Podcasts about Big Dipper

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  • 207PODCASTS
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  • May 8, 2022LATEST
Big Dipper

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Best podcasts about Big Dipper

Latest podcast episodes about Big Dipper

StarDate Podcast

The star that anchors the Big Dipper's handle is a bit of an outcast. The five stars that make up the dipper's middle are members of the same family — the Ursa Major Moving Group. They were born from the same cloud of gas and dust, and they move through space together. The stars at the ends of the dipper are different. Tens of thousands of years from now, they will have moved away from the others as seen from Earth, pulling the “dipper” apart. Alkaid is the end of the dipper's handle. It's farther away than the members of the moving group — about a hundred light-years. And it's only about 10 million years old, which is far younger than the members of the moving group. Ten million years isn't long on the astronomical time scale — the Sun is four-and-a-half billion years old. Even so, Alkaid is getting well along in life because it's more than six times as massive as the Sun. The cores of heavy stars are much hotter than those of lighter stars, which revs up their nuclear reactions. They consume their nuclear fuel at a much faster rate, so they burn out much more quickly. Alkaid, for example, will live a “normal” lifetime of less than a hundred million years, versus 10 billion years for the Sun — a short life for a stellar outcast. Look for Alkaid in the north as night falls, with the rest of the dipper extending to its left. The dipper rotates down toward the northern horizon during the night, ready to scoop up a dipperful of stars.  Script by Damond Benningfield Support McDonald Observatory

StarDate Podcast

If not for its location, the star Megrez would attract little attention. It doesn't look especially bright, and while the star itself is bigger and brighter than the Sun, it's still not all that remarkable. Yet we do pay attention to the star, because it's a celestial thumbtack — it connects the bowl and handle of the Big Dipper. In astronomical parlance, Megrez is a class A3 dwarf. The “A3” part of that designation means its surface is thousands of degrees hotter than the Sun's, so it shines pure white. And the “dwarf” part means that it's in the prime of life, steadily converting the hydrogen in its core to helium. A star in that phase of life isn't exactly tiny — Megrez is a couple of million miles in diameter. But later in life, it will puff up to many times that size — it'll be not a dwarf, but a stellar giant. Megrez and four other members of the Big Dipper are siblings — they were born from the same cloud of gas and dust, and they move through space together. The other Dipper stars in the group are the two at the bottom of the bowl, and the two in the handle that are closest to Megrez. They're all about 80 light-years from Earth. The Big Dipper is high overhead as night falls, with the handle to the right of the bowl, linked by Megrez. It's the faintest star in the entire dipper, but perhaps the most important: Without it, there would be no Big Dipper at all. We'll talk about another star in the Big Dipper tomorrow.  Script by Damond Benningfield Support McDonald Observatory

Observing With Webb

WATCH this on YouTube LISTEN as a podcast on Podbean, Stitcher, or iTunes Social Media: @mrwebbpv on Twitter and Instagram @pvplanetarium on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram   Lunar Eclipse Month!!! Get ready for a May that boasts a wonderful blood moon and an array of morning planets all month long.          Welcome to Observing With Webb, where a high school astronomy teacher tells you what you're looking at, why it's so cool, and what you should check out later this month…at night.    Naked-eye PLANETS Sunset – Mercury (first week of May) Mercury (WNW) – It sounds like this apparition of Mercury will be the best one of the year. Just get out after sunset, look WNW, and the first point of light you'll see is Mercury.  BONUS: On the 2nd, Mercury will be right next to the Pleiades, with the Moon. Get out some binoculars or a low-power scope to see both of them in the same view. Throughout the night – None Morning – Venus, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn (SE) Let's use Venus as our guidepost for the month, as it is the most visible object in the morning sky. Venus (E) – Keep an eye out after 4:30am, looking E, for the highlight of the spring and summer mornings this year, Venus. About 15˚ above the horizon and hard to miss, the brightest object in the morning sky will blaze as a “morning star”. Jupiter (ESE) ­– Jupiter starts May less than 1˚ away from much brighter Venus, then travels 30˚ rightward to finish the month right next to Mars in the SE Mars (ESE) – Mars starts May about 15˚ away from Venus, to the right, and travels away to 30˚ from Venus by the end of the month, with Jupiter joining it. Saturn (SE) – Saturn starts cautiously leaving the group of morning planets in May, starting less than 20˚ to the right of Mars, and ending up double that distance away.   EVENTS Evening Crescents (look West after Sunset) First Quarter Moon – 8th (Visible until midnight) Evening Gibbous (Mostly lit, after Sunset) Full Moon – 17th (Visible all night) Waning Gibbous (Mostly lit, rises later at night) Last Quarter Moon – 22nd (Visible from midnight into the morning) Morning Crescents (look East in the AM) New Moon – 30th (darkest skies)   1st – CONJUNCTION – Jupiter, Venus – Less than 1˚ apart, Jupiter and Venus rise together this morning.  Get out and look low in the East after 4:30am (when they rise) for the brightest object, Venus, with Jupiter barely up and to the right. 2nd – Close Encounter – Mercury, Pleiades, Moon – Get out just after sunset, with a nice view of the NWN horizon.  The first light in the sky will be Mercury, in its crescent phase, with the Pleiades about 2˚ down and to the right.  Get your binoculars and scopes out!  The Moon can also be your guide, being 4˚ up and to the left of Mercury. 15th – 16th – TOTAL LUNAR ECLIPSE – Sunday night into Monday morning            Watch the Moon pass through the Earth's shadow and witness the light from all the sunrises and sunsets on Earth at the same time! No telescope needed for this event! (Though it will certainly make the event even cooler)  Make sure you have a view of the Moon.  For those of us on the east coast, you'll be looking South about 25˚ above the horizon.  Those nearby trees could get in the way.  Try going out the night before from 10pm to midnight.  The moon will be in a similar direction, but about 5˚ higher on the 14th. Partial Phases starts: 10:28pm EDT – This is when the dark umbra of the Earth's shadow will start to “eat away” at the Moon. Totality Starts – 85 minutes – 11:29pm EDT – This is when the Moon is FULLY in the umbra of the Earth's shadow.  Only the light that has passed through the Earth's atmosphere and bent toward the Moon is visible.  The atmosphere scatters the blue, violet, green, and yellow, leaving only the orange and red to reach the moon, similar to what you see during a sunrise or sunset.  Notice that the top of the Moon will be darkest while the bottom will be lightest. Greatest eclipse 12:12am – This is when the Moon is as deep in the Earth's shadow as possible for this eclipse.  Not quite dead center, but about halfway there. Totality Ends – 12:54am EDT on the 16th – The Moon leaves the umbra of the Earth's shadow and is back to be a partial lunar eclipse until… Partial phase ends: 1:56am EDT – Eclipse is over! (Technically, it's in the penumbra of the Earth's shadow for about another hour, but that's really hard to detect with the naked eye. 21st - 27th – Close Encounter – Moon, Jupiter, Mars, Venus, Saturn – The Moon joins the sunrise planet party this week!  To set the scene, each morning get out between 4:30am and 5am, and you'll be able to see Venus, with Jupiter to the right about 15˚, Mars to the right of that 5˚, and Saturn about 30˚ even further to the right of Mars.  From left to right, that's Venus, Jupiter, Mars, Saturn.  What happens over the next week or so is the Moon travels through the lineup.    The Moon is about 15˚ to the right of Saturn on Saturday the 21st, but moves to about 5˚ below Saturn on Sunday the 22nd.  Monday morning it's between Saturn and Mars, and makes a nice triangle with Mars and Jupiter on Tuesday the 24th.  On the 25th, The Moon lines up perfectly with a line connecting Mars and Jupiter.  Thursday the 26th, you'll have a beautiful crescent Moon less than 10˚ to the right of Venus, and the next morning it switches over to the other side of Venus. 29th – 30th – CONJUNCTION – Jupiter, Mars –  Just like early in the month, but this time with Mars, Jupiter is less than 1˚ away from a fellow planet of in the ESE.  This time, though, you can start seeing them after 3am.   CONSTELLATIONS Use a sky map from www.skymaps.com to help you out. After Dinner, Before Bed: Leo, Big Dipper, Bootes – Leo will be high in the South, almost straight above you. It has a backward question mark with a right triangle to the left of the question. If you look above Leo, behind you and high in the sky, you should find the Big Dipper: seven very bright stars that form a spoon shape. Now if you take the handle of the Dipper, follow its curve to the next bright star you see, about 30˚ away, which is Arcturus. “Follow the arc to Arcturus.” That's the brightest star in Bootes, which looks like a kite. Take that same curve, and follow it about another 20˚ to “speed on to Spica”, the brightest star in Virgo, one of my favorite constellations, since it reminds me of the Dickinson Mermaid. Before Work: Lyra, Hercules, Hercules Cluster – Look pretty much straight above you, and find the brightest star up there. You'll notice a parallelogram attached to it. This is the brightest star Vega, part of the constellation Lyra, the harp. Next to that is a keystone shaped constellation called Hercules. On the right side of the keystone is a small cluster of stars known at the Hercules Cluster, which is a collection of hundreds of stars on the outskirts of our galaxy. Given how high it is in the sky right now, you might catch its faint fuzziness with your naked eye, but a set of binoculars or a small telescope will really help you see it. Don't forget this podcast is found on my Podbean page, Stitcher, and iTunes.  There's also a video version on my YouTube Channel and I can be found on Twitter and Instagram as @mrwebbpv. The Pequea Valley Planetarium and its events and updates are on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram as @pvplanetarium.  

Q-90.1's Backyard Astronomer
5/2/22 - Arc to Arcturus

Q-90.1's Backyard Astronomer

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 2:00


Spring is when the Big Dipper climbs high into the north, making it an excellent guidepost in the sky. Look for the three stars in the handle of the Big Dipper and you'll notice they form a curve or arc in the sky, the "Arc to Arcturus."

