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Brightest star in the constellation Ursa Minor

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Screaming in the Cloud
The re:Invent Wheel in the Sky Keeps on Turning with Pete Cheslock

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 54:52


About PetePete does many startup things at Allma. Links: Last Tweet in AWS: https://lasttweetinaws.com Twitter: https://twitter.com/petecheslock LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/petecheslock/ TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part byLaunchDarkly. Take a look at what it takes to get your code into production. I'm going to just guess that it's awful because it's always awful. No one loves their deployment process. What if launching new features didn't require you to do a full-on code and possibly infrastructure deploy? What if you could test on a small subset of users and then roll it back immediately if results aren't what you expect? LaunchDarkly does exactly this. To learn more, visitlaunchdarkly.com and tell them Corey sent you, and watch for the wince.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Redis, the company behind the incredibly popular open source database that is not the bind DNS server. If you're tired of managing open source Redis on your own, or you're using one of the vanilla cloud caching services, these folks have you covered with the go to manage Redis service for global caching and primary database capabilities; Redis Enterprise. To learn more and deploy not only a cache but a single operational data platform for one Redis experience, visit redis.com/hero. Thats r-e-d-i-s.com/hero. And my thanks to my friends at Redis for sponsoring my ridiculous non-sense.  Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. I am joined—as is tradition, for a post re:Invent wrap up, a month or so later, once everything is time to settle—by my friend and yours, Pete Cheslock. Pete, how are you?Pete: Hi, I'm doing fantastic. New year; new me. That's what I'm going with.Corey: That's the problem. I keep hoping for that, but every time I turn around, it's still me. And you know, honestly, I wouldn't wish that on anyone.Pete: Exactly. [laugh]. I wouldn't wish you on me either. But somehow I keep coming back for this.Corey: So, in two-thousand twenty—or twenty-twenty, as the children say—re:Invent was fully virtual. And that felt weird. Then re:Invent 2021 was a hybrid event which, let's be serious here, is not really those things. They had a crappy online thing and then a differently crappy thing in person. But it didn't feel real to me because you weren't there.That is part of the re:Invent tradition. There's a midnight madness thing, there's a keynote where they announce a bunch of nonsense, and then Pete and I go and have brunch on the last day of re:Invent and decompress, and more or less talk smack about everything that crosses our minds. And you weren't there this year. I had to backfill you with Tim Banks. You know, the person that I backfield you with here at The Duckbill Group as a principal cloud economist.Pete: You know, you got a great upgrade in hot takes, I feel like, with Tim.Corey: And other ways, too, but it's rude of me to say that to you directly. So yeah, his hot takes are spectacular. He was going to be doing this with me, except you cannot mess with tradition. You really can't.Pete: Yeah. I'm trying to think how many—is this third year? It's at least three.Corey: Third or fourth.Pete: Yeah, it's at least three. Yeah, it was, I don't want to say I was sad to not be there because, with everything going on, it's still weird out there. But I am always—I'm just that weird person who actually likes re:Invent, but not for I feel like the reasons people think. Again, I'm such an extroverted-type person, that it's so great to have this, like, serendipity to re:Invent. The people that you run into and the conversations that you have, and prior—like in 2019, I think was a great example because that was the last one I had gone to—you know, having so many conversations so quickly because everyone is there, right? It's like this magnet that attracts technologists, and venture capital, and product builders, and all this other stuff. And it's all compressed into, like, you know, that five-day span, I think is the biggest part that makes so great.Corey: The fear in people's eyes when they see me. And it was fun; I had a pair of masks with me. One of them was a standard mask, and no one recognizes anyone because, masks, and the other was a printout of my ridiculous face, which was horrifyingly uncanny, but also made it very easy for people to identify me. And depending upon how social I was feeling, I would wear one or the other, and it worked flawlessly. That was worth doing. They really managed to thread the needle, as well, before Omicron hit, but after the horrors of last year. So, [unintelligible 00:03:00]—Pete: It really—Corey: —if it were going on right now, it would not be going on right now.Pete: Yeah. I talk about really—yeah—really just hitting it timing-wise. Like, not that they could have planned for any of this, but like, as things were kind of not too crazy and before they got all crazy again, it feels like wow, like, you know, they really couldn't have done the event at any other time. And it's like, purely due to luck. I mean, absolute one hundred percent.Corey: That's the amazing power of frugality. Because the reason is then is it's the week after Thanksgiving every year when everything is dirt cheap. And, you know, if there's one thing that I one-point-seve—sorry, their stock's in the toilet—a $1.6 trillion company is very concerned about, it is saving money at every opportunity.Pete: Well, the one thing that was most curious about—so I was at the first re:Invent in-what—2012 I think it was, and there was—it was quaint, right?—there was 4000 people there, I want to say. It was in the thousands of people. Now granted, still a big conference, but it was in the Sands Convention Center. It was in that giant room, the same number of people, were you know, people's booths were like tables, like, eight-by-ten tables, right? [laugh].It had almost a DevOpsDays feel to it. And I was kind of curious if this one had any of those feelings. Like, did it evoke it being more quaint and personable, or was it just as soulless as it probably has been in recent years?Corey: This was fairly soulless because they reduced the footprint of the event. They dropped from two expo halls down to one, they cut the number of venues, but they still had what felt like 20,000 people or something there. It was still crowded, it was still packed. And I've done some diligent follow-ups afterwards, and there have been very few cases of Covid that came out of it. I quarantined for a week in a hotel, so I don't come back and kill my young kids for the wrong reasons.And that went—that was sort of like the worst part of it on some level, where it's like great. Now I could sit alone at a hotel and do some catch-up and all the rest, but all right I'd kind of like to go home. I'm not used to being on the road that much.Pete: Yeah, I think we're all a little bit out of practice. You know, I haven't been on a plane in years. I mean, the travel I've done more recently has been in my car from point A to point B. Like, direct, you know, thing. Actually, a good friend of mine who's not in technology at all had to travel for business, and, you know, he also has young kids who are under five, so he when he got back, he actually hid in a room in their house and quarantine himself in the room. But they—I thought, this is kind of funny—they never told the kids he was home. Because they knew that like—Corey: So, they just thought the house was haunted?Pete: [laugh].Corey: Like, “Don't go in the west wing,” sort of level of nonsense. That is kind of amazing.Pete: Honestly, like, we were hanging out with the family because they're our neighbors. And it was like, “Oh, yeah, like, he's in the guest room right now.” Kids have no idea. [laugh]. I'm like, “Oh, my God.” I'm like, I can't even imagine. Yeah.Corey: So, let's talk a little bit about the releases of re:Invent. And I'm going to lead up with something that may seem uncharitable, but I don't think it necessarily is. There weren't the usual torrent of new releases for ridiculous nonsense in the same way that there have been previously. There was no, this service talks to satellites in space. I mean, sure, there was some IoT stuff to manage fleets of cars, and giant piles of robots, and cool, I don't have those particular problems; I'm trying to run a website over here.So okay, great. There were enhancements to a number of different services that were in many cases appreciated, in other cases, irrelevant. Werner said in his keynote, that it was about focusing on primitives this year. And, “Why do we have so many services? It's because you asked for it… as customers.”Pete: [laugh]. Yeah, you asked for it.Corey: What have you been asking for, Pete? Because I know what I've been asking for and it wasn't that. [laugh].Pete: It's amazing to see a company continually say yes to everything, and somehow, despite their best efforts, be successful at doing it. No other company could do that. Imagine any other software technology business out there that just builds everything the customers ask for. Like from a product management business standpoint, that is, like, rule 101 is, “Listen to your customers, but don't say yes to everything.” Like, you can't do everything.Corey: Most companies can't navigate the transition between offering the same software in the Cloud and on a customer facility. So, it's like, “Ooh, an on-prem version, I don't know, that almost broke the company the last time we tried it.” Whereas you have Amazon whose product strategy is, “Yes,” being able to put together a whole bunch of things. I also will challenge the assertion that it's the primitives that customers want. They don't want to build a data center out of popsicle sticks themselves. They want to get something that solves a problem.And this has been a long-term realization for me. I used to work at Media Temple as a senior systems engineer running WordPress at extremely large scale. My websites now run on WordPress, and I have the good sense to pay WP Engine to handle it for me, instead of doing it myself because it's not the most productive use of my time. I want things higher up the stack. I assure you I pay more to WP Engine than it would cost me to run these things myself from an infrastructure point of view, but not in terms of my time.What I see sometimes as the worst of all worlds is that AWS is trying to charge for that value-added pricing without adding the value that goes along with it because you still got to build a lot of this stuff yourself. It's still a very janky experience, you're reduced to googling random blog posts to figure out how this thing is supposed to work, and the best documentation comes from externally. Whereas with a company that's built around offering solutions like this, great. In the fullness of time, I really suspect that if this doesn't change, their customers are going to just be those people who build solutions out of these things. And let those companies capture the up-the-stack margin. Which I have no problem with. But they do because Amazon is a company that lies awake at night actively worrying that someone, somewhere, who isn't them might possibly be making money somehow.Pete: I think MongoDB is a perfect example of—like, look at their stock price over the last whatever, years. Like, they, I feel like everyone called for the death of MongoDB every time Amazon came out with their new things, yet, they're still a multi-billion dollar company because I can just—give me an API endpoint and you scale the database. There's is—Corey: Look at all the high-profile hires that Mongo was making out of AWS, and I can't shake the feeling they're sitting there going, “Yeah, who's losing important things out of production now?” It's, everyone is exodus-ing there. I did one of those ridiculous graphics of the naming all the people that went over there, and in—with the hurricane evacuation traffic picture, and there's one car going the other way that I just labeled with, “Re:Invent sponsorship check,” because yeah, they have a top tier sponsorship and it was great. I've got to say I've been pretty down on MongoDB for a while, for a variety of excellent reasons based upon, more or less, how they treated customers who were in pain. And I'd mostly written it off.I don't do that anymore. Not because I inherently believe the technology has changed, though I'm told it has, but by the number of people who I deeply respect who are going over there and telling me, no, no, this is good. Congratulations. I have often said you cannot buy authenticity, and I don't think that they are, but the people who are working there, I do not believe that these people are, “Yeah, well, you bought my opinion. You can buy their attention, not their opinion.” If someone changes their opinion, based upon where they work, I kind of question everything they're telling me is, like, “Oh, you're just here to sell something you don't believe in? Welcome aboard.”Pete: Right. Yeah, there's an interview question I like to ask, which is, “What's something that you used to believe in very strongly that you've more recently changed your mind on?” And out of politeness because usually throws people back a little bit, and they're like, “Oh, wow. Like, let me think about that.” And I'm like, “Okay, while you think about that I want to give you mine.”Which is in the past, my strongly held belief was we had to run everything ourselves. “You own your availability,” was the line. “No, I'm not buying Datadog. I can build my own metric stack just fine, thank you very much.” Like, “No, I'm not going to use these outsourced load balancers or databases because I need to own my availability.”And what I realized is that all of those decisions lead to actually delivering and focusing on things that were not the core product. And so now, like, I've really flipped 180, that, if any—anything that you're building that does not directly relate to the core product, i.e. How your business makes money, should one hundred percent be outsourced to an expert that is better than you. Mongo knows how to run Mongo better than you.Corey: “What does your company do?” “Oh, we handle expense reports.” “Oh, what are you working on this month?” “I'm building a load balancer.” It's like that doesn't add the value. Don't do that.Pete: Right. Exactly. And so it's so interesting, I think, to hear Werner say that, you know, we're just building primitives, and you asked for this. And I think that concept maybe would work years ago, when you had a lot of builders who needed tools, but I don't think we have any, like, we don't have as many builders as before. Like, I think we have people who need more complete solutions. And that's probably why all these businesses are being super successful against Amazon.Corey: I'm wondering if it comes down to a cloud economic story, specifically that my cloud bill is always going to be variable and it's difficult to predict, whereas if I just use EC2 instances, and I build load balancers or whatnot, myself, well, yeah, it's a lot more work, but I can predict accurately what my staff compensation costs are more effectively, that I can predict what a CapEx charge would be or what the AWS bill is going to be. I'm wondering if that might in some way shape it?Pete: Well, I feel like the how people get better in managing their costs, right, you'll eventually move to a world where, like, “Yep, okay, first, we turned off waste,” right? Like, step one is waste. Step two is, like, understanding your spend better to optimize but, like, step three, like, the galaxy brain meme of Amazon cost stuff is all, like, unit economics stuff, where trying to better understand the actual cost deliver an actual feature. And yeah, I think that actually gets really hard when you give—kind of spread your product across, like, a slew of services that have varying levels of costs, varying levels of tagging, so you can attribute it. Like, it's really hard. Honestly, it's pretty easy if I have 1000 EC2 servers with very specific tags, I can very easily figure out what it costs to deliver product. But if I have—Corey: Yeah, if I have Corey build it, I know what Corey is going to cost, and I know how many servers he's going to use. Great, if I have Pete it, Pete's good at things, it'll cut that server bill in half because he actually knows how to wind up being efficient with things. Okay, great. You can start calculating things out that way. I don't think that's an intentional choice that companies are making, but I feel like that might be a natural outgrowth of it.Pete: Yeah. And there's still I think a lot of the, like, old school mentality of, like, the, “Not invented here,” the, “We have to own our availability.” You can still own your availability by using these other vendors. And honestly, it's really heartening to see so many companies realize that and realize that I don't need to get everything from Amazon. And honestly, like, in some things, like I look at a cloud Amazon bill, and I think to myself, it would be easier if you just did everything from Amazon versus having these ten other vendors, but those ten other vendors are going to be a lot better at running the product that they build, right, that as a service, then you probably will be running it yourself. Or even Amazon's, like, you know, interpretation of that product.Corey: A few other things that came out that I thought were interesting, at least the direction they're going in. The changes to S3 intelligent tiering are great, with instant retrieval on Glacier. I feel like that honestly was—they talk a good story, but I feel like that was competitive response to Google offering the same thing. That smacks of a large company with its use case saying, “You got two choices here.” And they're like, “Well, okay. Crap. We're going to build it then.”Or alternately, they're looking at the changes that they're making to intelligent tiering, they're now shifting that to being the default that as far as recommendations go. There are a couple of drawbacks to it, but not many, and it's getting easier now to not have the mental overhead of trying to figure out exactly what your lifecycle policies are. Yeah, there are some corner cases where, okay, if I adjust this just so, then I could save 10% on that monitoring fee or whatnot. Yeah, but look how much work that's going to take you to curate and make sure that you're not doing something silly. That feels like it is such an in the margins issue. It's like, “How much data you're storing?” “Four exabytes.” Okay, yeah. You probably want some people doing exactly that, but that's not most of us.Pete: Right. Well, there's absolutely savings to be had. Like, if I had an exabyte of data on S3—which there are a lot of people who have that level of data—then it would make sense for me to have an engineering team whose sole purpose is purely an optimizing our data lifecycle for that data. Until a point, right? Until you've optimized the 80%, basically. You optimize the first 80, that's probably, air-quote, “Easy.” The last 20 is going to be incredibly hard, maybe you never even do that.But at lower levels of scale, I don't think the economics actually work out to have a team managing your data lifecycle of S3. But the fact that now AWS can largely do it for you in the background—now, there's so many things you have to think about and, like, you know, understand even what your data is there because, like, not all data is the same. And since S3 is basically like a big giant database you can query, you got to really think about some of that stuff. But honestly, what I—I don't know if—I have no idea if this is even be worked on, but what I would love to see—you know, hashtag #AWSwishlist—is, now we have countless tiers of EBS volumes, EBS volumes that can be dynamically modified without touching, you know, the physical host. Meaning with an API call, you can change from the gp2 to gp3, or io whatever, right?Corey: Or back again if it doesn't pan out.Pete: Or back again, right? And so for companies with large amounts of spend, you know, economics makes sense that you should have a team that is analyzing your volumes usage and modifying that daily, right? Like, you could modify that daily, and I don't know if there's anyone out there that's actually doing it at that level. And they probably should. Like, if you got millions of dollars in EBS, like, there's legit savings that you're probably leaving on the table without doing that. But that's what I'm waiting for Amazon to do for me, right? I want intelligent tiering for EBS because if you're telling me I can API call and you'll move my data and make that better, make that [crosstalk 00:17:46] better [crosstalk 00:17:47]—Corey: Yeah it could be like their auto-scaling for DynamoDB, for example. Gives you the capacity you need 20 minutes after you needed it. But fine, whatever because if I can schedule stuff like that, great, I know what time of day, the runs are going to kick off that beat up the disks. I know when end-of-month reporting fires off. I know what my usage pattern is going to be, by and large.Yeah, part of the problem too, is that I look at this stuff, and I get excited about it with the intelligent tiering… at The Duckbill Group we've got a few hundred S3 buckets lurking around. I'm thinking, “All right, I've got to go through and do some changes on this and implement all of that.” Our S3 bill's something like 50 bucks a month or something ridiculous like that. It's a no, that really isn't a thing. Like, I have a screenshot bucket that I have an app installed—I think called Dropshare—that hooks up to anytime I drag—I hit a shortcut, I drag with the mouse to select whatever I want and boom, it's up there and the URL is not copied to my clipboard, I can paste that wherever I want.And I'm thinking like, yeah, there's no cleanup on that. There's no lifecycle policy that's turning into anything. I should really go back and age some of it out and do the rest and start doing some lifecycle management. It—I've been using this thing for years and I think it's now a whopping, what, 20 cents a month for that bucket. It's—I just don't—Pete: [laugh].Corey: —I just don't care, other than voice in the back of my mind, “That's an unbounded growth problem.” Cool. When it hits 20 bucks a month, then I'll consider it. But until then I just don't. It does not matter.Pete: Yeah, I think yeah, scale changes everything. Start adding some zeros and percentages turned into meaningful numbers. And honestly, back on the EBS thing, the one thing that really changed my perspective of EBS, in general, is—especially coming from the early days, right? One terabyte volume, it was a hard drive in a thing. It was a virtual LUN on a SAN somewhere, probably.Nowadays, and even, like, many years after those original EBS volumes, like all the limits you get in EBS, those are actually artificial limits, right? If you're like, “My EBS volume is too slow,” it's not because, like, the hard drive it's on is too slow. That's an artificial limit that is likely put in place due to your volume choice. And so, like, once you realize that in your head, then your concept of how you store data on EBS should change dramatically.Corey: Oh, AWS had a blog post recently talking about, like, with io2 and the limits and everything, and there was architecture thinking, okay. “So, let's say this is insufficient and the quarter-million IOPS a second that you're able to get is not there.” And I'm sitting there thinking, “That is just ludicrous data volume and data interactivity model.” And it's one of those, like, I'm sitting here trying to think about, like, I haven't had to deal with a problem like that decade, just because it's, “Huh. Turns out getting these one thing that's super fast is kind of expensive.” If you paralyze it out, that's usually the right answer, and that's how the internet is mostly evolved. But there are use cases for which that doesn't work, and I'm excited to see it. I don't want to pay for it in my view, but it's nice to see it.Pete: Yeah, it's kind of fun to go into the Amazon calculator and price out one of the, like, io2 volumes and, like, maxed out. It's like, I don't know, like $50,000 a month or a hun—like, it's some just absolutely absurd number. But the beauty of it is that if you needed that value for an hour to run some intensive data processing task, you can have it for an hour and then just kill it when you're done, right? Like, that is what is most impressive.Corey: I copied 130 gigs of data to an EFS volume, which was—[unintelligible 00:21:05] EFS has gone from “This is a piece of junk,” to one of my favorite services. It really is, just because of its utility and different ways of doing things. I didn't have the foresight, just use a second EFS volume for this. So, I was unzipping a whole bunch of small files onto it. Great.It took a long time for me to go through it. All right, now that I'm done with that I want to clean all this up. My answer was to ultimately spin up a compute node and wind up running a whole bunch of—like, 400, simultaneous rm-rf on that long thing. And it was just, like, this feels foolish and dumb, but here we are. And I'm looking at the stats on it because the instance was—all right, at that point, the load average [on the instance 00:21:41] was like 200, or something like that, and the EFS volume was like, “Ohh, wow, you're really churning on this. I'm now at, like, 5% of the limit.” Like, okay, great. It turns out I'm really bad at computers.Pete: Yeah, well, that's really the trick is, like, yeah, sure, you can have a quarter-million IOPS per second, but, like, what's going to break before you even hit that limit? Probably many other things.Corey: Oh, yeah. Like, feels like on some level if something gets to that point, it a misconfiguration somewhere. But honestly, that's the thing I find weirdest about the world in which we live is that at a small-scale—if I have a bill in my $5 a month shitposting account, great. If I screw something up and cost myself a couple hundred bucks in misconfiguration it's going to stand out. At large scale, it doesn't matter if—you're spending $50 million a year or $500 million a year on AWS and someone leaks your creds, and someone spins up a whole bunch of Bitcoin miners somewhere else, you're going to see that on your bill until they're mining basically all the Bitcoin. It just gets lost in the background.Pete: I'm waiting for those—I'm actually waiting for the next level of them to get smarter because maybe you have, like, an aggressive tagging system and you're monitoring for untagged instances, but the move here would be, first get the creds and query for, like, the most used tags and start applying those tags to your Bitcoin mining instances. My God, it'll take—Corey: Just clone a bunch of tags. Congratulations, you now have a second BI Elasticsearch cluster that you're running yourself. Good work.Pete: Yeah. Yeah, that people won't find that until someone comes along after the fact that. Like, “Why do we have two have these things?” And you're like—[laugh].Corey: “Must be a DR thing.”Pete: It's maxed-out CPU. Yeah, exactly.Corey: [laugh].Pete: Oh, the terrible ideas—please, please, hackers don't take are terrible ideas.Corey: I had a, kind of, whole thing I did on Twitter years ago, talking about how I would wind up using the AWS Marketplace for an embezzlement scheme. Namely, I would just wind up spinning up something that had, like, a five-cent an hour charge or whatnot on just, like, basically rebadge the CentOS Community AMI or whatnot. Great. And then write a blog post, not attached to me, that explains how to do a thing that I'm going to be doing in production in a week or two anyway. Like, “How to build an auto-scaling group,” and reference that AMI.Then if it ever comes out, like, “Wow, why are we having all these marketplace charges on this?” “I just followed the blog post like it said here.” And it's like, “Oh, okay. You're a dumbass. The end.”That's the way to do it. A month goes by and suddenly it came out that someone had done something similarly. They wound up rebadging these community things on the marketplace and charging big money for it, and I'm sitting there going like that was a joke. It wasn't a how-to. But yeah, every time I make these jokes, I worry someone's going to do it.Pete: “Welcome to large-scale fraud with Corey Quinn.”Corey: Oh, yeah, it's fraud at scale is really the important thing here.Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Oracle HeatWave is a new high-performance accelerator for the Oracle MySQL Database Service. Although I insist on calling it “my squirrel.” While MySQL has long been the worlds most popular open source database, shifting from transacting to analytics required way too much overhead and, ya know, work. With HeatWave you can run your OLTP and OLAP, don't ask me to ever say those acronyms again, workloads directly from your MySQL database and eliminate the time consuming data movement and integration work, while also performing 1100X faster than Amazon Aurora, and 2.5X faster than Amazon Redshift, at a third of the cost. My thanks again to Oracle Cloud for sponsoring this ridiculous nonsense.Corey: I still remember a year ago now at re:Invent 2021 was it, or was it 2020? Whatever they came out with, I want to say it wasn't gp3, or maybe it was, regardless, there was a new EBS volume type that came out that you were playing with to see how it worked and you experimented with it—Pete: Oh, yes.Corey: —and the next morning, you looked at the—I checked Slack and you're like well, my experiments yesterday cost us $5,000. And at first, like, the—my response is instructive on this because, first, it was, “Oh, my God. What's going to happen now?” And it's like, first, hang on a second.First off, that seems suspect but assume it's real. I assumed it was real at the outset. It's “Oh, right. This is not my personal $5-a-month toybox account. We are a company; we can absolutely pay that.” Because it's like, I could absolutely reach out, call it a favor. “I made a mistake, and I need a favor on the bill, please,” to AWS.And I would never live it down, let's be clear. For a $7,000 mistake, I would almost certainly eat it. As opposed to having to prostrate myself like that in front of Amazon. I'm like, no, no, no. I want one of those like—if it's like, “Okay, you're going to, like, set back the company roadmap by six months if you have to pay this. Do you want to do it?” Like, [groans] “Fine, I'll eat some crow.”But okay. And then followed immediately by, wow, if Pete of all people can mess this up, customers are going to be doomed here. We should figure out what happened. And I'm doing the math. Like, Pete, “What did you actually do?” And you're sitting there and you're saying, “Well, I had like a 20 gig volume that I did this.” And I'm doing the numbers, and it's like—Pete: Something's wrong.Corey: “How sure are you when you say ‘gigabyte,' that you were—that actually means what you think it did? Like, were you off by a lot? Like, did you mean exabytes?” Like, what's the deal here?Pete: Like, multiple factors.Corey: Yeah. How much—“How many IOPS did you give that thing, buddy?” And it turned out what happened was that when they launched this, they had mispriced it in the system by a factor of a million. So, it was fun. I think by the end of it, all of your experimentation was somewhere between five to seven cents. Which—Pete: Yeah. It was a—Corey: Which is why you don't work here anymore because no one cost me seven cents of money to give to Amazon—Pete: How dare you?Corey: —on my watch. Get out.Pete: How dare you, sir?Corey: Exactly.Pete: Yeah, that [laugh] was amazing to see, as someone who has done—definitely maid screw-ups that have cost real money—you know, S3 list requests are always a fun one at scale—but that one was supremely fun to see the—Corey: That was a scary one because another one they'd done previously was they had messed up Lightsail pricing, where people would log in, and, like, “Okay, so what is my Lightsail instance going to cost?” And I swear to you, this is true, it was saying—this was back in 2017 or so—the answer was, like, “$4.3 billion.” Because when you see that you just start laughing because you know it's a mistake. You know, that they're not going to actually demand that you spend $4.3 billion for a single instance—unless it's running SAP—and great.It's just, it's a laugh. It's clearly a mispriced, and it's clearly a bug that's going to get—it's going to get fixed. I just spun up this new EBS volume that no one fully understands yet and it cost me thousands of dollars. That's the sort of thing that no, no, I could actually see that happening. There are instances now that cost something like 100 bucks an hour or whatnot to run. I can see spinning up the wrong thing by mistake and getting bitten by it. There's a bunch of fun configuration mistakes you can make that will, “Hee, hee, hee. Why can I see that bill spike from orbit?” And that's the scary thing.Pete: Well, it's the original CI and CD problem of the per-hour billing, right? That was super common of, like, yeah, like, an i3, you know, 16XL server is pretty cheap per hour, but if you're charged per hour and you spin up a bunch for five minutes. Like, it—you will be shocked [laugh] by what you see there. So—Corey: Yeah. Mistakes will show. And I get it. It's also people as individuals are very different psychologically than companies are. With companies it's one of those, “Great we're optimizing to bring in more revenue and we don't really care about saving money at all costs.”Whereas people generally have something that looks a lot like a fixed income in the form of a salary or whatnot, so it's it is easier for us to cut spend than it is for us to go out and make more money. Like, I don't want to get a second job, or pitch my boss on stuff, and yeah. So, all and all, routing out the rest of what happened at re:Invent, they—this is the problem is that they have a bunch of minor things like SageMaker Inference Recommender. Yeah, I don't care. Anything—Pete: [laugh].Corey: —[crosstalk 00:28:47] SageMaker I mostly tend to ignore, for safety. I did like the way they described Amplify Studio because they made it sound like a WYSIWYG drag and drop, build a React app. It's not it. It basically—you can do that in Figma and then it can hook it up to some things in some cases. It's not what I want it to be, which is Honeycode, except good. But we'll get there some year. Maybe.Pete: There's a lot of stuff that was—you know, it's the classic, like, preview, which sure, like, from a product standpoint, it's great. You know, they have a level of scale where they can say, “Here's this thing we're building,” which could be just a twinkle in a product managers, call it preview, and get thousands of people who would be happy to test it out and give you feedback, and it's a, it's great that you have that capability. But I often look at so much stuff and, like, that's really cool, but, like, can I, can I have it now? Right? Like—or you can't even get into the preview plan, even though, like, you have that specific problem. And it's largely just because either, like, your scale isn't big enough, or you don't have a good enough relationship with your account manager, or I don't know, countless other reasons.Corey: The thing that really throws me, too, is the pre-announcements that come a year or so in advance, like, the Outpost smaller ones are finally available, but it feels like when they do too many pre-announcements or no big marquee service announcements, as much as they talk about, “We're getting back to fundamentals,” no, you have a bunch of teams that blew the deadline. That's really what it is; let's not call it anything else. Another one that I think is causing trouble for folks—I'm fortunate in that I don't do much work with Oracle databases, or Microsoft SQL databases—but they extended RDS Custom to Microsoft SQL at the [unintelligible 00:30:27] SQL server at re:Invent this year, which means this comes down to things I actually use, we're going to have a problem because historically, the lesson has always been if I want to run my own databases and tweak everything, I do it on top of an EC2 instance. If I want to managed database, relational database service, great, I use RDS. RDS Custom basically gives you root into the RDS instance. Which means among other things, yes, you can now use RDS to run containers.But it lets you do a lot of things that are right in between. So, how do you position this? When should I use RDS Custom? Can you give me an easy answer to that question? And they used a lot of words to say, no, they cannot. It's basically completely blowing apart the messaging and positioning of both of those services in some unfortunate ways. We'll learn as we go.Pete: Yeah. Honestly, it's like why, like, why would I use this? Or how would I use this? And this is I think, fundamentally, what's hard when you just say yes to everything. It's like, they in many cases, I don't think, like, I don't want to say they don't understand why they're doing this, but if it's not like there's a visionary who's like, this fits into this multi-year roadmap.That roadmap is largely—if that roadmap is largely generated by the customers asking for it, then it's not like, oh, we're building towards this Northstar of RDS being whatever. You might say that, but your roadmap's probably getting moved all over the place because, you know, this company that pays you a billion dollars a year is saying, “I would give you $2 billion a year for all of my Oracle databases, but I need this specific thing.” I can't imagine a scenario that they would say, “Oh, well, we're building towards this Northstar, and that's not on the way there.” Right? They'd be like, “New Northstar. Another billion dollars, please.”Corey: Yep. Probably the worst release of re:Invent, from my perspective, is RUM, Real User Monitoring, for CloudWatch. And I, to be clear, I wrote a shitposting Twitter threading client called Last Tweet in AWS. Go to lasttweetinaws.com. You can all use it. It's free; I just built this for my own purposes. And I've instrumented it with RUM. Now, Real User Monitoring is something that a lot of monitoring vendors use, and also CloudWatch now. And what that is, is it embeds a listener into the JavaScript that runs on client load, and it winds up looking at what's going on loading times, et cetera, so you can see when users are unhappy. I have no problem with this. Other than that, you know, liking users? What's up with that?Pete: Crazy.Corey: But then, okay, now, what this does is unlike every other RUM tool out there, which charges per session, meaning I am going to be… doing a web page load, it charges per data item, which includes HTTP errors, or JavaScript errors, et cetera. Which means that if you have a high transaction volume site and suddenly your CDN takes a nap like Fastly did for an hour last year, suddenly your bill is stratospheric for this because errors abound and cascade, and you can have thousands of errors on a single page load for these things, and it is going to be visible from orbit, at least with a per session basis thing, when you start to go viral, you understand that, “Okay, this is probably going to cost me some more on these things, and oops, I guess I should write less compelling content.” Fine. This is one of those one misconfiguration away and you are wailing and gnashing teeth. Now, this is a new service. I believe that they will waive these surprise bills in the event that things like that happen. But it's going to take a while and you're going to be worrying the whole time if you've rolled this out naively. So it's—Pete: Well and—Corey: —I just don't like the pricing.Pete: —how many people will actively avoid that service, right? And honestly, choose a competitor because the competitor could be—the competitor could be five times more expensive, right, on face value, but it's the certainty of it. It's the uncertainty of what Amazon will charge you. Like, no one wants a surprise bill. “Well, a vendor is saying that they'll give us this contract for $10,000. I'm going to pay $10,000, even though RUM might be a fraction of that price.”It's honestly, a lot of these, like, product analytics tools and monitoring tools, you'll often see they price be a, like, you know, MAU, Monthly Active User, you know, or some sort of user-based pricing, like, the number of people coming to your site. You know, and I feel like at least then, if you are trying to optimize for lots of users on your site, and more users means more revenue, then you know, if your spend is going up, but your revenue is also going up, that's a win-win. But if it's like someone—you know, your third-party vendor dies and you're spewing out errors, or someone, you know, upgraded something and it spews out errors. That no one would normally see; that's the thing. Like, unless you're popping open that JavaScript console, you're not seeing any of those errors, yet somehow it's like directly impacting your bottom line? Like that doesn't feel [crosstalk 00:35:06].Corey: Well, there is something vaguely Machiavellian about that. Like, “How do I get my developers to care about errors on consoles?” Like, how about we make it extortionately expensive for them not to. It's, “Oh, all right, then. Here we go.”Pete: And then talk about now you're in a scenario where you're working on things that don't directly impact the product. You're basically just sweeping up the floor and then trying to remove errors that maybe don't actually affect it and they're not actually an error.Corey: Yeah. I really do wonder what the right answer is going to be. We'll find out. Again, we live, we learn. But it's also, how long does it take a service that has bad pricing at launch, or an unfortunate story around it to outrun that reputation?People are still scared of Glacier because of its original restore pricing, which was non-deterministic for any sensible human being, and in some cases lead to I'm used to spending 20 to 30 bucks a month on this. Why was I just charged two grand?Pete: Right.Corey: Scare people like that, they don't come back.Pete: I'm trying to actually remember which service it is that basically gave you an estimate, right? Like, turn it on for a month, and it would give you an estimate of how much this was going to cost you when billing started.Corey: It was either Detective or GuardDuty.Pete: Yeah, it was—yeah, that's exactly right. It was one of those two. And honestly, that was unbelievably refreshing to see. You know, like, listen, you have the data, Amazon. You know what this is going to cost me, so when I, like, don't make me spend all this time to go and figure out the cost. If you have all this data already, just tell me, right?And if I look at it and go, “Yeah, wow. Like, turning this on in my environment is going to cost me X dollars. Like, yeah, that's a trade-off I want to make, I'll spend that.” But you know, with some of the—and that—a little bit of a worry on some of the intelligent tiering on S3 is that the recommendation is likely going to be everything goes to intelligent tiering first, right? It's the gp3 story. Put everything on gp3, then move it to the proper volume, move it to an sc or an st or an io. Like, gp3 is where you start. And I wonder if that's going to be [crosstalk 00:37:08].Corey: Except I went through a wizard yesterday to launch an EC2 instance and its default on the free tier gp2.Pete: Yeah. Interesting.Corey: Which does not thrill me. I also still don't understand for the life of me why in some regions, the free tier is a t2 instance, when t3 is available.Pete: They're uh… my guess is that they've got some free t—they got a bunch of t2s lying around. [laugh].Corey: Well, one of the most notable announcements at re:Invent that most people didn't pay attention to is their ability now to run legacy instance types on top of Nitro, which really speaks to what's going on behind the scenes of we can get rid of all that old hardware and emulate the old m1 on modern equipment. So, because—you can still have that legacy, ancient instance, but now you're going—now we're able to wind up greening our data centers, which is part of their big sustainability push, with their ‘Sustainability Pillar' for the well-architected framework. They're talking more about what the green choices in cloud are. Which is super handy, not just because of the economic impact because we could use this pretty directly to reverse engineer their various margins on a per-service or per-offering basis. Which I'm not sure they're aware of yet, but oh, they're going to be.And that really winds up being a win for the planet, obviously, but also something that is—that I guess puts a little bit of choice on customers. The challenge I've got is, with my serverless stuff that I build out, if I spend—the Google search I make to figure out what the most economic, most sustainable way to do that is, is going to have a bigger carbon impact on the app itself. That seems to be something that is important at scale, but if you're not at scale, it's one of those, don't worry about it. Because let's face it, the cloud providers—all of them—are going to have a better sustainability story than you are running this in your own data centers, or on a Raspberry Pi that's always plugged into the wall.Pete: Yeah, I mean, you got to remember, Amazon builds their own power plants to power their data centers. Like, that's the level they play, right? There, their economies of scale are so entirely—they're so entirely different than anything that you could possibly even imagine. So, it's something that, like, I'm sure people will want to choose for. But, you know, if I would honestly say, like, if we really cared about our computing costs and the carbon footprint of it, I would love to actually know the carbon footprint of all of the JavaScript trackers that when I go to various news sites, and it loads, you know, the whatever thousands of trackers and tracking the all over, like, what is the carbon impact of some of those choices that I actually could control, like, as a either a consumer or business person?Corey: I really hope that it turns into something that makes a meaningful difference, and it's not just greenwashing. But we'll see. In the fullness of time, we're going to figure that out. Oh, they're also launching some mainframe stuff. They—like that's great.Pete: Yeah, those are still a thing.Corey: I don't deal with a lot of customers that are doing things with that in any meaningful sense. There is no AWS/400, so all right.Pete: [laugh]. Yeah, I think honestly, like, I did talk to a friend of mine who's in a big old enterprise and has a mainframe, and they're actually replacing their mainframe with Lambda. Like they're peeling off—which is, like, a great move—taking the monolith, right, and peeling off the individual components of what it can do into these discrete Lambda functions. Which I thought was really fascinating. Again, it's a five-year-long journey to do something like that. And not everyone wants to wait five years, especially if their support's about to run out for that giant box in the, you know, giant warehouse.Corey: The thing that I also noticed—and this is probably the—I guess, one of the—talk about swing and a miss on pricing—they have a—what is it?—there's a VPC IP Address Manager, which tracks the the IP addresses assigned to your VPCs that are allocated versus not, and it's 20 cents a month per IP address. It's like, “Okay. So, you're competing against a Google Sheet or an Excel spreadsheet”—which is what people are using for these things now—“Only you're making it extortionately expensive?”Pete: What kind of value does that provide for 20—I mean, like, again—Corey: I think Infoblox or someone like that offers it where they become more cost-effective as soon as you hit 500 IP addresses. And it's just—like, this is what I'm talking about. I know it does not cost AWS that kind of money to store an IP address. You can store that in a Route 53 TXT record for less money, for God's sake. And that's one of those, like, “Ah, we could extract some value pricing here.”Like, I don't know if it's a good product or not. Given its pricing, I don't give a shit because it's going to be too expensive for anything beyond trivial usage. So, it's a swing and a miss from that perspective. It's just, looking at that, I laugh, and I don't look at it again.Pete: See I feel—Corey: I'm not usually price sensitive. I want to be clear on that. It's just, that is just Looney Tunes, clown shoes pricing.Pete: Yeah. It's honestly, like, in many cases, I think the thing that I have seen, you know, in the past few years is, in many cases, it can honestly feel like Amazon is nickel-and-diming their customers in so many ways. You know, the explosion of making it easy to create multiple Amazon accounts has a direct impact to waste in the cloud because there's a lot of stuff you have to have her account. And the more accounts you have, those costs grow exponentially as you have these different places. Like, you kind of lose out on the economies of scale when you have a smaller number of accounts.And yeah, it's hard to optimize for that. Like, if you're trying to reduce your spend, it's challenging to say, “Well, by making a change here, we'll save, you know, $10,000 in this account.” “That doesn't seem like a lot when we're spending millions.” “Well, hold on a second. You'll save $10,000 per account, and you have 500 accounts,” or, “You have 1000 accounts,” or something like that.Or almost cost avoidance of this cost is growing unbounded in all of your accounts. It's tiny right now. So, like, now would be the time you want to do something with it. But like, again, for a lot of companies that have adopted the practice of endless Amazon accounts, they've almost gone, like, it's the classic, like, you know, I've got 8000 GitHub repositories for my source code. Like, that feels just as bad as having one GitHub repository for your repo. I don't know what the balance is there, but anytime these different types of services come out, it feels like, “Oh, wow. Like, I'm going to get nickeled and dimed for it.”Corey: This ties into the re:Post launch, which is a rebranding of their forums, where, okay, great, it was a little crufty and it need modernize, but it still ties your identity to an IAM account, or the root email address for an Amazon account, which is great. This is completely worthless because as soon as I change jobs, I lose my identity, my history, the rest, on this forum. I'm not using it. It shows that there's a lack of awareness that everyone is going to have multiple accounts with which they interact, and that people are going to deal with the platform longer than any individual account will. It's just a continual swing and a miss on things like that.And it gets back to the billing question of, “Okay. When I spin up an account, do I want them to just continue billing me—because don't turn this off; this is important—or do I want there to be a hard boundary where if you're about to charge me, turn it off. Turn off the thing that's about to cost me money.” And people hem and haw like this is an insurmountable problem, but I think the way to solve it is, let me specify that intent when I provision the account. Where it's, “This is a production account for a bank. I really don't want you turning it off.” Versus, “I'm a student learner who thinks that a Managed NAT Gateway might be a good thing. Yeah, I want you to turn off my demo Hello World app that will teach me what's going on, rather than surprising me with a five-figure bill at the end of the month.”Pete: Yeah. It shouldn't be that hard. I mean, but again, I guess everything's hard at scale.Corey: Oh, yeah. Oh yeah.Pete: But still, I feel like every time I log into Cost Explorer and I look at—and this is years it's still not fixed. Not that it's even possible to fix—but on the first day of the month, you look at Cost Explorer, and look at what Amazon is estimating your monthly bill is going to be. It's like because of your, you know—Corey: Your support fees, and your RI purchases, and savings plans purchases.Pete: [laugh]. All those things happened, right? First of the month, and it's like, yeah, “Your bill's going to be $800,000 this year.” And it's like, “Shouldn't be, like, $1,000?” Like, you know, it's the little things like that, that always—Corey: The one-off charges, like, “Oh, your Route 53 zone,” and all the stuff that gets charged on a monthly cadence, which fine, whatever. I mean, I'm okay with it, but it's also the, like, be careful when that happen—I feel like there's a way to make that user experience less jarring.Pete: Yeah because that problem—I mean, in my scenario, companies that I've worked at, there's been multiple times that a non-technical person will look at that data and go into immediate freakout mode, right? And that's never something that you want to have happen because now that's just adding a lot of stress and anxiety into a company that is—with inaccurate data. Like, the data—like, the answer you're giving someone is just wrong. Perhaps you shouldn't even give it to them if it's that wrong. [laugh].Corey: Yeah, I'm looking forward to seeing what happens this coming year. We're already seeing promising stuff. They—give people a timeline on how long in advance these things record—late last night, AWS released a new console experience. When you log into the AWS console now, there's a new beta thing. And I gave it some grief on Twitter because I'm still me, but like the direction it's going. It lets you customize your view with widgets and whatnot.And until they start selling widgets on marketplace or having sponsored widgets, you can't remove I like it, which is no guarantee at some point. But it shows things like, I can move the cost stuff, I can move the outage stuff up around, I can have the things that are going on in my account—but who I am means I can shift this around. If I'm a finance manager, cool. I can remove all the stuff that's like, “Hey, you want to get started spinning up an EC2 instance?” “Absolutely not. Do I want to get told, like, how to get certified? Probably not. Do I want to know what the current bill is and whether—and my list of favorites that I've pinned, whatever services there? Yeah, absolutely do.” This is starting to get there.Pete: Yeah, I wonder if it really is a way to start almost hedging on organizations having a wider group of people accessing AWS. I mean, in previous companies, I absolutely gave access to the console for tools like QuickSight, for tools like Athena, for the DataBrew stuff, the Glue DataBrew. Giving, you know, non-technical people access to be able to do these, like, you know, UI ETL tasks, you know, a wider group of a company is getting access into Amazon. So, I think anything that Amazon does to improve that experience for, you know, the non-SREs, like the people who would traditionally log in, like, that is an investment definitely worth making.Corey: “Well, what could non-engineering types possibly be doing in the AWS console?” “I don't know, jackhole, maybe paying the bill? Just a thought here.” It's the, there are people who look at these things from a variety of different places, and you have such sprawl in the AWS world that there are different personas by a landslide. If I'm building Twitter for Pets, you probably don't want to be pitching your mainframe migration services to me the same way that you would if I were a 200-year-old insurance company.Pete: Yeah, exactly. And the number of those products are going to grow, the number of personas are going to grow, and, yeah, they'll have to do something that they want to actually, you know, maintain that experience so that every person can have, kind of, the experience that they want, and not be distracted, you know? “Oh, what's this? Let me go test this out.” And it's like, you know, one-time charge for $10,000 because, like, that's how it's charged. You know, that's not an experience that people like.Corey: No. They really don't. Pete, I want to thank you for spending the time to chat with me again, as is our tradition. I'm hoping we can do it in person this year, when we go at the end of 2022, to re:Invent again. Or that no one goes in person. But this hybrid nonsense is for the birds.Pete: Yeah. I very much would love to get back to another one, and yeah, like, I think there could be an interesting kind of merging here of our annual re:Invent recap slash live brunch, you know, stream you know, hot takes after a long week. [laugh].Corey: Oh, yeah. The real way that you know that it's a good joke is when one of us says something, the other one sprays scrambled eggs out of their nose. Yeah, that's the way to do it.Pete: Exactly. Exactly.Corey: Pete, thank you so much. If people want to learn more about what you're up to—hopefully, you know, come back. We miss you, but you're unaffiliated, you're a startup advisor. Where can people find you to learn more, if they for some unforgivable reason don't know who or what a Pete Cheslock is?Pete: Yeah. I think the easiest place to find me is always on Twitter. I'm just at @petecheslock. My DMs are always open and I'm always down to expand my network and chat with folks.And yeah, right, now, I'm just, as I jokingly say, professionally unaffiliated. I do some startup advisory work and have been largely just kind of—honestly checking out the state of the economy. Like, there's a lot of really interesting companies out there, and some interesting problems to solve. And, you know, trying to spend some of my time learning more about what companies are up to nowadays. So yeah, if you got some interesting problems, you know, you can follow my Twitter or go to LinkedIn if you want some great, you know, business hot takes about, you know, shitposting basically.Corey: Same thing. Pete, thanks so much for joining me, I appreciate it.Pete: Thanks for having me.Corey: Pete Cheslock, startup advisor, professionally unaffiliated, and recurring re:Invent analyst pal of mine. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with an angry comment calling me a jackass because do I know how long it took you personally to price CloudWatch RUM?Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Linch With A Leader
Episode 127: Being a Confident Leader with Dan Reiland

