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Break It Down Show
Margret Younis - Human Engineering & Behavior Training

Break It Down Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 57:48


Margret Younis - Human Engineering & Behavior Training - Margret Younis is a law enforcement instructor, researcher, speaker, and the owner of Hybrid Academy of Behavioral Security - security, investigative, and behavioral risk mitigation training firm. She implements science-based training concepts designed to prevent suicide, eliminate workplace violence, and improve the mental health and resilience of law enforcement officers, first responders, and criminal justice professionals. Find out more about her company at: Margret's passion can be found in neuropsychological research that explains behavior and decision-making processes in high-stress environments. She investigates concepts of fear, resentment, anxiety, PTSD, depression, suicide, resilience, and performance, including their correlation with the physical brain and psychological mind. Margret talk about all of that, plus her background, traumatic experiences from her past, her inner strength, and more in this ep, hosted by our Pete and co-hosted by Erik Kleinsmith. Please support the Break It Down Show by doing a monthly subscription to the show  All of the money you invest goes directly to supporting the show!   For the  of this episode head to  Haiku She found her own strength Now she helps others find it Do visit her 'site   ​Similar episodes: Bill Mankins DW Wilber Mark Sullivan Join us in supporting Save the Brave as we battle PTSD.  Executive Producer/Host: Pete A Turner  Producer: Damjan Gjorgjiev  Writer: Dragan Petrovski  The Break It Down Show is your favorite best, new podcast, featuring 5 episodes a week with great interviews highlighting world-class guests from a wide array of shows.

The College Football Daily
Former Michigan title winner Chris Singletary sees similar traits in the 2021 version

The College Football Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 13:55


247Sports' Chris Singletary won a national championship in 1997 with Michigan, thanks to a physical, well-rounded attack, a dominant defender who made everybody better and a steady QB who didn't always make things look pretty. It's fair to say he's seeing some similarities with the 2021 team that takes on Iowa on Saturday in the Big Ten Championship. Host: Trey Scott   Guest: Chris Singletary Follow or Subscribe to The College Football Daily on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts. Find the 247Sports podcast for your favorite team here! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Hacking Humans
Do you really want that device to be a connected device?

Hacking Humans

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 47:24


Guest Jay Radcliffe from Thermo Fisher Scientific shares his advice and security concerns with smart devices since the holiday gifting season is around the corner, Joe and Dave have some listener follow up about 2FA, Joe's got a story about the Robinhood breach, Dave's story is about numerous LinkedIn requests from HR specialists with GAN images (Generated Adversarial Network), and our Catch of the Day is from listener Michael who was just trying to sell his car and then he got a text message. Links to stories: Data Breach of Robinhood Trading Platform Blamed on Social Engineering, Similar to 2020 Twitter Breach LinkedIn Fakes: A Wolf in Business Casual Clothing Have a Catch of the Day you'd like to share? Email it to us at hackinghumans@thecyberwire.com or hit us up on Twitter.

Positively Real Podcast
How to Finish 2021 Strong

Positively Real Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 23:11


Similar to years passed, Brittny is sharing how you can finish the last 30 days of the year strong by getting a head start on a goal you may have WITHOUT the hustle culture mentality. She breaks down how and why setting micro commitments can lead to micro progression which will actually allow you to reach bigger goals quicker and feel more effortless. Share your micro goal with Brittny by sending her a message at https://instagram.com/positivelyreal_podcast!Connect with Brittny:www.brittnyking.comwww.instagram.com/brittnyking_Join the Mindset Mastery for High-Achieving Women Facebook Group

Scanner School - Everything you wanted to know about the Scanner Radio Hobby

Gregg Johnson and I discuss Plectrons and early fire alerting methods before portable radios and pagers were commonplace. We discuss the history of Plectron receivers and how volunteer firefighters were alerted to calls before they had in-home radio alerting or portable receivers. What You Need To Know Plectrons are one of the earliest types of home receivers ever used for volunteer firefighters. The plectron had a different name back in the beginning, and in 1955 it was called FYRCALL. It was the first model that they made. Plectrons was the first widely used in-home unit that allowed firefighters to be activated and keep the radio-quiet. Similar to today's alerting receivers, the dispatcher would generate set tones that would set the receiver to activate. Plectrons were analog devices and required reads in the receivers. These reeds needed to be tuned by a radios shop and would resonate to the paging tone. If the resonate frequency matched, the Plectron would alert. Plectrons are a piece of radio history and many are still in use today. Scanner Radios with “Fire Tone Out” can mimic what early Plectron receivers were. ====================================

