Podcasts about Personally

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Best podcasts about Personally

Show all podcasts related to personally

Latest podcast episodes about Personally

Founders
The Big Rich: The Rise and Fall of the Greatest Texas Oil Fortunes

Founders

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2021 31:01


What I learned from reading The Big Rich: The Rise and Fall of the Greatest Texas Oil Fortunes by Bryan Burrough.Subscribe to listen to the rest of this episode and gain access to all full length episodes.WHAT OTHER PEOPLE ARE SAYING:“Without a doubt, the highest value-to-cost ratio I've taken advantage of in the last year is the Founders podcast premium feed. Tap into eons of knowledge and experiences, condensed into digestible portions. Highly, highly recommend. “Uniquely outstanding. No fluff and all substance. David does an outstanding job summarizing these biographies and hones in on the elements that make his subjects so unique among entrepreneurs. I particularly enjoy that he focuses on both the founder's positive and negative characteristics as a way of highlighting things to mimic and avoid.”“I just paid for my first premium podcast subscription for Founders podcast. Learning from those who came before us is one of the highest value ways to invest time. David does his homework and exponentially improves my efficiency by focusing on the most valuable lessons.”“I haven't found a better return on my time and money than your podcast for inspiration and time-tested wisdom to help me on my journey.“I've now listened to every episode. From this knowledge I've doubled my business to $500k a year. Love your passion and recommend your podcast to everyone.”“Founders is the only podcast I pay for and it's worth 100x the cost.”“I have listened to many podcasts on entrepreneurship (HIBT, Masters of Scale, etc.) and find Founders to be consistently more helpful than any other entrepreneurship podcast. David is a craftsperson, he carefully reads biographies of founders, distills the most important anecdotes and themes from their life, and draws commonalities across lives. David's focus is rightfully not on teaching you a formula to succeed but on constantly pushing you to think different.”“I highly highly recommend this podcast. Holy cow. I've been binge listening to these and you start to see patterns across all these incredible humans.”Listening to your podcast has changed my life and that is not a statement I make often.“After one episode I quickly joined the Misfit feed. Love the insight and thoughts shared along the way. David loves what he does and it shines through on the podcast. Definitely my go-to podcast now.”“It is worth every penny. I cannot put into words how fantastic this podcast is. Just stop reading this and get the full access.”“Personally it's one of my top 3 favorite podcasts. If you're into business and startups and technology, this is for you. David covers good books and I've come to really appreciate his perspective. Can't say enough good things.”“I quickly subscribed and it's honestly been the best money I've spent all year. It has inspired me to read biographies. Highly recommend.”“This is the most inspirational and best business podcast out there. David has inspired me to focus on biographies rather than general business books. I'm addicted.”“Anyone interested in business must find the time to listen to each any every Founders podcast. A high return on investment will be a virtual certainty. Subscribe and start listening as soon as possible.”“David saves you hundreds of hours by summarizing bios of legendary business founders and providing valuable insight on what makes an individual successful. He has introduced me to many founders I would have never known existed.”“The podcasts offer spectacular lessons on life, human nature and business achievement. David's enthusiasm and personal thoughts bring me joy. My journey has been enhanced by his efforts.”"Founders is the best self investment that I've made in years."Sign up to listen to the rest of this episode and get access to every full episode. 

Random Badassery
No Comfort in Broken Music

Random Badassery

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 0:41


I think I’ve always wanted to be a more anal person than I actually am. I’ve tried to be the person who puts every task immediately into an app, schedules it, and adds the perfect emoji (the important part.) I allowed myself to obsess over minimalism and Marie Kondo, trying to transform my home into the clean white soulless void of an Apple store. I feel in love with the ideas of Zettlekasten and Roam Research where every fart and hiccup in my brain is meticulously connected to all the others like a perfect meth-smoking spider’s web. I wanna meditate every day, take clod showers, get in my reps, nail my macros, and hustle hustle hustle. I want to use footnotes. But honestly, I just don’t give that much of a fuck about any of it. My real life is a maelstrom of monotony and chaos. I spend my days reading books, scribbly sloppy notes on paper, and hoping I can read them when I sit down to right one of these posts. I count days by how many clean pairs of underwear I have left until I’m forced to do laundry. My living space leans more towards piles than it does toward organization. My analytical mind is easily distracted by emotion, novelty, cartoons, and hormones.Oh well. That’s who I am. I improve what I can, and move along with the rest.As I write this I’m watching the screen saver on my Apple TV as it shows slow-motion drone footage of people on a beach and carnival rides on a pier (likely Santa Monica.) I hate the way it makes me feel. I look at it and I don’t see tomorrow. I don’t think “I can’t wait to go to the beach again.” I look at it and I see the past. I see something lost. I see a world that feels like something we may never make our way back to. I’m sure you feel it too. It’s not every day, but it’s there: the part of our brain that wonders if hugging, and crowded festivals, and movie theaters will ever feel normal again. Or will the trepidation and caution forever follow us?Oh well. That’s life. Improve what we can, and move along with the rest.“there’s a gun in the room”I’m sure you noticed the audio file above. I’m sure some of you thought it was a podcast. I wonder how many of you were unable to scroll onward without clicking it first. I would have.I’ve been playing my guitar a lot recently, and have been sending 1-2 minute little pieces to my friend Johnny (who will probably be the first person to open this and read it. Hi Jon.) I went down a rabbit hole for an hour the other day looking at looping pedals until it hit me: “I have an iPhone.” So I’ve been screwing around with laying guitar pieces in Garageband for iOS.The audio above is one of those pieces. I like playing with dissonance—which can come across as jazz. I think to some degree it does here, which is why I tried to play with the timing in each guitar line (of which there are five,) and make it feel a little broken and discombobulating. In the lead line, I even threw in a bend (which is more blues than jazz.) And the keys for each line are different. I wanted to see how they would weave together, going in and out of harmony.All of this was going through my head but don’t get the idea that I was sitting and planning out every note. I’ve always been more instinctual than technical. I think the reason I’ve never been the kind of guitar player who can sit down and strum an Eagles song or solo like Slash is that music is more of an experiment for me. “What happens is if do this and do this?” This often leads to awful results (the song above might be an example of that to you.) It’s not about writing songs, it’s about exploration. It’s curiosity not product. Charlie Kaufman not Aaron Sorkin.Almost everybody knows by now how much I love the Rolling Stones, but I’ve never been interested in making music that sounds like the Stones (in fact I’ve never even bothered to learn how to play any of their songs.) My own music always veers more towards Sonic Youth, John Cage, Captain Beefheart, Harry Partch, everything post-punk, and The Velvet Underground. Somehow, even I forgot about that.I intend to explore my weirdo nature more. Expect more broken music.the velvet undergroundSpeaking of music, I finally sat down and watched the Apple TV+ documentary on The Velvet Underground. I loved it. It’s exactly what I needed. I’m glad Todd Haynes was the one who directed this. The standard music documentary format would have been very un-Velvet Underground. I can think of no better director than Haynes whose first film was the Karen Carpenter story told via Barbie dolls. His use of split-screen here makes sure that nothing ever feels standard or boring (especially at the beginning where he uses Warhol’s copious footage of the band members staring non-stop into the camera.)La Monte Young & John Cale were creating drones (referring to long musical notes, not the flying quad-copters that watch you when you’re naked in the swimming pool.)We found that the most stable thing we could tune to was the 60 cycle hum of the refrigerator because 60 cycle hum was, to us, the drone of western civilization. — John CaleI’ve long been fascinated by the drone of the microwave often harmonizing my voice to it as I waited for something to cook.I looked up La Monte Young but couldn’t find any recordings of him. I did find Noël Akchoté playing guitar arrangements of some of his compositions.The bass line for “The Ostrich” by The Primitives (basically Lou Reed, John Cale, and some friends) sounded really familiar.Then I placed it. It seems Sebadoh borrowed it for “Flame.”christineI read Christine by Stephen King. I’m a latecomer when it comes to King. Before this year the only thing by him I had ever read was On Writing. Having read The Shining earlier this year and now having read Christine, I think I’ve discovered what makes King such a tremendous writer. He does the work. Stephen King comes up with the most ridiculous concepts (teenage nerd falls in love with a dilapidated car which over time possesses him,) yet rather than descending into camp, he accepts the concepts. He doesn’t criticize the ideas, he embraces them and embodies them. “If this was real, what would it look like.” He fills the books with so much character and detail that even the most absurd concepts become legitimate.the righteous mindI read The Righteous Mind by Jonathan Haidt. Here are some key points:People bind themselves into political teams that share moral narratives. Once they accept a particular narrative, they become blind to alternative moral worlds.We have intuition (the elephant) and reasoning (the rider.) The rider is not in control like a pilot is over a plane; the rider serves mostly to understand the actions of the elephant. Our reason writes the story of our intuitive action. Rather than appealing to someone’s reasoning (as we normally do,) we should find a way to appeal to their intuition. Lead the elephant and the rider comes along.The foundations of morality:care/harmliberty/oppressionfairness/cheatingloyalty/betrayalauthority/subversionsanctity/degradationThe liberal foundation favors care, liberty, and fairness with care being the most favored. The libertarian foundation favors liberty & fairness with liberty being the most favored. The conservative foundation favors all six equally.Nonetheless, if you are trying to change an organization or a society and you do not consider the effects of your changes on moral capital, you’re asking for trouble. This, I believe, is the fundamental blind spot of the left. It explains why liberal reforms so often backfire, and why communist revolutions usually end up in despotism. It is the reason I believe that liberalism—which has done so much to bring about freedom and equal opportunity—is not sufficient as a governing philosophy. It tends to overreach, change too many things too quickly, and reduce the stock of moral capital inadvertently. Conversely, while conservatives do a better job of preserving moral capital, they often fail to notice certain classes of victims, fail to limit the predations of certain powerful interests, and fail to see the need to change or update institutions as times change.media biasAfter reading all of these political books I’ve been thinking a lot about the inherent biases of our media sources. In the process, I discovered this tremendous website called Media Bias / Fact Check. You can look up any media source and it will show you it fits on the left/right spectrum as well as the factual/not factual spectrum.Personally, I like to get differing perspectives (without dipping into extremism and outright falsehoods.) Some of my favorite media sources are: Reuters: least biased / very high factualThe Economist: least biased / high factualThe Christian Science Monitor: least biased / high factual Newsweek: left-center / high factual Business Insider: left-center / high factual Texas Monthly: left-center / high factual The Wall Street Journal: right-center / mostly factualThe Spectator World: right-center / mostly factualReason: right-center (libertarian) / high factualbtwI had intended to write a bunch more but this is so long already. I think I will post a supplemental in a few days. If I continue writing as much as I have been lately, then this may become ongoing (no promises.)debatable ideasDebatable Ideas is a weekly curation of the ideas that stand out to me from the week. That can mean something I see truth in, something worth contemplating, something questionable, something I'm bothered by, something ridiculous, something that I think is false, or something that will make you shake your phone like you caught a snake while waiting in line at Starbucks. It's up to you to decide what you think—and politely discuss in the comments.The ideas are numbered for easy reference. addition, if you run across any fascinating, horrifying, insane, bonkers, and entertaining ideas, please direct me to them in the comments.Judaism was the foundation of my childhood. As a child, I attended Jewish day school and Jewish summer camp and regularly celebrated Shabbat and the Jewish holidays. Some of my most enduring childhood memories are at the Shabbat dinner table, where my parents and their friends would discuss world affairs and important societal issues. There were always multiple viewpoints expressed. My mother is a rabbi, and my parents always taught us that such disagreements were the essence of living Jewishly—to argue, as the rabbis taught, for the sake of heaven. Jew vs. JewInformation vacuums are common in breaking-news events in the social-media era. In the early moments after a mass shooting or a natural disaster, or in the unknown moments after the polls close but before votes are tabulated in an election, there is a higher demand for definitive information than there is supply. These moments offer propagandists, trolls, pundits, politicians, journalists, and anyone else with an internet connection the opportunity to fill that vacuum with … something. It’s a treacherous situation, where rumor, speculation, and disinformation have the power to outpace verified information. Traditional breaking-news events tend to have a short half-life but, as we’ve found with COVID coverage, information gaps can last weeks or months. Sometimes, the definitive information we want (when will the pandemic end?) is basically unknowable, or too hard to pin down. The Omicron Information VacuumThe collapse is inevitable: Virtually every world power that ever existed has eventually declined, failed, and disappeared. The Soviet Union had survived for nearly 70 years, the British Empire for more than 400, and ancient Egypt for almost 30 centuries. But even though the land of the pharaohs was long crowned with success, its decline and destruction were unstoppable. History tells us it’s not a question of whether a world power will eventually be destroyed but rather a question of when. Secrets and Lies That Brought Down Empires // Ideas and Discovery Magazine - Dec 2021In other words, pretty minimal changes to get a tractor working on Mars. So if you want to imagine the future in ten years, picture a big Martian construction site busy with people in spacesuits driving John Deere tractors around. It is, in other words, frontier work. The aesthetics of human space colonization is Firefly, or the grit of the original Star Wars, not the sleek bureaucratic competence of Star Trek. NASA and SpaceX are establishing the first Martian city by 2030 Get full access to Graphorrhea at cahall.substack.com/subscribe

Director's Club
Bonus Episode: Andy Ostroy (Adrienne)

Director's Club

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 39:56


You may not know the name of today's guest but hopefully you are aware of the subject of his new documentary, ADRIENNE. This is one of the best films of 2021. Personally, the radiant Adrienne Shelly was one of my favorite actresses ever since discovering her in the early 90s through the work of Hal Hartley. Then she went on to write and direct one of my favorite romantic comedies, Waitress, which is now a successful Broadway play. I may be biased in loving Andy's film due to my love of Shelly but I guarantee watching it is an experience that everyone will connect to in some way. Whether it's discovering who Adrienne was as an artist or seeing how the family responds to tragedy, there is something for everyone here, as hard as it is to watch at times especially if you're a fan of her work and wish we could have so much more. But Andy's brave and compassionate approach is truly something to treasure and there's no doubt Adrienne would approve. Thank you so much to Andy for not only this film but for a lot of joy and insight in remembering a true talent, taking from us way too soon. I'm grateful to Adrienne for the legacy she left and please go back and celebrate all of her work as an actress/writer/director. View ADRIENNE: https://www.hbo.com/movies/adrienne Learn more about The Adrienne Shelly Foundation: https://www.facebook.com/TheAdrienneShellyFoundation Follow Andy On Twitter: https://twitter.com/AndyOstroy

Culture Factor 2.0
Cliff Ravenscraft, Part 2: Principles for Massive Transformation Personally and Professionally

Culture Factor 2.0

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 30:23


Cliff Ravenscraft websiteHolly Shannon's WebsiteZero To Podcast on AmazonHolly Shannon, LinkedinHolly Shannon, InstagramHolly Shannon, ClubhouseMusic by Paco HallakThink and Grow Rich by Napoleon HillSecrets of the Millionaire Mind by T. Harve EckerThou Shall Prosper by Rabbi Daniel LapinAutobiography of a YogiProsperous CoachThe Big Leap by Gay HendrixUnlimited Power by Tony RobbinsPsycho Cybernetics by Dr. Maxwell Maultz

Patriots Player & Coach Audio
Trent Brown 12/1: "Personally, there's still a lot of room to grow"

Patriots Player & Coach Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 4:10


Patriots offensive lineman Trent Brown addresses the media on Wednesday, December 1, 2021.

Mad Genius with Ariel Kashanchi
Oversharing Is Caring

Mad Genius with Ariel Kashanchi

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 38:59


Dealing with depression is a lifelong battle and I share mine for a multitude of reasons. Personally, it's cathartic to verbalize my thoughts and process them. Knowing how lonely this condition is and how comforting it feels to have other people who understand it, I'd like to use this pain to help others heal. In this episode, I talk about the rollercoaster I've been on and how I'm dealing with having brain surgery this month (not well).  I hope this is helpful for anyone who feels this way and if you have any feedback or suggestions, DM me on Instagram at https://www.instagram.com/arielsnotamermaid/

Business Coaching Secrets
135: How To Add More Value Personally + Professionally

Business Coaching Secrets

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 51:52


Business Coaching Secrets with Karl Bryan Episode: 135 Karl answers questions from business coaches around the world with real-world strategies and tactics to grow your coaching business. - How to add more value personally? - How to add more value professionally? And more. Karl Bryan helps business coaches get clients. Period. For more magic on how you can grow a coaching business by attracting small business owners, filling local live events, andclosing more high end coaching clients... go to focused.com For a free subscription to my magazine The Six-Figure Coach go to thesixfigurecoach.com/get-it Be sure to subscribe, rate and share the show!

Founders
Anthony Bourdain: The Definitive Oral Biography

Founders

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 39:07


What I learned from reading Bourdain: The Definitive Oral Biography by Laurie Woolever.Subscribe to listen to the rest of this episode and gain access to all full length episodes.If you choose the annual subscription option I will upgrade your subscription so you have lifetime access. (You invest once and listen to every future episode for free.) You can also subscribe monthly if you prefer.WHAT OTHER PEOPLE ARE SAYING:“Without a doubt, the highest value-to-cost ratio I've taken advantage of in the last year is the Founders podcast premium feed. Tap into eons of knowledge and experiences, condensed into digestible portions. Highly, highly recommend. “Uniquely outstanding. No fluff and all substance. David does an outstanding job summarizing these biographies and hones in on the elements that make his subjects so unique among entrepreneurs. I particularly enjoy that he focuses on both the founder's positive and negative characteristics as a way of highlighting things to mimic and avoid.”“I just paid for my first premium podcast subscription for Founders podcast. Learning from those who came before us is one of the highest value ways to invest time. David does his homework and exponentially improves my efficiency by focusing on the most valuable lessons.”“I haven't found a better return on my time and money than your podcast for inspiration and time-tested wisdom to help me on my journey.“I've now listened to every episode. From this knowledge I've doubled my business to $500k a year. Love your passion and recommend your podcast to everyone.”“Founders is the only podcast I pay for and it's worth 100x the cost.”“I have listened to many podcasts on entrepreneurship (HIBT, Masters of Scale, etc.) and find Founders to be consistently more helpful than any other entrepreneurship podcast. David is a craftsperson, he carefully reads biographies of founders, distills the most important anecdotes and themes from their life, and draws commonalities across lives. David's focus is rightfully not on teaching you a formula to succeed but on constantly pushing you to think different.”“I highly highly recommend this podcast. Holy cow. I've been binge listening to these and you start to see patterns across all these incredible humans.”Listening to your podcast has changed my life and that is not a statement I make often.“After one episode I quickly joined the Misfit feed. Love the insight and thoughts shared along the way. David loves what he does and it shines through on the podcast. Definitely my go-to podcast now.”“It is worth every penny. I cannot put into words how fantastic this podcast is. Just stop reading this and get the full access.”“Personally it's one of my top 3 favorite podcasts. If you're into business and startups and technology, this is for you. David covers good books and I've come to really appreciate his perspective. Can't say enough good things.”“I quickly subscribed and it's honestly been the best money I've spent all year. It has inspired me to read biographies. Highly recommend.”“This is the most inspirational and best business podcast out there. David has inspired me to focus on biographies rather than general business books. I'm addicted.”“Anyone interested in business must find the time to listen to each any every Founders podcast. A high return on investment will be a virtual certainty. Subscribe and start listening as soon as possible.”“David saves you hundreds of hours by summarizing bios of legendary business founders and providing valuable insight on what makes an individual successful. He has introduced me to many founders I would have never known existed.”“The podcasts offer spectacular lessons on life, human nature and business achievement. David's enthusiasm and personal thoughts bring me joy. My journey has been enhanced by his efforts.”"Founders is the best self investment that I've made in years."Sign up to listen to the rest of this episode and get access to every full episode. 

Catholic Daily Reflections
Wednesday of the First Week of Advent - Jesus Cares About the Details

Catholic Daily Reflections

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 3:50


Jesus summoned his disciples and said, “My heart is moved with pity for the crowd, for they have been with me now for three days and have nothing to eat.  I do not want to send them away hungry, for fear they may collapse on the way.”   Matthew 15:32The first thing this passage reveals could easily be missed.  It reveals Jesus' deep concern for the crowds of people.  He not only cared for their souls, He also cared for their bodies in that He did not want them to go away hungry.  This reveals Jesus' total care for His followers.We know the rest of the story.  Jesus multiplies the loaves and fish and feeds the multitude.  And though this is an incredible miracle on a physical level, it is just as miraculous on a personal and spiritual level.Personally speaking, the miracle is that God, the Almighty, the Omnipotent One is deeply concerned about the small detail of feeding the crowd their next meal.  This reveals that God is not only concerned for our eternal salvation, He is also concerned about our daily needs.Note that the passage quotes Jesus as saying, “My heart is moved with pity for the crowd…”  And “I do not want to send them away hungry…”  This very personal and human concern of Jesus should offer us great comfort in knowing that His care is deep and exhaustive.  The concern Jesus has for the physical need of food for His followers also points to His spiritual concern for His followers' souls.  If He cares this much about the body, He cares all the more for the soul and deeply desires to nourish their souls with the food of eternal life.Reflect, today, upon Jesus' deep and all-consuming care for you.  Know that there is no detail of your life that escapes His notice.  Though that may be hard to believe at times, know that it is absolutely true! Surrender all to Him in trust and know that He is there to reach out to you in your every need.Lord, thank You for Your unfailing and perfect concern for every detail of my life.  Thank You for Your perfect attentiveness to my needs.  May I always trust in Your perfect care for me and surrender to Your loving providence.  Jesus, I trust in You.Source of content: catholic-daily-reflections.comCopyright © 2021 My Catholic Life! Inc. All rights reserved. Used with permission via RSS feed.

Wander Your Way
Visiting Scotland in the Off Season

Wander Your Way

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 34:08


Beautiful light.Cheaper accommodation.Fewer crowds.And some crazy weather filled with rain, clouds, a wee bit of sunshine and some rainbows.This is Scotland in the off season.There are some definite advantages such as cheaper accommodation and fewer crowds.But there are some aspects to Scotland in the late autumn and winter — such as short days — that may not be for everyone.Personally, I'm sold on Scotland at this time of year. However, I recommend tuning into this episode to see if visiting Scotland in the off season is for you.It might be.Or it might not be.Want to talk more about traveling to Scotland in the off season, then send me an email at lynne@wanderyourway.com.In this episode:1:33 Intro4:12 Flights5:18 Accommodation9:10 Less crowded11:00 Meeting locals16:15 Visiting sites18:00 The weather19:23 Short days20:46 The beautiful light22:50 My opinion on visiting Scotland in the off season31:49 Snow!Important links:9 Reasons You Need to Visit the Wonderful and Charming Fife ScotlandVisit Scotland (Tourism Board)Fort William ScotlandLowlands of Scotland with Bo FraserHighlands of Scotland with Bo Fraser — Part 1Highlands of Scotland with Bo Fraser — Part 2Exploring the Island of Scotland with Bo FraserSupport the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/wanderyourway)

Abounding Grace from Calvary Church with Ed Taylor
#16003 - Personally Chosen by God - 1 Peter 1:1-2, Part 2

Abounding Grace from Calvary Church with Ed Taylor

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 25:59


The Better Leaders Better Schools Podcast with Daniel Bauer
Fostering curiosity in schools with Cultured Kids

The Better Leaders Better Schools Podcast with Daniel Bauer

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 32:25


Michelle Goldschlag is the Co-founder and CEO of Cultured Kids (CK), a nonprofit organizationthat believes a student's sense of belonging is the primary catalyst for their success. Michelle's entrepreneurial spirit led to two other “failed” businesses before starting CK. Both endeavors, along with her dual degrees in Art & Spanish, strengthened CK's foundation. Aside from partnering with schools and community organizations in Northern VA and the Metro Boston area since their 2015 founding, Michelle has provided consulting services for international museums and global organizations like the Holistica Foundation in Brazil. Michelle's personal mission is to use her creative gifts and empathy to maximize her impact.   Her lofty professional goals include: Changing the trajectory of education along with her community impact Growing a robust and unified donor community that is genuinely valued Developing the most sought after, kickass volunteer program   Personally, Michelle aspires to: Shed her fear of failure and stop caring what others think Learn to love public speaking (currently makes her sick) Become an author To Michelle, Cultured Kids is a third child, constantly working its way through new stages of development, inciting sleepless nights, and in constant need of attention & nourishment. While Michelle loves her job and struggles to draw the line between work and life, during her personal time she can be seen backpacking and hiking with her family all over the country,reading four or more books at a time, and dreaming with reckless abandon.    Show Highlights Involve yourself in the greatest need for students. Programs that impact, solve problems and connect for the entire learning community.  The value in CLOSING CIRCLES. The number one focus in education moving forward. Facing these fears for unlimited growth. Engage students' curiosity about themselves and the world with Cultured Kids Natural and unique ways to promote SEL and embrace cultures.    “Having two children of my own and not being able to afford to travel. I wanted to make sure they were exposed to other perspectives. They were not only seeing cultural diversity around them, but that they were actually learning about different cultures and about how to talk about differences.”  Full Transcript Available    Michelle Goldschlag's Resources & Contact Info: Cultured Kids Jacqueline Woodson - books What Do You Do With an Idea?  Webinar Form: https://view.flodesk.com/pages/6169a87f74d564fa09f3f4f4 Instagram Facebook Linkedin Twitter   Looking for more? Read The Better Leaders Better Schools Roadmap Join “The Mastermind” Read the latest on the blog   SHOW SPONSORS: HARVARD GRADUATE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION Transform how you lead to become a resilient and empowered change agent with Harvard's online Certificate in School Management and Leadership. Grow your professional network with a global cohort of fellow school leaders as you collaborate in case studies bridging the fields of education and business. Apply today at http://hgse.me/leader.   TEACHFX School leaders know that productive student talk drives student learning, but the average teacher talks 75% of class time! TeachFX is changing that with a “Fitbit for teachers” that automatically measures student engagement and gives teachers feedback about what they could do differently.  Learn more about the TeachFX app and get a special 20% discount for your school or district by visiting teachfx.com/blbs.   ORGANIZED BINDER Organized Binder is the missing piece in many classrooms. Many teachers are great with the main content of the lesson. Organized Binder helps with powerful introductions, savvy transitions, and memorable lesson closings. Your students will grow their executive functioning skills (and as a bonus), your teachers will become more organized too. Help your students and staff level up with Organized Binder.   Copyright © 2021 Twelve Practices LLC

Clinton Baptist Church
Matthew 27 - Jesus Loves You and Wants You to Know Him Personally

Clinton Baptist Church

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 38:50


A message from the pulpit of Clinton Baptist Church, Pastor Mark Philbrick.