Linch With A Leader

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 48:57


Episode 127 finds Mike sitting down with a great friend and leader of leaders, Dan Reiland. Dan Reiland is the Executive Pastor at 12Stone Church in Lawrenceville, Georgia. He first partnered with the legendary John Maxwell for 20 years, as the Executive Pastor at Skyline Wesleyan Church located in San Diego. He then moved on to become the Vice President of Leadership and Church Development at Injoy. Dan also writes a blog to help encourage and pass on leadership insights that he has learned and acquired from his time in ministry. He has a passion for seeing leaders grow and become empowered in what God has called them too. In this episode, Mike Linch and Dan Reiland discuss what it means to be a confident leader and how this plays in to your spiritual journey! Some of God's greatest leaders struggled until they found this "confidence" that God desires them to have!

StarDate Podcast
Double Duty

StarDate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2022 2:14


One of the brightest stars of the summer sky is performing double duty here in the dead of winter — it appears in both early evening and early morning. And from far-northern latitudes, it never sets at all — it's in the sky every hour of the day, all year 'round. Deneb is at the tail of Cygnus, the swan. The brilliant star forms one point of the Summer Triangle, which soars high overhead during the summer months. Deneb remains visible for all or most of the year, though, because it's quite far north in the sky. It's about 45 degrees from the North Star, Polaris. From the northern hemisphere, Polaris is always at the same point in the sky, day or night. Its altitude depends on your latitude. From 30 degrees north, it stands 30 degrees above the northern horizon. And from 50 degrees north, it's 50 degrees above the horizon. As Earth turns on its axis, any star that's within that range of Polaris remains in view all night. From Seattle or Duluth, for example, that includes Deneb. At this time of year, the star passes just above the horizon during the night. For skywatchers south of that range, though, Deneb does disappear — for anywhere from a few minutes to hours. From most of the United States, it's in the northwest as night falls now and sets a few hours later. But it climbs into view again before dawn — this time in the northeast. So keep watch for Deneb — a summer star that's performing double duty on winter nights.  Script by Damond Benningfield Support McDonald Observatory

The POZCAST: Career & Life Journeys with Adam Posner
John R Miles: Passion Struck: Creating a No Regrets Life

The POZCAST: Career & Life Journeys with Adam Posner

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 53:12


1:11 - Collaboration over Competition1:30 - Getting into Military/Navy4:44 - Building a Leadership System in Navy7:20 - A Born Leader8:42 - Transition in Navy10:20 - Dealing with Politics13:36 - Start with character, Fear not the Future14:43 - Core difference between working in Navy and Corporate16:25 - Major Pivot22:43 - Politics and Solution24:22 - Personal 'Un-happiness'28:50 - Armed Burglary 201735:28 - Facing Trauma36:30 - Glimpse of Coaching Approach/Mindset39:20 - CHANGE40:32 - PassionStruck Podcast43:21 - Single Greatest Piece of Advice44:21 - John Miles' North Star 

