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The Doors of Perception by Aldous Huxley | Book Summary and Review | Free Audiobook

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 19:31


Free Audiobook: https://geni.us/doors-free-audiobook (https://geni.us/doors-free-audiobook) Disclaimer: The information provided here is for entertainment purposes only. It is not a replacement for professional medical advice. Always consult your doctor and check your local laws before taking any drugs. StoryShots Summary and Analysis of The Doors of Perception by Aldous HuxleyAbout Aldous HuxleyAldous Huxley was a post-war intellectual elite born in 1894. He studied English literature at Oxford University. He wrote almost 50 books and was nominated for nine Nobel Prizes in Literature. Huxley's first novel was Crome Yellow (1921), an exposition of the futility of the lifestyle of many privileged intellectuals in the 1920s. He later wrote Antic Hay (1923), which satirizes modern society's preoccupation with sex, business, and consumerism. Huxley was a respected philosopher. Intrigued by how we perceive things, he famously wrote Brave New World, a dystopian vision of society, in 1932. Brave New World is about using mind-altering drugs. The characters take a drug called Soma, which allows them to break from reality. Huxley was a pacifist. His interest in philosophical mysticism and universalism led him to produce The Perennial Philosophy, which illustrates the similarities between Western and Eastern mysticism, and The Doors of Perception, which explores his psychedelic experience with mescaline. IntroductionPublished in 1954, The Doors of Perception is about Aldous Huxley's first psychedelic experience. The book is an account of his trip on Mescaline, the insights he experienced, and the esthetic beauty he saw. Huxley's psychedelic experience helped him develop psychological and philosophical ideas around perception. He believed we live in a narrow field of perception. We need to open our minds to a broader perceptual experience to improve our lives. Because of his experience, Huxley recommended Mescaline to others. Similar to Brave New World, The Doors of Perception also describes how we can break away from normal perception and uniquely experience the world. Back in the 1930s, Huxley called Mescaline a poison worse than Soma. So it's interesting to see how his perception of the drug changed within the 22 years of writing the two books. “We live together, we act on, and react to, one another; but always and in all circumstances we are by ourselves. The martyrs go hand in hand into the arena; they are crucified alone. Embraced, the lovers desperately try to fuse their insulated ecstasies into a single self-transcendence; in vain. By its very nature every embodied spirit is doomed to suffer and enjoy in solitude. Sensations, feelings, insights, fancies—all these are private and, except through symbols and at second hand, incommunicable. We can pool information about experiences, but never the experiences themselves. From family to nation, every human group is a society of island universes.” — ALDOUS HUXLEY

Break It Down Show
Janeshia Adams-Ginyard - Emmy Nominated Stuntwoman and Actor

Break It Down Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 56:49


Janeshia Adams-Ginyard - Emmy Nominated Stuntwoman and Actor - Janeshia Adams-Ginyard is an award winning stunt woman, actress, wrestler, writer, and motivational speaker. Born on Valentine's Day and raised in Southern California, Janeshia graduated from Gahr High School in Cerritos and completed her Bachelor of Arts degree in Linguistics from the University of California, Berkeley. Check out Janeshia's sizzle reel at She has had major roles on commercial, television, and film projects, executing two separate roles in the Marvel Studios feature film Black Panther. She was also Nomble, one of the eight main Dora Milaje…And what are Dora Milaje? Guess you'll have to find out in today's BIDS ep! Please support the Break It Down Show by doing a monthly subscription to the show  All of the money you invest goes directly to supporting the show!   For the  of this episode head to  Haiku No action movies If there weren't stunt-women Thank you, Janeshia!   ​Similar episodes: Dee C Lee  Anna Simons  Mike Guardia  Join us in supporting Save the Brave as we battle PTSD.  Executive Producer/Host: Pete A Turner  Producer: Damjan Gjorgjiev  Writer: Dragan Petrovski  The Break It Down Show is your favorite best, new podcast, featuring 5 episodes a week with great interviews highlighting world-class guests from a wide array of shows.

Breaking Brave with Marilyn Barefoot
JOHN CULLEN on founding "IT'S JUST PARKINSON'S", battling Parkinson's Disease as an Avid Athlete & Powerlifter, his new DOCUMENTARY, motivating others fighting similar battles, and so much more!

Breaking Brave with Marilyn Barefoot

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 46:24


This episode of Breaking Brave is brought to you by: SOULSNACKS! Soul snacks are single ingredient, eco conscious dog and cat treats! Sourced directly from farms in Ontario and wrapped in fully compostable packaging. Treating your pets never felt so good. Head to https://soulsnacks.ca/ and use coupon code BREAKINGBRAVE for 15% off your purchase!!! ​ & CRANK COFFEE the newest member of the Neal Brothers family. Crank Coffee is a new Canadian whole bean coffee brand that is certified organic and fair trade. Founded by the Neal Brothers Peter and Chris. This brand was influenced by cycling, coffee lovers, and experts! Check it out at the Neal brothers online shop here: https://shop.nealbrothersfoods.com/collections/crank%C2%AE-coffee-co and USE COUPON CODE BRAVE for 20% OFF Your first Crank Coffee purchase! -- In 2015 John Cullen was diagnosed with Parkinson's disease. An avid athlete his whole life, John has participated in over 100 running and cycling races, and over a dozen obstacle races all over the country and even in Europe. After his Parkinson's diagnosis, physical exercise became crucial. But this wasn't going to stop John. He knew he would need to prepare himself for the unknown battle that he was about to face. In 2019 John started powerlifting. To his surprise he discovered that lifting heavy weights stressed his central nervous system, which helped set back some of his Parkinson's symptoms. Although not a cure for Parkinson's, John finds that frequent powerlifting exercises allow him to control some of the symptoms associated with the disease. John's love for the sport as well as for people sparked his inner passion to want to bring light to his situation in order to motivate others fighting the same battle. What started off simply as John's mindset and motto that he lives by “Its Just Parkinson's” has spiralled out of control and developed into a powerful movement and organization called IJP or IT'S JUST PARKINSON'S. Through this platform John continues to connect and help people battling Parkinsons Disease both within his community and even across the country and the globe like in Europe and the Middle East. John hopes to continue to touch as many people as possible through his new Documentary Movie titled “IT'S JUST PARKINSON'S” that will soon be available to the public. John is determined to help shine light on what a lot of people still don't know about Parkinsons Disease, and feels that anyone dealing with a disease of their own or hardship in their life, can develop an IJP mindset that can help them through their journey in life. FOR MORE FROM JOHN CULLEN, Please connect via: His website: www.itsjustparkinsons.com And Instagram @itsjustparkinsons -- As always, thanks so much for tuning into Breaking Brave! If you like the show, please subscribe, review, and/or send us your suggestions or questions via the platforms below! For more from Marilyn Barefoot or to get in touch with her directly, please connect via: Marilyn's website: https://marilynbarefoot.com/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/marilynbarefootbigideas/ Twitter: @MarilynBarefoot Instagram: @marilynbarefoot ABOUT Marilyn Barefoot, the Host of Breaking Brave: Breaking Brave is Hosted by Marilyn Barefoot, one of the foremost business coaches & creative ideators in North America - Marilyn gets hired by several of the world's biggest brands, companies, and organizations (the NHL, McDonald's, Deloitte, Coca-Cola, MTV, Viacom, The CFL, Forbes Magazine; to name just a few) to help them get unstuck and generate big, creative ideas. It helps us so much to have your feedback which goes a really long way in helping us shape the future of Breaking Brave and host the guests you're most interested in hearing from! So if you have the time, please subscribe, review, and connect with Marilyn on social media or through her website! And as always, thanks so much for tuning in!

Indianz.Com
Business Meeting to consider S.3381, S.3773 & S.3789

Indianz.Com

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 5:23


Senate Committee on Indian Affairs Business Meeting to consider S. 3381, S. 3773 & S. 3789 Wednesday, May 18 2022 – 03:00 PM Location: Dirksen Room Number: 628 AGENDA • S.3381, the Tribal Trust Land Homeownership Act. The bipartisan bill accelerates the review and processing of mortgages by the Bureau of Indian Affairs. A hearing took place on February 16. • S.3773, a bill to authorize leases of up to 99 years for land held in trust for the Confederated Tribes of the Chehalis Reservation in the state of Washington. Similar bills have been enacted for other Indian nations. A hearing took place on March 23. • S.3789, a bill to amend the Native American Tourism and Improving Visitor Experience Act, also known as the NATIVE Act. The NATIVE Act requires federal agencies to update their existing management plans and tourism strategies to include American Indians, Alaska Natives and Native Hawaiians. A hearing took place on March 23. Committee Notice: https://www.indian.senate.gov/hearing/business-meeting-consider-s-3381-s-3773-s-3789-and-roundtable-discussion-public-safety

Victory Condition Gaming
CY_BORG RPG Actual Play ”Reaper Repo” - Victory Condition Gaming

Victory Condition Gaming

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 131:44


CY_BORG RPG Actual Play "Reaper Repo" - Victory Condition Gaming CY_BORG is a cyberpunk spinoff game based on and compatible with multi-award-winning apocalyptic heavy metal RPG MÖRK BORG. This is to noise, industrial and underground hiphop what MÖRK BORG is to doom and black metal. Rules-light, rage-heavy. A fever-dream of tech, punk and fury. Of fighting a failed future. A deck-hacking, brick-throwing upheaval of a game. A game about climate collapse, out-of-control consumerism, the commodification of personal data, late-stage capitalism, transhumanism and senseless violence. 160 pages of cybernetic upheaval. CY_BORG RPG is a messed-up mirror image of MÖRK BORG RPG. Similar in tone and approach to game and book design but enhanced and augmented. Includes an introductory scenario and ≈60 random tables for your every cyberpunk need.   You can stay up to date with VCG at: http://patreon.com/victoryconditiongaming http://youtube.com/victoryconditiongaming1 http://facebook.com/victoryconditiongaming http://twitch.tv/victoryconditiongaming http://twitter.com/DougVCGaming http://instagram.com/victoryconditiongaming http://victoryconditiongaming.com

Break It Down Show
John Green - The Counselor of Afghanistan

Break It Down Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 59:58


John Green - The Counselor of Afghanistan - John Green returns to the Break It Down Show to talk about his experiences in Afghanistan. Pete A Turner and John go back about 15 years...they've both found incredible things throughout their time. Most importantly, John's experience is rooted in the Ground Truth...his tales will reveal why the US lost in both Afghanistan and Iraq.  John has worked for bosses of all ranks and services.  Be sure to check out the other 2 episodes that John has joined us for. You'll find them in the Similar episodes section below. One more thing...you won't find this level of knowledge on other media outlets.  To truly understand why the US is bad at combat...and can't win. Keep listening to the Break It Down Show. Please support the Break It Down Show by doing a monthly subscription to the show  All of the money you invest goes directly to supporting the show!   For the  of this episode head to  Haiku Back with our guy John Serving Ground Truth to you all Hit play on that thang   ​Similar episodes: John Green John Green Anna Simons  Join us in supporting Save the Brave as we battle PTSD.  Executive Producer/Host: Pete A Turner  Producer: Damjan Gjorgjiev  Writer: Dragan Petrovski  The Break It Down Show is your favorite best, new podcast, featuring 5 episodes a week with great interviews highlighting world-class guests from a wide array of shows.

Foundry UMC
Resilience for Times When You're Not In Control - March 15, 2022

Foundry UMC

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 26:07


Resilience for Times When You're Not In Control A sermon for Foundry UMC, - Rev. Ben Roberts Acts 11:1-18 – 5/15/2022 There are numerous aside from the point takeaways for this passage. For instance, God wants you to take naps and eat snacks. It's okay to eat bacon. Wonderful and good as they are just not the point. This 5th Sunday of the Easter season the author of Luke Acts continues to tell a story of an expanding early church community. In this passage what we are being treated to is a recounting of the conversion of Cornelius and his household. Peter's version here given as he says “point by point” is offered to the believers at the church in Jerusalem. Any story of a conversion or out pouring of the Holy Spirit in someone's life should be an immediate cause for celebration. But this isn't a celebration, it's more of an interrogation. There is a distinction noted about the communities involved. In this case the distinction is noted in the passage as circumcised or uncircumcised believers. That is, those following laws and rituals including dietary restrictions physical observance and those who do not. The Israelites and the gentiles within an expanding Christ follower community. But the interrogation doesn't feel necessary if it was just a matter of did you or did you not do the ritual? Instead, the questions are rooted in long standing traditions involving the identity of those to whom God comes. Peter's actions in dining with and staying with this gentile household is a real cause of concern for believers' whose identity, assurance, and to some extent control is tied up in the observances of purity practice. In seeking to be generous, I'm not sure it can be overstated the significance of Peter transgressing norms in this story and perhaps that's part of why a story of a single household takes up almost a chapter and a half of Acts. Karl Kuhn, a Professor of Religion at Lakeland College puts it this way in a commentary for this week; “such purity norms reinforced for Israelites their identity as a people set apart to serve God, to honor God's Torah, and to receive God's deliverance. Purity codes for many Israelites…emerged from and reinforced Israelite understandings of how creation, humanity, and daily life were to be ordered, or “mapped out.” They reflected essential elements of their worldview that defined their role and place as the people of God.”[1] Once more those norms were predictable, outlined, taught from birth, they were somewhat manageable and Peter himself adhered to them. Peter reports how he argues with a voice in his vision telling him “kill and eat.” In verse 8 he recounts how three times he pushed back on what he'd been shown and told, “by no means, Lord, for nothing profane or unclean has ever entered my mouth.” Not only this, but in Chapter 10 he also double-checks the people who were sent to fetch him essentially saying, “Y'all know there's rules about me coming to your house, right?” But all the same, Peter knows he's not the one in control of the situation and has been sent out to bring the good news. Comforted or spurred along on some level by an answer from heaven saying, go without hesitation, “make no distinction between them and us,” “What God has made clean, you must not call profane.” But still, and not without good reason the believers in Jerusalem encountered I imagine all manner of unsettling feelings when they first received the story: anger, betrayal, fear, uncertainty. And based on some of the Greek words used in the text, possible reactions include meddlesomeness or seeking an altercation. I'm not sure I blame them either because frankly from their view things were out of control and possibly perilous for their own wellbeing. It's almost a little too simple this story. Sort of the biblical version of 1/2 hour sitcom. Main characters are introduced conflict emerges quick solution is found and everything is wrapped up in 1 1/2 chapters. It sounds rather nice as a way to get past the entrenchment of us versus them thinking. With no shortage of factional conflict all around us these days, I'd very much appreciate a quick solution and movement toward celebration and reconciliation. Sadly, it seems the propensity to leverage religious practice against one another as justification for conflict or controlling others has not abated much at any point in history. Even now we are being told that a justification for Russia's fratricidal invasion in Ukraine is for the protection of “ethnic Russians,” but also for the defense and preservation of a religious orthodoxy which ascribes no tolerance or acceptance of LGBTQIA+ persons in society (specifically noted parades) neverminded being welcomed in the church. Of course, there are other false justifications and there are many more layers to the conflict, but it is nonetheless the leveraging of us vs. them thinking to enact violence against those who are otherwise just your neighbors. Similar ideas related to purity and orthodoxy have brought our own denomination to this point of division where rather than invite the stories of the work of the Spirit in people's lives, we've drawn our lines and actively sort ourselves into camps. Some of the simplistic religious justifications have been framed as differences related to biblical interpretation, but there is of course at play issues of power, of finance, and of control. I have been very aware of my own lack of a generous spirit on this whole matter of late. Based on repeated histories I'm sure we too are not immune from being pitted further against one another nor immune from some seeking to leveraging these same justifications to enact violence against each other. Indeed, we see it from individuals and groups, but we now draw more lines around larger camps, and it saddens me. As that happens, I invite myself to be aware of my own reactions of us and them thinking and want to guard against being so walled-off, I might miss what Spirit is doing beyond my lines. And we know there's not just one violent conflict happening in the world with religious justifications at the fore. We know that it's not just the UMC experiencing separations along ideological lines. We know our fragile political realities in this country are fraught with seemingly deepening synthetic tribalism and racism drawing and separating the population out into us and them. It's a lot to try and bear and very little of it do we have control over directly. It's unsettling at best and too often dangerous, but there are forces at work in the world that some feel more than comfortable leveraging for their own gain. Whether the root is fear or greed. Or whether it's a matter of feeling one's identity tied to specific rules and practices. Or if someone feels they must separate out or attack because their own relationship or favor with God depends upon it, this approach of us and them lends itself to destroying peace within if not between one another. Now let's be clear, there are things worth fighting for. There are times it's necessary to separate out for safety of vulnerable communities (spiritual, mental, physical safety). The caution in this is not so that we accept harm or injustice in the world. I think there's a call in here to be pliable with the at times necessary lines drawn, so that we don't wall ourselves off so completely or deeply we forget that God exists beyond those walls too. Not only does God exist beyond whatever US we've fallen into, but Spirit does work there as well. And can even do it with them. Step by step, the passage says in verse 4, Peter explains to the believers in Jerusalem what had taken place. It was necessary because they seem to be very twisted up about the situation, they criticized him. What were you doing Peter? You know you're not supposed to do that? Feels like there's an undercurrent of “you've put yourself at risk” or worse “you've put all of us at risk.” We had this thing all figured out and now you're breaking all our rules. Enter Peter's defense; “I know, I tired, multiple times I tried to refute the voice God sent to me in a vision. Told the Lord all about how I don't eat unclean things. Three times in fact. All the same the word came to me, do not call profane what I have called clean.” Peter accredits himself, “I know the rules,” but then must find a way to shake the community out of their us them box because they're about to miss it. This whole interaction is only happening because they already knew what had happened, but we're shown the first reaction isn't celebration, it's trepidation. He pulls them back from the brink not with a harsh return of chastising, but points them to the work of the Spirit at the house. What's been called the “Gentile Pentecost” took place as Spirit was poured out upon Cornelius' house as Spirit had been pour out on others. Making no distinction between us and them. Verse 17, “If then God gave them the same gift [given] to us when we believed in the Lord Jesus Christ, who was I that I could hinder God?” They were silenced, then they praised God. Not bad Peter, pulling the group back from the brink by pointing to the work (or blaming) the Holy Spirit. And it's true, she doesn't really check with anyone, as Pastor Ginger says, Spirit will do what Spirit's going to do. Two things here, first; Peter does not tell the story “step by step.” There are a number of details in chapter 10 that are left out of this recounting. Primarily that this whole thing started by Peter going to pray…getting hungry while attempting to do so…and falling into a nap…I mean a trance… he took a nap. But maybe, I was prying and fell asleep because I was hungry isn't the message the church needed that day. Second, I don't love the English translation in verse 18; “they were silenced.” Little too harsh for the situation and misses something about what happened in the space. Though, there are a number of people or groups I would love to silence with a recounting of the work of the Spirit, I think there's something else in here for us. It's a little more than not speaking or not making noise; the Greek here, hésuchazó (hay-soo-khad'-zo) has additional uses including to cease from altercation, leading a quite life, a mental condition of awe, and even to refrain from, not just speech, but work and meddlesomeness. It's fun, but I think my favorite this round was from the French translation I work with, “[at this word those listening] “retrouvèrent leur calme.” They found their calm. I love that, lost sight of my calm for a minute, Peter and Spirit helped me find it. Part of the calmness likely comes because there is recognition that their identity (including important acts and rituals central to the practice of their faith) and their relationship with God isn't subsumed or at risk because of what happened with the gentiles. Instead, the reminder of the baptism by water and the Spirit. That we're incorporated into a larger family. Rev. Dr. Choi Hee An puts it like this, [the community is a place where believers share “the same whatever we have and they have together. … After we share what we have and what they have, we become them, and they become us. Our individual cultures are not erased, but we and they become one, in the sense of living with one another in mutual respect and support.”[2] The invitation to life goes further, thanks be to God. I know the purpose of the story is to show the expanding early church and the ways the early Christians were figuring out life together. Balancing a melding of traditions or no traditions at all and a joining of diverse groups into one. Try as I might, I do still read into this the similar acts of established groups within churches or congregations who see new people arriving and joining and reacting in less than hospitable ways. It does make me wonder about our denomination and the ways our polity seeks to exclude even those people for whom it is obvious Spirit is active and poured out in their life and ministry. Who are we to hinder God? I've tried to be generous with the group in our story and imagine what it must be like to feel out of control or as if something is being taken away from you because of what someone else has. But I also feel a strong impulse to just say, “can't you perceive what's happening here. The evidence. The active of God, the good work and fruit of the faithful? Get off your privilege and make room on the bench.” They should get some credit though, because at least they question what was happening rather than simply saying over and over, “but they're gentiles!” And trusted relational leadership in Peter helps them along, knowing they're not in control, to discover and not miss the ongoing work of God in the world. It's also unlikely the author of Luke-Acts intended to offer strategies of spiritual and communal resiliency in these verses. Nonetheless, they are present. There's a reminder that the church in Jerusalem is part of something larger. That the baptism by water and the pouring out of the Holy Spirit connects them across all manner of lines. They are connected to a larger purpose. They are a community of mutual support and care. What they have is shared with others and what others have is shared with them. That even when things happen beyond their control (scary, sad, or wonderful) they are incorporated into a community that bears with one another through all those things. In a spiritual sense, Peter reminds them the work of God in the world continues. Spirit doing what Spirit does to draw people into life and the love of Christ. These are all things that help a community and individuals build resiliency in the face of stress and trauma: a sense of purpose, acts of service, spiritual practice, relational connections. Part of resilience for times that are stressful or beyond our control is taking better stock of what is in our control. You will not control Holy Spirit. While we can assume the work of Spirit will be positive, any situation beyond our control can be questioned. We can situate it within a rubric of the fruits of the Spirit. Are these things or my re-actions to them making me more joyful, peaceful, patient, kind, good, faithful, gentle. Or am I practicing self-control within my reaction? There are things in the world that we can control even as the world itself and many events of life and community remain far beyond our grasp. Within our church community we can exercise some of those healthy things to make us more resilient as we bear with one another. There are spaces for service, for learning and expanding skills, for retreat and rest, and places you can both help care for others and get care for yourself. The prayer ministers and the care teams to name a few. You can engage in a larger purpose, to share broadly the love of Christ and extend in the place a radical welcome for whomever Spirit brings through the door. In your relationships that I pray you will continue to build out with one another, you can share the work of the Holy Spirit in your life and in others. I think one of the best things Peter does in this story is to show where Spirit has been at work in wondrous ways helping the community to find their peace and their praise. May we in days that are difficult find the same. https://www.foundryumc.org/archive/resilience-for-times-when

