backyard, but that's about it.   Tom: Working on one right now.   Emil: Are you doing a shed? Are you building an ADU?   Tom: Uh, it's in a level electrical. It won't have a bathroom in it.   Emil: It's made to be like your office like an office area   Tom: Exactly. Office gym 10 by 18 I kind of wish I did it a little bigger like man 12 by 20 would have been like kind of fun but 10 by 18 is still very good it's basically the equivalent of like two rooms in one room so and doing prefab I think I've talked about before but anyways, the long journey and getting it the concrete truck should be coming any any moment now to lay the piers for the foundation of it.   Emil: Alright guys, I'm gonna I'm gonna send this home before we meander as we always do. So if you've made it this far, thank you for watching. Thank you for listening, and we will catch you on the next episode. Happy investing.   Tom: Happy investing.   Michael: Happy investing.

Intimate Interactions
BIPOC in Sex Positive Spaces (Ricardo)

Intimate Interactions

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 60:00


Representations of people of colour in the world of sex- why is it important that people of colour be in this space? What are some of the barriers to more people of colour being in this space? What has been my experience as a poc being in this space? Trinidad-born Ricardo Scipio has thus far garnered the reputation for making unique, multi-layered, provocative work in film and photography. His first feature film "When" was an irrepressibly brutal and comedic portrayal of dysfunctional struggling actresses in New York. His second feature film "Watershed" was the first independent feature film in North America to be shot in digital high-definition, breaking ground with its technical and narrative accomplishments. His third feature film "Finder of Lost Children," set in the Caribbean community of Canada, is a poignantly moving and humorous story of two half-sisters that meet for the first time at the funeral of the father neither one of them knew. Ricardo grew up in Toronto and attended both The Nova Scotia College of Art and Design and The University of Waterloo. He started his art career as a fashion photographer and then later as a fine art nude photographer. He has had 14 gallery shows of his work and his first book of photographs- a collaboration with noted Canadian poet George Elliott Clarke, was published in November of 2005. His second book "The Goddess Project" was completed in 2010. A book of nudes of Black women entitled "Uzuri" was finalized in 2011. Never idle for long, Scipio has completed photographing his fourth book "The Goddess Project Book Two" in 2012. His fifth book "The Goddess Project Book Three" was finished in 2015. The Sex Goddess Project Book One was completed in 2016 He completed The Sex Goddess Project Book Two in 2018, Book Three of the series in 2019 and Book Four in 2020. Ricardo has recently started his his tenth book "The Intimacy Project." When not on tour, Scipio makes his home in Canada. The Sex Goddess Project sexgoddessproject.com --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/intimate-interactions/message

The Marc Cox Morning Show
MCMS: Teryn Gregson, "they're trampling on our rights"

The Marc Cox Morning Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 9:54


Waterloo, IL native Teryn Gregson was let go from her job as a TV host for the PGA tour.   Getty Images Europe See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Business Wars
Blackberry vs iPhone | The Jesus Phone | 2

Business Wars

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 26:46


It's late 2005, and Steve Jobs is deciding between two prototypes for an Apple phone. His choice will go on to become perhaps the best-selling product ever. Now his team just has to make the touchscreen technology work.Thousands of miles away in Waterloo, Canada, Jim Balsillie and Mike Lazaridis can barely keep up with orders for BlackBerrys. But a scandal at the company blackens their reputation, and plants a seed of disaster between the two co-CEOs.Listen to new episodes 1 week early and to all episodes ad free with Wondery+. Join Wondery+ for exclusives, binges, early access, and ad free listening. Available in the Wondery App https://wondery.app.link/businesswars. Please support us by supporting our sponsors!Podium - Get started free today at podium.com/BWSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Trapped Under Plastic
Who Makes the Most Hobby Money in Kickstarter (Top 5)?

Trapped Under Plastic

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 117:50


On today's podcast Scott and Jon discuss the top grossing Kickstarter Campaigns for the miniature hobby! Support the Show on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/trappedunderplasticSupport the Show with Merch: https://teespring.com/stores/trapped-under-plasticFollow Jon: https://www.youtube.com/ninjonFollow Scott: https://www.youtube.com/miniacJoin the FB group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/395664561386239/Listen to the audio versons: http://www.trappedunderplastic.com/On patreon, we offer our patron's the ability to submit topics for us to discuss during a podcast, you get an extended version of the podcast, and you can submit miniatures for us to critique during an episode!Relevant LinksFor Kickstarter Links Click Here: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1-qM7_Gr1UzcR40EoJrbY8cfFxA-KLfYN/edit?usp=sharing&ouid=115933011857852654306&rtpof=true&sd=true Suckin' on My Tendies Song: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qr-sDJX72WYMiniac Tournament Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JgXMUPW6T8oThe Chef Mini: https://mindworkgames.net/collections/mindwork-originals/products/the-diner-at-the-end-of-the-galaxy-the-chefSpira Mirabilis Minis: https://www.spiramirabilisminiatures.com/home?page=2Broken Toad Bright Friday: https://www.brokentoad.co.uk/product-page/bright-friday-raffle-ticketJon's Army Painting Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kMvYPCQYApwScott's Bust Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MImbBm68Do8Warhammer Scented Candles: https://www.wargamer.com/warhammer-40k/scented-candles-revealRed Harvest: https://www.warhammer-community.com/2021/10/31/sunday-preview-time-to-reap-the-red-harvest/Wyrd Models: https://www.wyrd-games.net/news/2021/11/3/waldos-weekly-november-releasesArmy Painter Gamemaster Dungeons and Caverns Core Set: https://admin.thearmypainter.com/files/products/GM1001%20Dungeons%20and%20Caverns%20Core%20Set/GM1001%20Dungeons%20&%20Cavern%20Adventures%20-%20Promo%20pack-1%20copy.jpgMore News:Kill Team: https://www.games-workshop.com/en-CA/kill-team-chalnath-2021-engIconoclast Titan: https://www.warhammer-community.com/2021/11/03/behold-the-iconoclast-titan-weapons-that-can-fell-a-lesser-god-engine-in-one-swing/Waterloo: https://warlord-community.warlordgames.com/announcing-black-powder-epic-battles-waterloo/Riftforged Orcs: https://www.manticgames.com/news/riftforged-orcs-interview-with-matt-james-from-the-kings-of-war-rc/Raging Heroes Models: https://www.ragingheroes.com/collections/newReliquaries: Fantasy Dice Thrones & Metal Relic Dice Kickstarter: https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/dwarvenforge/reliquaries-hand-painted-dice-thrones-from-dwarven-forge?ref=discoveryStudio X: Mobile Miniature Painting Studio Kickstarter: https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/925919432/studio-x-mobile-painting-studio-0Mimics Upcoming Kickstarter: https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/philipreed/mimics-an-unnecessary-work-for-use-with-fantasy-rpgs?ref=discovery00:00 Start01:15 Preamble Ramble19:42 What We Painted37:24 Topic Discussion01:42:40 NewsSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/trappedunderplastic)

TRADCAST: The Traditional Roman Catholic Podcast

TRADCAST 031 (10 NOV 2021) Contents Segment 1: No exclusion or discrimination? Vatican hypocrisy at Francis' direction / From Benedict's Peace to Francis's War: Semi-Trads fight losing battle against Francis on Traditional Latin Mass / Are Canonizations Infallible?: Some thoughts on the Novus Ordo canonization controversy / Questions and answers on Vatican II: Word on Fire's "Bp." Robert Barron vs. The Remnant's Chris Jackson Segment 2: A fun game: "Pope" Francis vs. the Dalai Lama / Comments on Lecture "The Case for Sedevacantism" / Recent developments at One Peter Five and the tragic fall of Steve Skojec / Analysis and commentary on Pedro Gabriel's article "The Modernist Root of Radical Traditionalism" Total run time: 1 hr 24 min Links to Items mentioned in the Show & Related Information News Article: Carol Glatz, "Being ‘different' must never lead to exclusion, discrimination, pope says", Crux (Oct. 4, 2021) News Article: "Green Pass required for access into Vatican from 1 October", Vatican News (Sep. 20, 2021) News Article: Inés San Martín, "Vatican employees without COVID Green Pass risk not getting paid", Crux (Sep. 29, 2021) Resource: "Outbreak of SARS-CoV-2 Infections, Including COVID-19 Vaccine Breakthrough Infections, Associated with Large Public Gatherings — Barnstable County, Massachusetts, July 2021", Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (Aug. 6, 2021) Book: Peter A. Kwasniewski, ed., From Benedict's Peace to Francis's War: Catholics Respond to the Motu Proprio Traditionis Custodes on the Latin Mass (Kettering, OH: Angelico Press, 2021). Full disclosure: Novus Ordo Watch makes a small commission on purchases made through this Amazon link. Novus Ordo Watch, "The Traditional Mask is Off: Commentary on Francis' Move against the Latin Mass (PODCAST)" (July 16, 2021) Novus Ordo Watch, "Pope Pius XII on ‘Traditionis Custodes': The Authority of the Roman Pontiff over the Sacred Liturgy" (July 17, 2021) Novus Ordo Watch, "SSPX Superior General blasts ‘Traditionis Custodes': A Sedevacantist Critique" (July 23, 2021) Novus Ordo Watch, "Francis Watch, Episode 47: Francis' Attack on the Traditional Latin Mass" (July 24, 2021) Novus Ordo Watch, "MELTDOWN: Round-Up of Reactions to Francis' Suppression of the Traditional Latin Mass" (July 28, 2021) Novus Ordo Watch, "Free Transcript: Bp. Donald Sanborn analyzes ‘Traditionis Custodes' – PLUS: More Resources" (Sep. 28, 2021) Book: Peter A. Kwasniewski, ed., Are Canonizations Infallible?: Revisiting a Disputed Question (Waterloo, ON: Arouca Press, 2021). Full disclosure: Novus Ordo Watch makes a small commission on purchases made through this Amazon link. Resource: Vatican Booklet for Canonization of Paul VI (Oct. 14, 2018). Formula of canonization is found on page 42. Novus Ordo Watch, "Do Catholics have to Assent to Non-Infallible Church Teaching?" (Mar. 2, 2019). This post includes the full text of the article by Canon George Smith, “Must I Believe it?”, The Clergy Review, Vol. 6 (April, 1935). Catholic Resource: Henry Denzinger's Sources of Catholic Dogma (1954 ed.) Novus Ordo Watch, "The Impossibility of Judging or Deposing a True Pope" (Mar. 15, 2016) Church Document: Pope Pius XII, Encyclical Mystici Corporis (1943) Church Document: Pope Pius IX, Encyclical Quartus Supra (1873) Article: "Bishop" Robert Barron, "Vatican II FAQs", Word on Fire Article: Chris Jackson, "The True Vatican II FAQs", The Remnant (Aug. 18, 2020) Discourse: Antipope Paul VI, Allocution to the Consistory of May 24, 1976 Advertisement: To register your interest in joining the Suscipe Media team, please contact Suscipe Media by emailing info[AT]suscipemedia.com or using the “Contact Us” form on Suscipe Media's website here. Article: Ulf Jonsson, "Interview with Pope Francis on the Occasion of his Apostolic Trip to Sweden", La Civiltà Cattolica (Oct., 2016) Tweet: Dalai Lama, Oct. 15, 2021 Discourse: "His Holiness the Dalai Lama's Message to COP26" (Oct. 31, 2021) Novus Ordo Document: Antipope Francis, Apostolic Exhortation Evangelii Gaudium (Nov. 24, 2013) Tweet: Dalai Lama, Aug. 16, 2021 Lecture: Mario Derksen, "Eclipse of the Church: The Case for Sedevacantism" (CMRI Fatima Conference, Oct. 8, 2021). This lecture is also available on video here. The lecture can also be purchased on CD or on a flash drive. Article: Steve Skojec, "Stand Fast. The Storm Will Break", One Peter Five (Apr. 3, 2017) Novus Ordo Watch, "Anything but Sedevacantism! Analysis of a curious Phenomenon" (Apr. 25, 2017) Article: Pedro Gabriel, "The modernist root of radical traditionalism", Where Peter Is (July 14, 2021) Facebook Post: Matt Fradd quotes Rev. Mark Goring (May 27, 2021) Novus Ordo Document: Antipope John Paul II, Apostolic Letter Ecclesia Dei (July 2, 1988) Article: Fr. Anthony Cekada, "The Motu Mass Trap", TraditionalMass.org (July 7, 2007) Discourse: Antipope Francis, Homily at Gyumri, Armenia (June 25, 2016) Article: "Pope Francis: our faith is an encounter with Jesus", Vatican Radio (Apr. 24, 2015) Discourse: Antipope Francis, Message at Angelus (Oct. 10, 2021) Discourse: Antipope Francis, Catechesis at General Audience, Zenit (Jan. 22, 2020) Video: Rev. Michael Olson defines "Faith" on American Religious Town Hall (Mar. 3, 2014). The background to this video can be found in Peter Crenshaw, "Who Is Bishop Michael Olson?", The Remnant (Mar. 7, 2014). Support TRADCAST/NovusOrdoWatch by making a tax-deductible donation HERE Novus Ordo Watch, “Now What?” — Being a Real Catholic Today TRADCAST: Complete Episode List TRADCAST EXPRESS: Complete Episode List Follow Novus Ordo Watch on Twitter Follow TRADCAST on Twitter More Information at TRADCAST.org

The Agenda with Steve Paikin (Audio)
Can the North-South Climate Divide be Fixed?

