Podcasts about Meyer

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  • 3,775PODCASTS
  • 9,054EPISODES
  • 43mAVG DURATION
  • 3DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • May 16, 2022LATEST

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Best podcasts about Meyer

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Latest podcast episodes about Meyer

How Long Gone
342. - Chris & Jason

How Long Gone

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 66:22


One-on-one pod live and unedited from Glendale. Chris and Jason talk about our trip to Toronto, airplane whining, TJ teaches his flight attendant how to make a Bloody Mary, visiting Matty Matheson's new restaurant, working out the tour life cobwebs, TJ taking mushrooms and DJing the afterparty, Canadian snowboarders teaching us about Japanese cuisine, tableside branzino sashimi, espresso martinis and asparagus, we got the lucid dream pills from Carsten's pod, and we spend the last half of the podcast discussing the new Kendrick Lamar album while TJ's Meyer lemon and sumac edible begins kicking in. twitter.com/donetodeath twitter.com/themjeans --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/howlonggone/support

Trend Following with Michael Covel
Ep. 1076: Michael Meyer Interview with Michael Covel on Trend Following Radio

Trend Following with Michael Covel

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 44:53


My guest today is Michael Meyer. He took a wide route to the story of Benjamin Franklin's remarkable afterlife, starting when Meyer was sent to China as one of its first Peace Corps volunteers. Beginning with The Last Days of Old Beijing, he authored three critically-acclaimed reported books set there, as well as numerous stories that appeared in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Financial Times, Time, Smithsonian, and on This American Life. A Guggenheim Fellow and Whiting Award winner, Meyer has also received fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the New York Public Library's Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers, MacDowell, and the Rockefeller Foundation's Bellagio Center in Italy. The topic is his book Benjamin Franklin's Last Bet: The Favorite Founder's Divisive Death, Enduring Afterlife, and Blueprint for American Prosperity. In this episode of Trend Following Radio we discuss: The incredible story of Benjamin Franklin's parting gift to the working-class people of Boston and Philadelphia—a deathbed wager that captures the Founder's American Dream and his lessons for our current, conflicted age. Jump in! --- I'm MICHAEL COVEL, the host of TREND FOLLOWING RADIO, and I'm proud to have delivered 10+ million podcast listens since 2012. Investments, economics, psychology, politics, decision-making, human behavior, entrepreneurship and trend following are all passionately explored and debated on my show. To start? I'd like to give you a great piece of advice you can use in your life and trading journey… cut your losses! You will find much more about that philosophy here: https://www.trendfollowing.com/trend/ You can watch a free video here: https://www.trendfollowing.com/video/ Can't get enough of this episode? You can choose from my thousand plus episodes here: https://www.trendfollowing.com/podcast My social media platforms: Twitter: @covel Facebook: @trendfollowing LinkedIn: @covel Instagram: @mikecovel Hope you enjoy my never-ending podcast conversation!

Forum - La 1ere
Aldi mise sur le bio pour séduire: interview de Jérôme Meyer

Forum - La 1ere

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 4:42


Interview de Jérôme Meyer, directeur d'Aldi Suisse.

Lesart - das Literaturmagazin (ganze Sendung) - Deutschlandfunk Kultur

Meyer, Frank; Teutsch, Katharina; Wörtche, Thomas; Drees, Jan; Hörmann, Andi; Hiwww.deutschlandfunkkultur.de, LesartDirekter Link zur Audiodatei

Studio Klassiker
Annonsquiz, spårsändare & vård av entusiastbil som giltig frånvaro

Studio Klassiker

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 63:50


I det sjuttioåttionde avsnittet av Studio Klassiker pratar vi bland annat spårsändare, gamla bilannonser och miltalets betydelse i förhållande till bilens ålder. Medverkande är Claes Johansson som funderar över om vägmätaren ska nollställas vid helrenovering, Fredrik Nyblad som berättar att han ska sälja sin Ford Fiesta, Björn Meyer som avslöjar att han har haft samma p-skiva i 20 år och Carl Legelius som tycker att man borde få ledigt från jobbet om bilen måste skrotas.