The CC Podcast: The Daily Dose
Luke 2:52 - Jesus's Development as a Man and a Prayer for Our Kids' Similar Development - Matt Reisetter

The CC Podcast: The Daily Dose

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 8:38


Thank you to our 2022 Daily Dose Devotions sponsor, https://www.thefamilyleader.com/ (The Family Leader)! Here are a few other ministries we are proud to highlight and partner with: Christian Crusaders, where you can find weekly 30 minute worship services at https://christiancrusaders.org/ (ChristianCrusaders.org) AND where you can hear engaging interviews and other content on https://christiancrusaders.org/ccpod-conversations (The CC Podcast: Conversations). Cedar Falls Bible Conference, whose conference videos are available at https://cedarfallsbibleconference.com/ (CedarFallsBibleConference.com). And please consider joining us for our 101st annual conference: Saturday, July 30 – Saturday, August 6, 2022. https://p2cdigital.com/ (Power to Change Digital Strategies): If you or someone you know could benefit from an anonymous online Christian mentor, please visit https://issuesiface.com/ (IssuesIFace.com). Please subscribe to or follow this podcast, leave a 5 star review, and prayerfully consider financially supporting one of our partnering ministries. Thank you for listening, and may God richly bless you! Contributors to The Daily Dose include: Tim Boettger - Director of Spiritual Care at Western Home Communities and Associate Radio Preacher for Christian Crusaders Radio & Internet Ministry Pastor Steve Kramer - Radio Preacher for Christian Crusaders Radio & Internet Ministry Andrew Nordstrom - Technical Director of Christian Crusaders Radio & Internet Ministry Matt Reisetter - Director of Christian Crusaders Radio & Internet Ministry and Director of the Cedar Falls Bible Conference Special thanks to, Terri, our podcast announcer!

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Christian Men at Work Podcast
Humility or Boldness at Work-Selah 78-CMAW174

Christian Men at Work Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 8:00


S   Ecclesiastes 3:1 says "To everything there is a season, A time for every purpose under heaven:" I heard my pastor Cam Huxford about 17 years ago at Savannah Christian church now Compassion Church preach a series on the Paradox of the Kingdom of God, of how in so many ways the Kingdom is the opposite of what we would think on our own. For example you must die in order to live and if you give you will receive.  There is much more to this than what I just shared and I probably need to try and find the sermon again and listen, but the reason it has stuck with me is that time and again it rings true for me.  I used to really enjoy the Seinfeld Show and one of my favorite episodes was when George and Jerry came to the conclusion that George's instincts were always wrong and so George began doing the opposite of what he thought he should do. In some way I think that applies to the Christian walk.  Proverbs 14:12 says “There is a way that seems right to a man, But its end is the way of death.” I know that we have the gift of the Holy Spirit but I can only speak for myself that I do not trust my own instincts on many matters and need to seek God and ask him to guide me all the time.  This creates tension but I think it's a good tension. There's another aspect to the Kingdom journey and walk I want to talk about that is similar to that Paradoxical aspect and that is the tension of knowing when to be humble and when to be bold, specifically in the workplace. I believe I shared about 6 months ago that I received some correction at work.  It was hard to take and it was humbling.  Things have gone much better since then.  I've received a lot of positive feedback, both in terms of WHAT I've been doing, meeting work metrics, and HOW I've been doing it, specifically that I had shown kindness to fellow workers. I've heard it said that the Christian walk is a tension between grace and law, between humility and boldness, between strength and weakness, and our response and focus should vary depending on where we are at in our circumstances. When we're at a low point in our circumstances at work, we should focus on God's grace, on His Promises, and on our inheritance and status as children of the living God.   Some verse that express that come to mind include: Eph 6;10 "be strong in the Lord and in the power of His might", Hebrews 4:16 "Let us therefore come boldly to the throne of grace, that we may obtain mercy and find grace to help in time of need.", Phil 4:13 "I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me", and Romans 8:37 "Yet in all these things we are more than conquerors through Him who loved us."   There was a season where my wife and I were very much following what is called "Word of Faith" doctrine, and attending a word of faith church.  Some of the preachers known for this are Kenneth Copeland, Andrew Womack, and Charles Capps among others.  This is often referred to as the Prosperity Gospel.  I agree there are errors in this part of the body. I have not thrown the baby out with the bath water and I believe God wants us to speak his word with power and confidence, particularly when we have been humbled and beaten down, whether it was a self-inflicted wound or not. When we are at a high point at work, we just got a promotion or an attaboy, we're feeling like we're providing value to others and have refined our skillset, those are the times, I believe, when we need to focus on our weakness and be humble.  That doesn't mean we should not celebrate our blessings and good times, but we should give glory to God and not to ourselves. We don't want to be like King Nebuchadnezzar who in Daniel 4:30 " was walking about the royal palace of Babylon. 30 The king spoke, saying, “Is not this great Babylon, that I have built for a royal dwelling by my mighty power and for the honor of my majesty?” Immediately God made him to be like a wild beast eating grass in the wilderness for 7 years. James 4:10 says " Humble yourselves in the sight of the Lord, and He will lift you up." As believers we are children of the most High God, but we are NOT God.  Like the old saying, we need to believe that there is a God and we are not Him. We are never as bad as we think we are at work in our lowest moments, nor are we as great as we might think we are at our greatest moments.   E   For an example of Faith at Work, I want to use an example the very first person I interviewed on this Podcast, Dave Brown.  Similar to the story of Chuck Colson, Dave humbled himself and dedicated himself to God through in the middle of his long career in government.  He later went to Seminary and became a pastor and has lead a ministry to men.  For more on Dave, check out episode 1 as well as Episode 140 where Dave and I talked about Isolation, Passivity, and Political Idolatry.   L   As for the rich in this present age, charge them not to be haughty, nor to set their hopes on the uncertainty of riches, but on God, who richly provides us with everything to enjoy. They are to do good, to be rich in good works, to be generous and ready to share, thus storing up treasure for themselves as a good foundation for the future, so that they may take hold of that which is truly life. 1 Timothy 6:17-19 - https://www.biblegateway.com/passage?search=1%20Timothy%206:17-19&version=ESV   A https://www.patreon.com/christianmenatwork https://www.paypal.com/paypalme/christianmenatwork H   What did the ocean say to the shore? - Nothing, he just waved  

Be In Demand
98. 3 Reasons Why Your Communication Is Similar To Great Speakers

Be In Demand

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 13:53


Like it or not, you're speaking every day and therefore, you're already a speaker.  When you hear about being a speaker what comes first into mind? Right, a person on a stage speaking to a large audience.  In this episode of Be In Demand, we are going to redefine that. And why you as a business owner, as a salesperson, or even as a virtual assistant are already a speaker.    Check out what you'll learn: 1:11 Why your everyday job is a form of speaking and how it'll help you boost your confidence. 6:20 The preconceived idea of speaking vs. what it really is 8:33 Speaking comes in many sizes, shapes, and forms. Your job is to identify where you're already speaking. It's time to redefine what speaking is for you, your career, your brand, and your business. 11:02 The benefit of knowing where you're already speaking that you don't perceive as speaking yet.    Again, you're speaking whether you realize it or not all day and every single day so therefore you are a speaker.  Links and resources mentioned in this episode: Grab the FREE resource Go from Unknown to Visible. Follow me on Instagram: @laurieann.murabito For more about me and what I do, check out my website. If you're looking for support to grow your business faster, get fully booked and profitable, schedule a call to explore if you'd be a good fit for one of my coaching programs.  This episode is brought to you by: Acuity Scheduling, the application for all your scheduling, payment and appointment reminders. This all in one easy place for clients, sales calls and interviews to book their own appointment with you to fit their schedule and you'll never worry about time zones again! For a limited time try it for free with no credit card.   Make sure you hit SUBSCRIBE so you don't miss out on any of my episodes.  

Connected Fitness Forum
E12: Peloton Homecoming and a New Rower Is Coming!

Connected Fitness Forum

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 153:19


*DISCUSSION TOPICS* - Peloton Homecoming Keynote! Thoughts on the Keynote? - Peloton Rower! Thoughts on the teaser? When is Danielle going to be able to order? - Peloton Just Workout Feature! Is this big news? Help me understand why? - Tunde Arms on the Guide! Thoughts? Similar to other Guide content, will those without a Guide be able to get to it? - Other Homecoming Announcements! Are there any particular announcements that you're excited about? - Homecoming Live Chats! Anyone join any sessions? Thoughts? - Homecoming Member Meets! Anyone do any Member Meets? Thoughts? - Peloton Homecoming Apparel Sale! Anyone see the Thursday sale? --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/runliftandlive/message

KGO 810 Podcast
Mark Thompson: Fencing Suspect in SF was Charged with Similar Crimes Three Years Earlier

KGO 810 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 19:07


The fencing suspect at a San Francisco boba tea shop was charged with similar crimes three years ago. Mark Thompson asks: what happened? Is this connected to SF District Attorney Chesa Boudin? See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Mark Thompson Show Podcast
Mark Thompson: Fencing Suspect in SF was Charged with Similar Crimes Three Years Earlier

The Mark Thompson Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 19:07


The fencing suspect at a San Francisco boba tea shop was charged with similar crimes three years ago. Mark Thompson asks: what happened? Is this connected to SF District Attorney Chesa Boudin? See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Remote Real Estate Investor
A real estate investor's guide to investing in agricultural land