The Agenda with Steve Paikin (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 35:31


With the UN Climate Change Conference (COP26) underway in Glasgow, Scotland, we take a closer look at how climate change is affecting the Global South, what a fair and just transition to renewable energy would entail, and how concerns from the Global South can be heard and addressed. Joining us from COP26 are Chido Muzondo, policy advisor, International Institute for Sustainable Development; Harjeet Singh, senior advisor, Climate Impacts, at the Climate Action Network International; Maisa Rojas, associate professor, Department of Geophysics at the University of Chile; and Sarah Burch, Canada research chair and executive director of the Interdisciplinary Centre on Climate Change at the University of Waterloo. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Top-Thema mit Vokabeln | Deutsch lernen | Deutsche Welle

Mit Songs wie „Dancing Queen“ und „Waterloo“ wurden ABBA zu Superstars. Nach fast 40 Jahren kehren die Schweden mit einem neuen Album auf die Bühne zurück. Alte und neue Fans auf der ganzen Welt sind begeistert.

Unsportsmanlike Conduct
Nov 5 Seg 1 - Live From The Doghouse Saloon!

Unsportsmanlike Conduct

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 18:47


We're live for the last time of the year from Doghouse Saloon in Waterloo!

Album 4 the Day
ABBA - Waterloo

Album 4 the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 9:43


Album 4 the Day - November 5, 2021 - Rock n Roll Hall of Famers - ABBA - Waterloo --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/album4theday/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/album4theday/support

Sustainability Leaders
Climate Change & Flood Risk: Implications for Real Estate Markets

Sustainability Leaders

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 38:04


Join George Sutherland, Climate Change and Sustainability Advisor at the BMO's Climate Institute and Blair Feltmate, Professor and Head of Intact Centre on Climate Adaptation at University of Waterloo, in part one of our Impacts of a Changing Climate series as they discuss how (and why) flooding has accelerated at an increasing rate, and how it's become not only an environmental issue, but a pressing economic and humanitarian issue as well.

Hustling Agent
Tips From TOP Real Estate Producer Ibrahim Hussein | The Hustling Agent

Hustling Agent

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 24:37


In this episode, the Hustling Agent sits down with Ibrahim Hussein from Waterloo, Ontario, Canada to talk about his experiences working with Keller Williams on the Affinity Real Estate Team. Ibrahim has been an agent for 5 years now, having previously worked as a lawyer. Ibrahim Hussein represents the Ontario region's finest properties with exceptional skill. His years of full-time experience have given him a clear understanding of the mindset of home buyers and sellers and a thorough understanding of the Canadian marketplace. Some of the things we talk about in this episode are: 1. We talk about Ibrahim moving to Canada from Egypt and becoming an agent 2. Why it's important to join the team that's right for you! 3. The exponential growth of the Affinity Team in Canada and so much more! Don't forget to watch the whole episode to listen to Ibrahim Hussein's incredible story, and to learn how you can create the same success for yourself! Thank you so so so much for watching, we hope you found this information valuable. Please consider liking and subscribing, we have lots of other videos just like this one, from agent tips to help you succeed, to way more agent interviews just like this one! Go check us out and as always, we'll see you next time!

The Kuhner Report
Waterloo in Virginia

The Kuhner Report

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 31:31


The Decibel
COP26 starts today – here's what's at stake

The Decibel

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 18:32


We've already warmed the climate by 1.1 C and we're starting to see the effects with more frequent extreme weather events. On Monday, political leaders from around the globe will address the world to talk about how they plan to tackle the immense challenge of climate change.Dr. Sarah Burch is a climate change researcher and an associate professor at the University of Waterloo. She is on the show today to discuss what to watch out for from COP26 and why – despite the complexity of the problem – she hasn't lost hope that we can still save the world from the worst effects of climate change.

The Current
Over a Barrel: Supporting workers and limiting climate change in Canada's fossil fuel transition

The Current

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 74:39


We bring you a special show this morning called Over a Barrel. It's about the challenge of a just transition in Canada's energy sector, supporting those who work in it and limiting the worst effects of climate change. We talk to Travis Hann, a pipe fitter from Newfoundland who works in an oil patch near Fort McMurray, Alta; and Randall Benson, who used to work in the oilsands as an electrician. He now works in solar energy and helps other workers transition. Then, we hear from Sadie Vipond, a 15-year-old climate activist from Calgary, who joins us from her first day at the COP26 climate summit in Glasgow. Plus, long-time environmentalist Tzeporah Berman discusses a bold proposal, the Fossil Fuel Non-Proliferation Treaty Initiative; and Chief Sustainability Officer at Suncor Energy Martha Hall Findlay argues that addressing the use of fossil fuels is only part of the solution. In Estevan, Sask., Executive Director of the Chamber of Commerce Jackie Wall discusses efforts to help the many members of her community who work in the local coal mine and two major coal-fired power stations. And is Canadian oil and gas really ready for transition? We ask Jackie Forrest, executive director of the ARC Energy Research Institute, which provides analysis of energy trends to investors and corporate leaders; David Yager, an oil industry consultant and the author of From Miracle to Menace: Alberta, A Carbon Story; and Angela Carter, a professor of political science at the University of Waterloo who studies the economic and ecological risks of fossil fuel dependence.

il posto delle parole
Arianna Arisi Rota "Il cappello dell'imperatore"

il posto delle parole

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 22:47


Arianna Arisi Rota"Il cappello dell'Imperatore"Storia, memoria e mito di Napoleone Bonaparte attraverso due secoli di culto dei suoi oggettiDonzelli Editorehttps://www.donzelli.it/Il collezionismo napoleonico cominciò all'alba del 19 giugno 1815 sul campo di battaglia di Waterloo e da allora non si è più fermato, contagiando per due secoli le personalità più disparate, da Lord Byron fino a Stanley Kubrick, che per il suo film mancato, quello appunto su Napoleone, realizzò una monumentale ricerca. Del resto, basta scorrere i cataloghi delle case d'aste e delle mostre per cogliere la persistenza del flusso emotivo, oltre che del valore economico, veicolato dai reperti del political drama più avvincente del XIX secolo. Ma gli oggetti ossessionarono lo stesso Napoleone, il quale nel testamento elencò gli effetti personali che desiderava fossero consegnati soprattutto al figlio: oltre a oggetti prevedibili come armi, uniformi e libri, orologi e argenteria varia, anche una collezione di tabacchiere, e poi il lavabo della camera da letto, un bidè d'argento dorato, i letti e i materassi usati a Sant'Elena, sino alla biancheria intima. Nel 1821 fu il suo corpo a diventare oggetto di culto: maschere funebri e presunti calchi di dita circolarono in una capillare operazione di commercializzazione e giunsero fino nelle Americhe, proiettando oltre oceano il mito innescato dalla nostalgia borghese e dal rimpianto dei veterani. Tra memoria, feticismo e necrofilia, il volume racconta il fenomeno di merchandising destinato al pubblico globale assetato di tracce materiali legate alla persona e al privato di Napoleone. Fiume carsico carico di simbologia, la cultura materiale napoleonica incentrata sui resti, sulle reliquie e sui cimeli fornisce consistenza tattile e visiva al mito, capace così di rinnovarsi in una «geografia del desiderio» globale e senza tempo. Nel bicentenario della morte dell'imperatore dei francesi, questo libro, arricchito da un curioso apparato iconografico – in cui il lettore potrà scoprire alcuni «feticci» dell'epopea –, porta l'onda lunga dell'epica napoleonica sino ai nostri giorni, dimostrando quanto essa ancora ci appartenga.Arianna Arisi Rota è professore ordinario di Storia contemporanea nel Dipartimento di Scienze politiche e sociali dell'Università degli Studi di Pavia. Si è occupata di diplomazia nell'Italia napoleonica, di mobilitazione politica giovanile nell'Ottocento europeo, di costruzione della memoria post-risorgimentale. Tra le sue monografie: I piccoli cospiratori. Politica ed emozioni nei primi mazziniani (il Mulino, 2010), 1869: il Risorgimento alla deriva. Affari e politica nel caso Lobbia (il Mulino, 2015), Risorgimento. Un viaggio politico e sentimentale (il Mulino, 2019).IL POSTO DELLE PAROLEascoltare fa pensarehttps://ilpostodelleparole.it/

Nostalgie - Le Top 5
La playlist des autres chansons d'ABBA

Nostalgie - Le Top 5

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 2:11


Dernier jour pour gagner votre séjour à Paris pour découvrir en VIP le nouvel album d'Abba ! Pour ça il suffit d'appeler le 39.37 dès que vous entendez deux chansons d'Abba...Et y'a pas que Waterloo, Dancing Queen et Gimme Gimme !

Working Capital The Real Estate Podcast
Real Estate Financing, Development and Student Housing, with Andrew Drexler | EP76

Working Capital The Real Estate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 46:31