The Karen Kenney Show
Our Calculator & Our Compass

The Karen Kenney Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 36:22


In our day-to-day life, we have both internal and external tools for figuring and feeling stuff out. If you need to know how much of a tip to leave when eating out, you can do some math in your head or you can do it on a calculator. The same is true when it comes to navigating and negotiating the affairs of the heart - the relationships we have with ourselves, with each other, the Divine and the world around us. Today on The Karen Kenney Show, we're talking about getting to know and when to use our inner calculator and inner compass, also known as the head and the heart, the intellect and the intuition. Decisions can be made from both places, and I think sometimes it behooves us to check in with the wisdom and guidance they each hold. When you have decisions to make or need guidance to create and choose - just know that you have incredible tools within you and available to you that require a little willingness, trust, faith and deep listening. It's simply a matter of making wise use of each of them where needed and not relying on only one of them all of the time. KK's Key Takeaways: • Where Is North (4:22) • Internal Compass (9:20) • Intellect Vs Intuition (14:40) • The North Star (18:46) • Compass & Calculator (23:09) • Sometimes People Are Too Busy (30:51) Karen Kenney is a certified Spiritual Mentor, writer, author, speaker, and the host of The Karen Kenney Show Podcast. She's also the founder of THE NEST - an online spiritual membership & community. She's been a student & guide of A Course in Miracles for close to three decades, a certified yoga teacher for 20+ years and is a longtime practitioner of Passage Meditation. She's also a Gateless Writing Instructor, workshop facilitator and transformational retreat leader. KK grew up in Lawrence & Boston, MA, and graduated from Boston University with a degree in Communications. She's known for her storytelling, her sense of humor and her “down-to-earth”, no BS approach to Spirituality. She helps people to rewrite their old stories, shift their perception from fear to Love, and deepen their connection to Self, Source & Spirit. Using her signature process - Your Story to Your Glory™ - people learn how to transform themselves and their lives from the inside out, so they can feel empowered, play a proactive part in their own healing, and experience more fun, flow, and freedom! A sought-after speaker, spiritual teacher, and thought leader for podcasts, shows, live events, group retreats and entrepreneurial mastermind programs, Karen has been invited to speak & teach on various platforms, stages & retreat centers across the country, including the renowned Omega Institute for Holistic Studies. You can learn more & connect with KK at: www.karenkenney.com Thank you so much for listening! If you're digging the show, I'd be wicked grateful if you would go to Apple Podcasts, hit Follow and then leave a star rating & review. If something I shared from my heart today somehow landed in yours, I'd love to hear about it. So please tag me on Facebook or Instagram and let me know what your favorite part was or what you found most helpful. If you can think of someone that could benefit from hearing this episode, please share it with them & help me to spread the good word and the Love. xo

Your Detour
North Star: Empowerment

Your Detour

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 30:54


Today's episode features Sam Ogborn, the founder of Once & More. Sam's background includes a healthy line of big-name corporations like Redbull and Walgreens, where she was the first hire to do direct-to-consumer marketing in the world of social media. Sam is a wealth of knowledge. She has taken all her learnings and then some to jump ship and start her own company, Once and More. Her passion for marketing is fueled by empowering female entrepreneurs to create brands or products by using her skills in SEO, eCommerce Marketing, Paid Media Strategy, and others. Listen to Sam's story and learn how we too can take steps to find our north star. Connect with Sam --> LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/samanthajogborn Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/onceandmoreco/ TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@marketingwithsam

Changing the Trajectory
James Seth Thompson: Life and Doctrine in Concert

Changing the Trajectory

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 27:07


James Seth Thompson leverages his platform to help advance communities of color. Today, we'll hear the whys behind this truth. Tune in as Maci Philitas, Changing the Trajectory's new co-host, flips the script inviting James to dish about his passions, the evolution of the podcast, and what fuels James's drive to have an impact in under-resourced communities. Reflecting on his personal life and 23 years in the financial services industry, James shares what most motivates his goal to be a North Star. Get the full episode of #ChangingtheTrajectory wherever you listen to podcasts. https://plnk.to/CT?to=page Note to All Readers: The information contained here reflects the views of AllianceBernstein L.P. or its affiliates and sources it believes are reliable as of the date of this podcast. AllianceBernstein L.P. makes no representations or warranties concerning the accuracy of any data. There is no guarantee that any projection, forecast or opinion in this material will be realized. Past performance does not guarantee future results. The views expressed here may change at any time after the date of this podcast. This podcast is for informational purposes only and does not constitute investment advice. AllianceBernstein L.P. does not provide tax, legal or accounting advice. It does not take an investor's personal investment objectives or financial situation into account; investors should discuss their individual circumstances with appropriate professionals before making any decisions. This information should not be construed as sales or marketing material or an offer or solicitation for the purchase or sale of any financial instrument, product or service sponsored by AllianceBernstein or its affiliates. The [A/B] logo is a registered service mark of AllianceBernstein, and AllianceBernstein® is a registered service mark, used by permission of the owner, AllianceBernstein L.P. © 2022 AllianceBernstein L.P.

Linch With A Leader
Episode 126: Smart Leadership with Mark Miller

Linch With A Leader

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 60:59


In Episode 126, Mike is blessed to sit down with Mark Miller, the Vice President of High Performance leadership with Chick-Fil-A. Mark has been with Chick-Fil-A for over 40 years and has helped architect the leadership pipeline in one of America's premier organizations! Mark also has written eight books and sold over a million copies in 25 different languages. Here is a link to discover Mark's previous works and order them! Today, Mike & Mark unpack his newest book "Smart Leadership"! Smart Leadership explores the four choices that every great leader, no matter their field, will have to make! The information contained in this podcast is transformational and one you will want to listen to with a pen & pencil in hand!

Solopreneur Money
The Solopreneur's Money Manifesto Launches Tomorrow: An Interview with My Ghostwriter

Solopreneur Money

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 35:31


My book, The Solopreneur's Money Manifesto, is all set to publish tomorrow, January 11! Since many of you solopreneurs have thought about writing your own books, I wanted to share the process of how my book was created.  On today's episode, you'll meet Mark, my ghostwriter from Scribe Media, who describes the steps that we went through to get my book published. If you have ever thought about writing a book of your own, you won't want to miss this interview to hear how Mark and Scribe helped me stay on track and get my book published. You will want to hear this episode if you are interested in... Mark's journey [1:32] The scribe-author matching process at Scribe [6:38] How the process works [11:20] What happens if the matching process isn't working [19:07] The case study helped bring the book to life [21:56] Lessons learned from the writer's perspective [26:40] The money questions [29:20] Who is Mark Travis? Mark Travis is, first and foremost, a storyteller. From an early age, he loved writing, but he really honed his skills during his years as a newspaper journalist. His role as a reporter taught him how to listen carefully, ask careful questions, think on his feet, and process what he heard. Unfortunately, the days of local newspapers are coming to an end despite Mark's 10 years fighting to save them as he worked on the business side of newspaper publishing. This industry decline led Mark to work with a tech startup before he tried freelance writing. With freelancing comes a feast or famine mindset which makes it hard to earn a steady paycheck. When Mark heard about Scribe, he was excited to work through the challenging hiring process and find a steady stream of clients. Mark's background in journalism and tech prepared him well for the role of ghostwriting at Scribe. He feels like the core of the job takes him back to his journalist roots and his years working in the business end of newspaper publishing prepared him to work with Scribe's business-minded clients. Scribe's process to match authors with ghostwriters Scribe works hard to match each author with the right ghostwriter. To do so, they dig in to discover the author's North Star. Once they help the client flesh out what they are trying to write and who the target audience is, then they help match the client to the ideal ghostwriter.  As a solopreneur who is approaching retirement, Mark knew he was the perfect fit for my book. Our process wasn't all business; we built a relationship along the way which helped Mark discover my voice.  The writing process After our initial interview, Mark learned more about me and my goals for the book. He led me through the Scribe writing process by asking me a series of questions. He learned the basic idea for the book, my ideal audience, and my secondary audience. Using Mark's questions, we were able to come up with an avatar and give them a name. Then, Mark wrote a few introductory samples to make sure he was capturing my voice. Listen in to hear how he not only captured my voice but improved it.  Over a series of phone calls, we went through the content of the book which Mark used to create the first draft. After getting edits from Scribe's professional editor, we went through a similar process to tweak the draft before getting the book ready for the production and marketing phases.  The Scribe process sets the author and ghostwriter up for success. Listen in to hear how Scribe can help you write your story. They take the challenge and mystery out of the book publishing process. Resources & People Mentioned Scribe Connect with Mark Travis AuthorMarkTravis.com Connect With Gabe Nelson BOOK - The Solopreneur's Money Manifesto by Gabe Nelson www.GabeNelsonFinancial.com/contact FREE Downloadable Resources at https://www.gabenelsonfinancial.com/resources/ EMAIL: Gabe (at) GabeNelsonFinancial.com Follow Gabe on LinkedIn Follow Gabe on Twitter: @GabeNelsonCFP Follow Gabe on Facebook Follow Gabe on Instagram: @GabeNelsonCFP Subscribe to Solopreneur Money Audio Production and Show notes by PODCAST FAST TRACK https://www.podcastfasttrack.com

The POZCAST: Career & Life Journeys with Adam Posner
Dr. Paul White: The 5 Languages of Appreciation in the Workplace

The POZCAST: Career & Life Journeys with Adam Posner

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2022 37:27


2:16 - Path to Christian Education3:40 -  Current Generation getting into Workplace4:30 - Instant Gratification6:25 - Early Work Experience/ Early Mistake7:40 - Definition of Family Business8:44 - Challenges of Succession10:25 - Love Appreciation vs. Work place Appreciation11:32 - Learning about Book Writing12:54 - Who is the book for13:56 -Feeling of Recognition15:34 - Genuine Care18:08 - Generational differences21:15 - Universal Boundaries23:23 - Written Communication / Digital Boundaries/ Different Perspective24:47 - Empathy26:05 - Introverts26:44 - Challenges of Consulting in a Large Company27:56 - Personal Feedback28:36 - Definition of Culture30:21 - Advice on Buying the book34:15 - Professional Accomplishment35:33 - Dr. Paul's North Star 

The Douglas Coleman Show
The Dougals Coleman Show w_ Habiba Zaman and Doug Lawrence

The Douglas Coleman Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 34:40


Habiba Jessica Zaman has a Master's degree in Professional Counseling specializing in trauma. She is the therapist and owner of North Star of Georgia Counseling. With 15 years of experience working in the counseling field, including counseling, advocacy, guidance and education, she believes that as a person becomes more aware of their fears, perception, desires and strengths, they can make successful life changes. She is author of 13 publications and 7 books, many of which have reached the Amazon Bestseller Lists and have won international recognition and awards. Habiba is of Bangladeshi and American descent. She has two children and lives in Atlanta, Georgia with her family.About Beautifully Bare, Undeniably You: Beautifully Bare, Undeniably You is interwoven with powerful song lyrics, each section represents a different, yet interconnected stage along this process. Each section and/or chapter includes the following: a therapeutic or theoretical explanation of the given stage in the process, one or more techniques identified to help reader successfully navigate the process, and at least one vignette that represents a time in the lived experiences of one or both authors, which exemplifies either our struggle or successes during our journey. The vignettes are a raw, exposed, and vulnerable window into the human condition.https://www.habibazaman.com/My name is Doug Lawrence, and I am the founder of TalentC® and proud co-founder of the International Mentoring Community (IMC). I have over 40 years of leadership and mentoring experience. I have had a journey that has been truly inspiring for me. My journey is one that has shaped what has been referred to as my calling. My calling is the “gift of mentoring” and the desire and goal to make the world a better place to be. It is by working with people and organizations to create mentoring movements and a mentoring community that we will realize a dream come true. My vision was that the world could be a better place with everyone embracing the “gift of mentoring.” One person, one organization at a time. That vision included championing the paradigm shift for mentoring and realizing that with that shift we could make mentoring a deeper, richer experience.http://talentc.caThe Douglas Coleman Show now offers audio and video promotional packages for music artists as well as video promotional packages for authors. We also offer advertising. Please see our website for complete details. http://douglascolemanshow.comIf you have a comment about this episode or any other, please click the link below.https://ratethispodcast.com/douglascolemanshow

The POZCAST: Career & Life Journeys with Adam Posner
From Dirty Rags to Riches: The Dave "Laundromat Millionaire" Menz Story

The POZCAST: Career & Life Journeys with Adam Posner

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 59:15


1:43 - Growing up and becoming an entrepreneur2:40 - Dave's parents5:02 - Balance in Parenting6:40 - Leading by example7:00 - Early days in Corporate America8:34 - The Aha Moment9:30 - Process of getting there13:57 - Evaluating different ideas16:14 - Laundromat from a Business Perspective20:30 - Professional Relationships and launch of first store22:40 - Evolution of Dave24:00 - Learn something on the way25:56 - Early tough lessons learned27:55 - Reaction of the Community / Community Building29:52 - Self service Laundry Business32:19 - Expansion of the Business35:56 - Value added36:29 - Learning Curve40:40 - Self service Element43:57 - People Leader44:23 - Lessons from Corporate America46:10 - Best small business48:17 - Impetus behind the book50:19 - Who is the book/podcast for52:50 - Greatest piece of advice54:00 - Dave's Super Power54:47 - Dave's North Star

The One Percent Better Show
Episode 138 - Finding Your North Star

The One Percent Better Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 31:05


Book referenced in episode.

Her CEO Journey
Managing Cash: The Stepping Stone of A Successful Business - The Journey of Sarah Isaacs

Her CEO Journey

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 31:48


Cash flow management is the foundation of all business operations. Without proper financial management, your business is highly likely to face financial challenges. It is true that an entrepreneur is putting a lot on their plate and a lot at stake when running their own company. Thus, an effective accounting tool is crucial to reduce the risks of any mismanagement.In this episode, Sarah Isaacs, the co-founder and COO of NorthStar, imparts the benefits of implementing the right financial tools for a business to succeed. She recalls how Dryrun helped her establish her own business. Finally, she shares the features of Dryrun that contribute to her company's development.Episode Highlights:[04:25] Sarah's Journey To NorthStar[05:30] What is NorthStar?[07:44] The Growth of Small Companies[07:58] Sarah's Struggles with Cash Flow and Management[11:32] QuickBooks and Dryrun Comparison[13:36] Before the Discovery of Dryrun[17:56] How Dryrun Helped Her Business[21:19] The Flexibility of Dryrun [22:18] What Dryrun Offers[23:43] Plan for the Future[28:09] About AvaTaxResources:Visit Christina Sjahli's website for more insights on designing an ownership structure that aligns with your company vision, and check out the Her CEO Journey™ podcast series!Sign up for the free 30-day free trial with Dryrun to see how you can monitor, manage, and model your own company's cash flow!Visit NorthStar.io's website Connect with Sarah: Twitter Enjoy the Her CEO Journey™ Podcast?As a mission-driven female entrepreneur, you are capable of making a difference through incorporating giving in your everyday business operations. If you enjoyed today's episode of Her CEO Journey Podcast, hit subscribe and share it with your friends!Write us a review and share it! If you enjoyed tuning into the show, then do not hesitate to leave us a review. You can also share this episode with the women you know so they can find financial empowerment and get their ideas into the world.Have any questions about business finance? You can contact me through LinkedIn or schedule a chat with me at any time. You can also suggest topics you're curious about for future episodes to help your business grow. Thanks for listening!For more episode updates, feel free to visit my website. You may also tune in on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify, or Stitcher.

Love, Life, Legacy: A Show About Sex
#104 - Why 2022 HAS TO BE the Best Year Ever!

Love, Life, Legacy: A Show About Sex

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 19:47


At the start of every year, we are all hopeful that this new year will be better than the last. We have a tradition of making New Year's resolutions, where we create goals for the coming year. But the question is: Do we intend to achieve these goals? Or do we just let fate take its course and hope that our lives will be significantly better? To achieve the goals we've set for ourselves, we must change a habit, trait, behavior, or mindset that we previously had to get our desired outcome. Sometimes, the lack of clarity about what it is that we really want is what's holding us back from growing. The North Star goal helps us be clear on what we want, which provides us with the motivation to take on our life and do things we didn't know we're capable of. It helps us grow and begin to reap all the benefits of having a life worth living.  In this week's episode, Andrew highlights the importance of transforming oneself first in order to achieve one's goals. He talks about how the North Star goal can help you figure out what type of person you want to become. Learn more about the North Star goal, why 2022 will be the best year for all of us and so much more when you listen to Episode 104! Shownotes: How High Noon can help you create the future of your choice [0:54] What is mind-body unity? [2:47] The value of the North Star goal [3:38] Where does every addiction come from? [9:15] The purpose of the 90-day journey of the North Star goal [11:08] The danger that comes with stagnation [13:35] Why 2022 will be the best year yet for all of us [16:16] Click HERE for the show transcript.