I Survived Theatre School

Intro: Boz deserves a seat at the table, life coaches, let's be directLet Me Run This By You: Gina versus plots - is it just ADD? Interview: We talk to Kate Dugan about living in Morocco, her playwriting program,  Sandy Shinner, Victory Gardens, shooting yourself in the foot, being ready or not to take advantage of opportunities, Outliers, regret, Sandra Delgado, the Bad Boyfriend years, Austin Film Festival, Ola Rotimi, Actor's Training Center, Meisner, Erica Daniels, Bikram yogaFULL TRANSCRIPT (unedited): 1 (8s):And Jen Bosworth from me this and I'm Gina Polizzi. We went to theater school together. We survived it, but we didn't quite understand it. 20 years later, we're digging deep talking to our guests about their experiences and trying to make sense of it all. We survived theater school and you will too. Are we famous yet? Not a whole hell of a lot. I mean, I'm, I feel I'm right. I just real, really excited to like level up my, my work life game. Like, it doesn't even mean that I, it just means that, like, I actually feel like an adult, like I just feel at 47 right now.1 (55s):I'm 47. I feel at 47. Like I'm ready. Oh girl. Wait, am I 40? No, I had a birthday. October four. Yeah. You turned 40 you're you're you're desperate to be older apparently. Oh, I've been telling people 47. Okay. So what year were you born? 75, but I'm terrible at math for 46 years. Okay. So what was I saying about being the wrong age? Oh, I just feel like at 46, right? That's my age at 46. I am finally ready to get a job, like, okay. I need a writing job, like a, B a real job, a real job of like, of like, I feel like I finally deserve, I just, I'm starting to feel like I finally deserve a seat at the table.1 (1m 47s):I love that. Yeah, I definitely do. Yeah. I mean, I just do deserve it, but like the world needs for you to have that seat at the table. Thank you. And I finally feel like that is a possibility, you know, it's interesting. And I was going to ask you about this. So there are all these Clem coaches in Los Angeles. Oh, that's funny. I was going to ask you if something about coaches, but go ahead. Okay, great. So, so God bless him and I can just see everyone is really trying to earn a living, right? So like, everyone I meet is trying to help. I know a lot of hustlers, right?1 (2m 28s):So coaches now have this language. It's fantastic. First time a coach uses language with me. I thought it was so cool. And I was so special. They all fucking use this language. Good ones, bad ones, whatever. Okay. So they get to the part. I had a free introductory session with a woman who was wonderful, nothing wrong with her. I'm talking about specific coaching language around payment and charging people talking about the fee. Okay. So therapists my in my, you know, the way it was, well, I also worked for a social service agency. So I could like just people please, my way out of it and say, well, the agency charges this, you know, all of this. Okay.1 (3m 8s):But for all the people I've seen as therapists, they're pretty straightforward. They're like, my fee is 180 an hour. This is how much your copay would. I looked up your insurance, whatever coaches have a whole nother situation where they say things like, I don't usually do this. This is what they say more than one coach say this to me. I don't usually do this, but I'm going to do something I don't normally do, which is I'm gonna let you set your fee. How much is this worth to you?2 (3m 36s):Oh God. Oh fuck you. What kind1 (3m 39s):Of invest?2 (3m 40s):$7 and 50 cents.1 (3m 42s):What kind of investment are you willing to make in your future? Whatever, whatever they get. And then2 (3m 51s):If you low ball it, it's like, well, I guess you're not recommend it to your future,1 (3m 54s):Right. Or, and you must not value. You must not yet. Right? You must not think that you're abundant enough to bring it the way. So the first time someone said this to me, I was like, this is brilliant. Like I totally, and I bought in and I was like, and I, and, and I didn't know. I was like, okay, you know, $80 a session. And then she later, and then we did that for a while later, she told me that she charges like $2,000 for, oh my God. Like a packet. And I was like, what? Okay, so right. Okay. This person did not do this the other day. I had a free introductory session. And she said that, you know, when she's a woman of color and I really adore her, but it was the same language.1 (4m 38s):And it's not, it's what they're trained to say. And so I just am, so I was so naive. I thought this was like such a cool thing. And now I'm like, wait, everyone's using the same thing, which is, I'm going to let you set your fee to tell me how much you are invested in yourself. And I'm like, wait, that's manipulative. Just set your fucking fee. And if I just said fan, and if I don't pay it, I don't pay it. And we don't work together because otherwise2 (5m 7s):You're setting up the road. I mean, setting up the dynamic where somebody is going to feel resentful, right? Like if, if you're the coach and you're not charging what you, what you think you're. I mean, what about that? Why wouldn't you turn it back on them and say like, well, I really rely upon providers to tell me what they think they're worth by having an established fee. I mean, this is, it's so crazy. It's, it's like saying actually I've had this before with, I can't think maybe babysitters, like how much you charge. Well, whatever you feel comfortable with, I don't know what to do with that. Like, I mean, I feel comfortable paying you nothing. Does that mean that's what you want to,1 (5m 48s):Right? This is what we get in trouble with when, whenever there's a barter situation as well. Like I remember, oh my God, my dad is a anyway. I remember a psychologist getting into huge trouble at a friend, my dad's friend for bartering with therapy.2 (6m 7s):Oh my God. Like, make me homemade tofu or something like1 (6m 11s):Similar, like out, like you do my yard work. I'll do. I mean, I mean, like you get into trouble. It leads to trouble. I think it's better to be out of vagueness, set your fee and not, and just say, this is my fee. And if someone wants to have a conversation about the fee and do you lower it, and then you have a further conversation, whether you decide to lower it or not is up to you. But like, yeah, I don't like this, this,2 (6m 39s):No. And let's just be direct. I mean, this is another problem that we have, like with just, I don't know, globally with communication. I just feel like people are so darn indirect and it doesn't help. I'm not, I'm not suggesting that like, I can't use more, you know, finesse or be half softer or whatever. But like at the end of the day, I just want to know what it is. You're trying to say to me, you know, and I don't want to guess about it because I'm going to guess wrong. And then you're going to feel a type of way about it. And it's unnecessary.1 (7m 12s):It's unnecessary. And I do, you know, as much as, as much as I, I always think back, I had a therapist at the, at Austin Riggs in Massachusetts and Stockbridge and Dr. Craig Pierce. Right. And he, it was interesting. I wanted to call him Dr. Craig. And he was like, no, that is not my name. And, and I was like, this guy is such a douche, but really he was setting a boundary saying, no, no, no, no, no. I'm not your friend. I'm actually not your dad. I'm not your, this isn't, we're working. We're doing serious work here. And it's either Craig or Dr. Pierce, but you can't. And at the time I was like 21 or something. I don't know what I was, but I thought what a douche, but now I'm like, oh, he actually was, was trying to help me.2 (8m 1s):Let's just get this out of the way. This is how I expect to be referred to this is how much I expect to be paid. My thing about coaches recently is I feel like everybody is doing this group delusion about, like, we can't go to therapy. So we have to say, I mean, we could pay more for a coach than we might for a therapist. We could be more revealing with a coach that we were therapists. It's just turned into the stigma of like, well, I don't want to go to therapy, but you know, I want to have a coach. And the problem with that is it's so wildly unregulated.1 (8m 34s):Yes,2 (8m 34s):Exactly. If anybody can call themselves a coach,1 (8m 37s):Right. And even this, this coach that I saw was like, yeah, it's wild Lynn regulated. And I understand that, you know, so, so there are some, you know, weird coaches and she's lovely and she's trying to make a living. The other thing that is so clear to me is everyone is trying to make a living. So there is right. Everyone's trying, I give them points for trying, like you she's trying to have a coaching business. So, so right. I don't fault her for it, but I did. I was like, so shocked that the language, I was like, oh, here we go. She's going to say the exact thing that this other coach said. So, duh, there's all kinds of like classes that for free structure that could the coaches taste.1 (9m 24s):Are you going to see her again? I mean, I'm not, no, no, no, no, no. I told her, I was like, you know, I'm just really not in a position to do coaching right now. And I'm not, I have a therapy. I have a new therapist. Let me just pay the therapist who told me what our fee was. So it was interesting. The other thing that I think was interesting is like I took, the reason I met this coach was I took a workshop on a free workshop on imposter syndrome, which is another like thing that people are really throwing around now is imposter syndrome. And self-sabotage those kinds of phrases. So I took an imposter syndrome workshop, lovely workshop. And then they said, you know, we're going to have a raffle and see who gets a free coaching session.1 (10m 5s):Well, we all, did. We all won the RAF. I mean,2 (10m 14s):Oh my God. I mean, is everything a play Like a performance piece in Los Angeles?1 (10m 24s):Yeah, it is. It is. And it's so, it's so funny, but like, so yeah, I was talking to my friend, I'm like, who went to the workshop? I'm like, oh, I won the I wasn't coaching says, she goes, so did I? And then I talked to someone else who I met when I networked with like soda. I was like,2 (10m 40s):I really respect how much it seems like people in LA are devoted to self-improvement. I really, really respect that in a way that I just feel like people out here aren't or if they are, they don't talk about it. Maybe it's what it is. But it does seem, it does seem like people in LA are either they're on a health kick or a mental health kick or they're, you know, getting sober or I just feel like there's a lot of, there's a lot of1 (11m 5s):Types here.2 (11m 8s):And I appreciate the fact that everybody talks about that openly. Because if, if people are into that stuff around here, they don't talk about it. So I ended up feeling like, you know, I'm a weirdo.1 (11m 19s):I feel like it's like, like literally like old money versus new money. I swear to God it's like old, old paradigms versus new paradigms. And like, yeah, it's out in the open here, everyone's on some kick, but at the same time, it's also lessened because everybody's talking about it all the time and it becomes like the, like a F like a farce, like not sacred in any way. It's like,2 (11m 47s):Yeah. And I bet there's a lot of people who are doing the most, like in terms of self-help and they're just still the biggest, or they're just lying to themselves about the fact that they're, they feel like they're getting better, but they're really just haven't changed at all. Yeah. I mean, I think that like, living anywhere is a problem. Well, let me get out of here. I feel like, wow, you can really feel the Puritan vibe. I mean, it's yes. You really it's like, we don't talk about feelings. We, we talk about things on the surface. We don't reveal, you know, very much about ourselves. Wow. Yeah. Keep everything. It's all, it's very buttoned up.2 (12m 27s):Wow. When I first moved here, I really appreciated that, you know, I've done some wild swings geographically, like yeah. Growing up in Sacramento was kind of one sort of thing unto itself that doesn't relate that much to California. Yeah. And then going to Chicago was like, oh, okay. I like this. These people are really down to earth. You know, then I got kind of sick of that. And then I moved to back to California, to the bay area. And I really was into that for awhile. And then I felt like, oh my God, this is all. So this is all bullshit. Like talking about everybody was an imposter. I felt like everybody was low key. So aggro. And then just this hippie, you know, talking about free level the time.2 (13m 8s):And then we moved to New York and I was like, oh, people will just get right to the point here. I really appreciate that. And I never got tired of that, but then we moved here and I thought, oh, this is new England. This is what the pilgrims they've decided a way to be. And it's very buttoned up and they haven't changed in, you know, 300 years. For, you know, have like a little ideas folder in my notes where I just make it little snippets of ideas and write them down. And I've had like six or seven that I realized are all circling around the same idea, which is, I want to have a movie or some, or some type of a script where it's a superhero, but the superhero, their power is that they can interact through some type of magic.2 (14m 8s):They can intervene in somebody else's life when they're making bad decisions. This is sort of romantic coaching and like, Hmm, maybe it's virtual reality, but they, they can kind of put themselves into the body of the person who's making the bad decisions and then help them. You know, it's like, it's basically like the therapist having none of the barriers to, you know, wellness or whatever, and just kind of getting right in there at the same time as this is a comment about how we look to other people to tell us how to behave. Anyway, the superheroes name is psyche and I love it. And, and I'm, I'm it, I'm it.2 (14m 49s):I want to kind of continue with this idea, but I am woefully terrible with plot, as I think we've talked about before. I don't know if you're talking about the podcast before and it's such a, it makes perfect sense that my given my own psychology, that plot would be the hardest thing,1 (15m 11s):Because more that,2 (15m 13s):Well, my, my mother is the first person to tell you, she's never done anything with a plan. She's always just reacted to whatever has come her way. In fact, the idea of like having a goal and working towards it was literally something I never learned until I met my husband. Wow. When like a week, a day. And he was like, what are you going to do today? And I said, oh, I think I'm going to sit out in the sun. And he said, what? I thought you were trying to be an actress. I thought you were like, well, you don't have any time to sit down and do anything. Like you have a goal. And that, and that's been my thing is like, I, I have these vague undefined or have had vague undefined goals yet that in some ways I'm working towards, but because there's no sort of master plan or not a conscious one, if don't know how to get from a, to B to C I know everything about what it looks like as you're traveling from a to B to C, I had to describe it and everything like that.2 (16m 10s):But as far as charting a course of like, this is where I'm starting, and this is where I'm going to end up. That's pretty new to me. And I feel like that's why I struggle with clot. Cause I just don't have like a lot of idea of how something unfolds.1 (16m 26s):Seriously. Literally just ADHD. Could that be,2 (16m 30s):Oh, maybe you have ADHD.1 (16m 33s):Did we talk about2 (16m 33s):This? I have add1 (16m 36s):Or add. So if you have that, this is when I talk to writers who have add that this is their exact situation. Oh, okay. Excellent. With dialogue, excellent. With everything except the actual plot pointing to a, to B, to C you just, I think you just need a class in some add meds. Like I'm serious. I, I don't think, Hey, this is not a, this is, this could be a very practical thing. So, so my father had some big problems, but was a brilliant man in a lot of ways, right? His dissertation, he could see the whole thing where it was going to end up.1 (17m 16s):He knew what he wanted people to feel when he read it. He knew he could not write the thing. So my mother ended up writing it for him. Please don't take your degree away possibly anyway, because he couldn't do the, the actual thing. So I I'm wondering, just like my thing was kind of practical of finding a coworking space and not getting a divorce kind of a situation like yours is literally like, could be a physiological response to too much stimuli going on and how to get to, to your vision. So, and maybe2 (17m 54s):I need a coach.1 (17m 56s):Well, Gina funny, you should bring that up because I was going to say to you, how much is it worth for? You know, I tried to tell you as being your coach on our pocket,2 (18m 6s):That would have been so slick. That would have been like, you're like, I, wasn't going to mention this to you, but I'm actually becoming okay.1 (18m 12s):I'm actually a coach now. So anyway, that is my 2 cents. When you start saying, when you start talking about that, I was like, wait a second. This is not a psychological problem. I don't think,2 (18m 25s):Okay. I mean, you know what? That sounds right to me.1 (18m 29s):Well, it makes a lot of work. You're not lazy and you're not, it's not like you don't have ambition. That's not true because you we've talked a lot on the podcast about how, like having some sense of power is really important to you. Maybe not fame, but power, the power that comes with that. So I'm like, all right, so that's not someone that has no ambition, right? So that's gotta be a different mechanism in the brain. That's not connecting in some way because you're also a people pleaser. So if someone, so my guess is if I w I would wonder if we did an experiment, like if you were in a class, right. And the class person was the teacher, the person in authority was like, and you trusted this person or mentor, whoever writing group, whatever the higher power is in that moment said, she said to you, Gita, you must do, you know, act one must be written by this date.1 (19m 18s):I wonder if you do it,2 (19m 20s):I would, I totally would. In fact, that's a part of me has been like, should I try to get into an MFA program? I don't think that's the answer. I class first just take a class,1 (19m 31s):The script anatomy, there's all these classes that like, that we can talk about later, but like take a class. I know I should have taken a class and not enrolled in an MFA program. Like that was what I, I mean, it was,2 (19m 44s):Can I tell you one of my favorite slash least favorite things in the world is when I have a big problem. And the answer is like, something really is. I both love and hate that. I hate it because I think, wow, why didn't I think of that? And why have I spent so much time just like ruminating and cogitating and wringing my hands about something that has like a pretty straightforward answer. Yeah.1 (20m 6s):And a lot of times, a lot of times us, I think kids that weren't really, for whatever reason, didn't get what they needed, emotionally, make all these things. Our brain works overtime to try to figure things out when this solution, like, I remember, like when I started having panic attacks, I thought I had schizophrenia. I thought I went to the doctor. He's like, you have a panic disorder, take this pill. And I was like, what? Yeah.2 (20m 31s):How could it be that easy? How could it be? How could it be? I feel like in that if I were in your shoes, I would think, no, no, no, I don't just have something that everybody else has. I have a truly unique, right. Is that what you were feeling?1 (20m 44s):Yeah. I thought I was going to end up in a state run nursing and I had a panic disorder. It was so I couldn't, and I think it gets wrapped up in shame and wrapped up and I should be able to, I could be, you know, all that shit, but yeah, it, it, it was like, he was like, no, no, no, no, you have something called a panic disorder. It's in this book and it was a DSM. He was like, it's in this book. And he read the, the stuff, the criteria. And I was like, I had that. He was like, no shit. Which is why I'm telling you to take this pill, the Zoloft. And I was like, wow, it didn't even cross my mind. The other thing is, nobody tells you about it. Like a lot of the struggle that we have, I think at, or at least that I have is internal. Right. So I don't, I'm not sharing it with people, which is why I think the podcast is good because maybe someone's listening to the podcast going, oh fuck.1 (21m 29s):Maybe I just have a panic disorder or maybe I have add, or I need a class instead of my life is over.2 (21m 36s):I'm terrible. I'm fundamentally incapable of getting any better. Yeah. Yeah. Totally. Totally. Well, thank you for that. What a gift1 (21m 42s):You gave me? Well, yeah, that's just what came forward. I'm like, wait, this is not a psychological weirdo, psychological pathological emotional problem.0 (21m 55s):Well,4 (22m 0s):Today on the podcast, we're talking to Kate, Dougan a playwriting major from DePaul theater school who currently lives in Morocco, where she teaches English. She is also a performer and has some interesting stories about her road from wanting to be a performer to deciding, to be a writer. So please enjoy our conversation with Kate Dougan2 (22m 27s):Oh my God. You haven't changed you one1 (22m 30s):Tiny bit. Let's say.3 (22m 34s):Thanks. Wow. Nice to see you girls. Do you guys look the same? I can't believe it. 30 years almost, right?2 (22m 41s):Yeah. Don't say it like that.3 (22m 43s): sorry. It's been 30 years since I graduated from high school. 25, since I graduated from college.1 (22m 53s):It's a long2 (22m 54s):You go by Kate.3 (22m 55s):Yeah. I go by Kate now. I grew up from Katie. Yeah. Yeah. That's great. Yeah.2 (23m 3s):Well, Kate Dougan congratulations used for five to theater3 (23m 7s):School. I did. I did.2 (23m 10s):You are now in of all places, Morocco, what the heck's going on in Morocco?3 (23m 15s):I'm teaching a high school here at an American high school. Yeah. My husband is Moroccan. So that's how we ended up here. We met in Chicago, worked together and in 2018. Yeah. We just decided it was, you know, he, his parents are, you know, getting a little older and he had not lived in Morocco for about 20, 25 years. And so he decided, you know, he wanted maybe try to come home for a little while. And so he got a job at an American high school. He's a teacher, he's a math teacher. And so we came and then I, I started sort of in one job that didn't really work for me.3 (24m 2s):Cause I initially thought like I was coming to teach theater. Always. The reality is never quite the same as what everybody says is gonna happen. And so, but when we got here, so I tried to teach a theater class, it didn't school wasn't quite ready for it. Then I sort of morphed into teaching English as a second language. And then last year during, well, during 20 19, 20, 20, I got my teaching accreditation to teach high school English. So I teach English language and literature. So yeah. Yeah. How cool do you like it? I do, actually.3 (24m 43s):I like it a lot. I, you know, everybody says the teaching is the hardest job and in many ways, teaching really is the hardest job. Like you, it's a lot of work and it's kind of, it's almost like doing like five shows a day, but you have to write all of your own material and learn all of your own material. And you know, it, it, you have to sort of, you have to really be ready for like a group of high school kids. I mean, these are, you know, they, they want to be engaged and they want to be entertained and they want to, you know, and if you can do those things and talk to the kids and be real with them, then you know, it works.3 (25m 28s):And on days that you're not quite up for it, it's a little tough. But yeah, I do like it a lot. I mean, I think that if you like to be in the room with the kids, then, then you you're, you're going to win, you know? Yeah. There's, I think that there's unfortunately, a lot of teachers who don't necessarily like children. And so you kind of questioned that sometimes. I'm sure we've all had experiences as students in that kind of situation. But yeah, I liked the kids. I liked being with high school kids, you know, they're alive and interested and you know, they haven't given up yet.3 (26m 11s):It's true. There, there, I read something to them the other day about, yeah, they're not dead yet. They're still alive. So that's, that's what I like about it.1 (26m 21s):The other thing I was going to say is that my, my mom was a teacher and she used to say the first year of teaching, like full-time was the hardest year of her life. And she like cried every day after school and it was the most rewarding. And so I, yeah, yeah.3 (26m 39s):I mean, my first year was 2019 or 20. So 2019 to 2020, I was doing my accreditation and I was teaching part-time and that was March, 2020, obviously it was all online. And then September, we started back, it was my first year teaching full time. And, you know, we had one class that was online and then everybody, you know, the kids had the option to be online if they wanted to. So there was one class online and then there were students in school and yeah, you're just trying to, you know, learn, figure out what you're doing and teach yourself the material and, you know, stay alive and handle whatever it was.3 (27m 20s):It was, it was a very stressful year. Last year I got to the, I got to June and I was really tired and really stressed out. And I just, you know, the good part of that is I have declared this year. I will never let myself get into that state again, you know, whatever I have to do to maintain my balance is really important to me. And so far it seems to be working. I I'm feeling much more on top of things this year, so. Oh, good. Yeah. Yeah.2 (27m 55s):So beef, let's talk about the period of time you decided to go to theater school. You did, you caught up on the east coast.3 (28m 7s):Yeah. I, well, not exactly. I'm from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. I know. I always thought of it as east coast. And then years later I was like, I think Pittsburgh is really Midwest. Like, I mean, it's, it's like this close to Ohio where I was from was like this close to West Virginia. So there's a whole other element going on. So it almost, you know, it is east coast, I guess, officially, but it has sort of a Midwest sort of feel like blue collar, you know, town, but yeah, so I grew up in Pittsburgh. I, I don't know.3 (28m 48s):Do you guys just want me to do grow2 (28m 49s):Performing and I do high school plays3 (28m 52s):And stuff. Okay. So not, not as much as I would've liked. I knew from a very young age that I did want to go into theater. We, we lived up the hill from a small college Washington and Jefferson college. I'm from Washington, Pennsylvania. And you know, they built a new like art center one year. And I remember going to see my first theater show there and it had just opened. And I think it was the Rainmaker. I think my dad knew the guy, the place Starbuck, and I just, you know, like, so we want to see the play and it was just the whole experience of it, you know, going to the theater and sitting in the audience and the lights and the people.3 (29m 36s):And I just remember like when the lights went down at the, at the end, I was just like, that's what I wanna do. I wanna do this, you know, how old were you? I was eight actually. So I, yeah, it got me at an early age. I wish I had gotten set on something else a little bit. But1 (30m 0s):Why Did the theater break your heart?3 (30m 5s):Ah, did the theater break? My heart? Well, I mean, it's, you know, it's, everybody's journey is different. Yeah. I mean, in some ways it's not that it broke my heart now. I feel like I just wish I had no, of course. I mean, I wouldn't change anything. I wouldn't change the trajectory. I wouldn't change that love, you know, like that feeling. But I think just like when you experience something like that, it's such a young age, like your mind gets like really set on that thing. And like, I think it's important to grow and change and you know, obviously I've done that and I've done other things.3 (30m 46s):It just, I don't know. No, because I don't wish it was really different. So I, but I, you know, we all have our moments, right. I'm sure. Of course.1 (30m 57s):Yeah. That's what this whole podcast is about where we were like, what the fuck was that? And theater broke my heart over and over again. I thought it was going to be one thing or the business and I, it was not that thing. So I, for me, it's been a off and on heartbreaking experience with the theater. And that doesn't mean that there hasn't been intense love to, you know what I mean? Like, I think it's all part of the same, but yeah. So you, you, from a young age, you were like, you saw Rainmaker and you were like, that's it? Yeah.3 (31m 25s):So that's what I want to do. And so, I mean, but like I said, it was a small town there wasn't like a whole lot going on there. I never really took any acting classes or anything until I was in high school. You know, I went like there was a, there was an acting teacher at my high school. And I just remember like going to her class and being like super excited to finally like, get to do this thing. And like, you know, she asked everybody to kind of give a spiel like about what they want to do. And so I talked about it. I was like, this is really what I want to do with my life. I'm really excited about it. I, I just, you know, this is it for me.3 (32m 6s):And, and I just remember her, like, it wasn't necessarily that day, but like at some point she just kind of looked at me and she was like, oh, you're the one that wants to be an actress. And it was like that first, like, I'm sure you guys have experienced this. It was like that first experience of like, oh, I guess like me being excited about it, isn't necessarily going to get people to be positive with me. There was certain that there was an element of bitterness, I guess, which I think happens to people, you know, and I think it happens justifiably.3 (32m 53s):And so I think, you know, it's very important to me that I don't become bitter that I, and I'm glad I haven't, but I, I felt it was a very, it was like that first experience, like, okay, this is somebody that I, I, this is something I want to do. And this is somebody that can help me. And she was just not very enthusiastic about being helpful to me, you know, like, yeah. Who knows I was, it was kind of a weird year for me. So maybe I, you know, wasn't a very good student or something, or maybe she,1 (33m 25s):She, she, that's a shitty you you're probably right on. No, no, because I know because I've done that to people. Actually, I, I feel like I've dampened peoples. I do this with my husband all the time where I rain on his parade. And she rained on your parade a little bit. I'm not saying it's not that she doesn't have good reason to rain grades, but she did. And that, that is sort of, we hear it a lot. So I would think for someone to either either blatantly or inadvertently reign on a youngster's parade in terms of their artistic dreams.3 (33m 57s):So like at high school, I wasn't really that, like, I, I think I, we did like a play for my English class or something. So I don't know. I, I try, like I was in speech and debate and I went to one meet. And let me tell you like the power of the mind. Like I got laryngitis that day. Like I got laryngitis on the bus on the way to the meet and couldn't talk all day. And then on the bus on the way home I was able to speak. And so, you know, I think, you know, there's, yeah. I mean, that's a, that's a whole other . I mean, does that mean you1 (34m 37s):Didn't keep going with speech and debate3 (34m 39s):Or you had no, I don't think I did. I don't really remember. I obviously it was not a huge part of my life because I think at some point I was like, okay, this is not the person that's going to help me. I'm not getting feeling very positive vibes here. And so I'm gonna try to, you know, do other things. So then I started taking acting classes.1 (34m 60s):Did she wait to interrupt? Did she run the speech and debate thing too?3 (35m 3s):Yes, she did. Oh, no.1 (35m 5s):So that's, I mean, there you go. I mean, that's3 (35m 8s):How my mom1 (35m 9s):Running.3 (35m 11s):Yeah. Who knows. Anyway, so then I started going to like taking acting classes in downtown Pittsburgh. There was the civic light opera, and they had like an academy of, it was musical theater, but I just took straight acting classes. I was never like really a singer or anything like that. And that was a really positive experience for me. I had a great teacher, Jill, and, you know, we did a lot of scene study and she was, she was the opposite, you know, she was a very positive person, very loving and sweet. And, you know, really, you made me feel good about what I was doing and what I could do.3 (35m 52s):So, you know, there are those people as well that, you know,2 (35m 57s):Who suggested that you could pursue it for college.3 (36m 5s):I mean, I think it was never, for me, it was just never a question like, but I long story, I didn't, I didn't, I wasn't in the acting program at DePaul, I was in the play. I was in the wait. I was in the, I was in the playwriting program. Yeah.2 (36m 27s):Why do I remember you as being in class with me? But I feel like I remember you as being one of the actors. I remember seeing you on Steve.3 (36m 38s):No, I, I, I doubt it. I, I, unless2 (36m 42s):Were you in a play onstage?3 (36m 44s):I don't think so. No. I mean, unless it was like some kind of workshop for one of my plays or something like that, but no,2 (36m 54s):I mean, do you remember me at all? I3 (36m 56s):Do remember. Yeah. I remember you guys. I remember you completely. I just, so I think I graduated. I was a year older than you guys. I think. When did you graduate? I graduated in 96. Okay. So yeah, one year older. You will, so, okay, go ahead.2 (37m 14s):Awesome. Yeah, that happened. What the hell?3 (37m 19s):Well, let me, let me dial back to, to where, cause you asked me if my teacher wanted me to go to college and for me, like there was just no other, I was going to school for theater and there was no stopping me. You know, it was funny. I've listened to some of your podcasts and, and I listened to Caitlin Kiernan's and she was just like, you know, I was 18. Like, what do you, you know, like what did I think? I don't know, but I just, this is what my mind was set on. So, so I'm sure she, she, I remember her telling me that that acting teacher, she was like of all of my, you know, she put me aside and this one other girl, Heather, who I think has actually done pretty well. I think she lives in LA and you know, there's not a lot of TV work.3 (38m 0s):And she was like, you know, she's like of my students. I think you guys have real potential to make something in this business. So she was very positive. So then I started auditioning. I auditioned for probably not enough schools. I should've heard DePaul and like Carnegie Mellon and I think some other, a couple of other schools. And so then I kind of had my mind set in Chicago. My brother lived in Chicago for a couple of years and I had gone to visit him. And I just really like fell in love with the city. And I always knew that I wanted to go to school in a city. So I kind of got my mind set on Chicago. I was like, well, if I get in the car to Carnegie Mellon, I'm from Pittsburgh obviously, but I didn't.3 (38m 45s):So then I auditioned for DePaul and I didn't get in my first, I didn't get in. And so I decided to take a year off and try again, which my dad was not super happy about, but I just had my mindset. I was like, no, I'm going to take year off. And then I'm going to try it again. I'm going to audition again. And that's it. And it ended up being, you know, I think taking your off was a good thing for me. I auditioned again and I didn't get in again. And so, you know, it's funny, like listening to these stories of you guys, like, and all the struggles that you went through and it's like, well, you know, well, at least you, you got in what's true.3 (39m 33s):Like there are different struggles. Yeah. There are different struggles for sure. But then so, and I, when I didn't get in the second time, I was just, I don't know. I think I was just set on Chicago. I was kind of set on DePaul. They'd offered me a place in theater studies program. And so I took it and then I, I decided when I was there to do join the playwriting program, and this is 1996 or 1992. And I was like, at that point I was like, literally like the only person in the playwriting program. My first year, there was like one person who was like a sophomore.3 (40m 14s):I think it was like the second or third year that Dean Corrin was there. He had just been taken on to start this program. And so, yeah. And then as I went through like a few other people joined like Diane Herrera and I think Adam Matthias was also in the writing program. And so while I was there kind of grew a little bit. Yeah. So I, it was, you know, I mean, I don't know. You just want me to keep talking? I feel like2 (40m 51s):I was just ask a question about the theater studies program, because I don't know that we've ever really talked about that program and, and how you just described it, made it sound like that's where people can go to figure out what non-acting thing they want to do in theater.3 (41m 9s):I mean, I think I, to be honest, you know, I mean, let's not kid ourselves college is about making money. Right. For, for most people it's, for-profit, it's private school. I think that they wanted to build the program and yeah. I don't know what it was. I mean, I think I did pretty good on my SATs. My grades were decent and I don't know, maybe my audition was okay. And so it was sort of, yeah, like, you know, they offered it to people like, you know, if you want to come, you're not invited to the acting program, but if you want, you can come to the theater studies program. And so I said, no, the first year, and then the second year I was like, I'm ready to go to school. I mean, sometimes I think I probably would've been better off like going to like a smaller school that didn't necessarily require an audition or something like that, but say levee.3 (41m 57s):Right. And, and so, yeah, I was like, well, I guess I'll do playwriting. And I, I, I mean, I'm glad I did it for many reasons. It was not, it ended up being a really good choice for me. I mean, I think like listening to you guys talk about the competition and, you know, sort of like, I don't do well with rejection. You know, I think you really, I don't, I don't necessarily like love to be the center of attention. And I think like, as an actor or at least to be successful on some level, you have to want that attention.3 (42m 42s):I mean, you guys do, do you feel that you like being the center of attention? She does.1 (42m 49s):Like, I love, I am constantly and mine is, if you listen to the podcast, like we talk about the psychological stuff. Like, I, I still, you know, feel like I wasn't treated right as a kid. So I'm constantly, I'm so transparent about it. I'm constantly trying to get the approval of my mother. Who's dead by the way. So yeah, I, I can say that, like, I want to belong and I want someone to say you are special and I pick you. That's like my dark sort of shadow side. And it always will be for me. I think even if I work through it, I think we all have our shadow sides and that's, and that's mine. And I think it transformed into, oh, maybe if this school likes me, that will give me that sense, but I never got that from DePaul because, you know, one it's that set up for that too.1 (43m 37s):People are bitter and weird and three it's an inside job. Yeah.3 (43m 41s):Yeah. For sure. Yeah. I mean, I think for me, like part of it was, I am the youngest of four and so I think it was like that craving for attention. Like I totally get what you're saying there. So, I mean, I like to be on stage, but like, I don't necessarily like the auditioning part of it and I don't necessarily, you know, like have to be the center of attention to parties or any of those things. But I did, you know, I really did enjoy, I really do enjoy acting like I, I do like it, but so1 (44m 12s):You, you,3 (44m 12s):You were doing a playwriting BFA. Yes. Okay. Yeah. Yeah. You did.1 (44m 18s):And your plays got workshopped.3 (44m 21s):Yeah. I mean, you know, the, the program was still very fledgling and I think because, you know, I wasn't in the acting program, you know, I had a little bit of a chip on my shoulder, I think admitted,1 (44m 43s):Wait, I just have to say, like, there's something really fierce about auditioning twice for the program and then going to theater school, studying theater studies, look at your, at a young age to say, you know what? I fucking want to go to school. So I'm going to, I mean, talk about, I, I see it as, you know, I hate calling people brave, cause I think it's kind of sending, but I think it's fierce to say I'm still going to go to this school. I mean, of course you had, I would have a chip on my shoulder so big. I wouldn't go. Yeah. You went and got an education for God's sake in a degree.3 (45m 16s):Yeah. And I, I, I got a really good education, you know, that's part of what was really positive for me. And I'll go back to the question about workshopping in a second. But what was positive for me is that the theater school had this glitch in their, in their system in because the acting students had to take so many classes cause you guys had yoga and movement to music and scene study and whoever knows what else. So like as part of your tuition, you could take up to 24 credits. And so what I did is I then got a really great liberal arts education.3 (45m 57s):I took poetry writing classes. I took like performance of literature. I took video editing. I took intro to film. I took like,1 (46m 10s):We'll do you could do that Kate? Like, how did you figure out like, oh, I have 24 credits. I'm going to use these.3 (46m 15s):I really don't. I don't know that anybody told me, I think I just figured it out at some point. And I was like, okay, well I guess I'm going to get my money's worth and I'm going to go take these other classes and these other schools and learn how to write and learn how to make films and do intro to film and learn, you know? So like I really loved college. I don't, you know, the theater school was, I don't have anything negative to really say about the theater school either. I knew what I was getting into. Like I said, I sort of had that chip on my shoulder to begin with about being part of the theater school about feeling like Jen, like you said, like about feeling like an insider, but you know, all my friends were in the theater school.3 (47m 2s):I, I love theater people. I really enjoyed that experience. But, but part of my good college experience happened outside of it in many ways, just because I kind of took the reins and I was like, okay, I'm gonna, I'm gonna have some fun with this and get a good education and, and play. And I, I loved it. I loved school. I loved learning new things and try new things. I even, I even took like a leave of absence from the theater for theater school for one quarter. Cause I did a, an overseas, I went to Ireland for a quarter.3 (47m 43s):So, and to do that, I had to take a leave of absence from the theaters. Yeah. Does that seem familiar? Yeah, probably Kelly was crying because I was supposed to be her roommate, but I never got which Kelly Kelly and Mick Adams. I was when I came back from Ireland, we were supposed to be roommates, but I never called and she just got her own apartments. And then I was like, oh my God, I don't know where I'm going to live. But yeah. So I, you know, anyway, so back to my theater school experience, so was, was positive also for playwriting. I, I don't know. I mean, I, you know, Dean Corrin was great, you know, we took like dramatic criticism we had yeah.3 (48m 30s):You know, another, another theme that I have, you know, listening to your podcast and you guys talked about it a little bit is like self-sabotage or not taking advantage of the opportunities presented to you. I feel like, because I kind of had that chip and I wanted to be an actor. Like I didn't necessarily take advantage of the opportunities, like playwriting opportunities, which came easier of course, because cause that's the way it goes, because if you want something it's not going to be, you know, it's not going to be easy, but if you're kind of, sort of like, well maybe, maybe not then the opportunities roll in, but yeah, like we had a poetry or a playwriting workshop class with Sandy Shinar she worked at victory gardens at the time.3 (49m 18s):Yeah. And she was good friends with Dean and like he had her come in as like a guest teacher one day and we were going to work my play and he'd given it to her and she had read it and, and I was just, I don't know. I, I just was like, oh God, I hate that. I really don't want to work on it. Do we have to do this? Can we do something else? And like how we shoot ourselves in the foot, you know, like what an opportunity really? And because I was insecure and scared, I'm sure like whatever psychological, you know, thing you want to come up with that, that, that we, we do to why, why we do these things for ourselves.3 (50m 1s):So, you know, and I, I had other opportunities like that along the way that I didn't necessarily take advantage of. But1 (50m 8s):Did you pull your play or did you work3 (50m 10s):On it? We didn't work on it. No, because there was somebody else in the class who was much smarter than I was and was like, oh, well here's my play. We can do my play. We can work on mine today. Yeah. I know. That's really that's.1 (50m 26s):I mean, I totally relate. And I think it, it just speaks to many things, but like, you weren't ready for that and that's it. And I, I'm starting to look at things like ready versus not ready versus good and bad. So you just weren't ready to have that experience. And we can look back and, you know, I listened to Gina and I talk to people on and we're like, we blame ourselves for that, but you just simply didn't have the emotional resources to take in that experience. And that sucks. But,2 (51m 1s):And when you're not ready, it, people could say anything to you. That person could have said, we want you to be the new resident playwright, a victory gardens. You would've said, I don't think so.1 (51m 13s):I could've gotten the laryngitis again. Like it it's, we couldn't stop.3 (51m 19s):That's so interesting. I mean, I agree with you. I think you're, I think you're right. And that's, that's hearing it come from you. It, it, it's nice Rather than me saying it to myself or trying to figure out, like, why, why do I do these things to myself?1 (51m 37s):And it's interesting having done all these podcasts, Kate, we see it over and over again. So we have the data to tell you that people have, we've heard like so many people like with these ICTs being offered these things and being like, no, I'm not going to move to LA because you know, I have an apartment in Wrigleyville. Like I'm not going to be a movie star. And people are like, what's the D we all have that. I think that's part of growing up. And I also also think it's part of expecting young people to really handle a lot of things we cannot handle.3 (52m 11s):Yeah. They're one of the books that I, I teach my students is called outliers. Have you guys read it? It's Malcolm Gladwell. And he, you know, there's a section in where he talks about practical intelligence and you know, how some people, the people that are successful, you know, they grow up with a certain family life, or, you know, maybe it's about money. It's about education. It's about these things. But it's also just knowing how to handle yourself in certain situations and knowing how to take advantage of the opportunities that are presented to you. And I think if you aren't, if you don't have that, or you're not taught that it is hard sometimes to, you know?2 (52m 50s):Yeah. And what, I just heard you, I mean, when you said, it's good to hear that from us, that made me think, oh, you've been beating yourself up about this for 25 years to yourself. Why did I squander this opportunity? Which, I mean, whether or not you did it, it's completely human. That, that you might occasionally have that thought, but have you spent a lot of time in, in regret?3 (53m 18s):I mean, I don't think so. I think I don't spend a lot of time in regret. You know, I definitely had moments over the years. I, well, a few years back, I sort of had like a little bit of a, not a breakdown, but like, I think of my midlife crisis started and like my, you know, I have two kids and my daughter was, you know, eight and my son was four and it was just kind of like, you know, you know, when kids are babies, it's just baby, baby, baby, baby. You don't, you don't have time to think about yourself. So who cares? And then like when you start to get back to yourself a little bit, it's just like, okay, I'm, you know, I'm 42 or, you know, whatever, and what have I really done?3 (54m 8s):And you know, what am I doing? And you know, is this, this, this it, I mean, I, I was teaching yoga. So, I mean, that's also a part of my journey. I mean, like I, so when I got out of school, like I did acting for a while, like, I've done some very bad independent films. Do you guys know Sandra Delgado? Oh yeah. Yeah. She, I like, we did a really bad film together in the early two thousands. And, you know, like I did like a horror film and I was like, had some small parts as mother independent films.3 (54m 52s):And, you know, I, I was trying to act and auditioning and auditioning and auditioning and like I did a couple of plays, but it was just never, you know, I just could never get to a certain point. I really just, I would have done theater and crappy theater and whatever, but I just, I couldn't, you know, for whatever reason, you know, I have the, that decade that I called the, the bad boyfriend years, so which we can all relate to on some level, which I, you know, where we all waste a lot of energy on people who don't deserve it. Oh yeah. Yeah. And then, so, so then, yeah, like a few years back, so it was kind of not in a good place.3 (55m 39s):And I was like, okay, well, I guess it's now or never. And I, I finally finished the play, so I went back to writing. Yeah. That's huge. That's awesome. You know, I finally cause I, I was like, okay, I guess if I'm going to try, I guess I gotta try. And, you know, I, I really discovered a few things. I discovered that I like writing. I, I feel good when I'm doing it. You know, there's a lot of positives to it in that way. I finished the play. I, it got, it got into like the second round at the Austin film festival.3 (56m 19s):So that was, yeah, that was pretty cool. I guess, since it was just like my first foray out of doing anything in theater in quite some time, and I had a stage reading in Chicago and then it sort of, you know, petered out after that. I, I was sending it out, sending it out, but no, no, no hits after that. But so, you know, I'm kind of gearing up to write again. So, no, I don't, I don't have, I don't, I haven't been beating myself up about it. I think that, you know, life takes a course and you can only do what you are doing in the time that you're doing it.3 (57m 0s):You only have the information that you have. You only have the life skills that you have. You only have the resources that you have. And so I think regret, I don't waste a lot of time on regret. I have enjoyed listening to the podcast and sort of like you said, Jen, like everybody's story is the same, a little bit. And that, you know, a lot of people who, you know, I've looked up to and had a lot of respect for and were really good actors and good at what they did. It just didn't happen for them. And so that's, that's like, I, yeah.2 (57m 37s):So I'm still just trying to, I'm still trying to wrap my head around why I just remember you as being an acting student, maybe it had to do with that. You were friends with Kelly and maybe because of your friendship with Kelly.3 (57m 54s):Yeah, probably that was it. Yeah. I mean, I was, I was friends with all the apartment three crew. I, yeah.1 (58m 2s):So I mean, I like, I like that even like deeper in my brain, I was like, what if I was taking on your desire to be an actor? I saw you as an actor because it was so strong that you wanted to be an actor. Like, I literally have an image of you on stage, but I actually can't3 (58m 22s):Be somebody else. Yeah. I1 (58m 25s):It's your face. It's really weird. So, anyway,3 (58m 27s):I mean, I guess at one time, like I had a play that maybe I did a stage reading of with Darryl Dickerson at school and maybe some other actors, maybe Kelly was in it. I don't know. But that would have really been like in a classroom. Yeah, yeah, no, I not an actor or, I mean, I am an actor, but none of the theater school. Yeah.2 (58m 54s):So these days, I mean, when you're talking about the work of being an English teacher, it reminded me actually, ironically, just a few days ago, I ran across a notebook that I haven't opened since I was a teacher of social studies and drama. And I re remember that I used to take for social studies. I used to write my lesson like a monologue kind of, and sort of not memorize it exactly, but almost like repeatedly rehearse it because it was not information that I already knew. I was learning the lesson right before I taught it. And teaching is so performative that during that time I was doing theater at the time.2 (59m 35s):But even if I weren't, I think I would have felt fulfilled in a performance way. Do you have that feeling about being a teacher? That it feels like a performance?3 (59m 50s):I guess what I, I do like the exchange of energy, like, like you would get from say a live audience or something like that. I don't know that I necessarily look at it as a performance, but I do feel like, yeah, you, obviously you have to be ready. You have to know what you're going to say. You have to know the material. And like, even if it is you just learning it that day or getting, you know, I feel that exchange, like, I feel good after class, like after talking with the kids and being with the kids and talking at them and, and teaching them, it does feel that way, like a little bit like that exchange of energy that you get from an audience a little bit.3 (1h 0m 35s):Yeah.2 (1h 0m 37s):Do you otherwise feel a kind of a need to do, do you have a need for any other type of creative outlet or your guys you're doing it because you're kind of getting back into3 (1h 0m 48s):My goal is to, yeah. To start writing again, like, I, I don't know how, what your, how you guys write. Like, I don't know what if you're constantly writing all the time or for me it's, it's like, I tend to sort of get inspiration and then work on something, you know, in a, in, in a period of time. Or if I create the discipline, like when I finished this play, I was getting up at like four 30 every day. I was teaching yoga at the time and the kids were, you know, still pretty young. And so I knew that the only way it was ever going to work is if I was disciplined enough to, you know, set that time aside, this is my time, my time to write.3 (1h 1m 33s):And so now, you know, after, like you said, you know, that first year is so hard, so now I'm starting to get my legs again. And I'm hoping to, yeah. Maybe start working on something I have, I've like dabbled in screenwriting before a little bit. So I'm thinking about, maybe I'm getting too into that a little bit.1 (1h 1m 57s):I have a question for you when you took playwriting. So this is interesting because it was such a young program, right. Was there any actually teaching of writing at the theater school, Like how to write a play?3 (1h 2m 12s):You know, it's funny about that. It's funny because I mean, like, I, it feels like we would write and we give it the stuff to Dean and we had deadlines and things like that. And he would give us feedback on it. You know, it's the funny thing is, is like the only, I feel like the only piece of practical writing advice that I ever got, and I, this is nothing against Dean. It's just what I remember. So Dean was awesome. I loved him. Well, we had a visiting playwright from Nigeria all over TIMI. I don't know if you remember him being there. He was there for like one quarter and he basically just like, kind of taught me to, to write a bit, you know, he's like, he's like, you have this scene here.3 (1h 2m 57s):And the guy he's at the cafe and he wants his coffee, but the waitress isn't giving him his coffee. He has to keep asking for his coffee over and over again. And it was just like, oh, you mean, I have to create like a little bit of dramatic tension in the scene, what a revelation. Right?2 (1h 3m 16s):Like it just a Mo create3 (1h 3m 17s):A moment. I felt like, you know, he gave me some real practical advice. It was just like, okay, you just have to, you know, these two people are here and you have to kind of, he wants his coffee and she won't give him his coffee and that's where the comedy comes in. And so, yeah. I don't know. I, I don't know how much, you know, they taught me about writing. I feel like I could have used a little bit of more help, like in practical matters, you know, listening to Kate's thing when you guys all went out for your showcase and that kind of thing. Like if somebody had talked to me more about submitting my work, maybe that would have been helpful.3 (1h 3m 58s):I mean, it's so weird though, to think of it at that time. I mean, I was, we were sending out headshots through the mail. We were sending out work through the mail. I mean, you have to go ,1 (1h 4m 14s):You'd have to go to what was called Kinko's then print out your play and then, and then mail it in an envelope to theaters or drop it off in person.3 (1h 4m 24s):And there was like that, like one place where you could get your headshots downtown, like the one like photography place where you could go and get like your headshots in bulk and you'd have to go pick them up. And like the blue2 (1h 4m 35s):Box. I remember the blue box.3 (1h 4m 37s):Yes. I still box exactly. You know,1 (1h 4m 44s):I think, or2 (1h 4m 45s):Yeah, something like that. So. Okay. So then let's talk about the period between graduating and we're where you are now. So you, well, you said you were auditioning,3 (1h 4m 57s):So I graduated. Yeah. And then after that, I, I, you know, I would go in spurts of productivity, you know, where I would audition a lot. You know, I was always looking at performing, you know, once again, trying to, I took a lot of classes in Chicago. I, I took classes at the actor's center. They had a lot of Meisner there. I did Steven, Steven. I have a villages program. He had a studio in like Wicker park. And so he had like a, like a, I think it was like a nine month program or something. So you would, you know, go and you'd be with the same group.3 (1h 5m 40s):And I went through a program there. I took classes downtown at, I forget what it's called now, the audition studio, or, you know, and I remember taking like an on-camera class with Erica Daniels. And who was the other, who was the lady that she always worked with? The casting director. Do you remember she was blonde1 (1h 6m 8s):Phyllis at Steppenwolf?3 (1h 6m 9s):No. It was like a casting director. Her name began with an ass. I want to say it was like Sharon or Sally, or, I dunno, she was like a big casting director at the time. So I took like an on-camera class with them, you know, I, Yeah. I don't know. It's funny cause like you, you, there's these moments where you realize like you're trying to be funny and it just, isn't funny and it just ends up really awkward. And that was one of those moments with them, you know, you're trying to impress somebody and, and she, I was sort of like chubby in high school.3 (1h 6m 57s):And so I think that as with most women who have issues with body issues, like you, you have those body issues forever. It takes a long time to shake them off. And I remember they gave me the scene. It was, the character was played by Sarah rule. Yeah. So, you know, she was a little overweight at the time, you know, and I remember kind of making this off-color joke about how, oh, I guess I see you gave me the, the part of the fat girl or something like that. Like really like probably not appropriate, but I, I meant it to be self-deprecating, but I wasn't really fat at the time.3 (1h 7m 37s):So it was didn't come off as self-deprecating it was another one of those instances where it's just like, and the woman just like hated me after that, you know? And Erica was pretty cool. I think she kind of realized that I was just nervous and awkward. And with the other woman, I remember seeing her like outside after, and she crossed the street to like, not talk to me. And I was like, oh my God, I'm such an asshole. Like, why did I say that? I didn't mean it. You know? And so I'm even blushing now I think thinking about it,1 (1h 8m 10s):You said what probably a lot of people were thinking when they would get that.2 (1h 8m 15s):Honestly, you can rest assured that absolutely every person who was there was just in an internal monologue about their own body issues. I mean, that's, that's the thing that comes up over and over again, when we feel so much shame about something like that, it's like, those people would never remember it. A and if, even if they did, they'd say with the benefit of hindsight, they might say, oh yeah, well, that just brought up for me. You know, my feelings about myself. And3 (1h 8m 44s):I mean, you know, I think, yeah, it just, it, so I took classes all over the city. I auditioned a lot, like I said, I did some independent films and then, you know, like I was still auditioning kind of in spurts over time, I think. And then I discovered yoga. And so I started doing Bikram yoga. It's just the hot yoga. I hear you guys talking about cults and cult leaders a lot on here. He's, he's one of those guys. He's a, he's a cult leader, a guru now downfall on by sexual harassment.3 (1h 9m 26s):But I started doing the yoga and that was like 2007, I think. And, you know, I had a friend who really kind of pushed me to go do the training and I wasn't really sure, but I decided to go do it. And you know, it kind of, I think, I don't know if you guys have ever done yoga, but it is sort of, you know, it kind of, it gave me something that I had been missing in a way. I think, you know, it is that, that mind body connection, I think I had been very detached from my body for many reasons, you know, abuse and all that.3 (1h 10m 7s):Like not physical abuse, but other kinds of abuse. And, and so like, I think that people get detached from their bodies. And so I think I was really connected to it in a way, and I felt good, you know, in a way that I hadn't felt in a long time. And, you know, I think that's the hardest thing. Sometimes when it goes, when you go back to theater, it's like you put so much energy into it and so much time. And I took so many classes and, you know, I enjoyed the classes and, but I just, you know, I really wanted to get on stage and it was just like, I just couldn't get there. And I think like at a certain point, you're just kind of like, what positive am I getting from this thing that I'm giving all this time and energy and love to like, what's the positives that I'm getting out of this.3 (1h 10m 55s):And I'm not, I'm not really seeing it anymore. You know, you know, I, I would get calls from people. We loved your audition. It was lovely. Please come audition for us again. So, you know, there, there were positives, but it just could never, it just really came to fruition. And so then I started doing the yoga and I, I felt really connected to it and I felt really good and in a way that I hadn't felt. And so then I started teaching yoga and I did that for like 10 years while I was having babies and raising them. And then like, yeah.3 (1h 11m 36s):So then 27 16, I started writing again.2 (1h 11m 40s):I did, I did Bikram yoga for like two years and you're just making me re remember that part of what I liked about it. It was kind of like rehearsal. I mean, cause you just go and you do the same, whatever it is, 26 poses. And the set is the same and the smell the same. And it is kind of like, it's very rich of all the nuggets, like really ritualistic.3 (1h 12m 8s):It is very ritualistic and you know, I haven't been practicing here in Morocco. Sometimes I, you know, close all the doors to my kitchen and I turn on t