Secrets From The Saddle: All things Cycling PODCAST
155. BLACK FRIDAY DEALS & really Personally LACKING FREAKIN MOTIVATION: Coach Sylvie

Secrets From The Saddle: All things Cycling PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 22:27


In this episode, you will learn about: How even the people who have the most energy can experience a Low Lack of Motivation sometimes and even we need to have a TRIBE around us OH and some BLACK FRIDAY Specials if you're looking to spend some money ;o)

Abounding Grace from Calvary Church with Ed Taylor
#16003 - Personally Chosen by God - 1 Peter 1:1-2, Part 1

Abounding Grace from Calvary Church with Ed Taylor

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 25:59


Naughty But Nice with Rob Shuter
We finally know if Justin Timberlake personally talked to Britney Spears after the backlash. Will Smith admits he used to vomit after having an orgasm. Hannah Brown didn't think her husband was on ‘The Bachelorette' from night one.

Naughty But Nice with Rob Shuter

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 27:38


While Justin apologized for his actions via Instagram following the initial backlash, a new report reveals that he has yet to “reach out personally” on the matter. Will Smith revealed that he turned into a gag-prone “ghetto hyena” sexually after his then-girlfriend, Melanie, cheated on him. On her first night as lead of “The Bachelorette,” Hannah Brown did not believe her future husband was among the 30 men competing for her heart. Rob is joined by the charming Marc Lupo to discuss the latest dish. Don't forget to vote in today's poll on Twitter at @naughtynicerob or in our Facebook group. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Founders
My Turn: A Life of Total Football

Founders

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 29:38


What I learned from reading My Turn: A Life of Total Football by Johan Cruyff.Subscribe to listen to the rest of this episode and gain access to all full length episodes.If you choose the annual subscription option I will upgrade your subscription so you have lifetime access. (You invest once and listen to every future episode for free.) You can also subscribe monthly if you prefer.WHAT OTHER PEOPLE ARE SAYING:“Without a doubt, the highest value-to-cost ratio I've taken advantage of in the last year is the Founders podcast premium feed. Tap into eons of knowledge and experiences, condensed into digestible portions. Highly, highly recommend. “Uniquely outstanding. No fluff and all substance. David does an outstanding job summarizing these biographies and hones in on the elements that make his subjects so unique among entrepreneurs. I particularly enjoy that he focuses on both the founder's positive and negative characteristics as a way of highlighting things to mimic and avoid.”“I just paid for my first premium podcast subscription for Founders podcast. Learning from those who came before us is one of the highest value ways to invest time. David does his homework and exponentially improves my efficiency by focusing on the most valuable lessons.”“I haven't found a better return on my time and money than your podcast for inspiration and time-tested wisdom to help me on my journey.“I've now listened to every episode. From this knowledge I've doubled my business to $500k a year. Love your passion and recommend your podcast to everyone.”“Founders is the only podcast I pay for and it's worth 100x the cost.”“I have listened to many podcasts on entrepreneurship (HIBT, Masters of Scale, etc.) and find Founders to be consistently more helpful than any other entrepreneurship podcast. David is a craftsperson, he carefully reads biographies of founders, distills the most important anecdotes and themes from their life, and draws commonalities across lives. David's focus is rightfully not on teaching you a formula to succeed but on constantly pushing you to think different.”“I highly highly recommend this podcast. Holy cow. I've been binge listening to these and you start to see patterns across all these incredible humans.”Listening to your podcast has changed my life and that is not a statement I make often.“After one episode I quickly joined the Misfit feed. Love the insight and thoughts shared along the way. David loves what he does and it shines through on the podcast. Definitely my go-to podcast now.”“It is worth every penny. I cannot put into words how fantastic this podcast is. Just stop reading this and get the full access.”“Personally it's one of my top 3 favorite podcasts. If you're into business and startups and technology, this is for you. David covers good books and I've come to really appreciate his perspective. Can't say enough good things.”“I quickly subscribed and it's honestly been the best money I've spent all year. It has inspired me to read biographies. Highly recommend.”“This is the most inspirational and best business podcast out there. David has inspired me to focus on biographies rather than general business books. I'm addicted.”“Anyone interested in business must find the time to listen to each any every Founders podcast. A high return on investment will be a virtual certainty. Subscribe and start listening as soon as possible.”“David saves you hundreds of hours by summarizing bios of legendary business founders and providing valuable insight on what makes an individual successful. He has introduced me to many founders I would have never known existed.”“The podcasts offer spectacular lessons on life, human nature and business achievement. David's enthusiasm and personal thoughts bring me joy. My journey has been enhanced by his efforts.”"Founders is the best self investment that I've made in years."Sign up to listen to the rest of this episode and get access to every full episode. 

True Stride
EP61: How Are Your Thoughts Creating Intentional Experiences?

True Stride

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 7:36


When you crave a feeling, idea, or thought, you are more likely to seek or replicate that thing in the world around you. This episode talks about understanding how thoughts create intentional experiences. Happy Thanksgiving! I hope you all are spending the holidays in whichever way helps you tune into your Joy Frequency. Personally, I'm traveling to visit my family for the holidays. For right now, I'm here to spend quality solo time with you for EP61's Wise Walk as we discover our True Stride. I can tell you that I'm excited this Thanksgiving to hug and laugh with people I did not see in a while. My crave and excitement for hugs actually began showing up in other interactions in a very wholesome manner. Those experiences are part of what sparked today's quick conversation. On our Wise Walk, I discuss why the habits and thoughts developed from your internal cravings influence the things you seek or replicate in how you operate. Really pay attention to the patterns of your brain. You'll notice reflections of what you already planted in your mind. Since this happens naturally, you can also use that knowledge to understand yourself better. During this brief chit-chat, I share my perspective of creating intentional experiences from my thoughts to reflect on these Wise Walk questions and more: What are you training your brain to crave? What thoughts are you planting in your mind? Being intentional about what you are feeding your brain can train your brain to anticipate positivity, engagement, or whatever you are craving. This helps you prepare to receive. If you want to understand how to plant thoughts that align with your True Stride, tune in to hear these Wise Walk questions: How are we being intentional about the thoughts we plant? How can we better prepare ourselves to receive what we crave? Join this inspiring community to uncover a new sense of freedom, and be sure to follow and review the True Stride podcast as we continue to exchange our light and Heart Value with each other.   In this episode: [00:23] - Welcome to the show! [00:47] - Mary Tess shares a lesson from a book on happiness. [01:46] - Habitual thoughts and mindsets ripple into how you are inclined to view the world. [02:39] - Mary Tess retells how her excitement for the holidays transferred into her interactions with others. [04:54] - Mary Tess encourages everyone to step into the world with intention and be open to receiving. [06:07] - Take actions that align with your Hear Value. [06:42] - Thank you for listening!   Memorable Quotes: “I can really influence my mindset. I can really be selective about how my thoughts impact my future.” - Mary Tess   Links and Resources: Mary Tess Rooney Email Facebook | LinkedIn | Twitter | Instagram Heart Value

Culture Factor 2.0
Cliff Ravenscraft, Part 1: Principles for Massive Transformation Personally and Professionally

Culture Factor 2.0

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 46:17


Cliff Ravenscraft websiteHolly Shannon's WebsiteZero To Podcast on AmazonHolly Shannon, LinkedinHolly Shannon, InstagramHolly Shannon, ClubhouseMusic by Paco HallakThink and Grow Rich by Napoleon HillSecrets of the Millionaire Mind by T. Harve EckerThou Shall Prosper by Rabbi Daniel LapinAutobiography of a YogiProsperous CoachThe Big Leap by Gay HendrixUnlimited Power by Tony RobbinsPsycho Cybernetics by Dr. Maxwell Maultz