Alex Rosèn Show Podcast
The Big Dipper

Alex Rosèn Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2022 50:29


Har du også plutselig fått en ekstrem interesse i stjerner? Det har nemlig Alex fått den siste uka og kom opp med en fantastisk bursdagsgave til sin bestemor! Få også med deg Eirik Newth som forteller gutta om terraforming.

When the Curves Line Up
2022, May 19: Morning Planets Separate, Evening Big Dipper

When the Curves Line Up

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 15, 2022 4:58


May 19: This morning the moon is in the handle of Sagittarius. The morning planets are in the eastern sky. A gap grows between them. The Big Dipper is in the northern sky after night falls. This episode is also available as a blog post: 2022, May 19: Morning Planets Separate, Evening Big Dipper --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/jeffrey-l-hunt/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/jeffrey-l-hunt/support

Only Three Lads - Classic Alternative Music Podcast

We had such a great time with Bill Goffrier from The Embarrassment and Big Dipper that we had to adjourn for a little while and reconvene after the sun went down.  And, if you recall our first After Dark micro-episode, we tend to go off the rails when we record at night! Hey, it's not Andrew Dice Clay, but we do talk about things that three red blooded American lads talk about.  You know, like pop stars and Hilary Clinton.   You have been warned!

Only Three Lads - Classic Alternative Music Podcast
E105 - Bonus - In Conversation with BILL GROFFIER from The Embarassment and Big Dipper

Only Three Lads - Classic Alternative Music Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 6, 2022 47:53


Part two of the three part O3L extravaganza with the marvelous Bill Goffrier from The Embarrassment and Big Dipper! Hear nearly a half hour of our conversation with Bill that we couldn't fit into Episode 105.   Bill came up in the Wichita, KS punk rock scene of the late '70s, with The Embarrassment forging their own unique, nervy, nerdy brand of music that they dubbed "blister pop."  After the seminal group disbanded in 1983, Bill headed east to Boston to pursue a painting career, before getting drawn back into the music world with Big Dipper.  From 1985 - 1991, Big Dipper released three critically lauded indie albums before signing to major label Epic for what would turn out to be the fourth and final album of their initial run.  More recently, both bands have reunited throughout the years and Bill has returned to Wichita to fulfill his destiny as a renowned painter. We delve into the history of both The Embos & Big Dipper, the development of the Wichita scene, the legendary house parties, major label woes, his art career, and much more! Stay tuned for one more episode that we've culled from our time with Bill.   April 7, 2022: O3L After Dark, Volume 2

Story Story Podcast: Stories and fairy tales for families, parents, kids and beautiful nerds.

What would you do if you woke one day and the sun, the moon, and the stars were gone from the sky? Join host Simon Brooks as he brings you Laura Packer and a tale from Ukraine "The Sun, the Moon and the Stars" and Jenni Cargill-Strong telling "The Legend of the Big Dipper".Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/storystorypodcast)

Only Three Lads - Classic Alternative Music Podcast
E105 - Top 5 Albums of 1986 (with BILL GOFFRIER from The Embarrassment and Big Dipper!)

Only Three Lads - Classic Alternative Music Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 5, 2022 118:26


Hide the cats, strap yourself in and get ready for an O3L three part extravaganza! This week, we discuss the Top 5 Albums of 1986 with Third Lad Bill Goffrier, guitarist, singer and songwriter from not just one, but two groundbreaking bands of the O3L era, The Embarrassment and Big Dipper.   Bill came up in the Wichita, KS punk rock scene of the late '70s, with The Embarrassment forging their own unique, nervy, nerdy brand of music that they dubbed "blister pop."  After the seminal group disbanded in 1983, Bill headed east to Boston to pursue a painting career, before getting drawn back into the music world with Big Dipper.  From 1985 - 1991, Big Dipper released three critically lauded indie albums before signing to major label Epic for what would turn out to be the fourth and final album of their initial run.  More recently, both bands have reunited throughout the years and Bill has returned to Wichita to fulfill his destiny as a renowned painter. In this double-stuffed episode, we delve into everything from the formation of the bands, the legendary house parties, major label woes, Alice Cooper, ALF, destruction, the emotional death (and unlikely wardrobe) of Uncle Gregg's father, and Brett adds another nickname to the list?? But wait, there's more... We spent such quality time with Bill that we have enough extra content for two more shows to follow! April 6, 2022: In Conversation with Bill Goffrier April 7, 2022: O3L After Dark, Volume 2 Trust us...we know what we're doing!  (We think...)

Observing With Webb
April 2022

Observing With Webb

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 5, 2022 16:16


WATCH this on YouTube LISTEN as a podcast on Podbean, Stitcher, or iTunes Social Media: @mrwebbpv on Twitter and Instagram @pvplanetarium on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram            Quite the exciting month for planets…if you like getting up early.  4 of the 5 visible planets are hanging out together in the mornings, with Mercury having its best apparition for the year in the evenings, along with two conjunctions of morning planets and some possible meteors.          Welcome to Observing With Webb, where a high school astronomy teacher tells you what you're looking at, why it's so cool, and what you should check out later this month…at night.    Naked-eye PLANETS Sunset – Mercury (last week or two of April) Mercury (WNW) – It sounds like this apparition of Mercury will be the best one of the year. The last two weeks of April it SHOULD be visible, but the 30th will be the best day, given Mercury will be higher in the sky than ever, and doesn't set until 9:45pm.  Just get out after sunset, look WNW, and the first point of light you'll see is Mercury.  BONUS: On the 30th, Mercury will be right next to the Pleiades.  Get out some binoculars or a low-power scope to see both of them in the same view. Throughout the night – None Morning – Venus, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn (SE) Let's use Venus as our guidepost for the month, as it is the most visible object in the morning sky. Venus (SE) – Keep an eye out after 5am, looking SE, for the highlight of the spring and summer mornings this year, Venus. About 20˚ above the horizon and almost impossible to miss, the brightest object in the morning sky will blaze as a “morning star”. Mars (SE) – Mars starts February about 5˚ to the right of Venus, with Saturn nearby as well. Mars is considerably dimmer than Venus, so you'll have to get out there before dawn starts, when it's still dark, and look right around Venus for it.  Throughout April, Venus moves away from Mars to be about 15˚ to the right by the 30th. Saturn (SE) – Saturn begins the month in between Mars and Venus, but a little lower. By the 5th, Saturn passes Mars in its rightward march away from the cluster of planets, and is less than one degree away from Mars. Onward through the month, Saturn continues to move rightward, ending April about 17˚ degrees to the right of Mars. Jupiter (SE) ­– Jupiter is coming into its own as a morning planet this month. On April 1st, it rises after 6am, so it will be low and hard to see in twilight, and far away (25˚ to the left) from the cluster of Venus, Saturn, and Mars.  Each day from there though, it rises earlier and is higher, pretty easily visible by mid-month, when Jupiter, Venus, Mars, and Saturn are lined up and about equally spaced. Venus then closes in on Jupiter, and on April 30th, the pair are less than 1˚ apart, rise around 5am, and are easily visible.   EVENTS New Moon – 1st (darkest skies) Evening Crescents (look West after Sunset) First Quarter Moon – 9th (Visible until midnight) Evening Gibbous (Mostly lit, after Sunset) Full Moon – 16th (Visible all night) Waning Gibbous (Mostly lit, rises later at night) Last Quarter Moon – 23rd (Visible from midnight into the morning) Morning Crescents (look East in the AM)   5th – CONJUNCTION – MARS, SATURN – The first of a couple conjunctions this month, go out early in the morning after about 5am and find Venus (the brightest one). About 7˚ to the right of Venus will be both Mars and Saturn less than half a degree apart.  Them being so close should allow some good telescope opportunities, astrophotos, and a chance to see how differently colored they are, Mars being red, Saturn typically described as light caramel. 22nd – LYRID METEOR SHOWER – At only 10-20 meteors per hour, it is a minor shower, and we have a Moon washing out the fainter ones starting at 2:30am.  You'll still be able to see SOME meteors at night, but don't get too excited.  The shower is greatest on the 22nd, but you might see some on the 21st and 23rd as well.  Just remember each meteor is piece of debris left over from a comet, and we're crashing into it at over 100,000 miles per hour, which crushes the atmosphere it hits, heating it up and causing the bright flash. Some advice for watching: Find a dark location and lie down in a reclining chair or something that insulates you from the ground. Check the weather to see if the skies will be clear Adapt your eyes to the dark by staying away from light sources or using a red light if you need to look at a star chart or not trip over something.  If you're feeling extra nerdy, do a scientific meteor count (S&T and IMO) 23rd - 27th – Close Encounter – Moon, Jupiter, Mars, Venus, Saturn – The Moon joins the sunrise planet party this week!  To set the scene, each morning get out between 4:30am and 5am, and you'll be able to see Venus, with Jupiter to the left 6˚, Mars to the right 13˚, and Saturn about 13˚ further to the right.  From left to right, that's Jupiter, Venus, Mars, Saturn.  What happens over the next week or so is the Moon travels through the lineup.  On the 23rd, the Moon is 22˚ to the right of Saturn, and then move to only about 10˚ to the right on the 24th.  On the 25th, the Moon moves between and below Mars and Saturn, making a nice triangle.  Then it switches dance partners up on the 26th, moving between and below Venus and Mars.  Finally, on the 27th the Moon is closest to some planets for this trip, about 5˚ below both Venus and Jupiter.  30th – CONJUNCTION – Jupiter, Venus – Only ½˚ apart!  Get out there by 5am at the latest (they rise at 4:30am) and look ESE with a decently low horizon and find the VERY bright Venus with also bright Jupiter less than a pinky-width to the left. Get out that telescope and see both of them in the same view! 30th – Close Encounter – Mercury, Pleiades – Get out just after sunset, with a nice view of the NWN horizon.  The first light in the sky will be Mercury, in its crescent phase, with the Pleiades about 1˚ to the right.  Get your binoculars and scopes out! 30th – Partial Solar Eclipse (that you probably won't see) – Only visible in western South America and the ocean around there.  Check social media for pictures and live streams!   CONSTELLATIONS Use a sky map from www.skymaps.com to help you out. After Dinner: Leo, Orion & his winter companions – Leo will be high in the South, almost straight above you. It has a backward question mark with a right triangle to the left of the question mark. Also, take a moment to get your last glimpse Orion, Taurus, the Pleiades, Gemini, Auriga, and Canis Major off in the West. Before Bed: Big Dipper, Bootes – If you look above Leo, behind you and high in the sky, you should find the Big Dipper: seven very bright stars that form a spoon shape. Now if you take the handle of the Dipper, follow its curve to the next bright star you see, about 30˚ away, which is Arcturus. “Follow the arc to Arcturus.” That's the brightest star in Bootes, which looks like a kite. Take that same curve, and follow it about another 20˚ to “speed on to Spica”, the brightest star in Virgo, one of my favorite constellations, since it reminds me of the Dickinson Mermaid. Before Work: Lyra, Hercules, Hercules Cluster – Look pretty much straight above you, and find the brightest star up there. You'll notice a parallelogram attached to it. This is the brightest star Vega, part of the constellation Lyra, the harp. Next to that is a keystone shaped constellation called Hercules. On the right side of the keystone is a small cluster of stars known at the Hercules Cluster, which is a collection of hundreds of stars on the outskirts of our galaxy. Given how high it is in the sky right now, you might catch its faint fuzziness with your naked eye, but a set of binoculars or a small telescope will really help you see it.