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 11.29.21

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 58:46


Yoga improves quality of life in men with new diagnosis of prostate cancer University of Texas at San Antonio, November 23, 2021 An estimated 1.4 million men were diagnosed with prostate cancer worldwide in 2020, according to the American Cancer Society and the International Agency for Research on Cancer. With a new diagnosis of prostate cancer, these men have approximately a 30% incidence of depression and anxiety, a fourfold higher risk of heart attack and a twofold higher risk of committing suicide. Yoga, a set of specific body postures combined with breathing techniques and mindfulness, may be an easy-to-implement answer in this stressful situation, according to a study published Nov. 23 in the journal Prostate Cancer and Prostatic Diseases. A pilot randomized clinical trial by urology researchers at the Mays Cancer Center, home to UT Health San Antonio MD Anderson Cancer Center, enrolled 29 men who were awaiting prostatectomy. Fourteen were randomized to participate in yoga and 15 were assigned to the standard of care, which was just waiting for surgery. “We gave the active intervention group six weeks of yoga, at least twice a week, for 60 to 75 minutes,” said lead author Dharam Kaushik, MD, associate professor of urology in UT Health San Antonio's Joe R. and Teresa Lozano School of Medicine and cancer surgeon with the Mays Cancer Center. Via questionnaires, the team documented the men's perceived quality of life at the start of yoga, at the time of surgery and after surgery. Men who did not do yoga completed the same questionnaires at study enrollment and at the other two junctures. The team drew blood samples before the men began yoga and after all sessions were completed. Samples were also taken from men who did not do yoga. Sense of well-being  “What we found was very interesting,” Dr. Kaushik said. “Yoga improved quality of life in men compared to the standard of care, specifically on the fatigue scale, meaning they were less tired; on sexual function; and on their functional, physical and social well-being.” A more robust immune response and lower levels of inflammation were observed in the yoga group, he added. “This is positive data and further large-scale studies are needed, for which this pilot study can be a model,” Dr. Kaushik said. Biomarkers and yoga The primary study outcome was self-reported quality of life assessed by the questionnaires. Changes in immune cell status and inflammatory markers with yoga were secondary outcomes. The yoga group showed increased numbers of circulating CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, which are important contributors to immune health. Among other markers, the yoga group also exhibited a reduction in inflammatory markers called cytokines. The median age of participants was 56 years in the yoga group and 60 years in the standard of care group. Yoga has been studied in breast cancer, but not at the level of detail of this study, matching self-reported quality of life data with markers of immune response and inflammation, Dr. Kaushik said. “If we are able to encourage patients to do a small, inexpensive and easy-to-implement intervention that can have a big impact, then why not?” he said.     Researchers Discover How Antibiotic Power of Garlic Fights Chronic Infections Washington State University, November 28, 2021   Garlic is probably nature's most potent food. It is one of the reasons people who eat the Mediterranean diet live such long healthy lives. An active sulphurous compound found in garlic can be used to fight robust bacteria in patients with chronic infections, a new study from the University of Copenhagen indicates.   A previous finding from Washington State University showed that garlic is 100 times more effective than two popular antibiotics at fighting disease causing bacteria commonly responsible for foodborne illness.  Here the researchers show that the garlic compound is able to destroy important components in the bacteria's communication systems, which involve regulatory RNA molecules. 'We really believe this method can lead to treatment of patients, who otherwise have poor prospects. Because chronic infections like cystic fibrosis can be very robust. But now we, together with a private company, have enough knowledge to further develop the garlic drug and test it on patients', says Assistant Professor Tim Holm Jakobsen from the Costerton Biofilm Center at the Department of Immunology and Microbiology. The study is the latest addition from a research group headed by Professor Michael Givskov, which since 2005 has focussed on garlic's effect on bacteria. At the time they learned that garlic extract is able to inhibit bacteria, and in 2012 they showed that the sulphurous compound ajoene found in garlic is responsible for the effect. The new study, which has been published in the scientific journal Scientific Reports, takes an even closer look and documents ajoene's ability to inhibit small regulatory RNA molecules in two types of bacteria. 'The two types of bacteria we have studied are very important. They are called Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. They actually belong to two very different bacteria families and are normally fought using different methods. But the garlic compound is able to fight both at once and therefore may prove an effective drug when used together with antibiotics', says Tim Holm Jakobsen. Previous studies have shown that garlic appears to offer the most powerful, naturally occurring resistance to bacteria. In addition to inhibiting the bacteria's RNA molecules, the active garlic compound also damages the protective slimy matrix surrounding the bacteria, the so-called biofilm. When the biofilm is destroyed or weakened, both antibiotics and the body's own immune system are able to attack the bacteria more directly and thus remove the infection. In 2012 the researchers took out a patent on the use of ajoene to fight bacterial infections. Similar patents have been taken out for compounds in allicin -- which gives garlic its aroma and flavour -- and is known as one of the world's most powerful antioxidants.     Calorie restriction cycles could help cancer patients Fondazione Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori (Italy), November 22 2021.  Findings from a trial reported on November 17, 2021 in Cancer Discovery revealed that five days of a diet that mimics fasting is safe for people with cancer and could improve factors that affect prognosis. The trial included 101 patients with different cancers treated with standard therapies. Participants were assigned to a five-day low protein, low carbohydrate, plant-based diet that provided up to 600 calories on the first day and up to 300 calories per day during the remaining days. The regimen was repeated every three or four weeks for up to eight cycles. Each period of calorie restriction was followed by a period in which patients were instructed to adhere to healthy diet and lifestyle guidelines. Blood samples were collected before and at the end of each calorie restricted period. Severe adverse events related to the diet were reported by 12.9% of the participants, which was significantly lower than the 20% figure hypothesized by the researchers prior to the study. Median plasma glucose, serum insulin and serum IGF-1 were decreased by 18.6%, 50.7% and 30.3% after each cycle. In an evaluation conducted among a subgroup of participants after the first calorie restricted cycle, a reduction in peripheral blood immunosuppressive cells and an increase of immune cells known as activated CD8+ T cells was observed. To explore the effects of the diet on immunity within cancer patients' tumors, the researchers performed an analysis of findings from an ongoing trial that administered the fasting-mimicking diet prior to tumor removal in breast cancer patients. Tumor microenvironments revealed enhanced tumor-infiltrating CD8+ T cells and additional favorable immune factors when compared to biopsy samples obtained before the diet was initiated.  “Cyclic fasting-mimicking diet is a safe, feasible and inexpensive dietary intervention that modulates systemic metabolism and boosts antitumor immunity in cancer patients,” the authors concluded.     Morning exposure to deep red light improves declining eyesight University College London, November 24, 2021       Just three minutes of exposure to deep red light once a week, when delivered in the morning, can significantly improve declining eyesight, finds a pioneering new study by UCL researchers. Published in Scientific Reports, the study builds on the team's previous work*, which showed daily three-minute exposure to longwave deep red light ‘switched on' energy producing mitochondria cells in the human retina, helping boost naturally declining vision.   For this latest study, scientists wanted to establish what effect a single three-minute exposure would have, while also using much lower energy levels than their previous studies. Furthermore, building on separate UCL research in flies** that found mitochondria display ‘shifting workloads' depending on the time of day, the team compared morning exposure to afternoon exposure. In summary, researchers found there was, on average, a 17% improvement in participants' colour contrast vision when exposed to three minutes of 670 nanometre (long wavelength) deep red light in the morning and the effects of this single exposure lasted for at least a week. However, when the same test was conducted in the afternoon, no improvement was seen. Scientists say the benefits of deep red light, highlighted by the findings, mark a breakthrough for eye health and should lead to affordable home-based eye therapies, helping the millions of people globally with naturally declining vision. Lead author, Professor Glen Jeffery (UCL Institute of Ophthalmology), said: “We demonstrate that one single exposure to long wave deep red light in the morning can significantly improve declining vision, which is a major health and wellbeing issue, affecting millions of people globally. “This simple intervention applied at the population level would significantly impact on quality of life as people age and would likely result in reduced social costs that arise from problems associated with reduced vision.” Naturally declining vision and mitochondria In humans around 40 years old, cells in the eye's retina begin to age, and the pace of this ageing is caused, in part, when the cell's mitochondria, whose role is to produce energy (known as ATP) and boost cell function, also start to decline. Mitochondrial density is greatest in the retina's photoreceptor cells, which have high energy demands. As a result, the retina ages faster than other organs, with a 70% ATP reduction over life, causing a significant decline in photoreceptor function as they lack the energy to perform their normal role. In studying the effects of deep red light in humans, researchers built on their previous findings in mice, bumblebees and fruit flies, which all found significant improvements in the function of the retina's photoreceptors when their eyes were exposed to 670 nanometre (long wavelength) deep red light. “Mitochondria have specific sensitivities to long wavelength light influencing their performance: longer wavelengths spanning 650 to 900nm improve mitochondrial performance to increase energy production,” said Professor Jeffery. Morning and afternoon studies The retina's photoreceptor population is formed of cones, which mediate colour vision, and rods, which adapt vision in low/dim light. This study focused on cones*** and observed colour contrast sensitivity, along the protan axis (measuring red-green contrast) and the tritan axis (blue-yellow). All the participants were aged between 34 and 70, had no ocular disease, completed a questionnaire regarding eye health prior to testing, and had normal colour vision (cone function). This was assessed using a ‘Chroma Test': identifying coloured letters that had very low contrast and appeared increasingly blurred, a process called colour contrast.    Using a provided LED device all 20 participants (13 female and 7 male) were exposed to three minutes of 670nm deep red light in the morning between 8am and 9am. Their colour vision was then tested again three hours post exposure and 10 of the participants were also tested one week post exposure.  On average there was a ‘significant' 17% improvement in colour vision, which lasted a week in tested participants; in some older participants there was a 20% improvement, also lasting a week. A few months on from the first test (ensuring any positive effects of the deep red light had been ‘washed out') six (three female, three male) of the 20 participants, carried out the same test in the afternoon, between 12pm to 1pm.  When participants then had their colour vision tested again, it showed zero improvement. Professor Jeffery said: “Using a simple LED device once a week, recharges the energy system that has declined in the retina cells, rather like re-charging a battery. “And morning exposure is absolutely key to achieving improvements in declining vision: as we have previously seen in flies, mitochondria have shifting work patterns and do not respond in the same way to light in the afternoon – this study confirms this.” For this study the light energy emitted by the LED torch was just 8mW/cm2, rather than 40mW/cm2, which they had previously used. This has the effect of dimming the light but does not affect the wavelength. While both energy levels are perfectly safe for the human eye, reducing the energy further is an additional benefit. Home-based affordable eye therapies With a paucity of affordable deep red-light eye-therapies available, Professor Jeffery has been working for no commercial gain with Planet Lighting UK, a small company in Wales and others, with the aim of producing 670nm infra-red eye ware at an affordable cost, in contrast to some other LED devices designed to improve vision available in the US for over $20,000. “The technology is simple and very safe; the energy delivered by 670nm long wave light is not that much greater than that found in natural environmental light,” Professor Jeffery said. “Given its simplicity, I am confident an easy-to-use device can be made available at an affordable cost to the general public. “In the near future, a once a week three-minute exposure to deep red light could be done while making a coffee, or on the commute listening to a podcast, and such a simple addition could transform eye care and vision around the world.” Study limitations Despite the clarity of the results, researchers say some of the data are “noisy”. While positive effects are clear for individuals following 670nm exposure, the magnitude of improvements can vary markedly between those of similar ages. Therefore, some caution is needed in interpretating the data. It is possible that there are other variables between individuals that influence the degree of improvement that the researchers have not identified so far and would require a larger sample size. This research was funded by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council, and Sight Research UK.   Global rise in red/processed meat trade linked to sharp increase in diet-related illness Michigan State University & University of California at Merced, November 22, 2021   The global rise in the red and processed meat trade over the past 30 years is linked to a sharp increase in diet related ill health, with the impact greatest in Northern and Eastern Europe and the island nations of the Caribbean and Oceania, finds an analysis published in the open access journal BMJ Global Health. Health policies should be integrated with agricultural and trade policies among importing and exporting nations as a matter of urgency, to stave off further personal and societal costs, say the researchers. Among continuous urbanisation and income growth, the global red and processed meat trade has risen exponentially to meet demand. This trend has implications for the environment because of the impact it has on land use and biodiversity loss.  And high red and processed meat consumption is linked to a heightened risk of non-communicable diseases, particularly bowel cancer, diabetes, and coronary artery heart disease. The researchers wanted to find out what impact the red and processed meat trade might be having on diet-related non-communicable disease trends and which countries might be particularly vulnerable.  They drew on data on meat production and trade from the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) from 1993 to 2018 for 154 countries, focusing on 14 red meat items derived from beef, pork, lamb and goat, and six processed primarily beef and pork items, preserved by smoking, salting, curing, or chemicals. They then calculated the proportions of deaths and years of life lived with disability (DALYs) attributable to diet as a result of bowel cancer, type 2 diabetes, and coronary artery heart disease among those aged 25 and over in each country. The global red and processed meat trade increased by more than 148% from 10 metric tonnes in 1993–5 to nearly 25 metric tonnes in 2016–18. While the number of net exporting countries fell from 33 in 1993–5 to 26 in 2016–18, net importing countries rose from 121 to 128.  Developed countries in Europe accounted for half of total red and processed meat exports in 1993–95 and 2016–18.  But developing countries in South America, such as Brazil, Argentina, and Paraguay made up nearly 10% in 2016–18, up from around 5% in 1993–5.  Developing countries also increased their meat imports by 342.5% from 2 metric tonnes in 1993–5 to nearly 9 metric tonnes in 2016–18; developed countries doubled theirs from 8 metric tonnes to 16. Diet related attributable death and DALY rates associated with the global meat trade rose in three quarters of the 154 countries between 1993-5 and 2016-18. Worldwide, the researchers calculated that increases in red and processed meat consumption, aligned to increases in trade, accounted for 10,898 attributable deaths in 2016–18, an increase of nearly 75% on the figures for 1993-5.  The global meat trade contributed to increases of 55% and 71%, respectively, in attributable deaths and DALYs in developed countries between 1993-5 and 2016-18.  The equivalent figures in developing countries were significantly higher: 137% and 140%, respectively, largely as a result of increased demand for meat, prompted by rapid urbanisation and income growth, suggest the researchers. Between 1993– 2018, island nations in the Caribbean and Oceania and  countries in Northern and Eastern Europe became particularly vulnerable to diet-related disease and deaths associated with large meat imports.  The island nations have limited land for meat production, so depend heavily on meat imports, while many of the European countries, such as Slovakia, Lithuania and Latvia, benefited from regional trade agreements and tariff exemptions after joining the European Union in 2003-4, which accelerated meat imports, explain the researchers. In 1993–5, the top 10 countries with the highest proportion of deaths attributable to red meat consumption included Tonga, United Arab Emirates, Barbados, Fiji, Gabon, Bahamas, Greece, Malta, Brunei and Saint Lucia.  In 2016–2018, the top 10 included The Netherlands, Bahamas, Tonga, Denmark, Antigua and Barbuda, Seychelles, United Arab Emirates, Singapore, Croatia and Greece. The meat trade in these countries accounted for more than 7% of all deaths attributable to diets high in both red and processed meat in 2016-18. The trends in attributable DALYs more or less mirrored those for attributable deaths. Attributable death and DALY rates associated with global meat trade fell in 34 countries between 1993–5 and 2016–18. But this was partly due to population growth exceeding increases in meat imports in 24 countries, while domestic meat production increased in 19.  In more than a half of these countries (20) the absolute number of diet-related deaths and DALYs rose in tandem with increased meat consumption between 1993-5 and 2016-18. And some countries, including Brazil, Paraguay, Argentina and Germany increasingly acted as net meat exporters, changing their land use, with consequent biodiversity loss. This is an observational study, and as such, can't establish cause. And the researchers acknowledge that many countries import and process red meat items for export, which may have skewed their findings. Nevertheless, they conclude: “This study shows that global increases in red and processed meat trade contribute to the abrupt increase of diet-related [non-communicable diseases]... Future interventions need to urgently integrate health policies with agricultural and trade policies by cooperating between responsible exporting and importing countries.”     Glyphosate levels sharply increase by 1,208% within the human body University of California San Diego The environmental dangers of glyphosate in Roundup and other weed killer products have been well documented. Now new research, from a team led by Paul Mills of the University of California San Diego, has found it could be negatively affecting human health – especially in lower-income communities, as illustrated by the 1,208 percent increase in human glyphosate levels. The study tracked people in southern California over age 50 from the years 1993 to 1996 as well as from 2014 to 2016. Urine samples were collected from these persons (periodically) during that time. Number of persons testing positive for glyphosate in their urine went up by 500 percent within 20 years The researchers determined the percentage of persons testing positive for glyphosate went up an alarming 500 percent during that time period.  And, for some, glyphosate levels surged by a frightening 1,208 percent. A past UK trial of rats fed low doses of glyphosate – over their lifetimes – were found to have a higher risk of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Research out of King's College in London found this toxic herbicide ingredient can cause non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in rats at just 4 nanograms/kg. By the way, this amount is 437,000 times below levels that are allowed in the United States. In more recent research, the levels of glyphosate in the humans studied were proportionately 100-fold higher. Further research regarding the connection between glyphosate and liver disease are being planned.  But, what we already know has been published in JAMA. Important to note: people who live in rural areas near farms that use Roundup are at the highest risk for exposure.  Yet, traces of this herbicide ingredient – left on fruits and vegetables – can easily make its way into the bloodstream of anyone who consumes these foods. Glyphosate weed killer in Roundup considered “probable carcinogen” by World Health Organization While Roundup was developed to kill weeds, many weed types have actually become resistant to the herbicide. This is causing some farmers to use even more Roundup. Glyphosate has been listed as a “probable human carcinogen” by WHO (the World Health Organization). It has also been linked with birth defects, ADHD and autism. Studies on humans have shown Roundup causes liver damage even when found in “permissible amounts” in tap water. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease currently affects 90 million Americans and is on the verge of becoming a global epidemic. Associated disorders such as diabetes, obesity and metabolic syndrome are also soaring. Glyphosate in Roundup weed killer INCREASES the risk of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease While the known causes of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease include overeating, sugary foods and a sedentary lifestyle, some health professionals are beginning to wonder if glyphosate exposure is exacerbating this trend. NAFLD symptoms include chronic fatigue, nausea, abdominal pain and/or swelling, weight loss, jaundice, itching, confusion and swelling of the legs. Untreated, NAFLD can lead to liver cancer and liver failure. Unfortunately, glyphosate residue has been showing up in increasing amounts in our food supply. It has even been detected in wine, table salt and vaccines. So, it really isn't a wonder how glyphosate levels in the human bloodstream have increased by 1,208 percent. If you're outraged by this, take the time to voice your opinion to your state representatives. And, at the very least, eat organic fruits and vegetables – as often as possible to avoid this cancer-causing substance.   Study finds psychedelic microdosing improves mental health University of British Columbia, November 23, 2021 An international study led by UBC Okanagan researchers suggests repeated use of small doses of psychedelics such as psilocybin or LSD can be a valuable tool for those struggling with anxiety and depression. The study, recently published in Nature: Scientific Reports, demonstrated fewer symptoms of anxiety and depression, and greater feelings of wellbeing among individuals who reported consuming psychedelics in small quantities, or microdosing, compared to those who did not. Microdosing involves regular self-administration of psychedelic substances in amounts small enough to not impair normal cognitive functioning. Considering this is the largest psychedelic microdosing study published to date, the results are encouraging, says UBCO doctoral student and lead author Joseph Rootman. "In total, we followed more than 8,500 people from 75 countries using an anonymous self-reporting system—about half were following a microdosing regimen and half were not," Rootman explains. "In comparing microdosers and non-microdosers, there was a clear association between microdosing and fewer symptoms of depression, anxiety and stress—which is important given the high prevalence of these conditions and the substantial suffering they cause." The study is also the first to systematically examine the practice of stacking, or combining microdoses of psychedelics with other substances like niacin, lions mane mushrooms and cacao, which some believe work in conjunction to maximize benefit. Rootman works with Dr. Zach Walsh, a psychology professor in UBCO's Irving K. Barber Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences. Dr. Walsh says it's an exciting time for research in this area. "These findings highlight adults who are microdosing to treat their mental health conditions and enhance their wellbeing—rather than simply to get high," says Dr. Walsh. "We have an epidemic of mental health problems, with existing treatments that don't work for everyone. We need to follow the lead of patients who are taking these initiatives to improve their wellbeing and reduce suffering." Study co-author Kalin Harvey is the chief technology officer of Quantified Citizen, a mobile health research platform. He says this study highlights the potential of citizen science. "The use of citizen science allows us to examine the effects of behaviors that are difficult to study in the lab due to regulatory challenges and stigma associated with the now discredited 'war on drugs.'" According to the Canadian Mental Health Association, one in five Canadians personally experience a mental health problem or illness each year. This is one of the many reasons Dr. Walsh says conducting innovative psychological research is imperative. "These cross-sectional findings are promising and highlight the need for further investigation to better determine the impacts of factors like dosage and stacking," explains Dr. Walsh. "While the data is growing to support the use of psychedelics like psilocybin in large doses to treat depression and addiction—our data also helps to expand our understanding of how psychedelics may also help in smaller doses."