SuperFeast Podcast
#143 Why The Weak Are Crumbling Right Now with Jost Sauer

SuperFeast Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 62:36


Over the past two years, the world has witnessed an onslaught of lifestyle stress and disruption brought on by a global pandemic and its ripple effects. The mental stability of many has suffered, and we are currently witnessing a mental health implosion like never seen before. On the podcast today, with remedy and reason for staying robust and ready for any invasion (microbial or psychological), we have our favourite lifestyle medicine man/Qi practitioner, Jost Sauer; Supercharging us with wisdom and guidance on maintaining sovereignty and strength. If you're a regular listener of the SuperFeast podcast, your ears have most likely been blessed with Jost's lifestyle elixirs before.   Given the current circumstances, we thought it was time for another injection of Jost's knowledge, guidance, and warrior mindset. This episode carries a potent message of going within, getting back to earth, and taking care of our inner world, our health, and not being sucked into noisy distractions of the outside world. Jost shares his insights on approaching COVID as a personal growth strategy; An opportunity for a new level of growth not yet encountered, and a reason to nourish the body, spirit, and essence. Jost also breaks down simple Daoist instructions on how to get in sync with nature, our organs, protect our Jing, Qi, and Shen, and follow the path of yin and yang; So we can maintain sovereignty and strength, no matter how many times we get knocked down. Be sure to tune in for this poignant, powerful conversation.     "If the blood gets weak, we get caught up in politics. If the blood is strong, we feel good within ourselves; And if we feel good within ourselves, we stay detached. That's all it is. So when I talk about detachment, it requires strong blood and strong Jing. Just focus on your Jing, focus on your blood, take your herbs, take your mushrooms, live the lifestyle, and that's really all there is; The rest will come naturally".   - Jost Sauer      Host and Guest discuss:   Signs of depleted/weak blood and Jing. The best hours for deep rest, and why. Why blood/Qi levels are at an all-time low. How fear triggers weakness within the body. Lifestyle practices to harness and guard Jing. The Metal element Lung-Kidney relationship. The importance of having a spiritual connection. Why we guard the three treasures; Jing, Qi, Shen. Why people are feeling depleted and weak right now. Following the Qi cycle model to strengthen blood/Jing. Why rest and recovery are essential for a robust immune system. Supporting your health/wellbeing through consistency and lifestyle. The body/mind connection and how weak blood/Jing leads to a weak mind.     Who is Jost Sauer? Jost (aka the lifestyle medicine man) was born in Germany in 1958 and is an acupuncturist, author, Qi practitioner of 40 years, and healthy lifestyle expert. His background includes competitive skiing, body-building, and ironman training. Post-drug addiction and suicidal depression led him to martial arts, TCM, the power and cycle of Qi, and the understanding that a natural rhythmic lifestyle holds the secrets to anti-aging, health, and success. Jost has been using lifestyle therapeutically for his clients for over 20 years. Jost is an expert in Chinese Medicine, which he lectured in for over a decade at the Australian College of Natural Medicine, has been running successful health clinics since 1991, initially specialising in addiction recovery, and has treated tens of thousands of clients. His passion is sharing his ongoing discoveries about making lifestyle your best medicine through his books, blogs, articles, workshops, and retreats (all of which we linked in the resources below).   CLICK HERE TO LISTEN ON APPLE PODCAST    Resources: Jost Website Jost Facebook Jost Instagram Jost Youtube Jing Blend SuperFeast Eucommia Bark SuperFeast The 15 Minute Bodyweight Workout Higher and Higher Book - Jost Sauer  Chi Health Cycle- Jost Sauer's new book Qi Cycles And The Dao with Jost Sauer (EP#48)   Lifestyle Medicine with Accupuncturist Jost Sauer (EP#63) The Importance of Sleep For Healthy Hun and Qi with Jost Sauer (EP#102)     Q: How Can I Support The SuperFeast Podcast? A: Tell all your friends and family and share online! We'd also love it if you could subscribe and review this podcast on iTunes. Or  check us out on Stitcher, CastBox, iHeart RADIO:)! Plus  we're on Spotify!   Check Out The Transcript Here:   Mason: (00:00) Okay. Jost, Welcome back, man.   Jost Sauer: (00:03) Yeah, welcome back. Nice to be back on here again, I think.   Mason: (00:07) Yeah, I think fourth podcast?   Jost Sauer: (00:11) Must be.   Mason: (00:11) Look at this [inaudible 00:00:12] I'm sorry. I'm so excited. Mostly because I know the realms we're going to be touching on. But I'm genuinely excited. I know the pace that you move in and your chemical process is transforming at such a rate that I know I'm going to hear things from you and the way that you've synthesise them based on all this material that's going on in the world. I'm going to hear it completely newly plus some new downloads. I can't wait. Let's jump straight in. How you going at the moment and how you are finding the world and where's your work taking you?   Jost Sauer: (00:50) Okay, look, I've been working with people for 40 years now. It's 2021, I started in 1981. And so obviously, originally I started in social work. The focus on mental health always was the main focus. So 40 years working with people you come across a lot of stories, and you really observe people's inner world, because you have to dig in. But what I'm experiencing the last year, what I've observed in the last year, I have not observed before. That's obviously something a totally new game that's playing and impacting on people more than all the other ramifications and troubles and tribulations I worked with in the past. Obviously, stress level is going through the roof, and because the question was about how I cope with this, I mean, from a Chinese medicine perspective, stress is a good thing. I mean, when we do tai chi, we stress the body. We need the stress in order to evolve. And so the body is actually designed to unleash forces during stress that otherwise wouldn't come forward. There's obviously a massive growth potential right now, if we know what to do.   Jost Sauer: (02:14) If you don't know what to do, then it's obviously, it can be a killer. It can really destroy you. And so the key element is here that without a stress factor, that means churning on the organs and churning on the blood, we can't actually produce vital forces. The one thing we can do to the body is to be lazy. Sit around all day, be comfortable, and just waiting for things to happen, and get delivered the action, rather than us actually stimulated to act on stressful situation and needing to get up and dig deep. Especially, dig very, very deep, and unleash forces that otherwise we didn't know we had. There's obviously always a principle of all-growth factors. We get thrown into a situation, we didn't know we could cope with, and suddenly, we discover we got vital forces available to us that before we couldn't. So from a Chinese medicine perspective, that would say, "The universe would never give us a problem if we don't have the potential to cope. The universe would never give us a situation if you don't have the ability to grow from."   Jost Sauer: (03:23) It's almost like the situation that we're facing, it's like what a martial artist would look at. Is that COVID, the virus, it's a threat, but it tries to invade the body, and we need to fight against it. So in order to fight against it, we will get stronger. It's like a battlefield right now and we need to look at life we are at war. But the war is a little bit tricky because it's not only COVID, the virus, it's also the government and it's also Big Pharma, and it's also people will buy into a belief pattern that are definitely based on some sort of like development from the dogmatic foreign politics and big business. So the enemy is not really direct. Personally, I'm not worried about COVID because I know what to do, but I'm more worried about what the government is going to do.   Mason: (04:31) I'm curious there because you said in 40 years, you haven't you haven't ever seen anything like this, and with your patients and with people that you're talking to. We talked about cracks showing, big crack showing mental health issues been gone through the roof. I'm curious. There's a few ways to approach this question. Now, what is it about the approach? What is it about that? The virus, the pharmaceutical companies, the media. Why are so many people... Let's say if no one has a challenge that maybe you don't get through it, but you do have the potential if you make the right choices to get through this challenge, why are people stumbling more than ever? What's tripping them up that's leading to so much mental disharmony and how are people going to get back into a flow and meet this battle in staying mentally healthy?   Jost Sauer: (05:25) The primary reason is, people's core is deficient and weak as never been before. From a Chinese medicine perspective, people's blood and chi level is at an all time low. That's as a result of having lived a life in comfort, too much in comfort, or the life of not needing to work as hard physically. Instead, to hand over to the computer to do the work. So means, getting up and sitting down and straight, alleging all the work done mentally and wire the computer without engaging bodily function, which would produce blood. Blood production is vital in China's medicine, because that's your fuel, that's your Elixer, that's your life. If your blood is strong, you got passion, you got drive. You want to express yourself, and you feel strong. This is the most important thing if the blood is healthy, your Jing is healthy, you feel strong. If your blood is deficient, and your blood is unhealthy, you feel weak. Of course, when you feel weak, you need to be protected, you've got the instinct, I need to get protected.   Jost Sauer: (06:42) And so over the last 10 years, society has depleted their blood, their Jing and their Chi, and therefore progressively year after year feeling more and more weak. And so people are actually starting to reach a point now where they feel weak just by getting up and all day they feel weak. And having observed people for 40 years, I must say this year is probably the highest number of weak people I've ever seen. I do regular workplace wellness talks. I'd go to companies and I talk about health measurements. And the last few weeks the talks I've been doing in particular last week, I was talking to a company, and there were 60 people in the audience. I've never seen so many weak people in one spot. I'm not judgmental, but I'm observing and I know what to look for. I know the signs of when blood is deficient. I know what to look for when the Jing is deficient. And I look at the face, I look at the way their [inaudible 00:07:41] the posture, the body, and I can see, "My God, these bodies aren't producing enough blood. Not producing enough Jing." If they don't produce enough blood and Jing, your self awareness is tempered by your psychological self profile of being, I am weak.   Jost Sauer: (08:00) If I feel weak, I am prone to accept the protection from a higher instances. That's why the government obviously now is doing all this fear mongering in order to trigger that weakness, and then obviously people are, "I need to get protected. I need to get protected." If that would have done the same thing, like 2,000 years ago to a village, [inaudible 00:08:25] the Vikings they wouldn't have had a problem. They would have got up and put the sword up and, "Get the fuck out of here. You don't get fuck with us." But if I feel weak, and the fear comes in, obviously, I defeat myself. So obviously, in all ancient cultures, the most important thing is, always nourish your essence. Always nourish the treasures. The Jing, the Chi, the Shen, because that gives you the feeling of being strong. If you feel strong, you will ward off enemy. If someone tries to invade the village, you are ready to attack, you're ready to fight. And obviously, I mean, people would say it was done [inaudible 00:09:17], whatever it is. Over the last 10 years, the lifestyle has led to a high level of lifestyle disease as never before. So we're looking at an enormous number of people dying because of lifestyle disease. But fundamentally, lifestyle disease is the deficiency in the vital forces. And that is really the real problem.   Mason: (09:38) When you talk about weakness, I can't help but just bring up in my terminology, like a weak mind. And we know the blood is transporting the Shen, our mental acuity to the rest of the body. And I do so to bring up the term "weak mind" because I know that people will think what I'm saying is, if you go and trust the government, you have a weak mind. Or if you go and do ABC, you have a weak mind. But it's not that it's what... You've nailed it. You bought into the fear, and you've got a weakness within yourself that you're not self generating, and you can topple over. And so you reach for a higher power an institution to tell you what to do. I mean I always feel, there's people listening to this that are choosing one road or the other road. I know, people that have beautifully with a strong mind, choosing to do medical interventions, and I know other people that are just freaking out with a weak mind and choosing to do that same thing. And there's a very big difference there. I love the way that you describe that man.   Jost Sauer: (10:41) I mean, the mind in Chinese medicine is affiliated with the substance, and that is obviously once again, connected to an organ. When we talk stronger mind, we don't really talk stronger mind, we talk strong organ, strong blood, which then means you have a strong mind. It's like, in order to experience power, you need a strong engine. And so the body-mind connection is obviously always number one in Chinese medicine. And so when we're talking about a weak mind, what we mean is, "I got weak blood, I got weak Jing."   Mason: (11:25) [crosstalk 00:11:25] no will no capacity to have that will take on responsibility for yourself.   Jost Sauer: (11:29) Yeah. If you if the battery's low, you feel defeated. If you've got lots of Jing, lots of power, lots of blood, and you're wrestling with someone or you go for a run, obviously you're trying to win. But if you come at the end of a marathon, and you're completely depleted, the battery is empty, and then someone tackles you, you would give in to the power invasion and say, "Okay. I can't do it anymore." That's what we see now. On the line is that people can't do it anymore. I hear this all the time now in clinic and when I do my talks, "I can't do this anymore. I had enough. I can't do this anymore." So when the battery is empty-   Mason: (12:16) Do they just mean life in general or?   Jost Sauer: (12:18) What they say with that is, "I can't fight against this anymore."   Mason: (12:21) Yeah, right.   Jost Sauer: (12:22) I had enough. I can't fight. It's too much fighting. But what it means it's like saying, "If we would have the same problem we have now 30 years ago, it wouldn't have been a problem." 30 years ago, people were still much healthier than what they are now. So 30 years ago, Jing and blood on a communal level was four or five times higher what it's now, if you want to give it a hypothetical figure.   Mason: (12:52) People that were like a strong piece of German rye bread versus a piece of flabby tip top white bread these days.   Jost Sauer: (13:00) Yeah, yeah. It's been too long. But the most important thing is obviously, the endless stimulation and lack of sleep. When it comes to what builds blood, every effort will tell you, it's recovery. We work hard, we get stressed, we work hard, we recover. We engage with the stimulus, we work hard we get our best, we recover. That's a principle that all the ancients have been doing. The vikings you fight hard, and then you recover. But recovery is now completely impaired in the western society, because recovery requires a deep, nourishing sleep. And for recovery purposes, the best sleep is before midnight. 9:00 PM go to bed, and then you sleep beautifully till two or three. So you got this six-hour sleep. The sleep before midnight is like four or five times more powerful than the sleep after midnight. That has been established already in the old times from way back. Everyone knows you got be trying to get that sleep before midnight. I still remember back in the early '80s, when I came to Australia, television stopped at 10:30 PM.   Mason: (14:22) It goes, "Fyiii."   Jost Sauer: (14:24) Good night everyone. And those of us who stayed up and smoked lots of bongs, we were staring at that ABC symbol for endlessly.   Mason: (14:37) I've vague memories, vague memories of that little like rainbow.[crosstalk 00:14:41]   Jost Sauer: (14:44) It was totally hilarious. The way I looked at it. Shit is still the same shit. But what it meant, good night, everyone. Let's go to bed. If you didn't go raging and partying, you actually had your sleep. And then you went to bed and there was no stimulation. But over the last 10 years, that has been dramatically changed. So first of all, television has gotten several channels now so it goes on 24/7, then you got the internet. But the next problem is the smartphone. Obviously, that means people have the phone, the stimulation brought up into the midnight and later. And so the body never actually goes into the recovery mode. There is absolutely no traces anymore for us to recover proper. Therefore, people would say, I just had enough I can't cope anymore. If exercise constantly, if you do like one of those ultra marathons and you do three, four days in a row, after the fourth day, you would say, "I had enough." You need to go home, you need recovery.   Jost Sauer: (16:04) Recovery is something that has been taken outside the equation of our lifestyle, we don't have that anymore. And so it's just people taking emails home, people working. I mean, we get emails that, when me see that next morning, when we go through the emails like after breakfast when I turn my computer on, I see emails have been sent at 2.00 AM, 1:00 AM and things like that. And especially with all those lockdowns people going working later into the night. And so obviously, all that impacts on the blood. And so the vital force needs to be replenished. If the vital force is not replenished through effective recovery, we're getting weaker. You would never see a martial art fighter in the UFC, before a big fight, having six weeks stay up all night. You never hear that. Never hear that. I live in the martial art world, I love martial art, and that need you to be strong because you don't know what that opponent is about. You don't know what the fight is going to be. You got to be prepared. You don't know the outcome. It's all about being as prepared as possible. You don't go in unprepared, you've got to be totally prepared. And then you're ready for surprises to come forward. Suddenly you discover a strength you didn't know you had.   Jost Sauer: (17:33) And this strength, this power that suddenly comes through, is stored in your blood, and it's stored in your Jing, and it's stored in your kidney. Your kidney stores the essence. And so therefore, the lifestyle of the fighter, or the female fighter, because there's a lot of incredible female fighters out there now, like women I would not face up to. I wonder, "My god, their power is mind boggling." But when you look at their lifestyle, all of them, early to bed, up early especially before an event in order to get the maximum recovery. And because we are at war now, we got to understand, "Okay, the only choice we have right now is, we're going to just protect and guard our essence." Those government, I mean, I nearly said those government assholes. It's absolutely it's fiery it's what they're doing now.[crosstalk 00:18:37] off their heads. It's complete insanity. They should all be shot. That's it, finished, start new. It's almost like we need a revolution shot at everyone's head and start again. I mean, it happened before in the past. They're crossing the line, they're crossing the line.   Mason: (19:01) The whole nature. I mean, I remember our last podcast went into sleep as well. And I want to keep on talking about it. Because we're not listening. I know why. I've I haven't. I mean, but I'm kind of like that battlefield. This is what we're looking at. We don't know how long and we don't know what's coming next. I have a lot of friends that when I do talk about it from this combative kind of mindset, and I also kind of have faith and trust in the process and I just simply do. I have, as we both know, there's that yin yang goes, on the Dow and something's going to happen eventually. There's going to be opposite reactions and I love having faith with that. It doesn't mean that I don't also call a spade a spade and acknowledge that there is a huge assault on the natural human right now. And so, the battlefield... And lot of your posts recently that spurred me to kind of get you on again, is just like I might be putting my own terminology into it. How do you maintain your sovereignty and not get knocked over, regardless of your choices through all of this? How do you guard your centre, guard your essence, and remain you and don't get compromised?   Mason: (20:21) Don't lose this battle essentially. The fact that you've gone up going to sleep, it's such an unlikely battlefield, isn't it?   Jost Sauer: (20:28) Yeah.   Mason: (20:29) Because right now we need stamina. We don't know how long this is going to go for. Maybe everyone forgets about it, like next February. Who knows what comes next? Who knows how much corporate interest and pharmaceutical interest goes in trying to the claim ownership over the human body? Who knows regardless of what choices you make, hopefully strong choices, not from fear, how much do you stay an individual. And the first battlefield the fact that you've gone back to sleep, and I feel like something's ringing in me right now. Because I have not been treating it as such. And I can feel I'm like, "Now, this is where you need to start." And I will ask you what other elements you see emerging as going, "These are the basics that you need to be aware of in order to stay within the natural and not fall over into reliance." But I really appreciate you hitting that space again. For the sake of our sweet kidneys and livers.   Jost Sauer: (21:30) Yes. And spleen. First of all, I always remind myself that being here in the physical is a battle. All the ancient scriptures, the Bhagavad Gita is based on a battlefield, the Taoist look at being in the physical is a battle, is a fight. That's why they're all trained warriors. The sea culture that I've studied quite extensively under, they carry a dagger and a sword with them all the time. So they understand that you've got to be a warrior or a female warrior. And so we are in battle. So the nature of the physical of planet Earth is, it's a battle. It's a battle between good and bad, yin and yang and so you got that constant struggle between one force trying to override the other force. You always have, obviously, from a Taoist perspective is like the source of inspiration. There are two forces, there's a dark force and there's the light force. And depending on how you live, and what you want, you will be guided by that source of inspiration.   Jost Sauer: (22:53) So if you got sinister motives and incentives, you will be guided by the source of inspiration that comes from a darker source. If you have a well being in mind of all humanity, you affirm with the lighter force, then obviously, your source of inspiration will be the light and you will be guarded accordingly. The support is obviously always behind the scene from either force. So Big Pharma, those people, obviously, their source of inspiration comes from the darker side, where, obviously, us freedom fighters, our source of inspiration comes from the light. So that means we have our connection to the light, they have their connection to the dark. And so behind the scene, those forces will actually move through us in order to act on us. For some reason, this planet Earth, which is considered planet number four, in the constellation of developments towards the journey of the soul towards higher realms, this is always been the planet of war and peace or the battle in order to understand the forces within.   Jost Sauer: (24:06) For example, they've identify that there's trillions and trillions of viruses in our body and those viruses fight each other all the time. Some of them are good and some of them are bad, and that the battlefield that creates the field of yin and yang, and that creates actually, what that physical makes up to be. And so it is dark and light, wet and dry. And so as a result of that is we got our existence, and that then shapes us somehow. So every morning, I remind myself that that is actually what we're here for, to engage with that field. And that's obviously the yin and the yang and the readiness to prepare to fight. And so then the next thing is that Taoism in particular has given us a lot of instructions, how to deal with that battle, how to fight the battle. So the first thing what they do is obviously they have identified the lifestyle. And the lifestyle is those who follow the path of yin and yang will become invisible to those who try and to control yin and yang.   Jost Sauer: (25:20) Big Pharma tries to control yin and yang. If you follow the path of yin and yang, you got under the radar. And this is something been said for thousands of years. So what we're experiencing right now has not been here before. It's just like in our lifetime, for the past 40 years, we haven't experienced it to such intensity. But it has been before many times and it's been observed in the history of Taoism and Buddhism all along, which is why obviously, those cultures always dedicate themselves to prayer and worship towards the forces, so that the group forces support them. And if you obviously you don't do that, then you may not have as much support. So obviously very important is to have a spiritual connection. Very, very strong, just be firmly grounded in a spirit of connection every morning to, "Boom. All right, I am a fighter of the light, I am connected to the light, I want the light." And obviously in that moment, it will come through to us. Every time you say, "I am light," bang, it's there.   Jost Sauer: (26:28) Obviously, if I can neglect that I weaken my position. That means I am on my own and that is not a good idea. I mean, my genetic background is, I'm the Viking. That's my philosophy, the Viking philosophy. The Vikings were enormously grounded and connected to the spirit of belief, that would not go into battle without being spiritually connected. That was their absolute most important thing. I am spiritually connected to my spiritual path, and when I lose my body, I will continue my battle. And that's all the training I've had all along with the Masters I studied under for all those years, that the spiritual of connection is crucial. So if you've got the spiritual connection, that means you actually feel supported. And then you understand deep down, "Okay." It's all part of life what we go through now.   Jost Sauer: (27:23) So the next thing is that Taoism has given us the instructions about how to nourish this body so we can fight effectively, such that we can keep getting up because what makes a good warrior, a strong warrior is the person who keeps getting up. They get flogged but they get up again. Like Rocky said, "It's not about how hard you can punch, it's about how hard you can get punched." It's about getting up again. That's why all those Rocky movies are great, because he just gets flogged, he gets up again, gets flogged, gets up again. And that's the spirit. That's the spirit that we need. Of course, they're trying to flog us, but that's the nature of the game. If I go into the ring for a sparring session, of course I get flogged. But I also keep getting up.   Mason: (28:26) That tenacity and that knowing that no matter what happens, I'm never giving up. I'll never going to stop. That connection. And then you come back to lifestyle, which is always amazing. Lifestyle [inaudible 00:28:42] it's always so fun to forget that it comes back to the consistency and lifestyle. That that's the thing that's going... And always when you start getting battered and beaten a little bit and you feel like you're losing your way, you get up, you go right. I'm going to get into my bad habits again. I'm going to like, [crosstalk 00:28:59]   Jost Sauer: (29:06) That's boom. That's a downward spiral.   Mason: (29:06) Well, and that's what you reiterate here because what we were talking about is our capacity to stay within our warrior, within our warriors centres, within our natural self with strong blood with a connection to what our own unique spiritual path is, to regardless of what choices you make know that you're not compromising and that you're willing to just get up again and again and again no matter what life throws at you, you never give up and hopefully doing so without deteriorating as you go along. Ideally doing it that way. Again we've talked about sleep. For you, going back into those basics and what's going right now, why are the cracks widening and people being exposed mentally having weak blood and weak bodies and then showing I can't do this anymore. I can't get up anymore. What are we introducing again to the lifestyle? Why don't we just reminding everyone about it, what we need to be doing and what are our staples and what of our flows in order to keep that blood strong?   Jost Sauer: (30:05) Okay, before we get into that, China's Medicine says that your blood and your Jing is your armour. If I live incorrectly, it's like, I'm going into battle and throw away the armour. I don't need it. So guarding the one is the holy mantra, the highest mantra in Daoism. Guard the one, and the one is your blood, your Jing, your Shen the treasures. Obviously that means I need to understand that this requires a certain life. If I live incorrectly, I will throw away the armour. That means, bullets will enter. The sword will get me, because the attack is obvious. I mean, anyone can see now that we are under attack. So when you get under attack, you're going to put the armour on. So obviously, it's not about choice anymore it's about a necessity. We need to shift in our mindset that it's not about, "Well, I'm going to say up late tonight, whatever." No. You got to put your armour on. Because if I don't follow the rules of Dao, if I don't follow the natural laws, those fuckers will get me. Whatever Bill Gates, whatever those fuckers are, they will get me. But if my blood is strong, he fucking can't get me. It's a promise of all masters, if our Chi is strong they   Jost Sauer: (31:40) That's why they do all this technique. That's why they're trying to undermine you. They're trying to make you weak. Because if you weaken your blood, they can get into you. It's a war tactic. Dismantling the beautiful castle, dismantle the foundation. First of all, we need to understand we are it's an urgency right now. It's not about a debate anymore. It's like we have no choice. We've got no choice other than nine o'clock, nine thirty, you got to turn off that phone. If you're not, Bill Gates is going to get you and fuck you. And he will. If not, there's going to be Pfizer, or some other fucking spike protein shit going on. Some other moderated gene that's coming next time. They're gonna have a lot of weapons, they haven't even started yet. But it's all part of a process and they will never do anything if our blood is weak. They can't get in. It's been a [inaudible 00:32:46] and it's been forever like that. The strong will always survive. It's how it is. And the strong are the blood and the Jing.   Jost Sauer: (32:56) So therefore, first of all, we need to switch the mind to, it's not about free of choice anymore. It's about we have no choice. It's because of those big pharma. We got no choice. We don't live in peaceful times anymore. There's rockets throwing everywhere now. And so it's silly to go without putting the armour on. It's totally silly. But when the armour is on they can't pierce yourselves. That's how it is. That's the first thing. The mindset needs to take you from choice to urgency, so I don't have any choice. We are at war, they are after me, they're trying to get me. And if my blood is strong, they can't get me. That's the first thing. So the next thing is obviously, to develop the discipline to ward off to the demands of the physical to be stimulated 24/7. We got to just ward that off and say, "Okay, if I'm stimulated 24/7 I jeopardise my recovery phase. If I jeopardise my recovery, my armour will get weak. My blood will get weak. Jing will get weak, so I got no choice."   Jost Sauer: (34:21) That means the Chi cycle is in fact, the ultimate model right now because it tells you what to do. The Chi cycle is like the model that will strengthen our blood, our Jing. All along, it's a system to make us strong, so we can live our path, so that we can follow up on our ideas without getting infected or impacted by those who are trying to stop us. And so obviously, that means we need to understand that it's there to support us. Once again, the universe will not give us a challenge without giving us all the possibilities to succeed. It's in old scriptures. Whatever God is, whatever that higher consciousness is it, it will constantly give us challenges, but it has given us also the ability to succeed. So it's within us.   Jost Sauer: (35:23) It's just like the dark forces like Bill Gates and Big Pharma. They know that. They're really sneaky little shits, because they're undermining you why you believe. So they give you a 24 simulation, they give you all the beautiful gadgets so that you are completely addicted to it 24/7, so you're lost in it, so all your blood gets weak and weak and weak, year by year, so you feel weaker all the time so they can get in and get you. It's not much point demonstrating against those guys, it's more important to build our blood and Chi because then they can't do anything.   Mason: (36:07) It's a huge point. It's the classic point, make your own bed before you go out and try and change the world. It's never been more palpable. As you're saying, we are on. We are on at the moment in terms of thinking that, "Going out and protesting, fine." A part of really does love that, regardless of what it's for, I really love watching people go and do that. But as you said, that's secondary. To you taking responsibility-   Jost Sauer: (36:42) That's it. It's secondary. Of course, we need demonstrating. We need to speak up. Of course, we need to speak our truth. But you need to have your armor up, you got to be strong. You got to believe in yourselves. And really just, "Fuck, you can't get me." I mean when I was young, back in the days as an anarchist in Germany, I was facing up against the cops. We were fighting the cops in demonstrations. They came to us with their plastic shields just like Melbourne. They came up with their rubber bullets and their gas bombs. So they're in formation, they matched towards us. And obviously, we learned very quickly, we also need to be armoured. And obviously, I learned all the tricks how to get armoured. And so obviously, then you can actually go face-to-face with that force. Because there is a psychological warfare, fundamental and underlying to that, that is far more impactful and far more sinister. And that psychological warfare wards off, can't get in if your blood is strong.   Jost Sauer: (37:51) Jing is stored in the kidneys. Jing is just your shield that's like the shield of a strong animal. Like when you look at a tiger, that's Jing. And of psychological warfare of the tiger. And of course, if there's this little mosquito bang warfare goes in. And obviously, but the beauty of that is, we have got all the tools available to get so strong, we got all the tricks, we know everything how to get so strong, stronger than those guys who are trying to screw us. Stronger than Bill Gates. And when I look at those Big Pharma dudes, they don't look strong. If I would have a wrestling match with them, I would flock them on the ground straightaway. They don't have that power. But they have these collective cheers, this psychological warfare, but they're not strong warriors. They're just like, they actually are weak. Imagine as one of those guys, by yourself on a street, it would be a totally different scenario. Look at Bill Gates. Look at him. It's just like if I probably move a little flag on his face, he will break his arm.   Mason: (39:05) I have this I have this joke. I'm not sure if I'll ever be allowed to do stand up comedy again at this point. I have this joke that I'm with Bill Gates, that when you look at his body, it's so flabby that they call it the antibody. They talk about the fact that when he has sex with his wife imagine all the vaccine sexual innuendos that she has to put up with. But just looking at the fact that, "Oh my God," Bill Gates, the antibody. When he has sex with his wife, he inoculates her and then she has his antibodies in him. He's the human vaccine.   Jost Sauer: (39:52) Yeah. It's very twisted. I know exactly what you mean. I mean, in order to get into that lifestyle of what they're doing, in order to have that intent, you got to be twisted psychologically in the first place. And then obviously getting evolves this loss force of the source of inspiration in order to keep you going. Obviously, they're going to twist you more and more and more, because they suck out Jing. Dark forces live on Jing. It's like vampires. They live on Jing. So they're sucking you out-   Mason: (40:19) Can you talk a little bit about that how Jing... With the fear cycle, I assume it's something to do with them. How exactly is that Jing funnelled off and out of somebody?   Jost Sauer: (40:32) Okay. It's metal element, which is the prime element to armour the Jing. So the metal element is lung. Your lung communicates with the kidney, kidney-lung communicating. Pathologies are the result of kidney-lung not harmonising or kidney-lung not communicating. For example, a lot of pathologies develop because people's inability to breathe correctly. When we breathe in, we take the Chi from the kidney, from the lower path, right up to the lungs, but then we're going to ground it again in the lower path in the lower genitals. And when you look at the whole spectrum of your breath, starting at the sacrum, going right up to the upper chest, so pathology develops, if that ratio that gets smaller and smaller and smaller. It starts initially as the whole range, but then the range gets smaller and smaller and smaller, till people only breathe in the upper region, only the upper region. Now they're not communicating, lung and kidney not communicating anymore. And that obviously when pathology starts to develop.   Jost Sauer: (41:48) When you have sex, automatically you engage lung and kidney. That's why sex is important. Tantric sex is important because immediately, it rectifies that deficiency in the breathing, and brings the whole ratio and the spectrum of the breathing all the way from the upper to the lower. You got that long, deep, connected breathing again. And then obviously gets rhythmatic, and when it comes to the combination of the orgasm, what happens now you breathe in all the cosmic Chi. And now the body gets flooded with cosmic Chi. That is all instrumental to metal. So the metal element is the prime element that regulates the function of having the ability to connect to this breath correctly. So this is where the protection of the Jing comes in, and the leaking of the Jing. So someone who just breathes with only in the upper region, and never Breathes deeply, most likely suffers from premature ejaculation or has got no patience in sex. So the more you get into deep breathing methods, the better lover you become, it's a fact. And that's why a lot of tantric movements work with the breathing first.   Jost Sauer: (43:09) The Jing needs to be guarded. So when we have sex we guard the Jing effectively. If you wouldn't guard the Jing and guide the Jing through the body, you would lose the Jing which is means premature ejaculation, you would lose the semen. And then obviously, bang, that's all and done with. You need to de la musica, no good sex. Obviously, that means if you have unhappy sexual experience is because the Jing is not nourished. The Jing was weak, it's that the essence has been lost. It's not a happy experience, if a man gets involved and then loses it straight away. And then obviously, both parties men and women, are not happy. Whereas, a really profound sex experience is where the Jing is hold on to on every level. So you take it through all the body parts, you play with the Jing in all different postures till it comes to the final culmination, and that makes it really, really happy both parties. The result of that is, the happiness is the result of holding on to that Jing.   Jost Sauer: (44:18) The trick in life is to know how to hold on to that Jing. And so that's where obviously, the metal strategies come into. That's why the Qi cycle is so important, because the Chi cycle always starts at metal time. Metal element is the harnessing of the Jing. We're getting up at a time when metal is in its peak time. So that means, I can now go in and get a grip of the Jing, harness the Jing and then circulate through the whole, body through my practise. So whatever practise I do, if it's Yoga, if it's tai Chi, martial art, it's all the same. First of all, we need to hold on to that Jing. And that's obviously the pranayama breathing technique, all kinds of breathing techniques. What we spoke about last time in depth about the Wim Hof and things like that. That allows me to hold on to the Jing, and then I move it through the body. That means now I have actually got a grip of the Jing. So in order to prevent the Jing leaking, I need to get a grip of the Jing, I need to feel it. So metal is armour, metal is holding on and some holding on. And so that means I'm holding on to the Jing.   Jost Sauer: (45:37) And obviously, holding on is also affiliated for letting go. So at the same time, I'm letting go. And as I'm letting go, what comes in is the cosmic Chi, because metal is breath. And your breath is directly connected to the cosmic Chi. So if I do the practise straight on waking up, that allows me to hold on to that Jing, but also connects me to the cosmic Chi, and then through the mechanism that is inherent in all of us, which we don't need to understand, we just have to do, the Jing comes in. And once we get a grip of that Jing, it is with us all day. And then we hold on to it, we feel it, we feel the armour is up. And then obviously the next thing is, once we have done that process, the next step is now we're going to have a nourishing meal. A nice substantial nourishing meal. Where we sit down in peace, because we do feel at peace by them. Because we went through all the incredible pathways where every emotion has been looked up and transformed. We feel at peace. And that means we feel good. There's no need to engage with the stimulus of the physical world because we feel so connected to the inner world, that the outer world is irrelevant.   Jost Sauer: (46:56) So there's no need to go to look at the phone, there's no need to go on Facebook. There's no need because I feel too good. It's like a good drug. That's what good drugs do. You feel good within yourself. And that's what Jing is. Is like a good drug. So I feel good, I don't need the outer. I'm happy. If you got good gear, you don't need the outer world, you're happy. And so that's exactly the same thing. So I feel good. I then eat a substantial meal and as I eat that beautiful substantial meal, of course with lots of good herbs, I always have my Eucommia bark. I do my beautiful porridge, then I have my beautiful porridge sold overnight with seeds lots of seeds and lots of ginger, lots of cinnamon I mean a big pot not a little pot. A huge pot. And then I have a beautiful cup of tea with the Eucommia bark. Because I found it works really well to eat porridge in peace transcended in a deeper state, and then having this dip of Eucommia bark with every bite. And be like, "Whoah," this goes in, goes in, goes in. I feel like, "Whoa," I just want to sit there and just don't move.   Jost Sauer: (48:07) And then may have a little bit more, and then maybe have a bit of Reishi. Because when I have my breakfast, I usually have little cups. I showed them on the website here. I got my little cups and I got my cup with my Eucommia bark, I got my cup with my Reishi, I've my cup with knowledge of the tongue under the four major. And then I've got them all there. It's like a banquette. What a feast. [inaudible 00:48:40] like a glass of water. I have a couple of Eucommia bark. And while I'm eating I'm sipping a bit of this and I'm sipping a little bit of Reishi. I just go with my feeling. I don't go by, "How much is supposed to be put in there?" I usually always put more in then I sip. And then sometimes I drink the whole out, sometimes I'll leave half behind. I'll just go with how I feel. And same with eating. I can go with how I feel. And then when I eat, then I drink and I'm always, "Ah." Then I just sit back and then I realised, "Ah, it's 2021 and there's other people out there. Oh, there's Bill Gates trying to screw me. Fuck him. Ah, there's like Facebook or whatever. Ah, all right there's emails."   Jost Sauer: (49:27) It's sort of like I was totally gone, totally in a different world. And obviously I use my Jing practise, I use my metal practise, and I use the tiny syrups, I use the mushrooms. And I use all that. And then obviously that has taken me into the inner world and it makes me strong and happy. And then that's the reference point for the rest of the day. It's far more pleasant to be there then dealing with the outer world which is bullshit. So of course I want to return.   Mason: (49:58) Oh Man. I feel I've got so much to digest of my own. Really it's nice. One thing I've really remembered today is the gravity of the situation. Just in western civilization, as the technology gets rolled out, the gravity of the situation of staying connected to our essence, and remembering with these little disciplines that we don't, and as you said, we don't have time, there's no there's no choice anymore. There's no time to muck around. If you're ready, if you're doing this, if you're going to be one of these people that goes, "I'm watching this. I'm not going to be able to be knocked over permanently I will get up again and again and again"   Jost Sauer: (50:46) Yes. Get up again.   Mason: (50:47) I'm going to [inaudible 00:50:47] on the side, I'm looking for one of those ways where someone needs just to be committed to putting roundup all over everything always. I'm not going to be a weed, you will never get rid of.[crosstalk 00:51:02] I mean, weeds is where it all starts. And then the natural ecosystem always does return.   Jost Sauer: (51:09) Yeah. That's the whole idea. Because that's the whole idea. It will always continue. This is not the end. We need to understand that this is how life works. But it will continue, it will not be finished. Of course, they always will try to get the old upper hand but they will never get the upper hand. That's not possible. It will always move towards the good. Tao always got the final saying, because we are protected. We are protected. We have given blood and Jing. And those people don't have that. And because they're using chemicals, they're using all these weird shit, I don't even know what it is anymore. Whatever the fuck that is mRNA whatever the bullshit. The body is so complicated, they will never get even close to it. The body is far beyond every one of those scientists. We don't need to understand how the body functions, we need to align the body with the forces then will understand why other feeling? Why that annoying? But we can't put it into words, is not necessary. Because we are healthy we are fit and living correctly is the most important thing right now. And whatever that is that created everything, it is good and it only as good in mind, but it wants to make a strong. That's all it is.   Mason: (52:50) I love it. I love it. I always love chatting to you mate. I feel like I'm getting the sense I can feel everyone listening to this throughout time and I think it's a good time to let everyone go and digest everything and really get the gravity of the situation. You're the lifestyle medicine man and just really let it sink in and allow you your lifestyle to emerge in relation to protecting your essence and your treasures. And you mentioned, for everyone listening, you're talking to a lot of businesses you're giving talks to people on how to stay healthy and radiant. From business culture perspective and you're also doing, you're doing your own clinic as well still?   Jost Sauer: (53:39) Yeah. I still got my own clinic. The reason why I'm doing talks at the moment, it's actually is about how to cope with COVID. But not about from the point of view, what is COVID, more like looking, "Okay. How are we going to get stronger as a result of that." I look at COVID as a personal growth strategy. My focus is personal growth. I look at COVID is just other means for another level of growth we haven't had before. And so if I go to the gym, and I've got to put five kilogrammes on the bench press, of course, it's going to not care and going to take me far. But if I going to put 85 kg on the bench press, I can go somewhere. And so that's obviously the situation. But in order to know how to deal with it, I need to be prepared. I go into businesses at the moment because they really truly suffer from all that because just so many people are so scared, and that we really are scared, and because of so much fear, it impacts on their mental health. And as a result of that mental health is now deteriorating rapidly as never before.   Jost Sauer: (54:47) So my books are out in the UK, so I'm talking to a lot of people in England, and they're observing the same situation that mental health is deteriorating rapidly. And so obviously what also realise is that counselling techniques don't deal with this anymore. Because when you are riddled of fear of COVID, because of the government, you just... Like here in Queensland the CHO is just every day, "Delta is coming. Delta is coming. Delta is coming. You will get infected." I mean this is just part of... And I emailed him anytime and said, "You got to shut up. You're going to cause one too many anxiety problems." Because I've got clients now, who don't leave the house anymore, because they're too scared Delta is around the corner, because the chief health officer said, "Delta is coming." And obviously, but the emails not seem to getting through. So from a psychological perspective, counselling perspective, what they do is completely opposite to what we need, we need encouragement, we need like a Winston Churchill who'll make us strong, not someone who tells you, "You'll all be fucked."   Jost Sauer: (56:03) So that one works or the businesses suffer from that, because a lot of workers are scared of turning up at work, and then they're too scared of someone around them has got Delta and they're going to get Delta or so are you vaccinated. If you're vaccinated, I could get your spike protein, if you're unvaccinated I'll soon get Delta. So either way, I'm screwed. That means if I got the vaccine, I can't get transmission, but then the other source said, now you'll still transmit, but then you've got a higher viral load if you're not vaccinated. So people have no idea what's going on anymore. And as a result of that if you can't resolve it, trying to resolve a Facebook or Instagram discussion on the vaccine. Try to resolve it.   Mason: (56:54) Try the Byron Bay community board. I think that's the least humanity and the funniest as well discussions around the vaccines.   Jost Sauer: (57:07) This is like, "You can't go there." So because we can't resolve it, as a result of that is we got now the highest level of mental health weaknesses before. Because mental health is a part of the five attributes of focus, memory, nourishment, and the ability to perception and reaction. So the five elements make up your mental health. But if you can't get any information anymore you can resolve, and now you're trying to resolve, you're going circles, you're going in loops. And as you go in loops, you are there, where a drug user finish off when they take too many drugs. So that's why we have a mass psychosis now. Everyone now is basically in the same situation, same stage, as someone who has taking a little bit too many drugs. They're trying to resolve and you can't resolve it, you're going in loops.   Jost Sauer: (58:09) But once you start going in loops, what happens is you weaken your spleen, your earth element. And earth or spleen is transformation and transportation. Transform, transport, move, move, move. But if you can't resolve it's going in circles, you don't move. So if the spleen doesn't move, that means nutrients aren't assimilated and they aren't moved up to the heart to produce blood. So trying to resolve and can't resolve leads to blood deficiency. That's what I observed when I worked with drug users. The whole world is exactly there now, what I've seen in drug rehab. It is the tweaking, too many drugs you're trying to tweak, if you finish you are in psychosis.   Mason: (58:53) The dopamine hit, like that as well?   Jost Sauer: (58:56) They can't get it anymore. When I treated psychosis back in the day in my rehabs, all I did, I didn't engage with the psychosis. I tried not to make the client resolve the situation. I just focused on building the spleen by herbs and lifestyle, and practise, and acupuncture. And as you build the spleen, transformation and transportation takes place. Suddenly things are moving again. Suddenly, it's clear. When the spleen starts moving again, mental health is going strong again. Mental health is either weak or strong. We all have mental health, but it's either impaired or it's strong and fundamental to mental health is your spleen. And so mental health is deteriorating over the last year because of people's innate desire trying to resolve the situation. You can see the whole trouble on the internet because people try to resolve what's going on, and they get really, really angry with each other because they can't resolve the debate. And you can't, and that's exactly the psychic war tactic that Bill Gates and those Big Pharma evils are doing. They're basically, "Make everyone loop, loop, loop." And then make everyone's spleen weak, weak, weak. As a result of that your mental health goes weak.   Jost Sauer: (01:00:26) Now, obviously, businesses suffer. Your business suffers. If your mental health is low, you're not productive. That's why they're realising that the vaccines don't do anything in terms of building mental health. And the campaign makes it worse, it weakens mental health. Obviously, some businesses started looking at alternatives, and that's they approached me, so I go into businesses, because I'm not going looking into what is COVID from a scientific or medical perspective, I look at how it's impacting on your organs? How is the government programme impacting on your organs? How is the whole mass psychosis caused by all these constant mental warfare they're doing? And all we need to do is build your spleen. So I'm doing strategies with businesses. I take everyone through a process. Do this, do that, eat that food, take this mushroom, take that herb, do this breathing technique. And automatically, the spleen gets stronger. And as a result of that is it will start impacting on the other organs, which are affiliated with mental health, and suddenly your mental health gets good again. This is the other thing, that this, whatever they do this Big Pharma dudes, it has a massive impact on your spleen. And that's obviously another aspect we need to look into. That's metal, Jing, and then there's the spleen.   Mason: (01:01:59) I think we've talked about the spleen, I think on our other podcast with Jost. And we've said it multiple times, if you're out of sync with your organs and with nature, the place to start stepping back in his start standing on the earth and on the soil, which is the spleen.   Jost Sauer: (01:02:18) Yes. Get back to earth.   Mason: (01:02:24) Get back to earth. Don't get fancy around going into kidney time and liver time and all that just yet. Just get back in three square meals, consistency.   Jost Sauer: (01:02:35) I never focus when I work with clients, I never focus on get up at five, I don't follow the organ clock I follow rhythm. And the rhythm, always the Chi cyclic rhythm. So it's about the rhythm, and then the rhythm eventually will move it towards the right time. But that will happen naturally. But the rhythm is always metal, earth, fire, and then water, and then wood. That's how the rhythm works. Because, everything metal is reaction. Every chemical process, everything in your life is dependent on the reaction. Metal is the starting point to everything. What I hear lots is, "My life is so out of control. I don't know where to start." And the Chi cycle says, "Of course, you can start. The start is always metal." It always starts with metal, because metal is your breath. Metal is the change in state, metal is reaction. You can't have anything in life without a reaction. A reaction is prior to something. And if you want change, it means you need to instigate the reaction. And that's metal.   Jost Sauer: (01:03:53) So we always start getting up to metal. So that means we start getting up to do breathing first, because everything starts with breath. When you look at all the spiritual practises, if it's martial art, Kung Fu, if it's yoga, if it's Tibetan Buddhism, it all comes down to 8,000 years ago, the first practise was breathing. It all comes down to breath and breath is metal. So it all starts with metal. Then from metal, that means you start the day with breathing. You're getting into the breath, you're going into metal, then we'll start to initiate a cycle of reaction that will move you towards betterment. And then you go into earth, and then you go into fire, and then you go into water, and then into wood, and then to sleep. It's just the rhythm which is more important than anything else. And that automatically then, once you follow the rhythm, you will discover the Tao. Like jazz music is all about getting the rhythm and you suddenly know what to do. Get into the rhythm. Like sex when two partners meet and have sex, you and get into the rhythm first. And once you have the rhythm, you discover what do.   Mason: (01:05:02) It emerges, it's a good exercise to go. Okay, can you tell me, Jost, exactly what time do I get up and what time [inaudible 01:05:09] breathing you're looking from that Western medical, give me the solution versus what you're saying? There's a rhythm. I mean, remind everyone that you've got a book. What is the new book's name I kind of-   Jost Sauer: (01:05:25) That's The Qi Health Cycle.   Mason: (01:05:28) That's the Chi Health Cycle.   Jost Sauer: (01:05:29) The Chi Health Cycle. That's actually now in 11 languages. So that's published in the UK, it's published in Germany, it's published in Italy. It's going really well in Europe. Welbeck Publishing took over that book about two years ago, and they made incredible beautiful job out of it. It's one of those really expensive high class, British publishers who just put like a real lot of effort into that book. It's all beautiful gloss and beautiful symbols in there. And it's beautiful. It's really well presented, a lot of nice pictures, a lot of yin and yangs. And it's all about that real lifestyle. Because Tao says over and over, "It's not our job to understand it." We can't. That's why we don't have to be scared of Big Pharma because what they know about the body is just so minimal to what really goes on. The secrets of life they never will be able to tap into it. They're trying to corrupt it, but they won't win. And the real power is within. And if we align with those forces, and commit ourselves to the light, that information will come through us. And we get stronger.   Mason: (01:06:46) Yes. I love it. You're my favourite warrior. I selfishly do these podcasts. I come out firing and just I'm like, "Yeah, that's right. Yup, that's right. I remember." So I love it. I really encourage everyone to jump over to your website. We've got all that in your show notes. Is your website the same?   Jost Sauer: (01:07:07) Yeah, still the same?   Mason: (01:07:11) Guys, go get after it. Jost Sauer.   Jost Sauer: (01:07:18) That's correct. J-O-S-T. Jost a Viking name. Viking warrior name. It means hope.   Mason: (01:07:28) Fill me with hope. All right. Everyone go get [crosstalk 01:07:30] the book that will give you the Chi cycle. Get on your herbs, get some good sleep. And you can work with the Jost as well. I've had a few friends go and do it. And just always incredible. You've been around doing this for so long. I've got so many incredible stories. It's definitely an asset to our community here. So get on it. Love your work, man. Thanks so much for coming.   Jost Sauer: (01:07:56) Thank you. It's always great fun.   Mason: (01:08:00) Well, until next time, we'll give it what? Maybe we'll just keep it at a four to six months cycle.   Jost Sauer: (01:08:05) Yeah. There is always something that goes on in the western world in the physical that needs to be discussing.   Mason: (01:08:12) Yeah. Maybe next time everyone will start calming down and will digest the intensity-   Jost Sauer: (01:08:19) Maybe Bill Gates is gone. And the Big Pharma blew up, new communities everywhere.   Mason: (01:08:27) That's a lot to do in six months. Beautiful. Anything else you want to share with everyone? Or you're good?   Jost Sauer: (01:08:34) We just have to understand that what we go through right now, it's all part of a bigger picture. If the blood gets weak, we get caught up in the politics. If the blood is strong, we feel good within ourselves. And if we feel good within ourselves, we just stay detached. That's all it is. So when I talk about detachment, it requires strong blood and strong Jing. Just focus on your Jing, focus on your blood, take your herbs, take your mushrooms, live the lifestyle, and that's really all there is and the rest will come naturally.   Mason: (01:09:08) I love it, mate. All right, catch you next time sending lots of love.   Jost Sauer: (01:09:13) Yep. I will do that. Okay, [Mason 01:09:16]. Talk to you then. Okay, bye.     Dive deep into the mystical realms of Tonic Herbalism in the SuperFeast Podcast!