Andrew Drexler has been a Part of the First National Financial Commercial Team for over 15 years, and has Originated more than $4 billion in Commercial Financing. In 2020 alone, his team funded over $1 billion in Commercial Mortgages, of which $822 million represented transactions in Ontario and $236 million Represented Transactions in Quebec In this episode we talked about: Andrew's Bio & Background The Real Estate Market Liquidity Debt Markets and Financing of Projects The Retail Real Estate Outlook Remote VS Onsite Work Real Estate Risks and Opportunities Underwriting Apartment Buildings Condo Development The Student Rental Market Canadian and US Real Estate Mentorship, Resources and Lessons Learned Useful links: https://www.linkedin.com/in/andrewdrexler/?originalSubdomain=ca https://www.firstnational.ca/contact-us Transcription: Jesse (0s): Welcome to the working capital real estate podcast. My name is Jesper galley. And on this show, we discuss all things real estate with investors and experts in a variety of industries that impact real estate. Whether you're looking at your first investment or raising your first fund, join me and let's build that portfolio one square foot at a time, or at least an in gentlemen, my name Jessica galley, and you're listening to working capital the real estate podcast. Our special guest today is Andrew Drexler. Andrew has been part of the first national financial commercial team for over 20 years.   Now, for those of you that don't know first national is one of Canada's largest non-bank mortgage lenders offering both commercial mortgages and resident residential mortgage solutions. And correct me if I'm wrong, Andrew, I believe you said that we're over 10 billion in, in mortgage originations.   Andrew (50s): It's going to be pretty close to 10 billion for this year. Yes, we're on the commercial side. It's going to be a very exciting year.   Jesse (56s): Well, first of all, thank you so much for coming on. It's it's great that you're being generous with your time. How you doing today?   Andrew (1m 2s): My pleasure. Good. Thank you. It's a beautiful fall day in Toronto right now. I love fall. It's my favorite season. So it's a beautiful day   Jesse (1m 9s): Transience of that fall season. We get it for such a small amount of time. That makes it so good. Well, it is a, it is false. Yeah, no, absolutely. I appreciate that. It is fall. It's a leaves home opener today. So at least versus Canadians for the hockey fans out there. What we do with, with guests that we have on first and foremost, Andrews, we like listeners to get a little bit of a background into, you know, how you got into the, the real estate space, maybe a little bit of, of your background and how you ended up where you are today.   Andrew (1m 44s): Sure. So, you know, I first got introduced to real estate actually, when I came as a 14 year old immigrant to Canada for Romania, with my family. And it was the first time it occurred to me that you have to pay rent to live somewhere. And I thought that was quite interesting. So I guess I went to school at the university of Toronto and upon graduating, I was very fortunate to meet more the co-founder of first national and, you know, he's a legendary figure in our industry.   He's been a great mentor for me now for 20 years. And so early on in my career Morty and I were looking after one of our largest clients from Israel who came into Canada and bought a lot of real estate in a very short period of time. And so early on, I was exposed to all the different asset classes and because they were short-staffed here, we did a lot for them, not just the financing, but a lot of the acquisition work and due diligence work, you know, and that gave me a really good understanding of both the equity and the debt side. So it's been, it's been a really amazing ride really for the last 20 years, we've worked on some really exciting deals, mixed use deals, construction loans, and pretty much every asset class.   So it's been, it's been quite an interesting last 20 years. We've seen a lot for sure. And you know, I'm excited about where the Canadian industry is. I mean, there, we see a lot of changes, but we also have some challenges going forward. So I think overall though, the industry, the Canadian real estate industry is in a pretty good space   Jesse (3m 12s): For sure. And in terms of coming out of the university of Toronto going, you know, meeting, meeting the, you know, the head of first national, was that your first path into real estate or was there, was there other companies that you work for prior to, to first national?   Andrew (3m 26s): No, that was my first. That was my first job out of university. It was, I was, I was quite lucky. Actually. I started a business lab in university, which led me to meet somebody who then introduced me to the Maury and went, you know, it, this is how the opportunity came about. And it's been, it's been a great opportunity that I really appreciated, you know, first actually has been just such a gold standard in the mortgage industry, Steven Smith and Moya Taz. And they've done a great job of being at the forefront of innovation. And, you know, like you said earlier, I mean, we're going to be close to $10 billion of new mortgages originated this year on the commercial side, the single family side is, is a leader in its space as well.   So we get a really good look at what's going on in the industry, you know, both from the commercial side and the, the, the, I guess the single family side and just the strength and the health of the overall industry. From that perspective,   Jesse (4m 18s): I'm curious to ask, I mean, it's not often you have a seasoned vet. That's been with a company like first national from inception in terms of the, the background that you've seen over the years, first National's evolution to, to what the different places that they lend within the capital stack. How has that evolved over your career there?   Andrew (4m 36s): So we used to be predominantly an apartment lender on the I'm only going to speak from the commercial side cause that's where, where I work, but we are mostly an apartment lender and now we've become, you know, we do retail, we do office, we do self storage, we do student housing and retirement. We've really become a very balanced lender. This is a time. I mean, there's definitely a lot of liquidity in the markets, both for on the equity side and on the debt side, it's a great time to be a borer. If you have existing assets, it's a very difficult time to be a developer, looking for land, looking for new projects, you know, it's become tougher and tougher to make money in real estate, both buying and developing.   But if you do have an existing portfolio, it's a very good time and there's so much liquidity. I don't think I've ever seen this much liquidity in our market, again, both from the, the equity and the debt side.   Jesse (5m 28s): So how has the last year, well, almost two years now, this environment that we've, we find ourselves in, how has that, if, if it has at all changed the way that you look at the debt markets, the way that you look at financing of projects, you know, anything different philosophies changed over the, over the last 18 to 24 months?   Andrew (5m 51s): You know, it's a good question. So I think we've been surprised at how certain asset classes have held up. I think at, you know, we were worried about apartment owners and, and, you know, we were wondering whether people are going to lose their jobs and not be able to pay their rents. And the apartment sector has held up incredibly well. You know, I mean, the government's done their job to, to support people and then people to their credit have done a great job of maintaining their rent payments and not defaulting there. I think, you know, rebel is had its challenges.   You know, obviously people shop differently. Now. I think people are spending less, I think on the office side it's yet to be determined, right? I mean, I, I'm a big believer in the return of the downtowns. I think, you know, we've seen apartment vacancies in the downtown core across Canada go from 0% to 15% almost overnight. I think we're starting to see the return now and nobody's really back at work, but very small people are, people are back in the office. I think that we will go back fairly quickly. I'm so bullish on, on the Canadian major cities.   I mean, I just think when I look around the world, I, I wouldn't rather be, I wouldn't be anywhere else really than, than here. So I think there's a big draw from an immigration perspective, economic perspective, our, our political system is good. Are healthcare systems good or universities are good. So I think, you know, Canada will continue to be a strong point of, of, of entry, you know, industrial of course has been booming. And so that's, we all know that everybody's looking for, for industrial space and, and rents and values and land and cap rates.   Everything is it's at an all time high cap rates at an all time low, of course. So the Canadian market is held up really well. I, I would say my biggest worry is really more around the retail side. I think the, the office side will rebound and I think the office sector for the most part is owned by very large institutional players that have a deep pockets. I think on the retail side, I'm more concerned about, you know, when you lose the mom and pop tenants and when you see some of the anchors that are maybe downsized or not quite taken up as much space, I'm not sure that there's a long list of replacement tenants that are waiting in the wings.   You know, in previous years or decades, there's always somebody new coming out of the U S there's always somebody new coming out of Europe. We just don't seem that anymore. And I'm just worried that that rents probably in the long-term are going to be flat lower than where they are today. And that's assuming the occupancy stays at the level that it's at, but overall the market has been good. I think you certainly put more emphasis now on the strength of the bore and their cashflow abilities. You know, it used to be that somebody got, they had a good net worth, they're good to go, but now it's, you know, they own a bunch of different plazas and they're not quite getting their full, you know, a hundred percent of rent that they used to collect.   So can they still support the loan or what happens when their loans roll over? And they start all of a sudden going to a higher interest rate, you know, which is the next point, which is, you know, I do think unfortunately we're in for a, a period of rising interest rates. I do think that everywhere you look, you know, it screams inflation, and eventually that's going to make its way into the interest rate environment. You know, there's talk about one a day data being, being slowed down or reduced at all levels and malt and other, you know, many countries.   And I think that that ultimately will put pressure on bond yields to move up, which will result in higher interest rates are interest rates can lead to higher cap rates, you know, maybe a reduction in values. And again, the cash flow is, is a big concern. So we're definitely, stress-testing our borders a little bit more, and we're looking very closely at the ability of the property as well to, to support their, that they plan on taking   Jesse (9m 32s): Yeah, in terms of a lot there. But for, for the particular asset class, I'm curious with retail, as you know, we've seen, I think whether in the states, whether it's 26 or 27 square feet per person per capita, and we're somewhere 16 and then, you know, European countries, sub 10. So all that to say that we, you know, a lot of real estate or retail, I think that even prior to COVID, we, we knew it was overbuilt, but now really getting granular. And the ones that at least we see is that the grocery anchored or the good anchor tenant malls or areas experiential areas I think are going to be positive.   But when it comes to you looking at retail as an asset class, are you looking, you know, with much more emphasis on the credit worthiness of, of the tenants and what that tenant profile looks like?   Andrew (10m 21s): Yeah. I think it's, it's the long-term stability of that tenant and trying to anticipate what their long-term needs are going to be. So, you know, when I look at a Canadian tire, when I look at a Walmart, Walmart, which used to be obviously the gold standard, and you have one of those in your Plaza and don't even have to worry about the rest of the tenant roster. I think you, you try to say now, well, where would they be in five years? Do they still need that kind of footprint? Is there a chance that, you know, we're competing with their own sites and they go somewhere else because they need more or less, you know?   And then when you look at the, the, the rest of the tenants and you look at their rents and you even look at the renewal rates, like, are they really going to be getting those rents? You know, considering that, you know, they spend more on cleaning, they spend more on staff, they're doing a little bit less business than they used to. You know, certainly if you go into the mall and all of a sudden you're allowing two people per store, four people per store, you know, what does that do to their bottom line? It's got to impacted, right? And then you add in, again, the extra cleaning Dexter wages, certainly the profit is going to be decreasing.   You start thinking about supply chain issues, you know, where they're getting their, their items that they're selling their merchandise. Does that cost them more? Are they still able to get it on time again, that affects their profit, which ultimately for them to stay afloat, do you need to come back to your landlord and say, Hey, I'm sorry, guys. I want to stay open, but I need to pay a little bit less. So I think it's more about not just happens right now, but it's really what happens two to five years from now. That's really important from a tenant by tenant perspective.   Jesse (11m 56s): Yeah. That makes sense. In moving over onto that office side, do you, do you, well, I'll say this, do you subscribe to the, this, this idea? I think I'm, I'm partial to, I'm also, you know, obviously biased in, in the Toronto downtown market, but the idea that I think that 24 hour cities are going to come back, whether it's the new Yorks, the Las Vancouver, Toronto, I think suburban offices have held up decently. I think it's, it's a lot of the mid tier, you know, the, the class B class C in mid markets that I think are going to be the questionable questionable office is the ones that aren't connected to the suburbs through transportation.   Like you just, you know, having a car and the ones that aren't downtown connected via all the transit that we have here. What are your thoughts on that?   Andrew (12m 43s): You know, for me, the question is about when people are going to feel comfortable being on public transit, right? So I'm a huge believer in that downtown. I'm a huge believer in, in, you know, not just the hybrid model, but a return to work model, because I truly think people need to be around others to brainstorm, to be more creative, to be more productive. I know we've all been very productive for the last year and a half, but the reality is everything's been shut down. You've had nothing to do blood work, you know, but now as things open up, you know, it's easy to, to, you know, not feel as, you know, energetic or enthusiastic plus you've been, you've been locked up at home for awhile.   You know, when you come into the office, is it just a certain level of energy that, that kicks in, right. And I think for the young people, not that, that I'm so old, but for the young people, you really need to be around to hear what's going on, to learn about deals, to learn about what's going on in the market. You just don't get that from the home. And so I do think the office market will come back strongly in the downtowns across Canada. I just, for me, the question is more, is this six months? Is it a year, is a year and a half. And I think the answer depends on when will people feel comfortable being on transit.   Cause you know, everybody thinks they're going to drive into work. I tell you I live 15 minutes away and it takes me 45 minutes now to drive in with 5% of the people being downtown. And so once everybody's back to work, it's just no chance I'm doing a drive in and out of downtown. So, but I I'm a such a believer in the return of the downtowns and, and it goes the same for buildings, right? I mean, people are not going to be working, living in the suburbs for the rest of their lives. You know, if you have family, that's a different story, but the young people, again, who may be moved home or, or bought a place for our way that I just think they'll, they'll want to come back into the downtown, you know, and once their friends are back and the energy's back, you want to be in and around the downtown.   And you know, that will signify the return of that 24 hour city that you're talking about.   Jesse (14m 38s): Yeah. I think that's born out by most of our experience that we've had with our office. We've, we've opened in October, so not too long ago, officially on, on kind of a rotational basis. And there's definitely that feeling that vibe, you know, just kind of interoffice sports are kind of slowly coming back. And I really felt during COVID or that at least the beginning, I really felt for the individuals that were associates and analysts just coming into our industry only, you know, the time where you should be making the most connections speaking with the most people, they were kind of forced to be at home during that time.   Andrew (15m 12s): Yeah. It's very difficult that you just can't learn the same way when you're at home. You know, you try, I mean, I have a team of analysts and you know, we try to get them on calls. You're calling your client, you get them on, but sometimes you don't get the client, you hang up, they call you back. You can't quite just say, hang on, let me put my house on line. And these are learning opportunities where you just around people and you learn, I mean, I've learned so much by, you know, the, the predecessors or the people that are still our company that had been there before me just listening to them. You know, that's how you learn how to talk to clients. You learn what to say, what not to say, you know, you learn about stuff that's going on in the market.   I mean, these are really valuable things that I really hope that the young people see the value in that. And they forget that it's been easy to work in your jogging pants and, you know, get a workout in, in the middle of the day. But hopefully you'll you realize that the importance of, of being in the office?   Jesse (15m 59s): Yeah. I think the interface, zoom, whatever it is, teams it's, they've got, they've done well, but there's definitely those subtleties. I, in terms of, you know, you mentioned interest rates, you know, I think it kind of went under reported with the fed kind of decoupling their, their target inflation. I'm I'm assuming I, I should be, I should be more up on this for the Canadian side of things, but I assume that we will follow something similar to what what's going on in the states right now you mentioned inflation and, and as a result of eventual, upward pressure on interest rates, how do you view, how do you analyze that?   How do you approach that when from a, from a lending point of view?   Andrew (16m 39s): So I think the challenges with the construction projects, you know, where you have, you're trying to underwrite the future value of the asset upon completion. And you're trying to peg a certain interest rate, a certain ceiling rates that you cannot exceed. So you're structuring your construction financing based on the end value. When you have a certain rate that you can't, when you convert to the term that you cannot exceed. And so, you know, the challenge with, with apartment construction is that the projects take so much longer than they used to.   You know, you start off with approval is taking years now, too. So the pre-development takes a lot longer. The construction is taking longer and you know, whether it's COVID related, whether it's supply global supply chain, disruptions related, you know, everything is taking longer. And so, you know, now you're looking at a project that could be five, six years before you get to completion. So we're essentially trying to peg where the interest rates are going to be in five or six years, because that's what we've tied our construction loan to. So I think that's, to me where I have the biggest concerns, we mitigate that by saying, you know, we're really just focusing on large bores that have liquid assets and very good cash flow in their portfolio.   But a lot of these apartment projects are getting to be very significant. I mean, we're doing projects that are, you know, $200 million upwards of $200 million. That's a lot of exposure. You know, you have a, a 50% basis point 50 basis point rise in interest rates, which could impact your cap rate by 25 basis points. You know, that's a lot of, that's a, that's a big value of sling. And I think if you try to say, look, you know, we're going to increase the interest rate in our underwriting by 50 basis points per year. Or if you're trying to Peggy at five years out, that's two and a half percent.   There's no chance that anything today is going to cover. So it's, it's a bit of a balance, right? But I think the biggest challenges in the multifamily sector, I think, you know, industrial, not so much office, but industrial and retail, usually construction is a lot shorter. And usually you have your leases done right at the beginning. So you don't even have to worry about leasing risk at the end. So it's merely just pegging your construction risk and then how quickly you can turn out the debt. But I think apartments though, you do have some, some serious interest rate.   Jesse (18m 53s): Yeah. At least with industrial construction too. I mean, it's a slab of concrete at, at a certain point. And the, the, the construction itself is simpler. I'm curious, Andrew, when it comes to the underwriting of apartment buildings, for those that don't know that the Canadian market is a bit unique, especially in comparison to the states. A lot of our apartments stock is older stock in terms of the actual, when, you know, when you hear that there's a class, a class apartments in whether, you know, it's in Miami or Boston, we really started building a class not very long ago.   So the projects that, that you would finance or that you would look at geographically, where do you find them clustering and what type of, what type of assets in the apartments fear are you financing? Are you lending on?   Andrew (19m 40s): So there it's our asset class that, that transacts the most. So there is a lot of capital chasing apartments. So the existing portfolios are being bought the existing older buildings. There there's a lot of demand for them. There are a lot of international players that are a lot of Canadian REITs. There are a lot of wealthy families and investors that are still looking to acquire multi reds in Canada. And so that's good because you know where your debt is today, and it's been very cheap.   And so you can lock into a 10 year rate and still get some pretty attractive returns. We send a lot of new rental development over the past five years. And the reason for that is because, you know, it used to be that interest rates were high and rents were low, right? We had rent control for many years and there was no incentive to build apartment buildings. And like you said, the apartment stock in our country is very old and we hadn't had new construction for a very long time. And so the shift happened when interest rates started going lower and lower to the point where we were at historically low levels, the financing environment became a lot more conducive to new development.   And a key part for me was that the tenant profile had changed. So tenants right now, whether you're dealing with retirees cashing in, on their home equity, young professionals that either can't afford or don't want to buy a house right now, or international students, these are very sophisticated pennants that have said, you know, I want a nice building. I want a superior HVAC system. I want amenities like rooftop, patios, and barbecue areas where we can entertain friends. I want gyms in our building. And so this level of demand from the tenants has driven the, the, the, the increase in supply of new apartment buildings.   Now, not all new apartments have been luxury. You know, we've built, you know, call it no frills, new apartment buildings as well. You know, new apartment buildings that maybe don't have the same level of amenities. And we've built those, not just in the major cities, on the major transit nodes, but on the outskirts as well. And so those have been really well received. So I think to your point, our rental stock is very old. And anything new that has been brought into the market has been received very well, because there are lots of people that have the ability to pay more for their rent and want to live in nice places.   And, you know, frankly, the units have gotten smaller, but that's okay because you live in a brand new, beautiful building. And again, you have these great amenities and you have people over, they're not going to be in your, an apartment. They're going to be in the, in the common areas. And so we've seen a lot of new developments in, in that sector. The challenge now is will that continue going forward? And I think, you know, the demand side is definitely there. I think the challenge is in those risks that we're talking about, namely interest rate risks, the fact that the projects have taken longer, they're becoming bigger.   