Montana Talks with Aaron Flint
Anti Vaccine Mandate Rallies Held Across Montana

Montana Talks with Aaron Flint

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 12:27


Corinne Hammond organized a rally in Billings against the vaccine mandate for healthcare workers. Similar rallies popped up in ten locations throughout the state. Hear her story on the podcast.

Break It Down Show
Bill Mankins - Trapped in Afghanistan

Break It Down Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 79:21


Bill Mankins - Trapped in Afghanistan - Bill has visited the show several times. Each time delivering incredible insight into Afghanistan. As the US and her coalition partners work to extract their citizens and Afghans, we must not lose sight of what it takes to succeed in overseas operations...and how quickly failed policy decisions can unravel any hope for success. Afghanistan experts Bill Mankins and Pete A Turner discuss elements of the latest phase of operations in Afghanistan. Currently, there are still an unknown number of Americans, visa-holding Afghans and people US coalition partners are desperate to get out of the country. Mankins notes that these exfiltrations are critical to reducing the amount of atrocity caused by the Biden Administration's irresponsible and bungled retreat. Please support the Break It Down Show by doing a monthly subscription to the show  All of the money you invest goes directly to supporting the show!   For the  of this episode head to  Haiku In Afghanistan Desperate people want out Who'll help if not us?   ​Similar episodes: Xander Bullock  John Green  Pete A Turner  Join us in supporting Save the Brave as we battle PTSD.  Executive Producer/Host: Pete A Turner  Producer: Damjan Gjorgjiev  Writer: Dragan Petrovski  The Break It Down Show is your favorite best, new podcast, featuring 5 episodes a week with great interviews highlighting world-class guests from a wide array of shows.

No Bull Business And Brews
Ep 34: Andre Allison: Manifesting a Magnificent Life Through Awareness

No Bull Business And Brews

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 35:22


At 15 years of age, most people are thinking about all the things most teens think about; friends, clothes, sex, and food. Today you'll get a chance to meet someone who was aware enough to ask questions most don't ask until we're in our 40s.   Andre Allison, is a serial entrepreneur who started his journey pumping gas.  He currently operates 3 other businesses and works with the Graybeal Group as an Insurance agent, serving their staff and clients with excellence. He's one of the most inquisitive human beings that learned early on how to ask the right questions, obtain the information, and put it into action by doing the work.  Jason, Steve, and Andre discuss the various stages of life we go through, compare what it's like being 23 now, compared to “the old days” and why age differences are a huge advantage right now. They talk about why it's important to read, work out, eat healthy, and build champion mindset practices and the work required to keep moving to the next level in life.     What You'll Learn:   Why surrounding yourself with better, more experienced people will change your life How Andre managed to collapse time and get an education in 2 years that takes most business owners 17 years to learn One thing Andre did to move himself from the gas station to a different life  The $70,000 question Andre asked that cost him exactly $0 Why Jason and Steve are huge supporters of creating other businesses Similar traits most commonly found amongst successful people  Andre's secret to sales How one cold-calling door knocking opportunity led to Andre becoming a first-time home owner Social Media will give you the game on how to win in life if you know where to look  Jason drops a huge secret of something coming in 2022 you'll want to be a part of Why falling on your face is better than paralysis by analysis  And much more!     FAVORITE QUOTE:  “There's no secret. Successful people will give you the roadmap.”    Connect with Andre:  Facebook Instagram    How to Get Involved: Find Jason on Instagram & Facebook. Find Steve on Instagram & Facebook. Enjoyed the episode? Hop over to Apple Podcasts for more! Like and share to help spread the word. We appreciate your support—and we hope to return the favor: Leave a review to let us know what you want to hear from Jason and Steve next.

Trail Runner Nation
EP 548: Bon Courage: How to Become More Courageous

Trail Runner Nation

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 48:48


Bon Courage is an essential French expression for offering verbal support before or during a difficult task.  Similar to the English, "good luck" but with a twist.  Luck is outside of our control, where courage is something we can control. Returning Guest,Hillary Gerardi, joins us to discuss her philosophy of building courage with "little c's and BIG "C's".        

High Intensity Health Radio with Mike Mutzel, MS
Fasting for 16 vs. 12 Hours Daily: Similar Muscle and Strength Gains but Better Metabolic Profiles

High Intensity Health Radio with Mike Mutzel, MS

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 18:03


A new study finds longer daily fasts were demonstrated to produce more favorable improvements in biomarkers that are associated with metabolic and cardiovascular health as well as inflammation. Let's break it down... Support your fasting lifestyle with Berberine HCl & Alpha Lipoic Acid by by MYOXCIENCE Nutrition: https://bit.ly/berberine-biotin-ala-stack Use code Podcast to save Save 40% off this at-home A1C test by Biocoach: http://bit.ly/BOGO-A1C-test Use code HIH10 Links to notes: https://bit.ly/30WjpeE REF: Moro, T., Tinsley, G., Pacelli, et al. (2021). Twelve Months of Time-restricted Eating and Resistance Training Improves Inflammatory Markers and Cardiometabolic Risk Factors. Medicine and science in sports and exercise, 53(12), 2577–2585. Time Stamps 0:00 Intro 0:18 New Study 0:08 Testing 16 Hour VS 12 Hour Feeding Windows 0:27 Markers of Inflammation decreased 1:17 Only four hour difference in feeding window 2:22 Study Title: 3:43 Testing your metabolic health 4:42 Berberine & metabolic health 5:50 Feeding Window comparisons 6:43 How Calories were distributed 7:36 Whey protein post workout 7:50 TRF group ate less calories by accident 8:33 Strength and muscle loss between two groups 11:08 Testosterone did decrease 11:53 Insulin, Leptin and Adiponectin 12:44 HDL, Triglycerides and glucose 13:52 Chronic Inflammation 15:11 Trade offs to consider

Working Capital The Real Estate Podcast
Finding & Funding Real Estate Deals with Anson Young | EP80

Working Capital The Real Estate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 36:53