Sales Hustle
#199 S2 Episode 68 - Losing It All Twice & to Level Up Personally and Professionally with Edward Purmalis

Sales Hustle

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 28:18


Book Your Free Revenue First Podcast Strategy here!Get Your Free Vidyard Account & State of Virtual Selling Report here!Claim Your Free 200 Leads here!HIGHLIGHTS01:17 Edward's unplanned but successful entry into sales 07:37 Prioritizing morals over the hunt for commissions 12:00 LinkedIn and RevGenius: Platforms to rebound from the losses of 2020 18:46 Selling to salespeople can be easier because of their natural curiosity21:30 Surround yourself with people who value you24:19 Embracing social media and starting his own podcast27:08 The Level Up Show: Success stories of where you fit in the business worldQUOTES07:16 "If you're constantly in an environment of people who really indulge in the narcissistic and manipulative ways, you'll see yourself slowly growing into that, and that didn't lead to anything good. I had to get a real reality check."10:01 "The best, most brilliant, top performing sellers that I know all have those traits, all have the ability to always be open-minded, willing to learn, willing to take feedback, and willing to put it into action, and understand patience and playing the long game."22:02 "I'd say losing a lot of confidence is pretty normal, if you lose the things that you have. And the biggest lesson that I learned is to surround yourself with people who actually understand your value and understand your growth."If you enjoy the Sales Transformation Podcast, please subscribe, share, and send us your feedback. Please make sure to rate us and leave a review on Apple. Learn more about Edward and follow his podcast in the links below:LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/edward-purmalis/Podcast - https://pod.link/1595662150Learn more about Collin in the link below: LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/collin-saleshustle/Also, you can join our community by checking out  @salescast.community. If you're a sales professional looking to take your career to greater heights, please visit us at https://salescast.co/ and set a call with Collin and Chris. 

Parenting Paused
Ep. 101 Do You Take Things Personally?

Parenting Paused

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 6:21


Do you believe you know what is best for your child? I know, I sure did. The parenting paradigm most of us were exposed to carries this view. The limitation of this view is that we find ourselves projecting onto our children the experiences we had which parallel theirs. Tune into this episode to hear more about healthy separation. www.purejoyparenting.com

Riding Shotgun With Charlie
RSWC #130 Ashley Hlebinsky.mp4

Riding Shotgun With Charlie

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 44:02


Riding Shotgun With Charlie#130Ashley HlebinskyFirearm HistorianThe DC Project   Ashley Hlebinsky is THE coolest firearm historian you'll ever meet! We were both speakers at AMMcon (hosted by the Second Amendment Foundation) in Dallas recently.  Since she is a  historian and we were in Dallas there is only one place for us to visit: Dealey Plaza.  Of course, you know this is where Kennedy was shot by Lee Harvey Oswald. I LOVE the Kennedy assassination conspiracies! All of them. And while watching any documentary on it, I will buy whatever theory they're selling. But not Ashley.  She likes the real story!   Ashley wanted to be a doctor like many folks, but she was interested in battlefield medicine which led to firearms and firearm history. Ted Koppel said about her, she wanted to learn to save lives then to things that could take lives. But she's really into much more about how firearms work, how the evolution of firearms has changed, and its impact on the industry, technology, society, and culture.     One of her personal interests is in guns used in crimes. Many museums don't want to bring up the firearms used in crimes, but Ashely really enjoys that part of the story about firearms. She says that not knowing about firearms leads museums to put some wrong firearms on display.  This is where she really enjoys working, coming up with how a firearm used in a crime can be a valid and educational display at a museum.    During her undergrad years after she changed majors, she was doing as much as she could including volunteering,  internships, researching, and  learning to shoot.  While a senior in college, Ashley was able to parlay internships into getting hired by the Smithsonian.  She was able to go from the Smithsonian to the Cody Firearms Museum in Wyoming, where she ran just about everything behind the scenes and all the displays for the exhibitions, collections, and education.     Once we get to Dealey Plaza, the conversation turns to the Kennedy assassination and what was going on during the 1960's and many of the various conspiracies. We do get some selfies at the School Book Depository, the grassy knoll, and the two X's where the bullets hit Kennedy.  Ashley brings up what she calls the Post World War II era and how the turbulent times and several assassinations lead to the Gun Control Act of 1968. We talk about the possibility of Frank Sinatra and Marilyn Monroe ties to the Kennedys, the similarities between Lincoln & Kennedy. And other irrelevant and interesting topics. Including James Earl Jones, where the Carcano rifle is, and the FBI trying to get Martin Luther King, Jr to commit suicide.    Besides everything that Ashley is involved with she's also with The DC Project. She testified in front of Congress. She's a producer of TV shows on the paranormal on the TRVL Channel and several shows for Brother in Arms and Midway USA's Gun Stories.    Ashley was a great sport going to Dealey Plaza and taking the conversation in several places. I'm glad that I was able to have her as part of the Stagecoach Across America.  Favorite quotes: “Personally, I'm more fascinated by guns used in crime and how to interrupt them than guns not used in crime.” “A lot of people want to work in the gun vault. And he said I was the only person that he actually thought could do it.”  “When I go to a museum, I don't like to read. I'm there to see the stuff.” “Because there's so much armed radicalism, the government starts doing some crazy stuff.” “I wouldn't be surprised if it was an inside job. Because they're doing kinds of stuff for the benefit of I'm not sure who. ” Ashley Hlebinsky Instagram https://www.instagram.com/historyinheels/   Ashley Hlebinsky Facebook https://www.facebook.com/officialashleyhlebinsky   Ashley Hlebinsky Twitter https://twitter.com/ashleyhlebinsky   The DC Project https://www.dcproject.info/   Gun Freedom Radio https://gunfreedomradio.com/   Pot of Gold Estate Auctions https://potofgoldestate.com/ Second Amendment Foundation http://saf.org/   Citizens Committee for the Right to Keep and Bear Arms https://www.ccrkba.org/     Please support the Riding Shotgun With Charlie sponsors and supporters.    Buy RSWC & GunGram shirts & hoodies, stickers & patches, and mugs at the store! http://ridingshotgunwithcharlie.com/rswc-shop/   Keyhole Holsters  Veteran Owned, American Made http://www.keyholeholsters.com/   Dennis McCurdy Author, Speaker, Firewalker http://www.find-away.com/   Self Defense Radio Network http://sdrn.us/

Go Get That
Ep 13 - What It's Like Knowing Tiger Woods Personally | Sean Van Anglen Interview

Go Get That

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 79:41


PGA Professional, Cigar Connoisseur, Businessman, All of the Above. Sean Van Anglen is the most interesting man we've ever talked to. Sean talks about what it's like having an ambassadorship with Tiger Woods, he tells us stories about his time as a professional and his time playing in a PGA Tour Pro-Am in which he beat his professional by 2 shots, and he has us laughing throughout the entire episode. One of the most fun ones we've ever done.

FIRElife Church
The Personally Present God

FIRElife Church

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 40:15


WSOU: Leadership with Darrell W. Gunter
Oliver Roup, former Founder and CEO, Viglink (acquired by Sovrn)

WSOU: Leadership with Darrell W. Gunter

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 29:24


Invented and delivered a set of "supply-side" tools enabling mainstream web publishers to participate in commerce revenue for the first time. VigLink was the first company to apply display advertising techniques including realtime bidding and historical purchase behavior to in-content commerce links. At sale, VigLink was breakeven, delivered $1B in annual GMV spend, $50M in commissions, and $10M in net revenue. Established demand-side partnerships with 75,000 advertisers including Amazon, Walmart, eBay, Nike and many others. Targetted the needs of the publisher side half of the commerce relationship. Used that strategy to build a proprietary network of 2 million publishers including partnerships with Yahoo, Microsoft, Mozilla, Opera, Meredith and Vertical Scope. Elected board member of the Performance Marketing Association. Speaker at Advertising Week, Affiliate Summit and others. Personally led the product function of the business balancing the needs of advertisers and publishers (and by extension consumers) as well as regulators including navigating the launch of European GDPR regulations. Personally recruited and hired more than 100 candidates across every startup discipline. Acquired competitors: Driving Revenue, LinkSmart and Prosperent. Raised venture capital: First Round Capital (Josh Kopelman), Google Ventures (Rich Miner), Emergence Capital (Kevin Spain), RRE (Will Porteous) and others including Reid Hoffman and Deep Nishar investing personally.

H.E.R Space: Uplifting Conversations for the Black Woman
S12E8: It Ain't About You Boo: How to Stop Taking Things Personally

H.E.R Space: Uplifting Conversations for the Black Woman

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 38:18


Rejection. Insecurity. Perfectionism. These are some of the reasons why we may be taking things personally. At different stages and seasons in life, we have all found ourselves in a space where we are asking, “What did I do? Why am I the target here?” Most of the time, it is not about you. However, your reaction is an indicator of something going on within you. In today's episode, Terri and Dr. Dom help us explore why we take things personally and offer strategies to heal. Quote of the Day: "Don't get upset with people or situations. Both are powerless without your reaction." -Unknown Tips to help us stop taking things personally: Consider the source Identify your triggers Choose your plan of action do you need to have a conversation? do you need to go within and do more healing? See #4 Address your unfinished business talk to your therapist create a personal SOP Wisdom Wednesdays with Terri Cultivating H.E.R. Space Sanctuary Resources: Dr. Dom's Therapy Practice Branding with Terri Melanin and Mental Health Therapy for Black Girls Psychology Today Therapy for QPOC Where to find us: Twitter: @HERspacepodcast Instagram: @herspacepodcast Facebook: @herspacepodcast Website: cultivatingherspace.com

Founders
The Autobiography of Estée Lauder

Founders

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 33:53


What I learned from rereading Estée Lauder: A Success Story by Estée Lauder. Watch Runnin' Down a Dream: How to Succeed and Thrive in a Career You Love by Bill Gurley.Subscribe to listen to the rest of this episode and gain access to all full length episodes.If you choose the annual subscription option I will upgrade your subscription so you have lifetime access. (You invest once and listen to every future episode for free.) You can also subscribe monthly if you prefer.WHAT OTHER PEOPLE ARE SAYING:“Without a doubt, the highest value-to-cost ratio I've taken advantage of in the last year is the Founders podcast premium feed. Tap into eons of knowledge and experiences, condensed into digestible portions. Highly, highly recommend. “Uniquely outstanding. No fluff and all substance. David does an outstanding job summarizing these biographies and hones in on the elements that make his subjects so unique among entrepreneurs. I particularly enjoy that he focuses on both the founder's positive and negative characteristics as a way of highlighting things to mimic and avoid.”“I just paid for my first premium podcast subscription for Founders podcast. Learning from those who came before us is one of the highest value ways to invest time. David does his homework and exponentially improves my efficiency by focusing on the most valuable lessons.”“I haven't found a better return on my time and money than your podcast for inspiration and time-tested wisdom to help me on my journey.“I've now listened to every episode. From this knowledge I've doubled my business to $500k a year. Love your passion and recommend your podcast to everyone.”“Founders is the only podcast I pay for and it's worth 100x the cost.”“I have listened to many podcasts on entrepreneurship (HIBT, Masters of Scale, etc.) and find Founders to be consistently more helpful than any other entrepreneurship podcast. David is a craftsperson, he carefully reads biographies of founders, distills the most important anecdotes and themes from their life, and draws commonalities across lives. David's focus is rightfully not on teaching you a formula to succeed but on constantly pushing you to think different.”“I highly highly recommend this podcast. Holy cow. I've been binge listening to these and you start to see patterns across all these incredible humans.”Listening to your podcast has changed my life and that is not a statement I make often.“After one episode I quickly joined the Misfit feed. Love the insight and thoughts shared along the way. David loves what he does and it shines through on the podcast. Definitely my go-to podcast now.”“It is worth every penny. I cannot put into words how fantastic this podcast is. Just stop reading this and get the full access.”“Personally it's one of my top 3 favorite podcasts. If you're into business and startups and technology, this is for you. David covers good books and I've come to really appreciate his perspective. Can't say enough good things.”“I quickly subscribed and it's honestly been the best money I've spent all year. It has inspired me to read biographies. Highly recommend.”“This is the most inspirational and best business podcast out there. David has inspired me to focus on biographies rather than general business books. I'm addicted.”“Anyone interested in business must find the time to listen to each any every Founders podcast. A high return on investment will be a virtual certainty. Subscribe and start listening as soon as possible.”“David saves you hundreds of hours by summarizing bios of legendary business founders and providing valuable insight on what makes an individual successful. He has introduced me to many founders I would have never known existed.”“The podcasts offer spectacular lessons on life, human nature and business achievement. David's enthusiasm and personal thoughts bring me joy. My journey has been enhanced by his efforts.”"Founders is the best self investment that I've made in years."Sign up to listen to the rest of this episode and get access to every full episode.   

Screaming in the Cloud
Breaking Down Productivity Engineering with Micheal Benedict