The Second Phase Podcast - Personal Branding & Brand Marketing and Life Strategies for Success for Female Entrepreneurs

Living with Purpose Means Your Goals are Unique to You Often times we look around and think, "oh, I should do what this woman is doing" or "I need to do these things too".  We end up setting our goals based on everyone else's metrics of success instead of defining what success looks like to us and leaning into our own unique gifts and talents and letting those be the guide. We find joy and satisfaction when we are aligned with our goals. Going from A to Z. The B to Y is so important. The endpoint can seem so daunting so we need to look at what's in between, the B to Y, to reach the goals. Where we are today, and where we want to go, there is a huge chasm. If we put one foot in front of the other every day, we'll get there so much faster than trying to rush through without being aligned. The Purpose Equation - For Finding and Living with Purpose Robyn shared her purpose equation, Values + Visions + Passions = Purpose. We must be aligned with our values or we will become frustrated. This ties in with Tayna's North Star concept that she shared in "The Joy of Missing Out", your values, visions, and mission are your guiding light and principal. This helps determine your soulmate clients. This is also important with how you run your team and set your boundaries. How to Discover Your Passions If you are feeling lost in the day-to-day of motherhood and are struggling to identify your passions, travel back in time. Do reflection work and discover what your passions were before you began the journey of motherhood and expectations. Dive into who you were when you were a kid. What were the activities you looked forward to? Tayna gave the example of playing softball. Maybe you won't play softball as an adult, but what did you like about softball. Was it being outdoors, the team environment, the athleticism, moving your body? Ask yourself why and you'll start to see bread crumbs for things you are passionate about. Another exercise to discover your passions is diving into what you wanted to be when you grew up. Remember when there were no constraints on you. Why did you want to be that? What was it about being that that made you excited? PIE We are all multi-passionate. Every person on the planet has more than one thing they love. It's important to narrow down first, niche down first, then add on and expand. You can't be Amazon straight out of the gate. When we do this, we wear ourselves out. Choose to focus. The cost of greatness is commitment. Commit to doing fewer things so that we can really do them well and then expand. Powers What are your powers? Impact What impact does it make? Excitement What is your excitement level? Being good at something doesn't mean you should be doing it. About Tayna Dalton Tayna is the author of “The Joy of Missing Out” and “On Purpose“. She is a productivity expert, author, and speaker. Click here to read the full show notes and access links.  

Alliance Aces
137. Ecosystems & Partners: The True Top of the Funnel

Alliance Aces

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 39:01


You've heard of an MQL — but what about an EQL?  In a world where 30% of all trade is slated to go through ecosystems by 2025, the go-to-market exercise can no longer be thought of as simply marketing and sales.  Ecosystems are the true top of the funnel — and it's time we acknowledge it.  Today's guest, Allan Adler, Managing Partner at Digital Bridge Partners, is one of the few out there sounding the alarm on this and other ways the shifting role of ecosystems will shape the coming decade.  Join us as we discuss: How ecosystems have fundamentally altered the go-to-market landscape Why ecosystems are a CEO function The evolution of the funnel and the rise of EQLs  Here are some additional episodes featuring other ecosystem leaders that might interest you:  #121 Aligning Ecosystem Strategy with Your Customer as the North Star with Lara Caimi, Chief Partner Officer, ServiceNow  #122 There's No Easy Button For Partnering with Nicole Napiltonia, VP Of Alliances and OEM Sales, at Barracuda  #106 The Secrets to Managing Alliances Like Microsoft with David Totten, Chief Technology Officer, US Partner Ecosystem at Microsoft  #97 Why Quality Always Beats Quantity in Software Ecosystems with Tom Roberts, Senior Vice President at the Global Partner Organization over at SAP.   Links & Resources  Learn more about how WorkSpan helps customers accelerate their ecosystem flywheel through Co-selling, Co-innovating, Co-investing, and Co-marketing.  Subscribe to the Ecosystem Aces Podcast on Apple Podcast, Spotify, Stitcher, Google Podcast.  Join the WorkSpan Community to engage with other partner ecosystem leaders on best practices, news, events, jobs, and other tips to advance your career in partnering. Find insightful articles on how to lead and get the most out of your partner ecosystem on the WorkSpan blog. Download the Best Practices Guide for Ecosystem Business Management  Download the Ultimate Guide for Partner Incentives and Market Development Funds   To contact the host, Chip Rodgers, with topic ideas, suggest a guest, or join the conversation about modern partnering, he can be reached on Twitter, LinkedIn, or send Chip an email at: chip@workspan.com   This episode of Ecosystem Aces is sponsored by WorkSpan.   WorkSpan is the #1 ecosystem business management platform. We give CROs a digital platform to turbocharge indirect revenue with their partner teams at higher win rates and lower costs. We connect your partners on a live network with cross-company business applications to build, market, and sell together. We power the top 10 business ecosystems in the technology and communications industry today, managing over $50 billion in the joint pipeline.

Navigating the Customer Experience
156: How to Achieve and Sustain Customer Success – Formula Explained with Aaron Thompson

Navigating the Customer Experience

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 31:05


Aaron Thompson is a Chief Revenue Officer at SuccessCOACHING, the leading provider of Customer Success training and education. He is a connector, educator and public speaker with over 20 years experience helping companies improve retention rates, increase recurring revenue and recoup customer acquisition costs. Aaron enjoys skiing, kayaking and golfing with his family and friends.   Questions   Could you share with us a little bit about your journey? What customer experience is and then what customer outcomes are and maybe give us a practical example of that. Could you maybe share with us maybe one or two drivers that you think can help organizations to try and stay ahead of the curve as it relates to anything that may be impacting them as a result of the pandemic? Could you share with us what's the one online resource, tool, website or app that you absolutely cannot live without in your business? Could you also share with us maybe one or two books that have had the biggest impact on you? It could be a book that you read a very long time ago, or even one that you've read recently that has impacted you. Where can listeners find you online? Do you have a quote or saying that during times of adversity or challenge, you'll tend to revert to this quote; it kind of helps to keep you on track or get you back on track if for any reason you got derailed. Do you have one of those?   Highlights   Aaron's Journey   Aaron shared that every job he's had his entire life has been customer facing. The first job he had was working at a health club, helping the members check in as they came in the front door, cleaning the club, etc. And he had a job all the way through high school, all the way through college, all customer facing in different regards, call centers, customer service, little retail here and there. And then about 36 years old, he actually got laid off for the first time in his career. And he had been down a technical track as a software programmer, he had been an implementation consultant, he had been a trainer and instructional designer and most recently was working in customer support at a SaaS company and they laid off about 100 people.   And for the first time he found himself without a job and he didn't know what he would do next. And so, he started looking at other kind of pivots in his career and thought maybe he would go into a sales track, he looked back into kind of the technical side. And long story short, there was this company in Portland, Oregon, where he's based that was looking for a new Head of Customer Success, that was going to be tasked with fixing the churn problem. See, they had a 40% year over year churn rate. And obviously, that was preventing them from growing. And so, they wanted to bring someone in to fix that hole in the bucket. And with his support background, he was able to get that job. And he tells this story when he does my classes now and his certifications in customer success.   His first day as the Head of Customer Success, he came in and again, he's tasked with fixing this churn problem. And he thinks he knows what customer success is at this point, it's like support on steroids or kind of account management 2.0.   And he came in on day one as the head of CS and he thinks, “Well, you know, what I've never actually Googled “What is customer success?” And long story short, he finds the industry, the technology players, the books, the authors, Jeanne Bliss and CCO 2.0 is really critical at the beginning of his development, of his strategy. And so, in a 12 month window, he was able to go and create his own customer success strategy, implement that strategy at that company, and take a 40% churn rate down to 8% in 12 months, by really doing some really foundational customer success practices, and starting to really, do quote unquote, customer success, not just customer support.   And so, at that point, he actually exited that company and founded his first company and at 38 years old, he became an entrepreneur for the first time, and not exactly how he would advise his son to do it. A seven year old son at 38 years old, to just kind of take that leap of faith, but alas, that's what he did. And he was an independent consultant, implementing that same strategy at some other SaaS companies. And then he met Todd and Andrew, the co-founders of SuccessCOACHING and they had the beginnings of this certification concept. And they were looking for another partner; he was kind of a lone wolf looking for a pack. And long story short, the three of them now own this business https://successcoaching.co/  and they have 4 levels of fully accredited certification in the discipline of Customer Success.   They work with B2B enterprise companies all around the world through an online learning management system. And then they also deliver live events. As their Chief Revenue Officer, he get to travel around, well, pre COVID, he got to travel around and do a lot of keynotes and meet with people in person. And for the last 18 months or so, he's been doing the same thing, but virtually, primarily into cameras, and then on the podcast like this.   So, he just loves to talk about customer success, he loves to learn from others and find new ways or better ways sometimes of doing things. And then they baked that into a certification. And then now like he said, they have multiple levels of it live, and they've certified about 7500 people around the world, they have nearly 10,000 on their platform today. And it's just been amazing to see this industry grow exponentially year over year, ever since he found it that first day when he Googled, What is customer success?   What is Customer Experience and What are Customer Outcomes   Me: So, one of your formulas for customer success is customer outcomes plus customer experience. So can we break that down, tell us exactly what customer experience is and then what customer outcomes are and maybe give us a practical example of that.   Aaron shared that he loves that formula. When he found that formula, he thought, okay, he can understand this just as a consumer and as having 20 plus years working with customers, it broke it down into such a simplistic approach he could wrap his head around it.   But, the customer's definition of success and when he says customer, he means human. And he means holistic human who has a personal life and a professional life and if they can impact them on the personal side in a positive way, by way of our professional relationship with them, so save them a little extra time, and they can now get home earlier or get off Zoom earlier, and spend some time with their family will profoundly affect their holistic life in a positive way that transcends their value proposition and B2B relationship, etc.   And so, for these holistic humans, keeping in mind what they want to accomplish, that's the CO (Customer Outcome).   So, CS (Customer Success) = CO (Customer Outcome) + CX (Customer Experience), the customer's definition of success, CS. And again, the human, accounts don't buy things, businesses don't buy things, make decisions, people do.   And typically speaking, we make business decisions based on personal preference. And so, there is a true blending both from the psychology as well as just building relationships and deepening and maintaining those with humans. And so that person's definition of success will always come down to what they want to accomplish, that's the CO (Customer Outcome). So what am I hoping to get whether it's time savings, and he oftentimes say that outcomes, the CO.   And they really come down to two kinds of outcomes, almost every outcome of any customer is either a pain to relieve or a gain to achieve, it's one or the other, I either got a pain point I need someone to solve it, or I'm looking to get bigger, faster, stronger, etc.   And so, when we can deliver what they want in terms of that outcome, and then we can do that how they want it, and that's the CX side.   And so, if we can deliver the same or better outcomes than our competition, and do it by way of the same or better customer experience than our competition, we will have delivered a higher volume of their definition of success.   And so, what that requires of us is to define what that definition looks like for that person, it's going to be different for your executives, stakeholder, then your subject matter expert, then your end user, then your system administrator, all the different roles have different definitions of success, but our job as CSMs is to define what that is for them, deliver on that, and then demonstrate to them that we've done so. That's where business reviews and reporting and benchmark data etc comes out.    And when we do all three of those, that then leads to renewal and expansion and advocacy from them in this concept of a customer success qualified lead, which is net new business coming into our funnel by way of the customer asset, as opposed to just filling the top of the funnel in sort of typical marketing approaches.   And so, when we do all of this effectively, we can grow our business from the customer asset outwards, we can unlock exponential growth because our acquisition costs go way down and our customer lifetime value goes up, either through renewal expansion, or like he said, advocacy which would be bringing us a net new lead, because we've made their lives so wildly successful. That's kind of the definition.   And that was when he found that, that was a big aha for him, because he thought he can wrap his head around this, he wasn't much of a math major growing up and so, to have a very simplistic CS = CO + CX, it allowed him to wrap his head around it and really start to use that as the North Star. And it's what they teach in their level one certification program as well.   Drivers that Can Help Organizations Stay Ahead of the Curve as it Relates to Anything that May Impact Them as a Result of the Pandemic   Me: So, a lot has been happening globally as it relates to different businesses and different industries and I'm sure it's become even more difficult to achieve customer success because I do believe that COVID has caused the bar to be raised for customer experience, especially for those organizations where there have been delays or I find a lot of companies sometimes are using COVID as an excuse as to why they're not delivering excellent service. So, could you maybe share with us maybe one or two drivers that you think can help organizations to try and stay ahead of the curve as it relates to anything that may be impacting them as a result of the pandemic?   Aaron stated that that's a really good point, actually. And he thinks Yanique is absolutely right when it comes to using COVID and quarantine, and everything that happened in March of 2020, as almost a cop out now. He feels like any company that is still revelling in, “Oh, well, we're still trying to figure out what the future looks like.”   And really kind of harkening to those early days of COVID, he genuinely just thinks it's a cop out at this point. Because we've been in it for pushing two years now and if you can't iterate, adjust, adopt new ways of doing things within two years, that says something about your company well beyond just this particular instance of COVID, and those early days of quarantine.   But the good companies, the agile companies, and he see this all the time. He watches Shark Tank a lot being an entrepreneur, he loves that show. And entrepreneur, after entrepreneur comes onto the carpet and tells their story about brick and mortar, this kind of products, direct to consumer, and then immediately having to shift and do that digital transformation to be completely digital because there was no other way to sell their products. And many of them were able to thrive in that scenario because of their ability to iterate and adopt.   He thinks it's probably trickier, he doesn't know if it's easier or harder for an early stage versus the later stage company, because you have more resources later stage, of course, as well. But he thinks that's the key is really making that digital transformation over to direct to consumer, if that's your business model. And if it's B2B, you still had to make a digital transformation, he's not going to be flying and taking you to dinner, and doing a business review in a boardroom with you, he's going to do it on Zoom and becoming adept at that, and really being able to pivot into that.   Like their business, they had the same problem. He was actually in London on March 12, 2020, speaking at a customer conference. It was crazy. And so, he's flying from Seattle to London and then he's going to do a keynote in London and a level one certification while he's there. And then he's going to hit New York City on his way back for the level one certification and then he's going to go home to Portland where he lives. And as he's getting on the plane from Seattle to London, this is March 9th, that's probably more like March 7th of 2020. His contact in New York emails him and says, “I'm sorry, we have to cancel the event because we just can't host people in one place.”   And he thought this is crazy. Like what are you talking about? This is nuts. What do you mean? you can't bring people together like this, it's just insane.   And so, he said, alright and he gets on the plane from Seattle to London now without needing to stop in New York on his way home. So he didn't have a direct flight back yet. And he'll always remember this Instagram post he made that day where it was the weirdest feeling to get on a plane headed out of country during a global pandemic without a return flight figured out yet. It was completely insane.   So he goes and he does the London events and about 25% of the attendees for this customer conference in London, about 25% actually came, 75% of them, their company said you can't go, a lot of the speakers had to pivot to a Zoom delivery, the conference company, Congress Geeks out of Israel did an amazing job of pivoting so that the speakers could do it virtually on Zoom, but he was there anyway. And so, he went ahead and did it.   And on March 13, he flew home and they had on Monday, the following Monday, the 13th was the Friday was when he was supposed to do his New York event and he immediately just pivoted to a virtual delivery. And they sent everybody a Zoom link and said, “All right, well, you're home. Now, I'm home. Let's see how this goes.” And now here we are 18 months later, that's how we will do it forever now.   Because he no longer has to take the time out of office to travel, he no longer has to find people in one given city; he can sell tickets around the world for any given event. They actually get more attendance and have a lower overhead for their business and so their margins went up and it's a delivery mode that they will forever do now, it's not to say he's not going to pick and choose different places to go in person. But they had to do that on a dime. And luckily, they were uniquely positioned, he thinks, to be able to make that digital transformation, literally overnight. And not every company could do that. But he thinks there's a lot of companies that have just used it as a cop out and haven't adopted this new world and kind of keep waiting for things to quote, go back to normal, as opposed to understanding that this is the new normal, and then using this to actually improve their customer experience and ultimately their customer success.   And just one more point on this, the difference between customer experience and customer success in that formula. Obviously, the CX is part of the CS formula, but how he likes to think of it and he did a keynote actually not very long ago on this. The customer experience is about the journey, it's about everything they do from the top of your funnel in marketing through the sales channels, to everything with on boarding and optimization and renewals, procurement, how easy it is to pay you, etc, etc, etc. All of the things of the journey from soup to nuts, from start to finish, that's CX it's all about the journey.   Customer Success is about the destination. It's about did we get you what you want, how you want it, and that how you want it is the CX side.   And so, he thinks a lot of companies haven't focused on that journey well enough and said, alright, now that we live in this COVID world, what can we do? How can we differentiate ourselves from a customer experience perspective?   While still delivering the same or better outcomes than our competition, iterating on the CX side is what ultimately creates the winners coming out of this pandemic.   And then, he doesn't like to say losers, but the not winners coming out of the pandemic. And so, he thinks that's a really good point and a good question. And that's a very long answer but he thinks at this point, if you haven't adopted or you're not in the process of adopting to this new life, this new way the world works, you're not going to succeed maybe how you did before the pandemic, and certainly not as well as the competition if they are able to iterate and adopt this new way of life better.   App, Website or Tool that Aaron Absolutely Can't Live Without in His Business   When asked about an online resource that he cannot live without in his business, Aaron stated that that's a good question. So much of their business is online; they have their learning management system and that's obviously where they make revenue is selling access to that for people to become certified. The typical collaboration tools are very critical in their business; they run a pretty lean shop and so, to be able to use something like Slack that is just so widely adopted by this point.   Zoom he thinks would probably be one that he would be chagrined to not include it because he's on it almost all day long now. There's this new product, actually, that's super fascinating and they're going to be rolling this out as part of their live virtual events. It's called Class and it's built on top of Zoom, but it creates a true classroom experience, but virtually and so there's a ton of functionality in there and they're just getting started, they're looking to roll this out for their business in Q1, probably mid Jan. But that's one that's actually really intriguing.   You talk about a company that's been built in the pandemic, these founders, similar to rocketlane, these founders saw an opportunity, they saw this pandemic as an opportunity not to take advantage of people, but to capitalize on in a positive way.   There are new pain points; there are new outcomes that people are going to have out there. How can we deliver those outcomes in a enjoyable frictionless customer centric experience, and they can start to build and grow and just like rocketlane, go to market, just in the last 18 months, they went from not existing to now they're in the market because of this shift in this digital transformation classes a similar approach.   And it's so super impressive to him as an entrepreneur, when people can see that pain, see that opportunity, that window and just jump at it and then it create something that is as high quality as rocketlane or Class, for example.   Books that Have Had the Biggest Impact on Aaron   When asked about books that have had the biggest impact, Aaron shared that Chief Customer Officer 2.0: How to Build Your Customer-Driven Growth Engine by Jeannie Bliss that was kind of his mantra as the first time he was the head of CS. When he did that Googling and he thought he knew what he was talking about and realized he doesn't know what customer success is, he better learn, that was a really critical book to doing that. And it's just so customer centric, the whole concept of earning the right to customer driven growth by making people's lives better, she really touches on that holistic human concept that he started the podcast with. So, that's a big one.   He's trying to think of another one that he's read that isn't customer success that has been critical, recently. Over the summer, he was doing the poolside reads, those are always nice. The Technology-as-a-Service Playbook: How to Grow a Profitable Subscription Business from TSIA, it's been out a long time, he got it for free years ago at a conference, they were just handing them out on a table. That was really big for him to understand the subscription economy and the shift in the business economics from the product era when we sold physical products that would then wear out or require the customer to go back into the market.   And now you shift over to selling the use of the product as a service, thus, it never wears out for the customer now because they never own it. And how do we get a little bit of revenue over time, instead of a whole bunch of revenue up front. Technology-as-a-Service Playbook is really critical as well.   And then there's some great customer success books out there, there's also some great leadership books that are out there as well. Another good one that he likes to recommend to people, Red Ocean, Blue Ocean – Blue Ocean Strategy, if you are an entrepreneur or even just have an inkling of an entrepreneurial spirit, that is a really profound book. It's all about when you find yourself in an ultra competitive environment, that's a red bloody ocean and you're really competing on price and kind of having this race to the bottom as they say, how to then innovate, how to pivot, how to adopt a new approach to break out of that and create and find yourself in a blue ocean that is wide open for you to fish within. They use the example of Cirque du Soleil.   And when they found in Cirque du Soleil, they thought why would you ever create a new circus company? That's insane. There are tons of circuses out there, and a lot of them are getting attacked or protested because of the animal rights and there's just so much gray area in there. And why would you ever do this? And so, what they do is they go and they create a circus that doesn't have any animals, it's all people and all of a sudden they find themselves in this blue ocean and they've got Las Vegas and all around the world, they're selling out these tents, like Barnum and Bailey's used to do back in the 70s, and 80s. But they're doing it without any animals; it takes all of the risk away and all they did was just take a very old concept, iterate it, take a new approach to it, and it just exploded worldwide. That's a perfect example of Red Ocean, Blue Ocean. And he thinks it's a good business book for anybody, even if you don't know what you want to do, but you want to be an entrepreneur, it can help you kind of see things in a more innovative way.   Where Can We Find Aaron Online   LinkedIn – Aaron Thompson Website – https://successcoaching.co/                 https://successhacker.co/   Quote or Saying that During Times of Adversity Aaron Uses   When asked about a quote or saying that he tends to revert to, Aaron shared that he wished he can show it because it works a little better with visual. So he'll try to talk it through here. But think of whether it's customer sentiment, and you've just brought on a new customer or a personal relationship, or whatever it is, and everything goes as you expected. And you've got a pendulum and whenever they goes as expected, the pendulum kind of swings back and forth, right there in the middle, and everything, is fine, it's not crazy, it is what it is, no surprises, etc.   And on one end of the spectrum, you have good, happy, pleased, satisfied, whatever. On the other end of the spectrum, you have bad, mad, angry, frustrated, confused, whatever, offended maybe, etc.   And we're swinging that pendulum right in the middle. And then something bad happens, whatever it is, and it moves this pendulum all the way out to the bad, mad, angry, frustrated side of things. And we find ourselves in that situation, that time of adversity. And in that moment, it's really easy to ourselves get mad, frustrated, etc, disappointed, etc. And really kind of relish in the moment. And what he tries to do is to remind himself that, “Now I have the opportunity to create enough momentum with that pendulum, that I can move it on to the good, happy, pleased side, to a degree that I never could have had I not found myself on the bad side.”   And so, it's really just a visual of with, “Every challenge presents an opportunity and when we find ourselves in these challenging times, we just want to focus on the opportunity that's presented by it, not the challenge that's presented by it. See these times of adversity as gifts and opportunities to create momentum and swing that pendulum to a place on the good side that it never could have been had you not had to go through that difficult time.” So that's kind of the like he said, it's a little easier if he's got a visual, he's a big whiteboard person, a lot of webinars, podcasts are a little tough for him. He talks with my hands a lot; nobody can see him right now. But hopefully they can visualize that a little bit, but it's really just “Every challenge presents an opportunity.”   Please connect with us on Twitter @navigatingcx and also join our Private Facebook Community – Navigating the Customer Experience and listen to our FB Lives weekly with a new guest   Grab the Freebie on Our Website – TOP 10 Online Business Resources for Small Business Owners   Links   Chief Customer Officer 2.0: How to Build Your Customer-Driven Growth Engine by Jeanne Bliss Technology-as-a-Service Playbook: How to Grow a Profitable Subscription Business by Thomas Lah   The ABC's of a Fantastic Customer Experience   Do you want to pivot your online customer experience and build loyalty - get a copy of “The ABC's of a Fantastic Customer Experience.”   The ABC's of a Fantastic Customer Experience provides 26 easy to follow steps and techniques that helps your business to achieve success and build brand loyalty. This Guide to Limitless, Happy and Loyal Customers will help you to strengthen your service delivery, enhance your knowledge and appreciation of the customer experience and provide tips and practical strategies that you can start implementing immediately! This book will develop your customer service skills and sharpen your attention to detail when serving others. Master your customer experience and develop those knock your socks off techniques that will lead to lifetime customers. Your customers will only want to work with your business and it will be your brand differentiator. It will lead to recruiters to seek you out by providing practical examples on how to deliver a winning customer service experience!