StarDate Podcast
Looking Up

StarDate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 3, 2022 2:14


If you want to see a lot of galaxies, you need to look up — not just up into the sky, but up and away from our own galaxy, the Milky Way. And the best spot for doing that is in and around the constellation Coma Berenices, which climbs high overhead on spring evenings. It's the location of the north galactic pole — the spot that's 90 degrees away from the plane of the Milky Way. That plane outlines the disk of the Milky Way. It's filled with stars and with clouds of gas and dust. There's so much stuff that it's hard to see the intergalactic space beyond. As you look farther from the glowing band of the Milky Way, though, many more galaxies come into view. Some of them are visible through binoculars, though most of them require a telescope. In fact, there are large clusters of galaxies in Coma Berenices and the adjoining constellation Virgo. In all, they contain several thousand galaxies. There are many other galaxies over in the opposite direction from Virgo, near the Big Dipper. HETDEX, a large project at McDonald Observatory, is looking at thousands of remote galaxies in that region to study dark energy — a force that's causing the universe to expand faster as it ages. Coma Berenices is low in the east at nightfall, then wheels high overhead after midnight. In early evening, the north galactic pole is to the right of the tip of the Big Dipper's handle. Galaxies are scattered all across that region — high “above” the Milky Way.  Script by Damond Benningfield Support McDonald Observatory

NASACast: What's Up? Video Podcasts

Conjunction junction and a hidden surprise in the Big Dipper…

NASACast Video
What's Up - April 2022

NASACast Video

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 2, 2022


Conjunction junction and a hidden surprise in the Big Dipper…

StarDate Podcast
Owl Nebula

StarDate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 30, 2022 2:14


In the 1840s, William Parsons, the Earl of Rosse, designed and built the world's largest telescope. Known as the Leviathan of Parsonstown, it provided especially sharp views of the heavens. That made it well suited for studying faint, fuzzy nebulae, which showed little detail through lesser instruments. Parsons turned his giant toward M97, an object near the Big Dipper. It had been cataloged by Charles Messier, a French comet hunter. Parsons's drawing of the object resembled an owl — a bright disk with two round voids. The object became known as the Owl Nebula — a name it retains today. The owl's “eyes” appear to be large, empty bubbles inside two shells of gas. The nebula was created by a dying star that's blowing its outer layers into space. It expelled the first shell perhaps 10,000 years ago. The second followed a few thousand years later. Later still, the star expelled a third wave. It consisted of two separate bubbles that expanded from the star's poles. They carved dark voids in the earlier shells. Those bubbles have stopped expanding. Eventually, they may collapse and fill with gas from the shells around them — depriving the owl of its distinctive eyes. The Owl Nebula is about 2,000 light-years away. As night falls, it's close to the lower right of Merak, the star at the bottom outer corner of the bowl of the Big Dipper, which is in the northeast. The Owl Nebula is an easy target for small telescopes.  Script by Damond Benningfield Support McDonald Observatory

Lazy Millennial
big dipper

Lazy Millennial

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 23, 2022 17:55


big dipper

Testing Normal
#132 - Blame Russia and Bitcoin

Testing Normal

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 22, 2022


Bitcoin and Russia are still seeming to make headlines as well as some other odd things. Per usual we want to talk about it and want you to join us in the fun.If you like the music check out the artist here: theearthonfireIntro song links: Spotify Apple MusicPlease subscribe to us on YouTube and Rumble to watch videos after they are published.Follow us on Instagram for random funny picsFollow us on Facebook to get notified of LIVE! episode recordings and to join the chat!Links discussed in episode:The quote tweets on the new time article about me are truly amazing. These are barely even cherry picked, it's pretty much one piece of awesome after another. Highly recommend scrolling.State Governments Shedding Millions Of Square Feet Of Office Space Amid Hybrid Work RevolutionI've been researching the record of Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson, reading her opinions, articles, interviews & speeches. I've noticed an alarming pattern when it comes to Judge Jackson's treatment of sex offenders, especially those preying on childrenPutin told to fire nuclear missile at largest US weapon range as a 'warning' - Mirror OnlineBIDEN: "I bet everybody knows somebody...that in an intimate relationship, what happened was the guy takes a revealing picture of his naked friend, or whatever, in a compromising position and then blackmails.”Ray Dalio's Bridgewater Investing in Crypto Fund: SourcesGoldman Sachs becomes the first American bank to offer Over-The-Counter crypto trading - The Economic TimesRussia finds Meta guilty of 'extremist activity' but WhatsApp can stay | ReutersWales introduces ban on smacking and slapping childrenTIL:TIL that a "Silent Man" in the UK repeatedly gets arrested for standing on a certain road to block traffic. He never speaks a word, not even to the court or his own lawyer. Everytime he is released, he repeats the crime and remains completely silent.If every person sat in the ocean at the same time. The answer? The total rise in sea level would be about 0.00012 of an inch, or less than 1/1000th of an inch. Half width of a hairTIL in Wisconsin your first DUI is only a civil offence. and not a felony until your fourth.TIL that two dim stars from the Big Dipper served as an ancient eye test. If you had lived in the time of the early Romans and could see them, you would have been eligible to be an archer in the Roman armyShower Thoughts:Teenagers often confuse being smart and well spoken with being mature.Our ancestors would probably be more impressed by our food abundance and security more than our technologyIf someone had mind reading they wouldn't be able to understand the people who think in a foreign languageA fat pet is a sign of neglect. A fat animal in the wild is a sign of success.The fact the the word 'Palindrome' is not a palindrome will forever be infuriating.You pay therapists to help you stop paying them

SkyCaramba
Stars and legends of the Big Dipper

SkyCaramba

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 13, 2022 5:08


One of the most famous star patterns isn't considered a constellation in its own right. But it's so easily recognized, many people have told stories about it and surely will for as long as they can see the stars. Two of the stars in the Big Dipper's handle were said to foretell life or death. That handle is a bear's tail. But for a bear's tail, it's very long. And there's a tale about that.

Under the Cortex
Constellations Across Cultures: How Our Visual Systems Pick Out Patterns in the Night Sky

Under the Cortex

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 9, 2022 13:23


There are hundreds of billions of stars in our galaxy, though only about 5,000 are visible to the naked eye. Under ideal conditions and far from city lights, you can see about half of them on any given night. Cultures the world over see similar shapes in the night sky--the Big Dipper, Orion, and the Pleiades are just a few. New research, as discussed by Charles Kemp and published in the journal Psychological Science, reveals that our visual processing system may explain the striking commonality of constellations across cultures. Read the transcript here.  Image credit: Milky Way from the Atacama Desert by Derek Demeter 

Bear with Us, Gurrrl!
Rapper Big Dipper chats Bear Community, Chubby Chasers, and Going Shirtless

Bear with Us, Gurrrl!

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 8, 2022 52:40


On this episode of Bear with Us, Gurrrl...we have a very honest and opinionated chat with rapper Big Dipper about our experiences with the bear community, sexual experiences, coming out, sexuality in the gay community, taking off our shirts, the pros and cons of chubby chasers, insecurities of go-go boys, body positivity vs reality, going gay vs going mainstream, the future of inclusivity, and more...with hosts Teddy Bear and Alexander Rodriguez. BIG DIPPER is a big hairy gay rapper known for his playful lyrics and raunchy music videos. He has released 3 EPs, 1 studio album, a mixtape project and a handful of singles, plus over a dozen music video videos on his youtube channel; including his viral videos for LaCroix Boi and Lookin'. Big Dipper has toured his exciting live shows all over the world, and has used his directorial and producing eye to create queer content not only for himself but also your favorite drag queens. On his podcast Sloppy Seconds with Big Dipper and Meatball his thoughtful and honest interviewing style asks all the most probing questions with comedy, warmth and unmatched vulnerability.

RN Drive - Separate stories podcast

What do you see when you look into the night sky? Do you know the Big Dipper and the Southern Cross? What about the Celestial Emu and the Seven Sisters? The skies of Australia were the focus of stories and study long before Europeans set foot on this land. And that knowledge from First Nations Peoples is beginning to be more widely acknowledged and celebrated. Associate Professor Alice Gorman is a Space Archaeologist and the guest editor of Astronomy: Sky Country, a new book in the First Knowledges series, written by Gomeroi astrophysicists Krystal De Napoli and Karlie Noon.