Anson Young is a Real Estate Agent and Investor with Hundreds of Transactions Completed in Each Category of Real Estate. Anson and his team Specialize in Marketing directly to Sellers for Off-market Deals, Using Many of the Methods that can be Found in his Book Finding & Funding Great Deals. When not Working, Anson can be Found Exploring the Wilds of Colorado's Rocky Mountains with his family, Reading Favourite Books to his Son, and Attending Loud Rock Concerts. In this episode we talked about:  • Anson's Bio & Background  • Anson's First Steps in Real Estate Business  • Becoming a Real Estate Agent   • Anson's Main Focus in Real Estate  • Raising capital   • Private Landing  • Sourcing Deals   • Building an Off-Market List  • Prospecting and finding  Opportunities  • Anson's Thoughts on Inflation and Interest Rates  • Mentorship, Resources and Lessons Learned   Useful links: https://www.instagram.com/younganson/?hl=en https://www.youtube.com/c/ansonyoung Transcriptions: Jesse (0s): Welcome to the working capital real estate podcast. My name is Jesper galley. And on this show, we discuss all things real estate with investors and experts in a variety of industries that impact real estate. Whether you're looking at your first investment or raising your first fund, join me and let's build that portfolio one square foot at a time. Right? Ladies and gentlemen, my name's Jessica galleon. You're listening to working capital the real estate podcast. Our special guest today is aunts and young Anson is a real estate agent and investor with hundreds of transactions completed in each category, real estate Anson, and his team specialize in marketing directly to sellers for off-market deals, using many methods that can be found in his book, finding and funding great deals when not working ants and can be found exploring the wilds of Colorado with his family and tending loud rock concerts.   And I can see you got a twig behind you there, and son, how you doing?   Anson (54s): I'm good. I'm good. Thanks for having me, Jesse.   Jesse (56s): Yeah, my pleasure having you on, what do you got there? Is that a base? It's hard to tell because   Anson (1m 1s): That one's a five string bass.   Jesse (1m 4s): I like it. Fantastic, man. Well, thanks for coming on. We were just chatting before the show, like a few of the most recent guests you were speaking at BP con this year, what was, what was your topic?   Anson (1m 17s): So my topic this year was finding the deals in any market and it focused on kind of out of state investing or long distance real estate investing, building a team, you know, how basically how to go ahead and find those deals, whether it's networking or off market. And, and yeah, that's seems to be a hot topic. Everybody's market is too expensive. So they're looking at other markets and I figured I'd hit on that since that's what I'm doing too. So   Jesse (1m 47s): Yeah, absolutely. It's certainly topical right now. It's we kind of joke around about the inverse relationship between, you know, the, the lower interest rates are, the cheaper money is the harder it is to find deals.   Anson (1m 59s): Oh yeah, for   Jesse (1m 60s): Sure. So in terms of a little bit of your background for listeners that aren't familiar with you, maybe you could kind of take us back to how you got into real estate. I know you just mentioned on the outset, you're also an agent. Maybe you could take us back to the beginning of how that journey started.   Anson (2m 17s): Yeah, sure. So back in 2003 or so I was working in it, I got laid off like everybody did, it feels like kind of boat, post.com, bubble burst. And so I was just looking around of what to do next. Do I go back into it? Do I double down in that arena or do I do something else? And at the same time, my wife and I were going to move down to Phoenix from Denver to be closer to family, my brother had just moved there.   They were having their first kid. So I was like, you know what? I don't have a corporate job anymore. I could kind of move wherever I want. And right before I left a friend of mine handed me rich dad, poor dad, which is, I think just the basic origin story of all real estate investors these days. But, but literally read that book on the way down to Arizona and changed my entire mindset about what I could do, what I should do and why going back into a corporate environment, probably wasn't the best idea.   And so landed in Phoenix and decided new city, a new me, and kind of jumped in and tried to learn as much as I could about anything that I could about real estate. And at the same time I was bartending. And so nights were spent working and days were spent trying to figure out real estate. So that's kind of a, that's kind of where I got started.   Jesse (3m 48s): That's great. So in terms of kind of getting into that mindset, I mean, not, not a dissimilar from a lot of people that come on the podcast or just talking in general, rich dad, poor dad just seems to be a cornerstone for a lot of, at least the beginning of real estate education, because I think ultimately the quadrants of that book for, you know, for anybody that hasn't read it, you definitely have to go check that book by Robert Kiyosaki. But I think it is ultimately when you get to that fourth quadrant where it's passive or, you know, quotations passive investments, I think real estate is just, it kind of lends itself to that, to that type of investment or that type of income.   Anson (4m 28s): Yeah, absolutely. And I had no idea that any of that existed, I mean, the guy who gave me the book, Paul, we were, I remember talking in this parking lot late at night and, and, and, and I couldn't even wrap my brain around getting a second mortgage. Like you have one mortgage who's going to give you money for a second house. You know, like that, that's how small my mindset was until that book helped me unlock and unpack what's possible.   So it, there's a reason why it's so such an origin story for many of us is because we weren't really taught that. And, and then this, this book just showed us kind of a different way of how things could work. Yeah,   Jesse (5m 10s): Yeah, yeah, absolutely. And it's, it's funny cause you know, that book, it really, it hits people in totally different, different jobs and different times in their life. And it still seems to be one of the ones that keeps coming up. So you, you read rich dad, poor, poor dad, you're you get laid off from your job where once, once that clicks for you and that light bulb goes off, what was, what was your process after that?   Anson (5m 35s): So I'm like, like many people starting off. I had no clue what I was doing. So I basically attended every single meetup that I could find from kind of Rhea meetups, real estate investment associations, to like cashflow one-on-one games. So, you know, tied in with the, the rich poor dad, it's basically a board game that people get together and play that kind of go through the principles of financial freedom and stuff.   And so anywhere that I could latch on to people who were doing real estate, I was there and I, I kind of made that my full-time job of, of doing that I've formed relationships. And in that I just started doing, trying to provide as much value as possible. So I'd go do all kinds of odds and end tasks for them for a couple of investors and a couple of agents. And in return, you know, all I asked for was just information. Like I would go run contracts, you know, for a long time for an agent.   And then I would ask for, Hey, can you teach me how to value properties on ML MLS? And so trying to provide that value first and then asking for something in return later on. And so I, I ran contracts, I punched signs in yards. I knocked on doors for a foreclosure investor. Feel like I did all these different things to try to learn as much as possible. And about after nine months to a year, one of the agents reciprocated with a deal.   And she was like, Hey, one of my clients has a property that they want to sell. I think that it would be great for you guys kind of sent over the numbers, helped me run through it and ended up to be our first deal. And it was a live in flip that we spent the next year fixing up and, and, you know, figuring out what's next. But we, we sold it after a year and ended up moving back to Denver. And so it was perfect timing because that was right at the end of 2005. And I think the Phoenix market crashed the next week.   So, so we got out just in time, but I learned a lot on that first deal and then went ahead and just appended and moved markets, which felt like starting over that's that's, that's kinda how that deal went. So   Jesse (7m 58s): Kind of started on that deal. Similar to a lot of individuals were, I guess, somewhat of a, you know, some people call it house hacking where you were living in at the time, but also renting out a, would that be fair to say it was kind of that, that type of arrangement for the first one?   Anson (8m 13s): No, we did. We did kind of a, it needed a lot of work. And so we just decided to move in and fix it while we were living there. We were fixing up stuff, you know, as time and money permitted and by the end of it, you know, it was fixed up and ready to go. And actually my agent w I, I had sent her an email, you know, we had gone to Vegas for our anniversary decided right then that we were kind of just done with Phoenix.   I sent her an email saying, Hey, I think we're going to sell. And she's like, I'll buy it. Like my parents will buy this. Like, she had very much faith that the market was going to keep and she was a little bit wrong on that, but that's okay. Yeah. So she gave us a really good price on it. We ended up making, I think $60,000 on it after a year, which isn't too bad and, you know, had some money to go back to Denver and continue the journey   Jesse (9m 11s): Right on. So was the journey continuing on that kind of operational level where it was value add deals or did you, did you pivot?   Anson (9m 22s): I think I, yeah, it was definitely a value add deals. When I got back, I felt like it was starting over because I didn't have a lot of real estate contacts I didn't have, I didn't know the market. And so, no, I kind of just went back to basics. I started working with investors and agents. I actually got hired on to a real estate agent team and was doing broker price opinions for banks. And right then I just, I figured out this whole thing of bank owned foreclosures and that this could be, you know, a really big thing.   And so, so from then on, probably for the next two years, pretty much everything that I bought was a bank owned foreclosure. So they were all distressed value, add properties that, that had almost no emotion into them because the banks don't care if you low ball them, they just care if it meets their kind of pricing matrix. So that was a fun time to be in real estate for sure. But I got my license maybe a year after I moved back and just kind of did both. I was an agent investor just kind of juggling both things.   Hm.   Jesse (10m 29s): So in terms of the kind of becoming an agent, because you get lots of people that are like, should I get my license as an investor, if you're going to make that switch, did you find it was something that was kind of critical or a nice to have type of type of thing where you still had to develop relationships with host of different agents?   Anson (10m 50s): Yeah. I found it to be absolutely critical to all the real estate that I was doing. Just, just from a, you know, obviously if I'm buying Oreos and my entire existence of finding deals is on MLS. I don't want to be one step removed from that process. I want to be, you know, like a direct actor in that process. And so right in front of MLS on a daily basis to try to find, you know, the deals that I'm looking for, rather than relying on an agent to send them to me, or, you know, go around the back door and give me their log-in or something like that, I could shoot off offers immediately, you know, set showings, do the things that I needed to do to go lock up these deals.   And so for me, it was absolutely pivotal   Jesse (11m 41s): In terms of kind of where you've developed your business today. So you kind of, you go through this process, there's the light bulb moment. You, you see that it's, there's proof of concept when you, you know, in one year you make 60 grand catch us up to today. What, where are you focusing? Not on, not just from a, from a geographical standpoint, but even from a type of asset or type of real estate that maybe you focus on or areas that you focus on.   Anson (12m 7s): Yeah. So, you know, it's kind of ebbed and flowed over the years between wholesales fix and flip. What I'm pivoting towards this year is more longterm buy and hold properties, single family, a small multifamily, those kinds of properties. And so that's a little bit different for me. I'm, I'm used to doing this transactional turn and burn, and now I'm trying to slow down and think for the longterm so that I can, you know, actually have something to show for my effort rather than just, you know, larger pay check, so to speak.   And so, so Ben pivoting in that direction as, as a business and Ben geographically in three different markets this year, just testing things out and getting the ball rolling on long-term cashflow. So that's kind of where we're at.   Jesse (13m 3s): So answered for the actual capital raising side of the business for you or where you source capital has that changed over the, the last few years? And if so, how, how has that evolved for, for yourself?   Anson (13m 16s): It hasn't changed too much once I kind of discovered private money lending before the sec kind of changed their rules, we would kind of just cold call for private lenders, developed relationships with them, had a good track record over time. And so after a while, you know, we would get referred to their friends who were looking to, you know, make, you know, a 10 to 14% return on their investment. And, and so, so yeah, so it hasn't changed too much because we're still using short-term even on these long-term projects we're using short-term funds to, to acquire them and then refinance it now to a more portfolio or, or bank loan style financing.   So I guess that side's new, but when we go into purchase, we're still using like our same private money lenders. They know that they're going to hang on for, you know, three to six months until we refinance out, but that's not too different from a flip where we would hold onto it for three to six months and they would get paid out at the end of that. So, so the, you know, the initial buy is the same. It's just that long-term piece of now it's going to convert into something long-term. So can you,   Jesse (14m 34s): You talked to, to that a little bit for listeners, you know, for that type of approach where you are, you know, getting short term finance, when you have a project going on and then stabilizing after that, maybe you could to kind of run through how that works. And, and, you know, on top of that private lending, I think is a bit of a black box for a lot of people. So, you know, maybe, maybe get your thoughts on that as well.   Anson (14m 59s): What do you mean by black box?   Jesse (15m 0s): Well, I, I feel that a lot of people that aren't in our industry, they hear private money and it sounds like they're meeting somebody in an alleyway and they're handing them a bag of cash. So I think, I think from like, I think for a lot of people, they don't realize how many private lenders there are out there, how many more options you have than just walking up to the bank that you've known for years, or are you, you know, you know, the brand,   Anson (15m 25s): Right? Yeah. So in, you know, I wish it was like an alleyway with a sack full of cat. That'd be kind of fun actually. But typically private lending is just lending from an individual rather than a bank. And so a sophisticated, private lender will operate somewhat like a bank where they, you know, they kind of vet deals. They've vet you, they vet the process. Some even want like a loan application and stuff. Others are very much more relational.   I mean, your next private lender could be your rich uncle or something who really believes in you and wants you to succeed. So it kinda runs the gamut from usually it's, you know, older people who are using the retirement funds. Some people who came into some money one way or the other, it seems like two or three of my guys who I lend or who I borrow from. They all sold a business in their sixties and now have kind of more money than they know what to do with, they see a return of 12% PR and that's very exciting to them.   And so they will lend that to the right person. And so it's kind of, I wouldn't call it a beginner strategy at all, because usually you have to have a kind of a track record. You have to have a reputation for what you're doing for somebody who just is sitting on, you know, even if it's a million dollars, you know, that's two projects in Denver. And so they, you know, lending out their entire million dollars. It has to be to the right person, the right projects with the right track record so that they are secure that bill, you know, end up getting that back.   And so it's kind of private lending in a nutshell. And to your other question for kind of stabilizing an asset, typically we're, we're purchasing with private money, which is for us, it's a hundred percent loan and fix. And so we're, we're into the deal with no money and we go ahead and we get the property fixed up rented, and our next lender wants to see it for at least three months.   We're, we're, we're collecting rent. Everything is stable. Everything's looking good before we can transition that into kind of a, it's a refinance into either a portfolio or, or a conventional style loan. I prefer portfolio, cause it seems just a little easier, but then they, they close on it and they'll pay off the private lender. And so now instead of owing, you know, this individual money, now we own, now we owe this credit union or this bank money and, and pay them.   And it's a long-term note, whereas our short-term private money lender is only like a six month note. So now we have a 30 year note and a smaller payment, so we can actually cash flow.   Jesse (18m 29s): Nice. Yeah, yeah. Obviously the goal there, if we switched to sourcing deals, like we talked about at the outset, it's a, it's a challenging thing to do right now. So it was topical, I guess, that that was in new Orleans. That was your kind of discussion topic, maybe as a comparison, if, if there has been things that are different than when you were starting out, how you were sourcing deals, then as opposed to strategies you've, you've learned and are using now, how has that evolved?   And, and you know, what, what approach are you using given the fact that it just seems like there is so little supply out there.   Anson (19m 7s): Yeah. That evolution has been pretty huge. So like I S like I said earlier, starting off, we did a lot of, we just bought bank owned, foreclosures right off of MLS. And we got really good at that to the point where we also sold REO, but we would buy from other REO brokers. And so we kind of knew the inside process of how asset managers think what different banks did, what, when they did their price reductions, you know, could we get in one day before a price reduction and then get under that price reduction and lock up a property before everybody else saw it.   We got pretty good at that kind of stuff. Once the foreclosure crisis started resolving itself, bailouts and everything else, there was just less foreclosures coming. And I saw the writing on the wall when, on the REO sourcing side, it's kind of the, you know, the, the, the source of the river started drying up and we were both benefiting from that source of the river plus way downstream, when we would pick up deals. It's like, oh man, I kind of see the writing writing on the wall here.   We're not going to be able to find as many deals as we used to. And so at the same time, we were also doing some short sales and looking around there was still, you know, a huge, you know, huge chunk of people who were underwater on their mortgages. And so we just aggressively attacked short sales that were listed and short sales that weren't listed. So we were just going straight after foreclosures basically. And so for about a year or two, we did mainly short sales. Was it, we got really good at that as well of going from the wild west or short sales to when it kinda got standardized and institutionalized.   We saw, you know, everything in that whole window. And then, and then the same thing happened where I started seeing that the market was rising, the prices were rising and not everybody would be underwater forever. And so what do I do next? And from there, we went off market. We, we, we did a little bit more MLS deals we would find, but those really just started getting few and far between, and we needed a bigger source of deals we were doing mainly wholesaling right then.   And so the better source of deals was just to go directly to the seller. And so ever since probably 2014, 15 up until now has been all off market direct to seller. I haven't bought an MLS deal probably three or four years. They just, I don't know. It's just not, not scary   Jesse (21m 54s): Now. Yeah,   Anson (21m 56s): Exactly. So all, you know, basically all off market right now, just going directly to those sellers and seeing if we can help them.   Jesse (22m 4s): So on that, on that note, in terms of the approach that you use with, you know, is it the, of, in the vein of direct mailers, are you kind of going to the secretary of state? Are you going through different software? How are you, how are you reaching out to those? Those would be sellers.   Anson (22m 22s): Yeah. So our main, our main way to reach out and touch them is direct mail. We have just this year started adding in, or I shouldn't say just this year, it was probably 2019, just started stacking in more ways to reach sellers, kind of this, the same lists and in different ways. So if they did respond to the direct mail, we also called them. We also text them. We also emailed them if we could, you know, find them on Facebook, knock on their door, whatever it took to really get in front of the right sellers.   You know, there was a time where you can just send out postcards and, you know, get a 2% response rate, just pick from the best ones. But that just started kind of getting less and less as there was more competition. So now we're reaching out in multiple ways, but direct mail is still our number one.   Jesse (23m 16s): Yeah. You know, it, it's interesting because it comes, I guess, depending on who the sellers are. Like, for instance, if you, if you're really reaching out to predominantly mom and pop, or like you said, small, multi, multi Juarez, you know, I found that the responses are usually better. However, if there's that one layer of say a corporate structure, LLC, partnership, whatever that is, do you, is that also part of the pool that you reach out to? And I guess from there, if it is, you probably have to do that one extra step of, you know, who's the principal who's, you know, who's the signing officer.   Anson (23m 49s): Yep. Yeah. So in Colorado, our, our secretary of state is pretty transparent. So we can go on and search LLCs and find out who, you know, who's the owner where their register addresses all that stuff. So our, oh, I wish I had the number of, of LLCs that we've mailed to, but I have given that over to a VA to go ahead and look those up and just make sure that we're hitting the right people and getting in front of them instead of just setting, you know, XYZ LLC, you know, it's like Paul Jones or something.   So,   Jesse (24m 25s): Yeah, yeah. In terms of the, so for those that are just kind of getting into real estate in terms of finding off market deals, they're coming into an environment that, you know, we we've seen prior to supply constraints, a different approach. Whereas now, because there's so few real estate opportunities out there properties, they were coming into a market where they probably have to start with direct, direct to seller or trying to find off market deals. How would you go about telling somebody who's getting into the industry? How does start building that list?   Anson (24m 58s): I mean, even today, it sounds very, very old school, but I think that are driving for dollars lists are still some of our Mo you know, highest producing lists. And if you want to keep the cost down and you have more time than you have money, I would say, drive for dollars and then cold column, just, you know, skip, trace them or look them up on white pages.com. Yup. And then, you know, send out phone calls. You'll probably, you know, get 50 to a hundred driving for dollars leads a day.   And then, you know, cold column the same day or the day after you'll, you'll keep yourself busy for sure. But it, you know, bang for buck time for payoff, it's definitely the best use of your time to try to find deals.   Jesse (25m 48s): Yeah. A hundred percent, all it really takes is, you know, you do it for a week. If you can hit one, then you know, there's your, there's your week's work right there. Exactly.   Anson (25m 57s): And pretty good ROI.   Jesse (25m 59s): Yeah. A hundred percent. And in terms of your stock, you know, your stock mailer, is it typically, like you said, you know, Hey, you know, Hey Doug Smith and then w what's the typical pitch that you, that you guys employ.   Anson (26m 14s): Yeah. So we definitely try to speak, you know, the ethos or the, you know, the, the makeup of our direct mail is, you know, handcrafted and handwritten. So we want to make sure that we're, we're talking to them down at like a normal level of like, Hey, we're here to help. So it's like, you know, using names, using addresses, using, you know, subdivisions, if we really want to like, like, Hey, you know, Hey, Jesse, we're, you know, we're wondering if you wanted to sell 1, 2, 3 main street, if you've ever thought about selling hassle-free please give us a call.   You know, we don't have any commissions or inspections or appraisals, you know, call us for a no obligation fair offer. And that that's enough of the core of the message to get across of like, Hey, we're here to help. You know, sometimes we'll add in that we're local, you know, we're, we're, we're definitely, you know, not an eye buyer or somebody who's a Zillow or something coming in that we're here to work with them and we have, you know, multiple ways to help them.   So,   Jesse (27m 28s): Yeah. Fantastic. At the end of the day, it's really just getting that phone call. You're not expecting it to get the sale, which it's nice, but not expecting to get the sale on the first touchpoint.   Anson (27m 37s): Right. Yeah, exactly. It's definitely a long game of multiple touches and, and yeah. Building on each other. So,   Jesse (27m 47s): So handsome, we're in a crazy time right now, recording this, you know, coming into the end of, of 20, 21. I don't think anybody could have predicted the last year and a half. How has your business, or how do you see your business evolving as a result of kind of the environment that we've been in, if at all, and, and maybe just prospectively, where do you see opportunities, you know, coming in the new year?   Anson (28m 15s): Yeah. So we're going to continue doing what we're doing for this year, which is, you know, more out of state looking at a state for markets that are conducive to cash flow. Short term rental opportunities is, is pretty big focus right now as well. And then locally, we've been partnering more with other investors because we've had a lot of time spent on the other side, kind of looking at a state. And, and so, you know, looking forward to next year, you know, I think the market's going to just be doing more of the same, can't foresee anything crazy that's going to happen.   And so, you know, we're just kind of to focus on long-term projects and, and even if we're wrong, you know, we still have, long-term more passive, passive things going, so   Jesse (29m 12s): Right on. All right. And so we ask a four questions, every guest before we wrap up. So before I get there, I'm just curious, I've been trying to, you know, for the last month or two kind of taking a poll of, of different real estate professionals I talked to, and I'm just curious your thoughts on number one, inflation, and number two interest rates. And, and I'm not expecting you to have a crystal ball, but I just, I find it funny because, you know, you have asked people, you get four opinions on these topics, right?   Anson (29m 46s): Yeah. So inflation's obviously going to be an issue. I think that Brian, who's the economist who spoke at BiggerPockets convention, had a lot of really good things to say. And pretty much everything that I would kind of repeat of, you know, inflation's a problem. It's not going to be a problem today or next year, but in the next, you know, four years or so, it will probably pop and become an issue.   And as far as interest rates, it's like, I think that they just voted that they're not, they're not going to change at all. And so as long as interest rates stay down and buying, and money is easy, it's just gonna turn, turn the market and keep it going. So buyers will keep buying. Investors will keep investing money right now is probably the easiest thing to get, whether it's hard money or otherwise, and so easy money, hard deals.   So it's going to probably just keep fueling that and, and yeah, just, it, it's kinda hard to say, but I think Brian had a really good kind of outlook on it where, you know, 20, 24 or 2026 is kind of when things will start changing and creeping up a little bit on, on interest rates. And I, I don't know enough about it to disagree. So   Jesse (31m 13s): Yeah, we had a, we had Brian on the show, you can check that episode out. I think it was in the sixties, but he was, he was great if especially if you, if you geek out on, on economics, that's definitely the one that listened to. I love it. Okay. Sweet. If you're ready, we'll fire off these final four questions to ya.   Anson (31m 32s): All right. I'm ready. Right on.   Jesse (31m 34s): What's something, you know, now in your career Anson, whether that's in real estate or business that you wish you knew when you started out.   Anson (31m 43s): So I kind of, I definitely always traded just short-term money for, you know, not worrying about long-term things and, you know, it's like, oh, you're in your twenties. You know, you don't really care too much about it, but once you get up into your forties and you're kind of still doing the same thing, it's probably not the best idea. And so I would, I would go back and tell myself for sure, just like, Hey, keep like even a third of the amount of houses that you're doing, and then you won't have to work when you're 40.   So   Jesse (32m 17s): There you go. That's a, that's a good point. Okay. In, in terms of, for that person, that's getting into our industry, what do you tell them in terms of your view on mentorship?   Anson (32m 32s): Yeah, that's a really, really good question. I'm a big fan of mentors, whether it's kind of formal mentors and informal mentors, you know, people who were willing to help you up. And I would say, just find somebody who aligns with your values and then see how you can provide value to them so that they can help you get to where you want to go. And then once you're at a place where, you know, a few years along the line, I think that mentorship works both ways where you should have a hand up and a hand down.   So you're, you know, you'll graduate through mentors that you're working with and every step along the way, you should be helping bring people up as well. And that teaches you a lot of things too, as you're teaching and working through things with other investors as well. So you've kind of learned by teaching and then obviously you learn by learning from somebody who's where you want to be.   Jesse (33m 31s): Yeah. That's great. Great answer as well. Okay. In terms of, let's put a pin in rich dad, poor dad. So put that one aside, but what is a book that you find yourself just recommending over and over again?   Anson (33m 45s): Yeah. So my, that is, it was a book that I also give about the most as well. And it's obstacle is the way by Ryan holiday and it's a book on stoicism and it's, it's really helped me in my personal life and also through business as well. And so it's just an, and an outlook on life and on business and situations that I wasn't exposed to until I kind of started getting into it. And that book definitely hammered it home for me.   So   Jesse (34m 19s): That's cool. I don't think we've ever had that book recommended on the show, but I've, I've definitely had people say it's a, it's a killer book. Yep. Okay. Last question. First car, make and model.   Anson (34m 32s): I had a 1979 tan VW rabbit. That is   Jesse (34m 38s): Unreal.   Anson (34m 39s): Two door.   Jesse (34m 40s): Yeah. That's pretty good, man. Like 79. I just looking at you. I would've, I would've assumed it'd be the eighties or nineties, but that's, that's quite the car.   Anson (34m 50s): That's the same year I was born. It just happened to be, my dad's always worked on VWs my whole life. And so my step-mom drove like a Cabriolet and my dad's had like dozens and dozens of bugs and, and yeah, when it came time to me, for me to start driving, you know, he bought this 79 tan rabbit that he's like, this is yours. If you get your grades up. And it took me a little while, but finally got my grades up enough to, to drive it. So   Jesse (35m 20s): I love how they're bringing back the seventies and eighties, the retro stitching for a, for a lot of their, their new models. So it got kind of that vintage look.   Anson (35m 29s): I'd love to see it. I'd love to see a new rabbit. Yeah.   Jesse (35m 32s): Oh yeah. Bring it back. Awesome. All right. Answered for those of you that want to connect or reach out or have any questions. I know you're doing work with bigger pockets. Maybe you could tell, tell listeners where they can go on the Google machine.   Anson (35m 47s): Yeah. If you go to the Google machine and if you want to connect with me bigger pockets, this is probably the easiest way to do it. It's just, if you just search my name on the site, you'll find my, my, my profile. Think I'm the only answer on the young, on there still. So that's good. Yeah. And then yeah, if you want to find me on Instagram at young Anson, and if you want to find me on YouTube, I do do videos for bigger pockets and starting to do more videos for myself as well. And so you can find me there.   Jesse (36m 16s): My guest today has been aunts and young aunts and thanks for being part of working capital.   Anson (36m 21s): Thanks, Jesse. Thanks so much.   Jesse (36m 31s): Thank you so much for listening to working capital the real estate podcast. I'm your host, Jesse for galley. If you liked the episode, head on to iTunes and leave us a five star review and share on social media, it really helps us out. If you have any questions, feel free to reach out to me on Instagram, Jesse for galley, F R a G a L E, have a good one. Take care.Jesse (0s): Welcome to the working capital real estate podcast. My name is Jesper galley. And on this show, we discuss all things real estate with investors and experts in a variety of industries that impact real estate. Whether you're looking at your first investment or raising your first fund, join me and let's build that portfolio one square foot at a time. Right? Ladies and gentlemen, my name's Jessica galleon. You're listening to working capital the real estate podcast. Our special guest today is aunts and young Anson is a real estate agent and investor with hundreds of transactions completed in each category, real estate Anson, and his team specialize in marketing directly to sellers for off-market deals, using many methods that can be found in his book, finding and funding great deals when not working ants and can be found exploring the wilds of Colorado with his family and tending loud rock concerts.   And I can see you got a twig behind you there, and son, how you doing?   Anson (54s): I'm good. I'm good. Thanks for having me, Jesse.   Jesse (56s): Yeah, my pleasure having you on, what do you got there? Is that a base? It's hard to tell because   Anson (1m 1s): That one's a five string bass.   Jesse (1m 4s): I like it. Fantastic, man. Well, thanks for coming on. We were just chatting before the show, like a few of the most recent guests you were speaking at BP con this year, what was, what was your topic?   Anson (1m 17s): So my topic this year was finding the deals in any market and it focused on kind of out of state investing or long distance real estate investing, building a team, you know, how basically how to go ahead and find those deals, whether it's networking or off market. And, and yeah, that's seems to be a hot topic. Everybody's market is too expensive. So they're looking at other markets and I figured I'd hit on that since that's what I'm doing too. So   Jesse (1m 47s): Yeah, absolutely. It's certainly topical right now. It's we kind of joke around about the inverse relationship between, you know, the, the lower interest rates are, the cheaper money is the harder it is to find deals.   Anson (1m 59s): Oh yeah, for   Jesse (1m 60s): Sure. So in terms of a little bit of your background for listeners that aren't familiar with you, maybe you could kind of take us back to how you got into real estate. I know you just mentioned on the outset, you're also an agent. Maybe you could take us back to the beginning of how that journey started.   Anson (2m 17s): Yeah, sure. So back in 2003 or so I was working in it, I got laid off like everybody did, it feels like kind of boat, post.com, bubble burst. And so I was just looking around of what to do next. Do I go back into it? Do I double down in that arena or do I do something else? And at the same time, my wife and I were going to move down to Phoenix from Denver to be closer to family, my brother had just moved there.   They were having their first kid. So I was like, you know what? I don't have a corporate job anymore. I could kind of move wherever I want. And right before I left a friend of mine handed me rich dad, poor dad, which is, I think just the basic origin story of all real estate investors these days. But, but literally read that book on the way down to Arizona and changed my entire mindset about what I could do, what I should do and why going back into a corporate environment, probably wasn't the best idea.   And so landed in Phoenix and decided new city, a new me, and kind of jumped in and tried to learn as much as I could about anything that I could about real estate. And at the same time I was bartending. And so nights were spent working and days were spent trying to figure out real estate. So that's kind of a, that's kind of where I got started.   Jesse (3m 48s): That's great. So in terms of kind of getting into that mindset, I mean, not, not a dissimilar from a lot of people that come on the podcast or just talking in general, rich dad, poor dad just seems to be a cornerstone for a lot of, at least the beginning of real estate education, because I think ultimately the quadrants of that book for, you know, for anybody that hasn't read it, you definitely have to go check that book by Robert Kiyosaki. But I think it is ultimately when you get to that fourth quadrant where it's passive or, you know, quotations passive investments, I think real estate is just, it kind of lends itself to that, to that type of investment or that type of income.   Anson (4m 28s): Yeah, absolutely. And I had no idea that any of that existed, I mean, the guy who gave me the book, Paul, we were, I remember talking in this parking lot late at night and, and, and, and I couldn't even wrap my brain around getting a second mortgage. Like you have one mortgage who's going to give you money for a second house. You know, like that, that's how small my mindset was until that book helped me unlock and unpack what's possible.   So it, there's a reason why it's so such an origin story for many of us is because we weren't really taught that. And, and then this, this book just showed us kind of a different way of how things could work. Yeah,   Jesse (5m 10s): Yeah, yeah, absolutely. And it's, it's funny cause you know, that book, it really, it hits people in totally different, different jobs and different times in their life. And it still seems to be one of the ones that keeps coming up. So you, you read rich dad, poor, poor dad, you're you get laid off from your job where once, once that clicks for you and that light bulb goes off, what was, what was your process after that?   Anson (5m 35s): So I'm like, like many people starting off. I had no clue what I was doing. So I basically attended every single meetup that I could find from kind of Rhea meetups, real estate investment associations, to like cashflow one-on-one games. So, you know, tied in with the, the rich poor dad, it's basically a board game that people get together and play that kind of go through the principles of financial freedom and stuff.   And so anywhere that I could latch on to people who were doing real estate, I was there and I, I kind of made that my full-time job of, of doing that I've formed relationships. And in that I just started doing, trying to provide as much value as possible. So I'd go do all kinds of odds and end tasks for them for a couple of investors and a couple of agents. And in return, you know, all I asked for was just information. Like I would go run contracts, you know, for a long time for an agent.   And then I would ask for, Hey, can you teach me how to value properties on ML MLS? And so trying to provide that value first and then asking for something in return later on. And so I, I ran contracts, I punched signs in yards. I knocked on doors for a foreclosure investor. Feel like I did all these different things to try to learn as much as possible. And about after nine months to a year, one of the agents reciprocated with a deal.   And she was like, Hey, one of my clients has a property that they want to sell. I think that it would be great for you guys kind of sent over the numbers, helped me run through it and ended up to be our first deal. And it was a live in flip that we spent the next year fixing up and, and, you know, figuring out what's next. But we, we sold it after a year and ended up moving back to Denver. And so it was perfect timing because that was right at the end of 2005. And I think the Phoenix market crashed the next week.   So, so we got out just in time, but I learned a lot on that first deal and then went ahead and just appended and moved markets, which felt like starting over that's that's, that's kinda how that deal went. So   Jesse (7m 58s): Kind of started on that deal. Similar to a lot of individuals were, I guess, somewhat of a, you know, some people call it house hacking where you were living in at the time, but also renting out a, would that be fair to say it was kind of that, that type of arrangement for the first one?   Anson (8m 13s): No, we did. We did kind of a, it needed a lot of work. And so we just decided to move in and fix it while we were living there. We were fixing up stuff, you know, as time and money permitted and by the end of it, you know, it was fixed up and ready to go. And actually my agent w I, I had sent her an email, you know, we had gone to Vegas for our anniversary decided right then that we were kind of just done with Phoenix.   I sent her an email saying, Hey, I think we're going to sell. And she's like, I'll buy it. Like my parents will buy this. Like, she had very much faith that the market was going to keep and she was a little bit wrong on that, but that's okay. Yeah. So she gave us a really good price on it. We ended up making, I think $60,000 on it after a year, which isn't too bad and, you know, had some money to go back to Denver and continue the journey   Jesse (9m 11s): Right on. So was the journey continuing on that kind of operational level where it was value add deals or did you, did you pivot?   Anson (9m 22s): I think I, yeah, it was definitely a value add deals. When I got back, I felt like it was starting over because I didn't have a lot of real estate contacts I didn't have, I didn't know the market. And so, no, I kind of just went back to basics. I started working with investors and agents. I actually got hired on to a real estate agent team and was doing broker price opinions for banks. And right then I just, I figured out this whole thing of bank owned foreclosures and that this could be, you know, a really big thing.   And so, so from then on, probably for the next two years, pretty much everything that I bought was a bank owned foreclosure. So they were all distressed value, add properties that, that had almost no emotion into them because the banks don't care if you low ball them, they just care if it meets their kind of pricing matrix. So that was a fun time to be in real estate for sure. But I got my license maybe a year after I moved back and just kind of did both. I was an agent investor just kind of juggling both things.   Hm.   Jesse (10m 29s): So in terms of the kind of becoming an agent, because you get lots of people that are like, should I get my license as an investor, if you're going to make that switch, did you find it was something that was kind of critical or a nice to have type of type of thing where you still had to develop relationships with host of different agents?   Anson (10m 50s): Yeah. I found it to be absolutely critical to all the real estate that I was doing. Just, just from a, you know, obviously if I'm buying Oreos and my entire existence of finding deals is on MLS. I don't want to be one step removed from that process. I want to be, you know, like a direct actor in that process. And so right in front of MLS on a daily basis to try to find, you know, the deals that I'm looking for, rather than relying on an agent to send them to me, or, you know, go around the back door and give me their log-in or something like that, I could shoot off offers immediately, you know, set showings, do the things that I needed to do to go lock up these deals.   And so for me, it was absolutely pivotal   Jesse (11m 41s): In terms of kind of where you've developed your business today. So you kind of, you go through this process, there's the light bulb moment. You, you see that it's, there's proof of concept when you, you know, in one year you make 60 grand catch us up to today. What, where are you focusing? Not on, not just from a, from a geographical standpoint, but even from a type of asset or type of real estate that maybe you focus on or areas that you focus on.   Anson (12m 7s): Yeah. So, you know, it's kind of ebbed and flowed over the years between wholesales fix and flip. What I'm pivoting towards this year is more longterm buy and hold properties, single family, a small multifamily, those kinds of properties. And so that's a little bit different for me. I'm, I'm used to doing this transactional turn and burn, and now I'm trying to slow down and think for the longterm so that I can, you know, actually have something to show for my effort rather than just, you know, larger pay check, so to speak.   And so, so Ben pivoting in that direction as, as a business and Ben geographically in three different markets this year, just testing things out and getting the ball rolling on long-term cashflow. So that's kind of where we're at.   Jesse (13m 3s): So answered for the actual capital raising side of the business for you or where you source capital has that changed over the, the last few years? And if so, how, how has that evolved for, for yourself?   Anson (13m 16s): It hasn't changed too much once I kind of discovered private money lending before the sec kind of changed their rules, we would kind of just cold call for private lenders, developed relationships with them, had a good track record over time. And so after a while, you know, we would get referred to their friends who were looking to, you know, make, you know, a 10 to 14% return on their investment. And, and so, so yeah, so it hasn't changed too much because we're still using short-term even on these long-term projects we're using short-term funds to, to acquire them and then refinance it now to a more portfolio or, or bank loan style financing.   So I guess that side's new, but when we go into purchase, we're still using like our same private money lenders. They know that they're going to hang on for, you know, three to six months until we refinance out, but that's not too different from a flip where we would hold onto it for three to six months and they would get paid out at the end of that. So, so the, you know, the initial buy is the same. It's just that long-term piece of now it's going to convert into something long-term. So can you,   Jesse (14m 34s): You talked to, to that a little bit for listeners, you know, for that type of approach where you are, you know, getting short term finance, when you have a project going on and then stabilizing after that, maybe you could to kind of run through how that works. And, and, you know, on top of that private lending, I think is a bit of a black box for a lot of people. So, you know, maybe, maybe get your thoughts on that as well.   Anson (14m 59s): What do you mean by black box?   Jesse (15m 0s): Well, I, I feel that a lot of people that aren't in our industry, they hear private money and it sounds like they're meeting somebody in an alleyway and they're handing them a bag of cash. So I think, I think from like, I think for a lot of people, they don't realize how many private lenders there are out there, how many more options you have than just walking up to the bank that you've known for years, or are you, you know, you know, the brand,   Anson (15m 25s): Right? Yeah. So in, you know, I wish it was like an alleyway with a sack full of cat. That'd be kind of fun actually. But typically private lending is just lending from an individual rather than a bank. And so a sophisticated, private lender will operate somewhat like a bank where they, you know, they kind of vet deals. They've vet you, they vet the process. Some even want like a loan application and stuff. Others are very much more relational.   I mean, your next private lender could be your rich uncle or something who really believes in you and wants you to succeed. So it kinda runs the gamut from usually it's, you know, older people who are using the retirement funds. Some people who came into some money one way or the other, it seems like two or three of my guys who I lend or who I borrow from. They all sold a business in their sixties and now have kind of more money than they know what to do with, they see a return of 12% PR and that's very exciting to them.   And so they will lend that to the right person. And so it's kind of, I wouldn't call it a beginner strategy at all, because usually you have to have a kind of a track record. You have to have a reputation for what you're doing for somebody who just is sitting on, you know, even if it's a million dollars, you know, that's two projects in Denver. And so they, you know, lending out their entire million dollars. It has to be to the right person, the right projects with the right track record so that they are secure that bill, you know, end up getting that back.   And so it's kind of private lending in a nutshell. And to your other question for kind of stabilizing an asset, typically we're, we're purchasing with private money, which is for us, it's a hundred percent loan and fix. And so we're, we're into the deal with no money and we go ahead and we get the property fixed up rented, and our next lender wants to see it for at least three months.   We're, we're, we're collecting rent. Everything is stable. Everything's looking good before we can transition that into kind of a, it's a refinance into either a portfolio or, or a conventional style loan. I prefer portfolio, cause it seems just a little easier, but then they, they close on it and they'll pay off the private lender. And so now instead of owing, you know, this individual money, now we own, now we owe this credit union or this bank money and, and pay them.   And it's a long-term note, whereas our short-term private money lender is only like a six month note. So now we have a 30 year note and a smaller payment, so we can actually cash flow.   Jesse (18m 29s): Nice. Yeah, yeah. Obviously the goal there, if we switched to sourcing deals, like we talked about at the outset, it's a, it's a challenging thing to do right now. So it was topical, I guess, that that was in new Orleans. That was your kind of discussion topic, maybe as a comparison, if, if there has been things that are different than when you were starting out, how you were sourcing deals, then as opposed to strategies you've, you've learned and are using now, how has that evolved?   And, and you know, what, what approach are you using given the fact that it just seems like there is so little supply out there.   Anson (19m 7s): Yeah. That evolution has been pretty huge. So like I S like I said earlier, starting off, we did a lot of, we just bought bank owned, foreclosures right off of MLS. And we got really good at that to the point where we also sold REO, but we would buy from other REO brokers. And so we kind of knew the inside process of how asset managers think what different banks did, what, when they did their price reductions, you know, could we get in one day before a price reduction and then get under that price reduction and lock up a property before everybody else saw it.   We got pretty good at that kind of stuff. Once the foreclosure crisis started resolving itself, bailouts and everything else, there was just less foreclosures coming. And I saw the writing on the wall when, on the REO sourcing side, it's kind of the, you know, the, the, the source of the river started drying up and we were both benefiting from that source of the river plus way downstream, when we would pick up deals. It's like, oh man, I kind of see the writing writing on the wall here.   We're not going to be able to find as many deals as we used to. And so at the same time, we were also doing some short sales and looking around there was still, you know, a huge, you know, huge chunk of people who were underwater on their mortgages. And so we just aggressively attacked short sales that were listed and short sales that weren't listed. So we were just going straight after foreclosures basically. And so for about a year or two, we did mainly short sales. Was it, we got really good at that as well of going from the wild west or short sales to when it kinda got standardized and institutionalized.   We saw, you know, everything in that whole window. And then, and then the same thing happened where I started seeing that the market was rising, the prices were rising and not everybody would be underwater forever. And so what do I do next? And from there, we went off market. We, we, we did a little bit more MLS deals we would find, but those really just started getting few and far between, and we needed a bigger source of deals we were doing mainly wholesaling right then.   And so the better source of deals was just to go directly to the seller. And so ever since probably 2014, 15 up until now has been all off market direct to seller. I haven't bought an MLS deal probably three or four years. They just, I don't know. It's just not, not scary   Jesse (21m 54s): Now. Yeah,   Anson (21m 56s): Exactly. So all, you know, basically all off market right now, just going directly to those sellers and seeing if we can help them.   Jesse (22m 4s): So on that, on that note, in terms of the approach that you use with, you know, is it the, of, in the vein of direct mailers, are you kind of going to the secretary of state? Are you going through different software? How are you, how are you reaching out to those? Those would be sellers.   Anson (22m 22s): Yeah. So our main, our main way to reach out and touch them is direct mail. We have just this year started adding in, or I shouldn't say just this year, it was probably 2019, just started stacking in more ways to reach sellers, kind of this, the same lists and in different ways. So if they did respond to the direct mail, we also called them. We also text them. We also emailed them if we could, you know, find them on Facebook, knock on their door, whatever it took to really get in front of the right sellers.   You know, there was a time where you can just send out postcards and, you know, get a 2% response rate, just pick from the best ones. But that just started kind of getting less and less as there was more competition. So now we're reaching out in multiple ways, but direct mail is still our number one.   Jesse (23m 16s): Yeah. You know, it, it's interesting because it comes, I guess, depending on who the sellers are. Like, for instance, if you, if you're really reaching out to predominantly mom and pop, or like you said, small, multi, multi Juarez, you know, I found that the responses are usually better. However, if there's that one layer of say a corporate structure, LLC, partnership, whatever that is, do you, is that also part of the pool that you reach out to? And I guess from there, if it is, you probably have to do that one extra step of, you know, who's the principal who's, you know, who's the signing officer.   Anson (23m 49s): Yep. Yeah. So in Colorado, our, our secretary of state is pretty transparent. So we can go on and search LLCs and find out who, you know, who's the owner where their register addresses all that stuff. So our, oh, I wish I had the number of, of LLCs that we've mailed to, but I have given that over to a VA to go ahead and look those up and just make sure that we're hitting the right people and getting in front of them instead of just setting, you know, XYZ LLC, you know, it's like Paul Jones or something.   So,   Jesse (24m 25s): Yeah, yeah. In terms of the, so for those that are just kind of getting into real estate in terms of finding off market deals, they're coming into an environment that, you know, we we've seen prior to supply constraints, a different approach. Whereas now, because there's so few real estate opportunities out there properties, they were coming into a market where they probably have to start with direct, direct to seller or trying to find off market deals. How would you go about telling somebody who's getting into the industry? How does start building that list?   Anson (24m 58s): I mean, even today, it sounds very, very old school, but I think that are driving for dollars lists are still some of our Mo you know, highest producing lists. And if you want to keep the cost down and you have more time than you have money, I would say, drive for dollars and then cold column, just, you know, skip, trace them or look them up on white pages.com. Yup. And then, you know, send out phone calls. You'll probably, you know, get 50 to a hundred driving for dollars leads a day.   And then, you know, cold column the same day or the day after you'll, you'll keep yourself busy for sure. But it, you know, bang for buck time for payoff, it's definitely the best use of your time to try to find deals.   Jesse (25m 48s): Yeah. A hundred percent, all it really takes is, you know, you do it for a week. If you can hit one, then you know, there's your, there's your week's work right there. Exactly.   Anson (25m 57s): And pretty good ROI.   Jesse (25m 59s): Yeah. A hundred percent. And in terms of your stock, you know, your stock mailer, is it typically, like you said, you know, Hey, you know, Hey Doug Smith and then w what's the typical pitch that you, that you guys employ.   Anson (26m 14s): Yeah. So we definitely try to speak, you know, the ethos or the, you know, the, the makeup of our direct mail is, you know, handcrafted and handwritten. So we want to make sure that we're, we're talking to them down at like a normal level of like, Hey, we're here to help. So it's like, you know, using names, using addresses, using, you know, subdivisions, if we really want to like, like, Hey, you know, Hey, Jesse, we're, you know, we're wondering if you wanted to sell 1, 2, 3 main street, if you've ever thought about selling hassle-free please give us a call.   You know, we don't have any commissions or inspections or appraisals, you know, call us for a no obligation fair offer. And that that's enough of the core of the message to get across of like, Hey, we're here to help. You know, sometimes we'll add in that we're local, you know, we're, we're, we're definitely, you know, not an eye buyer or somebody who's a Zillow or something coming in that we're here to work with them and we have, you know, multiple ways to help them.   So,   Jesse (27m 28s): Yeah. Fantastic. At the end of the day, it's really just getting that phone call. You're not expecting it to get the sale, which it's nice, but not expecting to get the sale on the first touchpoint.   Anson (27m 37s): Right. Yeah, exactly. It's definitely a long game of multiple touches and, and yeah. Building on each other. So,   Jesse (27m 47s): So handsome, we're in a crazy time right now, recording this, you know, coming into the end of, of 20, 21. I don't think anybody could have predicted the last year and a half. How has your business, or how do you see your business evolving as a result of kind of the environment that we've been in, if at all, and, and maybe just prospectively, where do you see opportunities, you know, coming in the new year?   Anson (28m 15s): Yeah. So we're going to continue doing what we're doing for this year, which is, you know, more out of state looking at a state for markets that are conducive to cash flow. Short term rental opportunities is, is pretty big focus right now as well. And then locally, we've been partnering more with other investors because we've had a lot of time spent on the other side, kind of looking at a state. And, and so, you know, looking forward to next year, you know, I think the market's going to just be doing more of the same, can't foresee anything crazy that's going to happen.   And so, you know, we're just kind of to focus on long-term projects and, and even if we're wrong, you know, we still have, long-term more passive, passive things going, so   Jesse (29m 12s): Right on. All right. And so we ask a four questions, every guest before we wrap up. So before I get there, I'm just curious, I've been trying to, you know, for the last month or two kind of taking a poll of, of different real estate professionals I talked to, and I'm just curious your thoughts on number one, inflation, and number two interest rates. And, and I'm not expecting you to have a crystal ball, but I just, I find it funny because, you know, you have asked people, you get four opinions on these topics, right?   Anson (29m 46s): Yeah. So inflation's obviously going to be an issue. I think that Brian, who's the economist who spoke at BiggerPockets convention, had a lot of really good things to say. And pretty much everything that I would kind of repeat of, you know, inflation's a problem. It's not going to be a problem today or next year, but in the next, you know, four years or so, it will probably pop and become an issue.   And as far as interest rates, it's like, I think that they just voted that they're not, they're not going to change at all. And so as long as interest rates stay down and buying, and money is easy, it's just gonna turn, turn the market and keep it going. So buyers will keep buying. Investors will keep investing money right now is probably the easiest thing to get, whether it's hard money or otherwise, and so easy money, hard deals.   So it's going to probably just keep fueling that and, and yeah, just, it, it's kinda hard to say, but I think Brian had a really good kind of outlook on it where, you know, 20, 24 or 2026 is kind of when things will start changing and creeping up a little bit on, on interest rates. And I, I don't know enough about it to disagree. So   Jesse (31m 13s): Yeah, we had a, we had Brian on the show, you can check that episode out. I think it was in the sixties, but he was, he was great if especially if you, if you geek out on, on economics, that's definitely the one that listened to. I love it. Okay. Sweet. If you're ready, we'll fire off these final four questions to ya.   Anson (31m 32s): All right. I'm ready. Right on.   Jesse (31m 34s): What's something, you know, now in your career Anson, whether that's in