Castle Super Beast
CSB 148: Fortnite Strats: Gentrify The Map

Castle Super Beast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 187:50


Download for Mobile | Podcast Preview | Full Timestamps Silent Hill 1 Holds Up Wolfstride: Style, Mecha & Peepoo Mortal Shell: Leave The Forest Don't Look Up: Preach To My Anxiety Riot's $100M Settlement Final FaNFT You can watch us record the podcast live on twitch.tv/castlesuperbeast Go to http://greenchef.com/superbeast130 and use code superbeast130 to get $130 off, plus free shipping! -- Go to http://expressvpn.com/superbeast to get an extra 3 months free! -- Go to http://buyraycon.com/superbeast to get 15% off your order! -- Get 25% off and zero delivery fees on their first order of $15 or more, when you download the DoorDash app and enter code CASTLE2021. Riot Games settles the 2018 California gender discrimination suit for $100 million. $80 million will go to women employees and contractors at Riot who worked there between 2014 and now. GoldenEye 007 Is Getting A Digital Release On Xbox the Titanfall 2 Northstar client has a custom mode where BT yeets you into the map at the start of every round and it absolutely owns ATLUS announced that Shin Megami Tensei V has sold around 800,000 copies since launch, making it the best selling title in the series Atlus Renews Domains For Unannounced Persona 5 Projects Square Enix president talks about new tech/concepts including NFTs It Takes Two Creator Josef Fares Would Rather "Get Shot In The Knee" Than Include NFTs In His Games A Harry Potter MMO was "killed" by EA for lack of belief in the IP

Subject Matter
Why Integrity is Your North Star for Success

Subject Matter

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 30:52


Do you need to be ruthless to attract success? The answer is a resounding no. In fact, for ambitious professionals to unlock their potential, personal integrity is a key component. Chief Ethics Officer at Airbnb and former US Counsel Rob Chesnut believes great leaders embody authenticity, self-awareness and transparency and set the temperature for the culture of the companies they work for. Rob talks with Ben about why young professionals must use their North Star to guide them towards companies whose values align with their own. You'll hear why customers are attracted to ethically-led businesses, why integrity can be a double-edged sword and why leaders should bring their personal ethics into their roles Listen to more Subject Matter podcasts at: http://www.subjectmatterpodcast.com (http://www.subjectmatterpodcast.com)

Business Meets Spirituality
What Is “White Space” Time, And Why Do You Need It?

Business Meets Spirituality

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 31:30


How do the greatest entrepreneurs create a rhythm in their lives that allows for strategic thinking and creative planning? Bill Gates, for example, was known to take extended solo vacations twice a year. No phone, no social events, just time to sit and reflect. This gave him the space to develop a strategy for the next six months of his life and business, and to make big moves instead of just reacting. While it may not be possible for you to take three days to unplug just yet, Hallie and I discuss how you can create some white space in your daily life today. Time to gain clarity, and create a North Star to follow. First, we break down what we mean by creating white space in our lives, and how we are supposed to make time for it alongside our jobs, taking care of kids, pets, spending time with friends, etc. Then, we share our ways of building white space into our daily schedules to help deal with burnout and become more aligned with ourselves. When you spend a little time just planning out how you spend your day and engage in self-inquiry, you get more life back to give in a way that really matters to you. https://adamhergenrother.com/124-what-is-white-space-time-and-why-do-you-need-it/ (See full show notes.)

I Don't Wanna Hear It
153 - One and One Are Five: Dancin' On the Radio

I Don't Wanna Hear It

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 88:23


I Don't Wanna Hear It Podcast153 - One and One Are Five: Dancin' On the Radio We're ringing in the new year with some bullshit you should get into. Happy 2022. Here comes the metaverse so it was nice knowing you, hu-mans - beep boop beep.Check out more of our stuff at I Don't Wanna Hear It and join the Patreon, jabroni. I mean, if you want. Don't be weird about it. Oh, and we publish books now at WND Press because we want to be bankrupted by a dying medium.Also, you should listen to our 2021 Christmas special: A Black Metal Christmas Carol, as well as Mikey's true crime podcast, Wasteland and Shane's psychology podcast, Why We Do What We Do.Aaannnddd... our good buddy Matt Moment is in a great hardcore band called Contact. Check 'em out!Episode Links:MindsetNorthstarDe Serpientes by Get ‘Em TigerThe Batman newest trailerThe Northman trailerYak: A Collection of Truck Songs by Angel Du$tDune Messiah by Frank HerbertQuinn's IdeasThe Matrix Resurrections trailerDrug Use For Grown-Ups by Carl HartSome of our old bands are on Spotify:Absent FriendsWe're Not DeadYears From NowMusical Attribution:Licensed through NEOSounds. License information available upon request.“5 O'Clock Shadow,” “America On the Move,” “Baby You Miss Me,” “Big Fat Gypsy,” “Bubble Up,” “C'est Chaud,” “East River Blues,” “The Gold Rush,” “Gypsy Fiddle Jazz,” “Here Comes That Jazz,” “I Wish I Could Charleston,” “I Told You,” “It Feels Like Love To Me,” “Little Tramp,” “Mornington Crescent,” “No Takeaways.”

Mom with Purpose
Finding Your North Star and Evolving into Who You're Called to Be with Elizabeth Hartke

Mom with Purpose

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 43:11


You can cast the vision, set all these goals but is that really the right path for you? Today we have an amazing guest episode to help you not only find the vision of your business but the vision for the life you want to build! Elizabeth Hartke is an international Business and Leadership Strategist and Founder of the Luminary Leadership Company and podcast. She works to elevate successful entrepreneurs into powerful leaders so they can do work that matters. Through her masterminds, mentorship and signature programs, Elizabeth has shown thousands of entrepreneurs across the globe how to shift from just building a business to creating a legacy. She brings with her ten years of leadership experience and has built two growing and successful businesses. Her expertise has been featured in media outlets including Forbes, Entrepreneur and Fast Company, and on stages throughout the world. Elizabeth and her husband live on their hobby farm with their three children in Wisconsin. In this episode, you will learn:  What it means to find your true north  Why building your life should come before building the business How to find the right path for you What questions you can ask yourself to evolve    Connect with Elizabeth: luminaryleadershipco.com   https://www.instagram.com/elizhartke/   Links Mentioned in this Episode:  True North freebie: luminaryleadershipco.com/truenorth   Other Resources:  Want my step-by-step guide on how to start your VA business today? Grab The Prep which will show you exactly how to set up and start your business! You will get instant access to the digital product so you don't have to wait any longer to start!  Join here >> aubreemalick.com/theprep   Looking to scale your freelancing business to 5k/month and want to join the Freelancer to CEO Academy? Jump into our signature program: aubreemalick.com/academy  Join the Freelancer to CEO Podcast Community on Facebook    If you found value in today's episode, I would love it if you shared this in your Instagram stories! Help us spread the message to more freelancers who are ready to step into the CEO role!    Connect with me on Instagram: @aubreemalick

Linch With A Leader
Episode 125: A Leaders Character with Dr. Richard Blackaby

Linch With A Leader

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 43:20


Mike kicks of 2022 talking about a "leaders character" with Dr. Richard Blackaby.  This is his second appearance on the podcast (Episode 100) and this conversation delves into the depths of what makes character so critical in the life of a leader! Dr.  Blackaby serves as the President of Blackaby Ministries International and has served in that role since 2006.  He has authored or co-authored over 36 books such as:  Spiritual Leadership, Experiencing God,  The Seasons of God Dr. Blackaby not only travels the country speaking but is a coach to many Christian CEO's and business leaders.  He also has a popular leadership podcast entitled "The Richard Blackaby Leadership Podcast".  In 2022, Dr. Blackaby is beginning a new "Experiencing God - Day by Day" Podcast He and his wife, Lisa, have three adult children and six grandchildren. They live in Atlanta, GA.

WSMF Broadcast Day Podcast
Screen Guild Theater 44-01-03 ep177 The North Star

WSMF Broadcast Day Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022


Clear Admit MBA Admissions Podcast
Episode 207: Wire Taps—Female engineer with lower GMAT quant score. Operations candidate targeting the COO role at Patagonia. Stern with $$$$ vs. Booth full-fare, for Investment Banking in New York?

Clear Admit MBA Admissions Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 38:31


Happy 2022 to all! Graham and Alex are back to ring in the New Year, despite some unexpected hurdles... Our dynamic duo talk R2-craziness as business schools line up about 20 admissions deadlines in 5 days! Graham also shares a truly heartwarming e-mail from a listener in Chile and some big news about Spotify podcast ratings (thanks John!). As to the candidates profiled this week: first up, Alex and Graham look at a female engineer who is targeting next season. With a 700 GMAT, and a lower quant score, the test seems to be a clear area of improvement. Your hosts also discussed the quality of her work experience (engineering sales) and her potential opportunity to target M7 programs. Next, Graham introduces another candidate who is targeting next season; her “North Star goal” is to someday be the COO at Patagonia. Alex and Graham like her operations experience and sustainability goals, and discussed her 'extra curriculars' and her GPA as both of those areas are going to require some attention and/or remedial work. Finally, from DecisionWire, Alex selected a candidate who is debating whether Stern with a very generous scholarship ($170K) is a better option than Booth without scholarship money. The candidate's short term goal is investment banking in New York City with a long term plan to potentially return to California. This episode was recorded in Cornwall, England and Paris, France. It was produced in West Philadelphia by Dennis Crowley. Please remember to rate and review this podcast wherever you listen (yes, even on Spotify!), and to have a safe, happy, and healthy New Year!