Crystal Shaman Life
#097 - March Message from the Star Cluster Aragonite

Crystal Shaman Life

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 6, 2022 19:58


As I sat with the Star Cluster Aragonite, in preparation for this week's podcast episode, it invited me on a journey to the stars. No surprise when it brought me to the Big Dipper. As we paused among this beautiful constellation it brought my attention to how each star holds space. Ahhh, yes, the Star Cluster Aragonite has wisdom to share about what it means to hold space during these changing times. In this week's podcast episode I sink deeper into this conversation. Listen in.  Join us in sacred community at https://loriaandrus.com

Thickness and The Shine
Episode #230 - The Big Dipper

Thickness and The Shine

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 3, 2022 90:55


This week the weed hits fast and strong as the boys dive deep into just what in the hell Egyptians were up too and why there's no better adhesive than human bodies. Grab a dipper and scoop up this week's episode!

StarDate Podcast
Ancient Skies II

StarDate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 2, 2022 2:14


The Big Dipper wheels across the north on March nights. Tonight, it's low in the northeast at nightfall, with the bowl above the handle. It passes high overhead at midnight, and is low in the northwest at first light. This prominent star pattern has been recognized by many cultures, although with different names and descriptions. In ancient Egypt, for example, it was Meskhetyu — the leg of a bull. It's recorded on one of the oldest astronomical charts on the planet — created 3500 years ago. The chart decorates the ceiling of a tomb, which was being built for Senenmut. He was the top advisor to Hatshepsut, the most successful of Egypt's female “kings.” The tomb was never finished, and Senenmut wasn't buried there. But it remained sealed until 1927, so the ceiling is well preserved. It's divided into two panels — one for the northern half of the sky, the other for the southern half. The northern panel shows the constellations, although only one is easy to recognize: the Big Dipper. Its stars were called “imperishable” because they never set; at the time, they always remained above the horizon as seen from Egypt. The southern panel shows four of the five planets visible to the eye alone — only Mars is missing. The panel may record a conjunction of the four planets. The panel also indicates that the Egyptian day was divided into 24 hours, with a different star for each hour — tracking time by the stars. Script by Damond Benningfield Support McDonald Observatory

ReviewTyme’s Theme Parkcast
Luna Park Sydney 2022 - Big Dipper, Loopy Lighthouse and More

ReviewTyme’s Theme Parkcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 25, 2022 59:39


Since we last talked about Luna Park Sydney they have opened not one, not two but nine brand new attractions! So join us as we talk about them all and how we feel about the park as a whole!

ZEIT. GEMEINSAM. ERLEBEN.  Der Europa-Park Podcast
Saisonstart, Bauarbeiten, Miss Germany und ein närrischer Fußballtrainer

ZEIT. GEMEINSAM. ERLEBEN. Der Europa-Park Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 18, 2022 9:54


Es ist offiziell: Wir starten in diesem Jahr früher in die Saison - alle Infos dazu gibt es in diesem Podcast. Außerdem machen wir einen kleinen Spaziergang durch Deutschlands größten Freizeitpark und schauen mal, wo gerade gebaut wird. Im Interview mit Jil Andert sprechen wir über die Miss Germany Wahl 2022 und wir stellen euch ein paar Promis vor, die im Europa-Park in den vergangenen Jahren einen ganz besonderen Preis erhalten haben.

Alaska News Nightly
Alaska News Nightly: Wednesday, February 9, 2022

Alaska News Nightly

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 10, 2022


The omicron wave is starting to recede in Alaska. Also, allegations of racism in the stands at a Ketchikan basketball game are under investigation. And NASA's big new space telescope is calibrating on a star in the Alaska-iconic Big Dipper.

When the Curves Line Up
2022, February 25: Venus, Mars, Moon, Dipper

When the Curves Line Up

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 4:59


February 25, 2022: The crescent moon joins Morning Star Venus and Mars before sunrise. During the evening the Big Dipper is in the northeast. This episode is also available as a blog post: 2022, February 25: Venus, Mars, Moon, Dipper. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/jeffrey-l-hunt/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/jeffrey-l-hunt/support

Tales From The North
19. Season 2: Episode 9 - THE MOON OF WINTERTIME

Tales From The North

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 8:19


At this late and magical hour, I decided to go out for a walk - something I used to do quite often when the moon was full and shining bright. I would go out without a lantern, my eyes easily adjusting to see the way ahead and much more besides. There was a rustling in the bushes as I walked past the house, a creature scuttling to a safer place. Then a flutter of wings sounded from the tree branches. Turning back to look at the house, I can see the indoor warmth through the windows. The twinkling of the small lights that frame the window, echo the silent stars above, and the faint sound of music drifts through the still frosty air. I continue my walk and as the music fades a flock of geese replace the choral tones with their honking sounds above and then flap away into the darkness. As I follow the winding road I wonder why I haven't done this midnight walk more often in recent years. The burn is flowing steadily, cutting through the ancient land and rocks, carving its peaty path to the sea. The incandescent moon shines full in the dark sky casting a bright light across the moorland. I can pick out objects, buildings and grasses in the night silence and tree branches and hills against the horizon. The outline of the castle stands tall against the wide open sea and landscape, its shape defined by the blue glow; and the waves reflect a momentary sparkle of silver white as they gently rolled into the shore. And if I look out toward the sea, even in the darkness I can make out the moving lights of ships passing on the horizon. The inkiness of the ocean merges with the headland, which merges with the large expanse of sky, hardly any distinction can be made between one and the other, and therein sits a smattering of house lights - or are they stars? These days are at their shortest, the nights long. As the moon gradually waxes, the stars are still strongly visible in the dark sky. The earth continues its usual rhythms and the world waits with anticipation. With hope. In stillness. Something is different. I stop in the sand on the beach and stand motionless for a time, awed by the silence and beauty and lulled by the incoming tide, the waves gently lapping the shore. I look up to see the stars, outshone by the moonlight, but there nonetheless. There is Orion … and the Big Dipper, or the 'Plough' as the call it here in the UK. 'Twas in the moon of wintertime… ' The lines from a song I learned in school back in Canada called ‘The Huron Carol' comes to my mind. I know we are all emerging from this past festive season, but looking back, it remains one of my favourite Christmas hymns… 'Twas in the moon of winter-time When all the birds had fled, That mighty Gitchi Manitou Sent angel choirs instead; Before their light the stars grew dim, And wandering hunters heard the hymn: "Jesus your King is born, Jesus is born, In excelsis gloria." It goes on, but I cannot remember all the words now. It is the oldest Canadian Christmas hymn, written in around 1642 by Jean de Brébeuf, a Jesuit missionary at Sainte-Marie among the Hurons in Canada. Brébeuf wrote the lyrics in the native language of the Huron/Wendat people; the song's original Huron title is "Jesous Ahatonhia". The song's melody is based on a traditional French folk song, "Une Jeune Pucelle". The well-known English lyrics were written in 1926 by Jesse Edgar Middleton . As the song continues... www.moniquesliedrecht.com

StarDate Podcast
The Leviathan

StarDate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 2:14


A beautiful spiral galaxy spins into view in the northeast this evening, near the tip of the Big Dipper's handle. It actually consists of two galaxies: a large one that's interacting with a smaller one, with a “bridge” of stars and gas between them. M51 is the first galaxy whose spiral nature was seen. It was revealed by the Leviathan of Parsonstown — the largest telescope in the world at the time. It entered service in 1847 — 175 years ago. The Leviathan was the invention of William Parsons, the Earl of Rosse, in Ireland. He owned and operated a large estate, but was also interested in astronomy. And he designed a telescope that far outclassed anything else of the time. Its main mirror spanned six feet — two feet wider than the second-largest. The metal mirror had to be taken out and polished every six months, so Parsons made two of them. The mirrors fit into a tube that was 58 feet long. It was suspended between two brick walls, and assistants used cables and pulleys to move it. Parsons did some of the observing himself, but he also hired a professional. Together, they studied the odd, fuzzy objects known as nebulae. Astronomers hadn't figured out what they were. The Leviathan revealed that some are clusters of stars. But more than a hundred were spirals. Decades later, astronomers showed that these objects are separate galaxies of stars — beautiful spirals first resolved with the Leviathan of Parsonstown.  Script by Damond Benningfield Support McDonald Observatory

What the Tuck? A RuPaul's Drag Race Podcast
S14 - Meet The Queens (w/ Big Dipper & Meatball)

What the Tuck? A RuPaul's Drag Race Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 78:13


Come On Season 14, Let's Get... umm... FourTuckNing! I dunno, man. Anyways, We tawkin' Meet The Queens of RuPaul's Drag Race Season 14 with Mano Agapion & those Sloppy Seconds Divas: Meatball & Big Dipper! WOW! Listen to these homos tawk those new kwans, peg em like crazy, and chirpy-burpy those looks! Go watch the eps on VH1, WOW Presents +, or BBC! KIKI with us at Drag Her's IG! PREPARE TO GAG, WHORES!!!!! PROPS TO YA, DWOTUR! BUY OUR MERCH! 50% of everything we make goes to The Okra Project! If you rate Drag Her 5-stars on Apple Podcasts & leave us ANY UNPOPULAR RPDR OPINION, we'll discuss it on the pod!!!!! DO IT!! AND PLUS AND!!! Go to our IG to watch our super special IG LIVES covering Drag Race UK!  Black Lives Matter. DONATE NOW! Listen to Drag Her on Stitcher, download the app, or get more info at stitcherapp.com/dragher! Get more Mano on We Love Trash & Podcast Killed The Video Star! Drag Her IG: dragherpodcast Theme Song: Twinkids (@twinkidsmusic) Art by Jack Manion (@jackmanion) Advertise on Drag Her via Gumball.fm See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Pastor Joe Sugrue - Grace and Truth Podcast
Ephesians 4:12-13: Every born-again believer will become fully mature in faith and in the knowledge of the Son of God.