And with the construction costs today, escalating rapidly, you know, the returns are now getting to that point where they don't really make sense. And so this all leads to this affordability crisis that we have in Canada, which is both the home ownership, we're home on affordability issue and the lack of affordability on the rental side. And the challenge is that people don't understand that the issue is a supply issue. It's not a matter of cap, the rents, you can increase rents anymore, or you can't get rid of and evictions.   It's not that the issue is that we don't have enough supply and pre COVID. We were pretty close to 0% vacancy rate across the country. Most cities we're going to get there again, as soon as immigration opens up, as soon as the international students are coming back, as soon as people come back into downtowns to the office, that vacancy rate goes back to zero. And yet here we are with facing a, an, an affordability issue again. And so we need to find a way to solve that.   Jesse (23m 28s): Yeah, I think that is kind of the knee, knee jerk reaction. It's it's these symptoms. I think of the problem that you, you go to like rent evictions or these, these type of things where it's it's, the constraint is supply. And I I'd like to get your thoughts just on the, the history, at least of our market. A lot of it has been this shadow market of condo development, being a proxy or a replacement for what should be purpose-built apartment buildings, people that are fully intending on, on renting. Is that, is that dynamic, do you think that's still happening and will happen between the two asset classes and maybe just a follow-up to that?   If so, is that because of the, the ability to build condos is regulatorily easier than, than a purpose-built right now,   Andrew (24m 18s): I'd say that's a complicated question. So I think traditionally, it was easier to do condos because, you know, you would pre-sell, you would have a certain profit built in there and then you'd go get your financing. And then you start construction. You also had a very level of construction industry where costs were an escalating, like they are today. And your, your development timeframe was a lot shorter than it is today. So it was fairly cookie cutter in that once you, the risk was in picking a site in and getting the pre-sales done, once you did your pre-sales and you locked in your profit, then it was just a matter of building it out.   And it was fairly straightforward. The challenge now on the condo side is that, you know, as a lender, I don't even know if I want our borders to pre-sale or to pre-sell the full, you know, 75 or 80% of the building to cover a loan because frankly cost escalations are so high that it's going to eat them through their profit pretty quickly. And then I don't really want them losing their motivation halfway through the project where we funded half. And now all of a sudden there's no profit left. So it's, it's very challenging as a lender to decide, you know, what do you want, do you want pre-sales or not?   Having said that the price is the sale price is seemed to continue to escalate and costs are not slowing down. And, but the, the sales side is not slowing down either. So you're seeing sale prices per square foot that are getting higher and higher in Toronto. So condo projects right now still make sense. The challenge is that the rental side no longer makes sense. And so we need to find a way to continue to enhance, you know, entice, I guess, developers to build the, you know, rental product because we need it.   But I think the difference between the two, I mean, personally, I would rather be in a, in a purpose still rent the building. You've got professional management, you've got a building full of renters that are going to be there. Long-term with the condos, there's constant turnover. People aren't as careful with the buildings, you know, it's just not the same crowd, but having said that they both been successful. And so that tells you that there's a lot of demand for whether it's condos or whether it's new rentals. The idea is that people want to live in newer, nicer buildings with nicer amenities.   And so right now the condo market seems to be really strong. Again, the rental market seems to be picking up as well again. And I think longterm they're both going to continue to be successful. The challenge is, will there be enough enticement to the developers to build rental, or are people all just going to, to condos now and be selling that because you can still make it work from a condo perspective.   Jesse (26m 49s): And as, as asset value is safer, multifamily increase and, and net operating income also continues to increase. Where do we hit that point of like that unaffordable point? And I guess more importantly from a policy perspective, w what do we do to, to ameliorate that aspect of, of what looks like the direction our market's going in?   Andrew (27m 12s): So I think the challenge is, so right now you have a federal government that has a very strong immigration platform, which is great for the economy, which is great for housing. It's really good all around. I mean, you know, as a, as a fellow immigrant, I know that people come here because they want a better life, right? So they come and they want to work hard and they want to, you know, own something, their house or a business. And so it adds a lot of value to the economy. So you want to continue to encourage that. So the federal government has done that. They're also offering financing through groups like CMAT, you know, to encourage development, the provinces are doing their part because they're giving grants at different levels.   And the municipalities are trying as well. They're, they're waiving development charges for affordable units. They're waiving taxes. The problem is that they're operating independently. And as a group, they need to come together to, to sacrifice a little bit more to say, what is it that we can each give up in order to balance the equation that the developers have? Because right now, what the government is offering is not enough to support for the development. I mean, these developers are building two, three, 4% cap rates.   And again, with the longer timeframe, and you were saying five, six years, by the time you're fully leased, that's a lot of time to wait and a lot of risks from an interest rate perspective and cap rate perspective and ultimately valuation perspective. So, you know, if it's barely interesting right now for developer to build, and they're only doing two or three, 4% cap rate, and that's assuming that everything pans out, you're just going to lose them, right? And so what can we do? We need to come together. We need to shorten from a municipal perspective, we need the shorter shorten approval times, you know, approve or reject an application within six months.   It can take two years, you know, maybe entice them, give them more density, but they have to build a certain amount affordable. But then you waive development charges on the full building, not just on the units that are affordable. Maybe you wave Realty taxes on the whole building, not just on the affordable units. These are things that, that have to happen in order for us to, to stimulate development. I mean, ultimately, look, if you're a developer, you have two sides of the equation, right? You have the development side, which right now costs are through the roof, and you need to reduce that.   And so from a government perspective, you can only help with agency self-assessment tax, where you can help out by waving or reducing development charges, or by, by maybe subsidizing land. But then once it's built on the operational side, if you're trying to put a cap on the rent that they can charge, and you're trying to entice them to reduce the rent to an affordable level, you have certain expense line items that can be adjusted. You can't adjust, you can't adjust insurance, which is going through the roof as well. You can't adjust wages.   I mean, again, huge inflationary pressures on wages and the staff. And so the only thing you can do is you can adjust Realty taxes, which is the municipality. So this is my point. Like the, you have to look at both sides, the development costs and the operational side, and, and is at all levels of government, we have to come together and we have to piece it to then entice these developers to provide more housing, which then in turn will, will alleviate your, your housing problem.   Jesse (30m 28s): Yeah, that's interesting because even on the office side, I think they've phased most of them out, but the tiger grants that we have where we're the tax incremental aspects of, of basically assisting whether it was developers or large tendencies with, with the tax piece, it's like, that's only one piece of the equation. And it's funny, we had, we had John Love on the program and other, you know, big name in Canadian commercial real estate, who said the same thing. It was a coordination problem with, with the different provinces that, you know, people need to be talking collectively and, and the federal government and the provinces need to need to work at this project.   Not, not unilaterally, but together. I'm curious if you want to pivot to an asset class. That was how I got started into, into the industry. And I know it's something that I wanted to chat with you about on the student residence, a student rental market in general, I think at the beginning of COVID just like you were mentioning before with our thoughts that apartments might be, you know, might be in trouble. And then it turns out they did pretty well compared to the comparatively. My first thought was when this happened, the first few months was that student rentals were going to get hit the hardest, just in, just in virtue of the nature of the pandemic.   How, how has the student rental market been, what, what has been the experience that you've seen over the last year or two?   Andrew (31m 47s): You know, I think as an asset class, they struggled a little bit and, and frankly, you know, they did because all of a sudden they had no students, right. And, and in the privately owned residences, you know, people stayed in, they weren't sure if they should go home or not. I think in the ones that were either owned by a university or managed by a university, you know, they allowed people to leave and basically let them walk out of their leases. But that's, to me was a shorter blimp. I mean, I absolutely love this asset class. I think it's got the most upside in, in Canadian real estate, you know, student housing to me, you know, when you think of it back when you're younger than me, but when we used to go to school, it was cinder blocks.   It was ugly buildings. It was, you know, poor locations, you know, the, the knock on it was you had eight month leases and you had kids that would just trash the place, right. I mean, that is completely gone. Now, you know, we do so much student housing at first Nash. Then I tell you, these buildings are unbelievable. I mean, you'll have, first of all, the wifi, capacity's huge. And it's the number one, you know, by far most important element in, in the decision of a, of a student. So that's different. They have amenities like gyms and, and, you know, again, these rooftop patios and study rooms and indoor parking and 24 hour security.   So that's from a tenant perspective, it's a dream they're located very close to campus in most cases. And from an operational perspective, I mean, these kids are now, they realize how lucky they are to be in those places. Their 12 month leases, they have parental guarantees. Sometimes they have cross tenant guarantees. So there's no issues with damage. And, and from a demand perspective, there's so much demand, you know, we have, we're, Canada's huge for international students. You know, I'm not sure if you know, but there, I think that the number is 5 million international students and Canada's third behind the U S and Australia.   Our education system is amazing. Our universities are ranked really well in the world. And so there's a lot of demand for these universities. Most of the students that are coming in have money there for them, whether they're paying $750 per month or $800, it doesn't really move the needle too much. And so you have really strong demand and equally important is the fact that it's the one asset class that is a great protection for inflation, right? Because you have 50% turnover every year.   And so unlike retail or industrial or office where you're locked into long-term leases for apartments, where you're maybe five to 10% turnover per year in student housing, you get 50% turnover. So it's the only asset class that allows you to truly capture the inflation should that materialize. So I think from a demand perspective, you're good from an operational perspective, you're good from a inflation perspective, you good? So I I'm very bullish on, on student housing and the quality of these purpose-built buildings are very high.   I mean, as a, as a parent, I can tell you that if my choice was a basement apartment for my kids with three other friends or one of those buildings, it's a no brainer we try to take and I'd be happy to pay more.   Jesse (34m 53s): Yeah, for sure. And I think when I started investing, it was in Waterloo. I went to school out there and that was, I think, kind of when I was finishing, they started to build these purpose built and, you know, pool rooms, gyms, like, eh, like everything you're describing here. And then the other piece is even compared to, in juxtaposition to regular apartments, where you have tenants that will stay in because we still have rent stabilization in Ontario or rent control in Ontario, you have the turnover. So you have the natural mark to market with, with the rents with student rentals that I think gets overlooked probably through the haze of this idea that students are just trashing these places, which it, you know, if you see, if you see the way that they're built today is not the case.   I'm curious when you are for student rentals, because you see a lot of these companies in, in the, in the states and in Canada that are signing up, sorry, they're, they're buying properties, they're developing them. And then they're actually taking on the property management of the companies. Is that, is that something that's being looked at holistically when you're underwriting those deals?   Andrew (35m 59s): Yeah. I mean, look much like seniors, housing, student housing is very much an operational business. So, you know, as much as I love the asset class, I think the caveat is you have to know what you're doing from an operational perspective. I mean, there's a different level of rapport you have to have with your tenants. You interact a lot more. They're very spontaneous. They want things immediately, right? Like they can't, I have a request for something to be fixed and you get two days later, it has to be immediate. You have to address things right away. So there's a different dynamic with your tenants at the same time.   Look, you are getting substantially higher rents because of this. So there's very much an operational component to the business. And I think the good operators don't know how to do that. And they can create synergies, especially if they have a larger portfolio. And so that's really important. So we do look at who the operator is, and it does make a difference that, you know, you're not a one-off and you understand what it's like to be and manage that asset class. You know, I think the more and more we're seeing consolidation in that as well.   I mean, we're, we're, you know, we're happy to have, you know, aligned with some Woodburn who are the top two operators in that field, and we can see how great they are managing their portfolio, because they understand again, how to manage. And they create synergies by having so many buildings in that, you know, a new player out of the U S Harrison street there they're coming in as well. And they've had experienced operating student housing in the U S so you're starting to see international interest in this asset class. You know, there's, there's squad Rio there, RBC, there are people that are large Canadian institutional investors, CPP, you know, who have large international portfolios, and they've never come into the Canadian market because it was too fragmented and it was too small.   And you know, now that there'll be some amalgamation now that you're starting to see players develop bigger portfolios, I think there'll be more interest because somebody that's large can come in and buy a large portfolio versus the one-off, which again is not going to move the needle. So, you know, again, I love the asset class, but I think it's, it's really important to understand the operational aspect of it, to know that what you, you know, when you're going into it, you need really need to know what you're, what you're doing and how you're dealing with   Jesse (38m 13s): On the, on the construction side for, for student rental, are you seeing companies that are building completely from scratch in some of these towns or, or actually buying existing existing properties and, and converting the use or, or, you know, changing something to student residents, whether that's complete change of use or just adding to the existing?   Andrew (38m 34s): Yeah, I think all of the above, you know, we've seen traditionally, it's been the one-off developers that have built, and then they've sold, you know, to the larger players, like the likes of Woodburn and align best. We're seeing these companies partner up with developers now as well for future developments. We have seen, you know, people come in and buy finished products with the hope that they'll be able to acquire more in that market. I mean, there are certain markets that, you know, certainly Waterloo has had a lot of development.   Kingston near Queens has had a lot of development. Toronto has had a lot of development, you know, I think though for the most part, what people don't understand is that these universities are full and the buildings, the good quality buildings are full as well. And so if you're building a good project, I don't think there's a risk for over-saturation. You know, I'm not worried about what a loo being oversaturated, because when you look at the enrollment, it's increasing substantially every year, and these kids again are coming from abroad, or they're coming from Toronto, or they come from Montreal, they come from other cities, they're there for the quality of the university.   And they're gonna pay if they're paying so much for tuition, they're certainly going to pay an extra a hundred dollars a month to live in a brand new purpose-built building over a, you know, an old basement apartment. So I think the good quality buildings in these places are full and the good operators know how to run them, to keep them full. So I'm, I, I do believe that that this will continue. You know, the other thing is some of the universities own buildings on campus, but they're old buildings, you know, they need retrofitting and to do that, you need to really gut them.   You need to empty them and got them and start them almost, you know, from the beginning, which means there's a, they're gonna decrease supply. Right. Which means that you're going to need more, you know, off-campus supplies. So that, that helps as well. The markets.   Jesse (40m 29s): Yeah, for sure. Andrew, we have four questions. We ask every guests at the end of the show and want to be conscientious of your time before we, before we get into that, we'd just love your thoughts on, on where you see opportunity in maybe the, the short to mid term in, in whether it's Canadian market us, you pick,   Andrew (40m 50s): I would say the only asset class that I really like is the one we just talked about, student housing. I just, I liked the protection against inflation. And I liked the fact that your tenants are not rent sensitive. I would say that is probably my only real opportunity. I mean, I still like multi-racial development providing that it's in the right markets and you have a very longterm outlook on it. You know, I don't think you should be building an apartment building if you have a five-year timeframe.   I think if you're a generational investor and you're building good quality real estate, that you're gonna pass through generations, I still like rent a multifamily, but you know, if you're just buying for the short term, I don't like it as much.   Jesse (41m 35s): Gotcha. All right, Andrew, if you're good to go with these all, I'll fire them off at. Yeah. All   Andrew (41m 40s): Right. Let's see it.   Jesse (41m 42s): Okay. What is something that, you know, now in your career, it can be in first national or, or business in general, you wish you knew when you, when you got started in this industry,   Andrew (41m 55s): You know, I would say understanding the, you need to add value to be properly compensated. And I would say, you know, don't be afraid to ask, to get paid, providing the, you add value. You know, most people, you know, they're always uncomfortable too. And I was too, too, oh, I got to talk about fees now. Well, that's who I got to ask to get paid, but you know what? I've come to realize over the years, if you truly add value, you should get compensated for, for your services.   You know, nobody works for free and you know, you should get paid. But the key though is understand how you add value. So understand who you're dealing with and what it is that you can provide to make that person, that company, that board, that developer better, you know, how do you enhance their life? To me, it's about, you know, making people money, saving the money and mitigating the risks. You know, these are the, this is sort of the mantra I live by. You know, when I talk to somebody it's like, can I help you make more money? Can I help you save money? And can I help mitigate your risk?   If you do these things, you're adding value. And if you add value, I think you should get properly compensated for it.   Jesse (43m 2s): What does mentorship mean to you? And what would you, what piece of advice would you give the younger individuals coming into our industry?   Andrew (43m 11s): You know, mentorship for me was huge. I mean, you know, everything I know in this industry started with Maury and I am forever grateful for, for his mentorship and his guidance and his, you know, introduction to people and watching him, you know, how he talked and how he dealt with people. It was, it was really useful for me. I think as a young person, you know, try really hard to be around good people and try to listen as much as you can. You know, there's so much knowledge and the people that had been around in the industry for a long time, they have so much knowledge, you know, of how deals work of real estate of just so many tidbits that you can pick up along the way.   I would say, if he can really put yourself in an office that's surrounded by and surround yourself with good people, you know, really do that, which is why I'm so adamant about people coming back to work. Cause I think that's the only way you can really learn. You know, you're not going to learn by being on a team skull, you know, you need to be there in person. So surround yourself with good people and just be a sponge, try to learn as much as you can also have a really long term outlook. You know, don't focus too much on what am I going to get paid today? You know, what's my job title today. Think about, you know, what is it that you can learn and are you around good people?   Because if you are, then you're going to learn a lot and you're going to, you know, benefit more in the long run. That's   Jesse (44m 33s): Great. What a book recommendation would, would you be able to give our listeners, we can put it up in the show notes,   Andrew (44m 41s): Huh? Atlas drug, but that's about a thousand pages and that takes a really long time.   Jesse (44m 47s): That's hilarious. I, that is the first we've gotten that. That's a, that's pretty good. And that is a long one though.   Andrew (44m 53s): You know, I, I thought the Steve jobs book was interested in the way he constantly challenged the status quo. You know, whether you like them or didn't like him as a person, I just loved the creativity and the ability to constantly challenge that I'm not satisfied with this, make it better. I want this. And every idea of his was always challenged and questioned, but that's how you create new things. Amazing things.   Jesse (45m 16s): I'll take us a month to make, okay, we need it next week. Last question. The, a nice softball first car make and model   Andrew (45m 26s): A Ford tempo, Ford   Jesse (45m 28s): Tempo. I   Andrew (45m 29s): Like it.   Jesse (45m 31s): That's funny. We had a, we had a Ford Fairlane on which I think, I think it was a car that my dad drove back in the seventies, but that's the first Ford tempo right on Andrew for first of all, thank you so much for coming on for individuals that if they're in the area or want to reach out connect, where's the best place for them to go   Andrew (45m 51s): LinkedIn or the first national website? My contact is there,   Jesse (45m 55s): I guess today has been Andrew Drexler. Andrew, thank you for being part of working capital.   Andrew (45m 60s): My pleasure, Jesse. Thank you.   Jesse (46m 9s): Thank you so much for listening to working capital the real estate podcast. I'm your host, Jesse for galley. If you liked the episode, head on to iTunes and leave us a five star review and share on social media, it really helps us out. If you have any questions, feel free to reach out to me on Instagram, Jesse for galley, F R a G a L E, have a good one. Take care.