Touchdowns and Tangents

Touchdownsandtangents.com live show featuring guests, the NFL schedule drop and much more. #letstalkaboutitNFL schedule dropsTom Brady gets mega broadcast deal post careerSpecial guest Cedric Walton at 8:30 p.m. #CollegeFootballNewsBraylon Addison transferNIL or booster deals?https://syndication.bleacherreport.com/amp/10034858-report-nil-contracts-to-be-subject-to-possible-ncaa-sanctions-under-new-guidelines.amp.html#TakeOrTangentChargers social media greatnessKendrick dropping. #TouchdownOrTurnoverDolphins flat ass Tua hype videoJosh Lambo sues Jags over salary, distress over Meyer kicking him. #UnnecessaryToughnessRants

C'est à la Une
C'est à la Une - Alexandre Meyer, Rédacteur en chef du magazine l'1visible

C'est à la Une

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022


Avec Alexandre Meyer, Rédacteur en chef du magazine l'1visible

Trey Wingo Presents: Half-Forgotten History
Tony Boselli on Making HOF, Jags/Titans Rivalry, Meyer Debacle & USC Pride | Half-Forgotten History

Trey Wingo Presents: Half-Forgotten History

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 52:26


Newly elected Pro Football Hall of Famer Tony Boselli joins Trey to talk about his dominant, but brief NFL career, how he became a star at USC and bought into the Trojans legacy of great offensive linemen, the process of going to New York for the NFL Draft, playing for the Jacksonville Jaguars and Tom Coughlin and when he knew they'd be successful, his impressions of Urban Meyer's epic failure as Jags head coach, his rivalry with Jason Taylor and famous smack talk on Monday Night Football, why John Randle was his toughest matchup, the Jaguars 1999 season where they lose to the Tennessee Titans 3 times, how challenging it was when his career was cut short due to injuries, the time that Adam Schefter talked about him not being a Hall of Famer, and what it was like to finally get elected to Canton.

Lesart - das Literaturmagazin (ganze Sendung) - Deutschlandfunk Kultur

Meyer, Frankwww.deutschlandfunkkultur.de, LesartDirekter Link zur Audiodatei

The Rich Eisen Show
REShow: Doug Pederson - Hour 2 (5-11-2022)

The Rich Eisen Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 52:38


Jaguars Head Coach Doug Pederson tells Rich why he's basically starting from scratch with Trevor Lawrence after his less-than-stellar rookie season under Urban Meyer, how he's rebuilding the Jags' culture following the disastrous year under Meyer, and what fans can expect from his team after re-stocking the roster with free agents and draft picks including #1 overall selection Travon Walker.  With the NFL 2022 season schedule trickling out this week, Rich lists the top ten games he's looking forward to most including Russell Wilson's return to Seattle with the Broncos, Deshaun Watson's return to Houston with the Browns, Bobby Wagner's return to Seattle with the Rams, and Mike McCarthy's return to Green Bay with the Dallas Cowboys. Rich and Suzy reveal the outcome of their son Cooper's big Little League playoff game yesterday and reveal if mom or dad was most upset by the umpire squeezing the strike zone on their young lefty. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Lesart - das Literaturmagazin (ganze Sendung) - Deutschlandfunk Kultur

Meyer, Frankwww.deutschlandfunkkultur.de, LesartDirekter Link zur Audiodatei

Sports Illustrated Weekly
Rugby vs. the Mafia, Urban Meyer Debacle, Ja Morant Is the Code