Pastor Joe Sugrue - Grace and Truth Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2022 60:00


Sunday January 2. 2022 [I ran a planetarium for a summer when I was in college. It was one of the coolest experiences of my life... I'm going to read you these wonderful passages from the Psalms because you and I in the Salem OR area are going to have to imagine it. We're getting 2 inches of rain today. If you're listening and have clear skies, and find yourself up after midnight, find the Big Dipper, look just below it, and be patient. Think of our Creator Father, Son, and Spirit and be patient, just like They instruct us. It's legit to make a wish, as long as it is His will. For us in OR, the meteors will be there in the heavens, like our Lord Jesus, but we won't see them or Him.] for full notes: https://www.cgtruth.org/index.php?proc=msg&sf=vw&tid=2551

Is It Hip?
Steely Dan, Rugby, Looking At the Stars, "Lazy Flies" by Beck

Is It Hip?

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 66:23


Billy Newman Photo Podcast
Billy Newman Photo Podcast | 192 California HWY 395 – Photographs Of Comet Neowise – Editing Imnaha River Canyon Photos

Billy Newman Photo Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 20:58


192 California HWY 395 - Photographs Of Comet Neowise - Editing Imnaha River Canyon Photos If you're looking to discuss photography assignment work, or a podcast interview, please drop me an email. Drop Billy Newman an email here. If you want to book a wedding photography package, or a family portrait session, please visit GoldenHourWedding.com or you can email the Golden Hour Wedding booking manager here. If you want to look at my photography, my current portfolio is here. If you want to purchase stock images by Billy Newman, my current Stock photo library is here. If you want to learn more about the work Billy is doing as an Oregon outdoor travel guide, you can find resources on GoldenHourExperience.com. If you want to listen to the Archeoastronomy research podcast created by Billy Newman, you can listen to the Night Sky Podcast here. If you want to read a free PDF eBook written by Billy Newman about film photography: you can download Working With Film here. Yours free. Want to hear from me more often?Subscribe to the Billy Newman Photo Podcast on Apple Podcasts here. If you get value out of the photography content I produce, consider making a sustaining value for value financial contribution, Visit the Support Page here. You can find my latest photo books all on Amazon here. Website Billy Newman Photo https://billynewmanphoto.com/ YouTube https://www.youtube.com/billynewmanphoto Facebook Page https://www.facebook.com/billynewmanphotos/ Twitter https://twitter.com/billynewman Instagram https://www.instagram.com/billynewman/ About   https://billynewmanphoto.com/about/ 0:14 Hello and thank you very much for listening to this episode of The Billy Newman photo podcast. 0:23 Today with another photograph This image was taken in 2012 during late November I think this is after we left Yosemite we traveled North again and then cut over to Carson City Nevada where we jumped on the 395 now that next day we traveled south on the 395 trying to get to Bishop California I think that's where this photograph was taken we pulled the camera over to take some photos, some photos of the the light that was in the sky in the afternoon sun that was those lighting up some of the clouds over this, this mountain this hill that was there that had no trees, I thought that was really cool. And so from this perspective, I turned and I looked back down toward the freeway or something toward the highway which you can see in the photo and then you can see just a little speck of where the camera is as you look out to those snow capped hills that are out there. It was just kind of a cool spot to get some photographs but I think this was in the higher elevations and then soon after this you start to come over that ridge come down and I think that's where you get into like mana lake and and you get into some of those other areas and in the 395 but that was really cool. hadn't thought through that that area, and Eastern California really interesting, remote area of land that it seems like a lot of Californians might not be too familiar with. It's got a cool area though really glad to get a chance to be out here and 1:43 photograph it. 1:44 So thanks for checking it out. You can see more of my work at Billy Newman photo comm you can check out some of my photo books on Amazon. And then you can look at Billy Newman under the authors section there and see some of the photo books on film on the desert, on surrealism on camping and cool stuff over there and wanted to jump into a couple of the things I've been doing through the month of July and some of the outdoor camping and travel stuff I've been up to was gonna run down some of that in this podcast today I wanted to talk about a trip I did out toward Eastern Oregon I think like last week before last is when I was out in this area and I was trying to get some good observations in for comet neowise I'm not sure if any of you guys got to check that out while it was in its prime viewing section there I think that was why we had kind of like the new moon before it switched over to being gibbous moon or nearly full moon like it's been the last week or so but I think was it around like the 15th through the 25th or so of July there's some pretty good observations to be made of comet neowise and I guess after after kind of reading about it a little bit it's not considered a great comment like Hale Bopp was or I think it was was I talkie in 1996 we haven't had a great comment in a long time I've ever seen those when I was a kid though that was pretty cool like watching halbach come through for it seemed like three months or something you know that you were just kind of looking at that in the in the low corners of the northwestern and Western skies was kind of cruising across the skyline I remember that still from from like third fourth grade when it was coming through and I also remember the year before that when when like straight up in the air like straight up in the sky at night for like a week or so I was a kid you know but I remember it for that week you can see a real bright two tailed comet those guns were I think I can't remember how to pronounce I think his height Taki or I think it's some it's some Japanese name pretty sure but that was a really cool one that one I still remember really clearly I was only like I don't know seven or something when that like when when that comic came through but I really appreciate you getting to make some observations without one one as a kid. I missed Halley's Comet though back in what 87 I think was the last one it It came through and I probably will be the few years that you know that decade or two of age range that doesn't get to see Halley's Comet in their lifetime so i think i think i was born in 88 of course so if I make it past 100 maybe I'll see it what is it maybe like 80 something years so it's probably not going to come back around until I think it's like the 2017 or 2000 80s that I'd have to make it to for to see Halley's Comet again. It'd be fine but I don't know maybe we'll see our future. The future is at that time. But it was really cool to get to see comet Neo wise it was just a little below What would be the legs and feet of Ursa Major, the Big Dipper, or like the big bear as it would kind of be observed, but if you kind of look at the deeper part that we're all, mostly familiar with, if you kind of consider Ursa Major, the larger bear constellation that it's structured on, if you kind of look down below the dipper is where I was able to make my observations of comet neowise. And over here in the elevation area that I'm at, in Western Oregon, it's about 200 or 300 feet above sea level. And there's there's kind of a constant problem with haze. And with light pollution in this area, and I think it has to do something with 5:46 Well, like I mean, of course, you know, the amount of population that's around and but also, something about the air quality or bad air kind of flows out around here that just doesn't ever seem to be as crisp or as dark as you can get up in the mountains. And, and really, it's just like a stunning difference, when you're able to get out further and make some some more clear observations, you know, the level of magnitude of stars that you're able to reveal, just in a dark night is so much more crisp and clear. It's just like a, it's a total difference. So it was cool to I think I first was able to spot just a little fuzzy bit of a second magnitude version of comet neowise while I was here in town, but I tried to make a special trip out toward Eastern Oregon out into the desert just to do some camping stuff. But what I wanted to do at the same time was make some good observations. And also try and get some good photographs of comet neowise as it was coming through during its period, where you could you can make some, some good sightings of it, but it was cool. So going out to Eastern Oregon, as it got dark, a little past 1030 or so as you look to the northwest, you can really see the comet and its tail spread for a couple inches in the sky. And I was really surprised to notice how little of it you could really make out. See, when you're in an area of almost any light pollution once you're back in town, or once you're in a lower elevation area. With some light pollution and haze around it was really difficult to make out the same way that it could out in the desert or out in the mountains. And so I thought that was pretty cool to get to get to see and get to check out over there. But yeah, it was a blast getting to do some stuff out in Eastern Oregon, I went over to the john de river area. And I was checking out that area. There's a lot of public land out in that area. But there's also some a lot of private land too. It's just kind of an interesting area how it sort of broken up and it was cool to get to go out go out to the I headed out to Madras and then I took off and headed over East there until I ran into the john de River. And then I was able to use this map that I have to go through and find some of the open off or just the open roads that are you know, smaller gravel roads that I set up to kind of traverse the back country out there. So I was able to find a few of those that were open and travel around on those for a while. That was pretty cool. I was able to find some dispersed campsites and set up right along the john de River, which is really cool. It's a beautiful area out there. It's kind of interesting, the john de river flows through this sort of, I guess it would be I don't know it's kind of like Canyon land and it's also sort of these rolling grass hills that sort of make up the landscape of, of Northern northern and northeastern Oregon. And I think Yeah, as soon as you kind of get a little bit for like a little bit north of bend is when you get out of the Great Basin area and you start to get into another kind of landscape that seems to stretch up north of the Columbia River up into Washington I've heard that some of it's from like really old 8:51 deposits from the river systems and the waterways that were up there and how it were like there's old old deposits and then an erosion that's happened from those rivers running through the area for such a long time but but really cool to see kind of the rolling hills and then some of the carved out canyons that go through the john de river area up there what I found the campsite I was sad I was pretty far away from everybody and I was really far away from any substantial town I think it was near i don't know i don't even know what it is there wasn't anything there when I drove through it there's a bridge and a couple little ranch houses you know real ranches right like just a little a little little house like a little two bedroom house and then 100 acres of cattle to deal with so it seems uh seems like another life out there I want to have they're dealing with you know, kind of the way the world is things are this summer, but it was cool. Yeah, getting out there. Went to Rei kind of set up my campsite and stuff had my truck going. And that was all pretty easygoing. But then I waited till dark after 1030 Yeah, comet neowise is really visible up below the Big Dipper. I was pretty cool to get to see out there in Eastern Oregon really bright, really clear, you could almost make out the second tail, I have my binoculars with me. I think there's some 10 by 40 twos. And those really well to view it to view the comment, like really crisp through there through the binoculars and it got really easy to spot most of the night, even just to the naked eye, it was really easy to spot it was like, Oh yeah, it's right there, there's a comment. It's just the big Wisp in the sky. So it was really cool to get to view it, what I did is I set up my tripod, and I have my camera with me. So I set it up with a really wide angle. And then I was trying to get some photographs of it as it was, as the comet was sort of coming down to set on the landscape of the hillside, you know, as the hours went on into the night. So I think I stayed out until maybe one or two in the morning, when the Big Dipper was sort of scooping down a little low onto the horizon. And then at that point, the place where the comment was dipped below the horizon and then was out of view for the rest of the evening. And I think even into the morning, I think by that time when I was photographing it, it wasn't it wasn't visible any longer. up in the morning sky, I think they said, you know, at first in early July, you could kind of view it around Capella if you were able to get out early enough, say three or four in the morning. But as as the direction as it was moving, it was kind of creeping up pretty quickly, you know, day over day over day, it would kind of move a good chunk through the sky. And in the direction that is moving, it was moving to be more visible at the nighttime which really offered more hours of good observation time, which I thought was pretty cool to wait until it was really dark enough in the northwest view of the sky probably about 1030 onward is when you're finally able to make out those kind of finer points of light in the sky in that region. So it was really cool, set up the tripod, set up the camera, set up some manual focus to to get it kind of set sharp at night you can't you can't use autofocus when you're trying to make photographs of the night sky The stars because it just kind of seeks back and forth, you have to set it to manual focus and then 12:13 wring out your your focus ring to infinity and then just back a little bit you'll notice this every time if you do it, it's really frustrating the dark because you can't really always make it out in an easy way and edit your mistake quickly. But if you go all the way to infinity and then take fixed pictures there the night sky you're going to notice that this points of light that are the stars sort of end up a little fuzzy and it's because all the way to infinity for whatever reason just isn't quite in focus at infinity. So you have to go all the way up to infinity and then back it off just a little bit. And that'll nearly ensure that most of that part of the image is in focus the whole way and it's difficult even even if you do have an F stop that's a little bit more tightened out say like an F four f six or something you're still going to get a lot of that out of focus softness, if the focus ring isn't really dialed into the right spot. So I tried to work on that a little bit and yeah, dialed in my focus was able to set it up with a reasonable ISO to get some images of the night sky and pick up some of those finer points of light and then it was able to take a series of photographs in a few different locations out there in the john de River Valley which I thought was really cool is pretty to be out there and it was a nice night really warm in the River Canyon. And really remote to like as mentioned, I think I was the only person out there for a few miles I saw another another group coming in on a like a little midsize SUV and they were going fishing out at a bend in the river a couple miles up from where I was. So I took my truck down a little further and camped out just on the side of the river. It was cool nice Green River up to the kind of high desert tan rim rock that runs the area around there. So it was it was a cool evening cool campsite area it's cool spot to check out comet neowise too. So I tried to check it out. Up until I don't know what yeah 130 in the morning when I couldn't see it anymore and then spent the night out there out in the john de river area and then the next morning got up and try to check out some of the different roads and stuff that 14:26 went around. 14:33 You can check out more information at Billy Newman photo comm you can go to Billy Newman photo.com Ford slash support. If you want to help me out and participate in the value for value model that we're running this podcast with. If you receive some value out of some of the stuff that I was talking about, you're welcome to help me out and send some value my way through the portal at Billy Newman photo comm forward slash support. You can also find more information there about Patreon and the way that I use it If you're interested or if you're more comfortable using Patreon that's patreon.com forward slash Billy Newman photo 15:12 and I think I just been going through editing a handful of photographs and I want to talk about a few of the ideas that I had around that it was cool I was going through through an archive on a hard drive that I have for a bunch of the images from a lot of the camping that we did during September while we were out this this past year and it was cool working with with the newer Sony cameras like like I talked about a handful of times in this podcast so far and and working by like traveling around and camping and stuff working on the track and all that so it was really cool but so with a lot of these photos a handful of or you know in a waterways they really haven't been processed to to a final outcome yet so one thing that I was working on was trying to go through some of the photographs from imnaha Oregon and then now we're going to talk about on here a bit was that area that's east of of Joseph and enterprise Oregon as you get up toward Hell's Canyon or Yeah, I guess up there like right on the Snake River and the Idaho border and it's a cool spot it's a really interesting little town and the geography out there really changes quite dramatically like right there next to the Snake River and out next all those hills and mountains that are over in that area, but it looks like it used to be way more full of water out there just the amount of erosion that you can you can see that seemed like it ran through there to create this giant gorges that we see now that's that's a lot of Earth movement that had happened out there so it's a really cool area out there but once you get out to him now there's no services there's no gas, there's no store really, I think there might be some type of thing if you if you could call ahead and knew what to call ahead for but there's a road that cuts out in the in the high River Canyon where the river flows through and then there's a road that cuts up and it would go out toward Hell's Canyon or toward a viewpoint at least of at the top of health Kanan as you look down into the Snake River and the Oregon Idaho divide really cool area up there and definitely worth the drive if you can get out there but at a certain point there's a viewpoint that you're able to kind of walk out to the shows all of the imnaha Canyon in a really interesting way just the angle of it I think everything starts to line up really nicely in that way and that's something I've tried to kind of look for us on try to put together some photographs. So that area was that was really cool, you know, it's designed to look really beautiful, but I tried to get real low and bring in some of the some of the contexts in texture the grass, in this this dry grassy field that the cast stressed off on a steep slope down the hillside as it went down to the bottom of the ravine or at the bottom of the canyon of the M the high River Canyon that's out there but the contours of the land and the distance that kind of all flowed into the same vanishing point as as in how river you know sort of worked its way up back towards the horizon but really beautiful area up there and it was cool just sort of focusing the camera and trying to try to frame that up to sort of capture that immense sness of edge to edge what it what it was really light is sort of feel that the way that just the amount of angle there is to that and so one thing that I was working on with this photograph was an A handful that is from from them Nairobi, Kenya was trying to try to work on some some more advanced black and white conversions of these photographs and I know there's there's different different like high contrast filters and stuff for for good black and white images and in a lot of ways that could really help a ton of images especially if they're shot right or you know cleanly with good light that you know the files are clean, there's a huge amount you can do with with things like that, but Gosh, yeah, just trying to like go through an ad. Black and White conversions that are a little bit more specific, a little bit more adjusted to some of these photographs, especially ones that have like a structural context to him or a compositional element that's really just defining the landscape by the structure of the land and by the the angle of the land I call it I try to mess with that a little bit so it was a school working on it now like the the way that it turned out, it kind of pulls some of the yellow color out of it which is really just almost sometimes distracting. And then the strips it down to the kind of sharp angles that come in from the top of the top of the frame to the bottom of the frame. These these other sharp diagonals that are kind of mashed up in parallel with the two so I kind of like that part of the composition elements that come about with when you're you start working on stuff when when you kind of work or just when you kind of start getting a little bit more trained and stuff and when you're able to sort of make things a little bit more easily that that starts to come around a bit better but but yeah, it was cool working tonight on a handful of photographs from from them now. rubric came in and try and make some black and white conversions of them. 20:06 Thanks a lot for checking out this episode of The Billy Newman photo podcast. Hope you guys check out some stuff on Billy Newman photo.com few new things up there some stuff on the homepage some good links to other other outbound sources, some links to books and links to some podcasts like this a blog posts are pretty cool. Yeah, check it out at Billy numina photo.com. Thanks a lot for listening to this episode and the back end. Thank you next time 192 California HWY 395 - Photographs Of Comet Neowise - Editing Imnaha River Canyon Photos