TIME's Top Stories
Workers Are Furious. Their Unions Are Scrambling to Catch Up

TIME's Top Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 10:41


James Geiger, a 53-year-old John Deere machinist in Waterloo, Iowa, is fed up with two things. The first is how newer workers are treated by the agricultural machinery manufacturer compared to older ones. After 19 years of service, he says his pay and pension benefits don't stack up against those of his coworkers hired before 1997 and he's often required to work mandatory overtime. As the clock struck midnight on Oct.

The Gazette Daily News Podcast
Gazette Daily News Briefing, October 27

The Gazette Daily News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 3:31


This is Stephen Schmidt from the Gazette digital news desk and I'm here with your update for Wednesday, October 27. Wednesday's weather will be a transitional one between the sun of Tuesday and the rain predicted to come Thursday. According to the National Weather Service, it will be mostly cloudy in the Cedar Rapids area with a high near 58 degrees. A southeast wind of 15 mph could gust as high as 25 mph. There will be a low of 45 degrees Wednesday night, with a possibility for rain as it turns into Thursday morning. A report of sexual assault at the Phi Gamma Delta fraternity at the University of Iowa that spawned widespread protests earlier this fall now is at the center of a lawsuit seeking enough money to act as a deterrence to others. In the lawsuit, filed Tuesday in Johnson County District Court, UI student Makena Solberg — who names herself in the filing — reports being sexually assaulted by two members of the fraternity, which goes by FIJI, on Sept. 4 into Sept. 5, 2020. She identified the defendants as FIJI “members, directors or officers” Carson Steffen and Jacob Meloan. She accuses the two men of sexually assaulting her while she was incapacitated and then sharing video and photos of the assault online in a group chat. A former assistant track coach at Linn-Mar High School and owner of a high school sports photography and video service in Marion was formally charged Tuesday with holding a 17-year-old male student in a school office bathroom and sexually abusing him during a Sept. 27 “training program.” Kameron Martelle Beets, 29, of Cedar Rapids, is charged with third-degree sexually abuse, third-degree kidnapping, sexual exploitation of a minor, sexual exploitation by a school employee and invasion of privacy. The criminal complaint was filed Oct. 22 when a warrant was issued for Beets, but he wasn't arrested until 5 p.m. Monday by Marion and Cedar Rapids police in southwest Cedar Rapids. The complaint was made public Tuesday when Beets made an initial appearance in Linn County District Court. MidAmerican Energy is adding sun power to its renewable energy portfolio, utility officials said Tuesday. The Des Moines-based energy company is taking the final steps to flip the switch at its first utility-scale solar energy project located in Waterloo. In mid-November, MidAmerican will power-up the 3-MW Waterloo solar project, made up of nearly 10,000 solar panels with capacity to serve nearly 650 average Iowa homes. In addition to the Waterloo solar array, MidAmerican plans to have more projects online this year elsewhere in Iowa that will add 61 megawatts of solar power.  According to the Associated Press, the U.S. moved a step closer to expanding COVID-19 vaccinations for millions more children as a panel of government advisers on Tuesday endorsed kid-size doses of Pfizer's shots for 5- to 11-year-olds. A Food and Drug Administration advisory panel voted unanimously, with one abstention, that the vaccine's benefits in preventing COVID-19 in that age group outweigh any potential risks — including a heart-related side effect that's been very rare in teens and young adults despite their use of a much higher shot dose. The FDA is not bound by the panel's recommendation and is expected to make its own decision within days. Are you a fan of trying in new restaurants? Get the latest restaurant openings & closings and more chewy tips from The Gazette's Chew On this newsletter. Sign up at http://thegazette.com/ (thegazette.com) slash chew  Be sure to subscribe to The Gazette Daily news podcast, or just tell your Amazon Alexa enabled device to “enable The Gazette Daily News skill" so you can get your daily briefing by simply saying “Alexa, what's the news? If you prefer podcasts, you can also find us on iTunes or wherever else you find your Podcasts. Support this podcast