Motoring Podcast - News Show
Hear the Sparrows Farting - 23 November 2021

Motoring Podcast - News Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 46:42


FOLLOW UP: VW SHOULD'VE PUBLISHED ENGINE PLANIn a test case brought by investors in Germany, Volkswagen is accused of failing to disclose the problem from back in 2008. The judge has stated that it is on the investors to prove VW or any of their staff withheld information, but it is up to VW to prove the board not telling investors from 2012 was not grossly negligent nor deliberate. To read more, click here for the Reuters article. FOLLOW UP: CONTINENTAL EX-CEO AND EX-CFO INVESTIGATED The ex-CEO, Dagenhart, and just sacked CFO, Wolfgang Schaefer, who held their roles for Continental, are being investigated by German prosecutors over their involvement in dieselgate, specifically regarding the 1.6 litre diesel engines. To read more on this story, click the Yahoo News article here. HAND HELD DEVICES TO BE ILLEGAL BEHIND THE WHEELThe Highway Code will be updated with changes to interacting with your mobile phone, whilst driving. The loopholes that allow playing games, filming or scrolling through playlists whilst holding the phone, will be illegal. However, if the device is in a cradle it can still be prodded as though it was a touchscreen infotainment system fitted to the car. To find out more, click here for the BBC News article. NATIONAL PARKS NOT CONSIDERING BANNING CARSStories started circulating that some National Parks were considering banning cars from some roads at certain times of the year, this is not the case. However, they are all looking at what they can do to reduce congestion and the effect so many visitors have travelling to these beauty spots. To read more, click the Autocar article here. PORTSMOUTH CAZ OPENS 29 NOVEMBERPortsmouth will be starting their Clean Air Zone (CAZ) initiative on 29 November. This will only affect HGVs, buses, vans, taxis and private hire vehicles as it is designated as a Class B CAZ, therefore private car drivers are not going to be saddled with extra costs to enter the city. To find out more, click here for the YesAuto article. VOLTA TRUCKS STARTS PRODUCTION IN COVENTRY Volta Trucks has started building their prototype all-electric Zero lorry, in Coventry. The vehicles comes with a range of 95-125 miles. 25 prototypes will be built in Coventry and once Volta are ready for full production they will be built in their Austrian factory. To find out more, click the Autocar Professional article here. MORGAN APPOINTS NEW HEAD OF EVSMorgan has made it clear that electrification is very much in their future, with the appointment of Matthew Hole as Chief Technical Officer, with Graham Chapman who moves up to Chief Operations Officer. To read more, click here for the Autocar article. MOTORWAY SERVICES EV CHARGING MONOPOLY LOOSENS Gridserve, who now own Ecotricity, has informed the Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) that they will not enforce the exclusivity clauses in their contracts with MOTO, Extra or Roadchef, after 2026, over EV charging stations. This will allow other operators to install their equipment and give consumers a choice on charging providers. To find out more, click the Electrifying article here. SMMT PUBLISHES MARKETING GUIDELINES FOR AUTOMATED TECHNOLOGYThe Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders (SMMT), has worked with industry organisations, the Advertising Standards Agency, Thatcham Research and Government departments to come up with principles for advertising automated vehicle technology. To find out more, click here for the SMMT article. PRIVATE E-SCOOTERS NEED MORE RESEARCH BEFORE LEGALISATIONThe Parliamentary Advisory Council for Transport Safety has advised that more information is required before private e-scooters can be legalised as there appears to be a difference in behaviour between rental and privately ridden scooters. They wish to gather more data so that recommendation that allow for safe approval of the idea or rejection can be fully considered. To read more, click the Autocar article here. ——————————————————————————-If you like what we do, on this show, and think it is worth a £1.00, please consider supporting us via Patreon. Here is the link to that CLICK HERE TO SUPPORT THE PODCAST——————————————————————————-WRC: RALLY MONZASebastien Ogier rounded off his last full time season with a win, which meant he captured his eighth championship. He was pushed all the way by teammate Elfyn Evans and Dani Sordo, for Hyundai, rounded off the podium. Ogier will take part in only a small number of events next season. To find out more about what happened at Monza, click here for the DirtFish article. To read the What We Learned article, click the link here. To watch the DirtFish video showing Ogier's final full-time season, click the link here. To watch the chat the Team Principles have with each other, click the DirtFish video here. NEW NEW CAR NEWSHyundai Heritage Series GandeurIn recognition of the importance of the Grandeur, Hyundai have created a retro-modern reinterpretation of their flagship model which they originally released 35 years ago. Similar to the recent Pony concept car, there are some lovely modern touches but a retention of the original, recognisable, shape. To read more, click the YesAuto article here. Genesis G70 Shooting BrakeWhilst marketing calls this a shooting brake, it is an attractive estate with five doors. They will be fitting this European only car with the same V6 from the Stinger, plus letting the Germany development centre make sure the ride, handling and everything else is how we expect them to be in this market. PRices start at £35, 250. To find out more and look at the rather attractive shape, click the EVO article here. LUNCHTIME READ: THE CORBY ORBITAL NORTHERN ROAD This article explains why the Corby Orbital Northern Road took £10 million public funding but has never been completed and possibly who is now the owner of it. Intrigue, multiple owners at the same Channel Island address and more can be found in this excellent example of why local reporting is so very important. To read the article, click the Northamptonshire Telegraph link here. LIST OF THE WEEK: GORDON MURRAY'S TOP 10 CARSYou can watch a fascinating video from Goodwood Road&Racing where they propose the Top 10 cars designed by Gordon Murray. Don't forget to let Alan know if you agree with his choice and if not which you would pick as the number one car. To view the video, click the YouTube link here. AND FINALLY: TINY ENGINE THAT IS A WORK OF ARTA creator called Maker B has spent 1,000 hours creating a miniscule 4-stroke engine and condensed the process into a 15 minute video show ing the skill and artistry involved in making the engine and getting it running. To see this click the Hagerty link here.

Break It Down Show
Graham Hurley – Last Flight to Stalingrad

Break It Down Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 58:42


Graham Hurley – Last Flight to Stalingrad - Graham Hurley joins us from the UK. His latest book is called The Last Flight to Stalingrad. Graham's writing has captured the imagination of readers throughout the world. In his Spoils of War series he's focused on a Georgian, there's not ours, general who works with Nazi propaganda master Goebbels.  Pete's read the Last Flight to Stalingrad...and says for World War II readers, it's a must buy.  Get the book on Amazon at We love having authors on the show, especially international ones. If you'e not familiar with Graham, head over to and you'll get why we already are in love with Graham and his work. Please support the Break It Down Show by doing a monthly subscription to the show  All of the money you invest goes directly to supporting the show!   For the  of this episode head to    Haiku World War II readers Graham has got you covered Read his awesome book Similar episodes:  -   -   -    Join us in supporting Save the Brave as we battle PTSD.  Executive Producer/Host: Pete A Turner  Producer: Damjan Gjorgjiev  Writer: Dragan Petrovski  The Break It Down Show is your favorite best, new podcast, featuring 5 episodes a week with great interviews highlighting world-class guests from a wide array of shows.

Business Breakdowns
AutoZone: Exemplary Capital Allocation - [Business Breakdowns, EP. 36]

Business Breakdowns

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 56:09


I'm Zack Fuss, and today we're breaking down AutoZone, the leading retailer and distributor of auto parts in the Americas. From the outside, AutoZone might look like a dull business in a mature industry, but once you dive into the details, you quickly realize it's a hidden gem that echoes the best of Walmart and Costco, earns some of the highest returns on capital in retail, and has a long history of outsized shareholder returns.   To help break down the business, I'm joined by Freddie Lait, founder and CIO at London-based Latitude Investment Management. Please enjoy this fascinating breakdown of AutoZone.   For the full show notes, transcript, and links to the best content to learn more, check out the episode page here.   -----   This episode is brought to you by Tegus. We created Business Breakdowns to uncover the lessons and frameworks behind every business, and that's what makes Tegus our perfect launch partner. Much of the foundational prep for these episodes starts with research on the Tegus platform.   With Tegus, you can learn everything you'd want to know about a company in an on-demand digital platform. Investors share their expert calls, allowing others to instantly access more than 20,000 calls on Coinbase, Hinge Health, Farfetch, or almost any company of interest. All you have to do is log in. If you're ready to go deeper on any company and you appreciate the value of primary research, head to tegus.co/breakdowns for a free trial.   -----   This episode is brought to you by Eight Sleep. Eight Sleep's new Pod Pro Cover is the easiest and fastest way to sleep at your perfect temperature. Simply add the Pod Pro Cover to your current mattress and start sleeping as cool as 55°F or as hot as 110°F. This holiday season Eight Sleep will be running their biggest sale of the year. To capture the savings be sure to visit eightsleep.com/patrick or use code "Patrick" this Black Friday or Cyber Monday.   -----   Business Breakdowns is a property of Colossus, LLC. For more episodes of Business Breakdowns, visit joincolossus.com/episodes.   Stay up to date on all our podcasts by signing up to Colossus Weekly, our quick dive every Sunday highlighting the top business and investing concepts from our podcasts and the best of what we read that week. Sign up here.   Follow us on Twitter: @JoinColossus | @patrick_oshag | @jspujji | @zbfuss   Show Notes [00:02:58] - [First question] - The general state of the auto part industry and its key players [00:06:14] - Similar and differing characteristics of AutoZone, O'Reilly, and Advanced Autoparts   [00:08:04] - The history of AutoZone and how they got to where they are today [00:12:11] - ESLs involvement with AutoZone and notable moments from that partnership [00:13:29] - Unit economics, sales per store, how much a store costs, and general features [00:16:32] - Other retail businesses that rank close to the unit economics of AutoZone [00:17:43] - How a customer interacts with their business [00:19:40] - What is being sold that allows them to earn such high gross profits [00:20:57] - Ways AutoZone has kept their competitors at bay [00:23:05] - Additional opportunities in their systems that offer competitive advantages [00:24:18] - Low inventory turnover working in specialty retail merchandise [00:26:14] - How they manage their stock locally and regionally to ensure a reliable supply [00:27:36] - Supplier finance mechanics overview for retailers [00:29:12] - Some of the private label programs they've had success with [00:31:40] - Failure oriented parts and what products inhabit this category [00:32:58] - How management and integrated culture find opportunities in DIFM [00:36:08] - Moving up and down the call list and gaining favor as a retailer [00:38:45] - The threat electric vehicles might pose to Autozone [00:37:48] - Whether or not an eCommerce giant may penetrate and disrupt this sector [00:44:58] - Paths AutoZone has taken to return capital to its shareholders [00:49:21] - COVID's impacts and detriments to the business [00:53:04] - What we can learn as builders and investors from studying AutoZone's story

Break It Down Show
DW Wilber – Under Cover for the CIA

Break It Down Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 62:36


DW Wilber – Under Cover for the CIA - Del W. Wilber brings over thirty years of experience in Security and Counterterrorism as a former Intelligence Officer serving with the Central Intelligence Agency and the Department of Defense in Eastern and Western Europe, and the Middle East, and in law enforcement. His expertise took him to Iraq from 2004-2007 where he served as an advisor for counterterrorism and counter-IED operations to the Commanding General, U.S. Army Multi-National Corps – Iraq. Get DW's Book In the Shadow of the Swords: The Baghdad Police Academy Get more on Del on his website: Del is fortunate enough to have a character after him, as he tells us on BIDS, reflects on his experience while in active duty (they might have been in the same room with our Pedro) the situation with COVID and the danger of biological weapons.Joining us to co-host is an actor and ex Army Ranger Tim Abell. Please support the Break It Down Show by doing a monthly subscription to the show  All of the money you invest goes directly to supporting the show!   For the  of this episode head to    Haiku He's ex CIA Joining us breaking it down Game recognize game   ​Similar episodes: Xander Bullock  John Green  Pete A Turner  Join us in supporting Save the Brave as we battle PTSD.  Executive Producer/Host: Pete A Turner  Producer: Damjan Gjorgjiev  Writer: Dragan Petrovski  The Break It Down Show is your favorite best, new podcast, featuring 5 episodes a week with great interviews highlighting world-class guests from a wide array of shows.

Suuuper Anime Podcast
BREATHE! Pt. 2 - Saturday AM Founder Frederick L. Jones Joins Us To Discuss An Exclusive Book Deal, Importance of Being Consistent, Why Manga and Hip Hop Are Similar + Much More! | Ep.74

Suuuper Anime Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 61:18


“Saturday AM, its authentic… these kids are creating manga whether you call it manga or not… the truth of the creator is the truth of the character”  - Frederick Jones  (Saturday AM founder )Our guest for this episode was Mr Fredrick L Jones who is the founder of Saturday AM - The World's most diverse comics anthology. The company has dozens of creators, thousands of fans all over the world, 100's of issued magazines which has inspired young, diverse, creators much the same way that Shonen Jump, cartoons, and comics did. We discuss the following things:  Saturday AM Founder Mr Jones drops the exclusive regarding their partnership with The Quarto Group?How did the partnership come about with the Quarto Group? Why it's important to be authentic and celebrate all identities! How can we solve for the lack of representation in manga? The importance of remaining consistent as a content creator! Is Manga entering a new ERA? Saturday AM's Mr Jones, talk about the 4 era of Manga and what the latest era is, listen to find out what these eras are?Are manga and hip hop similar?  Why Anime and Manga have transcended the notion of only being from Japan!Saturday AM Socials Website: http://www.saturday-am.comLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/frederickjonessatam/Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/saturday_amTwitter: http://www.twitter.com/saturday_amYou Tube: http://www.youtube.com/myfutprintThe Quarto Group book deal - https://www.saturday-am.com/blog/satambookdealIf you enjoy the podcast, please don't forget to FOLLOW, RATE and REVIEW the show (it takes less than 30 seconds) Please do also share with anyone you fill will enjoy the show. Doing so will allows us to grow the show and encourage us to keep putting out more content. Also as mentioned we love your reviews, so please keep them coming and will read them out in future shows.In case you're wondering here is how to rate and review our show.Also, to keep conversation going were super keen to hear your thoughts, questions and opinions on the show's discussion points, so please do drop us a voice note on our website www.suuuperanimepodcast.com or email at www.suuuperanimepodcast.com/contact Suuuper podcast title inspired by Fabolous – Breathe | Listen Here! Social media links Instagram: SuuuperanimepodcastTwitter: @SuuuperanimeFacebook: SuuuperAnimePodcast 

Big Talk with Laura and Rachel
Why Can't I Eat Dog for Dinner?

Big Talk with Laura and Rachel

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 65:48


Nothing says Thanksgiving like gathering around a giant, roasted turkey. But did you ever stop to think why Turkey is on the menu rather than horse dog or cat? Food taboos are complicated and vary greatly by geography. There are no cultural universals when it comes to what animals are and aren't on the menu.Today, we're uncovering food taboos around the world. How some unlucky critters ended up as diet staples and what role religion plays in shaping our dinner plates. That's what you're digging into today on impolite society.Email us your impolite questions at rude@impolitesociety.com and visit our website for info about the show and your hosts Laura and Rachel.SOURCES:Some We Love, Some We Hate, Some We Eat: Why It's So Hard to Think Straight About Animals , Hal HerzogFood taboos: their origins and purposesWhy These Animals? - The GastropodThe Juicy History of Humans Eating Meat, HistoryWhat the 'meat paradox' reveals about moral decision making, BBCDo You Eat Dog?,  TasteA recipe for friendship: Similar food consumption promotes trust and cooperationEvolutionary models of in-group favoritismThe Abominable PigNew study doubles the estimate of bird species in the worldMammals, National Wildlife Federation

Boston Celtics Game Day Recap
Tatum Is Officially Back!!!

Boston Celtics Game Day Recap

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 22:36


The Celtics held a pretty commanding lead throughout this one, being up 20 at multiple points throughout the night but that is not how it ended. While it may have been a pretty ugly 4th quarter, the Celtics pulled out a 6 point win on the second night of a back to back. Similar to last night, we got great performances from everyone in our starting lineup. Tatum had another very efficient night and was getting downhill to the basket a lot which is great to see. Schroder and Smart held it down again and both had great nights. Marcus, while he didn't shoot well, impacted the game on the defensive end but was also distributing at a very high level. Schroder was the #2 scoring option tonight ending with 29 points and we also saw another solid performance from Grant Williams (14pts 8reb on 4-6 shooting from 3). After scoring 28+ in the first three quarters, the offense certainly slowed down in the 4th and we saw their defense fall apart at times but a lot of that might just be fatigue and tired legs after playing last night against the Lakers. Either way, this is a solid win where the Celtics moved the ball effortlessly assisting 28 times on 41 makes and you just have to love it. This podcast is brought to you by our friends at Venture Greens Nutrition. They have the best CBD products in the world including tinctures, salves and gear and all of their products are made and manufactured in the United States. Check them out at venturegreensnutrition.com and use code Celticstake15 for 15% off! This podcast is also brought to you by The Basketball Podcast Network and DraftKings. Download the DraftKings Sportsbook app now, use promo code TBPN, bet JUST FIVE DOLLARS on any NBA team to win their game and win TWO HUNDRED DOLLARS IN FREE BETS. If they win, YOU WIN with promo code TBPN this week at DraftKings Sportsbook — an Authorized Sports Betting Partner of the NBA --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/guy-deplacido/support

Action Sports Jax On ESPN690
11-19-21 HOUR 1: Thursday Night Football Recap, Patriots and the Jags are very similar

Action Sports Jax On ESPN690

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 45:07


Brent and Kasey discuss Thursday Night Football, and how the Pats and Jags are very similar

The Wendy's Big Show
Tomasson: Vikings will try similar game plan as last year vs Packers

The Wendy's Big Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 13:52


In November 2020, the Vikings upset the Packers at Lambeau Field. Chris Tomasson from the St. Paul Pioneer Press joined the Big Show and explained how the Vikings will try and do the same thing again this season.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Gary DeMar Podcast
God's Kingdom is Not of this World

The Gary DeMar Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 30:19


In Chapter 12 of Myths, Lies, and Half-Truths, Gary discusses the objection that God's Kingdom is not "of this world." Similar to first-century Jews, modern Christians reject that God's Kingdom is actually here and now because of what they see around them. They have a particular idea of what God's Kingdom will look like and anything that doesn't meet that definition is thrown out. Get the book here: https://store.americanvision.org/products/myths-lies-and-half-truths

One Minute Retirement Tip with Ashley
Rule of 55 Withdrawals...Explained

One Minute Retirement Tip with Ashley

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 4:41


The theme this week on the Retirement Quick Tips Podcast is: penalty-free early withdrawals for retirement.  Today, I'm talking about how you might be able to use the Rule of 55 if you retire in your 50s and you need to start taking withdrawals from you tax-deferred accounts prior to age 59 ½. Yesterday, I talked about rule 72(t) for early withdrawals, but the inflexibility and room for error make that a pretty unpalatable solution. Another option if you're in this situation is called the Rule of 55. The catch is that it only works for certain workplace retirement plans, like a 401k or 403b, not with a Traditional IRA.  The Rule of 55 is an IRS regulation that allows those 55 and older to withdraw funds from their 401(k) or 403(b) without a tax penalty. I had this happen recently with a client who retired after age 55. Most of their assets are in 401k accounts, rather than taxable accounts, so it was something that we explored after my client retired. Similar to the rule of 72(t), it has certain restrictions and you'll want to make sure you adhere to the rules, but it's so much more flexible and a lot less room for error.  Basically, if you retire after age 55, you would leave behind the money you need for withdrawals in your 401k…let's say it's $30,000/year that you need for portfolio withdrawals. You would leave enough in the account for portfolio withdrawals. You could leave everything in your 401k, but if you rollover the remaining balance to an IRA, it's important that you leave enough in the 401k to cover your withdrawals until age 59 ½.  Your 401k may or may not allow this option, so you'll want to check with your HR/benefits dept. But if you can utilize this rule, it's more flexible and easier to administer than the 72(t) withdrawal rule, so it's worthy of consideration. Once you roll all of your 401k into the IRA, this option is no longer available, so it's important to find out if this is allowed in the plan before you initiate a rollover with your old employer. That's it for today. Thanks for listening! My name is Ashley Micciche and this is the Retirement Quick Tips podcast.  ---------- >>> Subscribe on Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/2DI2LSP >>> Subscribe on Amazon Alexa: https://amzn.to/2xRKrCs >>> Visit the podcast page: https://truenorthra.com/podcast/  ---------- Tags: retirement, investing, money, finance, financial planning, retirement planning, saving money, personal finance

Vintage Anime Club Podcast
Episode 133 - Nightmare Fuel (Little Nemo: Adventures in Slumberland)

Vintage Anime Club Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 145:45


On this episode, join hosts Garrett, Kate, Ed, and Dennis as we discuss the 1989 film Little Nemo: Adventures in Slumberland. Similar to our Unico watch, we discuss if this actually is an anime title or just anime adjacent? Many of your favorite dreams and least favorite nightmares as a child are featured, such as trains, clowns falling, monsters, magic, flying, derigibles, and a lot more. Except for that one nightmare when you're late for school or work and you don't have any bottoms on. So take a trip down to Slumberland with us, where you'll meet King Grandfather Santa, goat powered vehicles, a flying bed, and pajamas every which way you look. Hit that snooze button and keep on dreaming. Support the show by either donating to our Ko-Fi link below, or by purchasing Little Nemo: Adventures in Slumberland on DVD through our Amazon affiliate link: https://amzn.to/3DsCuTK Dennis: @ichnob | Ed: @ippennokuinashi | Garrett: @blkriku | Kate: @TaikoChan Website | Email | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | RSS | Ko-Fi

Break It Down Show
Mark Sullivan - The Last Green Valley

Break It Down Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 56:09


Mark Sullivan - The Last Green Valley -  has authored lots and LOTS of books. He and Pete A Turner sit down and talk about his process, how growth and the latest book called, "".   Get the last Green Valley on Amazon  Mark's book tells the tale of the Martel's, a Ukrainian family who lives on the edge of survival in Stalinist Russia. Then things get worse and the Nazis stand between them and a new life. World War II books aren't just about tanks and paratroopers...this time it's about family. For the  of this episode head to  Please support the Break It Down Show by doing a monthly subscription to the show  All of the money you invest goes directly to supporting the show! ​Haiku The Last Green Valley The Martels flee the Nazis Will the escape work?​​ Similar episodes:  -   -   -  Join us in supporting Save the Brave as we battle PTSD.  Executive Producer/Host: Pete A Turner  Producer: Damjan Gjorgjiev  Writer: Dragan Petrovski  The Break It Down Show is your favorite best, new podcast, featuring 5 episodes a week with great interviews highlighting world-class guests from a wide array of shows.