Famous This Week with Priyanka
Famous For A Day (w/ guest hosts Big Dipper and Meatball)

Famous This Week with Priyanka

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 47:49


Priyanka is so booked and busy, she's got guest hosts this week! Big Dipper and Meatball bring their “Sloppy Seconds” vibe to the Famous This Week podcast. They talk about the holiday season, pop culture moments with Kim K and Nicki Minaj, and how empowering queer spaces can be. Plus they listen to Priyanka's voicemails as if they are their own. CALL ME NOW! Leave your voicemail messages here: (661) 977 - 6855 FOLLOW PRIYANKA FOLLOW MOM PODCASTS FAMOUS THIS WEEK IS A FOREVER DOG AND MOGULS OF MEDIA (M.O.M.) PODCAST Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Just Another Knicks Fan
Episode 100 - Big Dipper

Just Another Knicks Fan

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 15:27


Knicks pull out the win be the Lakers !!! It wasn't pretty but we got it done. But we gotta our respect on Wilt name --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Dialogue Journal Podcast
Dialogue Out Loud #15: LePetit Richards and the Big Dipper Carpet—An Amusement Based on a Reworking of Whittle’s Research Notes by Simon Peter Eggertsen

Dialogue Journal Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 75:24


Listen on Spotify. Listen on Apple. In the moment of the swerve, family oral history says, Richards tumbled down the slope into a swift-moving stream and was swept away, presumed to have been killed or drowned or, if possible, both. He would have been sixty-three years of age at the time. But Rich-ards was, ifRead More » The post Dialogue Out Loud #15: LePetit Richards and the Big Dipper Carpet—An Amusement Based on a Reworking of Whittle's Research Notes by Simon Peter Eggertsen first appeared on The Dialogue Journal.