Breakfast Leadership
Interview with Ravi Sood

Breakfast Leadership

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 29:58


Ravi Sood (born July 5, 1976) is a Canadian financier and venture capitalist. Sood was raised in Waterloo, Ontario and resides in Hong Kong. He received a bachelor's degree in mathematics from the University of Waterloo. He is the co-founder and former CEO of Navina Asset Management and its predecessor company Lawrence Asset Management, which at its peak controlled over $800 million in assets globally.[1] On August 6, 2010, Sood sold Navina to Aston Hill Financial.[2] and moved on to focus on other endeavors.[3] Sood has also founded several businesses operating in emerging markets, including Buchanan Renewables, Feronia Inc., Jade Power Trust, and Galane Gold. Sood became well known in Canada as a regular TV personality and frequent guest host of the Business News Network's evening news programme "Squeeze Play". He is best known for commenting in the media on the income trust sector,[4] global markets,[5] natural resources and agriculture   Social Media Links: https://www.linkedin.com/in/ravisood/?originalSubdomain=hk

Plaza de Armas
49. Guerra de independencia Española. Introducción y Recreacionismo histórico.

Plaza de Armas

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 228:48


Nos adentramos en la Guerra de Independencia, la guerra contra el francés. Una introducción donde se hablará en un primer bloque de recreacionismo y ejércitos, con un segundo de antecedentes, que termina con Lisboa y Bailén, para retomar el tema con más profundidad en futuros programas. Contamos con Javier Muñoz, Miguel Bonmatí y Eduardo Cabrero, el Corresponsal en la historia. Presenta y coordina Javi Cuenca. ¡Por el Rey Fernando, Vencer o morir!. La imagen del capítulo es del fotógrafo Valischka, que nos ha dado permiso para publicarla. 200 aniversario de Waterloo. Las melodías entrada y salida han sido compuestas por axlD. La melodía previa a la entrevista es obra de KOM de Zagreb, una versión del fandango de Boccherini. La música que se escucha en bucle son obras cc de Boccherini. Las melodías que suenan en la sección el corresponsal en la historia han sido compuestas por Enzo2090 y Darren-Curtis. Todas con licencia “Creative Commons” y disponibles en www.soundcloud.com

Two Guys One Phone
Abba: Waterloo

Two Guys One Phone

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 7:30


Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/user?u=48075683)

WPL Book Drop
Episode 23: Waterloo Center for the Arts Director Kent Shankle Visits

WPL Book Drop

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 33:07


In this episode, Waterloo Center for the Arts Director Kent Shankle visits to about what's happening at the Center for the Arts and to share some favorite books.  Books discussed: The Art of Making Memories by Meik Wiking Mama Lola: A Vodou Priestess in Brooklyn by Karen McCarthy Brown Grant Wood: A Life by R. Tripp Evans

AI with AI
K9mm

AI with AI

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 35:19


Welcome to Season 5.0 of AI with AI! Andy and Dave discuss the latest in AI news and research, including. The White House calls for an AI “bill of rights,” and invites comments for information. In its 4th year, Nathan Benaich and Ian Hogarth publish their State of AI Report, 2021. [1:50] OpenAI uses reinforcement learning from human feedback and recursive task decomposition to improve algorithms' abilities to summarize books. [3:14] IEEE Spectrum publishes a paper that examines the diminishing returns of deep learning, questioning the long-term viability of the technology. [5:12] In related news, Nvidia and Microsoft release a 530 billion-parameter style language model, the Megatron-Turing Natural Language Generation model (MT-NLG). [6:54] DeepMind demonstrates the use of a GAN in improving high-resolution precipitation “nowcasting.” [10:05] Researchers from Waterloo, Guelph, and IIT Madras publish research on deep learning that can identify early warning signals of tipping points. [11:54] Military robot maker Ghost Robots creates a robot dog with a rifle, the Special Purpose Unmanned Rifle, or SPUR. [14:25] And Dr. Larry Lewis joins Dave and Andy to discuss the latest report from CNA on Leveraging AI to Mitigate Civilian Harm, which describes the causes of civilian harm in military operations, identifies how AI could protect civilians from harm, and identifies ways to lessen the infliction of suffering, injury, and destruction overall. [16:36] Follow the link below to visit our website and explore the links mentioned in the episode. https://www.cna.org/CAAI/audio-video

Poker Stories
Poker Stories: Mike Watson

Poker Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 72:33


Mike Watson has been one of the more consistent tournament performers over his 15-year poker career, having racked up more than $12.5 million on the circuit. The St. Johns, Newfoundland native broke out in 2008, winning the WPT Bellagio Cup main event for nearly $1.7 million. In addition to numerous final tables on the high roller circuit, he also took down the 2016 EPT PokerStars Caribbean Adventure, giving him two parts of poker's elusive Triple Crown.  Watson does have two wins at the World Series of Poker. The first came in a 2011 WSOP Europe side event, and the second was a year later at the WSOP Europe when he banked $1.3 million in the high roller event. Unfortunately, neither of those WSOP events awarded bracelets.In the last couple of years, 'SirWatts' has rededicated himself to online poker, bringing his career totals to $10 million. As a result, he is now Canada's top-ranked online player according to PocketFives, and reached a peak of no. 3 in the world earlier this year.  Highlights from this interview include when wedding season collides with poker season, having professors for parents, being a 'math nerd,' the Waterloo-poker connection, life-changing money at Bellagio, re-evaluating his game, winning two WSOP events and getting no bracelets, a big score in the Bahamas, a high-stakes online run, six-figure cash game pots, winning with Sam Greenwood, working as an umpire, fooling Dan Heimiller as Martin Jacobson, and enjoying sushi pizza for breakfast.

CFO Thought Leader
744: Democratizing Phone Services | Evan Fein, CFO, TextNow

CFO Thought Leader

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 34:40


CFOTL: Tell us about TextNow. What does this company do, and what are its offerings today? Fein: TextNow was founded in Waterloo, Ontario. Today, there's a big office in Waterloo and offices in San Francisco and even Seattle. I'm in the Seattle office now, and our mission is to democratize reliable phone services. What this means is making free, reliable phone service available to you and me. I've been a customer of AT&T Wireless for 20-something years. I pay a lot of money and don't have a great experience. We can offer very reliable phone service to people for free, which is really groundbreaking. This creates a huge opportunity for us. I get passionate about the mission because I want to provide communications availability to all of us, including the people who don't want to pay big bills to the large wireless carriers. Read More   We're an app that you download on your phone. Even if you're not on a wifi network and you need access to a cellular network, we can get you that for free. You have a banner ad experience, and we're able to provide high-quality voice, text, and FaceTime for free for customers, whether they're on a wifi network or not. The company is enjoying terrific growth this year, as seen in a press release that we put out recently with some of our financial metrics. In 20-something years of being a CFO, I have never been a part of a business that has had the growth tailwinds that this business has had in 2021. We have this awesome opportunity to grow and democratize reliable phone service to more and more people. I want to help to lead us through investing in the business so that we can achieve more of our mission. I want to help our leaders grow to become the best humans that they can be, and I want to help our employees grow to become the happiest humans that they can be as well. I want to lead the business, and I want to help other humans grow. Sometimes I call myself a “gardener” because I'm trying to grow leaders throughout the business and get myself out of the way. TextNow has offered me the opportunity to do this, and I needed it. I try to help us to prepare for growth and to help the people at TextNow achieve their human potentials.

Here First
Monday, October 18th, 2021

Here First

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021


The Iowa Medical Examiner's Office has confirmed that remains found in September are those of a boy who disappeared in May. The racial disparities in Iowa's prisons continue to rank among the worst in the country, according to the latest analysis by the advocacy group The Sentencing Project. Plus, a prosecutor has ruled that a police officer who shot and paralyzed a man in Waterloo in April acted legally because the target appeared to be chasing a deputy with a shotgun.

Iowa Business Report
Iowa Business Report Monday Edition -- October 18, 2021

Iowa Business Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 2:00


Iowa Business Report Monday EditionOctober 18, 2021      Katy Susong, president and CEO of Cardinal Construction in Waterloo, about the importance of a planned and public business leadership transition.

Le Feuilleton
Episode 9

Le Feuilleton

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 24:49


durée : 00:24:49 - Le Feuilleton - Le bienfaiteur est Jean Valjean.. Marius découvre que Le Thénardier est l'homme qui a sauvé son père à Waterloo. Javert débarque avec la police,Jean Valjean s'enfuit…et vit désormais avec Cosette rue Plumet, Marius retrouve leur trace grâce à Eponime, la fille aînée des Thénardier.

Iowa Business Report
Iowa Business Report 21-42 (October 15-17, 2021)

Iowa Business Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 22:50


On this edition of the Iowa Business Report: Iowa Lt. Gov. Adam Gregg, co-chair of the Empower Rural Iowa initiative, discusses the purpose of the effort and its key programs.Attorney and news analyst Dr. Wendy Patrick gives us the latest information about the legality of business-imposed vaccination mandates.And in this week's "Business Profile", we learn about business transitions from Katy Susong, president and CEO of Cardinal Construction of Waterloo. For more, go to totallyiowa.com and click on the "radio programs" link.    Presented by Advance Iowa, on line at advanceiowa.com. Search for "Advance Iowa" on LinkedIn and Facebook, as well.

Cyclocross Radio
Episode 239 | World Cup Waterloo

Cyclocross Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 71:30


It's a busy week with six total UCI races including three World Cups and The Media Pit is here to try and cover it all, starting with the Waterloo World Cup. Tighten up those shoes, we've got a lot to cover. 