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 45:32


About Micheal BenedictMicheal Benedict leads Engineering Productivity at Pinterest. He and his team focus on developer experience, building tools and platforms for over a thousand engineers to effectively code, build, deploy and operate workloads on the cloud. Mr. Benedict has also built Infrastructure and Cloud Governance programs at Pinterest and previously, at Twitter -- focussed on managing cloud vendor relationships, infrastructure budget management, cloud migration, capacity forecasting and planning and cloud cost attribution (chargeback). Links: Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com Twitter: https://twitter.com/micheal LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/michealb/ TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: You know how git works right?Announcer: Sorta, kinda, not really Please ask someone else!Corey: Thats all of us. Git is how we build things, and Netlify is one of the best way I've found to build those things quickly for the web. Netlify's git based workflows mean you don't have to play slap and tickle with integrating arcane non-sense and web hooks, which are themselves about as well understood as git. Give them a try and see what folks ranging from my fake Twitter for pets startup, to global fortune 2000 companies are raving about. If you end up talking to them, because you don't have to, they get why self service is important—but if you do, be sure to tell them that I sent you and watch all of the blood drain from their faces instantly. You can find them in the AWS marketplace or at www.netlify.com. N-E-T-L-I-F-Y.comCorey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Vultr. Spelled V-U-L-T-R because they're all about helping save money, including on things like, you know, vowels. So, what they do is they are a cloud provider that provides surprisingly high performance cloud compute at a price that—while sure they claim its better than AWS pricing—and when they say that they mean it is less money. Sure, I don't dispute that but what I find interesting is that it's predictable. They tell you in advance on a monthly basis what it's going to going to cost. They have a bunch of advanced networking features. They have nineteen global locations and scale things elastically. Not to be confused with openly, because apparently elastic and open can mean the same thing sometimes. They have had over a million users. Deployments take less that sixty seconds across twelve pre-selected operating systems. Or, if you're one of those nutters like me, you can bring your own ISO and install basically any operating system you want. Starting with pricing as low as $2.50 a month for Vultr cloud compute they have plans for developers and businesses of all sizes, except maybe Amazon, who stubbornly insists on having something to scale all on their own. Try Vultr today for free by visiting: vultr.com/screaming, and you'll receive a $100 in credit. Thats v-u-l-t-r.com slash screaming.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. Sometimes when I have conversations with guests here, we run long. Really long. And then we wind up deciding it was such a good conversation, and there's still so much more to say that we schedule a follow-up, and that's what happened today. Please welcome back Micheal Benedict, who is, as of the last time we spoke and presumably still now, the head of engineering productivity at Pinterest. Micheal, how are you?Micheal: I'm doing great, and thanks for that introduction, Corey. Thankfully, yes, I am still the head of engineering productivity; I'm really glad to speak more about it today.Corey: The last time that we spoke, we went up one side and down the other of large-scale environments running on AWS and billing aspects thereof, et cetera, et cetera. I want to stay away from that this time and instead focus on the rest of engineering productivity, which is always an interesting and possibly loaded term. So, what is productivity engineering? It sounds almost like it's an internal dev tools team, or is it something more?Micheal: Well, thanks for asking because I get this question asked a lot of times. So, for one, our primary job is to enable every developer, at least at our company, to do their best work. And we want to do this by providing them a fast, safe, and a reliable path to take any idea into production without ever worrying about the infrastructure. As you clearly know, learning anything about how AWS works—or any public cloud provider works—is a ton of investment, and we do want our product engineers, our mobile engineers, and all the other folks to be focused on delivering amazing experiences to our Pinners. So, we could be doing some of the hard work in providing those abstractions for them in such way, and taking away the pain of managing infrastructure.Corey: The challenge, of course, that I've seen is that a lot of companies take the approach of, “Ah. We're going to make AWS available to all of our engineers in it's raw, unfiltered form.” And that lasts until the first bill shows up. And then it's, “Okay. We're going to start building some guardrails around that.” Which makes a lot of sense. There then tends to be a move towards internal platforms that effectively wrap cloud services.And for a while now, I've been generally down on the concept and publicly so in the general sense. That said, what I say that applies as a best practice or something that most people should consider does tend to fall apart when we talk about specific use cases. You folks are an extremely large environment; how do you view it? First off, do you do internal platforms like that? And secondly, would you recommend that other companies do the same thing?Micheal: I think that's such a great question because every company evolves with its own pace of development. And I wouldn't say Pinterest by itself had a developer productivity or an engineering productivity organization from the get-go. I think this happens when you start realizing that your core engineers who are working on product are now spending a certain fraction of time—which starts ballooning pretty fast—in managing the underlying systems and the infrastructure. And at that point in time, it's probably a good question to ask, how can I reduce the friction in those people's lives such that they could be focused more on the product. And, kind of, centralize or provide some sort of common abstractions through a central team which can take away all that pain.So, that is generally a good guiding principle to think about when your engineers are spending at least 30% of their time on operating the systems rather than building capabilities, that's probably a good time to revisit and see whether a central team would make sense to take away some of that. And just simple examples, right? This includes upgrading OS on your EC2 machines, or just trying to make sure you're patching all the right versions on your next big Kubernetes cluster you're running for serving x number of users. The moment you start seeing that, you want to start thinking about, if there is a central team who could take away that pain, what are the things they could be investing on to help up-level every other engineer within your organization. And I think that's one of the best ways to be thinking about it.And it was also a guiding principle for us within Pinterest to view what investments we could make in these central teams which can up-level each and every different type of engineer in the company as well. And just an example on that could be your mobile engineer would have very different expectations from your backend engineer who was working on certain aspects of code in your product. And it is truly important to understand where you want to centralize capabilities, which both these types of engineers could use, or you want to divest and have unique capabilities where it's going to make them productive. There's no one-size-fits-all solution for this, but I'm happy to talk about what we have at Pinterest, which has been reasonably working well. But I do think there's a lot more improvements we could be doing.Corey: Yeah, but let's also be clear that, as you've mentioned, you are heavily biased towards EC2 instances for a lot of what you do. If we look at the AWS console and we see hundreds of different services now, and it's easy to sit here and say, “Oh, internal platforms are terrible because all of those services are going to be enhanced in various ways and you're never going to be able to keep up with feature parity.” Yeah, but if you can wrap something like EC2 in an internal platform wrapper, that begins to be a different story because sure, someone's going to go and try something new with a different AWS service, they're going to need direct access. But the EC2 product across the board generally does not evolve in leaps and bounds with transformative changes overnight. Let's also not forget that at a company with the scale that Pinterest operates at, “Hey, AWS just dusted off a new feature and docs are still rolling out, and it's not in CloudFormation yet, but we're going to roll it out to production,” probably seems like the wrong direction to go in, I would assume.Micheal: And yes, I think that brings one of the key guardrails, I think, which these groups provide. So, when we start thinking about what teams, centralized teams like engineering productivity, developer tools, developer platforms actually do is they help with a couple of things. The top three are: they can help pave a path for the most common use cases. Like to your point, provisioning EC2 does take a set of steps, all the time. If you're going to have a thousand people doing that every time they're building a new service or trying to expand capacity playing with their launch templates, those are things you can start streamlining and making it simple by some wrapper because you want to address those 80% use cases which are usually common, and you can have a wrapper or could just automate that. And that's one of the key things: can you provide a paved path for those use cases?The second thing is, can you do that by having the right guardrails in place? How often have you heard the story that, “I just clicked a button and that now spun up, like, a thousand-plus instances.” And now you have to juggle between trying to stop them or do something about it.Corey: Back in 2013, you folks were still focusing on this fair bit. I remember because Jeremy Carroll, who I believe was your first SRE there once upon a time, wound up doing a whole series of talks around how Pinterest approached doing an AMI Factory. And back in those days, the challenges were, “Okay. We have the baseline AMI, and that's great, but we also want to do deployments of things and we don't really want to do a new deploy of an entire fleet of EC2 instances for a single line of config change, so how do we wind up weighing off of when you bake a new AMI versus when you just change something that has—in what is deployed to them?” And it was really a complicated problem back then.I'm not convinced it's not still a complicated problem, but the answers are a lot more cohesive. And making sure that every team—when you're talking about a company as large as Pinterest with that many teams—is doing things in the same way, seems like it's critically important otherwise you wind up with a whole bunch of unique-looking instances that each have to be managed by hand as opposed to something that can be reasoned around collectively.Micheal: Yep. And that last part you mentioned is extremely crucial as well because like I said, our audience or our customers are just not the engineers; we do work with our product managers and business partners as well because at times, we have to tie or change our architecture based on certain cost optimizations which would make sense, like you just articulated. We don't want to have all the instance types. It does not add much value to a developer unless they're explicitly seeking a high-memory instance or a [GP-based instance in a 00:10:25] certain way. So, we can then work with our business partners to make sure that we're committing to only a certain type of instances, and how we can abstract our tools to only give you that. For example, our deployment system, Teletraan which is an open-source system, actually condenses down all these instance types to a couple of categories like high-compute, high-memory—and you've probably seen that in many of the new cloud providers as well—so people don't have to learn or know the underlying instance type.When we moved from c3 to c5, it was just called as a high-compute system, so the next time someone provisioned a new service or deployed it using our system, they would just select high-compute as the de facto instance type and we would just automatically provision a C5 for them. So, that just reduces the extra complexity or the cognitive overhead individuals would have to go through in learning each instance type, what is the base AMI that comes on it, what are the different configurations that need to go in terms of setting up your AZ-scaling properties. We give them a good reasonable set of defaults to get started with, and then they can then work on optimizing or making changes to it.Corey: Ignoring entirely your mispronunciation of AMI, which is, of course, three syllables—and that is a petty hill upon which I will die—it occurs to me the more I work with AWS in various ways, the easier it gets. And I used to think in some respects, it was because the platform was so—it was improving so dramatically around me. But no, in many cases, it's because the first time you write some CloudFormation by hand, it's a nightmare and you keep smacking into weird issues. But the second or third time, it's super easy because you just copy the thing you've already built and change the relevant bits around. And that was the learning curve that I went through playing around with a lot of these things.When you start looking at this from a large-scale environment where it's not just about upskilling the people that you have to understand how these things integrate in AWS land, but also the consistent onboarding of engineers at a fairly progressive clip is, great, you effectively have to start doing trainings on all these things, and there's a lot of knobs and dials that can blow up and hurt people. At some point, building the guardrails or building the environment in which you are getting all the stuff abstracted away from where the application engineers have to think about this at all, it eventually reaches a tipping point where it starts to feel like it's no longer optional if you want to continue growing as a company because you don't have the luxury of spending six months of onboarding before you let someone touch the thing they were hired to build.Micheal: And you will see that many companies very often have very similar programming practices like you just described. Even I learned that the same way: you have a base template, you just copy-paste it and start from there on. And no one goes through the bootstrapping process manually anymore; you want to—I think we call it cargo-culting, but in general, just get something to bootstrap and start from there. But one of the things we learned in sort of the hard way is that can also lead to, kind of, you pushing, you know, not great practices because people don't know what is a blessed version of a good template or what actually would make sense. So, some of those things, we have been working on.And this is where centralized teams like engineering productivity are really helpful is we provide you with the blessed or the canonical way to do certain things. Case in point example is a CI/CD pipeline or delivery of software services. We have invested enough in experimenting on what works with some of the more nuanced use cases at Pinterest, in helping generate, sort of, a canonical version which would cover 80% of the use cases. Someone could just go and try to build a service and they could just use the same canonical pipeline without learning much or making changes to it. This also reduces that cargo-culting nature which I called, rather than copying it from unknown sources and trying to like—again, it may cause havoc to our systems, so we can avoid a lot of that because of these practices.Corey: So, let's step a little bit beyond AWS—I know I hate doing it, too—but I'm going to assume that your remit is broader than, oh, AWS whisperer-slash-Wrangler. So, tell me a little bit more about what it is that your day-to-day looks like if there is anything that could be said not to focus purely around AWS whispering.Micheal: So, one of the challenges—and I want to talk about this a bit more—is our environments have become extremely complex over time. And it's the nature of, like, rising entropy. Like, we've just noticed that there's two things: we have a diverse set of customer base, and these include everyone trying to do different workloads or work service types. What that essentially translates into is that we realized that our solution may not fit all of them. For example, what works for a machine-learning engineer in terms of iterating on building a model and delivering a model is not the same as someone working on a long-running service and trying to deploy that. The same would apply for someone trying to operate a Kafka system.And that has made, I think, definitely our job a bit challenging in trying to assess where do you actually draw the line on the abstraction? What is the right layer of abstraction across your local development experience, across when you move over to staging your code in a PR model and getting feedback and subsequently actually releasing it to production? Because this changes dramatically based on what is the workload type you're working on. And we feel like that has been one of the biggest challenges where I know I spent my day-to-day and my team does too, in trying to help provide some of the right solutions for these individuals. There's—very often we'll also get asked from individuals trying to do a very nuanced thing.Of late, we have been talking about thinking about how you operate functions, like provide Functions as a Service within the company? It just put us in a difficult spot at times because we have to ask the hard question, “Is this required?” I know the industry is doing it; it's definitely there. I personally believe, yes, it could be a future, but is that absolutely important? Is that going to benefit Pinterest in any formal way if we invest on some core abstractions?And those are difficult conversations to have because we have exciting engineers coming in trying to do amazing things; it puts us in a hard spot, as well, as to sometimes saying graciously, no. I know many companies deal with it when they have these centralized teams, but I think it's part of that job. Like when you say it's day-to-day, I would say I'm probably saying no a couple of times in that day.Corey: Let's pretend for the sake of argument that I am, tomorrow morning, starting another company—Twitter for Pets—and over the next ten years, it grows to be larger than Pinterest in terms of infrastructure, probably not revenue because it turns out pets are not the lucrative source of ad revenue that I was hoping it would be but, you know, directionally the same thing. It seems to me that building out this sort of function with this sort of approach to things is dramatically early as far as optimizations go when it's just me puttering around on something. I'm always cognizant of the wrong people taking the wrong message when we're talking about things that happen like this at scale. When does having an engineering productivity group begin to make sense?Micheal: I mentioned this earlier; like, yeah, there is definitely not a right answer, but we can start small. For example, this group actually started more as a delivery team. You know, when we started, we realized that we had different ways of deploying services or software at Pinterest, so we first gathered together to figure out, okay, what are the different ways and can we start simplifying that part? And that's where it started expanding. Okay, we are doing button-based deployments right now we have thousand-plus microservices, and we are seeing more incidents than we wanted to because anything where there's a human involved means there's a potential gap for error. I myself was involved in a SEV 0 incident, and I will be honest; we ended up deploying a Hello World application in one of our production fleet. Not the thing I wanted to be associated with my name, but, you know—Corey: And you were suddenly saying hello to the world, in fact—Micheal: [laugh].Corey: —and oops-a-doozy.Micheal: Yeah. So—and that really prompted us to rethink how we need to enable guardrails to do safe production rollouts. And that's how those conversations start ballooning out.Corey: And the healthy correct way. We've all broken production in various ways, and it's—you correctly are identifying, I believe, the direction you're heading in where this is a process problem and a tooling problem; it is not that you are secretly crap and should never have been allowed near anything in production. I mean, that's my excuse for me, but in your case, this is a common thing where it's, if someone can unintentionally cause issues like that, there needs to be better processes and procedures as the organization matures.Micheal: Yep. And that's kind of like always the route or the starting point for these discussions. And it starts growing from there on because, okay, you've helped improve the deploy process but now we're seeing insane amount of slowness, say on the build processes, or even post-deploy, there's, like, issues on how we monitor and look into data.And that I think forces these conversations, okay, where do we have these bespoke tools available? What are people doing today? And you have to ask those hard questions, like what can we actually remove from here? The goal is not to introduce yet another new system. Many a times, to be honest bash just gets the job done. [laugh].Personally, I'm okay with that as long as it's consistent and people, you know, are able to contribute to it and you have good practices in validating it, if it works, we should go for it rather than introducing yet another YAML [laugh] and some of that other aspects of doing that work. And that's what we encourage as well. That's how I think a lot of this starts connecting together in terms of, okay, now this is becoming a productivity group; they're focused on certain challenges where investing probably one person here may up-level a few other engineers who don't have to do that on a day-to-day basis. And I think that's one of the key items for, especially, folks who are running mid-sized companies to realize and start investing in these type of teams to really up-level, sort of, the rest of the engineering.Corey: You've been doing this for a fair while. If you were to go back and start over again on day one—which is always a terrifying question, on some level—what would you have done differently about building out this function as Pinterest continued to scale out?Micheal: Well, first, I must acknowledge that this was just not me, and there's, like, ton of people involved in helping make this happen.Corey: No, that's fair. We'll blame them for the missteps; that is—Micheal: [laugh].Corey: —just fine with me. I kid. I kid.Micheal: I think, definitely the nuances. If I look back, all the decisions that were made then at that point in time, there was a decision made to move to Phabricator, which was back then a great open-source code management system where with the current information at that point in time. And I'm not—I think it's very hard to always look back and say, “Oh, we could have chosen x at one point in time.” And I think in reality, that's how engineering organizations always evolve, that you have to make do with the information you have right now to make a decision that works for you over a couple of years.And I'll give you a small example of this. There was a time when Pinterest was actually on GitHub Enterprise—this was like circa 2013, I would say—and it really served as well for, like, five-plus years. Only then at certain point, we realized that it's hard to hire PHP engineers to support a tool like that, and we had to rethink what is the ROI and the investments we've made here? Can we ever map up or match back to one of the offerings in the industry today? And that's when you make decisions that, okay, at this point in time, it's clear that business continuity talks, you know, and it's hard to operate a system, which is, at this moment not supported, and then you make a call about making a shift or moving.And I think that's the key item. I don't think there's anything dramatically I would have changed since the start. Perhaps definitely investing a bit more individuals into the group and going from there. But that said, I'm really, sort of, at least proud of the fact that usually these teams are extremely lean and small, and they always have an outsized impact, especially when they're working with other engineers, other [opinionated 00:22:13] engineers for what it's worth.This episode is sponsored by our friends at Oracle Cloud. Counting the pennies, but still dreaming of deploying apps instead of "Hello, World" demos? Allow me to introduce you to Oracle's Always Free tier. It provides over 20 free services and infrastructure, networking databases, observability, management, and security.And - let me be clear here - it's actually free. There's no surprise billing until you intentionally and proactively upgrade your account. 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Visit https://snark.cloud/oci-free that's https://snark.cloud/oci-free.Corey: Most folks show up intending to do good today, and you make the best decision at the time with the context and constraints that you have, but my question I think is less around, “Well, what were the biggest mistakes you made?” But more to do with the idea of, based upon what you've learned and as you have shown—as you've shined light on these dark areas, as you have been exploring it, has anything jumped out at you that is, “Oh, yeah. Now, that I know—if I had known then what I know now, I would definitely have made this other decision.” Ideally, something that applies a little more globally than specific within Pinterest, just because the whole idea, aspirationally, is that people might learn something from our conversation. At least I will, if nothing else.Micheal: No, I think that's a great question. And I think the three things that jump to me, top of mind. I think technology is means to an end unless it gives you a competitive edge. And it's really hard to figure out at what point in time what technology and why we adopted it, it's going to make the biggest difference. Humans always tend to have a bias towards aligning towards where we want to go. So, that's the first one in my mind.The second one is, and we spoke about this last time, embrace your cloud provider as much as possible. You'd want to avoid taking on operational burden which is not going to add value to the business. If there is something you see your operating which can be offloaded—because your provider can, trust me, do a way better job than you or your team of few can ever do—embrace that as soon as possible. It's better that way because then it frees up your time to focus on the most important thing, which I've realized over time is—I really think teams like ours are actually—we're probably the most value as a glue to all the different experiences a software engineer would go through as part of their SDLC lifecycle.If we can simplify someone's life by giving them a clear view as to where their commit or the work is in this grand scheme of rolling out and giving them the right amount of data to take action when something goes wrong, trust me, they will love you for what you're doing because you're saving them ton of time. Many times, we don't realize that when we publish 11 different ways for you to go and check to just get your basic validation of work done. We tend to so much focus on the technological aspect of what the tool does, rather than the experience of it, and I've realized, if you can bridge the experience, especially for teams like ours, people really don't even need to know whether you're running Kubernetes or any of those solutions behind the scenes. And I think that's one of the biggest takeaways I have.Corey: I want to double down on something you said about the fact that you are not going to be able to run these services as effectively as your provider can. And relatively recently—in fact, since the first time we spoke—AWS has released a investment report in Virginia. And from 2011 through 2020, they have invested in building AWS data centers there, $35 billion. I promise almost no company that employs people listening to this that are not themselves a cloud provider is going to make that kind of investment in running these things themselves.Now, do cloud providers have sharp edges? Yes, absolutely. That is what my entire career is about, unfortunately. But you're not going to do a better job of running things more sustainably, more reliably, et cetera, et cetera. But there are other problems with this—and that's what I want to start exploring here—where in the olden days, when I ran things in data centers and they went down a lot more as a result, sometimes when there were outages, I would have the CEO of the company just standing there nervous worrying over my shoulder as I frantically typed to fix things.Spoiler: my typing accuracy did not improve by having someone looming over me. Now, when there's an outage that your cloud provider takes, in many cases the thing that you are doing to fix it is reloading the status page and waiting for an update because it is completely out of your hands. Is that something that you've had to encounter? Because you can push buttons and turn dials when things are broken and you control it, but in an AWS—or other cloud provider—outage, all you can really do is wait unless you have a DR plan that is large-scale and effective enough that you won't feel foolish or have wasted a huge amount of time and energy migrating off and then—because then it gets repaired in ten minutes. How do you approach that, from your perspective? I guess, the expectation management piece?Micheal: It's definitely I know something which keeps a lot of folks within infrastructure up at night because, like you just said, at times we can feel extremely powerless when we obviously don't have direct control—or visibility at times, as well—on what's happening. One of the things we have realized over time as part of running on our cloud provider for over a decade now, it forces us to rethink a bit on our priority workflows, what we want our Pinners to always have access to, what they need to see, what is not important or critical. Because it puts into perspective, even for the infrastructure teams, is to what is the most important thing we should always have it available and running, what is okay to be in a degraded state, until what time, right? So, it actually forces us to define SLOs and availability criteria within the team where we can broadcast that to the larger audience including the executives. So, none of this comes as a surprise at that point.I mean, it's not the answer, probably, you're looking for because is there's nothing we can do except set expectations clearly on what we can do and how when you think about the business when these things do happen. So, I know people may have I have a different view on this; I'm definitely curious to hear as well, but I know at Pinterest at least we have converged on our priority workflows. When something goes out, how do we jump in to provide a degraded experience? We have very clear run books to do that, and especially when it's a SEV 0, we do have clear processes in place on how often we need to update our entire company on where things are. And especially this is where your partnership with the cloud provider is going to be a big, big boon because you really want to know or have visibility, at the minimum some predictability on when things can get resolved, and how you want to work with them on some creative solutions. This is outside the DR strategy, obviously; you should still be focused on a DR strategy, but these are just simple things we've learned over time on how to just make it predictable for individuals within the company, so not everyone is freaking out.Corey: Yeah, from my perspective, I think the big things that I found that have worked, in my experience—mostly by getting them wrong the first time—is explain that someone else running the infrastructure when they take an outage; there's not much we can do. And no, it's not the sort of thing where picking up the phone and screaming at someone is going to help us, is the sort of thing that is best to communicate to executive stakeholders when things are running well, not in the middle of that incident.Then when things break, it's one of those, “Great, you're an exec. You know what your job is? Literally anything other than standing in the middle of the engineering floor, making everyone freak out even more. We'll have a discussion later about what the contributing factors were when you demand that we fire someone because of an outage. Then we're going to have a long and hard talk about what kind of culture you're trying to build here again?” But there are no perfect answers here.It's easy to sit here in the silver light of day with things working correctly and say, “Oh, yeah. This is how outages should be handled.” But then when it goes down, we're all basically an inch away at best from running around with our hair on fire, screaming, “Fix it, fix it, fix it, fix it, now.” And I am empathetic to that. There's a reason but I fix AWS bills for a living, and one of those big reasons is that it's a strictly business-hours problem and I don't have to run production infrastructure that faces anything that people care about, which is kind of amazing and freeing for someone who spent too many years on call.Micheal: Absolutely. And one of the things is that this is not only with the cloud provider, I think in today's nature of how our businesses are set up, there's probably tons of other APIs you are using or you're working with you may not be aware of. And we ended up finding that the hard way as well. There were a certain set of APIs or services we were using in the critical path which we were not aware of. When these outages happen, that's when you find that out.So, you're not only beholden to your provider at that point in time; you have to have those SLO expectations set with your other SaaS providers as well, other folks you're working with. Because I don't think that's going to change; it's probably only going to get complicated with all the different types of tools you're using. And then that's a trade-off you need to really think about. An example here is just like—you know, like I said, we moved in the past from GitHub to Phabricator—I didn't close the loop on that because we're moving back to GitHub right now [laugh] and that's one of the key projects I'm working with. Yeah, it's circle of life.But the thing is, we did a very strong evaluation here because we felt like, “Okay, there's a probability that GitHub can go down and that means people will be not productive for that couple of hours. What do we do then?” And we had to put a plan together to how we can mitigate that part and really build that confidence with the engineering teams, internally. And it's not the best solution out there; the other solution was just run our own, but how is that going to make any other difference because we do have libraries being pulled out of GitHub and so many other aspects of our systems which are unknowingly dependent on it anyways. So, you have to still mitigate those issues at some point in your entire SDLC process.So, that was just one example I shared, but it's not always on the cloud provider; I think there are just many aspects of—at least today how businesses are run, you're dependent; you have critical dependencies, probably, on some SaaS provider you haven't really vetted or evaluated. You will find out when they go down.Corey: So, I don't think I've told this story before, but before I started this place, I was doing a fair bit of consulting work for other companies. And I was doing a project at Pinterest years ago. And this was one of the best things I've ever experienced at a company site, let alone a client site, where I was there early in the morning, eight o'clock or so, so you know, engineers love to show up at the crack of 11:30. But so I was working a little early; it was great. And suddenly my SSH session that I was using to remote into something or other hung.And it's tap up, tap enter a couple of times, tap it a couple more. It was hung hard. “What's the—” and then someone gently taps me on the shoulder. So, I take the headphones off. It was someone from corporate IT was coming around saying, “Hey, there's a slight problem with our corporate firewall that we're fixing. Here's a MiFi device just for you that you can tether to get back online and get worked on until the firewall gets back.”And it was incredible, just the level of just being on top of things, and the focus on keeping the people who were building things and doing expensive engineering work that was awesome—and also me—productive during that time frame was just something I hadn't really seen before. It really made me think about the value of where do you remove bottlenecks from people getting their jobs done? It was—it remains one of the most impressive things I've seen.Micheal: That is great. And as you were telling me that I did look up our [laugh] internal system to see whether a user called Corey Quinn existed, and I should confirm this with you. I do see entries over here, a couple of commits, but this was 2015. Was that the time you were around, or is this before that even?Corey: That would have been around then, yes. I didn't start this place until late 2016.Micheal: I do see your commits, like, from 2015, and I—Corey: And they're probably terrible, I have no doubt. There's a reason I don't read code for a living anymore.Micheal: Okay, I do see a lot of GIFs—and I hope it's pronounced as GIF—okay, this is cool. We should definitely have a chat about this separately, Corey?Corey: Oh, yeah. “Would you explain this code?” “Absolutely not. I wrote it. Of course, I have no idea what it does. That's the rule. That's the way code always works.”Micheal: Oh, you are an honorary Pinterest engineer at this point, and you have—yes—contributed to our API service and a couple of Puppet profiles I see over here.Corey: Oh, yes—Micheal: [Amazing 00:36:11]. [laugh].Corey: You don't wind up thinking that's a risk factor that should be disclosed. I kid. I kid. It's, I made a joke about this when VMware acquired SaltStack and I did some analytics and found that 60 some odd lines of code I had written, way back when that were still in the current version of what was being shipped. And they thought, “Wait, is this actually a risk?”And no, I am making a joke. The joke is, is my code is bad. Fortunately, there are smart people around me who review these things. This is why code review is so important. But there was a lot to admire when I was there doing various things at Pinterest. It was a fun environment to work in, the level of professionalism was phenomenal, and I was just a big fan of a lot of the automation stuff.Phabricator was great. I love working with it, and, “Great, I'm going to use this to the next place I go.” And I did and then it was—I looked at what it took to get it up and running, and oh, yeah, I can see why GitHub is so popular these days. But it was neat. It was interesting seeing that type of environment up close.Micheal: That is great to hear. You know, this is what I enjoy, like, hearing some of these war stories. I am surprised; you seem to have committed way more than I've ever done in my [laugh] duration here at Pinterest. I do managing for a living, but then again—Corey, the good news is your code is still running on production. And we—Corey: Oh dear.Micheal: —haven't—[laugh]. We haven't removed or made any changes to it, so that's pretty amazing. And thank you for all your contributions.Corey: Oh, please, you don't have to thank me. I was paid, it was fine. That's the value of—Micheal: [laugh].Corey: —[work 00:37:38] for hire. It's kind of amazing. And the best part about consultants is, is when we're done with a project, we get the hell out everyone's happy about it.More happy when it's me that's leaving because of obvious personality-related reasons. But it was just an interesting company from start to finish. I remember one other time, I wound up opening a ticket about having a slight challenge with a flickering on my then Apple-branded display that everyone was using before they discontinued those. And I expected there to be, “Oh, okay. You're a consultant. Great. How did we not put you in the closet with a printer next to that thing, breathing the toner?” Like most consulting clients tend to do, and sure enough, three minutes later, I'm getting that tap on the shoulder again; they have a whole replacement monitor. “Can you go grab a cup of coffee? We'll run the cable for it. It'll just be about five minutes.” I started to feel actively bad about requesting things because I did a lot of consulting work for a lot of different companies, and not to be unkind, but treating consultants and contractors super well is not something that a lot of companies optimize for. I can't necessarily blame them for that. It just really stood out.Micheal: Yep, I do hope we are keeping up with that right now because I know our team definitely has a lot of consultants working with us as well. And it's always amazing to see; we do want to treat them as FTs. It doesn't even matter at that point because we're all individuals and we're trying to work towards common goals. Like you just said, I think I personally have learned a few items as well from some of these folks. Which is again, I think speaks to how we want to work and create a culture of, like, we're all engineers; we want to be solving problems together, and as you were doing it, we want to do it in such a way that it's still fun, and we're not having the restrictions of titles or roles and other pieces. But I think I digressed. It was really fun to see your commits though, I do want to track this at some point before we move completely over to GitHub, at least keep this as a record, for what it's worth.Corey: Yeah basically look at this graffiti in the codebase of, “A shit-poster was here,” and here I am. And that tends to be, on some level, the mark we live on the universe. What's always terrifying is looking at things I did 15 years ago in my first Linux admin job. Can I still ping the thing that I built there? Yes, I can. And how is that even possible? That should not have outlived me; honestly, it should never have seen the light of day in production, but here we are. And you never know how long that temporary kluge you put together is going to last.Micheal: You know, one of the things I was recalling, I was talking to someone in my team about this topic as well. We always talk about 10x engineers. I don't know what your thoughts are on that, but the fact that you just mentioned you built something; it still pings. And there's a bunch of things, in my mind, when you are writing code or you're working on some projects, the fact that it can outlast you and live on, I think that's a big, big contribution. And secondly, if your code can actually help up-level, like, ten other people, I think you've really made the mark of 10x engineer at that point.Corey: Yeah, the idea of the superhuman engineer is always been a strange and dangerous one. If for nothing else, from where I sit, excellence is inherently situational. Like we just talked about someone at Pinterest: is potentially going to be able to have that kind of impact specifically because—to my worldview—that there's enough process and things around there that empower them to succeed. Then if you were to take that engineer and drop them into a five-person startup where none of those things exist, they might very well flounder. It's why I'm always a little suspicious of this is a startup founded by engineers from Google or Facebook, or wherever it is.It's, yeah, and what aspects of that culture do you think are one-to-one matches with the small scrappy startup in the garage? Right, I predicting some challenges here. Excellence is always situational. An amazing employee at one company can get fired at a second one for lack of performance, and that does not mean that there's anything wrong with them and it does not mean that they are a fraud. It means that what they needed to be successful was present in one of those shops, but not the other.Micheal: This is so true. And I really appreciate you bringing this up because whenever we discuss any form of performance management, that is a—in my view personally—I think that's an incorrect term to be using. It is really at that point in time, either you have outlived the environment you are in, or the environment is going in a different direction where I think your current skill set probably could be best used in the environment where it's going to work. And I know it's very fuzzy at that point, but like you said, yes, excellence really means you don't want to tie it to the number of commits you have pushed out, or any specific aspect of your deliverables or how you work.Corey: There are no easy answers to any of these things, and it's always situational. It's why I think people are sometimes surprised when I will make comments about the general case of how things should be, then I talk to a specific environment where they do the exact opposite, and I don't yell at them for it. It's there—in a general sense, I have some guidance, but they are usually reasons things are the way they are, and I'm interested in hearing them out. Everything's situational, the worst consultant in the world is the one that shows up, has no idea what's going on, and then asked, “What moron set this up?” Invariably, two said, quote-unquote, “Moron.” And the engagement doesn't go super well from there. It's, “Okay, why is this the way that it is? What constraints shaped it? What was the context behind the problem you were trying to solve?” And, “Well, why didn't you use this AWS service?” “Because it didn't exist for another three years when we were building that thing,” is a—Micheal: Yes.Corey: —common answer.Micheal: Yes, you should definitely appreciate that of all the decisions that have been made in past. People tend to always forget why they were made. You're absolutely right; what worked back then will probably not work now, or vice versa, and it's always situational. So, I think I can go on about this for hours, but I think you hit that to the point, Corey.Corey: Yeah, I do my best. I want to thank you for taking another block of time out of your day to wind up talking with me about various aspects of what it takes to effectively achieve better levels of engineering productivity at large companies, with many teams, working on shared codebases. If people want to learn more about what you're up to, where can they find you?Micheal: I'm definitely on Twitter. So, please note that I'm spelled M-I-C-H-E-A-L on Twitter. So, you can definitely read on to my tweets there. But otherwise, you can always reach out to me on LinkedIn, too.Corey: Fantastic and we will, of course, include a link to that in the [show notes 00:44:02]. Thanks once again for your time. I appreciate it.Micheal: Thanks a lot, Corey.Corey: Micheal Benedict, head of engineering productivity at Pinterest. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with a comment telling me that you work at Pinterest, have looked at the codebase, and would very much like a refund and an apology.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