Buddhism for Everyone with JoAnn Fox
Episode 125 - Making Positive Habits Stick, The Buddhist Way

Buddhism for Everyone with JoAnn Fox

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 35:40


The Buddha taught that small, good karmic actions lead to great results in the future, a powerful motivation for making even small positive changes in our lives. In this episode we look at the Four Powers of Effort, a process for making positive changes last. 1,200 years ago, the Buddhist Master Shantideva offered this Buddhist approach to lasting change and building confidence in his Guide to the Bodhisattva's Way of Life. The Four Powers of Effort are guiding principles to reaching a goal by aspiring to who you want to become, creating a joyful process for change, and steadfastly sticking to it. The Buddha said that “with effort we have all attainments,” meaning we can do anything we aspire to with enough effort—even attain enlightenment!    The Four Powers of Effort Aspiration. A strong wish is fundamental for accomplishing an important goal. How can we best create a strong wish and harness the power of it fir change?  By visualizing the future self. We decide who we want to become and visualize it, preferably in the quiet of meditation. We imagine what this new identity feels like, what they do each day, and the positive effects they have on others and our selves. For example, if we aspire to meditate every day, we imagine becoming a meditator, the newfound peace, and less anxiety. Or you might imagine becoming a fit and healthy person, and you visualize a future self that exercises most days of the week, feels light in your body, enjoys active pleasures like biking with friends or hiking.    A shift in identity will follow changing our habits, but choosing who we want to become helps us understand what processes we need to adopt in order to become that person. (Emptiness of the self at work here!). The most powerful wishes come when the outcome is meaningful to us and is an expression of our values. Living in accordance with our values is a path toward happiness. Engaging in the positive process is a type of success that can reliably bring us satisfaction. External success may or may not be achieved. External success may not deliver the happiness we believed it would, but acting in accordance with our values will bring us peace whatever the outcome. Outcomes are invariably unpredictable, but good will come if we make positive changes.   “Identity change is the North Star of habit change” —James Clear   Steadfastness. What is the smallest, most manageable step you can take in the next 24 hours to move in the direction of your goal? Very clearly identify the first step, according to your capacity. Plan the step for the following day, and even at a certain time and place. Make the plan specific. The plan, “I will meditate tomorrow” is less likely to be fulfilled than: “I will meditate tomorrow morning after I have my coffee while still sitting at the kitchen table.” Try to make one small step toward reaching your new identity each day. If we diligently put these planned steps into action, from this steadfastness will come a newfound confidence. We will eventually be confident in our new identity because we have performed this activity steadfastly over a period of time.    Joy. Try to make the plan for change a joyful one. We won't do what makes us suffer for very long! Adopting new habits will be challenging, but the experience can't be very unpleasant. The spiritual path should be a joyful one if we are practicing correctly. Try to make your plan for change as easy and pleasant as possible, like setting out your meditation cushion the night before if you intend to meditate in the morning.    Rest. Rest is a power of effort. Plan to take rest and have a break. Also, when we have an unexpected rest (when we diverge from our plan or slip up,  don't feel that you have failed, you just needed a little rest from all that willpower!) Steadfastness means we are going in the direction of our dreams, not that we are perfect.   From Atomic Habits by James Clear: I will [BEHAVIOR] at [TIME] in [LOCATION].  Meditation. I will meditate for one minute at 7 a.m. in my kitchen.  Studying. I will study Spanish for twenty minutes at 6 p.m. in my bedroom.  Exercise. I will exercise for one hour at 5 p.m. in my local gym.  Marriage. I will make my partner a cup of tea at 8 a.m. in the kitchen.   If by giving up small pleasures great happiness is to be found,  the wise should give up small pleasures  seeing (the prospect of) great happiness. (Verse 290) —Buddha, The Dhammapada   Apply for a free life coaching session: To apply for a complimentary 30-minute life coaching session with JoAnn Fox (for the first 5 that apply in December) visit https://buddhismforeveryone.com/coaching  References with Links Buddha (1986).The Dhammapada: Verses and Stories. Translated by Daw Mya Tin, M.A. (Website). Edited by Editorial Committee, Burma Tipitaka Association Rangoon. Courtesy of Nibbana.com. For free distribution only, as a gift of dhamma. https://www.tipitaka.net/tipitaka/dhp/verseload.php?verse=290   Clear, J. (2018). Atomic Habits. Avery. https://www.amazon.com/Atomic-Habits-Proven-Build-Break-ebook/dp/B07D23CFGR/ref=sr_1_1?crid=1QMEEZSP01C91&keywords=atomic+habits+james+clear&qid=1640962723&s=books&sprefix=Atomic%2Cstripbooks%2C142&sr=1-1

The POZCAST: Career & Life Journeys with Adam Posner
Leigh Steinberg: The Real Story Behind The Sports Empire

The POZCAST: Career & Life Journeys with Adam Posner

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 50:12


0:04 - Love for Sports3;15 - Envision Sports as a Career5:49 - True to the Values6:13 - Key Mistake in early days8:14 - Assess the character11:11 - The Movie15:28 - Peak of the Career17:59 - The dark side of Life21:26 - Relationship with David22:06 - Mental steps to separate a business25:05 - Going back to the roots25:27 - Second Big break28:47 - Accountability30:06- Deciding Factor31:56 - Approach to guiding the athletes / Aligning the values33:47 - How to address the wrong attitude/violence35:30 - Sports in terms of Covid39:35 - Leigh's Legacy40:37 - Greatest piece of advice42:11 -  Leigh's North Star

UFO Chronicles Podcast
Ep.29 North Star State Sasquatch (Throwback Thursdays)

UFO Chronicles Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 61:27


(Re-upload)For the next few weeks I will be doing a Throwback Tuesdays/Thursdays where I re-release old episodes from the archives. So don't worry if you have heard it already as a 'New episodes' will continue to come out on Sundays. The idea is to get some of the old episodes heard as they have very little downloads from the first few seasons, compared to newer episodes.~~~Episode:29Our guest today is Olin an avid outdoors-man and hunter from Minnesota. He saw a silver saucer object when he was a child, but when he got older and spent more time in the woods he would see some very strange things out there at night, then on a camping trip in 2016 Olin and members of his group heard some very loud and powerful vocalizations. If you have had encountered a Sasquatch in Minnesota/Wisconsin, Upper Peninsula Michigan, Iowa, Ontario, Manitoba.You can contact Olin at:glsasquatch@gmail.comMore information on this episode on the podcast website:https://ufochroniclespodcast.comWant to share your encounter on the show? Email: UFOChronicles@gmail.comTwitter: @UFOchronpodcastPodcast Merchandise:https://www.teepublic.com/user/ufo-chronicles-podcastHelp Support UFO CHRONICLES Podcast by becoming a Patron:www.patreon.com/UFOChroniclespodcastor tip and support as a one-off donationhttps://ko-fi.com/ufochroniclespodcastWe have partnered with Advertise Cast to handle our advertising/sponsorship requests. They're great to work with and will help you advertise on our show. Please click the link below to get started.https://www.advertisecast.com/UFOChroniclesPodcastThank you for listening!Please leave a review if you enjoy the show, and everyone that leaves a five-star rating and review on Apple Podcasts will get a shout-out on the following show.

UFO Chronicles Podcast
Ep.29 North Star State Sasquatch (Throwback Thursdays)

UFO Chronicles Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 61:27


(Re-upload)For the next few weeks I will be doing a Throwback Tuesdays/Thursdays where I re-release old episodes from the archives. So don't worry if you have heard it already as a 'New episodes' will continue to come out on Sundays. The idea is to get some of the old episodes heard as they have very little downloads from the first few seasons, compared to newer episodes.~~~Episode:29Our guest today is Olin an avid outdoors-man and hunter from Minnesota. He saw a silver saucer object when he was a child, but when he got older and spent more time in the woods he would see some very strange things out there at night, then on a camping trip in 2016 Olin and members of his group heard some very loud and powerful vocalizations. If you have had encountered a Sasquatch in Minnesota/Wisconsin, Upper Peninsula Michigan, Iowa, Ontario, Manitoba.You can contact Olin at:glsasquatch@gmail.comMore information on this episode on the podcast website:https://ufochroniclespodcast.comWant to share your encounter on the show? Email: UFOChronicles@gmail.comTwitter: @UFOchronpodcastPodcast Merchandise:https://www.teepublic.com/user/ufo-chronicles-podcastHelp Support UFO CHRONICLES Podcast by becoming a Patron:www.patreon.com/UFOChroniclespodcastor tip and support as a one-off donationhttps://ko-fi.com/ufochroniclespodcastWe have partnered with Advertise Cast to handle our advertising/sponsorship requests. They're great to work with and will help you advertise on our show. Please click the link below to get started.https://www.advertisecast.com/UFOChroniclesPodcastThank you for listening!Please leave a review if you enjoy the show, and everyone that leaves a five-star rating and review on Apple Podcasts will get a shout-out on the following show.

Love, Life, Legacy: A Show About Sex
#103 - How to Be a Spartan Warrior & Defeat Porn

Love, Life, Legacy: A Show About Sex

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 17:04


“If you focus on who you want to be, everything else in your life falls into place.” -Benjy Uyama Marriage is a life-long commitment that marks the beginning of building a family and committing to your partner. It leads us to a far greater purpose in life, as our responsibilities change, and we consider not just our own decisions but also our partners in everything we do.  The Spartan Warriors are a group of men, some of whom are battling porn addiction, who have decided to start a new life of sexual integrity. They are a group of men who want to become ‘marriageable' and be well-prepared for their future marriages. Because of the North Star goal, there has been a greater level of success in defeating porn addiction by identifying one's purpose, goals, and how a person wants to present themselves in life; the Spartan Program uses the "North Star Goal" approach as a stepping stone towards achieving one's vision and goal.  In this week's episode, Benjy talks about why he created a group called the ‘Spartan' Warriors and how this program can help you become a ‘marriageable' man. He talks about battling porn addiction, what sexual energy is, and how you can use it to create and find your purpose in life. Many people struggle with unwanted porn habits to the point where they no longer have control over their sexual drive or energy. Porn addiction can greatly affect your well-being, career, and even your relationships. So if you're someone struggling with porn addiction, High Noon is a great community that can help you battle porn addiction, overcome these bad habits, and gain back your sexual integrity in life.  Learn more about High Noon's Spartan program when you listen to Episode 103! Shownotes: The Spartan group [0:19] The Spartan group's North Star goal  [1:23] The Spartan program [3:07] How does the Spartan program work [4:10]  The nature of porn addiction [09:52] Why are some people not serious enough about battling porn addiction [10:27] How can your life be at stake because of porn addiction [13:48] Where can you use your sexual energy? [15:46] Click HERE for the show transcript.

Achieve Your Goals with Hal Elrod
410: Making Success Simple in 2022 (Part 4 of 4)

Achieve Your Goals with Hal Elrod

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 48:36


I don't know about you, but I'm much more effective when I keep things simple (and easy to remember). :^) In 2022, I'm using a 3-letter strategy to guide me. These three letters are something I can remember every day and serve as my North Star to handle any challenges I'm faced with and continue making progress toward my most important goals. Like the S.A.V.E.R.S, these three letters are easy to remember, stick to, and implement every single day. Today, I'm excited to start by giving you an overview of what we discussed in Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3 of this series. I then let you in on my 3-letter strategy to achieve success in 2022 and beyond! KEY TAKEAWAYS Why it doesn't make sense to measure your emotional well-being based on what's out of your control. The A-B-C Formula for Making Success Simple in 2022 Why resistance is the source of all emotional pain, how acceptance serves as the antidote, and why this is not the same thing as resignation. The many forms of gratitude–and how to stay grateful, even in the face of adversity. Four simple steps you can take to make daily progress toward your goals–and why none of these goals need to be monumental to make a difference. Get The Full Show Notes To get full access to today's show notes, including audio, transcript, and links to all the resources mentioned, visit HalElrod.com/410 Subscribe, Rate & Review I would love if you could subscribe to the podcast and leave an honest rating & review. This will encourage other people to listen and allow us to grow as a community. The bigger we get as a community, the bigger the impact we can have on the world. To subscribe, rate, and review the podcast on iTunes, visit HalElrod.com/iTunes. Connect with Hal Elrod Facebook Twitter Instagram YouTube

Make Your Life Magnificent with Jackie + Mimi
Winter Solstice: Word of the Year

Make Your Life Magnificent with Jackie + Mimi

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 32:10


If you've been part of our relaunch and our personal journey as a Modern Gen X Woman, you know how much we believe in a North Star, a guide, a flashlight in times of darkness. It's why we created our Manifesto which is getting a ton of incredible feedback and it's because it is empowering and a guide of how to show up in the world.Your Word of the Year can be just that. Mimi and I have become very good about setting intentions every day when we work together, or before interviewing a guest on our podcast. This simple daily practice pinpoints our energy and radiates it towards the outcome we are looking to project.Are you ready to uplevel your career? Apply to work with us here. Are you ready to activate your business? Apply to work with us here. In this episode we riff on…. Our 2021 words of the year and how it showed up for us and what we chose for our 2022 words of the year and why. How to choose YOUR word of the year.Are you a Modern Gen X Woman? Get the Manifesto! Subscribe: Apple Podcasts / Spotify / Google Podcast / Stitcher“Sound effects obtained from https://www.zapsplat.com“

Alliance Aces
136. How Partnerships Help Hyperscalers Succeed

Alliance Aces

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 34:32


Every partnership demands a unique approach because every partnership is different… And if you want an alliance to succeed, you need to understand what makes your partnership unique. But you can't do that unless you know what you're trying to achieve in the first place. That's how Parul Chheda, Vice President Strategic Alliances at CoreStack, approaches alliances with hyperscalers — a unique kind of partner with unique needs. Join us as we discuss: Why hyperscalers are an ideal partner for CoreStack and their customers The unique demands that come with working with hyperscalers The smart way to approach automation Here are some additional episodes featuring other ecosystem leaders that might interest you: #121 Aligning Ecosystem Strategy with Your Customer as the North Star with Lara Caimi, Chief Partner Officer, ServiceNow  #122 There's No Easy Button For Partnering with Nicole Napiltonia, VP Of Alliances and OEM Sales, at Barracuda  #106 The Secrets to Managing Alliances Like Microsoft with David Totten, Chief Technology Officer, US Partner Ecosystem at Microsoft  #97 Why Quality Always Beats Quantity in Software Ecosystems with Tom Roberts, Senior Vice President at the Global Partner Organization over at SAP  Links & Resources Learn more about how WorkSpan helps customers accelerate their ecosystem flywheel through Co-selling, Co-innovating, Co-investing, and Co-marketing.  Subscribe to the Ecosystem Aces Podcast on Apple Podcast, Spotify, Stitcher, Google Podcast.  Join the WorkSpan Community to engage with other partner ecosystem leaders on best practices, news, events, jobs, and other tips to advance your career in partnering. Find insightful articles on how to lead and get the most out of your partner ecosystem on the WorkSpan blog.  Download the Best Practices Guide for Ecosystem Business Management  Download the Ultimate Guide for Partner Incentives and Market Development Funds   To contact the host, Chip Rodgers, with topic ideas, suggest a guest, or join the conversation about modern partnering, he can be reached on Twitter, LinkedIn, or send Chip an email at: chip@workspan.com   This episode of Ecosystem Aces is sponsored by WorkSpan.   WorkSpan is the #1 ecosystem business management platform. We give CROs a digital platform to turbocharge indirect revenue with their partner teams at higher win rates and lower costs. We connect your partners on a live network with cross-company business applications to build, market, and sell together. We power the top 10 business ecosystems in the technology and communications industry today, managing over $50 billion in the joint pipeline. 

The Distillery Nation Podcast
DNP 092: Year In Review

The Distillery Nation Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 38:55


A very special podcast to wrap up the end of the year. This time I decided to go back, listen and re-listen to all the great interviews that happened in the last year and pick some of my favorite pieces and add commentary on why that piece was important and how in most cases it helped with the direction for my business. From comparisons, and finding what you love to do, to distribution and DTC to making quality as your North Star, sourcing and transparency to investor money to some technical barrel aspects like size and entry proof to the hot RTD category and the tier you might never have heard to one of the most important things, taking care of yourself.

Linch With A Leader
Episode 124: Living Leadership with Dr. Mark Rutland

Linch With A Leader

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 55:00


In episode 124 of Linch with a Leader, Mike sits down with Pastor, Author, Educator and "Leader of Leaders" Dr. Mark Rutland.  Mike & Dr. Rutland look back at his incredible journey and how God is still using him in big ways in leading leaders.  Dr. Rutland is the picture of "Living Leadership" for leaders at all levels! Dr. Mark Rutland is the Founder and Executive Director of the National Institute of Christian Leadership. He is a New York Times Best Selling author, educator, charismatic leader, businessman and a nationally recognized figure in Christian higher education. He served as the President of two prominent Christian universities from 1999 to 2013. Additionally, Dr. Rutland has served as Senior Pastor of Calvary Assembly of God in Orlando, Florida; and as an Associate Pastor at Mount Paran Church of God in Atlanta, Georgia. He is also the Founder of Global Servants, a ministry in Ghana and Thailand. In 1988, Global Servants opened House of Grace. Located in Northern Thailand, House of Grace is a home for tribal girls at risk of being sold into sexual slavery. Dr. Rutland is the author of more than sixteen books including a New York Times Bestseller, ReLaunch. His other books include: Launch Out into the Deep, The Finger of God, Hanging by a Thread, Behind the Glittering Mask, Streams of Mercy, God of the Valleys, Nevertheless, Dream, Character Matters, Power, Holiness, Resurrection, Most Likely to Succeed, and David the Great. Dr. Rutland and his wife, Alison, have one son, two daughters, four grandsons, and two granddaughters. This episode is so full of great wisdom & leadership from Dr. Rutland!  Hope you enjoy!