SharkPreneur
705: Guaranteeing a Pay Raise with Joseph Fung

SharkPreneur

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 19:58


Guaranteeing a Pay Raise Joseph Fung, Uvaro   – The Sharkpreneur podcast with Seth Greene Episode 705 Joseph Fung Joseph is the CEO of Uvaro, a tech sales career accelerator, and of Kiite, a sales enablement platform purpose-built to provide sales teams with the information they need when they need it. A graduate of the University of Waterloo's Computer Engineering program, Joseph's a repeat Founder & CEO, and with multiple successful exits, and speaks frequently on the topics of sales leadership, diversity, and corporate social responsibility. He is an active early-stage investor who ensures that the majority of his investments are into women-led companies. Joseph also sits on the boards of Communitech, the Golden Triangle Angel Network, and the Kitchener-Waterloo Symphony.   Listen to this illuminating Sharkpreneur episode with Joseph Fung about guaranteeing a pay raise using Uvaro. Here are some of the beneficial topics covered on this week's show: ●    Why it's important to thoroughly train sales representatives. ●    How Uvaro helps people land positions that pay on average 2.2 times more than their previous position. ●    Why using Uvaro is like having and MBA without going to grad school. ●    How people on average people find a new role 17 days after completing the Uvaro training. ●    How people are 50% more likely to achieve quota after their Uvaro training.   Connect with Joseph: Guest Contact Info Twitter @uvarolife Instagram @uvaro.life Facebook facebook.com/uvaro.life LinkedIn linkedin.com/school/uvarolife Links Mentioned: uvaro.com   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

#ElderWisdom | Stories from the Green Bench
Sheri Noecker - A story of sudden illness, inspiration after a stroke, and the Program for Active Living

#ElderWisdom | Stories from the Green Bench

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 31:31


Episode #27 - A sudden stroke caused Sheri Noecker to move into The Village at University Gates long-term care in Waterloo. While not being able to move, she was inspired by her friends and the team at the village to build an exercise plan and work with the Program for Active Living team in her determination to move again as she use to.  Hear this inspiring and motivational story as Sheri sits on the green bench with hosts Erin Davis and Lloyd Hetherington. Sheri shares about her life when she experienced a stroke at the age of 51, the wake-up call that motivated her to get better. Although she is unable to remember all the details of the time she shares as others have told her. Today, she is committed to doing exercise every morning.  Inspired by her nephew who experienced a tragic accident at the age of 18 and worked to be able to walk again. "You say you are going to be a motivational speaker, but I want to correct you.  You are a motivational speaker now." -Lloyd Hetherington to Sheri Noecker Sharing supports  she receives from participating in Chair Exercises with Caroline Jordon & Paul Eugene on YouTube The goal of the Michael T. Sharratt Program for Active Living (PAL) is to improve our residents' life quality and maximize independence through individualized exercise programming and a more active lifestyle. Learn more.  Sheri is one of many who receives the support from Kinesiologists, exercise therapists, physiotherapists and more. "The Program for Active Living team has helped me in so many different ways.  Coming to the Village as a full hoyer lift and after two years, I am able to stand without supports." -Sheri Noecker "I did not really care about myself before. Learning what happened to me, I am now fighting for everything I am doing. I am not a person that gives up on anything, and not giving up on myself either." -Sheri Noecker One day, when Sheri is recovered, she plans to go out to be a motivational speaker and supporter.  She would also like to become a PSW and return back to University Gates to work with the team.  Focusing her life on helping others. A stroke is a medical emergency. Learn more from Heart & Stroke Canada. F - Face, is it drooping? A - Arms, can you raise both? S - Speech, is it slurred or jumbled? T - Time, to call 9-1-1 right away? "Blood, sweat and respect.  First two you give, last one you earn." - Dwayne Johnson Subscribe, rate, and review our podcast on any network and share your thoughts on social media using the #ElderWisdom tag to help others find us. ----more---- The Green Bench is a symbol of elder wisdom. Physically or virtually, the bench invites us all to sit alongside a senior, share a conversation, or give and offer advice. It challenges the stigma seniors face; the ageism still so prevalent in society. It reminds us of the wealth of wisdom our elders offer and in doing so, helps restore them to a place of reverence. "The greatest untapped resource in Canada, if not the world, is the collective wisdom of our elders." -Ron Schlegel This podcast is brought to you by Schlegel Villages, retirement & long-term care homes in Ontario, Canada. #ElderWisdom | Stories from the Green Bench is produced by Memory Tree Productions  Learn more about our host, Erin Davis, at erindavis.com  Learn more about co-host, Lloyd Hetherington  Learn more about #ElderWisdom at elderwisdom.ca

Six Pixels of Separation Podcast - By Mitch Joel
SPOS #796 - Indira Samarasekera On Leadership And Nerve

Six Pixels of Separation Podcast - By Mitch Joel

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 56:08


Welcome to episode #796 of Six Pixels of Separation. Here it is: Six Pixels of Separation - Episode #796 - Host: Mitch Joel. Internationally recognized as one of Canada's leading engineers, Dr. Indira V. Samarasekera has led an amazing career. Indira has been awarded the E.W.R. Steacie Fellowship, the Peter Lougheed award for leadership in public policy and the Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal. She is an Officer of the Order of Canada and a Foreign Associate of the National Academy of Engineering. A former president and vice-chancellor of the University of Alberta, Indira has honorary degrees from the University of British Columbia, University of Toronto, the University of Waterloo, Queen's University Belfast, University of Montréal and the University of Western Ontario. She is also the first woman president ever at the University of Alberta. Indira is a member of the board of directors for Scotiabank and Magna International, and a member of the advisory board for Canada's Outstanding CEO of the Year award. She serves on the boards of the Asia-Pacific Foundation and the Rideau Hall Foundation. Most recently, she has co-authored the book, Nerve - Lessons on Leadership From Two Women Who Went First with Martha Piper. This is a conversation about leadership, mentorship and the different routes to lead. Enjoy the conversation... Running time: 56:07. Hello from beautiful Montreal. Subscribe over at Apple Podcasts. Please visit and leave comments on the blog - Six Pixels of Separation. Feel free to connect to me directly on Facebook here: Mitch Joel on Facebook. or you can connect on LinkedIn. ...or on Twitter. Here is my conversation with Dr. Indira V. Samarasekera. Nerve - Lessons on Leadership From Two Women Who Went First. Martha Piper. Follow Indira on Twitter. This week's music: David Usher 'St. Lawrence River'.    

WPL Book Drop
Episode 22: Waterloo Fire Rescue Battalion Chief Bill Beck Talks Fire Prevention and Books

WPL Book Drop

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 22:20


In this episode, Waterloo Fire Rescue Battalion Chief Bill Beck talks with Becky about fire prevention, his career, and books.  Recommended reads: Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury    Firefighters by Norma Simon   Report from Engine Co. 82 by Dennis Smith  