POD LEDOM
Cycle 14, Episode 1: The Host Who Has Personally Met Every Name

POD LEDOM

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 89:16


The Hosts discuss Cycle 14, Episode 1 of ANTM! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/podledom/support

Digital Marketing Made Simple with Jennie Lyon
#73 - 10 Time Management Tips to Help You Reach Your Goals

Digital Marketing Made Simple with Jennie Lyon

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 31:23


As business owners we often feel like we do not have enough time in the day. Personally, it isn't easy to accomplish my work goals and personal aspirations if I don't manage my time wisely. Over the past 20 years I have learned that the more time I spend doing one thing, the less time I have to do other things. If you're reading this, then the chances are that you're feeling the same way.It is challenging, if not impossible, to predict one's success. A considerable percentage of people will predict they won't succeed at their goals, but many are pleasantly surprised when they do. The problem is that people don't want to take the proper steps to achieve what they want. Procrastination often gets in the way; people say they don't have the time, but it's really because they don't want to try.That's why time is your equalizer. Whether you take the long or the short way, time matters in the end; it is the one thing that we all get. Time is the element that we can't take back. In today's episode, 10 Time Management Tips to Help You Reach Your Goals, we dive into actionable steps you can implement immediately.We will take a look at: Knowing your Goals - Setting goals should not be haphazard; you should only set goals within your control and realistically achievable. Understanding How You Spend Your Time - A month-long assessment is a great way to get an idea of your current habits. You'll be shocked at how much time you waste on tasks that you could easily avoid if you do this. Prioritizing Your Tasks - Do the most important and daunting tasks first. Planning Ahead - Set your daily schedule by deciding what you need to accomplish that day. Often doing this the evening before will ensure your day is set up for success. Time Blocking - To boost productivity is time-blocking using the Pomodoro Method. Protecting Your Time - You are the boss of your work. Sometimes it's not only okay to say no; it's required. You don't have to agree to everything someone asks of you.  Walking Away - One of the best pieces of advice I ever received is this: Don't get attached to anything that is not moving forward. In other words, abandon or re-associate with people who are bogged down with the problems of yesterday. Declutter and Organize Your Space - Keeping things unorganized will cause your mind to wander off into the "doldrums" and prevent you from becoming mentally overloaded with the tasks at hand. Eliminate Mental Distractions - Distractions are tricky. In general, bad habits, natural inclinations to find distractions, and restless minds are all time-wasters. Work-Life Balance - You must prioritize yourself, your own needs and desires, along your overall goals. Links For This Episode:Schedule a ConsultationGoal Planning Kit For Entrepreneurs Get in touch with Jennie:·         JennieLyon.com·         jennie@jennielyon.com·         Book a Free Consultation·         Facebook·         Instagram·         Twitter·         LinkedIn·         Pinterest

The Cory Truax Show
EP278: More Thoughts on the V-Word Mandate / CRT is Absolutely Taught In Schools / Last Week's Election Results

The Cory Truax Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021


On This Episode:THE ORIGIN OF THE RELIGIOUS RIGHTRecently, a podcast erroneously and slanderously alleged that the Religious Right formed through racism. I'll debunk that. However, more importantly, we'll use this as a lesson in learning to think with some nuance and admitting that a complicated world requires complicated thinking.V-WORD MANDATE IS ISSUED AND THEN STOPPEDThe 5th Circuit correctly stayed the federal government's unprecedented, obviously unconstitutional employer v-word mandate. I also, though, want to talk about the decision to receive the v-word because I know many are struggling through it. Some employers will mandate it even without the government's requirement. Personally, I struggle having a side in the V-Word war, but I at least want to talk through the decision.ELECTION ANALYSIS FROM LAST WEEKI'm never particularly encouraged when Republicans when elections, but it IS encouraging with destructive ideas and personalities on the Left are defeated. So, last week's elections were good news for those who want to see bad ideas repudiated. I'll provide a breakdown of some races you might have missed as well.CRITICAL RACE THEORY IS TAUGHT IN SCHOOLSAfter the election, many on the Left sought to gaslight parents regarding Critical Race Theory in schools. While CRT isn't taught explicitly, its tenants and consequences have made their way into instruction.

Mike Up In Your Business Podcast with Mike Michalowicz
Ep 87: Making Your Company Sale Ready with Josh Patrick

Mike Up In Your Business Podcast with Mike Michalowicz

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 34:12


Josh Patrick is a serial entrepreneur who's mission in life is helping successful blue collar business owners take their successful business and make it personally and economically sustainable. He is the author of Sustainable: A Fable About Creating a Personally and Economically Sustainable Business. His newest book The Sale Ready Company helps business owners understand the eight steps it takes to leave a business when you want, in the way you want. Websites and Handles:www.salereadycompany.com

Delegate Your Way To Success Podcast
Ep 102 - How To Delegate To Your Graphic Design Virtual Assistant

Delegate Your Way To Success Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 10:08


What Your Graphics Design VA Needs To Know?The first step is sharing your brand identity to your graphics design VA so they are aware of the look, feel, and visual identity of your brand. Once you do that, you can proceed with assigning types of graphics you can assign to your VA.Product DesignIf you need a product designed, a skilled graphic design virtual assistant should be able to convey it through a prototype. Simply ensure that your graphics VA researches thoroughly to avoid concerns like copyright issues with other products in the same identity.Branding DesignIn general, your marketing strategy should represent how you want your target market to perceive you because branding shapes a consumer's perception therefore, your portrayal of your brand should always be on top of your target audience's mind. Website GraphicsGiven that graphics design VAs are experts in their field,  they have a better understanding of user experience (UX) design when it comes to building a website. The design should match the type of branding your business has, so make sure that you take your brand book to heart.Social Media GraphicsYour graphics VA must be capable of producing eye-catching visuals that will entice your target audience. Compelling copy and captions should be supported by strong graphics because they are part of your branding. Tips On Working With Your Graphic Design VASet Clear Communication And ExpectationsPractice proper communications with the team your VA then,  choose a communication tool or platform that you both utilize and make sure that groups are properly set up so that everyone involved is always in touch. Create a standard operating procedure (SOP)  so you can simply delegate work to someone else if your graphics VA is unwell.Set A Clear Time When Your Graphic Design Virtual Assistant Can WorkEnsure that this is followed from Day 1 depending on the agreed-upon set hours. Also, make it clear that they must be present and on time if they are required to attend meetings.Discuss Plan BIf there are any power or internet outages while they are working on the project, make it clear that they must share these details with you in order for you to provide them with support.Share Your Company CultureTeach your VA, your company's culture so that they can work well with the team assigned to them, it's important that your graphic design VA understands the values of the people with whom they will be working.Use A Task Management ToolYou must ensure that everyone in your project is aware of the project's status.  Using atask management tool can help you with that. Personally, I believe   Teamwork is the best tool where you can also easily manage and track your team members' tasks progress and time spent on each task, as well as giving your clients visibility into the projects. They also provide a free plan for 5 people. You can check them out by clicking my referral link:https://www.teamwork.com/partner/e65djxskp8

The Determined People Podcast

In the United States, we have the right to vote for whomever we wish. However, we have allowed our voting to separate us...to divide us. Personally, I do not care who you cast your vote for. I care about something else which is the subject for today.

Spirit of Success
76: Shining My Own Light to Find the Freedom of the Good- Part 2

Spirit of Success

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 35:00


Welcome back for part 2 of another solo special! The last couple weeks saw me continuing on my world tour, travelling from France, back to Italy, and now to Chicago where I am taking some time to reflect and record this episode.  As I teased last episode, I returned to Damanhur - this time by myself instead of with a group. I didn't realize going into it what a different experience and meaning it would have for me between my first trip and my second. I attended a full moon event, which is all about letting go of that which does not serve you. Damanhur harnesses and fosters the energies available to all of us in the world through their shared community goals and understandings, and it makes for an amazingly supportive environment. It truly makes you feel like a superperson, and makes the hard things easy - because you're able to realize your full authentic power. My goal in this episode is to help provide tools to make my experiences here, and also in the last 18 months, usable for you as a listener. Personally, I promised myself that I would use this period constructively to help shift what I was stuck in - patterns, ways of thinking, and the energy I was tapping into. Damanhur made this mission feel possible because being there dropped away all of the resistance I had been feeling in making this change. I realized that I had been looking outside of myself for the answers I was seeking - but the answers were actually within me, in parts of that I had suppressed and repressed. I was afraid of those parts of myself, because they carried a lot of pain and fear - but I learned at Damanhur that those pieces of myself are necessary for who I am today, and ultimately was the gift that brought about my awakening. Now is the time to ask yourself, “Are there any parts of me that I have repressed, or suppressed, that want to be expressed?” You can transmute that energy, no matter its nature, into happiness and joy. It takes courage to show yourself love, and accept all of the parts of yourself...but adding a homeopathic dropper of love to the parts of yourself that your pain is housed in is the only way to heal and bring yourself together. The way of the future of health is changing - but you can start today by doing less, and embracing the inner power you already contain. Find a witness to help provide support - or reach out to me so that I can help walk with you towards the light. You don't need to go to Damanhur to make this happen for yourself - and you can also find ways to go to Damanhur without actually going there. Next week on the podcast, I speak to a friend of mine who lives at Damanhur so we can talk more about how you can bring Damanhur and its teachings into your life, no matter where you are - so make sure you tune in!  Read the vision that Falco held of Damanhur here. Find The Big Leap by Guy Henricks here. Learn about Carl Jung's shadow work concept here. Connect with Tracy Instagram/Facebook: @dr.tracydebi www.atelierix.co To work with Tracy, you can book a call here: https://calendly.com/drtracydebi/fit-ability-call Spirit of Success is a podcast creating a platform for honest conversations sharing the real life stories behind personal transformations. If you're a fan of the podcast, don't forget to subscribe, rate, and review Spirit of Success! If you resonated with something you heard, don't forget to share with a friend! Edited by: Jess Schmidt Logo: The Cultivated Group Music: ‘Breathe out, Breathe in' (Instrumental) by Roof

The Paul Minors Podcast: Productivity, Business & Self-Improvement
PMP #232: 5 Things I've changed my mind on

The Paul Minors Podcast: Productivity, Business & Self-Improvement

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 12:15


We live in a very opinionated world where it's easier than ever to share your stance on a topic. But sometimes we get nervous about changing our opinions at the risk of sounding flakey; going back on your own words may come across as weak or even unintelligent. Personally, I don't have an issue with changing my mind about something. I'm happy to be proven wrong and form a new opinion. I'm even happy to just change my mind about how I view a topic for no reason. This is something that's only become more frequent with age and experience. How I view and run my business now is quite different from when I was getting started. So, here are some examples of things I've changed my mind about in the last few years. Show notes (please leave me a comment with your questions and feedback) » https://paulminors.com/232 If you enjoyed this episode, I'd love it if you could leave me a review. Intro/Outro Music: "Synthia" by Scott & Brendo --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/paulminors/message

Founders
Authentic: A Memoir by the Founder of Vans

Founders

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 33:23


What I learned from reading Authentic: A Memoir by the Founder of Vans by Paul Van Doren. Subscribe to listen to the rest of this episode and gain access to all full length episodes.If you choose the annual subscription option I will upgrade your subscription so you have lifetime access. (You invest once and listen to every future episode for free.) You can also subscribe monthly if you prefer.WHAT OTHER PEOPLE ARE SAYING:“Without a doubt, the highest value-to-cost ratio I've taken advantage of in the last year is the Founders podcast premium feed. Tap into eons of knowledge and experiences, condensed into digestible portions. Highly, highly recommend. “Uniquely outstanding. No fluff and all substance. David does an outstanding job summarizing these biographies and hones in on the elements that make his subjects so unique among entrepreneurs. I particularly enjoy that he focuses on both the founder's positive and negative characteristics as a way of highlighting things to mimic and avoid.”“I just paid for my first premium podcast subscription for Founders podcast. Learning from those who came before us is one of the highest value ways to invest time. David does his homework and exponentially improves my efficiency by focusing on the most valuable lessons.”“I haven't found a better return on my time and money than your podcast for inspiration and time-tested wisdom to help me on my journey.“I've now listened to every episode. From this knowledge I've doubled my business to $500k a year. Love your passion and recommend your podcast to everyone.”“Founders is the only podcast I pay for and it's worth 100x the cost.”“I have listened to many podcasts on entrepreneurship (HIBT, Masters of Scale, etc.) and find Founders to be consistently more helpful than any other entrepreneurship podcast. David is a craftsperson, he carefully reads biographies of founders, distills the most important anecdotes and themes from their life, and draws commonalities across lives. David's focus is rightfully not on teaching you a formula to succeed but on constantly pushing you to think different.”“I highly highly recommend this podcast. Holy cow. I've been binge listening to these and you start to see patterns across all these incredible humans.”Listening to your podcast has changed my life and that is not a statement I make often.“After one episode I quickly joined the Misfit feed. Love the insight and thoughts shared along the way. David loves what he does and it shines through on the podcast. Definitely my go-to podcast now.”“It is worth every penny. I cannot put into words how fantastic this podcast is. Just stop reading this and get the full access.”“Personally it's one of my top 3 favorite podcasts. If you're into business and startups and technology, this is for you. David covers good books and I've come to really appreciate his perspective. Can't say enough good things.”“I quickly subscribed and it's honestly been the best money I've spent all year. It has inspired me to read biographies. Highly recommend.”“This is the most inspirational and best business podcast out there. David has inspired me to focus on biographies rather than general business books. I'm addicted.”“Anyone interested in business must find the time to listen to each any every Founders podcast. A high return on investment will be a virtual certainty. Subscribe and start listening as soon as possible.”“David saves you hundreds of hours by summarizing bios of legendary business founders and providing valuable insight on what makes an individual successful. He has introduced me to many founders I would have never known existed.”“The podcasts offer spectacular lessons on life, human nature and business achievement. David's enthusiasm and personal thoughts bring me joy. My journey has been enhanced by his efforts.”"Founders is the best self investment that I've made in years."Sign up to listen to the rest of this episode and get access to every full episode. 

Damon, Ratto & Kolsky
Did Andrew Wiggins take the Timberwolves personally?

Damon, Ratto & Kolsky

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 10:36


Damon Bruce and Ray Ratto break down Andrew Wiggins' epic performance vs. the Timberwolves last night an debate whether or not playing against his former team had anything to do with it. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Gutsy Podcast
Powerback 102: Develop one financial system to enhance your growth

The Gutsy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 7:07


Today I want to give you just a few bite-sized ways that you can start to develop a financial system that really works with you.Now ​​look, I know how terrifying looking at numbers can be BUT I can also sit here and honestly speak about how liberating and exciting it can be as well.First and foremost, I want you to create a Money Day. Every single week, choose one day to look at your numbers (creating this habit is really going to give you so much of the Powerback® because you're going to have knowledge, and knowledge is power);Then I want you to consider getting set up with an official accounting software (Personally, I love QuickBooks);Finally, I want you to get that freebie set up; that introductory offer that causes people to say, ‘Yes, I'd like to learn more.'Creating a financial system that works for you does not have to be cumbersome; it does not have to be complicated; it does not need to have all these bells and whistles involved in it. The most important thing here is to find something that works for you!---RESOURCES FROM THIS EPISODEGet 50% off your first 6 months of QuickBooks OnlineAt lauraaura.com, you can now sign up for my free mini-class on Undoing Your Business So You Can Take Your Powerback®Head on over to LauraAura.com to find out more about The BrandstarterTM Course, Brand Reviews, Powerback Sessions, and the freshly launched PowerbackTM Course. CONNECT WITH LAURAAURAInstagram: @thatlauraauraFacebook: @thatlauraauraTwitter: @thatlauraauraWebsite: LauraAura.comTHANK YOU, GUTSY TRIBE!We love, love, love to read your comments, feedback, and reviews. If you haven't yet, drop us one below! Your review might even get highlighted within one of our gutsy love posts or on our website.

Life On the Brink
42: Peaceful Self-Care for times of stress

Life On the Brink

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 28:58


Hello hello, and welcome to Episode 42 of Life on the Brink!Things are picking up, and in so many ways. Personally, this fall is the busiest, dare I say most stressful season I've had since Covid began. To be perfectly honest, it's been a tough few weeks. And while self care has become quite the trend over the past few years, often in a “treat yo self” way, lately I've had a different kind of self-care revelation.In this episode I'm sharing:-a personal experience about stress and help-10 ways to take care of yourself-methods for calming down and enjoying your time-how we are not alone  -a bit of encouragement for anyone who is going through itPlus I'm talking Harry Potter for this week's Little Joy, and sharing a laid back jazz playlist that is just cozy enough to prep you for Christmastime.For the complete show notes, click here!Site: lifeonthebrink.liveSocial: @anna_on_the_keys

Bourbon With Friends
Veterans Day Episode - Rodney Sickmann, 444 days captive in Iran

Bourbon With Friends

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 34:44


In this special episode. Paul & Stacey sit down with USMC Veteran Rocky Sickmann. Rodney “Rocky” Sickmann graduated from Washington High School in 1976 and immediately entered the U.S. Marine Corps. In 1979, just 28 days into his tour of duty at American Embassy in Tehran, Iran, Sickmann became a player in one of the most terrifying events in U.S. history. On November 4, 1979, after months of turmoil marked by the return of the exiled Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini, the American Embassy in Tehran was overrun by militants and its employees taken captive. Sergeant Rocky Sickmann, then just 22, was one of 65 Americans taken hostage. Sickmann remained a hostage for 444 days before being released on Jan. 20, 1981 following 14 months of diplomacy by President Jimmy Carter.Three months later, Sickmann was Honorably Discharged after six years in the U.S. Marine Corps and received several accolades during his service including the Prisoner of War Medal, The Defense Meritorious Service Medal, Award of Valor, and Good Conduct Medal. Following the military, he began working in advertising for KMOX radio in St. Louis, Mo. and then entered the private sector for Anheuser-Busch InBev. He spent the next 34 years with the company, most recently as the U.S. National Director for Military and Industry Affairs, until his retirement in July 2016. Sickmann's personal diary, “Iranian Hostage: A Personal Diary of 444 Days in Captivity” is also the only known diary to have been smuggled out of Iran and published. The diary is no longer in publication.  As the U.S. National Director for Military and Industry Affairs at Anheuser-Busch InBev, Sickmann oversaw all Military Special Events, Military and Industry Trade Media Publications, and National Industry Trade Shows. Throughout his career at Anheuser-Busch, Sickmann also played a key role in increasing Anheuser-Busch's market penetration among the Military by training wholesalers, coordinating marketing and publicity, executing national sales promotions, and planning special military events. Sickmann helped coordinate the “Here's to the Heroes Tour” which salutes the men and women of the armed forces, allowing Americans to show their support for the troops via recorded messages filmed on location at community events, celebrations, and festivals nationwide and shared with U.S. troops serving in Iraq and Afghanistan.Personally and professionally, Sickmann has been fortunate to share his story on many different platforms including ABC News, ESPN, Fox & Friends, Fox News, Los Angeles Times, MSNBC, NFL Time Line Series, The New York Times, to the cast of the Oscar award-winning film Argo (starring Ben Affleck), national and local Veteran and Military organizations, and educational institutions across the country. In August 2016, Sickmann's military and professional experience, coupled with his passion for our armed forces, led him to pursue an opportunity with his favorite non-profit organization: Folds of Honor. In this new role, Sickmann helps advance the Folds mission: To stand in the financial gap of the more than one million dependents adversely affected by war, providing educational scholarships to the children and spouses of those killed or disabled while serving our nation. If you would like to learn more or donate to Folds Of Honor. Please visit their website. https://foldsofhonor.org/

Growing Your Firm | Strategies for Accountants, CPA's, Bookkeepers , and Tax Professionals