Sports Illustrated Weekly

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 46:51


In the Sicilian suburb of Librino, an upstart rugby club defies Mafia violence and forges an identity for their community. Sean Williams traveled to the foot of Mount Etna and brought back the story of Briganti di Librino. SI Daily Cover, A Rugby Club Vs. the Mafia | The Underworld Podcast With rumors swirling that Urban Meyer is set to take a job at Fox, everyone, including Jaguars owner Shahid Khan, is taking shots at Meyer's short and disastrous stint on the NFL sidelines. SI staffer Conor Orr is here to review the long list of problems that led to Meyer being fired after just 13 games. Article, Urban Meyer Is Bringing Nothing to the Jaguars When Grizzlies point guard Ja Morant suffered a knee injury against the Warriors, he was playing some of the best basketball of anyone in the playoffs — continuing on his incredible season. SI staffer Michael Pina joins us to discuss Ja's leap to superstardom. Daily Cover, Behind Ja Morant's Sudden Ascent to NBA Superstardom See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Spielmacher - die Fußball-Analyse
Folge 17: Makkabi & die Eintracht mit Alon Meyer (mit Grußwort von Peter Fischer)

Spielmacher - die Fußball-Analyse

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 58:30


In dieser sehr besonderen Folge spricht Spielmacher Benjamin Heinrich mit Makkabi-Präsident Alon Meyer über den jüdischen Sportverein in Frankfurt, die besondere Beziehung zur Eintracht und deren Präsidenten Peter Fischer, der im Kampf gegen Rassismus, Diskriminierung und Antisemitismus in der Bundesliga für Meyer ein absoluter Vorreiter ist. Die beiden sprechen aber auch über den realen Judenhass im Privaten und auf den Sportplätzen, regen zum Nachdenken an und nehmen natürlich auch die Eintracht in der Europa League gegen Barcelona, West Ham und nun im Finale in den Blick - denn Meyer ist auch eins: Durch und durch Frankfurter und leidenschaftlicher SGE-Fan!

Lesart - das Literaturmagazin (ganze Sendung) - Deutschlandfunk Kultur

Meyer, Frankwww.deutschlandfunkkultur.de, LesartDirekter Link zur Audiodatei

Veterans  Radio
STORIES OF SERVICE FROM O'NEILL, MEYER

Veterans Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 57:00


ROB O'NEILL, NAVY SEAL TEAM TWO, FOUR AND SIX Rob O'Neill and Dakota Meyer are two of the most decorated and recognized US service members: O'Neill killed the world's most wanted man, Osama bin Laden, and Meyer is the first living Marine to receive the Medal of Honor since the Vietnam War. Combining the best of military memoirs and straight-talking self-help, “The Way Forward” alternates between O'Neill and Meyer's perspectives, looking back with humor at even the darkest war stories, and sharing lessons they learned along the way. “The Way Forward” presents O'Neill and Meyer's philosophy in combat and life. This isn't a book about the glory of war and combat, but one about facing your enemies: Your thoughts, doubts, boredom and regrets. Gritty and down-to-earth, O'Neill tells their stories with candor and vulnerability to help readers handle stress, tackle their biggest obstacles, and exceed their expectations of themselves while keeping life's battles in perspective with a sense of humor. Rob O'Neill discusses with host Jim Fausone the life lessons learned as a Navy Seal.For more information: www.robertjoneill.com Tom Clavin co-wrote “To The Uttermost Ends of the Earth” the epic hunt for the South's most feared ship and greatest sea battle of the Civil War. Tom explains how the South built the Alabama and its 3-year reign of terror on merchant ships headed to the North. The Alabama sailed 75,000 miles and captured 66 ships. The naval history of both the North and the South is revealed. The two captains, Semmes and Winslow, are central figures and are discussed by Clavin.For more information: www.tomclavin.com

Forschung Aktuell - Deutschlandfunk
Wissenschaftsmeldungen 09.05.2022

Forschung Aktuell - Deutschlandfunk

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 3:43


Meyer, Annekewww.deutschlandfunk.de, Forschung aktuellDirekter Link zur Audiodatei