Doug.Show by Niche Site Project
Similar KGR Terms, Homepage Content, Sandbox Myth – Mailbag – DS303

Doug.Show by Niche Site Project

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 33:32


Doug answers a few questions...and tells a guitar story. Trey asks about using KGR terms and using them in one post. What should I have on my home page? What about the sandbox? Is it real? This episode is brought to you in part by Ezoic.  And be sure to check out Leap to help your site load faster. Plus you won't have to worry about the Core Web Vitals. Contact me. Ask Questions! Send me an email here: feedback@doug.show Leave a voicemail: (406) 813-0613

Invest Like the Best
Bored Ape Yacht Club -  [Web3 Breakdowns, EP. 1]

Invest Like the Best

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 51:56


Today, I am excited to share our newest show, Web3 Breakdowns. Similar to our Business Breakdowns series, Web3 will have it's own dedicated feed so make sure to hit this subscribe link or find it on your preferred podcast player. The first episode of Web3 Breakdowns covers Bored Ape Yacht Club. You will hear from guest, Eric Golden, who will also be coming back to host his own Web3 Breakdowns moving forward. We are sharing this first episode to make sure no one misses this launch.  ---- Welcome to our new show, Web3 Breakdowns. We want to be your on ramp into this new decentralized world, and through conversations with builders, creators, and investors, we will do our best to help you understand and navigate this emerging ecosystem. First up, we are breaking down the NFT project and cultural phenomenon, Bored Ape Yacht Club. To help break down Bored Apes, I am joined by Eric Golden, former Portfolio Manager at Fidelity and current Bored Ape owner. Eric and I start with an overview of the Bored Ape Yacht Club and his path to owning an NFT in the collection. We then use Bored Apes as a lens to understand how NFT projects are not just creating rare art but strong membership communities too. Beyond the cultural differences between NFT communities, it was fascinating to hear how projects are differentiating themselves with IP ownership, roadmaps, and DAOs. Please enjoy this breakdown of the Bored Ape Yacht Club. For the full show notes, transcript, and links to the best content to learn more, check out the episode page here.   -----   This episode is brought to you by Coinbase Prime, an integrated solution that provides an advanced trading platform, secure custody, and prime services so you can manage all your crypto assets in one place.   Coinbase Prime fully integrates crypto trading and custody on a single platform while giving clients the market's best all-in pricing through their proprietary Smart Order Router and algorithmic execution. Coinbase Prime extends beyond individuals - with companies like Tesla and Microstrategy using the investing platform to execute some of the largest trades in the industry.    Coinbase is the only publicly-traded company with experience trading and custodying crypto assets at scale - build a unified investment portfolio with the most trusted name in crypto. Learn more by visiting coinbase.com/prime to get started.   -----   Web3 Breakdowns is a property of Colossus, LLC. For more episodes of Web3 Breakdowns, visit joincolossus.com/episodes.   Stay up to date on all our podcasts by signing up to Colossus Weekly, our quick dive every Sunday highlighting the top business and investing concepts from our podcasts and the best of what we read that week. Sign up here.   Follow us on Twitter: @Web3Breakdowns | @patrick_oshag | @JoinColossus   Show Notes   [00:02:30] - [First question] - What the Bored Ape Yacht Club is [00:03:39] - Motivations for owning a Bored Ape compared to traditional art  [00:07:46] - The scope of prices, hierarchy, turnover, and trading overview of these NFTs [00:09:51] - Distribution of rarity and why it matters  [00:11:29] - How the project roadmap is managed by the member community [00:16:23] - Who are the members and the key stewards of steering the ship [00:18:08] - An example of a project where the owners don't own the IP of their NFT [00:20:56] - Underlying fundamentals and utility behind owning a Bored Ape  [00:26:36] - Thoughts on fungible tokens inside of non-fungible projects [00:29:06] - Ways to think about the value proposition of owning an Ape and an Ape token  [00:30:36] - Different options for minting NFTs and their pros and cons [00:34:36] - Literal mechanics of the minting process [00:36:59] - Smart contract mediating of combining NFTs to generate rare ones [00:39:20] - Building a bottom up brand and other examples of this trend [00:41:50] - Are NFTs just gambling, or will they become investable assets like physical art [00:46:09] - Blockchain infrastructure of the NFT space and whether it'll stay on Ethereum [00:48:48] - What makes the Bored Ape Yacht Club so innovative compared to other projects

FM Talk 1065 Podcasts
Midday Mobile - Cameron Smith on how our current political division is similar to the Astroworld disaster - November 17 2021

FM Talk 1065 Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 19:12


Daily Halacha Podcast - Daily Halacha By Rabbi Eli J. Mansour
Mukse- If a Mukse Item Gets Mixed Up With Similar Non-Mukse Items

Daily Halacha Podcast - Daily Halacha By Rabbi Eli J. Mansour

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 3:57


One type of Mukse is "Basees L'davar Ha'asur"- a base for a Mukse item also becomes Mukse. Even if the Mukse item is subsequently removed, the base remains Mukse, as long as the Mukse item was on it during Ben Hash'mashot (twilight) of Ereb Shabbat. For example, if money was placed on a chair on Friday, the chair becomes Mukse, even if a non-Jew removed the money during Shabbat.Hacham Ovadia was asked the following question regarding this Halacha: What is the Halacha if the Mukse chair became mixed in with the other identical (non-Mukse) chairs in the house? Does the concept of Bitul (nullification) in the majority apply to Mukse, as it does to meat and milk? Accordingly, if there were a total of three chairs, then the Mukse chair would be Batel (nullified) in the majority of permitted chairs. However, the principle of Bitul does not apply to "Davar She'Yesh Lo Matirin"-cases in which the forbidden item will later become permitted. The classic case is an egg laid on Yom Tob, which is Mukse of Nolad, that became mixed in one thousand permitted eggs is not Batel, since that egg will become permitted after Yom Tob. Similarly, in the case of the chairs, the Mukse chair will become permitted after Shabbat, and would not be nullified in the mixture. Nevertheless, the Nodeh B'Yehuda (R. Yechezkel ben Yehuda Landau, 1713-1793, Prague) has the famous opinion that the restriction of "Davar She'Yesh Lo Matirin" applies only to food. His rationale is that food is a one-time use; it's eaten and then it's gone. Regarding such items the Halacha requires delaying the one-time consumption to eat it in its permitted state and not while it is still forbidden, since anyway there is only "one shot." However, something like a chair can be used time and time again. Therefore, the Halacha does not require one to miss out benefiting from it on Shabbat. Hacham Ovadia is lenient and relies on the Nodeh B'Yehuda in the case of Mukse, which is M'drabanan, and permits using all the chairs.SUMMARYIf a Mukse non-food item became mixed in with identical permitted items, one may rely on the lenient opinion and use all the items on Shabbat.

Transforming Trauma
Trauma Healing in the Black Community Through Play Therapy with Althea Simpson

Transforming Trauma

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 48:03


Althea Simpson, founder of Brighter Day Therapeutic Solutions, Unicorn Life Training and the Black Play Therapy Society, is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker specializing in Trauma Recovery, a Registered Play Therapist, and a Certified Lego Serious Play Facilitator. Althea shares that she would like for listeners to learn that play therapy is not just for children, but that it is a trauma-informed treatment. She was drawn to play therapy early in her career, which is a therapeutic modality that supports clients to express themselves in ways other than just verbal communication. She discusses a play therapy intervention that is aligned with NARM, which is using inquiry in the play therapy process. “It's not for us [as therapists] to give meaning to [the client's experience], that's for the client,” she says. Similar to the NARM approach, Althea invites curiosity which supports clients to connect more deeply to themselves.  Althea reflects on the importance of deconstructing the stigma around mental health with black families. She explains that many black families believe that the answer to their mental health problems is through church. She challenges this notion through addressing the intersectionality of spirituality, religion, and mental health. She also started the Black Play Therapy Society to address the disparities for black therapists not being able to showcase their work, as well as the inconsistencies and information that was being talked about in the black communities.   Althea details many important aspects that therapists need to understand in order to work with black families. She states, “We need more black therapists.” She also asks an important question for non-black therapists who are working with black families, which is, “Are black clients allowed to show up in their authentic self with all their pain, and can they express what they need to express?” Althea acknowledges that utilizing play therapy helped her to also address her own healing. Althea's lived experiences of trauma, as well as healing from her trauma, has supported her in her capacity to help her clients. She explains, “I'm a great therapist because I understand [the work] both personally and professionally.” About Althea: Althea is the founder of Brighter Day Therapeutic Solutions and Unicorn Life Training. She is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker specialized in trauma recovery, Registered Play Therapist-Supervisor, and Certified LEGO® SERIOUS PLAY® Facilitator. She has an active psychotherapy private practice in Northern, VA and has experience treating children, adolescents, and adults with diverse backgrounds and ranges of concerns, including anger, substance use/abuse, domestic violence, anxiety, and depression. Her approach to treatment is tailored to the unique needs of her clients and she brings a range of educational, professional and life experiences to her work as a therapist, clinical supervisor, and mental health consultant. Learn more: https://unicornlifetraining.net To read the full show notes and discover more resources visit http://www.narmtraining.com/podcast *** NARM Training Institute http://www.NARMtraining.com View upcoming trainings: https://narmtraining.com/schedule Join the Inner Circle: https://narmtraining.com/online-learning/inner-circle *** The NARM Training Institute provides tools for transforming complex trauma through: in-person and online trainings for mental health care professionals; in-person and online workshops on complex trauma and how it interplays with areas like addiction, parenting, and cultural trauma; an online self-paced learning program, the NARM Inner Circle; and other trauma-informed learning resources.   We want to connect with you! Facebook @NARMtraining Twitter @NARMtraining YouTube Instagram @thenarmtraininginstitute

Law Nation Podcast
The Dallas Cowboys vs Kansas City Chiefs | Both Teams Look Very Similar Match-Up...

Law Nation Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 10:17


Sub Here https://www.youtube.com/LawNation --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/lawsnation/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/lawsnation/support

Holly Crap!
Episode 14: All the Prince Movies!! they are all so similar though

Holly Crap!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 50:01


Part two of our three part Royal/Prince series in which we discover just how similar the storylines are. We each took a different film and did a recap and then chatted about the woes of the Prince’s in the Hallmark universe and the ladies that fall in love with them (in like a week). We watched Summer Prince, Once Upon a Prince and Royally Ever After. Will we ever get around to making the map of all the random countries that Hallmark Channel makes up for these royal families? We may also start writing fan fiction at some point…with an Avril Lavigne soundtrack and a cameo from Tony Hawk.

Bulletproof Radio
How to Deal with Toxic People (Including Yourself) – Robert Greene : 878

Bulletproof Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 84:26


WE APPRECIATE OUR PARTNERS. CHECK THEM OUT!Supplement Bioavailability: https://www.quicksilverscientific.com, use code DAVE15 to save 15% on your first order Find Out Your Biological Age: https://glycanage.com, use code DAVE to get 20% off testing packagesNature's Nootropic: https://trukava.com, use code DAVE15 for 15% offIN THIS EPISODE OF THE HUMAN UPGRADE™…… my guest fits right into the podcast transition to The Human Upgrade because he gets into the grittiness of what humans can do to level themselves up. No. 1 New York Times bestselling author Robert Greene shares science-backed knowledge about human nature.You know you want to be more powerful, more in control and excellent at what you do.Robert's insights help you do just that. He gives you actionable tips that help you unlock limitations you may be putting on yourself so you can move your life upward and forward. (Similar to something I like to tell my team is great momentum: “up and to the right.”) World leaders, military generals, business executives, philosophers, and hip-hop moguls alike revere Robert's books.After writing about mastery and power for more than two decades, he's now become a TikTok sensation and the universal truth for a new generation. He's one of my favorite authors who's profoundly influenced my own life and been on the podcast twice before. Both episodes are must listens: The 48 Laws of Power – #380 and The Laws of Human Nature – #575. I asked him back to talk about his latest book: “The Daily Laws: 366 Meditations on Power, Seduction, Mastery, Strategy, and Human Nature.” “In “The 48 Laws of Power,” I talk about deception and con artists,” Robert says. “But in The Laws of Human Nature, it's almost about self-deception, how we're con artists with ourselves, how we create an image of ourselves as being morally right, being a good person, being intelligent, being rational, being empathetic. Whereas in fact, we're usually quite far below that ideal. … Because your default position is to always look externally and blame other people.”In “The Daily Laws,” he distills the best of his previous books and never-before-published material in to one amazing life guide for you. He lays out themes for each month of the year: Power, seduction, persuasion, strategy, human nature, toxic people, self-control, mastery, psychology, leadership, adversity and creativity. Within these themes he features a “daily law” for you to follow.“By not looking at ourselves in an honest way, and glossing over our own flaws and weaknesses, we become trapped in patterns of behavior that we cannot control,” Robert says in his new book. “As the years go by, and the misreadings, missteps, and unrealistic decisions pile up, we can become bitter confused, and damaged.”“The Daily Laws” is designed to reverse [these] toxic patterns and reconnect you to reality,” Robert says. “It takes aim at the various delusions we have all absorbed and seeks to attune your mind instead to the most entrenched traits of human nature and how our brains actually operate.”Listen on for the truth bombs.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The InFluency Podcast
172. Similar English Vowels? Here's How Not To Get Confused!

The InFluency Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 23:03


Has it ever happened to you that you wanted to say ‘body' but it came out as ‘buddy' instead? Or maybe you never noticed that these two words should be pronounced differently because they sound the same to you? If you sometimes confuse vowel pairs in English, this episode is for you! In this episode, I'll go over some of the key vowel distinctions in English and will help you perceive the difference between each two vowels, and then – how to pronounce and practice them. Here are separate videos on some of the vowel pairs you might want to watch: ➡️ Sheep vs. Ship vowels https://youtu.be/Y3OKnbAaWSs ➡️ Bed vs. Bad https://youtu.be/8wEuD-k-qdo ➡️ Cap-Cup-Cop vowels https://youtu.be/f3xmPl34lso ➡️ POOL vs. PULL vowels https://youtu.be/c9V4JqRhPdo ➕ a full Pronunciation Masterclass on all English Vowels + PDF of IPA CHART FREE Download https://youtu.be/9E6F57s-V7U Finally, use ⏱️ Sprints with Free PDFs to practice vowel pairs and other English sounds: Sprint #1 https://hadarshemesh.com/spr1 Sprint #2 https://hadarshemesh.com/spr2 Sprint #3 https://hadarshemesh.com/spr3 Morning Pronunciation Routine https://youtu.be/l69yZ5xabbo

A Gutsy Girl
LMNT Electrolytes (What do Electrolytes Have to Do with the Gut?)

A Gutsy Girl

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 57:54


Podcast episode 23 is up today on the LMNT electrolytes, and asking the question,What do electrolytes have to do with the gut?Here's the episode with the one and only Robb Wolf.Robb Wolf, is a former research biochemist and 2X New York Times/Wall Street Journal Best-selling author of The Paleo Solution and Wired To Eat.He and co-author Diana Rodgers recently released their book, Sacred Cow, which explains why well-raised meat is good for us and good for the planet.Robb has transformed the lives of hundreds of thousands of people around the world via his top-ranked Itunes podcast, books and seminars.He's known for his direct approach and ability to distill and synthesize information to make the complicated stuff easier to understand.Robb is also the co-founder of Drink LMNT.I drink LMNT everyday to support intermittent fasting, my workouts, and optimal digestion. My favorite flavor can be found below!GET YOUR FREE DRINK LMNT SAMPLE PACKLMNT Electrolytes (What do Electrolytes Have to Do with the Gut?)Click HERE to save this post for later.Resources MentionedWired to EatLMNTRobb on InstagramRobb's personal websiteSacred CowThe Paleo SolutionDon't Miss These ThoughtsRobb's storyHis diet then and todayThe gut from a biochemical standpointWhat exactly are electrolytes and why are they necessary for the gut?Symptoms of an electrolyte imbalanceHow and why does an electrolyte imbalance lead to digestive issues?“An electrolyte imbalance can cause gut problems and gut problems can cause an electrolyte imbalance.”What does leaky gut have to do with all of this?How Robb founded LMNTWhat is the natriuresis of fasting?Robb's personal favorite LMNT flavor (get it HERE)Something about electrolytes most people get wrongRobb's 3 convictions around gut health and gut healingMore from A Gutsy Girl1. Welcome to A Gutsy Girl Podcast2. Hang out on Instagram3. BFF's on YouTube4. Free resource: The Master Gutsy Spreadsheet5. Rated-G Email ClubLMNTHere is more information on the LMNT product:LMNT is a tasty electrolyte drink mix with everything you need and nothing you don't. That means lots of salt — with no sugar.  LMNT is formulated to help anyone with their electrolyte needs and is perfectly suited to folks following a keto, low-carb, or paleo diet. With none of the junk. No sugar, coloring, artificial ingredients, gluten, or fillers.Current flavors include:Watermelon SaltCitrus SaltOrange SaltRaspberry SaltRaw UnflavoredMango ChiliLemon HabaneroChocolate SaltMint Chocolate (BRAND NEW!)GET YOUR FREE DRINK LMNT SAMPLE PACKStrong ElectrolytesHere are 4 main and common strong electrolytes:HCl (hydrochloric acid)H2SO4 (sulfuric acid)NaOH (sodium hydroxide)KOH (potassium hydroxide)And according to one source, here is the digestive benefit:Electrolytes keep the digestive system chugging along. Your intestines are lined with smooth muscle tissue that's controlled by the autonomic nervous system, the part you can't consciously control. Their rhythmic contractions are important for nutrient absorption and waste elimination. Potassium allows the muscles in the intestines to contract. However, low potassium levels can inhibit healthy digestion. That's why it's so important to load up on potassium with food and electrolyte supplements!But it's more than just that from a digestive standpoint. Keep reading to learn more about why electrolytes are critical for the Gutsy community.Sources: HERE, and HEREHow to Get ElectrolytesSome of the main causes of electrolyte imbalance include dehydration, sweating, diarrhea, certain medications, and vomiting.Because these are all very common in the Gutsy community, you can understand the chicken/egg scenario Robb discusses in the episode.So how can you get more electrolytes?For me and in/because of my research, supplementing is quickest and best for electrolytes. This is why, the electrolytes powder packets from LMNT are powerful.Electrolytes Powder PacketsI have the best electrolytes powder packets to share.In fact, I included these on my Holiday 2021 Wish List.However, today my favorite flavor releases and I can't even stand how excited I am about it.The flavor? Mint Chocolate. I'm a sucker for Mint Chocolate always, and this one is fantastic!It contains:1,000 mg sodium200 mg potassium60 mg magnesiumI got a sneak preview of the flavor and have been drinking it for the past couple weeks. So let me share a couple things.How to drink a packet of LMNTThe first time I tried LMNT I made a huge mistake. I poured an entire packet (stick) into about 8-10 ounces of water. Literally gagged and was like, “I cannot talk about this product because it tastes like colonoscopy prep.” Ladies – you know I'm always real and honest with you. That's what I thought.Well then I actually read the usage instructions and had the conversation with Robb. Turns out that if you drink an entire stick with just 8 – 10 ounces, it's going to be salty AF.So don't do as I did.Instead, for best results and the most incredible taste, pour the stick into 30 – 32 ounces and stir. I promise it tastes so good. Like, so good I now need to make sure I'm only drinking 1 – 2 sticks per day (or as needed with workouts!)I personally love the Mint Chocolate flavor over water and ice (was thinking of blending it next?!?!).Anyways, that's all you do to reap the benefits.I'M READY TO GET MY FREE LMNT SAMPLE PACKElectrolytes Supplement KetoOne final thing I have to mention: the Keto community loves this product.And if you're part of the Keto community, surely you have felt the “keto flu.”The body excretes electrolytes at an increased rate due while in a low-carb, ketogenic, or fasted state. Similar to the low-carb flu, electrolytes can make the difference between feeling great and feeling like garbage on a fast.I'll tell you what's real – I started drinking this and felt better before, during, and after my workouts. I also consumed a whole stick a night after having one too many cocktails and it did some magic!Finally, this product does use Stevia and I've always been skeptical of how my body (aka acne) reacts with Stevia. I'm keeping my eye on it with the handy, dandy, super lovely healing journal I created. You can, too! Wrap UpTime to wrap this up. As always, a huge goal for this show is to connect with even more people. Feel free to send an email to our team at podcast@agutsygirl.com. We want to hear questions, comments, show ideas, etc.Did you enjoy this episode? Please drop a comment below or leave a review on Apple Podcasts.Xox,SKH

Ministry Monday
Ministry Monday #178: How To Pray While I'm Working (with Kathleen M. Basi)

Ministry Monday

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021


Today we offer a short reflection from Kathleen M. Basi on the nuances of praying while "working" in pastoral music. Similar to the topic we discussed with Every Sacred Sunday, pastoral musicians experience the liturgy in a different way than many others. Kathleen offers great tips and suggestions in this Key Change presentation, taken from NPM's 2021 National Convention.