The Remote Real Estate Investor

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 21:08


Josh Ziegelbaum currently serves as Director of Investor Relations at Legacy Group and is based in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. He is responsible for managing investor communications, onboarding, individual and commercial clients, as well as overall support of company initiatives. The dynamic work experience Josh has gained throughout his career gives him a unique perspective on both sales and operations. Prior to joining Legacy Group, Josh worked as Vice President of Business Development for Lifeafar Capital, a boutique private equity and asset management firm where he led his team's capital-raising efforts. Before that, he was a Private Banker for Wells Fargo with a focus on complex credit needs and investments in public securities. During his time at Wells Fargo, Josh climbed through the ranks and received multiple internal recognitions and awards for his efforts. He most recently managed a book of business for high-net worth individuals and business owners in Miami Beach. Today, Josh shares about investing in ag land outside of the US and specifically in Colombia with a coffee company. Episode Links: https://legacy-group.co/ --- Transcript Before we jump into the episode, here's a quick disclaimer about our content. The Remote Real Estate Investor podcast is for informational purposes only, and is not intended as investment advice. The views, opinions and strategies of both the hosts and the guests are their own and should not be considered as guidance from Roofstock. Make sure to always run your own numbers, make your own independent decisions and seek investment advice from licensed professionals.   Michael: What's going on everyone? Welcome to another episode of the Remote Real Estate Investor. Today with me I have Josh Ziegelbaum, the director of Investor Relations at the legacy group and Josh is going to be talking to us today about investments in ag land outside of the US and specifically in Colombia with a coffee company. So let's get into it.   Before we jump in today's episode, I just want to speak really briefly about Roofstock Academy which is Rootstocks one stop shop for Investor Education, independent of where you are in your investing journey, whether you're just getting started or already have a sizable portfolio, we have something for you. Over 50 hours of on demand lecture access to private slack forums, one on one coaching as well as mastermind groups, depending on which program you end up enrolling in. We definitely want encourage you to come check us out. I look forward to seeing you there. Happy investing.   Josh, what's going on, man. Welcome to the Remote Real Estate Investor. Thanks for hanging out with me.   Josh: Hey, Michael, I'm happy to be here.   Michael: Awesome, so before we hit record here, we were chatting a little bit about your background. But for those people who weren't privy to that conversation, give us a quick and dirty who you are, where do you come from and what is it that you do in real estate today?   Josh: Sure, happy to dive into that. So my name is Josh Ziegelbaum. I'm the director of Investor Relations for legacy group. We're an alternative asset manager focused on real assets in Latin America, our niche in the real estate space will be agriculture. Our portfolio company Green Coffee Company is the second largest coffee producer in Colombia. Today, we have the business on track to be the largest this year. So that's the niche in which we're in. It's certainly different than the typical space that most guys invest in. But we love the alternative investment space. I've been working in this industry for the last few years, but in financial services for more than the last decade. Prior to doing this, I was a private banker with Wells Fargo, in New Jersey, and then in Miami Beach and I currently sit in Fort Lauderdale and support our teams capital raising efforts and investor relations across our portfolio companies.   Michael: Right on, so taking a step back, I mean, you mentioned is an alternative asset company or company focused on alternative asset, what's an alternative asset for someone that might not be familiar?   Josh: Sure, it's anything that falls out of your scope of traditional investments. So traditional assets would be stocks, bonds, cash and equivalents. So typical investor portfolio, you may have heard the 60-40 approach that 60% bonds, or sorry, 60% stocks, 40% bonds, depends on the age, of course and those are what's traditional. So a financial advisor in the traditional space will say, all right, based on your age, and risk tolerance, you should have X amount stock in your portfolio, X amount of bonds and this much cash alternatives would be things like gold, real estate, cryptocurrencies, private equity, anything that falls out of the scope of traditional asset classes, and they're a great, I'm not saying anything bad about traditional investments, but alternatives are a great way to diversify portfolios and most of our investors, you know, they have stocks and bonds and cash in their portfolio, and we're looking to complement that.   Michael: So Josh, why is it important, in your opinion, taking, you know, putting on your kind of financial hat for a minute, just from a personal standpoint, why is it important to have alternative assets? I mean, Why can't someone just go into the stock and bond and cash world? What attracted you?   Josh: Yeah, I mean, coming from that industry of traditional investments, portfolio management, kind of selling ETFs, mutual funds, individual securities, that everything's somewhat cut and dry and there's similar offerings across the board at all banks, right and, I mean, you could, you know, no matter what you do in your portfolio, if you have all stocks, months, like April, everything's going down, right. So I mean, stocks perform well, in the long term, but it's important to have parts of your portfolio that are entirely uncorrelated, and that could weather a recession and that can weather inflation, right. So if you look at the inflation rate today, I mean, we're clocking over 8% a year right now. So even the historical return of a stock portfolio, it's, it's basically at or below inflation, you can go in yeah, you want to add assets to your portfolio that are uncorrelated and that can also you know, beat that. So I was attracted to the industry by the high returns, the interesting offerings, you know, early stage investing is sexy. It's something cool and suddenly you can't get in a bank. So, you know, I was I was attracted by the projects and social and environmental impact of the projects and really, you know, bringing something unique and interesting to a client base that they otherwise wouldn't have access to.   Michael: Right on, and let's talk about you mentioned, uncorrelated for someone that might not be familiar with what correlation is, or how to be thinking about that, in terms of portfolio theory, making give us a quick rundown of how people should be thinking about that and really what correlation means.   Josh: Correlation essentially means that assets move in tandem with one another. So there's certain assets called risk assets, stocks that usually move in tandem. So when there's, you've heard, everyone's probably heard of the S&P 500, or the Dow Jones Industrial Average. So this tracks the movements of a basket of securities. However, if you actually look granularly, at each one of the securities that makes up the Dow Jones or the S&P and you look at it during a trading day, they somewhat move together. So I mean, while we're recording this markets recovering post lunch, and looking, if you look at the stocks that make up an index, almost all of them are recovering at the same time. So that's correlation, so you want to have assets that move in opposite directions, and that aren't all tied to one another. Another term for this in the industry would be beta. So a beta of one means that if the S&P goes up 1%, the underlying security in reference also goes up 1%. So a younger growth investor looks for high beta names. But at the same time, when the market goes down, all the high beta names go down at the same time. So look at taking a step back, and kind of looking at a typical portfolio of stocks and bonds, people are now starting to add other assets there. So maybe that's real estate that they own personally, real estate that they own in a syndicated manner, whether that be apartment buildings, or something similar to that. cryptocurrency is one, I mean, we're hearing from a lot of professionals, two to 5% of your portfolio should be in crypto assets. So that's one that wasn't really taught when I when I was studying finance, but that's emerged, right. So we're seeing this emergence of alternative investments, and it's becoming more widely accepted that they should be a part of an investor's portfolio in order to mitigate risk. hedge against inflation and increased upside potential.   Michael: Okay, right on. So and that's kind of where the legacy group comes in. That's an offering that you all have for investors and specifically, you said, in Latin America, ag land is that the main focus in Colombia, of course.   Josh: That is right now. So we're an asset manager, we're focusing on early stage investment opportunities in operating businesses. So the Green Coffee Company, our flagship portfolio company, is an operating business in the agricultural space. So we founded the company about five years ago, we've gone through several funding rounds brought in over $25 million of equity capital primarily from the US and we're deploying that and buying up real assets farmland in Sagar Colombia, it's two to three hours outside of managing and we're consolidating infrastructure and building a world class operation. It's collateralized like it like a real estate play, but our investors get the upside of an operating business, our goal is to continue to acquire farmland and grow and establish ourselves to be in a position to exit through a sale or an IPO. For our investor base.   Michael: What a cool kind of approach.   Josh: Yeah, it's a bit of a hybrid. So it's like different than, you know, a traditional agricultural investment where, well, it's kind of hard to describe a traditional because it's hard to access. But if you bought a plot of land, you have access to the, you know, the cash flow that's produced on that particular plot of land. In our model, we, our investors own a slice of a large, very large plot of land, you know, over 5000 acres right now is what we control and but they have higher upside than just the cash flow. So we're building out mechanisms in which we can use coffee byproduct to create possibly a liquor or southern other alternative. We're building out processing facilities, roasting channels are on the horizon. So investors not only own the land of the underlying business, but they have the left side of the operations and we think that markets will reward this type of business in the years to come for the reasons I mentioned, and also because of the impact, you know, we're doing a lot of things to lift up the community in which we operate. something really special, and I can attest to the fact that it's something really unique that I haven't seen in any other offering.   Michael: Interesting, so there's some wisdom out there that says don't invest in anything you don't understand, or you can't explain and so if someone doesn't have a clue about the club, be in coffee market or ag land in general, how should they get educated before making an investment like this?   Josh: Yeah, so I would encourage you to follow us on social subscribe to our newsletter, it takes time to get comfortable with the asset manager that you're working with and we put out regular content that educates you on the coffee industry shows us videos and footage from the farms. In terms of our management team. You know, we have world class operators on the ground in Colombia. We've hired a 25 year veteran of the Colombian agriculture industry, Boris Molnar, to head up the Green Coffee Company has it CEO, we have our chief agronomist, as the former agronomist for Starbucks in Colombia, we have a really strong team and within our investment materials, there's more details on the management team and more of an explanation of the process and, and in the model. So in order to get comfortable, I would subscribe to us request our offering docs hop on a call with me happy to address questions individually, but definitely it takes a bit of time, of course.   Michael: Okay, cool and you were talking about the return profile, potentially out beating are outpacing inflation and having a really attractive return compared to your traditional investments. What are you seeing in terms of returns to your investors over the last couple of years with Green Coffee Company?   Josh: Sure, we're about to launch our Series C funding round, we're expecting to launch that and in July, and our expectation is to do that, at $1,000 a share up from 700 a share in our series B round and we're currently forecasting 8x net returns for our investors or in terms of an IRR or internal rate of return 53% annualized through a 2026 exit. The value that we've delivered to date is up rounds for all of our earlier investors. The seed round was at $500 a share and most recently, our B was at 700. So we've delivered significant value for our investors through capital appreciation. But from here, there's even more upside, like I said at the current are what we're expecting to be the next funding round. We're forecasting 8x net returns way higher than the inflation rate in the US and forecasting right now.   Michael: That's awesome and so should investors expect a cash flow dividend or payment on any kind of regular frequency or not until the exit of the company are they IPO?   Josh: Yeah, that's a great question, Michael. So we are modeling in dividends and cashflow on an annual basis. In our investor presentation it's forecasted to begin in 2023 for the 2022 operating year, and to continuously pay dividends each year of throughout operations until we exit. It's mostly a growth investment. So the bulk of the return is going to be realized when we sell the business or we IPO. But there's definitely a cashflow component that that we're modeling in here.   Michael: Interesting, so in a syndication play, a lot of syndicators will give investors the opportunity at the exit to 1031 their money, keep their money with the operator, we're gonna go invest it into a new property, you're not going to pay any capital gains tax. How does it work with this because it's really a business more so than a real estate asset in the US specifically, because it's international, so how does that all work?   Josh: That's a great question, Michael. So we've structured the investment to be in the US. So our investors are receiving common equity in Green Coffee Company holdings and it's a US based investment for all intents and purposes, the assets are primarily in Colombia, but the structure of the business is here in the States. Now, once we exit, whether that if it's through an IPO, we would classify that as a liquidity event, investors would be able to sell their shares without a lockup period. But you're not forced to sell in the event of an IPO. Similar, like if someone comparatively if we're exiting a commercial real estate deal, you have to take your money out and like if they're selling or the refinancing, they're gonna give you your money out. But if we go public, there's optionality there, you could sell a portion you could sell all you could sell none, it's actually the investor could not realize any capital gains if they wanted to. Now, there's no ability to 1031 stocks, right. So even though there's underlying real estate, and it's a US based investment, there's no ability to do a 1031 exchange with this type of product. However, investors can invest in a tax deferred manner. We have people who invest in retirement accounts, traditional IRAs or Roth IRAs, so that they could essentially accomplish what you're saying, but within a retirement account, that's a way in which people could do it. I didn't mention this, but it's a it's open for accredited investors only. So it's a 506 C offering minimum investments 100,000 so most of our investors are high net worth or ultra are high net worth and it's a means in which to complement their current portfolio, but um, no ability on the 1031. But there's there are other tax advantages through an IRA that can be achieved.   Michael: Okay, interesting. Have you ever looked into qualified opportunity zones?   Josh: We have, so I have experience in that through another portfolio company of ours, we were developing opportunity's own projects in in Puerto Rico, which is a US territory. Now, the business as it relates to coffee, the coffee business, it's in the US, but the assets, the farmland, it's all in Colombia. So there's no the opportunity's own legislation is specific to the US and its territories. So that we unfortunately, we don't have ability to use utilize the opportunity's own legislation for this project.   Michael: But I'm wondering about actually going the other way with it. So if it's considered a stock and someone sells shares of their stock and has a capital gain, if they invest those gains into a fund, I think that there might be opportunity there as well.   Josh: That's right on the back end, if an investor I mean, assuming that the opportunity zone legislation remains intact, at the exit, right. When an investor gets a distribution, they could, like you said, theoretically identify and opportunities on investment to roll their capital gain into to relieve to alleviate some of the tax burden.   Michael: Yeah, but definitely talk to a tax professional before doing any of this stuff, because we're not tax advisers. It's really interesting. So I'm curious, Josh, I think a lot of investors, especially in the states understand some of the risks and the downside associated with real estate investing, specifically with regard to single family homes. That's why they have insurance, that sort of thing. What kind of risks and downsides are you seeing as potentials that people should be aware of in the coffee industry down in Colombia?   Josh: Yeah, I think the main one is weather. So you know, in agriculture, whether it's Columbia us, I mean, weather is something that needs to be mitigated. It's just the main risk when it comes to agriculture. Last year, the harvest in Colombia, it was lighter than expected across the board. There was also some adverse weather patterns in Brazil and other parts of the world. This pushed up coffee commodity prices dramatically, however, it lowered production of the farmland, so a bit of a double edged sword, we were able to benefit from the increase in prices. But there is some uncertainty as it relates to weather and we have to mitigate it. We use methods in which to monitor soil weather patterns and we have some world class technology on the farms in order to monitor and mitigate on the weather side and be proactive. But I would say that's a risk that investors need to be aware of, in the end.   Michael: It was great to know and you mentioned social and environmental impacts. Can you talk to that a little bit?   Josh: Sure, on the social side, it's my favorite one. So we're the largest start there. We're the largest employer in Sagar. It's a town in which we operate. We have great relationship with the mayor and the local officials there. We recently inaugurated a processing facility at the end of last year, we had the America mount the chief of police, the head of the Council of American enterprises doing business in the country and what we're doing in the community is something really special, we're providing fair and equal employment with above average wages, paid time off, fringe and benefits in an industry that does not have benefits, and that pays its employees with cash. So we're taking an industry that's done in this informal manner, and we're formalizing it and we're more really lifting up the community and you could see it when you're there. There's so much passion behind the work that's done by the employees. It's something it's really special to me, and we're employing several 100 people and growing and, yeah, we have an entire presentation on social and environmental impact. On the environmental side of some things that we're doing, we're planting the coffee with through a system called an Ella pod. It allows us to plant biodegradable pods for the new trees instead of coffee, but instead of plastic bags, so we're removing tons and tons of waste from the environment with our planting methods. On fertilizers, we're spraying the trees at the base. So we're reducing the amount of fertilizer that's used and we're also preventing harm to the surrounding area. We do reforestation and a lot of different things and we're working on a solar project. Now that's in the works. So a lot of things on the environmental side as well, I would say.   Michael: Very, very cool. So Josh, this has been super fun, man. Where can people learn more about you and learn more about Green Coffee Company get in touch with folks at Legacy group? How, you know, how should they go about doing that?   Josh: Yeah, definitely go to our website. That's legacy/group.co. Maybe we could put a link to that in the show notes, then our email address investor.relations@legacy/group.co and you can find us on social media through LinkedIn, Instagram, but definitely check out our website, subscribe to our newsletter. I think that's the best way to get in touch with us and always happy to connect for a call or through email as well.   Michael: Perfect, Josh, thank you so much. I really appreciate it and can't wait to stay in touch. see where this goes.   Josh: Thanks, Michael. Appreciate your time as well.   Michael: Hey, you got it, take care. So that was episode everyone a big thank you to Josh for coming on super interesting business model with that hybrid approach of kind of stock company private equity as well as the real estate side of things. So definitely go give their company website at checkout. As always, if you liked the episode, please feel free to leave us a rating or review wherever you get your podcasts these are really, really, really helpful for us, and we look forward to seeing our next one. Happy investing…

Geology Bites By Oliver Strimpel
Tony Watts on Seamounts and the Strength of the Lithosphere

Geology Bites By Oliver Strimpel

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 28:33


When plate tectonics was adopted in the 1960s and early '70s, researchers quickly mapped out plate movements. It seemed that plates moved as rigid caps about a pole on the Earth's surface. But since then, a lot of evidence has accumulated suggesting that plates are not, in fact, totally rigid. In fact, we can see them flex in response to stresses that are imposed on them. Such stresses can arise on plate boundaries, such as when two plates collide and one plate flexes down to subduct under the other. For example, we see a flexural bulge in Northern India where the Indian plate bends down under the Eurasian plate. Similar bulges are seen at subduction zones where the oceanic lithosphere flexes up before it bends down into a trench, such as off the eastern coast of Japan. Stresses can also be imposed in plate interiors when the plate is subjected to a load, such as a volcano or a sedimentary basin. An example of sediment loading occurs in river deltas, such as that of the Ganges in the Bay of Bengal. Our guest today pioneered an ingenious method of determining the flexural strength of oceanic plates. The method uses the flexural sag of plates in response to the weight of seamounts, most of which were emplaced on their surfaces by mid-ocean eruptions. His results suggest that less than half of an oceanic plate actually contributes to its elastic strength. The rest is brittle (top layer) or ductile on the relevant time scales (bottom layer).Tony Watts is Professor of Marine Geology and Geophysics at the University of Oxford and a Fellow of the Royal Society. If you like Geology Bites, please rate and review the podcast. It helps others find it.

Aphasia Access Conversations
Episode #84: Interprofessional Practice and Interprofessional Education: In Conversation with Mary Purdy