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 10.07.21

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 51:37


Natural compound in basil may protect against Alzheimer's disease pathology University of South Florida, October 5, 2021 Fenchol, a natural compound abundant in some plants including basil, can help protect the brain against Alzheimer's disease pathology, a preclinical study led by University of South Florida Health (USF Health) researchers suggests. The new study published Oct. 5 in the Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience, discovered a sensing mechanism associated with the gut microbiome that explains how fenchol reduces neurotoxicity in the Alzheimer's brain. Emerging evidence indicates that short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs)– metabolites produced by beneficial gut bacteria and the primary source of nutrition for cells in your colon—contribute to brain health. The abundance of SCFAs is often reduced in older patients with mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease, the most common form of dementia. However, how this decline in SCFAs contributes to Alzheimer's disease progression remains largely unknown. Gut-derived SCFAs that travel through the blood to the brain can bind to and activate free fatty acid receptor 2 (FFAR2), a cell signaling molecule expressed on brain cellscalled neurons. "Our study is the first to discover that stimulation of the FFAR2 sensing mechanism by these microbial metabolites (SCFAs) can be beneficial in protecting brain cells against toxic accumulation of the amyloid-beta (Aβ) protein associated with Alzheimer's disease," said principal investigator Hariom Yadav, Ph.D., professor of neurosurgery and brain repair at the USF Health Morsani College of Medicine, where he directs the USF Center for Microbiome Research. One of the two hallmark pathologies of Alzheimer's disease is hardened deposits of Aβ that clump together between nerve cells to form amyloid protein plaques in the brain. The other is neurofibrillary tangles of tau protein inside brain cells. These pathologies contribute to the neuron loss and death that ultimately cause the onset of Alzheimer's, a neurodegenerative disease characterized by loss of memory, thinking skills and other cognitive abilities. Dr. Yadav and his collaborators delve into molecular mechanisms to explain how interactions between the gut microbiome and the brain might influence brain health and age-related cognitive decline. In this study, Dr. Yadav said, the research team set out to uncover the "previously unknown" function of FFAR2 in the brain. The researchers first showed that inhibiting the FFAR2 receptor (thus blocking its ability to "sense" SCFAs in the environment outside the neuronal cell and transmit signaling inside the cell) contributes to the abnormal buildup of the Aβ protein causing neurotoxicity linked to Alzheimer's disease. Then, they performed large-scale virtual screening of more than 144,000 natural compounds to find potential candidates that could mimic the same beneficial effect of microbiota produced SCFAs in activating FFAR2 signaling. Identifying a natural compound alternative to SCFAs to optimally target the FFAR2 receptor on neurons is important, because cells in the gut and other organs consume most of these microbial metabolites before they reach the brain through blood circulation, Dr. Yadav noted. Dr. Yadav's team narrowed 15 leading compound candidates to the most potent one. Fenchol, a plant-derived compound that gives basil its aromatic scent, was best at binding to the FFAR's active site to stimulate its signaling. Further experiments in human neuronal cell cultures, as well as Caenorhabditis (C.) elegans (worm) and mouse models of Alzheimer's disease demonstrated that fenchol significantly reduced excess Aβ accumulation and death of neurons by stimulating FFAR2 signaling, the microbiome sensing mechanism. When the researchers more closely examined how fenchol modulates Aβ-induced neurotoxicity, they found that the compound decreased senescent neuronal cells, also known as "zombie" cells, commonly found in brains with Alzheimer's disease pathology. Zombie cells stop replicating and die a slow death. Meanwhile, Dr. Yadav said, they build up in diseased and aging organs, create a damaging inflammatory environment, and send stress or death signals to neighboring healthy cells, which eventually also change into harmful zombie cells or die. "Fenchol actually affects the two related mechanisms of senescence and proteolysis," Dr. Yadav said of the intriguing preclinical study finding. "It reduces the formation of half-dead zombie neuronal cells and also increases the degradation of (nonfunctioning) Aβ, so that amyloid protein is cleared from the brain much faster." Before you start throwing lots of extra basil in your spaghetti sauce or anything else you eat to help stave off dementia, more research is needed—including in humans. In exploring fenchol as a possible approach for treating or preventing Alzheimer's pathology, the USF Health team will seek answers to several questions. A key one is whether fenchol consumed in basil itself would be more or less bioactive (effective) than isolating and administering the compound in a pill, Dr. Yadav said. "We also want to know whether a potent dose of either basil or fenchol would be a quicker way to get the compound into the brain."   Researchers find sense of purpose associated with better memory Florida State University, October 6, 2021 Add an improved memory to the list of the many benefits that accompany having a sense of purpose in life. A new study led by Florida State University researchers showed a link between an individual's sense of purpose and their ability to recall vivid details. The researchers found that while both a sense of purpose and cognitive function made memories easier to recall, only a sense of purpose bestowed the benefits of vividness and coherence. The study, which focused on memories related to the COVID-19 pandemic, was published in the journal Memory. "Personal memories serve really important functions in everyday life," said Angelina Sutin, a professor in the College of Medicine and the paper's lead author. "They help us to set goals, control emotions and build intimacy with others. We also know people with a greater sense of purpose perform better on objective memory tests, like remembering a list of words. We were interested in whether purpose was also associated with the quality of memories of important personal experiences because such qualities may be one reason why purpose is associated with better mental and physical health." Nearly 800 study participants reported on their sense of purpose and completed tasks that measured their cognitive processing speed in January and February 2020, before the ongoing coronavirus pandemic took hold in the U.S. Researchers then measured participants' ability to retrieve and describe personal memories about the pandemic in July 2020, several months into the public health crisis. Participants with a stronger sense of purpose in life reported that their memories were more accessible, coherent and vivid than participants with less purpose. Those with a higher sense of purpose also reported many sensory details, spoke about their memories more from a first-person perspective and reported more positive feeling and less negative feeling when asked to retrieve a memory. The researchers also found that depressive symptoms had little effect on the ability to recall vivid details in memories, suggesting that the connection between life purpose and memory recall is not due to the fewer depressive symptoms among individuals higher in purpose. Purpose in life has been consistently associated with better episodic memory, such as the number of words retrieved correctly on a memory task. This latest research expands on those connections to memory by showing a correlation between purpose and the richness of personal memory. "We chose to measure the ability to recall memories associated with the COVID-19 pandemic because the pandemic is an event that touched everyone, but there has been a wide range of experiences and reactions to it that should be apparent in memories," said co-author Martina Luchetti, an assistant professor in the College of Medicine. Along with the association with better memory, previous research has found other numerous benefits connected with having a sense of purpose, from a lower risk of death to better physical and mental health. "Memories help people to sustain their well-being, social connections and cognitive health," said co-author Antonio Terracciano, a professor in the College of Medicine. "This research gives us more insight into the connections between a sense of purpose and the richness of personal memories. The vividness of those memories and how they fit into a coherent narrative may be one pathway through which purpose leads to these better outcomes.   Vitamin D protects against severe asthma attacks Queen Mary University of London, October 3, 2021 Taking oral vitamin D supplements in addition to standard asthma medication could halve the risk of asthma attacks requiring hospital attendance, according to research led by Queen Mary University of London (QMUL). Asthma affects more than 300 million people worldwide and is estimated to cause almost 400,000 deaths annually. Asthma deaths arise primarily during episodes of acute worsening of symptoms, known as attacks or 'exacerbations', which are commonly triggered by viral upper respiratory infections. Vitamin D is thought to protect against such attacks by boosting immune responses to respiratory viruses and dampening down harmful airway inflammation. The new study, funded by the National Institute for Health Research, and published in The Lancet Respiratory Medicine, collated and analysed the individual data from 955 participants in seven randomised controlled trials, which tested the use of vitamin D supplements. Overall, the researchers found that vitamin D supplementation resulted in: a 30 per cent reduction in the rate of asthma attacks requiring treatment with steroid tablets or injections - from 0.43 events per person per year to 0.30. a 50 per cent reduction in the risk of experiencing at least one asthma attack requiring Accident and Emergency Department attendance and/or hospitalisation - from 6 per cent of people experiencing such an event to 3 per cent. Vitamin D supplementation was found to be safe at the doses administered. No instances of excessively high calcium levels or renal stones were seen, and serious adverse events were evenly distributed between participants taking vitamin D and those on placebo. Lead researcher Professor Adrian Martineau said: "These results add to the ever growing body of evidence that vitamin D can support immune function as well as bone health. On average, three people in the UK die from asthma attacks every day. Vitamin D is safe to take and relatively inexpensive so supplementation represents a potentially cost-effective strategy to reduce this problem." The team's use of individual participant data also allowed them to query the extent to which different groups respond to vitamin D supplementation, in more detail than previous studies. In particular, vitamin D supplementation was found to have a strong and statistically-significant protective effect in participants who had low vitamin D levels to start with. These participants saw a 55 per cent reduction in the rate of asthma exacerbations requiring treatment with steroid tablets or injections - from 0.42 events per person per year to 0.19. However, due to relatively small numbers of patients within sub-groups, the researchers caution that they did not find definitive evidence to show that effects of vitamin D supplementation differ according to baseline vitamin D status. Professor Hywel Williams, Director of the NIHR Health Technology Assessment Programme, said: "The results of this NIHR-funded study brings together evidence from several other studies from over the world and is an important contribution to reducing uncertainties on whether Vitamin D is helpful for asthma - a common condition that impacts on many thousands of people worldwide." Dr David Jolliffe from QMUL, first author on the paper, added: "Our results are largely based on data from adults with mild to moderate asthma: children and adults with severe asthma were relatively under-represented in the dataset, so our findings cannot necessarily be generalised to these patient groups at this stage. Further clinical trials are on-going internationally, and we hope to include data from them in a future analysis to determine whether the promise of today's results is confirmed in an even larger and more diverse group of patients."     Study Shows Lifestyle Choices Have Significant Impact on Multiple Chronic Conditions, Significant Implications For Reducing Costs Yale University,  October 05, 2021 In a study published in the Journal of Preventive Medicine, Adams and colleagues showed a linear association between a number of modifiable risk factors and multiple chronic conditions, making those modifications a key to health care cost savings and to preventing a wide range of conditions. The data analyzed for the study, https://authors.elsevier.com/a/1VpFeKt2pmc9H, were from the publicly available 2013 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System and included 483,865 non-institutionalized US adults ages 18 years old or older. Chronic conditions included asthma, arthritis, heart disease, stroke, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), cognitive impairment, cancer other than skin, and kidney disease. Risk factors included obesity, current smoking, sedentary lifestyle, inadequate fruit and vegetable consumption and sleeping other than seven to eight hours, while depression, hypertension, high cholesterol, and diabetes were considered in each category. Previous research by Thorpe and colleagues had estimated that the care of adults with four or more chronic conditions (17.1% of all adults in the study) is responsible for 77.6% of all health care costs in the U.S. today. The potential savings by reducing just two risk factors (diabetes and hypertension) and their related comorbidity was estimated previously by Ormond and colleagues at $9 billion annually over one to two years and closer to $25 billion a year after 5 years or more, factoring in possible complications. True Health Initiative founder, at Yale University  Director and study co-author David L. Katz, MD, MPH, FACLM, pointed out that in addition to costs, another implication of the study results is an individual's access to healthcare if they have one or more of the chronic conditions. "Although insurers decide what qualifies as a pre-existing condition, all the chronic conditions used in this study except cognitive impairment are commonly included," he said. "Individuals with a pre-existing condition could be denied coverage or face higher premiums. While having a pre-existing condition might not affect coverage for adults eligible for Medicare, over half of all adults with multiple chronic conditions are ages 18 to 64 years." American College of Lifestyle Medicine President George Guthrie, MD, MPH, FACLM, said the study confirms the necessity for addressing the root cause of chronic conditions. "The evidence shows that the risks for chronic disease are rooted in lifestyle choices," he said. "More than ever, it is important to emphasize lifestyle medicine as the first treatment option for preventing, treating, and in some cases, reversing the cause of chronic conditions. If we can help people with chronic conditions, we can add years to their life and life to their years, as well as lower the ever-increasing costs of healthcare for everyone."     Physical athletes' visual skills prove sharper than action video game players University of Waterloo (Canada), October 7, 2021 Athletes still have the edge over action video gamers when it comes to dynamic visual skills, a new study from the University of Waterloo shows. For an athlete, having strong visual skills can be the difference between delivering a peak performance and achieving average results. "Athletes involved in sports with a high-level of movement—like soccer, football, or baseball—often score higher on dynamic visual acuity tests than non-athletes," said Dr. Kristine Dalton of Waterloo's School of Optometry & Vision Science. "Our research team wanted to investigate if action video gamers—who, like e-sport athletes, are regularly immersed in a dynamic, fast-paced 2D video environment for large periods of time—would also show superior levels of dynamic visual acuity on par with athletes competing in physical sport." While visual acuity (clarity or sharpness of vision) is most often measured under static conditions during annual check-ups with an optometrist, research shows that testing dynamic visual acuity is a more effective measure of a person's ability to see moving objects clearly—a baseline skill necessary for success in physical and e-sports alike.  Using a dynamic visual acuity skills-test designed and validated at the University of Waterloo, researchers discovered that while physical athletes score highly on dynamic visual acuity tests as expected, action video game players tested closer to non-athletes.  "Ultimately, athletes showed a stronger ability to identify smaller moving targets, which suggests visual processing differences exist between them and our video game players," said Alan Yee, a Ph.D. candidate in vision science. All participants were matched based on their level of static visual acuity and refractive error, distinguishing dynamic visual acuity as the varying factor on their test performance. These findings are also important for sports vision training centers that have been exploring the idea of developing video game-based training programs to help athletes elevate their performance. "Our findings show there is still a benefit to training in a 3D environment," said Dalton. "For athletes looking to develop stronger visual skills, the broader visual field and depth perception that come with physical training may be crucial to improving their dynamic visual acuity—and ultimately, their sport performance."  The study, Athletes demonstrate superior visual dynamic visual acuity, authored by Waterloo's School of Optometry & Vision Science's Dalton, Yee, Dr. Elizabeth Irving and Dr. Ben Thompson, was recently published in the journal Optometry and Vision Science.     Probiotic Akkermansia muciniphila and environmental enrichment reverse cognitive impairment associated with high-fat high-cholesterol consumption University of Oviedo (Spain), September 8, 2021 Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is one of the most prevalent diseases globally. A high-fat, high-cholesterol (HFHC) diet leads to an early NASH model. It has been suggested that gut microbiota mediates the effects of diet through the microbiota–gut–brain axis, modifying the host's brain metabolism and disrupting cognition. Here, we target NASH-induced cognitive damage by testing the impact of environmental enrichment (EE) and the administration of either Lacticaseibacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) or Akkermansia muciniphila CIP107961 (AKK). EE and AKK, but not LGG, reverse the HFHC-induced cognitive dysfunction, including impaired spatial working memory and novel object recognition; however, whereas AKK restores brain metabolism, EE results in an overall decrease. Moreover, AKK and LGG did not induce major rearrangements in the intestinal microbiota, with only slight changes in bacterial composition and diversity, whereas EE led to an increase in Firmicutes and Verrucomicrobia members. Our findings illustrate the interplay between gut microbiota, the host's brain energy metabolism, and cognition. In addition, the findings suggest intervention strategies, such as the administration of AKK, for the management of the cognitive dysfunction related to NASH. In this study, we described cognitive, brain metabolism, and microbiota alterations associated with high-fat and high-cholesterol consumption. In addition, we clearly showed that environmental enrichment and A. muciniphila CIP107961 restore cognitive dysfunction. Furthermore, we revealed that cognitive improvement is associated with differential effects of environmental enrichment and this strain of A. muciniphila on brain metabolism and gut microbiota. Finally, we discovered that restored cognitive function was associated with the administration of A. muciniphila CIP107961, but not L. rhamnosus GG, which may be clinically relevant when selecting probiotics for treating HFHC-derived pathologies. In conclusion, the microbiota and cognition are intimately connected through the gut–brain axis, and in HFHC pathologies they can be influenced by environmental enrichment and A. muciniphila CIP107961 administration. Cognitive improvement was accompanied by changes in brain metabolic activity and gut microbial composition analysis, pointing to specific microbiota targets for intervention in diet-induced pathologies. However, some mechanisms other than major changes in microbiota composition and the combined effect of environmental enrichment and A. muciniphila administration, which we identified in this study, may also be biologically relevant and will need to be investigated in future studies due to their relative contributions to the selection of effective treatments for patients.           

Autoline This Week - Video
Autoline This Week #2524 - Using AI To Make ADAS More Effective

Autoline This Week - Video

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 26:46


Automotive safety technology can prevent accidents and save lives. But it can also be maddeningly annoying. All those beeps, buzzes and warning chimes. So researchers are carefully collecting data on how humans drive, and using artificial intelligence to make those safety systems less intrusive and more effective.

KXnO Sports Fanatics
College Football, MLB Playoffs, and Nate Teut - Tuesday Show Hour 1

KXnO Sports Fanatics

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 45:04


The guys kick off a Honky-Tonk Tuesday discussing Iowa's game vs Penn State this coming weekend and Iowa State on the bye. They also get into MLB playoffs and the Wild Card games tonight and tomorrow. This leads down a rabbit hotel talking about Ramón Martinez, Pedro Martinez and Pedro hitting Reggie Sanders during a bid for a perfect game and classic Yankees/Red Sox rivalry. Then Nate Teut from the Des Moines Buccaneers joins to preview the Bucs hosting Waterloo and talk MLB and playoffs.

KXnO Sports Fanatics
Tim Harwood from Waterloo Black Hawks, NFL Week 4 Recap and MLB Wild Card Games Preview - Monday Show Hour

KXnO Sports Fanatics

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 50:54


Erick Zamora kicks off the four hour chatting with voice of the Waterloo Black Hawks Tim Harwood to talk about his thoughts on what he's seen out of the Des Moines Buccaneers and talk about the Black Hawks before Waterloo and Des Moines play at Buccaneer Arena this Saturday. Then Zamora gives his thoughts on this past week in the NFL. To end the hour he talks about the MLB Wild Card games.

The Douglas Coleman Show
The Douglas Coleman Show w_ Mark Leslie Lefebvre and Nguyen Phan Que Mai

The Douglas Coleman Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 48:45


Mark Leslie Lefebvre's first short story appeared in print in 1992, the same year he started working in the book industry.He has published more than twenty-five books under the name Mark Leslie that include thrillers and fiction (Evasion, A Canadian Werewolf in New York, One Hand Screaming), paranormal non-fiction (Haunted Hospitals, Spooky Sudbury, Tomes of Terror) and anthologies (Campus Chills, Tesseracts Sixteen, Obsessions). Under his full name he writes books to help authors navigate publishing. And they include The 7 P's of Publishing Success and An Author's Guide to Working with Libraries and Bookstores.His industry experience includes President of the Canadian Booksellers Association, Board Member of BookNet Canada, Director of Author Relations and Self-Publishing for Rakuten Kobo, Director of Business Development for Draft2Digital and Professional Advisor for Sheridan College's Creative Writing and Publishing Honours Program.Mark lives in Waterloo, Ontario and can be found online at http://markleslie.ca/Dr Nguyễn Phan Quế Mai is an award-winning Vietnamese writer and journalist. She is the author of eleven books of poetry, short fiction and non-fiction. Her books in Vietnamese has received the 2010 Poetry of the Year Award from the Hanoi Writers Association, the Capital's Literature & Arts Award, and First Prize in the Poetry Competition celebrating 1,000 Years of Hanoi. Her debut novel and first book in English, THE MOUNTAINS SING, is an International Bestseller, Finalist of the 2021 Dayton Literary Peace Prize, Winner of the 2020 BookBrowse Best Debut Award, Winner of the Blogger's Book Prize 2021, Winner of the 2021 International Book Awards, Winner of the 2021 PEN Oakland/Josephine Miles Literary Award, and Winner of the 2020 Lannan Literary Award Fellowship for "a work of exceptional quality" and for "contribution to peace and reconciliation".https://nguyenphanquemai.com/The Douglas Coleman Show now offers audio and video promotional packages for music artists as well as video promotional packages for authors. Please see our website for complete details. http://douglascolemanshow.comIf you have a comment about this episode or any other, please click the link below.https://ratethispodcast.com/douglascolemanshow