Hi I'm Rob Brown, former high school math teacher, kickboxing blackbelt, stroke survivor, chess fan, part-time musician, teetotaller and committed Christian. Most of my work is in the accounting/CPA/fintech world in these 6 areas: ❶ BD/SALES TRAINING. Online webinars or in-house business development programs that train accountants/CPAs to become confident, effective and strategic work winners. Growth related sessions include prospecting, referrals, pipeline, cross-selling, personal branding, pitching, networking and closing. ❷ EVENT HOST & MODERATOR. Professional MC, event host, moderator, interviewer and chair for F2F/virtual conferences, summits and panels in the accounting and fintech world. Throughout the pandemic, I chaired 24 virtual panels with leaders of global accounting networks and alliances to discuss the key issues and challenges. View them here: https://bit.ly/acc-panels ❸ ACCOUNTABILITY COACH. 1-1 career mentoring for accountants/CPAS to ensure they hit their goals and accelerate their careers outside chargeable hours. This includes discretionary activities such as networking, profile raising, career development, winning business, personal branding, developing commercial acumen, speaking and writing etc. ❹ PODCAST CO-HOST. The top-rated ACCOUNTING INFLUENCERS PODCAST features daily segments featuring news, rants and expert interviews for accountants/CPAs and the accounting/fintech world who serve them. https://bit.ly/accinfpodcast ❺ INFLUENCER MARKETING. Accounting/fintech vendors and accounting networks/associations/alliances hire me as an 'accounting influencer' to generate interview-based video content (testimonials, case studies, staff bios, launches) for greater brand exposure, internal comms, audience engagement and product promotion. ❻ ACCOUNTING INFLUENCER ROUNDTABLE (AIR). With Martin Bissett, I co-chair a door-opening club of 50+ practitioners, experts and vendors who serve the accounting/fintech world. https://accountinginfluencers.com/ Finally, I'm the author of Amazon bestseller BUILD YOUR REPUTATION with global publishers WILEY. I'm a featured TEDx speaker and my talk THE PERSONAL BRAND OF YOU has generated close to 300K YouTube views. Personally, I have a diploma in accounting and coaching qualifications in 7 sports. I live in Nottingham (home of Robin Hood) with wife Amanda and 2 daughters. I'm a proud Yorkshireman, am allergic to grapefruit and cannot whistle or ice skate. I have epilepsy, am not allowed to drive and I play 4 musical instruments to an average standard. ☛ www.BDAcademy.pro ☏ +44(0) 7855 710 201

Drink Beer, Think Beer With John Holl
Ep. 110 - Sean Lilly Wilson of Fullsteam Brewery

Drink Beer, Think Beer With John Holl

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 45:43


Show notes from host John Holl:"You'll hear how I first met Sean Lilly Wilson a little later in the show, but what I didn't know back then and what I've come to experience over the course of nearly a decade, is his commitment to food, drink, hospitality, creativity, culture, and community.   Outside of Fullsteam, the brewery he launched in 2010, much of the growth of North Carolina as a premiere beer state has to do with the efforts he mounted – with a dedicated group of others – to change the then byzantine beer laws and restrictions.  It was an effort called Pop the Cap, and its impact is still felt today. His efforts haven't stopped with the laws, but have moved onto the land. Through the brewery, work within the state guild, and conversation with other brewing professionals he wants to help southern agriculture grow and thrive. He's called it "plow to pint" and the beers he and the brewing team have produced bear the fruit of that hard work.  Nationally, he's been recognized four times by the James Beard Foundation as a semi-finalist in the outstanding Wine, Spirits, or Beer Producer category. Personally, he's a nice guy to talk to. He's thoughtful and earnest and an incredibly hard worker.  At the brewery he goes by CEO – Chief Executive Optimist – and works to bring forward thinking to both the original brewery in Durham as well as a new location – which opened on the day this was recorded, a day before it first aired. It will focus on pizza and beer pairings, something that might sound simple, but is actually a tightrope walk. This Episode is sponsored by:NZ HopsNZ Hops, the co-operative of Master Hop Growers are a passionate collective of farms dedicated to innovation and sustainability. Leading the charge in sustainable farm practices, some NZ Hops farms have over five generations of knowledge that inform their composting program, used by growers to promote healthy regenerative growth of hops year upon year. This creates high quality soil, a critical component of healthy growing conditions. At NZ Hops, they feel that sustainability is not only being a steward for the land, but for our future.Stomp StickersStomp Stickers is a proud member of the brewers association that produces a wide variety of printed brewery products such as beer labels, keg collars, coasters, beer boxes and much more. Stomp's website features an easy-to-use design tool, low quantity orders, fast turn times, and free domestic shipping. Visit StompStickers.com and use code DRINKBEER15 for 15% off your first order.For more Drink Beer, Think Beer or to check out Beer Edge: The Newsletter for Beer Professionals, follow us on Twitter @thebeeredge and subscribe to our beer industry focused newsletter. There is more information, articles, and engaging content at Beer Edge. Host: John Holl Guest: Sean Lilly Wilson of Fullsteam Brewery Sponsors:   NZ Hops, Stomp Stickers and The Beer Edge Tags: Beer, Farming, Pilsner, Local, IPA, Food, Laws

Founders
The General and the Genius: Groves and Oppenheimer—The Unlikely Partnership that Built the Atom Bomb

Founders

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 32:36


What I learned from reading The General and the Genius: Groves and Oppenheimer—The Unlikely Partnership that Built the Atom Bomb by James Kunetka. Sign up to listen to the rest of this episode and get lifetime access to every full episode. You will: Immediately unlock 223 full length episodes that are available no where else.Get access to every future episode for free.Learn from history's greatest entrepreneurs and apply their ideas to your work.Tap this link on a mobile device so you can install your private podcast feed into your favorite podcast player. It takes less than 29 seconds to set up. You will learn the key insights from biographies on Steve Jobs, Elon Musk, John D. Rockefeller, Coco Chanel, Andrew Carnegie, Enzo Ferrari, Estee Lauder, Jeff Bezos, Warren Buffett, Charlie Munger, Phil Knight, Joseph Pulitzer, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Alexander Graham Bell, Bill Gates, P.T. Barnum, Edwin Land, Henry Ford, Walter Chrysler, Thomas Edison, David Ogilvy, Ben Franklin, Howard Hughes, George Lucas, Levi Strauss, Walt Disney and so many more. You will learn from the founders of Nike, Patagonia, Apple, Microsoft, Hershey, General Motors, Ford, Standard Oil, Polaroid, Home Depot, MGM, Intel, Federal Express, Wal Mart, JP Morgan, Chrysler, Cadillac, Oracle, Hyundai, Seagram, Berkshire Hathaway, Teledyne, Adidas, Les Schwab, Renaissance Technologies, IKEA, Sony, Ferrari, and so many more. WHAT OTHER PEOPLE ARE SAYING:“Without a doubt, the highest value-to-cost ratio I've taken advantage of in the last year is the Founders podcast premium feed. Tap into eons of knowledge and experiences, condensed into digestible portions. Highly, highly recommend. “Uniquely outstanding. No fluff and all substance. David does an outstanding job summarizing these biographies and hones in on the elements that make his subjects so unique among entrepreneurs. I particularly enjoy that he focuses on both the founder's positive and negative characteristics as a way of highlighting things to mimic and avoid.”“I just paid for my first premium podcast subscription for Founders podcast. Learning from those who came before us is one of the highest value ways to invest time. David does his homework and exponentially improves my efficiency by focusing on the most valuable lessons.”“I haven't found a better return on my time and money than your podcast for inspiration and time-tested wisdom to help me on my journey.“I've now listened to every episode. From this knowledge I've doubled my business to $500k a year. Love your passion and recommend your podcast to everyone.”“Founders is the only podcast I pay for and it's worth 100x the cost.”“I have listened to many podcasts on entrepreneurship (HIBT, Masters of Scale, etc.) and find Founders to be consistently more helpful than any other entrepreneurship podcast. David is a craftsperson, he carefully reads biographies of founders, distills the most important anecdotes and themes from their life, and draws commonalities across lives. David's focus is rightfully not on teaching you a formula to succeed but on constantly pushing you to think different.”“I highly highly recommend this podcast. Holy cow. I've been binge listening to these and you start to see patterns across all these incredible humans.”Listening to your podcast has changed my life and that is not a statement I make often.“After one episode I quickly joined the Misfit feed. Love the insight and thoughts shared along the way. David loves what he does and it shines through on the podcast. Definitely my go-to podcast now.”“It is worth every penny. I cannot put into words how fantastic this podcast is. Just stop reading this and get the full access.”“Personally it's one of my top 3 favorite podcasts. If you're into business and startups and technology, this is for you. David covers good books and I've come to really appreciate his perspective. Can't say enough good things.”“I quickly subscribed and it's honestly been the best money I've spent all year. It has inspired me to read biographies. Highly recommend.”“This is the most inspirational and best business podcast out there. David has inspired me to focus on biographies rather than general business books. I'm addicted.”“Anyone interested in business must find the time to listen to each any every Founders podcast. A high return on investment will be a virtual certainty. Subscribe and start listening as soon as possible.”“David saves you hundreds of hours by summarizing bios of legendary business founders and providing valuable insight on what makes an individual successful. He has introduced me to many founders I would have never known existed.”“The podcasts offer spectacular lessons on life, human nature and business achievement. David's enthusiasm and personal thoughts bring me joy. My journey has been enhanced by his efforts.”"Founders is the best self investment that I've made in years."GET LIFETIME ACCESS TO FOUNDERS