Aphasia Access Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 36:35


During this episode, Dr. Janet Patterson, Research Speech-Language Pathologist at the VA Northern California Healthcare System, speaks with Dr. Mary Purdy about aphasia rehabilitation, Interprofessional Practice (IPP) and Interprofessional Education (IPE).    In today's episode, you will:   Learn how IPP and IPE are related, in concept and practice. Hear about the similarities and differences in IPP in inpatient settings and outpatient settings. Listen to ideas on delivering client-centered treatment in an atmosphere of IPP.   Interview Transcript: Janet Patterson: Welcome to this edition of Aphasia Access Podversations, a series of conversations about community aphasia programs that follow the LPAA model. My name is Janet Patterson, and I am a Research Speech-Language Pathologist at the VA Northern California Healthcare System in Martinez, California. Today I am delighted to be speaking with my colleague and friend, Mary Purdy, about Interprofessional Education, or IPE, and Interprofessional Practice, or IPP. Dr. Purdy is Professor and Graduate Program Coordinator in the Department of Communication Disorders at Southern Connecticut State University in New Haven, Connecticut, and a speech- language pathologist at Hartford Health Care Rehabilitation Network. Mary has been involved with educating graduate students in the principles and practices of IPE for several years and is currently Chair of Southern Connecticut State University's College of Health and Human Services IPE committee. Additionally, she actively engages in Interprofessional Practice in the outpatient setting.  As Mary and I start this podcast, I want to give you a quick reminder that this year we are again sharing episodes that highlight at least one of the ten gap areas in aphasia care identified in the Aphasia Access White Paper authored by Dr. Nina Simmons-Mackie. For more information on this White Paper, check out Podversation Episode #62 with Dr. Liz Hoover as she describes these gap areas, or go to the Aphasia Access website.  This episode with Dr. Purdy focuses on gap area five, attention to life participation across the continuum of care, and gap area six, training and protocols or guidelines to aid implementation of participation-oriented intervention across the continuum of care. We focus on these areas through our discussions of IPE and IPP. Two previous Aphasia Access podcasts included conversations about IPE, Episode #7 with Darla Hagge and Episode #78 with Michelle Gravier, Albert Mendoza and Jennifer Sherwood. For so many reasons, IPE and IPP are crucial in creating and sustaining high quality aphasia rehabilitation programs. I hope our conversation today adds to the growing body of knowledge in IPP and IPE. With that introduction, I would like to welcome Dr. Mary Purdy to Aphasia Access conversations. Thank you, Mary for joining me today to discuss aphasia rehabilitation, IPP and IPE.  Mary Purdy: Well, thanks Janet. And thank you. It's really good to be here.  Janet: Let me just jump right in then Mary to say we've heard a lot about Interprofessional Education, or IPE, and Interprofessional Practice, or IPP. How do you define and think about these two related, but different concepts, both in general, and as they apply to aphasia rehabilitation?  Mary: Well, in general, when we think about IPP, the whole concept of collaboration, we know, leads to improved health care outcomes, and that's what we're all after, with our people with aphasia. In terms of the education students need, to learn how to collaborate with other professionals, and this can be quite complex. First of all, they need to understand what their own roles and responsibilities are, just related to their profession. Plus, they have to learn to work as a member of a team, and not just operate on their own, solo. In order to have students become comfortable in these roles, we have to provide them with opportunities to learn, and those opportunities, I think, really need to be both didactic and interactive.  Specifically, to aphasia rehabilitation, in addition to just general education about collaboration, students need to understand that individuals with aphasia really do have complex needs and to meet these needs, we have to focus on the patient. We hear a lot about patient-centered care, and that's really what it is that we need to be doing. So, students need to have some training in how to communicate with people with aphasia, and they need to get to the point where they can be comfortable training others to help communication. We have to help our patients identify what their goals are.  Interprofessional collaboration and practice, and patient-centered care really is all about the patient goals. They have to be really included with the whole program. Students have to be comfortable in aiding patients in identifying their goals, and they have to understand how other professionals can help meet those goals. You know, when we work with our clients, we of course, are focused on communication, but our patients are so much more than that. We have to look at them as the entire person that they are and recognize that we as speech pathologists can't take care of all their needs by ourselves. So, we have to bring in other professionals to help the clients meet their goals. The other thing is, we know that patient's needs change, as they adjust to life with aphasia, and they move throughout the continuum of care. As those needs change, the team members may also change, so students need to recognize that collaboration and interprofessional practice is always in flux. It's an ever-changing concept, in terms of practicing interprofessional collaboration. As clinicians, we need to practice what we preach, we have to remain focused on our patient, what their needs are, what their goals are. It can be difficult at times given time constraints and other constraints within the healthcare environment, but we really do need to try to make the effort.  Janet: Hearing you talk Mary, I'm envisioning a student, a graduate student, who is focused in trying to learn everything they can about the different aspects of communication disorders, not to mention everything about aphasia, and now we're asking them to learn more. That is, what an occupational therapist does or what a physical therapist does and how to organize that. Is that a daunting task for students?  Mary: I think so. As I said, they're learning what they themselves have to do, you know, what do I do as a speech-language pathologist. And so, when we start throwing everything else at them, I can imagine it's very daunting for students and it's hard to try to design educational opportunities that take into consideration where the student is in their whole educational process. I think there's a timing issue of how to be introducing all of these different concepts throughout the student's education.  Janet: Mary, as you recall from the introduction today, the White Paper authored by Dr. Simmons-Mackie identified gap areas in aphasia rehabilitation across the continuum of care, two of which I think relate to IPE and IPP. I would like to ask you about your thoughts regarding IPE and IPP and how they intersect with the LPAA model at three times: first, during graduate education as we teach and model for students who will become clinicians; second, during aphasia treatment in inpatient medical facilities; and third in the outpatient setting, including community aphasia groups. Let's begin with the educational environment. How do you teach and model IPE for your students? Can you tell us about some examples you use and how your students respond to your IPE activities?  Mary: First of all, in the educational environment when we're first really training the students, this is truly the IPE portion where we're preparing the students to learn the process of collaboration. Specific to aphasia, I usually start in my aphasia class. We have a couple of different case studies that we go through, that provide information to students about stroke, the professionals involved with stroke, then the person with aphasia. Through the case studies, I'm introducing them to the professions, and then to aphasia and how the professionals work with aphasia. Another thing that I do in class is, every semester students will interview a person with aphasia. They'll do a little language screen, and they'll interview a patient that comes up from our clinic. Recently with COVID, we've been doing this over Zoom, and it works fine. As part of that, they are instructed to ask the clients about their goals; what goals do they have both for clinic in terms of their communication, but also in general. Then later, we discuss what is needed to help the patient accomplish the specific goals, both within our own profession as well as outside. So, in class, there's a general introduction to IPE.  In the clinic, we've had some fun activities, very informative from multiple perspectives. One thing that we do is we have nursing students who are enrolled in their community health class, come into the clinic to perform a health intake with our individuals with aphasia. Now prior to that, our students have given the nursing students a little bit of background on aphasia, and we have the students view a video about it. And then when the nurses come into the clinic, they work with our students there together during the interview process. The nurses go through and ask all their questions and, I shouldn't laugh, but sometimes it's amusing to see the nursing students' reactions. They are just kind of flabbergasted in terms of, “okay, now what do I do?” For one client, the nurse was asking, the client, “Do you have a history of heart problems, cancer”, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, and the client was responding “Yes” to everything. The nurse was saying “Oh, my gosh, you poor thing you've just been through so much”. I was in the observation room with the wife, who was saying he didn't have any of those problems. So, it was actually a very good learning experience for the nurse. Then our student jumped in and started using more pictures to try to help with understanding. We provided the supported communication prompts to help with that.  We've had therapeutic recreation come into the clinic, and we've had a few trips into the community. We've gone bowling, and that was interesting. The students learned about devices that are available to individuals who have hemiparesis. There are these stands that the person puts the ball on and just kind of pushes the ball off this rolling stand and it goes down the alley. Our students learn a lot about accessibility and what can be done to help our patients get around in the community a bit more. That's a couple of examples of what we've done in the clinic.  We also have worked with the Marriage and Family Therapy department to provide support to the spouses of the individuals with aphasia. I think that's another important aspect to make the students aware of, that aphasia doesn't affect just the person who has it. It affects everybody, and the spouses need support as well. Our students have sat in on and facilitated some of those sessions as well.  Some other opportunities our students have had are again related to assessment. We had our students go to the nursing lab, where they were doing simulations of assessments, and our students played people with aphasia. That was a lot of fun, and I tell you, it told me a lot about how much our students really understood about aphasia; it gave me some very good feedback as well. We've had a variety of different kinds of activities to educate other professionals about aphasia, to educate our students about the other professionals. So, it's been a lot of fun.  You asked about how the students responded to these activities, and an important component is the debriefing. After every activity, we always talk with the students about what they thought of the experience. They obviously they love the hands-on activities, they find those to be much more beneficial than the case studies and what have you. They've talked about how much they've learned about the patient; they're stunned often with the complexity of medical issues that the patients have, and it's sometimes led to new goals in our therapy sessions. We've had some goals where we would use aphasia friendly educational materials to inform the clients about their medications. We did roleplay scripts for community reentry, so that's been helpful for the students. It just increased their awareness overall. Their feedback was that it forces them to really look beyond just communication. And it also helped their interactions with the clients, kind of viewing them and accepting them as a real person, not just a client with a communication problem.  Janet: It sounds like such a rich experience for your students, when they're hearing it - the case studies, it's one thing to see those words on the piece of paper that says the patient has this diagnosis or has had that treatment, and then to see this person talk about, or try to talk about, whatever their concerns are, or their issues. I imagine the students must just be on one hand overwhelmed with everything, all the information that's coming to them, but very grateful for this experience, the whole interprofessional education experience,  Mary: They sometimes are overwhelmed, but I think the benefit outweighs the degree to which they're overwhelmed.  Janet: I'm sure that you can share stories of your own, thinking back to assure them that other people experience this, and you'll get better with time, and it will feel better and more natural in these kinds of conversations the longer you go in the career in the field of speech language pathology. Mary: I always tie in my personal experiences when I'm trying to explain one of these concepts. It does make it a bit more real to the students.  Janet: Well, that actually leads into my next question, Mary. You are, in addition to being the university faculty member, you are also a practicing clinician, and you use IPE and IPP in your work. How do you incorporate the ideas and the principles of IPP into your clinical activities, when you're in the inpatient medical settings, we'll talk about that setting for just a few minutes, the inpatient medical setting?  Mary: That's actually where I started my clinical career, in inpatient rehab, and it's always remained kind of dear to my heart, although it was very different back then, where patients would stay inpatient for three months. Two weeks they get now if they're lucky. In the inpatient situation it's a little bit easier to do collaboration because there usually are established team meetings. There are some requirements for accreditation related to collaboration. Though I have to say, that just having a group of individuals come together for a meeting doesn't necessarily include collaboration. I think it has to be approached very thoughtfully, in terms of what are we going to do to differentiate true interprofessional collaboration from just a multidisciplinary team? I think one of the main differences is truly staying focused on the patient and having more of a problem-based approach. We look at what are the issues with the patient and who needs to come together to address those issues. So, the collaboration is kind of built in through these regular team meetings.  In addition to that, though, I think the inpatient setting provides some unique opportunities. I've done a lot of co-treatment with PT and with OT. Just last week I was down in our makeshift apartment, it's actually a model of an apartment that has a bedroom, kitchen, everything, and I was working with OT. The OT was trying to help the individual manage with their one hand and also be conscious of the safety issues. The inpatient setting provides the opportunity for us to do some co-treatment as well. I've worked with PTs and OTs, trying to help the patient ambulate. We work on carryover of each other's techniques, and we educate each other about our own professions. Even at that level we have new OTS coming on the scene who had never worked with a person with aphasia. So, the co-treatments allow us to provide some of that education in a very naturalistic environment, which obviously is helpful to the patient. We also work together to figure out which discipline needs to address, what aspects of a problem. If a patient is having issues with problem solving, or flexibility, speech can address that, or OT can address that. So, we kind of work out who's going to do what, in a very non territorial way, which is fun.  One of my favorite projects that I did was a self-medication program. I work very closely with nursing to help educate the patient about their medications, what they're for, what the side effects are, what to do if there's a problem, and how to fill their med boxes. I took a lot of the information that the nurse was providing the client and incorporated that into my own therapy sessions in a much more aphasia friendly manner. It really is helpful in helping the individuals become a bit more independent. Anything that we can do to help increase their independence is so good for their psyche, for their motivation, and for their own self-worth. Not having to depend on a spouse to give them their meds is a big accomplishment. We also follow through on using techniques recommended by one profession in the other settings. So, I will make sure that I have patients positioned properly, when I'm working with them; I make sure that client has their communication book with them, or the OT would make sure the patient has the communication book when they're in the OT session. There's a lot of ongoing discussion about what we each need to be doing to help one another and help the patient.  Janet: That actually, it's both education and its practice, isn't it, because whatever you're learning and teaching new about aphasia in your classroom is also being shared, if you will, with your colleagues at the hospital, and they're teaching you, and you're doing it within the confines of the needs of a particular patient. So, I imagine that the interprofessional practice part, the education part of that, is just always there, is ongoing, and you don't make assumptions that the OT or PT automatically understand your goals in speech, nor do you automatically understand theirs for occupational or physical therapy. Mary: The education component really is carried on throughout, not with students, but as you said, with the other professionals. We're all always learning. I've been in this practice for more years than I care to count and I'm still learning things. That makes things fun and exciting and never boring.  Janet: When I think back, about the importance of LPAA and the importance of patient- centered care, when I think back on some of my practice 100 years ago, I wish I would have done things differently for patients. I could have been a much more effective clinician, but I wasn't thinking in that direction at that point in time. But I am now and I'm hoping that our listeners will also realize there's a lot out there that we can learn from, and we can impart to other professions as we all work to help patients. Mary: I cringe at some of the things that I did 30 years ago, but you live and learn. The end goal is always the same - we want to do what we can to help our patients. We want our patients to be able to lead fulfilling lives, how we get them there has changed, a little bit.  Janet: You've talked to us now about some of the activities you use when you educate students in IPE, and then you've talked about some of the things you do in Interprofessional Practice when you're in the inpatient setting. The third setting I would like to talk to you about is community aphasia groups and the outpatient setting. You may be the only speech-language pathologist on the staff, or you may not have access to other rehabilitation professionals in the outpatient setting like you do in the inpatient setting. How do you see IPE and IPP intersecting with the LPAA model in these clinical settings, either outpatient settings or community aphasia groups?  Mary: Personally, I don't work with community groups outside of the university and I think groups within a university are very different than groups in the community, you know, separate from an educational environment. I continue to work providing outpatient services to single individuals with aphasia, and without a doubt, thinking about collaboration requires more effort. Most of the time, the patients have already finished their OT and PT by the time they get to the Outpatient Center, at least where I am. I don't have those professionals nearby so collaborating would be difficult. But the thing is, even though they may have been dismissed from those other therapies, that doesn't mean that the patients don't still have needs, and their needs now might be very different than when they were discharged from the therapy, three months, or six months prior. I think we need to remain patient centered and always be thinking about, “What is this person doing? How fulfilled is this person? What are their goals?” The patient has been living with aphasia for a while now and so their needs have changed. They are, in my experience, branching out a whole lot more or wanting to branch out more so we have to know what their goals are for life participation, what is it they want to accomplish? Those goals may be completely unrelated to what I, as a speech-language pathologist, will be doing.  For example, one of my patients had always done knitting, she just loved to knit. She was lamenting that she wasn't able to knit for her new grandchild. I was asking her what was the main problem with it? Of course, she indicated her hand, she couldn't hold the knitting needles. I briefly talked with our OT in our clinic, and asked, “Would this be something that you think we should get another referral for? Is it something that you could really assist her with?” And the OT said, “Well, yeah, sure.” So, we did get a referral for her to get an OT eval, and the OT gave her a built-up knitting needle. I was familiar with them for pens, but I had never even thought of one on a needle. That enabled the patient to continue with her knitting. Granted, she was slower, and she might have missed a stitch or two, but she was so much happier that she was able to do that. And so, OT accomplished the goal of getting this patient back involved. I guess the moral of the story is, even if we're not directly working with the other professionals, they may be accessible, or we can get them re-involved, and so we need to keep an open mind about that, and not just think that, okay, they're done with PT, they're done with OT, because there definitely are things that can be done outside the realm of communication.  Having a good understanding of what our patients' skills are and what their challenges are, can also help us set realistic goals, help our patients set realistic goals. I remember working with a client a while ago who was living at home but needed assistance to get out of the house, to transfer into a car, and so on and so forth. I wasn't really even thinking about that, you know, the patient made it to my office, so I just kind of assumed that they could do whatever. The patient wanted to go back to going out to eat so we were working on scripts. I talked about this with the physical therapist as the patient was still receiving physical therapy. The physical therapist said to me that it's okay if she wants to work on that, but she's not going to be able to get into that restaurant, it's not accessible, physically accessible, and the patient has so much trouble getting out of her home into a car. The whole thing is very laborious and so the family doesn't really want to undertake that challenge at this point. They are willing to do it to get her to therapy, but the family isn't really ready to get her into the community yet. That just made me take a step back and think, “Well, duh! Yeah, of course!” I didn't have my goals aligned with what other professionals had for goals and what the patient had. Understanding more about our patients really can help us all, patient and professionals, align our goals, so that we can accomplish them in a more efficient manner. If a patient needs some therapy and isn't receiving it, we can always ask for referrals; they might be denied, but it doesn't mean we can't ask for them.  Janet: What you said made me think of a couple things. Something you said earlier that aphasia doesn't just affect the person with aphasia, it affects the family. So, when you're talking about setting goals, like your restaurant example, thinking about the PT goals, the OT goals, the family goals, the patient goals - maybe the patient's goal of wanting to be able to order in a restaurant could have been redirected to learn a script in preparation, maybe, for finding a restaurant script later on, but now, at this moment in time that isn't the best direction, as you said. So, it just makes me think really that aphasia is about the family, it is about more than just the person with aphasia.  Mary: Oh, absolutely. Patient-centered goals definitely are centered on what the patient wants, but I think have to be considered, along with what the family wants, and what's realistic. They're the ones that are existing together. They are the ones that are ultimately responsible for carrying out, or not carrying out, these different things. I think everybody needs to be on the same page. Janet: Something else you said also made me think - the knitting needle example. In addition to achieving a goal, or to listening to the patient, you're also modeling for the patient how to ask for something, or how to think about another referral, because a new set of skills has developed, or a new set of problems has developed, now that you're further along in the aphasia journey.  Mary: I think it's a part of our phase of therapy in general, I think increasing self- advocacy is a critical component, making them aware of what their rights are, and what they can be asking for and demanding. Then giving them the tools to do that is a major component of our therapy,  Janet: That is exactly what LPAA is, asking what it is the patient wants to do, looking around the environment, and asking how we can help the individual achieve those goals, and the family achieve the goals as well. So, your comments and ideas about IPE and IPP, I think are pretty exciting, Mary, I hear the excitement in your voice as you're talking. But I also think they're crucial to the way that we should be thinking about how to deliver rehabilitation services in the coming years and months ahead of us.  As we draw this Podversation to a close, what are the pearls of wisdom or lessons learned, that you would like to share with our listeners? And in particular, what practice suggestions might you offer to clinicians, as they try to incorporate principles of IPE and IPP into their own practices?  Mary: Well, I've certainly learned a lot. I've learned my lessons as I've moved through this journey. I do have fun with it, so it's always worth it. In terms of education, for educators and IPE, I think I would recommend starting small. Sometimes my excitement about IPE has led me to be a bit over ambitious, and that can get frustrating for me, it can get frustrating for my colleagues, and for my students. So, starting small I think, is a good place to start. We might set expectations that are not necessarily realistic for our particular environment or for a particular academic department. I think it's important to know that we can be effective with small changes, small changes in our curriculum, like incorporating the activities into the aphasia class. Another thing that has been helpful is finding a group of like-minded colleagues, because a lot of times many of these projects are carried out on our own time in the educational environment, so you have to be with others who are as excited about the project as you are to really make it work. I'd suggest getting involved with schoolwide Interprofessional Education efforts if they exist. If they don't exist, jump in and try to create them so that they can exist.  For clinicians, I think we have to practice what we preach - more follow through on the different principles that we're instilling in our students. I think as clinicians we have to stay patient-centered and think beyond just communication. Similar to what I mentioned for educators, start small. A meaningful change in the life of a person with aphasia doesn't necessarily require great amounts of time and effort. If we just think small, think of individual goals, little changes can have a big impact. Then finally, I would say, get to know your patient and be their advocate.  Janet: Those are good lessons for all of us and not always easy to do, but certainly worth the doing, I think.  This is Janet Patterson, and I'm speaking from the VA in Northern California, and along with Aphasia Access, I would like to thank my guest, Mary Purdy, for sharing her knowledge and experiences with us, as she continues her exciting and important work in IPE and IPP.  You can find references and links in the Show Notes from today's podcast interview with Mary Purdy at Aphasia Access under the resource tab on the homepage. On behalf of Aphasia Access, we thank you for listening to this episode of The Aphasia Access Conversations Podcast. For more information on Aphasia Access, and to access our growing library of materials, please go to www.aphasiaaccess.org. If you have an idea for a future podcast topic, please email us at info@aphasiaaccess.org. Thank you again for your ongoing support of Aphasia Access.  References  purdym1@southernct.edu  Purdy, M. H., Hindenlang, J.& Warner, H. L. (2017). "Interprofessional Education: Take the leap." Presentation to the AMERICAN speech-Language-Hearing Association, November 2017.  Gurevich, N., Osmelak, D.R. & Farris, C. (2020). Interprofessional education between speech pathology and nursing programs: A collaborative e-platform curriculum approach. Journal of Interprofessional Care, 34(4), 572-575. https://doi.org/10.1080/13561820.2019.1657815 

Break It Down Show
Charles Arthur – Social Warming, Social Media's Dangerous Effects

Break It Down Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 61:07


Charles Arthur – Social Warming, Social Media's Dangerous Effects - Charles Arthur is a journalist, author and speaker, writing on science and technology for over thirty years. He was technology editor of the Guardian from 2005–2014, and afterward carried out research into social division at Cambridge University. He is the author of two specialist books, Digital Wars and Cyber Wars. Get SOCIAL WARMING: THE DANGEROUS & POLARISING EFFECTS OF SOCIAL MEDIA on Amazon at In SOCIAL WARMING: THE DANGEROUS & POLARISING EFFECTS OF SOCIAL MEDIA, releasing August 10 2021 from Oneworld Publications, author and technology journalist of over 30 years, Charles Arthur, helps us understand the crisis being caused by social media and how we can put a stop to it.   Please support the Break It Down Show by doing a monthly subscription to the show  All of the money you invest goes directly to supporting the show!   For the  of this episode head to  Haiku Social media Causing crisis left and right Can we stop it?   ​Similar episodes: Adrian Goldsworthy  DW Wilber  Anna Simons  Join us in supporting Save the Brave as we battle PTSD.  Executive Producer/Host: Pete A Turner  Producer: Damjan Gjorgjiev  Writer: Dragan Petrovski  The Break It Down Show is your favorite best, new podcast, featuring 5 episodes a week with great interviews highlighting world-class guests from a wide array of shows.

ThePrint
ThePrintPod: Delhi's ‘founder-king' Anangpal at heart of Monuments Authority's bid to ‘decolonise history'

ThePrint

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 9:40


Central body's efforts are aimed at shedding light on capital's 'Hindu-Sikh history overshadowed by Islamic invasions & British prejudices'. Similar projects are on across states. ----more---- https://theprint.in/india/delhis-founder-king-anangpal-at-heart-of-monuments-authoritys-bid-to-decolonise-history/952025/ 

SAGE Otolaryngology
OTO: Objective Improvement After Frenotomy for Posterior Tongue-Tie: A Prospective Randomized Trial

SAGE Otolaryngology

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 24:44


This podcast highlights original research published in the May official journal of the American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery (AAO-HNS) Foundation. Infants with posterior tongue-tie (PTT) can have substantial difficulty with breastfeeding and bottle-feeding. This study aimed to address the dearth in investigational objective data surrounding PTT release to better quantify the postoperative impacts of frenotomy for ankyloglossia. In conclusion, when measured 10 days after frenotomy for PTT, infants improve feeding parameters using an objective bottle-feeding system. Similar improvements are seen with patient-reported outcomes when PTT is released. Posterior tongue-tie is a valid clinical concern, and surgical release can improve infant and maternal symptoms.   Click here to read the full article.

Disney World is Awesome
Ep. 098: These Disney World "Lands" Are Strikingly Similar

Disney World is Awesome

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 31:39


TJ compares different lands within Disney World...there are some big similarities, so we compare and pick our favorites.  * * * * * *We hope this podcast brings up good memories from your past trips, gets you excited for your next trip, and fills the void in between. Brought to you by TJ, Matt and Landon...and sometimes Ben.Thanks so much for listening!We'll see you on Facebook: DISNEY WORLD IS AWESOMEWe'll see you on Instagram: @disney.world.is.awesomeA Walt Disney World Podcast for Disney fans. Talking all things Magic Kingdom, Hollywood Studios, Epcot and Animal Kingdom.