FirstPresHolyPost's Podcast
Patterns of Liberation: Destination Determines the Journey

FirstPresHolyPost's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 15:46


This is the last sermon in a four-part series focusing on our church's abolitionist heritage and connection with the Undergound Railroad. Each week we've focused on a different pattern from Ozella's Quilt Code that can be found in the book Hidden in Plain View. "North Star: The North Star has always been critical to navigation on the seas as well as for land travel. Many cultures and traditions use the drinking gourd, the Big Dipper, as a guiding light to the North Star. This pattern in the code told escaping slaves to follow the stars." -- God's vision for the future should act as a North Star for the living of our lives and our navigation through hostile territory. To find out more about First Presbyterian Church of Racine visit www.firstpresracine.org To participate in our ministry, you can donate through PayPal here: firstpresracine.org/give/give-now

StarDate Podcast
Moving in Step

StarDate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 2:14


Five of the stars of the Big Dipper are kindred spirits. They move through the Milky Way Galaxy together, and they may even share a birthplace. And they have some fellow travelers in other constellations. Together, the stars form the Ursa Major Moving Group. It's a stream of a few dozen stars. The most prominent are five members of Ursa Major, the great bear. They form all but the tip of the handle and the outer edge of the bowl of the Big Dipper, which makes up the bear's body and tail. The stars in the group move through the galaxy in the same direction, and at about the same speed. That suggests they're roughly bound together by their gravitational pull — or they were in the past. And they're all about the same age — a few hundred million years. For stars, that's quite young. The members of the group also have about the same chemical composition. That could mean they were born from the same cloud of gas and dust. But a study a couple of years ago noted that many other stars of the same age have a similar make-up. So while the stars of the Ursa Major Moving Group may be kindred spirits, they may not be actual kin. Look for the Big Dipper low in the northern sky at nightfall this month, roughly parallel to the horizon. Some of the other members of the moving group are in the adjoining constellations Draco, which is above the dipper, and Boötes, to the left of the dipper. We'll have more about Ursa Major tomorrow. Script by Damond Benningfield Support McDonald Observatory

Housewives And Me
Saturn Rising and Star Amerasu on RHOBH, Housewives Music and More!

Housewives And Me

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 58:18


This week as the show hits 50 episodes (!) Conor is joined by two amazing guests for an epic Housewives discussion. Saturn Rising and Star Amerasu, recording artists and hosts of the podcast Fully Charged With Saturn and Star sit down to discuss RHOBH from Erika's legal drama to how Garcelle is navigating the group, what they make of the musical stylings of our favourite Housewives, whether or not we need queer representation on the franchise and much much more. It's a raw, funny and unfiltered episode that's perfect to mark 50 episodes of Housewives deep dives. (Apologies for the slight issue in sound quality in the intro this week, the tech was not behaving!) You can listen Fully Charged with Saturn and Star wherever you get your podcasts including Apple and Spotify. The playlist featuring the music recommendations on the podcast can be found here. You can find Saturn on Instagram and Twitter and Star on Instagram. A huge thank you to Big Dipper for his help in making this interview happen, you can listen to the podcast he co-hosts Sloppy Seconds here. And given that this is the 50th episode thank YOU for listening to this episode whether it's your first time, you've been here since the start or found the show somewhere in between. Two very fun returning guests will be on the show over the next couple weeks to mark one year of the show. You can find this podcast on both Instagram and Twitter and follow Conor on Instagram and Twitter too! New episodes arrive every Tuesday, follow so you never miss an episode. If you're enjoying the show and listening on Apple Podcasts rating and reviewing the show is a huge help too. Thanks for listening!

Master of None- Adventures in a Hands-on Life
Episode 125: Lose the GPS, Look at the Stars

Master of None- Adventures in a Hands-on Life

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 71:27


Who needs a GPS or compass when you can navigate by the stars?  In this episode, I teach you some of the basics of celestial navigation.  

Wanna Be On Top? with Shea Couleé
WBOT Presents: A Sloppy Throwback

Wanna Be On Top? with Shea Couleé

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 65:40


Wanna Be On Top? is taking the week off as they prepare to kick off Cycle 4 of America's Next Top Model. To keep things nostalgic, take a listen to Shea Coulee's visit to MOM Podcast Sloppy Seconds hosted by Big Dipper and Meatball. Hear what Shea Weber as up to at the start of the pandemic and before winning All Stars 5. Shea talks about Chicago Drag, cooking at home, and gives some lessons in fierceness.Listen to Wanna Be On Top? Ad-Free on Forever Dog PlusWant to send us your own Tyra Mail? Email us at beontoppod@gmail.comFOLLOW SHEAInstagram - @sheacouleeSheaCoulee.comFOLLOW MOM PODCASTSWANNA BE ON TOP? IS A FOREVER DOG AND MOGULS OF MEDIA (M.O.M.) PODCASTSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

StarDate Podcast
Directions

StarDate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2021 2:14


Thanks to a constellation of satellites, your smartphone can tell you exactly where you are — your precise latitude and longitude. It can even tell you which direction you're facing. And it can do so even in the dark. In centuries past, though, people had to rely on other sky objects to help them get their nighttime bearings: the stars. And if you'd like to see how it worked, we can help. As night falls this evening, find the most famous of all star patterns: the Big Dipper. It's low in the northwest, with the bowl hanging below the handle. Next, draw a line connecting the stars at the outer edge of the bowl, Merak and Dubhe. Then extend the line to the upper right. Keep going until you reach the first moderately bright star. That's Polaris, the North Star. Earth's axis points toward the star, so when you face it, you're looking due north. The next step is to hold your fist at arm's length, and see how many fists you can stack between Polaris and the horizon — the true horizon, not the tops of trees or buildings. Your fist spans about 10 degrees, so if there are three fists between Polaris and the horizon, the star is 30 degrees up. And that reveals your latitude: However far Polaris appears above the horizon corresponds to your latitude north of the equator. Unfortunately, we can't help much with longitude. That's a much more difficult calculation to make — perhaps best accomplished with modern technology.  Script by Damond Benningfield Support McDonald Observatory

Jean & Mike Do The New York Times Crossword
Monday, September 13, 2021 - BAGELS, Assemble!

Jean & Mike Do The New York Times Crossword

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 6:16


Mondays are traditionally the easiest crossword of the week: last week's had a bit more crunch to it than usual, so this may be Will's way of balancing the ledger. Today's puzzle did have a few TIL (Today I Learned) clues, most notably 33A, State whose flag, with eight gold stars in the shape of the Big Dipper, was designed by a 13 year old, ALASKA, and 6A, Face ______ (app that creates bizarre photos), SWAP; but most were of the order of 11D, "Eat your _______!" (parent's order), VEGETABLES and 15A, Leonardo da Vinci's "_____ Lisa", MONA. So, a smooth solve, and honestly, we don't mind one bit!

Mack's World
Be The One And Only | Harry Mack x Kso Big Dipper

Mack's World

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 19:49


JOIN  MY PATREON: https://www.patreon.com/harrymackSHOP MY MERCH: http://shop.harrymackofficial.com/ JOIN MY DISCORD: https://discord.gg/8yXRxbF SUBSCRIBE TO HARRY MACK CLIPShttps://www.youtube.com/channel/UCcnAEyz9VnlBL1DiQqliJkQFOLLOW ME ON SOCIALS https://twitch.tv/harrymackofficial https://www.instagram.com/harrymack https://www.facebook.com/harrymack https://twitter.com/harrymack http://tiktok.com/@harrymackofficial

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 591 (8-23-21): Water Symbolism in African American Civil Rights History (Episode Two of the Series “Exploring Water in U.S. Civil Rights History”)