You Can Learn Chinese
#75 How to learn similar words the right way

You Can Learn Chinese

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 47:57


In this episode John and Jared share the proper way to compare similar words, characters, sounds, and grammar points. There's a time and a place for everything, and once you know the right way to approach these comparisons, you can maximize your learning. Guest interview is with Stefan Erfurth, a Chinese learner from Germany working in artificial intelligence who decided to put his heart into learning Chinese all because of a little girl. Links from the episode:Pitfalls of Studying Similar Words (AllSet Learning)Jekyll and Hyde - Mandarin Companion Level 2 graded readerThanks for listening to the podcast! Please write John and Jared a review on Apple Podcastsand they'll give you a shout-out! They are also taking questions from listeners. If you have a question, reach them at feedback@mandarincompanion.com. Follow them on Facebookand catch their latest Chinese-learning memes on Instagram.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Legends of S.H.I.E.L.D.: An Unofficial Marvel Agents Of S.H.I.E.L.D. Fan Podcast
November 11th, 2021 Weekly Marvel News Review (A Marvel Comic Universe Podcast) LoS399

Legends of S.H.I.E.L.D.: An Unofficial Marvel Agents Of S.H.I.E.L.D. Fan Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 41:35


The Legends Of S.H.I.E.L.D. Consultant Chris and Producer of the show Director SP discuss the Marvel screen related news of the week. The Team debriefs you on the penultimate Disney+ Day marvel news, Black Panther 2 production delays and questions about when production can resume, the Eternals opening weekend box office reports, continuing story regarding Eternals censorship worldship, how Marvel titles could possible be viewed better on Disney+ through IMAX formats now, how Ronin might impact the Hawkeye series, the impact of Ms Marvel's Inhuman superpowers on the MCU, and when the potential Young Avengers series or film could be coming. Stay tuned after the credits for a few minutes of Legends Of S.H.I.E.L.D. bonus audio.   THIS TIME ON LEGENDS OF S.H.I.E.L.D.:   Weekly Marvel News Information on the Black Panther sequel's filming delays The Marvel Eternal's film opening weekend box office numbers A Disney+ Ms. Marvel series update ...and much, much more.   WEEKLY MARVEL SCREEN RELATED NEWS [4:16]   TOP NEWS STORY OF THE WEEK   Shang Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings is scheduled to premiere on September 3rd, 2021. Eternals is scheduled to premiere on November 5th, 2021. Disney+ Day on November 12th, 2021 including streaming premiere for Shang-Chi Hawkeye is scheduled to premiere on November 24th, 2021. There will be 6 episodes … I think.  Spider-Man: No Way Home is scheduled to premiere on December 17th, 2021. Ms Marvel is supposed to premiere late in 2021 on Disney+ but no date has been announced.  Moon Knight is supposed to premiere late in 2022 on Disney+ but no date has been announced.  She-Hulk is supposed to premiere late in 2022 on Disney+ but no date has been announced.    Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness (Mar 25th 2022?) Secret Invasion is in development for release on Disney+ but no date has been announced.  Ironheart is in development for release on Disney+ but no date has been announced.    Thor: Love and Thunder (May 6th, 2022) Armor Wars  is in development for release on Disney+ but no date has been announced.    Black Panther: Wakanda Forever (July 8th, 2022) https://comicbook.com/marvel/amp/news/black-panther-riri-williams-ironheart-mcu-debut-dominique-thorne/ Echo is in development for release on Disney+ but no date has been announced.  An untitled Wakanda series is in development for release on Disney+ but no date has been announced.    The Marvels (November 11th, 2022) Also, we know there will be a Loki season two at some point.   Ant-Man and the Wasp: Quantumania (February 17th, 2023)   Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 3 (May 5th, 2023)   Fantastic Four  (???) I Am Groot is in development for release on Disney+ but no date has been announced. I've heard this will be a holiday special. Untitled (February 16th, 2024) Untitled (May 3rd, 2024) Untitled (July 26th, 2024) Untitled (November 8th, 2024) List of MCU films in production without premiere dates Fantastic Four Deadpool 3 Blade Avengers-Level Team up to end the phase (not confirmed in development) Could be linked to Russo Brothers story from last week Captain America Sequel Possible X-Men Projects that have NOT been announced yet Young Avengers   MCU – MARVEL STUDIOS   [4:16] ‘Black Panther: Wakanda Forever' Shutting Down Production as Letitia Wright Recovers From On-Set Injury (Exclusive) https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/movies/movie-news/black-panther-wakanda-forever-shutting-down-production-as-letitia-wright-recovers-from-on-set-injury-exclusive-1235041911/ BY BORYS KIT NOVEMBER 5, 2021 1:20PM Disney's highly anticipated Black Panther sequel has hit a new speed bump.   The Marvel feature, Black Panther: Wakanda Forever, is temporarily shutting down due to the severity of the injury sustained by star Letitia Wright, sources close to the production tell The Hollywood Reporter.   Wright was injured in late August while the film was shooting a sequence involving a stunt rig on-location in Boston. At the time, Marvel Studios said Wright's injury would ultimately not impact the shooting schedule of the film.   After the injury, Wright left for London, where the star has been since, while the production shot around her character, Shuri, the sister of Black Panther T'Challa. Wright's Shuri became a fan-favorite breakout in the 2018 blockbuster, which grossed $1.3 billion and won three Oscars. When star Chadwick Boseman died from cancer in August 2020, the character was elevated as the lead of the sequel.   Wakanda Forever had been filming mostly in Atlanta for the last two months. Director Ryan Coogler is said to have shot all footage that his crew is able to without Wright.   Sources say the production is taking the hiatus to reconfigure the shoot to get things back on track for an early 2022 restart. The shutdown is expected to begin the week of Thanksgiving.   “Letitia has been recovering in London since September from injuries sustained on the set of Black Panther 2 and is looking forward to returning to work early 2022,” a representative for Wright said in a statement to THR. “Letitia kindly asks that you keep her in your prayers.”   Marvel already pushed back the release of Wakanda Forever in October, moving it from July 8, 2022, to Nov. 11, 2022. At this time, insiders say, that new release date remains intact   [10:11] Hollywood Studio Projects Get Stricter About COVID-19 Vaccine Mandates https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/business/business-news/hollywood-studio-projects-get-stricter-about-covid-19-vaccine-mandates-1235045153/ https://www.cbr.com/black-panther-2-letitia-wright-unvaxxed-delay-filming/ Logistical challenges await for studios that are working with stars who haven't gotten the shot. Disney's Black Panther: Wakanda Forever star Letitia Wright — who portrays the lead Shuri, the sister of Black Panther T'Challa (the late Chadwick Boseman) — is not vaccinated, sources say. After sustaining an on-set injury in August, the Guyanese-born British actress went home to London.   Now, a return to the U.S. for a possible shoot in Atlanta, where Wakanda Forever is based, could be an issue. On Nov. 8, the CDC implemented rules that require all non-immigrant, non-citizen air travelers to the U.S. be fully vaccinated and provide proof of vaccination status before boarding a plane. Wright is not a U.S. citizen. Disney declined to comment.   Wright's U.K. rep pointed to a statement issued Nov. 5 to THR regarding the actress' injury, prompting a shutdown of production that will begin the week of Thanksgiving (director Ryan Coogler is said to have filmed everything he can without her). The rep notes: “Letitia has been recovering in London since September from injuries sustained on the set of Black Panther 2 and is looking forward to returning to work early 2022. Letitia kindly asks that you keep her in your prayers.”   [12:30] Box Office: ‘Eternals' Battles Its Way to $71M Opening, $161.7M Globally https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/movies/movie-news/eternals-box-office-opening-battles-1235043852/ BY PAMELA MCCLINTOCK NOVEMBER 7, 2021 8:41AM Chloé Zhao's Eternals battled its way to a $71 million debut from 4,090 theaters in North America — the low end of expectations — but fared better overseas for a worldwide start of $161.7 million, the second-biggest global opening of the pandemic era.   Eternals‘ domestic start is among the lowest of any of the 26 titles in the Marvel Cinematic Universe — the last film to open to less was Ant-Man in 2015 ($57.2 million) — and lower than the two other Marvel/Disney movies released during the COVID-19 pandemic, Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings and Black Widow.   The good news for Marvel Studios and Disney: Plenty of loyal fans still came out, and Eternals was able to make it past the $70 million mark (some analysts had it launching to $67 million).   And numbers were robust internationally, where the superhero offering opened to a better-than-expected $90.7 million from 46 material markets — excluding China and Russia, where a COVID surge has prompted another round of cinema closures.   Eternals opened No. 1 everywhere except for India. South Korea — where it scored the top opening of the pandemic era for a Western film — led with $14.1 million, followed by the U.K. ($7.1 million), France $6.7 million, Mexico ($5.7 million) and Australia ($5 million). Disney estimates that in like-for-like markets, Zhao's film is pacing 76 percent ahead of Shang-Chi and 26 percent ahead of Black Widow.   Heading into the weekend, Disney and Marvel Studios were hopeful that Eternals would hit $75 million in North America.   At the end of the summer, Shang-Chi opened to a dazzling $94.7 million domestically over the four-day Labor Day weekend, including $75.4 million for the three days Friday-Sunday. Black Widow opened to $80.4 million in late spring even though it was also available in the home via Disney+ Premier Access.   Eternals received a B CinemaScore. The previous lowest was the first Thor (B+), while the rest have earned a variation of an A. Similar to the CinemaScore grade, Eternals presently has the lowest Rotten Tomatoes score — 49 percent — of any MCU offering.   Eternals is the third entry in Marvel's Phase Four. The film stars a diverse ensemble cast, including Gemma Chan, Richard Madden, Kumail Nanjiani, Lia McHugh, Brian Tyree Henry, Lauren Ridloff, Barry Keoghan, Don Lee, Harish Patel, Kit Harington, Salma Hayek and Angelina Jolie. [17:26] Disney Removes Eternals Sex Scenes In International Markets https://thedirect.com/article/eternals-disney-sexy-censor-removal-international-release https://deadline.com/2021/11/eternals-banned-saudi-arabia-qatar-kuwait-bahrain-oman-1234867992/     Another first for the project is its introduction of sex scenes within the MCU . Chloé Zhao has spoken on this movie having the first true love story of the franchise , and that is evident in Ikaris and Sersi's late-night escapade in the Babylonian desert.   This carnal outing, along with Phastos' sexuality, has gotten the film in some hot water internationally. Eternals has been banned in certain markets because of this material with Disney denying requests to censor the project. Well, it seems an edited version of the film will see the light of day in some markets, but not others.   According to Deadline , an edited version of Eternals will release in various middle eastern markets like Egypt, Lebanon, Jordan, and the United Arab Emirates. This censored cut will remove any instances of intimacy, whether they be hetero or gay. This practice is common in these markets.   While it is a bummer that Disney has to edit the film to work in some markets, it is not as bad as it seems. Some will look at this headline, see it as the House of Mouse caving into a certain part of the world, and take to their Twitter accounts. But that isn't necessarily the case here.   Marvel Studios has already said it will not bend to a few requests of extreme censorship on the project. In places like Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, and Oman, the studio was asked to make further cuts not only pertaining to the intimacy shown in the film, thus those nations were not issued distribution certificates.   Other middle eastern countries like Kuwait and Qatar have problems with depictions of prophets, gods, and other theological beings, so that is the reason the film will not be playing there.   Disney+   [20:38] Marvel Cinematic Universe Titles Arrive on Disney+ in IMAX's Expanded Aspect Ratio https://www.marvel.com/articles/movies/imax-expanded-aspect-ratio-mcu-disney-plus Want MORE out of the Marvel Cinematic Universe? That's about to come true as beginning November 12 — which also happens to be Disney+ Day — fans will be able to stream some of their favorite Marvel titles in IMAX's Expanded Aspect Ratio at home with IMAX Enhanced on Disney+.    IMAX's Expanded Aspect Ratio is 1:90:1, which offers up to 26% more picture for select sequences – meaning more of the action is visible on screen, just as the filmmakers intended. In the future, the collaboration will deliver even more enhanced audio and visual technology to Disney+, including immersive IMAX signature sound by DTS.   The 13 titles available at launch include: The Disney+ premiere of Marvel Studios' Shang-Chi and The Legend of The Ten Rings on November 12th as well as other fan-favorite MCU movies like  Iron Man Guardians of the Galaxy Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 Captain America: Civil War Doctor Strange Thor: Ragnarok Black Panther Avengers: Infinity War Ant-Man and The Wasp Captain Marvel Avengers: Endgame And Black Widow (content availability varies by region)   [24:45] Hawkeye: Marvel's unexpected, absurd Christmas show Hawkeye Doesn't Ignore Clint's Dark Actions During the Blip https://www.gamesradar.com/hawkeye-marvel-disney-plus-show-interview-director/ https://www.cbr.com/hawkeye-ronin-dark-side/ By Tara Bennett  One of those things being Barton's murderous past as the vigilante Ronin who went on a rampage after his whole family was blipped by Thanos. While the series doesn't do an excessive deep dive of that time, Bert [aka Amber Templemore-Finlayson https://www.imdb.com/name/nm2134432/ of the “Bert and Bertie” duo https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bert_and_Bertie ] says it's a part of who he is now and Renner didn't want to discount it.    "He wanted the darkness," she says. "He wanted to go there. And there are moments that the Ronin Clint resurfaces. It's very important to have those depths that you can explore, so that he can come out of it."   [26:39] Ms. Marvel, Star Wars: Andor Set 2022 Disney+ Release Window https://www.cbr.com/ms-marvel-star-wars-andor-set-2022-disney-release-window/ Disney+ has narrowed down a release window for two of its upcoming original series: Marvel Studios' Ms. Marvel and Lucasfilm's Star Wars spinoff Andor.   As revealed during The Walt Disney Company's Q4 earnings call for 2021, Ms. Marvel and Andor are currently slated to premiere on Disney+ during Q4 of 2022. In other words, both shows will hit the streaming service sometime next year between October and December, inclusive.   One of many Disney+ original series set within the Marvel Cinematic Universe, Ms. Marvel stars Iman Vellani as the Marvel Comics superhero Kamala Khan/Ms. Marvel and is slated to run for six episodes. Vellani will reprise her role as Kamala Khan opposite Brie Larson's Carol Danvers/Captain Marvel and Teyonah Parris' Monica Rambeau in the upcoming Marvel Studios film The Marvels, which is scheduled for release on Feb. 17, 2023. The Marvels serves as both a continuation of the Ms. Marvel Disney+ series and a sequel to the 2019 Larson-led film Captain Marvel.   In addition to Vellani, Ms. Marvel stars Aramis Knight as Kareem/Red Dagger, Saagar Shaikh as Amir Khan, Rish Shah as Kamran, Matt Lintz as Bruno Carrelli, Zenobia Shroff as Muneeba Khan, Mohan Kapur as Yusuf Khan and Laurel Marsden as Zoe Zimmer. Additionally, Yasmeen Fletcher, Laith Nakli, Azhar Usman, Travina Springer, Nimra Bucha, Alyy Khan and Alysia Reiner have been cast in undisclosed roles. Hulu Series   OUTRO [32:14]   We would love to hear back from you! Call the voicemail line at 1-844-THE-BUS1 or 844-843-2871.                    Join Legends Of S.H.I.E.L.D. next time as the hosts discuss the first ever Disney+ Day. You can listen in live when we record Thursday Evenings at 8:00 PM Eastern time at Geeks.live. Contact Info: Please see http://www.legendsofshield.com for all of our contact information or call our voicemail line at 1-844-THE-BUS1 or 844-843-2871   Legends Of S.H.I.E.L.D. Is a Proud Member Of The GonnaGeek Network (gonnageek.com).   This podcast was recorded on Thursday November 11th, 2021.   Standby for your S.H.I.E.L.D. debriefing ---   Audio and Video Production by Stargate Pioneer of GonnaGeek.com.

Break It Down Show
Erik Kleinsmith - DB Cooper, Hoffa, Zodiac, Cracking the Coldest Cases

Break It Down Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 61:35


Erik Kleinsmith - DB Cooper, Hoffa, Zodiac, Cracking the Coldest Cases - Erik Kleinsmith Erik has authored books on intelligence analysis, found the 9/11 hijackers BEFORE 9/11, helped solve the DB Cooper case...and a lot more. Erik used to be Pete A Turner's commander in Bosnia when they were in the might 165th MI Bn. You'd imagine that commanding a company of spies would be the pinnacle of one's career, but that's just the beginning... Erik returns to the Break It Down Show. It's always a good time when we get to hear from him. Please support the Break It Down Show by doing a monthly subscription to the show  All of the money you invest goes directly to supporting the show!   For the  of this episode head to  ​Haiku Commanding the spies Just the tip of the iceberg Coop', Hoff', Zodiac!!!   Similar episodes:  -   -   -    Join us in supporting Save the Brave as we battle PTSD.  Executive Producer/Host: Pete A Turner  Producer: Damjan Gjorgjiev  Writer: Dragan Petrovski  The Break It Down Show is your favorite best, new podcast, featuring 5 episodes a week with great interviews highlighting world-class guests from a wide array of shows.

Enjoy The Walk Podcast
3.51 - Brandel Chamblee | An LPGA "Players" Venue?

Enjoy The Walk Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 44:17


Brandel Chamblee. Quite possibly one of golf's most polarizing figures in the booth over the last few decades has his eyes set on plans far larger than a mic and a few words. Joining hands with renowned golf course architect Agustin Pizá, Chamblee is setting his sights on building a golf course & property like one the golf industry has never seen before. A site specific to the women's game. "LPGA National" as he calls the prospective course in Harlingen, Texas. Similar to what TPC Sawgrass accomplishes for the PGA Tour professionals, Brandel's brainchild would cater to the women's game specifically its professionals. From course architecture to junior camps for aspiring women professional golfers & everything in between. Chamblee's attempt to create such a venue has far more meaning than simply "a course for women" and we dive into everything behind the idea from analytics, odes to architects pasts, & much more! If you enjoyed this episode please subscribe to the channel! You can find more information about us at Enjoy The Walk Golf Podcast @ www.enjoythewalkpod.com As always, get out there, carry your clubs, & Enjoy The Walk! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/enjoythewalkpod/support

Break It Down Show
Kate Linder - Young and the Restless

Break It Down Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 63:31


Kate Linder - Young and the Restless - Kate Linder was cast as Esther Valentine on The Young and the Restless over 38 years ago. She remains a key member of the top-rated daytime drama's cast. In 2008, Linder received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. Linder was elected to two terms as the Television Academy's Governor of Daytime Programming Peer Group and was elected to multiple terms as a SAG-AFTRA board member. Get more on Kate's like, work and charitable focus She enjoys the best of both worlds — on the air and in the air. "Acting is my life and my creative satisfaction," says Linder. She never quit her pre-Y&R weekend job as a United Airlines flight attendant because it keeps her grounded. Please support the Break It Down Show by doing a monthly subscription to the show  All of the money you invest goes directly to supporting the show!   For the  of this episode head to  ​Haiku Esther Valentine 38 years, still counting Who can brag like that?   Similar episodes:  -  -  -    Join us in supporting Save the Brave as we battle PTSD.  Executive Producer/Host: Pete A Turner  Producer: Damjan Gjorgjiev  Writer: Dragan Petrovski  The Break It Down Show is your favorite best, new podcast, featuring 5 episodes a week with great interviews highlighting world-class guests from a wide array of shows.

The Unashamedly Human Podcast
Similar But Different

The Unashamedly Human Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 20:01


"When we all reside in love there is no place for judgement." - Jacquie Forde Take a listen to this weeks podcast where I talk about how we are all similar yet different. That is what makes us unashamedly human. And please don't forget to join the Unashamedly Human mailing list for sneak peaks and exclusive offers of my new school. Enrolment begins again in January 2022. https://jacquieforde.com/the-unashamedly-human-school/

Believing the Bizarre: Paranormal Conspiracies & Myths
Listener Submission Collection: Vol. 2 | Ep. 82

Believing the Bizarre: Paranormal Conspiracies & Myths

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 58:43


Welcome to another episode of Believing the Bizarre. Today we present the second edition in our Listener Submission Collection. That's right, this week is Listener Submission Collection: Volume 2. Similar to Volume 1, we have a handful of paranormal, supernatural, and straight-up bizarre stories. From shadow figures and hauntings to terrifying entities peeping in windows, this episode covers a lot. But, how much of it is believable? Listen now to find out! Sponsor: Check out Liquid Death and get free shipping when you order two cases of water OR sell your soul and get a free shirt here: https://liquiddeath.com/bizarre Support Believing the Bizarre and get tons of extra content by joining our Patreon here: https://www.patreon.com/believingthebizarre For updates and extra content, follow Believing the Bizarre on social media: https://www.instagram.com/believingthebizarre/ https://www.facebook.com/believingthebizarre/  You can rep Believing the Bizarre and buy some unique merch here: https://believing-the-bizarre.creator-spring.com/

C3 Church San Diego // AUDIO
It‘s A Wonderful Life - Ps. Stacy Capaldi

C3 Church San Diego // AUDIO

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 40:41


Ever wonder why our church and community is so wonderful? Similar to the early church in the book of Acts, Awaken has been modeled, designed and created with intentionality that helps us to experience the wonderful life God intended for us. In a world that seems to go mad, Ps. Stacy shares on how we can live and experience a wonderful life.

Finding Harmony Podcast
Susanna Finocchi: Transitions Through Time and Space

Finding Harmony Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 96:27


Similar to Ganesha the elephant-headed deity in India, Janus is the god of beginnings, gates, transitions, time, duality, doorways, passages, frames, and endings in ancient Roman mythology. He is usually depicted as having two faces. Susanna Finocchi, (our first Italian guest!) is a woman who knows these transitions well. Susanna expounds on the weirdness of being a Southerner in the North. You become a kind of “in-between person,” neither here nor there, but like all these mythological figures you are given a special insight to human nature. And Susanna, in her loving and enthusiastic way, gifts us with her wisdom today. Susanna's mother was a Herbalist, and her father Dionysus was a connoisseur of wine, so it's no surprise that she would grow to hold space for transformation and health. She details her childhood for us and her first encounter with Ashtanga Yoga, and her subsequent emigration to Denmark. Together, with Jens Bache, she co-founded Astanga Yoga Copenhagen and was the main teacher there for almost 18 years, teaching hundreds of students. In 2006, she hosted the entire Jois family in Copenhagen and in 2009 she had the honor of being the first school to invite her teacher Sharath Jois, as the incumbent Guru, on his debut tour, and has since hosted him 6 times since that year. She made her first pilgrimages to Mysore in 1995 and 1996 and since 2003 has returned yearly to KPJAYI (now Sharath Yoga Centre) to practice and study. Susanna studied Sanskrit at the University of Copenhagen and continues to learn together with chanting and Indian Philosophy during her trips to Mysore. She currently is living in Rome, her place of birth, and travels all over Italy and Europe teaching the Ashtanga Yoga method. FIND OUT MORE ABOUT SUSANNA WEBSITE I INSTAGRAM FIND HARMONY WEBSITE I INSTAGRAM - harmonyslater.com The Finding Harmony Podcast is hosted, edited and produced by Harmony Slater and co-hosted by Russell Case. A big heart of thanks to our friends, family, and students from around the world, who've generously supported this podcast through your comments, sharing, and financial donations. If you've enjoyed today's podcast, please consider supporting our future episodes by making a donation. Every little bit goes a long way and we are immensely grateful for any and all of your support. Make A Donation Don't forget to subscribe and leave a review! ❤ Give us a 5★ rating! Opening and closing music compliments of my dear friend teaching Ashtanga yoga in Eindhoven, Nick Evans, with his band “dawnSong” from the album “for Morgan.” Listen to the entire album on Spotify - Click Here. To purchase your own copy - Click Here.

Economist Radio
Covering the ground: trees and COP26

Economist Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 22:54


At the global climate summit, more than 100 countries have promised to end deforestation by 2030. Similar promises have been made before, but might this time be different? America's Supreme Court dives into the thorny topics of abortion and gun rights. And we report on the peculiar economics of African cities where the UN has set up shop. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Intelligence
Covering the ground: trees and COP26

The Intelligence

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 22:54


At the global climate summit, more than 100 countries have promised to end deforestation by 2030. Similar promises have been made before, but might this time be different? America's Supreme Court dives into the thorny topics of abortion and gun rights. And we report on the peculiar economics of African cities where the UN has set up shop. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Lucas Rockwood Show
488: How to De-Escalate Conflicts with Doug Noll

The Lucas Rockwood Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 38:38


1000s of air rage incidents have been logged just in the past year alone where people lose it mid-flight. They scream, become violent, and cause such a ruckus that they have to be duct taped to their chairs or arrested. Similar incidents are happening at public rallies, in grocery stores, and perhaps even in your home or office. In short, emotions are running high, and most of us are poorly equipped to deal with them. You've no doubt heard of emotional intelligence, but that's simply a test or assessment. Emotional competence consists of the hard skills needed to understand your own emotions and those of others. And once you can understand, label, and communicate those emotions effectively, high conflict situations can de-escalate fast. On this week's podcast, you'll meet a lawyer and mediator who shares his multi-decade experience in some of the most high-stakes situations imaginable. Listen & Learn How to start by being self aware The importance of self-regulate How to develop empathy and affect label others  Why most of us were raised in emotional dysfunctional homes How most situations can be de-escalated in 90 seconds or less Links: Doug's Website  ABOUT OUR GUEST Doug Noll, is a lawyer, mediator, and author who has mediated thousands of conflicts. After serving as a civil trial lawyer for 22 years, he has turned his focus to understanding human conflict. His book De-Escalate includes his best techniques for emotional competence and navigating challenging situations.  Nutritional Tip of the Week Spirulina overuse Like the Show? Leave us a Review on iTunes

Door Bumper Clear - Dirty Mo Media
236 – Martinsville II with Jeff Gluck: Everyone Went Nuts

Door Bumper Clear - Dirty Mo Media

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 151:18


A tripleheader race weekend at Martinsville Speedway set the stage for NASCAR Championship Weekend. Brett Griffin, T.J. Majors, Freddie Kraft, and special guest Jeff Gluck of The Athletic return from Virginia to react to a wild two days of action. They begin by sharing their instant thoughts on how the NASCAR Cup Series race on Sunday unfolded, including debating what served as the spark to the dramatic final 50 laps. T.J. shares the intensity that Brad Keselowski faced throughout the race and especially in the closing laps when he could sniff the win that would earn him a Championship 4 spot. Multiple instances of brake-checking occurred at Martinsville, including between Keselowski and Chase Elliott as they raced for third late in the day. Hear what events led up to the contact that sent the No. 9 car around as the event neared its finish. Then with 5 laps remaining, Alex Bowman spun leader Denny Hamlin as they fought for the top spot. Hear what the gang thinks of Bowman's move, whether it was warranted and what it says about racing with respect. Was it a cheap shot or just hard racing? Then the non-playoff vs playoff driver debate resurfaces and the guys share what they believe has changed in the driver's minds. After taking the checkered flag, Bowman returned to the frontstretch to celebrate where he was met by an angry No. 11 car. The crew reacts to Hamlin's actions on the track, the double-birds he displayed to Bowman and the choice words he had for the winner afterwards. Were his comments justified? Hear what the table thinks and what it means moving forward. Now the Cup Series title race will come down to a battle between Hendrick Motorsports and Joe Gibbs Racing. Is this best for the sport? Who has the upper hand? How will it play out? The gang engages in a lively debate about what to expect in the season finale. Plus, hear their thoughts about if Martinsville could ever host the title race. The Xfinity Series race featured its share of action as its Championship 4 was determined. The always spicy Ty Gibbs had harsh comments for eventual winner Noah Gragson after contact sent the No. 54 car around. Find out what the guys think Gibbs lacks and why it has been impacting his performance throughout the season. A decision to stay out during Saturday night's race placed the slower car of Spencer Boyd right in the middle of the playoff mix. The group doesn't hold back airing their feelings about a car that typically runs in the back being a moving chicane at the front of the field as drivers raced for their seasons. Similar comments are shared when discussing the Truck Series race and how Austin Wayne Self nearly cost John Hunter Nemechek a shot at the championship. Find out whether the guys believe what he said afterwards and how the series has completely lost its respect. Plus, is it time for NASCAR to step in? Before Reaction Theatre, the DBC crew and listeners gets a sneak peek of a brand-new podcast coming soon to Dirty Mo Media. In Reaction Theatre, the fans are fired up after the ending of Sunday's race. Hear what they have to say to Denny Hamlin and then what the gang thinks about Hamlin's more unfiltered approach to life. The crew then makes championship picks for each of the three title races this weekend at Phoenix Raceway. They dissect what to look for in each event and breakdown the opportunities that the drivers fighting for the title will battle for. Then Gluck answers questions from the guys before leaving, including his thoughts on what transpired this season, the reaction to his column contrasting NASCAR and Formula 1, and what's next for him.