An Extra Dose
Why We Love Walking, Intuitive Eating vs Counting Macros, Our Favorite Sunscreens

An Extra Dose

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 31:08


On this episode of An Extra Dose Podcast, we are sharing why we love to walk everyday, what counting macros is and how it's different than intuitive eating. We finish off with our favorite sunscreens and workout shorts.   Item mentioned in this episode: EltaMD UV Clear Broad Spectrum spf 46 Tula Protect + Glow-- code is doubledose Sunbum  Colorscience Sunforgettable  Thinksport  Free People Workout Shorts Amazon Workout Shorts      This episode is brought to you by: Ossa Collective podcast network   Similar listening:   Everything You Need To Know About Essential Oils | Lash Extensions vs Lash Lifts | Foods To Eat For Immunity   Follow us on our blog- https://www.adoubledose.com Instagram: @alexis.belbel | @samanthabelbel doubledoseblog@gmail.com    

Charlottesville Community Engagement
May 9, 2022: Council briefed on ECC's progress toward 988, Marcus Alert implementation

Charlottesville Community Engagement

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 18:17


Welcome to the second Monday of May, a fact that will likely fade from our minds the further we get from its actual happening. Let the record show that this was in fact May 9, which is considered by some to be National Lost Sock Memorial Day. That’s an appropriate feeling for this installment of Charlottesville Community Engagement, which seeks to catch up on as many loose threads as possible. I’m your host, Sean Tubbs.On today’s program:Charlottesville City Council is briefed on efforts to implement the Marcus Alert system across VirginiaSupervisor Donna Price will only serve one term on the Albemarle Board of SupervisorsAlbemarle County’s Historic Preservation Committee weighs in on the Comprehensive Plan review First shout to JMRL’s How To FestivalIn today’s first subscriber-supported shout-out, the Jefferson Madison Regional Library will once again provide the place for you to learn about a whole manner of things! The How To Festival returns once more to the Central Library in downtown Charlottesville on Saturday, May 14 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. There is something for everyone in this fast-paced, interactive and free event!There will be 15-minute presentations and demonstrations on a diverse set of topics. Want to know how to do a home DNA test? Tune a guitar? What about using essential oils to repel mosquitoes? Visit the library website at jmrl.org to learn more. Schedule is coming soon! That’s the How To Festival, May 14, 2022. Price will not seek re-election to second term in Albemarle’s Scottsville DistrictNow that she’s announced a candidacy for the 55th District in the House of Delegates, Albemarle Supervisor Donna Price has announced she will not seek a second term representing the Scottsville Magisterial District.  She made a Facebook post on Saturday. “I will continue to dedicate my service to the County through the end of my term, be it January 2024 (the natural end of my four year term), or January 2023 (should there be a House of Delegates election this year and I am elected to commence service with that body at that time,” Price wrote.That continues a string of one-term members in the Scottsville District. Price succeeded Rick Randolph, who had served one term from 2016 to 2019. Randolph succeeded Jane Dittmar, who was elected in November 2013 and did not seek another term in order to run for the Fifth District in the U.S. Congress. Before Dittmar, William “Petie” Craddock had been appointed to the seat to fill a vacancy left when Chris Dumler resigned after pleading guilty to a misdemeanor charge of sexual battery.  Dumler was elected after Lindsay Dorrier opted to not run for a fifth term representing Scottsville.Price faces emergency room nurse Kellen Squire for the Democratic nomination for the 55th District. Incumbent Rob Bell has not indicated his plans. Squire officially launched his campaign with a video on Friday. Albemarle Comprehensive Plan review continues; Historical Preservation Committee asked for input Albemarle County is in the first phase of a four phase review of the Comprehensive Plan, and there are three opportunities to learn what’s happening. This first phase is intended to look at the county’s growth management policy. The Let’s Talk Albemarle van will visit the Forest Lakes Farmers Market on Tuesday at 4 p.m. and will be at the Batesville Day Festival on Saturday from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. There’s also a “virtual office hour” on Thursday at noon to get more information.The Albemarle Historic Preservation Committee was consulted on the Comprehensive Plan at their meeting on April 25, 2022. Specifically they were asked two questions by Margaret Maliszewski, one of Albemarle’s planning managers. “What opportunities exist for achieving our historic preservation goals, objectives, and strategies?” Maliszewski asked. “Are there new, or current, or ongoing threats to the county’s historic resources?”Ross Stevens said he wanted the committee to play a larger role in the county’s land use process, particularly as it relates to demolitions of structures that may be historic but not protected. He specifically singled out a manor house called Dunlora that will be removed as part of a by-right development. “I think we should be called upon for our advice and consulting of these structures and be part of the mix instead of just documenting stuff afterwards,” Stevens said. “I think we should be brought in to give our advice just like the Planning Commission does for the Board of Supervisors. I think we should be that resource to provide data and information regarding these properties.”Another member, Liz Russell, agreed and said the committee currently has little venue to make their views known. “And even if only on things like rezoning and special use permits and things that go up to the Planning Commission and the Board,” Russell said. Russell is also a member of the Charlottesville Planning Commission. Betsy Gondes-Baten said she would like the county to pass a historic preservation ordinance to protect certain structures. “It would also provide an opportunity in that we would be able to qualify for certain funds for surveys and nominations and that sort of thing,” Gondes-Baten said. Russell said an ordinance would take more support from the county’s elected and administrative leadership. “So how do we educate not only the public but also our own leadership about the benefits, not just for protecting historic resources, but what other benefits?” Russell asked. “How do we make those links between the benefit between historic preservation and economic development? The benefits of historic preservation and sustainability? And I think now is the time to begin connecting those dots.” Russell said preserving naturally occurring affordable housing is also a role that historic preservation can play. “Older housing stock,” Russell said. “More modest turn-of-the-century, 1920’s, 1930’s, 1940’s. These houses are out there serving a role in our community in terms of affordable housing.” Supervisor Bea LaPisto-Kirtley threw cold water on the idea of historic preservation playing a stronger role in Albemarle. “I sometimes have to be [what] I’ll call it the reality check,” LaPisto-Kirtley said. “I know Betsy keeps bringing up the ordinance. That’s something you all would have to develop and we’d have to see what that is and what it means and what it entails. At this point I have no idea what kind of ordinance we want.” LaPisto-Kirtley acknowledged many people have passion for historic preservation, but she did not think it was the county’s role to make it happen. She said it was unlikely more staff time be dedicated to the topic. “I’m not going to lie,” LaPisto-Kirtley said. “We’re up to our necks in all kinds of different things as people on the staff know we’re doing a lot of things at the county level. There’s a lot going.”LaPisto-Kirtley suggested a private foundation be set up to raise funds for historic preservation efforts. She said many homestays are being set up in larger historic buildings and their outbuildings.Russell said she was disappointed by Supervisor LaPisto-Kirtley’s response. “That is one of the most discouraging things I think anyone on this committee could hear from a Supervisor who is appointed to be on this committee to advocate for us,” Russell said. “Historic preservation is a chapter in the county’s Comprehensive Plan because ostensibly the county values it just as it values economic development, the environment.” LaPisto-Kirtley said she was simply being realistic. “This is an important committee,” LaPisto-Kirtley said. “[But] this is not the top priority because of everything else going on.” For the rest of the meeting, the committee members discussed ways to advance an ordinance, beginning with research into what other communities have done. If you were to attend any of the three Comprehensive Plan meetings this week, what would be on your mind? Watch the April 25, 2022 Albemarle County Historic Preservation Committee:Second shout-out goes to Camp AlbemarleToday’s second subscriber-supported public service announcement goes out to Camp Albemarle, which has for sixty years been a “wholesome rural, rustic and restful site for youth activities, church groups, civic events and occasional private programs.”Located on 14 acres on the banks of the Moorman’s River near Free Union, Camp Albemarle continues as a legacy of being a Civilian Conservation Corps project that sought to promote the importance of rural activities. Camp Albemarle seeks support for a plan to winterize the Hamner Lodge, a structure built in 1941 by the CCC and used by every 4th and 5th grade student in Charlottesville and Albemarle for the study of ecology for over 20 years. If this campaign is successful, Camp Albemarle could operate year-round. Consider your support by visiting campalbemarleva.org/donate. Council briefed on efforts to bring Marcus alert system to region At least one in ten American adults will suffer a depressive illness every year, according to information from the National Institute of Mental Health.  That information was cited at City Council’s May 2, 2022 work session. Officials with the Emergency Communications Center for Charlottesville, Albemarle County, and the University of Virginia briefed the Council on efforts to ensure that people experiencing mental health crises are not met with deadly force by public safety officers.  (view the presentation)“We do receive around a quarter of a million calls per year here in the Charlottesville-UVA-Albemarle Emergency Communication Center,” said Josh Powell, the support services manager for the ECC. Powell said at least 90 percent of the 9-1-1 calls are answered within 15 seconds, an industry standard. He said that at least some of those calls are misdials or hang-ups. “If you do happen to misdial 9-1-1, please do not hang up,” Powell said. “It is important that you are able to make contact with the communications officer and let them know there is no emergency because otherwise they are going to continue to reach you to confirm that there is not an emergency.” A new emergency number will soon go into operation. Powell explains about what the 9-8-8 service will do.“This is going to be a system that responds specifically for mental health crises,” Powell said. “Similar to 9-1-1 you will be able to reach it by call or text.” Also coming in the future is something called the Marcus Alert, as explained by Sonny Saxton, the director of the ECC. “The goal of Marcus Alert, if we were to place a singular goal on it, would be to provide a behavioral health response to behavioral health emergencies,” Saxton said. “Essentially Marcus Alert creates that coordination between the 9-1-1 and the regional crisis centers as well as specialized behavioral health response from law enforcement.”Saxton said there are multiple initiatives to address multiple structural issues, including a shortage of psychiatric beds across all of Virginia. “The time has long passed for us to deal with these behavioral health emergencies effectively and to understand that it can happen to any of us,” Saxton said. The Marcus Alert system is intended to identify behavioral health issues whether the call comes in from a crisis line, 9-1-1, the future 9-8-8, or the rest of what’s referred to as the “crisis care continuum.” “When it comes to 9-8-8 being the new short code if you will to emergency services for mental health crises, it’s really that ‘no wrong door’ approach,” Saxton said. “In order words, you could call any of those. You could call 9-1-1, you can call 9-8-8, you could call the suicide hotline and the idea is you would have a complete continuum of care no matter where you access it.” Saxton said nearly 80 percent of calls can be resolved over the phone, but the remaining would require mobile crisis teams consisting of local law enforcement, emergency medics, and social workers trained in emergency responses.“When you put that group together and deploy those into the community, that can really perhaps begin that emergency care treatment at the person’s side and then work on getting them to a crisis stabilization unit and then to a hospital or in-patient care if needed,” Saxton said. Marcus Alert programs are in different stages of implementation across Virginia. There are two pilot rounds, but the Charlottesville area is not located within either of these. Saxton said it might be some time to have the entire state covered. Region 10 is serving as a “crisis hub” but that’s not connected yet to the ECC. Legislation passed the General Assembly in 2020 to establish the system across Virginia, but legislation that passed in 2022 carves out exceptions for some communities (SB361). Saxton said it also took many years for the technology to make 9-1-1 ubiquitous, and the same can be said for implementation of behavioral calls to be as universal.“Now, we do know that for 9-8-8, the telephone companies have to have that short-code set up by July 1, 2022, so July of this year,” Saxton said.  Saxton said protocols are still in development and there will be more updates in the future. A sizable group of people in Charlottesville would like to see the Charlottesville Police Department abolished. Mayor Lloyd Snook asked this question perhaps on their behalf.“I know that a lot of folks in the community want very much for there to be as many opportunities as possible for there to be a non-police response to a mental health crisis,” Snook said. “Is there anything that can be done before we would get to the full implementation of the Marcus Alert System? Any sort of first step that we can be taking?”Saxton said some steps have already been taken.“For one, if you do call 9-1-1 today within the Charlottesville, Albemarle and UVA region, that call is answered by a communications officer that has received additional training,” Saxton said. “They’ll answer the phone and use the guidance from a National Academy protocol, so a new standard. They will do so quickly and get you on the line with someone that stay on the line until law enforcement gets there. They’re also trained in how they’re going to dispatch the law enforcement so they’re very careful about the information they give… over the radio to set the correct tone. That’s all training that’s underway that’s already happened.”Saxton said an alternative is to call the non-emergency line and state that there is a mental health care plan in place.“That’s essentially what the Marcus Alert voluntary database is,” Saxton said. “If you report to us or to Region 10, that you have a mental health care plan, we can notify law enforcement.”The non-emergency line is 434-977-9041. Help support Town Crier Productions with a paid subscription to this newsletter!For one year now, Town Crier Productions has a promo with Ting!Are you interested in fast internet? Visit this site and enter your address to see if you can get service through Ting. If you decide to proceed to make the switch, you’ll get:Free installationSecond month of Ting service for freeA $75 gift card to the Downtown MallAdditionally, Ting will match your Substack subscription to support Town Crier Productions, the company that produces this newsletter and other community offerings. So, your $5 a month subscription yields $5 for TCP. Your $50 a year subscription yields $50 for TCP! The same goes for a $200 a year subscription! All goes to cover the costs of getting this newsletter out as often as possible. Learn more here! This is a public episode. If you’d like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit communityengagement.substack.com/subscribe

Answers for the Family - Radio Show
Maximize Your Medicare

Answers for the Family - Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 55:00


Maximize Your Medicare: Qualify for Benefits, Protect Your Health, and Minimize Your Costs Show Guest: Jae Oh “Maximize Your Medicare's real-world, practical information makes it a must-read for both current and future retirees. This book is one of a kind because it provides a practical strategy, a practical approach of how to think about how Medicare works today, and how it can affect a retirement plan in the future. There are many books on the topic of retirement planning, from Social Security to investing, written by professionals who have direct real-world experience. Similar guidance is difficult to find regarding Medicare, where the pitfalls are everywhere, especially when a Medicare beneficiary is not aware of the nuances that are not stated in the many advertisements and mailings.” —Robert Powell, editor, Retirement Daily. Confused by Medicare? The you need to prepare properly for Medicare 2022! Get answers from Maximize Your Medicare, an informative guide by nationally recognized expert Jae W. Oh. Maximize Your Medicare helps readers understand how and what to choose when deciding on Medicare options. This book shows readers how to enroll, compare the plans and part, avoid costly errors, and get the most from your participation in the system. Written in a clear and concise style, Maximize Your Medicare is a vital resource for every American aged sixty-five or older, as well as for their families and care coordinators.

TIME's Top Stories
Border Patrol Agents Will No Longer Be Able to Investigate Themselves

TIME's Top Stories

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 3:42


United States Customs and Border Protection (CBP) issued a memo Friday ending a controversial Border Patrol oversight team charged with investigating incidents involving border enforcement personnel. Instead, investigations will be turned over to the Office of Professional Responsibility, a different department that, while still within CBP, is specifically charged with agency oversight. Similar offices exist at other government agencies, including the Department of Justice.

FAMMS
Reverse Engineering

FAMMS

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 12:12


Family, Abs, Money, Music, Sports - no matter what you're doing, take the time to truly understand how every component works. Similar to an engineer taking an iPhone apart and putting it back together again. @Jbird7864 on Twitter --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/famms/message

Break It Down Show
Ripley Rawlings – The Kill Box

Break It Down Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 60:51


Ripley Rawlings – The Kill Box - Lt Col Hunter "Rip" Rawlings, IV (Ret.) is the New York Times bestselling author of the Tyce Asher series and co-author of RED METAL with Mark Greaney. With over twenty-three years of active duty service as a Marine Corps infantry and Reconnaissance Officer, he completed ten combat and peacekeeping deployments to Afghanistan (OEF), Iraq (OIF), Saudi Arabia, and Northern Africa (OEF), among others. Get all of Rip's work on his website at: Pete and Ripley talk about…Duh! His combat experience, but besides that, his writing experiences, future plans or books that lurk on his computer, so stay tuned. Please support the Break It Down Show by doing a monthly subscription to the show  All of the money you invest goes directly to supporting the show!   For the  of this episode head to  Haiku Combat writer's on Has the years to back it up Books from own knowledge   ​Similar episodes: Adrian Goldsworthy  DW Wilber  Anna Simons Join us in supporting Save the Brave as we battle PTSD.  Executive Producer/Host: Pete A Turner  Producer: Damjan Gjorgjiev  Writer: Dragan Petrovski  The Break It Down Show is your favorite best, new podcast, featuring 5 episodes a week with great interviews highlighting world-class guests from a wide array of shows.

Down To Earth: A podcast for Geoscientists by Geoscientist
S2 (EP7) Down to Earth: Taking Imaging Spectroscopy to New Heights through International Collaboration

Down To Earth: A podcast for Geoscientists by Geoscientist

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 22:19


Similar to GNSS-R, spaceborne imaging spectroscopy is a fairly new field of remote sensing. Originating in aerospace, these pieces of equipment have now reached zero-G. But how did they get there? In this episode, we speak with Dr. Uta Heiden and Dr. Cindy Ong to explore how international collaboration has led to advancements in the field of spaceborne imaging spectroscopy.

Family Talk on Oneplace.com
Real Moms, Real Jesus - II

Family Talk on Oneplace.com

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 25:55


Many Christians view Jesus as being completely God, but sometimes forget that He was also human.On today's edition of Family Talk, Jill Savage shares why every mom can take comfort in the assurance that Jesus understands their exhaustion, disappointment, and vulnerabilities. Similar to how a mom has her sleep interrupted because her child is sick, when the disciples were startled by a great storm at sea, they woke Jesus after He had an exhausting day of ministry. Jill also explains to Dr. Dobson the need for people to define themselves by who Christ is, not what they may see or receive in other people. It's also necessary for a mom to have a supportive and caring husband. To support this ministry financially, visit: https://www.oneplace.com/donate/707/29

Dr. James Dobson's Family Talk
Real Moms, Real Jesus - Part 2

Dr. James Dobson's Family Talk

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 25:55


Many Christians view Jesus as being completely God, but sometimes forget that He was also human. On today's edition of Family Talk, Jill Savage shares why every mom can take comfort in the assurance that Jesus understands their exhaustion, disappointment, and vulnerabilities. Similar to how a mom has her sleep interrupted because her child is sick, when the disciples were startled by a great storm at sea, they woke Jesus after He had an exhausting day of ministry. Jill also explains to Dr. Dobson the need for people to define themselves by who Christ is, not what they may see or receive in other people. It's also necessary for a mom to have a supportive and caring husband.

Optimal Health Daily
1716: Q&A - Allulose Sweetener Consumed in Moderation - Is It Similar to Other Sugar Substitutes

Optimal Health Daily

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 11:09


Ask Dr. Neal your question about health, nutrition, diet, fitness, and more here: http://OLDPodcast.com/ask or call: 614-568-3643 Episode 1716: Q&A - Allulose Sweetener Consumed in Moderation - Is It Similar to Other Sugar Substitutes Zocdoc is a FREE app that shows you doctors who are patient-reviewed, take your insurance and are available when you need them. Go to Zocdoc.com/OHD  Visit Me Online at OLDPodcast.com Interested in advertising on the show? Visit https://www.advertisecast.com/OptimalHealthDailyDietNutritionFitness Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Ben Fordham: Highlights
Anthony Albanese's gaffe eerily similar to trainwreck '6-point plan' interview

Ben Fordham: Highlights

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 3:27


Ben Fordham has noticed Anthony Albanese has something in common with a former Liberal candidate. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The tastytrade network
From Theory to Practice - May 5, 2022 - How to Roll a Butterfly

The tastytrade network

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 32:39


Similar to an Iron Condor roll, a Butterfly roll is best done by breaking the strategy down into its component parts. The Long Strangle on the outside will be a debit to roll, and the Short Straddle on the inside will be a credit to roll. And much like an Iron Condor, the objective is for the net roll between the two to be a credit, so that overall risk is reduced on the position.Did you catch my naked strategies for a $5,000 account segment?Check out my YouTube Series on Trade Management!

The tastytrade network
From Theory to Practice - May 5, 2022 - How to Roll a Butterfly

The tastytrade network

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 31:48


Similar to an Iron Condor roll, a Butterfly roll is best done by breaking the strategy down into its component parts. The Long Strangle on the outside will be a debit to roll, and the Short Straddle on the inside will be a credit to roll. And much like an Iron Condor, the objective is for the net roll between the two to be a credit, so that overall risk is reduced on the position.Did you catch my naked strategies for a $5,000 account segment?Check out my YouTube Series on Trade Management!