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (5:32).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments Images Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 8-23-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of August 23, 2021.  This episode, the second in a series of episodes on water in U.S. civil rights history, explores water as symbolism in African American civil rights history.  [The first episode in the series--the series overview--is Episode 566, 3-1-21.]  We start with about 50 seconds of music. MUSIC – ~53 sec – Lyrics: “Well the river ends between two hills; follow the drinkin' gourd.  There's another river on the other side; follow the drinkin' gourd.  Follow the drinkin' gourd; follow the drinkin' gourd.  For the ol' man is a'waiting for the carry you to freedom; follow the drinkin' gourd.” You've been listening to part of “Follow the Drinking Gourd,” recorded by Eric Bibb in 2013.  The song is believed to have been used prior to the Civil War as a code to help enslaved people escape on the Underground Railroad.  In that interpretation, the verses gave information about the route, and the drinking gourd referred to the Big Dipper, setting the direction to go by pointing towards the North Star.  Another water-related spiritual song, “Wade in the Water,” is also believed to have been used as Underground Railroad code.  Both songs became popular hymns within African American churches and, by the mid-1900s, were closely associated with the modern Civil Rights Movement. In a 2018 post entitled “The Role of Water in African American History,” Tyler Parry stated that, “water's culturally symbolic importance resonated across generations….” Following are four other examples of water symbolism connected to the African American movement for civil rights. Number 1: “Parting the waters.”  This phrase refers to the account in the Bible Book of Exodus, in which God parted the waters of the Red Sea so that the Israelites could escape from Egyptian slavery.  It's been used as a metaphor for the enormous challenges that African Americans have faced in acquiring and asserting their civil rights.  For instance, it's the title of the first volume in Taylor Branch's trilogy on the modern civil rights era, America in the King Years.  That trilogy is the source for the next two examples. Number 2. “Until justice rolls down like waters, and righteousness like a mighty stream.”  Martin Luther King, Jr., frequently used this phrase, taken from the Bible Book of Amos, to describe how long the U.S. civil rights movement would need to continue. Number 3: “Springs of racial poison.”  At the signing of the federal Civil Rights Act in July 1964, President Lyndon Johnson said, “We must not fail.  Let us close the springs of racial poison.” And number 4. “A fire no water could put out.”  Dr. King used this phrase in his final public sermon in Memphis.  Recalling demonstrations in Birmingham, Alabama, when Birmingham Commissioner of Public Safety “Bull” Connor ordered fire hoses turned on demonstrators, Dr. King said that Connor didn't realize “that there was a certain kind of fire that no water could put out.” These examples are only a small piece of a much larger story.  I invite listeners to offer Virginia Water Radio other examples of water metaphors and symbolism in U.S. civil rights history. Thanks to Eric Bibb, his manager Heather Taylor, and Riddle Films for permission to use this week's music, and we close with about 25 more seconds of Mr. Bibb performing “Follow the Drinking Gourd.” MUSIC – ~ 24 sec – Lyrics: “For the ol' man is a'waitin' for to carry you to freedom; follow the drinkin' gourd.” SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close the show.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The Eric Bibb performance of “Follow the Drinking Gourd” heard in this Virginia Water Radio episode was taken from a video recording dated March 19, 2013, and posted by Riddle Films online at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kjBZEMkmwYA.  Audio for this recording is used with permission of Eric Bibb, via his manager Heather Taylor; and of Liam Romalis at Riddle Films.  More information about Eric Bibb is available online at https://www.ericbibb.com/.  More information about Riddle Films is available online at http://riddlefilms.com/.An excellent version of “Wade in the Water” (the other song mentioned in this week's audio), performed by Deeper Dimension, is available online at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9NQvOFTioJg. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (2 min./22 sec.) of the “Shenandoah” arrangement/performance by Ben Cosgrove that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Cosgrove is available online at http://www.bencosgrove.com. IMAGES Image of the relation of the constellation known as the Big Dipper and as the Drinking Gourd to the North Star.  Image from the National Park Service, “North Star to Freedom,” accessed online at https://www.nps.gov/articles/drinkinggourd.htm, 8/23/21.Map of escape routes for enslaved people prior to the U.S. Civil War.  Map by National Park Service, “What is the Underground Railroad?”  Image accessed online at https://www.nps.gov/subjects/undergroundrailroad/what-is-the-underground-railroad.htm, 8/23/21.Sculpture in Birmingham, Alabama's, Kelly Ingram Park, recalling fire hoses being used on civil rights protestors in the 1960s.  Photo by Carol M. Highsmith, March 3, 2010.  Accessed from the Library of Congress, online at https://www.loc.gov/item/2010636978/, 8/23/21.SOURCES Used for Audio Kenyatta D. Berry, “Singing in Slavery: Songs of Survival, Songs of Freedom,” PBS “Mercy Street Revealed Blog,” 1/23/17, online at http://www.pbs.org/mercy-street/blogs/mercy-street-revealed/songs-of-survival-and-songs-of-freedom-during-slavery/. Taylor Branch:At Canaan's Edge: America in the King Years, 1965-68, Simon & Schuster, New York, 2007;Parting the Waters: America in the King Years, 1954-63, Simon & Schuster, New York, 1988; Personal Communication, March 16, 2021;Pillar of Fire: America in the King Years, 1963-65, Simon & Schuster, New York, 1998. Joel Bressler, “Follow the Drinking Gourd: A Cultural History,” online at http://www.followthedrinkinggourd.org/. Encyclopedia Britannica, “The Negro Speaks of Rivers – Poem by Langston Hughes,” online at https://www.britannica.com/topic/The-Negro-Speaks-of-Rivers. C. Michael Hawn, “History of Hymns: ‘Wade in the Water,'” 2/1/16, Mississippi Conference of the United Methodist Church, online at https://www.mississippi-umc.org/newsdetail/2576866. High Museum of Art (Atlanta, Ga.), “'A Fire That No Water Could Put Out': Civil Rights Photography” (exhibit November 4, 2017—April 29, 2018), online at https://high.org/exhibition/a-fire-that-no-water-could-put-out-civil-rights-photography/. Martin Luther King, Jr.:August 28, 1963, speech at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C. (“I have a dream” speech), as published by American Rhetoric, online at https://www.americanrhetoric.com/speeches/mlkihaveadream.htm;April 3, 1968, speech in Memphis, Tenn. (“I've been to the mountaintop” speech), as published by American Rhetoric, online at https://www.americanrhetoric.com/speeches/mlkivebeentothemountaintop.htm. LearntheBible.org, “Parting of the Waters,” online at http://www.learnthebible.org/parting-of-the-waters.html.Bruce McClure, “Here's How To Find The Big Dipper and Little Dipper,” EarthSky, March 7, 2021, online at https://earthsky.org/favorite-star-patterns/big-and-little-dippers-highlight-northern-sky/. Merriam-Webster Dictionary, “Symbolism,” online at https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/symbolism. National Center for Civil and Human Rights (Atlanta, Ga.), “Rolls Down Like Water: U.S. Civil Rights Movement” (exhibit), online at https://www.civilandhumanrights.org/exhibition/us-civil-rights/. National Park Service:“Kelly Ingram Park” [Birmingham, Ala.], online at https://www.nps.gov/places/kelly-ingram-park.htm;“North Star to Freedom,” online at https://www.nps.gov/articles/drinkinggourd.htm;“Theophilus Eugene ‘Bull' Connor (1897-1973),” online at https://www.nps.gov/people/bull-connor.htm;“Underground Railroad,” online at https://www.nps.gov/subjects/undergroundrailroad/index.htm. NPR (National Public Radio) and Smithsonian Institution, “Wade in the Water” (26-part series produced in 1994 on the history of American gospel music), online at https://www.npr.org/series/726103231/wade-in-the-water.Tyler Parry, “The Role of Water in African American History,” Black Perspectives blog (African American Intellectual History Society), May 4, 2018, online at https://www.aaihs.org/the-role-of-water-in-african-american-history/.PBS (Public Broadcasting System) “American Experience/Soundtrack for a Revolution,” online at https://www.pbs.org/wgbh/americanexperience/films/soundtrack/. Walter Rhett, “Decoding ‘Wade in the Water,'” Black History 360*, February 18, 2011, online at https://blackhistory360.wordpress.com/2011/02/18/decoding-wade-in-the-water/. Selma [Alabama] Times-Journal, The drinking gourd and the Underground Railroad, January 26, 2004. Smithsonian Folkways, “Voices of the Civil Rights Movement: Black American Freedom Songs 1960-1966,” online at https://folkways.si.edu/voices-of-the-civil-rights-movement-black-american-freedom-songs-1960-1966/african-american-music-documentary-struggle-protest/album/smithsonian. Tellers Untold, “How Harriet Tubman used ‘Wade in the Water' to help slaves escape,” February 15, 2021, online at https://www.tellersuntold.com/2021/02/15/how-harriet-tubman-used-the-song-wade-in-the-water-to-help-slaves-escape-to-the-north/. For More Information about Civil Rights in the United States British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC), “The Civil Rights Movement in America,” online at https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/guides/zcpcwmn/revision/1. Georgetown Law Library, “A Brief History of Civil Rights in the United States,” online at https://guides.ll.georgetown.edu/civilrights. Howard University Law Library, “A Brief History of Civil Rights in the United States,” online at https://library.law.howard.edu/civilrightshistory/intro. University of Maryland School of Law/Thurgood Marshall Law Library, “Historical Publications of the United States Commission on Civil Rights,” online at https://law.umaryland.libguides.com/commission_civil_rights. U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, online at https://www.usccr.gov/. U.S. House of Representatives, “Constitutional Amendments and Major Civil Rights Acts of Congress Referenced in Black Americans in Congress,” online at https://history.house.gov/Exhibitions-and-Publications/BAIC/Historical-Data/Constitutional-Amendments-and-Legislation/. U.S. National Archives, “The Constitution of the United States,” online at https://www.archives.gov/founding-docs/constitution. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “History” subject category. This episode is part of the series Exploring Water in U.S. Civil Rights History.  As of August 23, 2021, other episodes is the series are as follows:Episode 566, 3-1-21 – series overview. Following are links to some previous episodes on the history of African Americans in Virginia. Episode 459, 2-11-19 – on Abraham Lincoln's arrival in Richmond at the end of the Civil War.Episode 128, 9-17-12 – on Chesapeake Bay Menhaden fishing crews and music.Episode 458, 2-4-19 – on Nonesuch and Rocketts Landing in Richmond.  FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sourc

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The Chop with Latrice Royale & Manila Luzon
Betterhelp Presents: Emotional Whiplash

The Chop with Latrice Royale & Manila Luzon

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2021 7:39


Big Dipper and Meatball (Sloppy Seconds) discuss the emotional whiplash of life's constant changes and how to find balance in the back and forth.If you're looking for someone to talk to, you can get 10% off your first month at Betterhelp.com/thechopSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Jason and Deb Full Show
The Morning X with Jason Dick and Friends - Hour 4 - The Definition of Insanity

Jason and Deb Full Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2021 13:13


We discuss why Nick thinks he can see his six pack and play another round of Are You Smarter Than Jason Dick. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Blade Dive
The Blade Dive || Episode 15 || Steve Petrie

The Blade Dive

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2021 136:07


"The Big Dipper" The Blade Dive Podcast, Episode 15 - we are joined by Steve Petrie.  A Terrain Park legend from Ottawa, Canada. Steve Petrie developed a passion for Snowboarding at a young age, later landing an opportunity at Whistler Blackcomb and eventually going on to establish Arena Snow Parks.Petrie's interest in catching air "took off", while building wooden ramps as a kid. Petrie's dad encouraged that interest in Skiing and Snowboarding, by driving south from Ottawa, Canada  and stopping at as many resorts as possible along the journey west, across the country. Petrie's family supported the Terrain Park pioneer's primary interest in Action Sports; BMX, Skateboarding and Snowboarding. Petrie ultimately drove  his Toyota Tercel towards Vancouver, British Columbia in 1994.  landing a job working for Whistler Blackcomb in the Vehicle Maintenance shop, Petrie furthered his skillset and the then Grooming Manager, Stan Kelly, Offered Petrie a job within the Grooming Department.Petrie went on to build Superpark features and in 2005, founded Arena Snow Parks. The highly successful rider owned and operated Terrain Park consulting and contracting business has gone on to design and construct not only Snowpark accessories and tools but leading industry projects such as Holy Bowly, and has traveled the globe contributing to Olympic venues such as Halfpipes and Slopestyle courses in Canada, Russia and China. Episode 15 is a deep dive into the life of an innovator for the Snow Industry – the OG of Canada. We discuss what its like to balance a Terrain Park Consulting business and a family. We revisit some historic moments in park building, such as Cutters Cup. We also evaluate the future and how cultivating new interest may be possible through smaller Halfpipes.Enjoy...  and if you're in the machine, go ahead and TURN THE VOLUME UP!Follow us on:https://www.instagram.com/thebladedive/https://www.facebook.com/thebladedive