The Bike Shed
315: Emotions Are A Pendulum

The Bike Shed

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 41:23


Steph talks about starting a new project and identifying "focused" tests while Chris shares his latest strategy for managing flaky tests. They also ponder the squishy "it depends" side of software and respond to a listener question about testing all commits in a pull request. This episode is brought to you by ScoutAPM (https://scoutapm.com/bikeshed). Give Scout a try for free today and Scout will donate $5 to the open source project of your choice when you deploy. rspec-retry (https://github.com/NoRedInk/rspec-retry) Cassidy Williams - It Depends - GitHub Universe 2021 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aMWh2uLO9OM) Say No To More Process (https://thoughtbot.com/blog/say-no-to-more-process-say-yes-to-trust) StandardRB (https://github.com/testdouble/standard) Become a Sponsor (https://thoughtbot.com/sponsorship) of The Bike Shed! Transcript: CHRIS: My new computer is due on the fourth. I'm so close. STEPH: On the fourth? CHRIS: On the fourth. STEPH: That's so exciting. CHRIS: And I'm very excited. But no, I don't want to upgrade any software on this computer anymore. Never again shall I update a piece of software on this computer. STEPH: [laughs] CHRIS: This is its final state. And then I will take its soul and move it into the new computer, and we'll go from there. [chuckles] STEPH: Take its soul. [laughs] CHRIS: Hello and welcome to another episode of The Bike Shed, a weekly podcast from your friends at thoughtbot about developing great software. I'm Chris Toomey. STEPH: And I'm Steph Viccari. CHRIS: And together, we're here to share a bit of what we learn along the way. So, Steph, what's new in your world? STEPH: Hey, Chris. Let's see. It's been kind of a busy week. It's been a busy family week. Utah, my dog, hasn't been feeling well as you know because you and I have chatted off-mic about that a bit. So he is still recovering from something, I don't know what. He's still on most days his normal captain chaos self, but then other days, he's not feeling well. So I'm just keeping a close eye on him. And then I also got some other family illnesses going on. So it has been a busy family week for sure. On the more technical project side, I am wrapping up my current project. So I have one more week, and then I will shift into a new project, which I'm very excited about. And you and I have chatted about this several times. So there's always just that interesting phase where you're trying to wrap up and hand things off and then accomplish last-minute wishlist items for a project before then you start with a new one. So I am currently in that phase. CHRIS: How long were you on this project for? STEPH: It'll be a total of I think eight months. CHRIS: Eight months, that's healthy. That's a bunch. It's always interesting to be on a project for that long but then not longer. There were plenty of three and four-month projects that I did. And you can definitely get a large body of work done. You can look back at it and proudly stare at the code that you have written. But that length of time is always interesting to me because you end up really...for me, when I've had projects that went that long but then not longer, I always found that to be an interesting breaking point. How are you feeling moving on from it? Are you ready for something new? Are you sad to be moving on? Do you feel attached to things? STEPH: It's always a mix. I'm definitely attached to the team, and then there are always lots of things that I'd still love to work on with that team. But then, I am also excited to start something new. That's why I love this role of consulting because then I get to hop around and see new projects and challenges and work with new people. I'm thinking seven to eight months might be a sweet spot for me in terms of the length of a project. Because I find that first month with a project, I'm really still ramping up, I'm getting comfortable, I'm getting in the groove, and I'm contributing within a short amount of time. But I still feel like that first month; I'm getting really comfortable with this new environment that I'm in. And so then I have that first month. And then, at six months, I have more of heads-down time. And I get to really focus and work with a team. And then there's that transition period, and it's nice to know when that's coming up for several weeks, so then I have a couple of weeks to then start working on that transition phase. So eight months might be perfect because then it's like a month for onboarding, ramping up, getting comfortable. And then six months of focus, and then another month of just focusing on what needs to be transitioned so then I can transition off the team. CHRIS: All right. Well, now we've defined it - eight months is the perfect length of a project. STEPH: That's one of the things I like about the Boost team is because we typically have longer engagements. So that was one of the reasons when we were splitting up the teams in thoughtbot that I chose the Boost team because I was like, yeah, I like the six-month-plus project. Speaking of that wishlist, there are little things that I've wanted to make improvements on but haven't really had time to do. There's one that's currently on my mind that I figured I'd share with you in case you have thoughts on it. But I am a big proponent of using the RSpec focus filter for when running tests. So that way, I can just prefix a context it block or describe block with F, and then RSpec I can just run all the tests. But RSpec will only run the tests that I've prefixed with that F focus command., and I love it. But we are running into some challenges with it because right now, there's nothing that catches that in a pull request. So if you commit that focus filter on some of your tests, and then that gets pushed up, if someone doesn't notice it while reviewing your pull request, then that gets merged into main. And all of the tests are still green, but it's only a subset of the tests that are actually running. And so it's been on my mind that I'd love something that's going to notice that, that's going to catch it, something that is not just us humans doing our best but something that's automated that's going to notice it for us. And I have some thoughts. But I'm curious, have you run into something like this? Do you have a way that you avoid things like that from sneaking into the main branch? CHRIS: Interestingly, I have not run into this particular problem with RSpec, and that's because of the way that I run RSpec tests. I almost never use the focus functionality where you actually change the code file to say, instead of it, it is now fit to focus that it. I tend to lean into the functionality where RSpec you can pass it the line number just say, file: and then line number. And RSpec will automatically figure out which either spec or context block or entire file. And also, I have Vim stuff that allows me to do that very easily from the file. It's very rare that I would want to run more than one file. So basically, with that, I have all of the flexibility I need. And it doesn't require any changes to the file. So that's almost always how I'm working in that mode. I really love that. And it makes me so sad when I go to JavaScript test runners because they don't have that. That said, I've definitely felt a very similar thing with ESLint and ESLint yelling at me for having a console.log. And I'm like, ESLint, I'm working here. I got to debug some stuff, so if you could just calm down for a minute. And what I would like is a differentiation between these are checks that should only run in CI but definitely need to run in CI. And so I think an equivalent would be there's probably a RuboCop rule that says disallow fit or disallow any of the focus versions for RSpec. But I only want those to run in CI. And this has been a pain point that I felt a bunch of times. And it's never been painful enough that I put in the effort to fix it. But I really dislike particularly that version of I'm in my editor, and I almost always want there to be no warnings within the editor. I love that TypeScript or ESLint, or other things can run within the editor and tell me what's going on. But I want them to be contextually aware. And that's the dream I've yet to get there. STEPH: I like the idea of ESLint having a work mode where you're like, back off, I am in work mode right now. [chuckles] I understand that I won't commit this. CHRIS: I'm working here. [laughter] STEPH: And I like the idea of a RuboCop. So that's where my mind went initially is like, well, maybe there's a custom cop, or maybe there's an existing one, and I just haven't noticed it yet. But so I'm adding a rule that says, hey, if you do see an fcontext, fdescribe, ffit, something like that, please fail. Please let us know, so we don't merge this in. So that's on my wishlist, not my to-don't list. That one is on my to-do list. CHRIS: I'm also intrigued, though, because the particular failure mode that you're describing is you take what is an entire spec suite, and instead, you focus down to one context block within a given file. So previously, there were 700 specs that ran, and now there are 12. And that's actually something that I would love for Circle or whatever platform you're running your tests on to be like, hey, just as a note, you had been slowly creeping up and had hit a high watermark of roughly 700 specs. And then today, we're down to 12. So either you did some aggressive grooming, or something's wrong. But a heuristic analysis of like, I know sometimes people delete specs, and that's a thing that's okay but probably not this many. So maybe something went wrong there. STEPH: I feel like we're turning CI into this friend at the bar that's like, "Hey, you've had a couple of drinks. I just wanted to check in with you to make sure that you're good." [laughs] CHRIS: Yes. STEPH: "You've had 100 tests that were running and now only 50. Hey, friend, how are you? What's going on?" CHRIS: "This doesn't sound like you. You're normally a little more level-headed." [laughs] And that's the CI that is my friend that keeps me honest. It's like, "Wait, you promised never to overspend anymore, and yet you're overspending." I'm like, "Thank you, CI. You're right; I did say I want the test to pass." STEPH: [laughs] I love it. I'll keep you posted if I figure something out; if I either turn CI into that friend, that lets me know when my behavior has changed in a concerning way, and an intervention is needed. Or, more likely, I will see if there's a RuboCop or some other process that I can apply that will check for this, which I imagine will be fast. I mean, we're very mindful about ensuring our test suite doesn't slow down as we're running it. But I'm just thinking about this out loud. If we add that additional cop, I imagine that will be fast. So I don't think that's too much of an overhead to add to our CI process. CHRIS: If you've already got RuboCop in there, I'm guessing the incremental cost of one additional cop is very small. But yeah, it is interesting. That general thing of I want CI to go fast; I definitely feel that feel. And we're slowly creeping up on the project I'm working on. I think we're at about somewhere between five to six minutes, but we've gotten there pretty quickly where not that long ago; it was only three minutes. We're adding a lot of features specs, and so they are definitely accruing slowdowns in our CI. And they're worth it; I think, because they're so valuable. And they test the whole integration of everything, but it's a thing that I'm very closely watching. And I have a long list of things that I might pursue when I decide it's time for CI to get a haircut, as it were. STEPH: I have a very hot tip for a way to speed up your test, and that is to check if any of your tests have a very long sleep in them. That came up recently [chuckles] this week where someone was working in a test and found some relic that had been added a while back that then wasn't caught. And I think it was a sleep 30. And they were like, "Hey, I just sped up our test by 30 seconds." I was like, ooh, we should grep now to see if there's anything else like that. [laughs] CHRIS: Oh, I love the sentence we should grep now. [laughter] The correct response to this is to grep immediately. I thought you were going to go with the pro tip of you can just focus down to one context block. And then the specs will run so much faster because you're ignoring most of them, but we don't want to do that. The sleep, though, that's a pro tip. And that does feel like a thing that there could be a cop for, like, never sleep more than...frankly, let's try not to sleep at all but also, add a sleep in our specs. We can sleep in life; it's important, but anyway. [chuckles] STEPH: [laughs] That was the second hot tip, and you got it. CHRIS: Lots of hot tips. Well, I'm going to put this in the category of good idea, terrible idea. I won't call it a hot tip. It's a thing we're trying. So much as we have tried to build a spec suite that is consistent and deterministic and tells us only the truth, feature specs, even in our best efforts, still end up flaking from time to time. We'll have feature specs that fail, and then eventually, on a subsequent rerun, they will pass. And I am of the mindset that A, we should try and look into those and see if there is a real cause to it. But sometimes, just the machinery of feature specs, there's so much going on there. We've got the additional overhead of we're running it within a JavaScript context. There's just so much there that...let me say what I did, and then we can talk more about the context. So there's a gem called RSpec::Retry. It comes from the wonderful folks over at NoRedInk, a well-known Elm shop for anyone out there in the Elm world. But RSpec::Retry does basically what it says in the name. If the spec fails, you can annotate specs. In our case, we've only enabled this for the feature specs. And you can tell it to retry, and you can say, "Retry up to this many times," and et cetera, et cetera. So I have enabled this for our feature specs. And I've only enabled it on CI. That's an important distinction. This does not run locally. So if you run a feature spec and it fails locally, that's a good chance for us to intervene and look at whether or not there's some flakiness there. But on CI, I particularly don't want the case where we have a pull request, everything's great, and we merge that pull request, and then the subsequent rebuild, which again, as a note, I would rather that Circle not rebuild it because we've already built that one. But that is another topic that I have talked about in the past, and we'll probably talk about it again in the future. But setting that aside, Circle will rebuild on the main branch when we merge in, and sometimes we'll see failures there. And that's where it's most painful. Like, this is now the deploy queue. This is trying to get this out into whatever environment we're deploying to. And it is very sad when that fails. And I have to go in and manually say, hey, rebuild. I know that this works because it just worked in the pull request, and it's the same commit hash. So I know deterministically for reasons that this should work. And then it does work on a rebuild. So we introduced RSpec::Retry. We have wrapped it around our feature specs. And so now I believe we have three possible retries. So if it fails once, it'll try it again, and then it'll try it a third time. So far, we've seen each time that it has had to step in; it will pass on the subsequent run. But I don't know; there was some very gentle pushback or concerns; let's call them when I introduced this pull request from another developer on the team, saying, "I don't know, though, I feel like this is something that we should solve at the root layer. The failures are a symptom of flaky tests, or inconsistency or et cetera, and so I'd rather not do this." And I said, "Yeah, I know. But I'm going to merge it," and then I merged it. We had a better conversation about that. I didn't just broadly overrule. But I said, "I get it, but I don't see the obvious place to shore this up. I don't see where we're doing weird inconsistent things in our code. This is just, I think, inherent complexity of feature specs." So I did it, but yeah, good idea, terrible idea. What do you think, Steph? Maybe terrible is too strong of a word. Good idea, mediocre idea. STEPH: I like the original branding. I like the good idea, terrible idea. Although you're right, that terrible is a very strong branding. So I am biased right now, so I'm going to lead in answering your question by stating that because our current project has that problem as well where we have these flaky tests. And it's one of those that, yes, we need to look at them. And we have fixed a large number of them, but there are still more of them. And it becomes a question of are we actually doing something wrong here that then we need to fix? Or, like you said, is it just the nature of these features-specs? Some of them are going to occasionally fail. What reasonable improvements can we make to address this at the root cause? I'm interested enough that I haven't heard of RSpec::Retry that I want to check it out because when you add that, you annotate a test. When a test fails, does it run the entire build, or will it rerun just that test? Do you happen to know? CHRIS: Just the test. So it's configured as in a round block on the feature specs. And so you tell it like, for any feature spec, it's like config.include for feature specs RSpec::Retry or whatever. So it's just going to rerun the one feature spec that failed when and if that happens. So it's very, very precise as well in that sense where when we have a failure merging into the main branch, I have to rebuild the whole thing. So that's five or six minutes plus whatever latency for me to notice it, et cetera, whereas this is two more seconds in our CI runtime. So that's great. But again, the question is, am I hiding? Am I dealing with the symptoms and not the root cause, et cetera? STEPH: Is there a report that's provided at the end that does show these are the tests that failed and we had to rerun them? CHRIS: I believe no-ish. You can configure it to output, but it's just going to be outputting to standard out, I believe. So along with the sea of green dots, you'll see had to retry this one. So it is visible, but it's not aggregated. And the particular thing is there's the JUnit reporter that we're using. So the XML common format for this is how long our tests took to run, and these ones passed and failed. So Circle, as a particular example, has platform-level insights for that kind of stuff. And they can tell you these are your tests that fail most commonly. These are the tests that take the longest run, et cetera. I would love to get it integrated into that such that retried and then surface this to Circle. Circle could then surface it to us. But right now, I don't believe that's happening. So it is truly I will not see it unless I actively go search for it. To be truly honest, I'm probably not doing that. STEPH: Yeah, that's a good, fair, honest answer. You mentioned earlier that if you want a test to retry, you have to annotate the test. Does that mean that you get to highlight specific tests that you're marking those to say, "Hey, I know that these are flaky. I'm okay with that. Please retry them." Or does it apply to all of them? CHRIS: I think there are different ways that you can configure it. You could go the granular route of we know this is a flaky spec, so we're going to only put the retry logic around it. And that would be a normal RSpec annotation sort of tagging the spec, I think, is the terminology there. But we've configured it globally for all feature specs. So in a spec support file, we just say config.include Rspec::Retry where type is a feature. And so every feature spec now has the possibility to retry. If they pass on the first pass, which is the hope most of the time, then they will not be tried. But if they don't, if they fail, then they'll be retried up to three times or up to two additional times, I think is the total. STEPH: Okay, cool. That's helpful. So then I think I have my answer. I really think it's a good idea to automate retrying tests that we have identified that are flaky. We've tried to address the root, and our resolution was this is fine. This happens sometimes. We don't have a great way to improve this, and we want to keep the test. So we're going to highlight that this test we want to retry. And then I'm going to say it's not a great idea to turn it on for all of them just because then I have that same fear about you're now hiding any flaky tests that get introduced into the system. And nobody reasonably is going to go and read through to see which tests are going to get retried, so that part makes me nervous. CHRIS: I like it. I think it's a balanced and reasonable set of good and terrible idea. Ooh, it's perfect. I don't think we've had a balanced answer on that yet. STEPH: I don't think so. CHRIS: This is a new outcome for this segment. I agree. Ideally, in my mind, it would be getting into that XML format, the output from the tests, so that we now have this artifact, we can see which ones are flaky and eventually apply effort there. What you're saying feels totally right of we should be more particular and granular. But at the same time, the failure mode and the thing that I'm trying, I want to keep deploys going. And I only want to stop deploys if something's really broken. And if a spec retries, then I'm fine with it is where I've landed, particularly because we haven't had any real solutions where there was anything weird in our code. Like, there's just flakiness sometimes. As I say it, I feel like I'm just giving up. [laughs] And I can hear this tone of stuff's just hard sometimes, and so I've taken the easy way out. And I guess that's where I'm at right now. But I think what you're saying is a good, balanced answer here. I like it. I don't know if I'm going to do anything about it, but...[laughter] STEPH: Well, going back to when I was saying that I'm biased, our team is feeling this pain because we have flaky tests. And we're creating tickets, and we're trying to do all the right things. We create a ticket. We have that. So it's public. So people know it's been acknowledged. If someone's working on it, we let the team know; hey, I'm working on this. So we're not duplicating efforts. And so, we are trying to address all of them. But then some of them don't feel like a great investment of our time trying to improve. So that's what I really do like about the RSpec::Retry is then you can still have a resolution. Because it's either right now your resolution is to fix it or to change the code, so then maybe you can test it in a different way. There's not really a good medium step there. And so the retry feels like an additional good outcome to add to your tool bag to say, hey, I've triaged this, and this feels reasonable that we want to retry this. But then there's also that concern of we don't want to hide all of these flaky tests from ourselves in case we have done it and there is an opportunity for us to improve it. So I think that's what I do really like about it because right now, for us, when a test fails, we have to rerun the entire build, and that's painful. So if tests are taking about 20 minutes right now, then one spec fails, and then you have to wait another 20 minutes. CHRIS: I would have turned this on years ago with a 20-minute build time. [chuckles] STEPH: [laughs] Yeah, you're not wrong. But also, I didn't actually know about RSpec::Retry until today. So that may be something that we introduce into our application or something that I bring up to the team to see if it's something that we want to add. But it is interesting that initial sort of ooh kind of feeling that the team will give you introducing because it feels bad. It feels wrong to be like, hey, we're just going to let these flaky tests live on, and we're going to automate retrying them to at least speed us up. And it's just a very interesting conversation around where we want to invest our time and between the risk and pay off. And I had a similar experience this week where I had that conversation, but this one was more with myself where I was working through a particular issue where we have a state in the application where something weird was done in the past that led us to a weird state. And so someone raised a very good question where it's like, well, if what you're saying is technically an impossible state, we should make it impossible, like at the database layer. And I love that phrase. And yet, there was a part of me that was like, yes, but also doing that is not a trivial investment. And we're here because of a very weird thing that happened before. It felt one of those interesting, like, do we want to pursue the more aggressive, like, let's make this impossible for the future? Or do we want to address it for now and see if it comes back up, and then we can invest more time in it? And I had a hard time walking myself through that because my initial response was, well, yeah, totally, we should make it impossible. But then I walked through all the steps that it would take to make that happen, and it was not very trivial. And so it was one of those; it felt like the change that we ended up with was still an improvement. It was going to prevent users from seeing an error. It was still going to communicate that this state is an odd state for the application to be in. But it didn't go as far as to then add in all of the safety measures. And I felt good about it. But I had to convince myself to feel good about it. CHRIS: What you're describing there, the whole thought sequence, really feels like the encapsulation of it depends. And that being part of the journey of learning how to do software development and what it means. And you actually shared a wonderful video with me yesterday, and it was Cassidy Williams at GitHub Universe. And it was her talking to her younger self, and just it depends, and it was so true. So we will include a link to that in the show note because that was a wonderful thing for you to share. And it really does encapsulate this thing. And from the outside, before I started doing software development, I'm like, it's cool. I'm going to learn how to sling code and fix the stuff and hack, and it'll be great, and obvious, and correct, and knowable. And now I'm like, oh man, squishy nonsense. That's all it is. STEPH: [laughs] CHRIS: Fun squishy, and I like it. It's so good. But it depends. Exactly that one where you're like, I know that there's a way to get to correctness here but is it worth the effort? And looping back to...I'm surprised at the stance that I've taken where I'm just like, yeah, I'm putting in RSpec::Retry. This feels like the right thing. I feel good about this decision. And so I've tried to poke at it a tiny bit. And I think what matters to me deeply in a list of priorities is number one correctness. I care deeply that our system behaves correctly as intended and that we are able to verify that. I want to know if the system is not behaving correctly. And that's what we've talked about, like, if the test suite is green, I want to be able to deploy. I want to feel confident in that. Flaky specs exist in this interesting space where if there is a real underlying issue, if we've architected our system in a way that causes this flakiness and that a user may ever experience that, then that is a broken system. That is an incorrect system, and I want to resolve that. But that's not the case with what we're experiencing. We're happy with the architecture of our system. And when we're resolving it, we're not even really resolving them. We're just rerunning manually at this point. We're just like, oh, that spec flaked. And there's nothing to do here because sometimes that just happens. So we're re-running manually. And so my belief is if I see all green, if the specs all pass, I know that I can deploy to production. And so if occasionally a spec is going to flake and retrying it will make it pass (and I know that pass doesn't mean oh, this time it happened to pass; it's that is the correct outcome) and we have a false negative before, then I'm happy to instrument the system in a way that hides that from me because, at this point, it does feel like noise. I'm not doing anything else with the failures when we were looking at them more pointedly. I'm not resolving those flaky specs. There are no changes that we've made to the underlying system. And they don't represent a failure mode or an incorrectness that an end-user might see. So I honestly want to paper over and hide it from myself. And that's why I've chosen this. But you can see I need to defend my actions here because I feel weird. I feel a little off about this. But as I talk through it, that is the hierarchy. I care about correctness. And then, the next thing I care about is maintaining the deployment pipeline. I want that to be as quick and as efficient as possible. And I've talked a bunch about explorations into the world of observability and trying to figure out how to do continuous deployment because I think that really encourages overall better engineering outcomes. And so first is correctness. Second is velocity. And flaky specs impact velocity heavily, but they don't actually impact correctness in the particular mode that we're experiencing them here. They definitely can. But in this case, as I look at the code, I'm like, nah, that was just noise in the system. That was just too much complexity stacked up in trying to run a feature spec that simulates a browser and a user clicking in JavaScript and all this stuff and the things. But again, [laughs] here I am. I am very defensive about this apparently. STEPH: Well, I can certainly relate because I was defending my answer to myself earlier. And it is really interesting what you're pointing out. I like how you appreciate correctness and then velocity, that those are the two things that you're going after. And flaky tests often don't highlight an incorrect system. It is highlighting that maybe our code or our tests are not as performant as we would like them to be, but the behavior is correct. So I think that's a really important thing to recognize. The part where I get squishy is where we have encountered on this project some flaky tests that did highlight that we had incorrect behavior, and there's only been maybe one or two. It was rare that it happened, but it at least has happened once or twice where it highlighted something to us that when tests were run...I think there's a whole lot of context. I won't get into it. But essentially, when tests were being run in a particular way that made them look like a flaky test, it was actually telling us something truthful about the system, that something was behaving in a way that we didn't want it to behave. So that's why I still like that triage that you have to go through. But I also agree that if you're trying to get out at a deploy, you don't want to have to deal with flaky tests. There's a time to eat your vegetables, and I don't know if it's when you've got a deploy that needs to go out. That might not be the right time to be like, oh, we've got a flaky test. We should really address this. It's like, yes; you should note to yourself, hey, have a couple of vegetables tomorrow, make a ticket, and address that flaky test but not right now. That's not the time. So I think you've struck a good balance. But I also do like the idea of annotating specific tests instead of just retrying all of them, so you don't hide anything from yourself. CHRIS: Yeah. And now that I'm saying it and now that I'm circling back around, what I'm saying is true of everything we've done so far. But it is possible that now this new mode that the system behaves in where it will essentially hide flaky specs on CI means that any new flaky regressions, as it were, will be hidden from us. And thus far, almost all or I think all of the flakiness that we've seen has basically been related to timeouts. So a different way to solve this would potentially be to up the Capybara wait time. So there are occasionally times where the system's churning through, and the various layers of the feature specs just take a little bit longer. And so they miss...I forget what it is, but it's like two seconds right now or something like that. And I can just bump that up and say it's 10 seconds. And that's a mode that if eventually, the system ends in the state that we want, I'm happy to wait a little longer to see that, and that's fine. But there are...to name some of the ways that flaky tests can actually highlight truly incorrect things; race conditions are a pretty common one where this behaves fine most of the time. But if the background job happens to succeed before the subsequent request happens, then you'll go to the page. That's a thing that a real user may experience, and in fact, it might even be more likely in production because production has differential performance characteristics on your background jobs versus your actual application. And so that's the sort of thing that would definitely be worth keeping in mind. Additionally, if there are order issues within your spec suite if the randomize...I think actually RSpec::Retry wouldn't fix this, though, because it's going to retry within the same order. So that's a case that I think would be still highlighted. It would fail three times and then move on. But those we should definitely deal with. That's a test-related thing. But the first one, race conditions, that's totally a thing. They come up all the time. And I think I've potentially hidden that from myself now. And so, I might need to lock back what I said earlier because I feel like it's been true thus far that that has not been the failure mode, but it could be moving forward. And so I really want to find out if we got flaky specs. I don't know; I feel like I've said enough about this. So I'm going to stop saying anything new. [laughs] Do you have any other thoughts on this topic? STEPH: Our emotions are a pendulum. We swing hard one way, and then we have to wait till we come back and settle in the middle. But there's that initial passion play where you're really frustrated by something, and then you swing, and you settle back towards something that's a little more neutral. CHRIS: I don't trust anyone who pretends like their opinions never change. It doesn't feel like a good way to be. STEPH: Oh, I hope that...Do people say that? I hope that's not true. I hope we are all changing our opinions as we get more information. CHRIS: Me too. Mid-roll Ad And now a quick break to hear from today's sponsor, Scout APM. Scout APM is leading-edge application performance monitoring that's designed to help Rails developers quickly find and fix performance issues without having to deal with the headache or overhead of enterprise platform feature bloat. With a developer-centric UI and tracing logic that ties bottlenecks to source code, you can quickly pinpoint and resolve those performance abnormalities like N+1 queries, slow database queries, memory bloat, and much more. Scout's real-time alerting and weekly digest emails let you rest easy knowing Scout's on watch and resolving performance issues before your customers ever see them. Scout has also launched its new error monitoring feature add-on for Python applications. Now you can connect your error reporting and application monitoring data on one platform. See for yourself why developers call Scout their best friend and try our error monitoring and APM free for 14 days; no credit card needed. And as an added-on bonus for Bike Shed listeners, Scout will donate $5 to the open-source project of your choice when you deploy. Learn more at scoutapm.com/bikeshed. That's scoutapm.com/bikeshed. CHRIS: Well, shifting only ever so slightly because it turns out it's a very related question, but we have a listener question. As always, thank you so much to everyone who sends in listener questions. We really appreciate them. And today's question comes from Mikhail, and he writes in, "Regarding the discussion in Episode 311 on requiring commits merged to be tested, I have a question on how you view multi commit PRs. Do you think all the commits in a PR should be tested or only the last one? If you test all commits in a PR, do you have any good tips on setups for that? Would you want all commits to pass all tests? For one, it helps a lot when using Git bisect. It is also a question of keeping the history clean and understandable. As a background on the project I currently work on, we have the opinion that all commits should be tested and working. We have now decided on single commit PRs only since this is the only way that we can currently get the setup reasonably on our CI. I would like to sometimes make PRs with more than one commit since I want to make commits as small as possible. In order to do that, we would have to find a way to make sure all commits in the PR are tested. There seems to be some hacky ways to accomplish this, but there is not much talk about it. Also, we are strict in requiring a linear history in all our projects. Kind regards, Mikhail." So, Steph, what do you think? STEPH: I remember reading this question when it came in. And I have an experience this week that is relevant to this mainly because I had seen this question, and I was thinking about it. And off the cuff, I haven't really thought about this. I haven't been very concerned about ensuring every single commit passes because I want to ensure that, ultimately, the final commit that I have is going in. But I also rarely have more than one commit in a PR. So that's often my default mode. There are a couple of times that I'll have two, maybe three commits, but I think that's pretty rare for me. I'll typically have just one commit. So I haven't thought about this heavily. And it's not something that frankly I've been concerned about or that I've run into issues with. From their perspective about using Git bisect, I could see how that could be troublesome, like if you're looking at a commit and you realize there's a particular commit that's already merged and that fails. The other area that I could think of where this could be problematic is if you're trying to roll back to a specific commit. And if you accidentally roll back to a commit that is technically broken, but you didn't know that because it was not the final commit as was getting tested on CI, that could happen. I haven't seen that happen. I haven't experienced it. So while that does seem like a legitimate concern, it's also one that I frankly just haven't had. But because I read this question from this person earlier this week, I actually thought about it when I was crafting a PR that had several commits in it, which is kind of unusual for me since I'm usually one or two commits in a PR. But for this one, I had several because we use standard RB in our project to handle all the formatting. And right now, we have one of those standard to-do files because we added it to the project. But there are still a number of manual fixes that need to be applied. So we just have this list of files that still need to be formatted. And as someone touches that file, we will format it, and then we'll take it out of that to-do list. So then standard RB will include it as it's linting all of our files. And I decided to do that for all of our spec files. Because I was like, well, this was the safest chunk of files to format that will require the least amount of review from folks. So I just want to address all of them in one go. But I separated the more interesting changes into different commits just to make others aware of, like, hey, this is something standard RB wants. And it was interesting enough that I thought I would point it out. So my first commit removed all the files from that to-do list, but then my other commits are the ones that made actual changes to some of those files that needed to be corrected. So technically, one or two of my middle commits didn't pass the standard RB linting. But because CI was only running that final commit, it didn't notice that. And I thought about this question, and so I intentionally went back and made sure each of those commits were correct at that point in time. And I feel good about that. But I still don't feel the need to add more process around ensuring each commit is going to be green. I think I would lean more in favor of let's keep our PR small to one or two commits. But I don't know; it's something I haven't really run into. It's an interesting question. How about you? What are your experiences, or what are your thoughts on this, Chris? CHRIS: When this question came through, I thought it was such an interesting example of considering the cost of process changes. And to once again reference one of our favorite blog posts by German Velasco, the Say No to More Process post, which we will, of course, link in the show notes. This is such a great example of there was likely a small amount of pain that was felt at one point where someone tried to run git bisect. They ran into a troublesome commit, and they were like, oh no, this happened. We need to add processes, add automation, add control to make sure this never happens again. Personally, I run git bisect very rarely. When I do, it's always a heroic moment just to get it started and to even know which is the good and which is the bad. It's always a thing anyway. So it would be sad if I ran into one of these commits. But I think this is a pretty rare outcome. I think in the particular case that you're talking about, there's probably a way to actually tease that apart. I think it sounds like you fixed those commits knowing this, maybe because you just put it in your head. But the idea that the process that this team is working on has been changed such that they only now allow single commit PRs feels like too much process in my mind. I think I'm probably 80%, maybe 90% of the time; it's only a single commit in a PR for me. But occasionally, I really value having the ability to break it out into discrete steps, like these are all logically grouped in one changeset that I want to send through. But they're discrete steps that I want to break apart so that the team can more easily review it so that we have granular separation, and I can highlight this as a reference. That's often something that I'll do is I want this commit to standalone because I want it to be referenced later on. I don't want to just fold it into the broader context in which it happened, but it's pretty rare. And so to say that we can't do that feels like we're adding process where it may not be worth it, where the cost of that process change is too high relative to the value that we're getting, which is speculatively being able to run git bisect and not hit something problematic in the future. There's also the more purist, dogmatic view of well, all commits should be passing, of course. Yeah, I totally agree with that. But what's it worth to you? How much are you willing to spend to achieve that goal? I care deeply about the correctness of my system but only the current correctness. I don't care about historical correctness as much, some. I think I'm diminishing this more than I mean to. But really back to that core question of yes, this thing has value, but is it worth the cost that we have to pay in terms of process, in terms of automation and maintenance of that automation over time, et cetera or whatever the outcome is? Is it worth that cost? And in this case, for me, this would not be worth the cost. And I would not want to adopt a workflow that says we can only ever have single commit PRs, or all commits must be run on CI or any of those variants. STEPH: This is an interesting situation where I very much agree with everything you're saying. But I actually feel like what Mikhail wants in this world; I want it too. I think it's correct in the way that I do want all the commits to pass, and I do want to know that. And I think since I do fall into the default, like you mentioned, 80%, 90% of my PRs are one commit. I just already have that. And the fact that they're enforcing that with their team is interesting. And I'm trying to think through why that feels cumbersome to enforce that. And I'm with you where I'll maybe have a refactor commit or something that goes before. And it's like, well, what's wrong with splitting that out into a separate PR? What's the pain point of that? And I think the pain point is the fact that one, you have two PRs that are stacked on each other. So you have the first one that you need to get reviewed, and then the second one; there's that bit of having to hop between the two if there's some shared context that someone can't just easily review in one pull request. But then there's also, as we just mentioned, there's CI that has to run. And so now it's running on both of them, even though maybe that's a good thing because it's running on both commits. I like the idea that every commit is tested, and every commit is green. But I actually feel like it's some of our other processes that make it cumbersome and hard to get there. And if CI did run on every commit, I think it would be ideal, but then we are increasing our CI time by running it on every commit. And then it comes down to essentially what you said, what's the risk? So if we do merge in a commit that doesn't work or has something that's failing about it but then the next commit after that fixes it, what's the risk that we're going to roll back to that one specific commit that was broken? If that's a high risk for you and your team, then adding this process is probably the really wise thing to do because you want to make sure the app doesn't go down for users. That's incredibly important. If that's not a high risk for your team, then I wouldn't add the process. CHRIS: Yeah, I totally agree. And to clarify my stances, for me, this change, this process change would not be worth the trade-off. I love the idea. I love the goal of it. But it is not worth the process change, and that's partly because I haven't particularly felt the pain. CI is not an inexhaustible resource I have learned. I'm actually somewhat proud our very small team that is working on the project that we're working on; we just recently ran out of our CI budget, and Circle was like, "Hey, we got to charge you more." And I was like, "Cool, do that." But it was like, there is cost both in terms of the time, clock time, and each PR running and all of those. We have to consider all of these different things. And hopefully, we did a useful job of framing the conversation, because as always, it depends, but it depends on what. And in this case, there's a good outcome that we want to get to, but there's an associated cost. And for any individual team, how you weigh the positive of the outcome versus how you weigh the cost will alter the decision that you make. But that's I think, critically, the thing that we have to consider. I've also noticed I've seen this conversation play out within teams where one individual may acutely feel the pain, and therefore they're anchored in that side. And the cost is irrelevant to them because they're like, I feel this pain so acutely, but other people on the team aren't working in that part of the codebase or aren't dealing with bug triage in the same way that that other developer is. And so, even within a team, there may be different levels of how you measure that. And being able to have meaningful conversations around that and productively come to a group decision and own that and move forward with that is the hard work but the important work that we have to do. STEPH: Yeah. I think that's a great summary; it depends. On that note, shall we wrap up? CHRIS: Let's wrap up. The show notes for this episode can be found at bikeshed.fm. STEPH: This show is produced and edited by Mandy Moore. CHRIS: If you enjoyed listening, one really easy way to support the show is to leave us a quick rating or even a review in iTunes, as it really helps other folks find the show. STEPH: If you have any feedback for this or any of our other episodes, you can reach us at @_bikeshed or reach me on Twitter @SViccari. CHRIS: And I'm @christoomey STEPH: Or you can reach us at hosts@bikeshed.fm via email. CHRIS: Thanks so much for listening to The Bike Shed, and we'll see you next week. All: Byeeeeeeeeee! Announcer: This podcast was brought to you by thoughtbot. thoughtbot is your expert design and development partner. Let's make your product and team a success.

Stoic Meditations
942. The universe is not after you, personally

Stoic Meditations

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 2:31


Fortune has not chosen you as the only person in the world to receive so severe a blow: there is no house in all the earth, and never has been one, that has not something to mourn for.

The FlipMyFunnel Podcast
982: Choosing The Right Stories To Tell Organizationally & Personally

The FlipMyFunnel Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 49:58


Once a decision is made, it becomes a story. Enough stories make up a life. When you look back and tell that grand story to your loved ones, do you want to be the hero or the villain?We'll all be faced with decisions either personally or professionally that will go against our values. Framing each decision as a future story can help us develop and shape our careers and personal lives. We speak with Andy Stanley, Founder of AndyStanley.com & Author of Better Decisions, Fewer Regrets, about his idea of the internal salesperson and creating clarity for your organization.What we discussed:Andy's book and the internal salespersonMaking the tough decisions as an organizationYour integrity as a leader & simplifying decision makingHow to know what the wise thing to do isAudience questions & answersA challenge to the audienceThis is a #FlipMyFunnel podcast. Check us out on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or here.Listening on a desktop & can't see the links? Just search for Flip My Funnel in your favorite podcast player.

Fitness Confidential with Vinnie Tortorich
Meat Jewelry & Alcohol Consumption - Episode 1968

Fitness Confidential with Vinnie Tortorich

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 34:54


: Episode 1968 - On this Sunday School, Gina Grad (or Harris) joins Vinnie Tortorich, and the two discuss the WhiskeyX and drinking, the Carolla Show, meat jewelry, and more. https://vinnietortorich.com/2021/11/meat-jewelry-alcohol-consumption-episode-1968 PLEASE SUPPORT OUR SPONSORS MEAT JEWELRY Vinnie views veggies as jewelry for your meat. The meat is the main show, but you can throw some veggies to dress it up. Veggies are great, but there are plenty of people who just eat carnivore.  Personally, Vinnie loves veggies and enjoys them often! DRINKING Adam Carolla got drunk a few weeks ago. He and Gina were at the WhiskeyX convention, so it's caught on tape. Check out the Carolla show! Adam doesn't often get drunk, but this was an exception. Vinnie has never been a real drinker. He didn't drink in college or anything like that. When he was a teen, he tried the whole drinking thing and didn't like it. And he is careful about when he chooses to drink. FAT DOC 2 IS AVAILABLE ON iTUNES and AMAZON Please also share it with family and friends! Buy it and watch it now on iTunes to get it to the top of the charts. We need it to get big for people to see it. Here's the (BLUERAY, DVD, PRIME) (MAY NOT BE AVAILABLE YET ACROSS THE POND). And the And the https://amzn.to/3rxHuB9 [the_ad id="17480"] PLEASE DON'T FORGET TO REVIEW the film AFTER YOU WATCH!   FAT DOC 1 IS ALSO OUT Go watch it now! We need people to buy and review for it to stay at the top of iTunes pages. Available for both rental and purchase. You can also buy hardcopy or watch online at Amazon. YOU CAN NOW STREAM FOR FREE ON AMAZON PRIME IF YOU HAVE IT! RESOURCES Https://www.vinnietortorich.com Https://www.purevitaminclub.com Https://www.purevitaminclub.co.uk Https://www.purecoffeeclub.com Https://www.nsngfoods.com Https://www.bit.ly/fatdocumentary  

THE STEFANIE GASS SHOW - Clarity Coaching, Kingdom Entrepreneurs, Podcasting, Courses, Christian Business Coach
356 \\ Ready to Power BATCH Your Podcast Episodes?! How I Batch Recorded 4 Episodes in Less Than 2 Hours.

THE STEFANIE GASS SHOW - Clarity Coaching, Kingdom Entrepreneurs, Podcasting, Courses, Christian Business Coach

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 16:55


Hi Friend! Today I am sharing with you HOW I am able to power batch FOUR episodes in less than 2 hours! I reveal my POWER BATCHING strategy for the first time ever! I hope it helps you get gangster at busting out content for your podcast. Personally, the vision for this podcast is giving you exactly what you need tactically with a sprinkle of encouragement and tough love, with room for Holy Spirit to MOVE. (All in the least amount of time as possible). And that is possible for YOU. Ready? Xo, Stef   Snag Free Gifts, and Find out More at: https://stefaniegass.com Come connect with us in the Female Entrepreneur Facebook Group: http://bit.ly/successsupportgroup Ready to get clarity so you can build a profitable, online business? My FREE WORKSHOP will help you get clear. Instant access at: http://getclarity.gr8.com   Wanna work together, friend!? Here to help you start and scale a God-centered business: Step 1: Get Clarity on Your God-led Calling: http://clarifyyourcallingcourse.com Step 2: Grow an Organic, Evergreen Audience using Podcasting: http://podcastprouniversity.com Step 3: Monetize & Scale your Podcast using courses and coaching: http://podcasttoprofitmastermind.com Courses and masterminds, not your thing? Snag a private session with Stef. support@stefaniegass.com