Eat & Drink
Mimosa & Omelette

Eat & Drink

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 43:06


Mimosa & OmlettesBrunch might be on your mind as you listen to this podcast episode. Ali Hassan & Marco talk about these Sunday staples. They both get very passionate as they talk about these two A Sneak-Peek:[01:15] Marco & Ali get radically political off the top over a text on Omelettes . [2:30] Marco and Ali both don't love the Mimosa. [4:42] Ali tells his Samosa story.[7:00] Mimosa and Mimosa like cocktails (see list below).[18:21] Omelette classic and modern (see list below).[38:28] Basil conversation.Favourite Quote:“No one wants to barf fizz” -Marco [3:49]“Don't make me a Frittata and called it an Omelette…I'm not an asshole” -Marco [21:08]“Not a bag of carrots that taste like wood or styrofoam” - Ali [34:04]Recipes:Classic mimosa:equal parts orange juice (freshly squeezed) and sparkling wine (Prosecco, Champagne or Cava) in a flute glass. OJ in first and then the prosecco (let gravity do the mixing) you can float half oz of triple sec onto to add more dimension. Buck's Fizztwo parts sparkling wine, to one part orange juice. Similar to the classic mimosa. Mimosa, which also contains champagne and orange juice, but in equal measures. OtherPoinsettia Cocktailsame as above with cranberry juice instead of orange juice. Lemosa Cocktail Same as above with lemonade instead of orange juice.Vermosa Cocktail apple cider with champagne, served in Vermont, USA.St. Germain cocktail if you want the subtle flavour or elder flowers use St. Germain instead of OJ.Classic Omelette:3 eggs, kosher salt, ground white or black pepper, 1 tablespoon butter.Indian Omelette:onions, crushed cumin seeds, Chile seeds brown in veg or grape seed oil (not butter or olive oil). 2 eggs, cilantro, greens of green onions and salt and mixed up and added to our brown items.Ali will often add quarter of teaspoon of home made hot sauce. Thai Omelette (Khai Jiaow):https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KnSsV5xAJIUHassan Special Omelette:(good) carrots, garlic clove and shallots finely minced.Chives, salt cilantro to your egg mixture (don't over mix). don't over cook the carrots.Connect with us on:Twitter: @podisdelciousInstagram: This Podcast is DeliciousWeb: thispodcastisdelicious See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Family Talk on Oneplace.com
Real Moms, Real Jesus - I

Family Talk on Oneplace.com

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 25:55


On today's edition ofFamily Talk, Dr. James Dobson is joined by author and speaker Jill Savage, who shares insights from her book,Real MomsReal Jesus: Meet the Friend Who Understands. Together they discuss Jill's fundamental precept that Jesus can be a relatable, identifiable source of strength in every busy mom's life.Between nursing your infant to having your toddler mistake you for a jungle gym, it's normal to long for some personal space. For Jesus in His ministry, the pressure from the crowd became equally overwhelming. Similar to the need to establish boundaries to ensure some down time, Jesus stepped away from ministry to be alone and pray. To support this ministry financially, visit: https://www.oneplace.com/donate/707/29

Dr. James Dobson's Family Talk
Real Moms, Real Jesus - Part 1

Dr. James Dobson's Family Talk

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 25:55


On today's edition of Family Talk, Dr. James Dobson is joined by author and speaker Jill Savage, who shares insights from her book, "Real Moms…Real Jesus: Meet the Friend Who Understands". Together they discuss Jill's fundamental precept—that Jesus can be a relatable, identifiable source of strength in every busy mom's life. Between nursing your infant to having your toddler mistake you for a jungle gym, it's normal to long for some personal space. For Jesus in His ministry, the pressure from the crowd became equally overwhelming. Similar to the need to establish boundaries to ensure some down time, Jesus stepped away from ministry to be alone and pray.

Custom Apparel Startups
Episode 172 - 2 Cheapest Ways to Start a T-shirt Business - Sublimation vs Vinyl

Custom Apparel Startups

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 65:29


So you want to start a t-shirt business on a budget. The two cheapest / lowest cost ways to start are with sublimation and HTV (Heat Transfer Vinyl).But what is the difference between Sublimation and HTV?Which is better: Sublimation or Heat Transfer Vinyl?Which is cheaper?In this episode we are going to deep dive into both Sublimation and HTV to help you pick the best for your new business.Why is HTV or Sublimation right for you?First we will start who should get either of these.You want to customize t-shirts (or mugs or tumblers or more)You want to be able to operate in a small footprintYou don't want to be concerned about special electricity or venting etcYou want something relatively easy to learnYou want to get something that's versatileYou want to start on a small budget.SublimationWhat is sublimation?This is printing with an inkjet printer to a specialty paper. This paper and ink combination reacts with certain 'sublimation blanks' to transfer the print to the substrate. This process works on t-shirts, hats, mugs, mouse pads, keychains, towels and tons of other goods.Cost to get startedThe SG500 is the best option for starting on a small budget. You can purchase a printer like this for just over $600 or finance a sublimation package for around $50 a month.The next step up is the SG1000, This is just a bigger version of the printer. Bigger means bigger prints and faster production. This printer is just over $1500 and you can finance kits for this for around $100-200 a month.You will also want to get a heat press machine. These can range from a few hundred to a couple of thousand dollars a month (by the way when we mentioned financing packages before, those often include a heat press.)The heat press machine will be based on what you want to make.Flat heat presses - these will work for t-shirts, mouse pads, key chains, etc.Cap heat presses - these work for hats and other curved items.Mug Heat Press - Designed for cylinder shaped items like a mug or tumblerPROsSuper versatilePretty easy to use and learn'Feels' and 'washes' greatProven technologyTons of options for blanks from luggage tags to t-shirts to coastersCONsInkjet systems do require some maintenance.Need to use 'sublimation blanks' (also a can be a pro since YOU have to provide the blanks, customer cannot ask to go to Walmart and buy shirts)Only works on light colored itemsIt's HOT - nearly 400 degrees to sublimateEverything requires heat (no stickers or car windows or body art)Heat Transfer Vinyl (HTV) and Other VinylWhat is Vinyl Cutting?This is a process where you take a rolled material and run it through a cutting machine. It is kind of like how you make Christmas cookies. You roll out the dough, cut out your shapes and put the shapes in the oven.Vinyl comes on a roll. You roll it through a cutting machine, then put your cut-out shapes on t-shirts, or tumblers, or signs.Cost to get StartedWe recommend the Graphtec and Roland brand of cutters. The lowest cost of entry on these is the Graphtec CE7000-40 which is around $1300 and kits can be financed for around $50-150 a month. You can also get larger cutters for closer to $2000 and even a system that prints and cuts (the Roland BN-20a for about $6000 or under $200 a month).Similar to above, you also want to consider about getting a heat press.One thing to note is that cutters don't always need a heat press, because you can also cut sticker materials that adhere to glass, cars, signs, etc. which don't require a heat press.PROsSuper versatilePretty easy to use and learn'Feels' and 'washes' great (depending on the material you buy - Triton vinyl is A+)Proven technologyUse almost any blankPrint stickers alsoCut interesting materials like glitter or flock or reflectiveCONsOne color at a time!Rolls of material take up space - if you have 20 colors, that's 20 rollsCannot print full color (like a puppy or baby) - unless using a BN-20AMore colors & more complicated designs take longerBoth of these systems are great and they are useful on day one of your business, and 10 years later. These can be considered like a great plan for someone just getting started.

Bull & Fox
Jeff Brohm says film speaks for itself with David Bell; not to put in that category, but game somewhat similar to Jerry Rice

Bull & Fox

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 13:11


Jeff Brohm talks about the potential for wide receiver David Bell at the NFL level, comparing his style of play to one of the best receivers of all-time, the changes in college football with NIL and the transfer portal, the future for the major conferences with the College Football Playoff and more.

Break It Down Show
Gina Wilkinson - When the Apricots Bloom

Break It Down Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 60:41


Gina Wilkinson - When the Apricots Bloom - Gina Wilkinson writes, "I've been a nomad from the age of six-months, when my parents packed me and our Siamese cat into an old Renault and set off for a remote gold-mining town in Australia's Nullarbor desert. Since then I've circumnavigated the globe many times. As a foreign correspondent, I reported from some of the globe's most intriguing and dangerous places for renowned broadcasters such as the BBC, NPR, and the ABC." Get Gina's Iraqi-based thriller on Amazon at Enjoy this episode where we talk about Gina's book, her living in Iraq, and other aspects of our guest's life, as we always do. Please support the Break It Down Show by doing a monthly subscription to the show  All of the money you invest goes directly to supporting the show!   For the  of this episode head to  Haiku Need a book to read? That's When the Apricots Bloom So do hit that link   ​Similar episodes: Dee C Lee  Anna Simons  Mike Guardia  Join us in supporting Save the Brave as we battle PTSD.  Executive Producer/Host: Pete A Turner  Producer: Damjan Gjorgjiev  Writer: Dragan Petrovski  The Break It Down Show is your favorite best, new podcast, featuring 5 episodes a week with great interviews highlighting world-class guests from a wide array of shows.

The Austin Daily Drop
Austin Daily Drop - Wednesday May 4, 2022

The Austin Daily Drop

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 10:12


Thousands of protesters marched on the Texas State Capitol building on Tuesday, less than 24 hours after the leaking of a U.S. Supreme Court draft opinion that indicates the impending overturning of the 1973 Roe V Wade decision - in that event, abortion would be immediately outlawed in Texas and a dozen other states. Similar protests occurred in Washington D.C. and at statehouses across the country. ERCOT has asked power plants across Texas to postpone regularly scheduled maintenance outages in advance of near-record heat Mother's Day weekend that is expected to create record demand on the grid - so far, blackouts or outages are not specifically feared. Large tech companies including Facebook parent Meta continue investing in downtown Austin office space because of the bustling and vibrant tone of the area. Plans for Project Connect's Orange Line were detailed in a Monday conference with local transit officials. Meanwhile, the future of Capital Metro service in Leander hangs in the balance of Saturday's election. The University of Texas unveils its 10-year plan to become "the highest-impact public research university in the world" - that impact is already being felt, as researchers at UT have developed an enzyme that can break down plastics that would normally take centuries to degrade, in just hours or days. Texas Baseball defeated Houston Baptist last night 13-3 in seven innings at Disch-Falk Field - rain is expected in Morgantown as the Horns travel there for a Big 12 series at West Virginia starting Friday. A proposal by the San Antonio Spurs to host "some" games in Austin leads to speculation that they might be considering a permanent move. The Austin City Limits Music Festival will announce its 2022 lineup and put tickets on sale next Tuesday, May 10. An Austin resident has won $1 million via a Texas Lottery ticket purchased at the C-Mart store at Research and Fairfield. Amidst a recent lack of late night options, Epoch Coffee on North Loop is moving to a 24-hour schedule starting tomorrow, Sundays excluded. Austin's Spoon have been profiled in a short but interesting piece in The New Yorker, and local Twitter sensation Evil Mopac has been interviewed by MySanAntonio.com.

D-Lo & KC
Tuesday 5/3 Hour 1 - Mark Jackson Similar to Jason Kidd?

D-Lo & KC

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 47:12


The guys spend the first hour talking about the Suns being too much for the Mavs in game one, D-Lo asks if Jason Kidd and Mark Jackson are similar, and much more.

Crypto Marketing with Ty Daniel Smith | A Coinbound Podcast
Web3 Marketing: Bull Market vs Bear Market | Ep 67

Crypto Marketing with Ty Daniel Smith | A Coinbound Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 7:50


The cryptocurrency market is in a bear market, and, once again, many are speculating on the sustainability of the crypto industry. Similar to the stock market, bear vs bull markets are inevitable in crypto and teams must find creative ways to mediate these market trends to ensure their projects can stand the tides of this nascent industry. So here's the million-dollar question– as a crypto-entrepreneur, how do you survive in this volatile industry that goes through these drastic ebbs and flows? In this episode, Ty disclosed his top tips to market and position your Web3 brand in bear vs bull markets, and how to take advantage of each one! More specifically, how do you build your brand in these markets? How do you get people to care about your project during times of volatility? And what messages need to be tailored towards a bullish or bearish crypto market? You can't miss this episode! Key Takeaways Main Topic: 0:03 Web3 Marketing in Bull vs Bear Markets Sub Topic 1: 0:55 How To Position Yourself Sub Topic 2: 3:00 Content Strategies Sub Topic 3: 4:00 Conference Attendance Strategies Sub Topic 4: 5:24 How Marketing Pricing and Costs Change Sub Topic 5: 6:23 Ty's Market Hack Resources ►Connect with Ty: https://coinbound.io/ty-consulting/ ►Listen on Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/1aOrVp8kAMhgYSgKTIwaz6 ► More about the Crypto Marketing Podcast: https://coinbound.io/podcast ► Check out our agency, Coinbound: https://coinbound.io ► Check out our Twitter: https://twitter.com/coinboundio

No Sharding - The Solana Podcast
Kanav Kariya - President, Jump Crypto Ep #65

No Sharding - The Solana Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 56:13