Mastering Midlife Podcast
Curiosity: A Gardener's Secret to a Vibrant Life with Fran Sorin

Mastering Midlife Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 38:33


My friend, Fran Sorin, is a coach, best-selling author, gardening and health evangelist, futurist, and an advocate of open-heartedness, joy, and deep connection. Her mission is to help people design a life they're meant to live–one that's aimed at joy, wellbeing, and freedom. In her highly-regarded book, Digging Deep: Unearthing Your Creative Roots through Gardening, Fran teaches the art of living creatively and encourages us to discover the magic taking place every day. Fran joins us today to share her wisdom on maturing and aging gracefully. She describes her transition from motherhood to empty-nester and how becoming an interfaith minister allowed her to own her spiritual identity. She offers advice for people who want to start gardening but are afraid that they might kill plants. She also underscores the role of curiosity in living a vibrant life and highlights the importance of focusing on people who suffer. “Curiosity leads me to where I need to go; it is my North Star.” - Fran Sorin Today on Mastering Midlife: Fran's experience joining an interfaith seminary and discovering what it means to be a spirit in a body The importance of living life with an open heart How accepting vulnerability makes us braver The relationship between physical, emotional, and mental health Why you need to become the CEO of your own health Gardening as a way of making meaning out of life Fran's morning routines and the power of meditation How curiosity keeps our lives vibrant Confronting the fear of failure through gardening and what gardening has done for Fran's life What makes great gardeners and what plants can teach us about patience Connect with Fran Sorin: Fran Sorin Website Fran Sorin on LinkedIn Fran Sorin on Facebook Fran Sorin on Twitter Book: Digging Deep: Unearthing Your Creative Roots through Gardening Mastering Midlife...Together! Thanks for tuning into today's episode of the Mastering Midlife Podcast: How to Thrive When the World Asks the Most of You with Mark Silverman. If you enjoyed this episode, subscribe to the show on Apple Podcasts and leave us a review. Be sure to visit our website and connect with us on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and YouTube and don't forget to share your favorite episodes on social media.

Raw As S**t
Ep: 165 - 24 Things I‘m Thankful For | The RAS Project with Ivan Temelkov

Raw As S**t

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 37:06


What are you thankful for this year? Every day? Gratitude is attitude! Unfortunately the special guest I was looking forward to having today as mentioned previously could not make it due to a family situation where a loved one came down with COVID.  So, I decided to do something special nonetheless as promised. In this episode I share the 24 things I'm thankful for daily and in 2021. Sharing these is intended to show you that living a life with gratitude is so rewarding on every level. Personal and professional.  Tune in to hear about the 24 things that I'm grateful for daily and in 2021 and to learn how you can channel gratitude to be an asset, a North Star in your life and business. Make sure to take notes. This is an extra lengthy episode.   

The Love Fix
Getting Off Codependency Autopilot and Becoming Conscious: Cheryl Fidelman

The Love Fix

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 39:19


At the top of the episode, Sherry and Carla talk about what “breadcrumbing” is in dating, and what to do if you think someone is just offering you crumbs. Then, they take a Love Fix Question on how long it takes to unlearn codependent habits and welcome Conscious Codependence Coach Cheryl Fidelman to the show. Cheryl talks about her mission to eradicate trauma from the human condition, one nervous system at a time. Cheryl developed her attunement practice called Feeling Without Thinking to help her clients heal from trauma and become the person they were inherently born to be. She talks about the three tenets of co-dependence, how to give yourself compassion if you have been or currently are co-dependent, and why self-love is the North Star for true independence and healing.   What You'll Hear In This Episode: A Love Fix Question: how long does it take to get over being codependent? Cheryl started focusing on codependence 6 years into her work, as she saw it was an epidemic that plagued so many of her clients.  What are the signs of conscious codependency? What are the three tenets of co-dependence? The importance of having compassion for yourself if you did end up in a relationship with a narcissist or if you are codependent. Dating is a great way to practice our skills, but should we wait to heal ourselves before diving in? Find out more about Cheryl's Conscious Codependent Listening Program, along with ways to work with Sherry and Carla on overcoming codependency, dating, a break-up, healing from toxic relationships, and gaining confidence. How do our romantic relationships mimic the environment we grew up in as children? How is codependency rooted in unhealed trauma? Recovery doesn't mean you never have any codependent actions, but that you are conscious of what you are doing, and are mindful about your patterns and actions.   Tweetables: “All of our unhealed trauma can be found in the filters through which we listen.” - Cheryl “Codependency is an epidemic. In almost every one of my clients, I could see big, red blinking lights of codependence.” - Cheryl “I think it's very empowering as a codependent to not victimize yourself. Because then you recognize you have choices.”  - Carla “Codependency goes beyond being with an addict or alcoholic. It could also be someone who's attracted to a narcissist or could be people-pleasing and needing validation.” - Sherry “I focus through the lens of trauma healing because I look at codependence as one of the most obvious ways that we demonstrate our unhealed trauma in relationships.” - Cheryl “Codependency is incubated in some kind of wound that you had. It starts with that inner child wound and you're reacting to triggers related to those wounds. Whether it was that your parents neglected you, you were invisible, you were abused or you were abandoned.” - Sherry   Connect with Us! The Love Fix | @thelovefixpodcast Become a Member - Codependency Special - Wake Up Recovery  - $1 trial membership Join the Narcissistic Abuse and Codependent Relationship Transformation Challenge FB group  The Love Fix Relationship Quiz   Sign up for a Connection call with Sherry https://sherrygaba.com/coaching/life-coaching/    Holiday Special: Sign up for Sherry's Inner Circle for 1/2 off and get 6 months FREE!   Find Out More:    Sherry Website | Instagram | Facebook | Love Smacked | Wake Up Recovery for Codependents and Toxic Relationships | Sherry Gaba's Coaching Packages   Carla Website | Instagram | Facebook | Contagious Love | Online Dating Bootcamp   Cheryl Fidelman Website | Instagram   Today's episode is sponsored by Carla's book Contagious Love: Break Free from Codependency for Damn Good and Sherry's book Love Smacked: How To Stop the Cycle of Relationship Addiction and Codependency To Find Everlasting Love.  Thanks to Contagious Love and Love Smacked for sponsoring this episode.  

Radio 1 Breakfast Best Bits with Greg James
North Star Caller Returns

Radio 1 Breakfast Best Bits with Greg James

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 26:35


Actual Father Christmas calls a very special young listener, Gregg Wallace is back making Christmas cards (much to Greg's delight) and Beth reviews another festive Ali Plumb recommendation.

The Boss Mom Podcast - Business Strategy - Work / Life Balance - -Digital Marketing - Content Strategy
Your 2022 Word Of The Year: How to Pick Something That Resonates With and Guides You Over The Next 12 Months

The Boss Mom Podcast - Business Strategy - Work / Life Balance - -Digital Marketing - Content Strategy

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 31:29


As we near the start of a new year, many of us have begun thinking about what we want to achieve over the next 12 months, and for some, picking a ‘word of the year' is their first port of call.    When we can narrow down everything we want to accomplish into just one word, that can become our guiding light throughout the year; our North Star that promises to not only keep us on track with our goals, but can also play a role in decision-making over the coming months.    The only problem is, picking just one word to encapsulate everything we want to achieve can be overwhelming in itself. Is it even possible to narrow our dreams down to such a degree? More importantly, is it really necessary?   In this episode, Matt Johnson returns to the show to share how he's gotten better at defining his word of the year, and how it's impacted his business.    Things You'll Learn in This Episode   How to stay focused when we're multi-passionate Narrowing down our dreams to just one word is a great way to stay focused, but what happens when our dreams are all over the place? Is it even possible to be successful if we're multi-passionate?    1 thing to consider when picking a word of the year Is there a way we can ensure our word of the year continues to hold value for us over the full 12-month period?    How to pick our words of the year Is there a fool-proof formula to picking a word of the year that genuinely resonates with us?

The POZCAST: Career & Life Journeys with Adam Posner
Brett Berish: A Self-Made Career Building Spirit Brands

The POZCAST: Career & Life Journeys with Adam Posner

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 38:16


0:01 - Prized Possession2:11 - Getting into Investment Banking3:07 - Entrepreneurial Spirit4:02 - Entry in the Spirit Industry4:50 - Best Bagel in the country6:05 - Taste test Wine or Alcohol6:26 - Early Life Lessons7:40 - Competition for shelf space10:02 - The Downhill11:37 - Safety Net / Room to fail13:30 - Alignment with Influencers15:04 - The Secret Sauce16:35 - Jay Z Brand Endorsement (First Impression)18:33 - The People Connection19:28 - Instant Gratification20:44 - Self Made Symbol22:39 - Creating a Canvas23:47 - Relationship with Nipsey25:18 - Grind and Hustle26:50 - Eat what you kill27:09 - What is Authenticity29:11 - Greatest piece of advice30:02 - Bret's North Star

Purple Patch Podcast
199 Performance Lessons from 2021

Purple Patch Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 39:31


As we round out the year, Matt takes time to reflect on the biggest performance lessons we've learned in 2021 that you'll be able to carry into your 2022 season planning. It's also a chance to share how Purple Patch will continue to apply these lessons to expand and enhance our programming and global community. Matt's Biggest Performance Lessons include: Athletes benefit greatly from mixing it up Accountability and Community are vital Human connection and real coaching interaction amplify your performance Embrace the journey Know your North Star - your "why" Do the right thing 2021 can certainly be labeled a year of emergence as we started on a quest to return to normal as best as we possibly could. While we're certainly not out of the woods, we hope you'll be able to use these lessons and apply them to your own performance journey in work, sport, and life. 0:00-02:30 Welcome, Episode Introduction, and a word from our sponsor, Inside Tracker - use code PURPLEPATCHPRO25 for 25% in the InsideTracker Store. 02:30-06:50 Squaddie Update - Run and Bike Squad Launch in January 2022 06:50-10:30 Word of the Week - Daddy Long Legs 10:30 Performance Lessons in 2021   Episode Resources This episode is sponsored by our collaboration with INSIDE TRACKER. Inside Tracker and Purple Patch - Receive 25% off their services with code: PURPLEPATCHPRO25 Bike and Run Squad Launching in January 2022. Email info@purplepatchfitness.com for information, or hop on the preview lists below. Bike Squad Interest List Run Squad Interest List Purple Patch Swim Analysis Learn more about Purple Patch Fully Customized 1:1 Coaching Learn more about Purple Patch Squad High-Performance Training Program Learn more about Purple Patch Strength Programming Stay Up-to-Date with Purple Patch News and Events Purple Patch Upcoming Webinars and Events

The POZCAST: Career & Life Journeys with Adam Posner
Sean Harper: Humanizing the Insurance Industry

The POZCAST: Career & Life Journeys with Adam Posner

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2021 47:02


1:40 - First itch2:40 - What programming taught about Business4:00 - Focus on the End Game6:06 - The Assessment6:48 - Good Ol' days7:59 - Transition process9:50 - Find the answer10:32 - Being inquisitive11:36 - Key golden takeaway14:02 - TSS Radio15:34 - Opportunity arises16:50 - The Exit Strategy18:15 - Passion for Bees20:18 - HomeOwners Insurance23:28 - Knowledge about Insurance Industry25:00 - The Hypothesis27:07 - Regulations around the insurance company28:30 - The Painful road - Solution29:55 - The cool things31:56 - Proactive Insurance32:13 - The Mindset Shift32:47 - Future for Kin.34:10 - Go-to Interview Questions36:04 - No is better than a 'No' Response36:34 - Meeting with Matt Higgins38:30 - SPAC40:49  - Greatest piece of advice41:56 - Sean's Super Power43:21 - How to Keep Cool44:10 - Sean's North Star

The POZCAST: Career & Life Journeys with Adam Posner
Kathleen Griffith: Architecting the Life of Your Dreams

The POZCAST: Career & Life Journeys with Adam Posner

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 50:13


1:32 - Impetus behind working as an Entrepreneur4:30 - The Black Sheep5:15 - Early Life Lessons6:55 - Jumping around too much8:57 - Disadvantage of working remote / Lack of first-hand learning10:07 - Leaving the Corporate World11:32 - Pragmatic Strategic Approach14:30 - Working Parents17:15 - Lessons taught by Grandmother19:20 - Year 1 Big Mistakes21:36 - Dealing with the first client25:26 - How to take in Accountability27:15 - Close to the Vision29:24 - Eat what you kill32:09 - Pattern Recognition34:06 - Pushing yourself out of your comfort zone37:32 - Empower Female Customers39:39 - One Tribal World42:10 - Greatest piece of advice43:55 - Kathleen's Super Power45:42 - Kathleen's North Star  

The MMQB NFL Podcast
We Will Rewrite the Rules of Football!

The MMQB NFL Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 36:55


More specifically, Jenny, Conor and Gary each write—or change, or eliminate—one rule in the NFL that will make the sport we love into a sport we love more. We saw it done in light of the Kenny Pickett “fake slide” move in the ACC title game—the rule banning it was in place less than a week later. So it's time to get out in front of a few other things. Conor delves into the evils of the onside kick, and looks to the Alliance of American Football to improve upon it. Gary asks that you expand your mind, and reconsider how we administer penalties in light of down and distance—does the first-down marker really have to stay fixed in place like the North Star? And finally, Jenny wants more points for some kicks, but fewer points for others, and it doesn't matter if it creates a nightmare scenario for indecisive coaches. Do you have a good rule-change suggestion? Even better, do you have a bad one? Email themmqb@gmail.com or tweet at @GGramling_SI, @JennyVrentas or @ConorOrr Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Sway
Buy an Earth Suit, Shoot Sulfur into the Atmosphere (And Other Contingency Plans for a Warming Earth)

Sway

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 36:05


We are quickly approaching the dystopian future that Neal Stephenson outlined in his 1992 best seller “Snow Crash.” That book anticipated and coined the term “metaverse,” a concept that almost 30 years later has become a reality for many gamers, and the North Star for a certain Mark Zuckerberg. In his latest book, “Termination Shock,” Stephenson sounds his next alarm bell — this time on climate change.In this conversation, Kara discusses the perverse relationship between personal wealth and climate survival. They chat about sulfur guns, earth suits and the need to ramp up the space race for human survival. And they lament that politics and sluggish government action to rein in climate change may mean human survival will be left to the benevolence of future “carbon capture trillionaires.”You can find more information for all episodes at nytimes.com/sway, and you can find Kara on Twitter @karaswisher.

The Breakdown with Shaun King
Word.Life: A brand new podcast from Donney Rose (Writer/Chief Content Editor at The North Star)

The Breakdown with Shaun King

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 2:20


I have to be out this week, so the staff is going to play episodes from throughout the podcast network we have developed here at The North Star. Today, here's the preview episode of our newest podcast Word.Life hosted by our Chief Content editor, Donney Rose! [From The North Star] Nina Simone once said that it is “an artist's duty is to reflect the times,” when interviewed about her seminal classic Mississippi Goddamn. It is in that spirit of critical reflection that The North Star introduces Word.Life., a new podcast seeking to unpack the intersections of literary art, music, politics and the revolutions that are often amplified in the creative realm. Hosted by The North Star's Chief Content Editor and poet, Donney Rose, Word.Life. is an exploration into the lyrics, verses, messaging and context of the songs and poems and prose and scripts where the art is the heartbeat, bassline and bottom line for radical change. From the timeless classics of yesteryear to the urgent work of modern-day griots, Word.Life. will dissect the work that lights the fire and calls the people to the frontlines. Word.Life. is a weekly podcast that is released every Thursday on all streaming platforms, including Spotify, Stitcher, Apple Podcasts, & Google Play and streaming on Twitch & YouTube. www.TheNorthStar.com

The Breakdown with Shaun King
Ep. 546 - The Wealth Gap of the Middle Class

The Breakdown with Shaun King

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 58:06


I have to be out this week, so the staff is going to replay some of their favorite episodes from throughout the podcast network we have developed here at The North Star. Here's an episode from The Momentum Advisors from the end of summer that breaks down the wealth gap of the middle class. A very important topic of our times.  [From The Momentum Advisors] Keeping liquid savings on hand in case of an emergency is one area where Americans of all income brackets are falling short--especially the "middle class." But what is this middle class? Is it defined by a salary range, household income or aspirational possessions? And is being in the "middle class" all it's chalked up to be? On this episode we answer all these questions while addressing the wealth gap of the middle class and how to thrive in it.

The Breakdown with Shaun King
Ep. 545 - Year-End Adult-ing Checklist

The Breakdown with Shaun King

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 54:47


I have to be out this week, so the staff is going to replay some of their favorite episodes from throughout the podcast network we have developed here at The North Star. Today, is a recent episode from The Momentum Advisors that we feel is right on time. Enjoy.  [From The Momentum Advisors] The end of the year always seems to sneak up on us. After Thanksgiving, the buzz of the holiday season keeps us busy through the New Year and all of our financial, health and tax planning become distant thoughts until 2022. Not this year! On this episode, we make your year-end adult-ing planning a priority; because when the year ends there's no going back.