Kanav Kariya (President, Jump Crypto) joins the Solana Podcast to discuss his optimism for the future and the many areas in which Jump Crypto is innovating in the crypto and blockchain space. Austin Federa (Head of Communications, Solana Labs) guest hosts. 00:49 - What is Jump?03:07 - The path to operationalizing crypto06:00 - Optimism for Crypto10:49 - Discovering and Building in Crypto with Jump14:24 - Personal Journey at Jump16:43 - What's being built at Jump?17:55 - Reasons to want to build19:39 - What does Pyth offer?22:22 - Criticism about conflict of interest26:30 -  How Web 3.0 facilitates resource coordination28:46 - Data contributors benefiting from onchain data31:01 - Token Plans for Pyth31:46 - Message bridging34:48 - Wormhole, stable coins and asset tokens37:36 - Time synchronization for cross-chain dApps39:14 - State storage on wormhole for dApps40:21 - Is Wormhole layer 0?41:14 - Wrapped NFTs44:13 - Jump's position towards NFTs48:36 - Exciting things in the ecosystem49:43 - Custom silicon / FPGAs53:22 - A parallel execution model? DISCLAIMERThe content herein is provided for educational, informational, and entertainment purposes only, without any express or implied warranty of any kind, including warranties of accuracy, completeness, or fitness for any particular purpose. Those who appear in the content may have a financial interest in any projects referenced, and any content herein is not intended to be and does not constitute financial advice, investment advice, trading advice, or any other advice.  This content is intended to be general in nature and is not specific to you, the user or anyone else. You should not make any decision, financial, investment, trading or otherwise, based on any of the information presented without undertaking independent due diligence and consultation with a professional advisor. Austin (00:10):Welcome to another episode of The Solana Podcast. I am Austin Federa, sitting in for Anatoly again this week. Today we've got a pretty special episode I think. I'm really looking forward to this conversation. I think it's been a long time coming with a few false starts. Today we have Kanav Kariya president of Jump Crypto, or do we just say Jump at this point?Kanav (00:32):Yeah, Jump Crypto is good.Austin (00:34):President of Jump Crypto, which maybe this time last year very few people knew existed, very few people knew what you guys were doing, what you were building, what your role in the ecosystem has been. So yeah, I guess let's just go ahead and Jump right into it. What is Jump Crypto and how did it come about?Kanav (00:51):Yeah, thanks for having me on Austin. So for context for the audience that aren't very familiar with us, Jump is historically a prop trading firm founded over 20 years ago in the pits at the CME. Today one of the largest quantitative trading firms in the world. And we started a crypto division over seven years ago. It started as an intern project at the University of Illinois, where we were running a miner in a closet and building some trading infrastructure.And today we've got over 150 people on the crypto team doing a lot of different things. So the way I like to describe our business is spitting it into three primary pillars. One is prop trading, which is exactly what we do on the other side of the house, we build trading intelligence and we scale it. The second piece is building and that's the piece that I hope we'll get to talk a lot more about on this call and it's closest to my heart and closest to the heart of the team.And that's in building pieces of infrastructure, really streets and sanitation for the space and a couple of the marquee projects that we've really focused a lot of our efforts on have been Wormhole and Pyth. And of course, along the journey, we've aligned ourselves with a lot of the major ecosystems in the place, including Solana, Terra and a whole number of others in building a lot of different things across those platforms.The third bucket is venture, I like to call ourselves accidental VCs in that we found opportunities to add value, or we had requests come in to work with partners over the last six years in various different capacities. And we found that we could be meaningful in those contexts and work with people that were solving problems for us. And that has now grown into the venture division that's deploying across the space.Austin (02:31):I want to get into a lot of the work that Jump is doing as core code contributors and supporters of projects in the ecosystem. But I kind of want to start a little bit with that journey. I would say that the transition from prop trading equities and commodities to prop trading crypto, that feels pretty organic. And there's a number of firms in the space that have also made that transition. Albeit you guys seem to have made it sooner than a lot of other firms in the industry. What was that process like of going from deciding that you wanted to add crypto to actually operationalizing that? And then we'll get into some of the journey to actually becoming builders.Kanav (03:07):The project started as an intern project at this thing called Jump Labs. There was a research lab at the University of Illinois and was meant to work on cool stuff with the university on working on fun problems. So alongside the crypto stuff we were doing when I was an intern, there was a VR project working with professors at the university to abstract away trading screens. And there was work on some interesting machine learning and networking problems.And the group has grown out of that. And of course matured out of these things, but we've definitely strongly retained that ethos. Now I want to caveat this by saying we definitely didn't have oppressions in being infrastructure builders. When we started the project in the lab that many years ago. It's been a very organic and natural process for us. And it's hard to make the instant leap from prop trading to what we're doing today, but it's easy to reason through the steps along the way.As one of the earliest large trading firms in the space, we had a lot of requests from institutional liquidity exchanges, OTC platforms, and importantly projects that were looking to solve trading and liquidity related problems. And those conversations gave way to us exploring a lot of DeFi projects and a lot of L1 platform projects that shared a lot of the problems they were thinking through on complex financial system design or programming in resource consumer environments, which are very natural and germane to a quantitative trading firm. And those conversations led to jamming about foreign ideas to implementing governance proposals, to maybe starting to write a little bit of code in them. And then all the way into committing over 50, 70 engineers that we have today in building through the space. And that process involves a few different steps. One, it involves the willingness for the institution at large to be mentally long the space. It requires a recognition and frankly a little bit of a taste of the upside.It requires flexibility, which of course, prop trading firms just generally naturally just have to have. And then everything else you can just learn along the way, right? We've done a lot of things wrong. We've stumbled over ourselves a hundred times, but you've got to keep digging shots on asymmetric upside and with all the resources that we've had at the firm I think we've been able to make some good ones.Austin (05:20):Going back to you last year, Jump Crypto had sort of a moment where it decided it wanted to make itself public. You wrote a blog post that was laying out. I wouldn't quite call it a thesis, but laying out an idea of how you view the space and the role that something like Jump could play within it. One of the things I was struck by going back and rereading this is your level of optimism in this post, right? Which is something that you don't see from many financial trading firms. You see them seeing opportunities to make lots of money. You see them making lots of money. They're very profitable endeavors, but you usually don't see optimism contained within it. Where'd that come from?Kanav (06:01):That's a pretty good question. So quant firms today are basically research and development firms, right? So the people that build trading systems, that build the intelligence behind trading systems are generally of quantitative background. They generally have PhDs in either statistics, machine learning, physics, those kinds of endeavors. And the people building the platforms are low latency high performance systems engineers that there are different optimizations across every level of the stack to build robust, scalable, fast infrastructure.The environment down to the lab five years ago was about exploring this space. It was like, what does this space mean? Right. And it wasn't about, okay, how are we going to make X billion dollars kind of getting into this endeavor? It was about exploring it. And I think it attracted that kind of people and it occurred that kind of environment.And the leadership that stays since then has kind of embodied that. And just personally I'm a raging optimist, I believe in technology, I believe in the future, I believe in building towards something bigger. And thankfully I think the firm has shared those ideas and I hope I've been able to shape a lot of the culture and behaving that passion.Austin (07:10):Where do you think that optimism in yourself comes from? There's a lot of things you could have gone into coming out of school. What about both, something, an organization like Jump, which is undoubtedly a great place to go work. But you stay there for a while now, you've worked your way up, you're now in charge of the crypto division. Where does that sense of optimism in you come from and what makes Jump the right place for that?Kanav (07:33):I feel something for Jump because they had a cool internship program and they had a lab on site and they were working on really fun problems in a well resourced environment, that just made it fun and attractive. And after I had the opportunity to intern there for eight to 10 months, I kind of got a sense for the possibilities that existed. And this is the flexibility that the whole space had. And it was like, you come in, you get to make a lot of bets, you get a lot of resources. And if you make good bets, you get more resources and then you get more resources. This is the only place I've ever worked. I think it would be rather unique to have that kind setup. And again, no, I wouldn't say it was a passion moment to come in to Jump and know that I would be able to build suites and sanitation for crypto. But I knew I would get to do a lot of really cool stuff, work on fun problems with smart people. And where does optimism come from?Austin (08:25):Yeah. I mean, you look at a space like this. It's been through boom and bust. There's tons of amazing projects being built in the space that end up going nowhere. And especially from the vantage point of a trading firm, right? One of the secret sauce of a trading firm is it can make money in an up marketing, it can make money in a down market, right. And that is the advantage of a professional trading operation versus a more passive trading operation. But again, like those are not usually characteristics that breed optimism. Those are usually characteristics that bleed margins, where you're optimizing 1%, 2%, 3% here. So you can compound that over a year and it will make a marginal difference. But again, that's not usually an optimistic space, that's a very functional space to work in.Kanav (09:10):Yeah, it is. And traditionally I don't think it lends itself to naturally just exactly this. Jump culture has kind of always been a little bit unique. So Jump also has a number of other kind of divisions that work on non-high frequency trading stuff. Historically, since about 2011 or 2012, had a VBC arm called Jump Capital that invests in growing technologies in this space. They've had some cool endeavors in the biospace working on automation there in healthcare.And so the founders have generally been optimist. They definitely believe in the future. They've been able to take shots at things that are going on. And even if it's not naturally germane to the trading business in and of itself, the culture itself lends itself to being able to do something like this, which is a really awesome combination of knowing how to monetize, but then also knowing how to build. Yeah, it's been an absolute pleasure to be able to soak in from that environment.Austin (10:04):Let's look at the building for a bit. I think it's pretty open secret at this point that Jump are core contributors to Wormhole and Pyth, you've been very heavily involved in that process. Take me back to some of the early days there where you are internal to Jump, and you're saying like, "Hey, we need to do more than just trade and invest in this space. I think we can actually build." And especially you're talking about this from the perspective of sanitation and roads and the very base level infrastructure. Crypto's been around for a long time. I think most people coming into the space in that time horizon wouldn't have necessarily looked at and said like, "Oh, there's very base level features that are missing from this ecosystem." What was that both discovery process like, and then the process of convincing everyone internally that this was worth dedicating resources to?Kanav (10:50):Yeah, the discovery process was very organic. We had a lot of inbound from people looking to solve trading and liquidity problems because a lot of people in the space, even though we were quite kind of new of our trading presence, and as one of the early trading firms that really was trying to make bigger pushes in the space. When you get to talk to awesome founders every day about all the problems that they have and get to build relationships with them, you start to uncover a lot more of the problem space that exists, start to internalize a lot of it.And once you've got the opportunity to sit in that for a little bit, and I'm sure you see this today. We are much later on than we were when we made a lot of those big switches, but there's still a lot of opportunity, right? When we were kind of ideating on the origins of Pyth, the conversation we had was, look, our whole thesis at Jump Crypto is to be as long aligned with the space as possible, right? We're trying to get the maximum exposure we can on the space that we think is going to be explosive. And we're trying to ideate this ways which we put that quote unquote trade on, right? The best way to put a long trade on in a growing space, and the best mode to value capture is value creation. There's definitely a lot of inefficiencies created by hyper growth, right? And there's room to capture those inefficiencies. But those are small in magnitude relative to the absolute value creation at play.And then there's a value creation capture correlation that you think about there. So if you think about it in that lens and you know that you want to be big contributors to the space and just aim to create a lot of value to both, then you start thinking about what the opportunities are within your realm to be able to engage in that capacity.Austin (12:27):But at some point there's a meeting, or you have a boss who you report to, and you have to go down and sit down in front of him or her and say, "Hey, I want to spend a lot of money to hire a lot of engineers to do something that's going to be totally public and totally open source at a firm that historically likes to stay out of the news."Kanav (12:46):It was a few meetings.Austin (12:46):Yeah, I'm sure.Kanav (12:46):And it's kind of baby steps along the way, or big steps along the way that compound into a complete shift and a big switch of that nature. We had this summit, we called the August summit a few years ago. And we went down to an offsite location and we talked about what being in this space means for us and how we differentiate. And I remember we showed up with these sheets that we went around and distributed to people. We were like, this is the toolkit that we have. This is the opportunity set in the space.And everyone kind of had their own, things went on, but that was one of the approaches that I've taken. And if we believe this is where the space is going, this is the opportunity set that we can tackle. And these are the levels that we have to pull, right? And then you socialize that and you try to convince them people that there is opportunity to be had here and you get buy-in to take a first little step. And once you get the buy-in to take a first little step, and you kind of really show the big medics of differentiation in a native space, you get the buying for the next step.And then suddenly it's the entire [inaudible 00:13:47]. You get the whole kitchen sink thrown behind you, and then you are kind of propelling to this part that you want to be at. And that's the whole thesis of Jump everywhere. You take bets with asymmetric upside and we throw the kitchen sink at things that are working. And a lot of the stuff that we were doing started working.Austin (14:02):How is that journey for you personally, going from an intern involved in a few projects now to the Jump Crypto teams over a hundred at this point?Kanav (14:11):Yeah. We've got over 150 now, hard to keep track.Austin (14:14):Wow. Yeah. From a leadership role, and from your own perspective, how has that transition been? What parts of it were easier for you? What parts were harder than you were anticipating? Scaling yourself is often much harder than scaling a company.Kanav (14:28):Without a doubt, yeah. I started in the team as an intern like you pointed out, working on software problems. I came back to the team a year later in a formal full-time capacity, working on quant problems, which was to do with predicting crypto markets, building alpha and kind of scaling that piece. And the early conversations with projects where we were trying to solve liquidity problems was an area that I got really, really interested in. And I just kind of went about trying to build that a little bit further.Over time that led to a transition from engineering and quantitative work to more conversational business development work, just having spent years across all those functions and natively knowing how to live them has been the biggest tool that I've been able to build in the toolbox. Now that doesn't teach you how to manage a hundred people, that doesn't teach you how to propagate culture. It doesn't teach you how to scale hiring strategy. Doesn't teach you how to value the troops when things are low.I definitely want to make a claim that there are many who are close to a finished product, rather than trying to be good at everything, good at every one thing, we always try to be excellent at a few things. And then by force just propel everything forward. I'd say some of the biggest lessons I've learned, the biggest mistakes we've made, definitely been in the shape of trying to shove square bags in a round hole. Where in a trading environment it's like the only people you have on your team are engineers and quants. They're just smart people that can solve any shape of technical problem you throw them at. When you move that towards sales and marketing and product and everything else, that all kind of falls apart.Kanav (16:05):And you need people that are able to natively live within specific sub domains across those functions. And that's something that we've been trying to scale in. I spend basically all my time hiring and trying to focus on making sure our zero to one projects have a lot of momentum. But yeah, it's been an awesome journey. And of course I have support from a company that's grown to a 1500 people as the largest quant trading firm in the world and so lots of guidance and help along the way.Austin (16:33):Let's talk a little bit about that work you guys are doing and actually building. So if I understand correctly, the two projects that you are mostly core contributors to is Pyth and Wormhole. Is there anything else that you'd put into that category of engagement?Kanav (16:46):That's the highest level of engagement for sure. We do a lot of things across the big ecosystems of course. We can talk all of what we're doing with Solana. We're always trying to get deeper. We built an NFD project on the Metaplex landscape after their investment as an intern project. That was a real fun one. We've been core contributors to some of the projects that are coming out on the data landscape today. We've worked on a lot of the mechanism design that goes on, on the other one. And there's a few other projects, but the highest levels of engagement have definitely been with Wormhole and Pyth.Austin (17:18):Looking at over that landscape, Pyth high frequency Oracle. But again, Oracles, they've existed for a long time. There's a number of name brand ones that got their start on the ecosystem in the 2017 range. Lots of people have had ideas about Oracles over the years, some of them have worked, some of them haven't. Similar to Wormhole, bridges have existed for a long time. Bridges are actually the basis of how any L2 works, right? Both of these are hardly new ideas I would say. What about looking at the landscape gave you guys the confidence to say, not only there's a need for something different, but we can help build something different and better.Kanav (17:57):Again, just like 100% organic. In that August summit, we were looking at some of the biggest things we could do. And a big problem that everyone kind of kept voicing to us is that they don't have access to equities data. They don't have access to fast data so that they don't have to have things like clawback mechanisms and all these different things that LPs don't get direct on every turn, right?The fundamental thing with financial oracles is that they're used to settle risk transfer. They're used to set a price at which two parties exchange value. And if that price is latent or slow or not accurate, one side gets left folding the bag. Now, DeFi, the way protocols are constructed, the side that gets left holding the bag is either the LP that's contributing to the protocol or the protocol stakers or a key stakeholder in building the ecosystem.And the takers are able to take all that value. If you are going to build something that's going to house all of OTC, if we're building something like synthetics for example, and your protocol stakers are taking the other side of every trade that happens on S-Oil or SSNP, you need to make sure that's the right price. Otherwise you're just going to get up the way down to zero. When we were ideating on what the biggest ways we could contribute is let's contribute our data. And the first idea was in let's start, let's go and figure out how we bring together a network of people to build an Oracle.It was how do we contribute our data, right? And we browsed through the category of solutions. We had all the conversations. We spoke to dozens of investors and builders in the space. And there wasn't an easy way to slot in high fidelity financial data, into existing Oracle solutions. And so we spoke with some of the founding partners of the Pyth program and came to consensus that there was an opportunity here. And that led to the first step and we just kept building sets.Austin (19:39):In your mind, what is it that Pyth offers that other Oracle solutions don't offer?Kanav (19:46):Pyth is a very hyper specialized tool for high fidelity financial data, specifically financial data for settlement of risk transfer, right? If you think about the way the market data landscape looks today, it's different across asset classes, but there is a class of people that have access to high fidelity, streaming price data that they can legally distribute and make available to a protocol, create like an Oracle program.One you need access to very fast financial data, which is hard to get and even harder to have a legal right to distribute. You want to make sure that the people who are publishing the prices are the real owners of the data so that you can set incentives for the data to be accurate, right? If you are staking the value of a third party aggregator, their third party aggregator has no skin in the game. That's one of the other kind of fundamental things that you have to think about.And third, you need to acknowledge the fact that a price is not absolute. A price for Bitcoin has about 20 liquid trading venues that are distributed across the globe that can often be fractured, that can often have all kinds of different idiosyncrasies. And that being able to accurately determine the price on most relevant venues and build a dispersion is really important. If you think about kind of all those things together, you want very fast access. You want a broad range of access of independent sources, not reporting from the same source.You want very high liveness and uptime of course, and you want kind of good legal clarity that that price can continue to be distributed because you don't want the application to suddenly get turned off when the regulator says, "What's going on?" And those are the kind of key things that Pyth has really focused on very heavily to build that piece of infrastructure and Solana was the perfect opportunity. Before Solana there wasn't a way to create a high fidelity fast Oracle. There just wasn't a need for it and there wasn't a platform for it, right. And so all those things just came together.Austin (21:49):One of the criticisms that you'll hear about Pyth is that because of its structured model here, where the people providing data are permissioned at this point and are also like firms that are professionalized trading operations themselves, that there is an inherent kind of conflict of interest in that system. With any system in blockchain, you have to assume everyone is trying to cheat, everyone is trying to extract the most value possible. How have you gone about setting up incentives to make sure that the users of Pyth and the contributors to Pyth are not at odds with one another?Kanav (22:27):Yeah. I think you made a totally fine point there in that we are building for byzantine systems, right? And so that's the kind of incentive design you've got to keep in place. I'll frankly say I think that claim is a little bit ludicrous for a few different reasons. Once you peel back the onion just a little bit, and I'll talk through some of the reasons why.Austin (22:43):Let's peel back the onion.Kanav (22:44):One, you've got to first understand that the amount of value that can be created in actually pulling something like Pyth off successfully is dramatic. And the forms that are building this are now incentive aligned to make that happen. But two, this is an open sourced protocol, it is decentralized, and you can look at exactly what the inputs are, how they're being aggregated and what their resort in price output is.Three most importantly, there are about 50 financial firms that are submitting independent price data to this article to construct final outputs. And these financial trading firms aren't friendly with each other. This is the very first time that a group of highly adversarial trading firms, banks, exchanges, and ODC players across the entire space have come together and said, "Let's go build a piece of infrastructure." And one, I think that needs to be celebrated a lot, it's a huge win.But two, the trading firm, there are 50 global financial trading firms contributing their proprietary prices directly to Solana on the Pyth program today. We have realized that these 50 comprise of between 60% to 80% of global asset class volumes at this point, given the network of participants that have aggregated around this protocol. When you are that big of market share that you're covering that kind of breadth, the participants in the protocol themselves are on the other side of each other's trades almost by definition. And so who's manipulating the price against who? Let's kind of just start there.The system of incentives that set up in this taking protocol, you can read through this on the Pyth white paper has some really intelligent aggregation algorithms that put all this data together, that identify the quality of each of these independent data publishers that then sets out a mechanism to aggressively punish providers that don't have good prices. And good prices can mean I published a malicious bad price. It can mean I have slow prices. It can mean I published, I had a bug, it can mean anything.The incentive design mechanism is meant to reward data providers that are not honest, but that have great data. And that's a fundamental difference in how system designs, we're not kind of rewarding agreement, we're rewarding prediction. And so you are rewarded for correctly predicting the price that would come up rather than for rewarding agreement between parties, and which can both have different kind of models and can both work in different ways.But there is almost no possibility for one collusion across these landscapes, given the composition of the people in the network. And the incentive structure again is obviously explicitly set up to discourage that. Third, all these forms are heavily, heavily regulated. I spoke about 20 years of its reputation and a giant, giant business behind kind of making a lot of this happen. And we're definitely incentive aligned to make this thing as successful as it can possibly be.Austin (25:39):The Web 2.0 world and the rise of FinTech apps has largely taught people that organizations that claim to be on their side often aren't. There's very legitimate reasons from a market making perspective that during the game stock run up and squeeze, users of Robinhood and other FinTech applications, their trading was turned off. Now, there's a bunch of really good backroom reasons for why that might have happened. But the effect is what matters to the retail trader, which is that they were using a platform that they thought gave them equal access to a market, that platform did not provide them equal and neutral access to a market.I think when people look at something like Pyth, it wouldn't be crazy to say that, well, the same incentives that made us think that Robinhood was on our side, could also be applied to Pyth. What is different about the Web 3.0 space and the construction of something like Pyth in your view that makes that not something someone should worry about.Kanav (26:37):Web 3.0 is fundamentally any means of resource coordination, and it facilitates that by, one, facilitating the export of trust. And the export of trust is actually one of the big reasons why the whole Robinhood debacle went on, right. They basically ran out of margin requirements in order to continue to clear trades on one side, since it was so directional.And there is this massive web of intermediaries that set up all throughout traditional finance for the express purpose of establishing trust as the FCM, the DCM, the clearinghouse, all the other three letter acronyms. And all of them exist to make sure that when a match occurs on any platform that actually settles into a financial trade.In crypto the match is the execution. And that's facilitated by the fact that you can export all the trust of executing a piece of code onto Solana, onto Ethereum, onto the blockchain itself. And that's unlocked this completely new means of resource coordination, which makes things like Pyth possible. It means that you can explicitly lay out a system of incentives in a closed loop fashion. And regardless of who's uploading the code, or who's proposing designs or architecting any of this, everybody is independently participating according to the incentives laid out very plainly by the program itself.And that means DRW and Jane Street don't have to trust Jump when they decide to publish prices to pay. That means they look at the program that's running on Solana that they can read. They look at Solana's trust model and decided they can or don't trust Solana as a platform. And then contribute to the platform that then self executes and lives on its own terms. And the fact that we can allow different kinds of state to compose in a trustless fashion is the entire revolution Web 3.0, that's basically what the whole space has been building for the last 10 years. And that's what makes Pyth possible, it simply was not possible before.Austin (28:32):What does something like Jump or Jane Street or anyone who's a data contributor to Pyth, what do they get out of it? What is their incentive apart from any rewards that might be generated from contributing data. How are they then going back and using this on chain data in their own operations?Kanav (28:51):There's a few elements. And so one, it is fundamentally a two sided marketplace, right? It has data publishers and it has data consumers. And the other interesting thing like Uber did for taxi cabs, where it created a marketplace where cars could now come online, created this marketplace where data that was once latent came online.Jump is publishing its own trades to the Pyth network. That is IP that it has the legal rights over, has only just been a cost center so far, and now has the opportunity to get monetized. And that's the same for all of the trading firms that sit in the network. It's a lot of people to turn cost centers into potential elements in the marketplace and that bootstraps the supply. The consumers of the data obviously are paying for this extremely created highly robust set of data inputs that then get aggregated. And that creates kind of flows in one direction. And then like your regular two sided marketplace, it accrues value, right?All the data publishers today in Pyth have some sort of stake of asset interest in the thing succeeding. And there is a set of incentives that then rewards them for the correct participation going on with fees, rewards, all those kinds of things. And all that is in gross detail laid out in the white paper and we can go over some of that. But the off chain applications and some of this stuff is also quite interesting, right?So if you look at kind of back office systems around the world at forms like Jump, you don't need microsecond level access to financial data, but you need that for your trading engines because otherwise you're playing at a disadvantage related to the field. But in order to make sure that your clearing prices have happened correctly in order to make charts in order to do something like a trading view, in order to get on the Bloomberg terminal or to be on a ticker somewhere, all these applications are now easily facilitated by subscribing to something like Pyth, that's living on an open kind of blockchain area. And so a lot of the off-chain use cases are getting more and more interesting I think over time. The fundamental value is in creating the pricing source for on chain data. And this is kind of like an awesome thing that just falls out of it.Austin (30:56):That's a really interesting way of thinking about both the incentive alignments and the rule that the data providers versus the data consumers play in the market. Are there any token plans for Pyth?Kanav (31:07):Yes, there is a token plan for Pyth. You can read all about it on the white paper, no comments on timing or anything of that at this point. And that's going to be a networking governance decision, but I'm sure in the near future.Austin (31:16):Transitioning over to Wormhole, which is the other project that Jump is heavily involved in as a core contributor of the code. When people look at wormhole, I think it's very easy to look at it and say, asset bridge, multi chain, cool, fundamentally utility. The first thing I noticed when we were talking about this and looking through it is this whole component of allowing different smart contracts on different blockchains to communicate with each other. I think most people understand how asset bridging works. Can you talk a little bit about this whole concept of message bridging?Kanav (31:51):Yeah. And this also kind of goes back to your question on, how do you decide that there's an opportunity here when bridging is something that people have talked about for a while? When we were kind of ideating with everybody else on kind the Pyth's team and the network on how Pyth goes across chain. Hendrick and team were building Wormhole as Solana Eths token bridge on the hackathon project at [inaudible 00:32:17].And I called Hendrick and I asked him, "Look, is there a way to generalize this thing so that we can get Pyth messages across?" We're building this Oracle thing on the best, fast, scalable censorship resistant message bus we can, but we want to get it to all the other ones that operate on a slightly different resolution. And through the course of that conversation, we came to a conclusion that enabling generic message bosses to allow this cross chain composability in a much more high dimensional fashion than just the token bridge word was a massive opportunity set that had to be filled.And so when we launched last August as a completely generic message bus. And what that means is that any piece of state that is created or lives on a blockchain can be included as a message that then gets communicated to any other blockchain environment. And so if you think about Oracles, you think about a governance board, right? Uniswap passes a governance board on Ethereum, produces workloads on a lot of different chains. The outcome of that governance board has to, in a secure, reliable fashion, be communicated to all the other geographies that Uniswap lives on. That needs to be encoded as a message.And so Wormhole has outpost contracts on every chain that is deployed, it is deployed over eight chains today. The outpost contract just listens for a message that is sent to that contract and the Wormhole network of guardians attests to that arbitrary binary block. That block can then be picked up, relayed to any other blockchain environment, verified that is coming attested from the homeowner network and then decode to do anything arbitrary and interesting. And so generic message process have really exploded over the last year. We've seen so many awesome applications being built on it. And I think we're just kind of scratching the surface, right? There's a lot to do here.Austin (34:04):When I think about messaging, I think about how a lot of the models right now for cross chain communication of assets are a little tedious and maybe have more risk inherent to them than are necessarily required. A very centralized example, USDC, right? You can go to FTX and you can withdraw USDC as an ERC-20, as an SPL token or across several different networks. And what's happening there largely is because the mint authority to that is centrally controlled. They're able to issue new, quote unquote new USDC natively on each layer that USDC is supported on. Do you see the capability of developers using something like Wormhole to make that possible for fully decentralized, both stable coins and just asset tokens?Not only possible, but already widely adopted in the Wormhole X asset framework, right? There's over four and a half billion of assets in the token bridge today. And the word token bridge kind of has meant a lot of different things to people at different points in time, right? The old token bridges were bidirectional, state sponsored bridges that sovereign ecosystems would run to communicate to Ethereum, to get liquidity in as soon as possible.And then if you send that across a different bridge, then you would have like a double wrapped and triple wrapped implementation and just an absolute UX nightmare. When you use something like Wormhole's X asset framework, you retain complete path independence as you move assets across the ecosystem. Once you're registered as an X asset, let's take USD as an example, there's a couple billion dollars of USD on the bridge today. It flows throughout the ecosystem using Wormhole on the back end, Terra bridge money, uses one more on the back end to expose one of many front ends to users.When USD flows from Terra over to Ethereum or to Solana to Polygon and then to Avalanche, it retains the same representation on Avalanche that USD flowing from Terra to Avalanche directly or through any other part in the ecosystem would retain. It's a truly cross chain native asset. It doesn't fracture liquidity, it fungus seamlessly, and it allows a lot of cool composition.If you look at something, now like the result in second order effects of this, it's this theme that we've been calling X Dapps, right? So cross chained apps. And we've seen kind of the first marquee deployment of one of these apps in the form of X anchor, which is deployed on the Avalanche chain now, right?And X anchor is just a light set of endpoints that's deployed on Avalanche. And all that does is it lets you kind of hit some functions that then really assets and/or messages bundled or separately or back to the Terra blockchain and then trigger state transitions on the Terra site. Anchor contracts don't need to be deployed to every chain. You don't need to replicate state everywhere, you don't need to stay synchronized continuously. But you allow for outposts and communications and different chains to then communicate back to the home chain using messages and assets. And now the USD that's in the X asset standard can be deployed to X anchors everywhere. And it's a much faster, much more robust getting strategy that has far less communication over.Austin (37:07):Let's dig into just a little bit on like a technical level too. When you're talking about X Dapps or cross chain Dapps that are communicating via Wormhole, you're inherently talking about fractured state across multiple L1s or L2, it's unavoidable when you're ... anything cross chain is inherently working under a fractured state model. How fast does that time synchronization need to be for developers to actually deploy something like an AMM or a club across chain and actually maintain price parody and appropriate liquidity between them.Kanav (37:42):Yeah, I'm glad you brought this up. There's a few different programming models for how cross chain Dapps works, right? One is you try to state synchronize as aggressively as possible. You keep sending messages back and forth. You have allowances, risk limits, tolerances that allow your apps to communicate. And the other is this X Dapps framework where state only lives on one chain and you allow people from other chains to then interact with it.Now, of course that also comes with its own downsides, right? If you look at something like a club and you're trying to trigger a cross chain swap using the club from another chain, you are inherently incurring the latency of the two blockchain transactions and the finality assumptions that you want to kind of work with that. The more stateful your application becomes, obviously the more latency and risk constraints everything through. With something like a lending protocol or like a cross chain anchor, things like that. They are less stateful than something like an order book, but order book is probably the most stateful you can get right in the spectrum of applications.And so any cross chain swap design inherently has to have some additional liquidity back then, that's like fundamental, right? You can ask people to take risk on your behalf. You can have the protocol take risk on your behalf, but that risk exists. There's a lot of ways to program around it and create better user experiences, but fundamentally that's a real problem and somebody has to be compensated with that risk.Austin (38:56):For the X Dapp framework, are you looking to actually be able to offload compute to the wormhole level there? Or is it really just ... The natural extension of this seems to be that eventually there's some sort of state storage on Wormhole that Dapps are able to actually access and leverage with some functionally side chain compute resourcing. Are you guys thinking about that as well?Kanav (39:19):Yeah. The fundamental cross chain thesis is that there are going to be independent, specialized compute environments that attack their own communities, their own audiences and their own apps. And Wormhole is away for folks to leverage state that results from these autogenous environments and compute the solutions on these environments to compose.And you can cut that in a million different ways. You can leverage Solana as a state execution machine. You can leverage Terra as your stable coin asset layer and you can represent this third thing as a NFT thing, or you can bundle them all in. But the Wormhole vision itself right now with all the genetic message capabilities that are out there, in the near term roadmap doesn't need to build an execution layer of its own. It can naturally extend to it. I think you're definitely kind of pointing to something that's relevant.But I don't know if that's the lowest hanging fruit given the capacities that exist in current blockchain compute environment. The vision of course is to make people, Web 3.0 users rather than blockchain users or L1 users. You basically want to deploy resources to the most relevant execution environment with the right community, that's creating the right apps and then expose that to at a higher order to consumers.Austin (40:24):Would you describe Wormhole as layer zero?Kanav (40:28):I'm rather old school, I think of layer zeros as networking protocols and internet backbones and things like that. I think it is maybe a useful analogy for kind of blockchain audiences given how we've very economically can't use the word L1, so I don't have an allergic reaction to it, but it's not my first word of choice.Austin (40:46):What would your first word of choice be?Kanav (40:49):Interoperability protocol. I'm not that creative.Austin (40:51):Yeah. Wormhole is also supporting wrapped NFTs, which is kind of an interesting concept. I think most people don't think of NFTs as something that's been bridged and quite frankly, the numbers on Wormhole on bridge NFTs are quite low compared to the success as an asset bridge or a messaging bridge. What was the original idea of using wrapped NFTs? And why do you think it hasn't caught on as much yet?Kanav (41:20):I think cross chain NFTs as a story are just beginning to play out. So there's about 16, 1700 on the NFT bridge itself. And again, NFTs are also cross chain fungible and composable across environments. They are also part of the X asset framework. And so X assets can mean anything. It can be in rebasing assets like STE, it can be in NFTs. It can be in fungible assets. It can mean anything else, right?The NFT story started to play out as a result of new other ones trying to access marketplaces that supported one or the other chain, right? And so you get to access as new audiences, you get to create experiences with different communities. You get to access different user bases, but we're seeing the experiences get a lot richer. So you see something like [inaudible 00:42:00] come out recently, they got featured on Bloomberg for new cross chain staking program where they have in game elements that kind of change based on cross chain NFT staking that are different experiences with different communities. And much like the asset bridge has that kind of globalization and cross pollination of commercial kind of elements. Cross chain NFTs are globalization kind of culture. And incorporating a lot of those elements across games that live on Solana, that live on Terra, that live on other environments and just creating those kind of richer experiences.And so we're seeing people make NFTs on one chain, come to Solana, fractionalize them, trade them, put them back in, move them over to OpenSea on Ethereum. There's all kind of interesting use case patterns. And so it's definitely been less aggressively adopted than the explosive token bridge or the other generic message applications. But there are still 16, 7,000 NFTs, there are a lot of teams using it for cool and innovative stuff that we just kind of keep up out of the wood works every some time.Austin (43:02):Do you think that's social? Do you think that's technological? Do you think that's just like the ecosystem hasn't matured enough? I think I'm surprised how much ... well, I guess surprises maybe the wrong term. People have a lot of emotional attachment to an NFT, in the same way they don't have an emotional attachment to a Bitcoin. They may have emotional attachment to the concept of a Bitcoin, but I would be upset if I lost my particular Degen ape, even if I got a different one for the exact same value. Do you think that factors in at all to how people view the concept of wrapping an NFT, that it somehow weakens the authenticity?Kanav (43:39):I think for a lot of purists, it does. I think it was just so worthy, right. For the most part, people aren't even going to realize, the large end of this consumers like buying these things, an NBA top shot or air, or any of these other platforms, it's something on the app for them. And eventually it's going to be extracted away as we draw to Eth, we draw to Solana, we draw to wallet, connect wallet, and it's going to be kind of as simple as that. And so we're always going to have purist stakes, but I think that's going to remain within our little chamber here.Austin (44:05):For Jump Crypto in general, how do you view NFTs? There are obviously firms now that are dabbling and market making and NFTs. Is that something that you've looked at and if not, what was the decision not to enter that space yet?Kanav (44:19):It just doesn't take a lot. We are looking at trading opportunities. You are looking about margins, you're looking about what predictive offer you can have, like what the edge you can have on a traders and then how many times you can apply that edge, right? It's just as simple as that. And even if you can get a 30% margin on something that trades a hundred million like week one, I mean, [inaudible 00:44:40] now.But if you have a low volume asset class, even if it has slightly higher edge, and it is harder to predict and more dimensional, this is on a good researching decision. So as that volume changes, we will continue to stay on top of it. And I don't know if these are trading tens of billions of dollars every day, and have really interesting datasets, I'm sure we'll be trading them.Austin (45:00):If the market hundred X in size, you wouldn't be opposed to it, it's just the sizing opportunity issue right now.Kanav (45:08):[inaudible 00:45:08] you can't be the richest man. It's about identifying if there's opportunity and executing all native there is.Austin (45:14):Looking at wormhole, one of the things I do want to touch on is the wormhole hack and exploit that happened a little while ago. It was one of the larger bridge hacks at the time. It was eclipsed a few weeks later by an even larger hack of another bridge, also targeting stolen Eth in this process. I'm sure that activities and projects that Jump has been involved in have had larger losses of money or similar volumes of money just based on the area you operate in. But this is one that inherently to the nature of Web 3.0 is very public. How is that like internally knowing that your core contributors to a project that suffered this kind of exploit, and also that failure is now a public failure, as opposed to maybe where it would've been a private failure beforeKanav (45:56):Building is hard, building in the open is even harder. And building in a decentralized open space where there's a large network of participants, consumers, affected people, the stakes we're playing in, right? That's the stakes that every DeFi application, that every L1 at every bridge and that everything in Web 3.0 that aims to do something meaningful inherently adopts and has to learn to deal with.The hack was big punch in the gut, obviously a big financial loss as well. The fundamental nature of smart contracts is that the code and code can have bugs. And this exploit was kind of deep, deep, deep down in the stack, in kind of like Solana instruction verification account check that was missing. The auditors listed our team that has independently been one of the biggest bug bounty finders in the space missed, and code based at the opportunity to be out in the wide for seven months, kind of had unchecked.The day of the hack, of course really, really rough. Jump is not used to being a public institution. So this was like you said, a very public kind of fallout in nature. I can't possibly have been prouder of the way the team reacted to this incident. We kind identified it within short course of it happening. We pulled the meeting room together, identified the bug, fixed up a batch, managed to coordinate the guardian network to bring it up, bring it down, announce our intent to refill the gaping 320 million hole within an hour of the incident being reported on, and brought the bridge back up within 18 hours to end to end.Building bridges and building cross chain is very, very hard. And that's where the reward for it, building it right, is even harder. You don't even make 320 million decisions very lightly, and this should hopefully signify you how much conviction and faith we have in the code base in bringing it back up in 18 hours. It should tell you about where we think this whole space is going and where Wormhole is going and where interoperability is going and what a core piece of infrastructure in that realm would mean.Security continues to be extremely, extremely top of mind. We have a 10 million bug bounty. We have an internal red team that's basically thinking about breaking Wormhole and our key projects every day. We have multiple audit from [inaudible 00:48:12] with lots of audits going on, pretty intense security review practices, all of which can be found publicly online. And I'm incredibly confident that Wormhole has come out more stronger from this incident. The team has come out kicking and that we're building one of the best and most trusted inter op solutions out there.Austin (48:32):Looking across the ecosystem, let's say over the next 12 to 18 months, what are you personally most excited for and what keeps you up at night? What do you still have worry around?Kanav (48:44):I'm looking forward to a whole bunch of things. So definitely very excited about all the advancements that we are seeing in the succinct proof and zero knowledge space. That stuff is just awesome, it's magic. And I'm just so excited to see all the things that's going to unlock for us. There's a lot of interesting problems in the hardware acceleration space that need to be made to make that possible. There's a lot of problems algorithmically that are kind of being uncovered there. And I think hopefully this conversation has lent on that we have a big infrastructure mindset. When I say streets and sanitation, that's kind of what we think about every day. That's what we're looking forward to. And on what we can build to and contribute to that.Austin (49:19):You said something I got to get a little more info. You said specific hardware to accelerate certain kinds of applications. The only place we've really seen this so far across the entire crypto landscape is ASICs for Bitcoin mining. You see GPU mining optimization, but again, nowadays I wouldn't necessarily even call GPU specialized hardware. It's really commodity hardware at this point that's just deployed for a specific application. When you're looking at the space, where are you seeing actually custom silicon or FPGAs becoming something that it makes sense to deploy?Kanav (49:50):Yeah, I mean, definitely for zero knowledge provers, right? So like two verification times have compressed a lot to the point where it's pretty feasible on most blockchain environments today. But proving itself is still super, super resource intensive. That's where there's a lot of simple math operations that can be encoded into Silicon and into FPGAs or ASICs to speed up the process significantly. And that's where we are seeing a lot of adopt. There's already a lot of people working on this on hardware acceleration using FPGAs, maybe even ASICs on zero knowledge provers.It's a little bit of like it's tough to say when the right time is because there's new changes like algorithmically coming out all the time with the new advances in new papers. And so when you spend a whole bunch of time just optimizing Fast Fourier transforms. And then the next paper makes Fast Fourier transforms not relevant. It's tough to make a decision on when the right time is, but I know there's a lot of work already going on into it. And it's a space that we are very familiar with and that we are also excited about. And mostly, mostly positive stuff on the regulatory side.Kanav (50:56):As of recently I think there's a lot of good faith engagement from regulators around the world on setting frameworks and policies for how kind of all this stuff gets put into place. Outside of maybe China we haven't seen anything very aggressively or handed on cutting off innovation. We even saw India now finally starting to open up. And so I feel more optimistic about the regulatory landscape than I did 12 months ago. We need a new influx of builders to keep coming and building cool experience and leveraging this technology where we're seeing that happen. We need capital being continued to commit to this space where we're seeing that happen.Austin (51:35):The inverse of that question, what are you most concerned about on a macro level for the space still?Kanav (51:39):Asset pricing is of course highly dependent on macro environment and that is unrelated to crypto, right? And there's just like, it's its own thing. And so we'll see price movements on a different time scale. And if you see a very sustained global macro depressed environment, then we're going to see less capital, less builders and less momentum in the space. And I think that's probably the biggest overhang we have today.Austin (52:03):In the long run we're all dead.Kanav (52:05):In the wrong run we're all dead. That's right, so let's keep building.Austin (52:09):Yes. One kind of last question here, I think if you rerun the clock maybe three or four years, the prevailing wisdom in this space was not that traditional financial institutions were going to expand their vision and embrace blockchain and we'd call it Web 3.0 at the end of the day. And you'd have Twitter profile pictures of NFTs, you'd have Jump Trading building software that's open source for a decentralized environment. And we really have seen that that is what was originally pitched as a forked parallel path of economic development.Austin (52:42):It's a little bit more twisty curvy than we thought it was going to be. And there's a lot more integration with traditional companies. As crypto has a thesis about it, that it's moving more consumer, right? Across the spectrum you see more normies getting into crypto in one way or another. Does the existing market of specifically the United States and Europe where you see very few competitors within an ecosystem.Austin (53:07):There's basically only two phone companies. There's basically only three cell phone companies. There's basically only four internet provider companies. Across the spectrum you see very non-competitive markets. When you look at the consumer landscape in the United States, do you imagine that we're going to see similar patterns rolling out there as we saw in the financial industry, or we really are going to go back to that idea of a parallel execution model?Kanav (53:30):Yeah. I'll strongly state that I don't hold a heretical view of this kind of being a completely forked off parallel path that has no relevance to anything that we do today. I think it's an amazing technological invasion that gives us tools to coordinate resources in an untrusted environment. And that's unlocking a lot of magic.Kanav (53:49):But that again bleeds in with the rest of the real world, which is also big and has its own dramatic pieces of innovation and with a whole bunch of other stuff going on. I think one of the most exciting things has been kind of the global equalizer that crypto can serve to be. Yesterday we saw Polygon come out with an integration with Stripe. And these are three kids from India that had no early supporting or backing that kind of boosted the network on their own and are now competing on a very, very competitive landscape with people from every single part of the world that are very well resourced, competent teams.Kanav (54:23):We see [Inaudible] coming from Korea. We see teams from Australia and New Zealand over the [inaudible 00:54:28] guys. We see people from Berlin and the US and everybody competing on the same, not only the similar consumer markets, but also on the same capital markets. And there are network effects that accrue, but not cannibalistic network effects that accrue. That makes me very excited about where the space is going overall. When we talk about integration points itself, it's going to largely depend on [inaudible 00:54:52], right? And that's like an unsatisfactory answer.Kanav (54:55):But if you're talking about financial markets, crypto is already integrated heavily into the financial markets with 15 excellent international venues that are competing, so we already have a fractured environment. That is before the [inaudible 00:55:08], the NASDAQ, the CME groups have made their moves in the space. And they're clearly not going to be monopolies in crypto, obviously, right?Kanav (55:16):If you look at something like a telco and interactions with like cell networks still remains to be seen, whether like decentralized constructions of those kinds of things can be competitive. I mean, building telcos and stuff has such strong network effects and so many economies of scale. And it's unclear whether a Web 3.0 means of accruing that value to a decentralized organization has the ability to accrue the similar kind of network effects and so remains to be seen. But I'm excited to see it play out.Austin (55:43):I always enjoy getting to pick your brain about where these technologies are going and the intersection of a very traditional financial world with this new global system that we've all been building. But thank you so much for joining us for spending some time digging into this stuff.Kanav (56:00):Thanks a lot for having me on Austin. This was super fun and as always, love chatting, so yeah, we'll see you again soon.Austin (56:04):Thanks.