Lesart - das Literaturmagazin (ganze Sendung) - Deutschlandfunk Kultur

Meyer, Frankwww.deutschlandfunkkultur.de, LesartDirekter Link zur Audiodatei

Podcasts de TopChrétien
Prédication Joyce Meyer - La puissance de la serviette (2/2) - Grandir avec Dieu

Podcasts de TopChrétien

Play Episode Listen Later May 8, 2022 25:25


Joyce nous enseigne comment être une bénédiction pour les autres.01:08 Jean 13:7-804:43 Jean 13:805:51 Jean 13:9-1508:29 Jean 13:16-1715:19 Philippiens 2:415:41 Philippiens 2:5-616:33 Philippiens 2:7-918:29 Matthieu 20:25-28

Sex With Ghosts
Stan The Man Meyer and His Water Car

Sex With Ghosts

Play Episode Listen Later May 7, 2022 53:54


Mollie tells Bridget about life and death of Stanley Meyer. Rate & Review us on Apple Want more? Support us on Patreon!

Good Food
Mother's Day, bagels, culinary journalism

Good Food

Play Episode Listen Later May 7, 2022 56:35


Chefs reflect on the life lessons their mothers taught them in the kitchen. Author Kim Fay weaves together a story of friendship and food in her epistolary novel, “Love & Saffron.” Food writer Barbara Hansen reminisces about introducing international flavors to her Angeleno audience. If you're ready to make mom breakfast in bed, Cathy Barrow has a five-ingredient recipe for homemade bagels. Ellen Freund and Mara LePere Schloop discuss the research involved to bring the food and cooking of “Pachinko” to the screen. Finally, Ben Mims talks to pastry chef Hannah Ziskin about her excitement for Meyer lemons.

All in the Industry ®️
Hallie Meyer, Caffe Panna

All in the Industry ®️

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 54:30


On today's episode of All in the Industry®, Shari Bayer is back at Heritage Radio Network's studio in Brooklyn, and her guest is Hallie Meyer, founder and owner of Caffè Panna, an Italian inspired ice cream and coffee shop in NYC's Gramercy neighborhood. Before opening the shop, Hallie worked in savory kitchens stateside and in Italy, and in one of Rome's most beloved gelaterias. She began making and selling her own ice cream in 2018 through popups in the South Bronx, while serving with Americorps City Year as a Team Leader at PS 154. Caffè Panna is inspired by Hallie's time living and working in Rome, featuring seasonally rotating flavors, creative sundaes, and their signature affogato sundaes, made with both Italian imported and local ingredients. Today's show also features Shari's PR tip to have integrity; Speed Round; Industry News Discussion on Netflix's reboot of "Iron Chef;" and Solo Dining experience at newly opened KYU NYC in Manhattan, a wood-fired Asian-inspired restaurant which originally opened in Miami in 2016.Photo Courtesy of Liz Clayman.Listen at Heritage Radio Network; subscribe/rate/review our show at iTunes, Stitcher or Spotify. Follow us @allindustry. Thanks for being a part of All in the Industry®. Heritage Radio Network is a listener supported nonprofit podcast network. Support All in the Industry by becoming a member!All in the Industry is Powered by Simplecast.

La Story
Pétrole et gaz russes, armes de diplomatie massives

La Story

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 24:52


Deux mois après l'invasion de l'Ukraine, l'Union européenne décide finalement d'un embargo sur le pétrole russe dans un nouveau train de sanctions. Pour « La Story », le podcast d'actualité des « Echos », Michèle Warnet et ses invités font le point sur ce tournant décisif et sur ce qu'il en est du gaz russe dont l'Allemagne, notamment, est particulièrement dépendante.La Story est un podcast des « Echos » présenté par Michèle Warnet. Cet épisode a été enregistré en mai 2022. Rédaction en chef : Clémence Lemaistre. Invités : Thierry Bros (spécialiste des questions énergétiques et enseignant à Sciences Po Paris) et Karl de Meyer (correspondant des « Echos » à Bruxelles). Réalisation : Willy Ganne. Musique : Théo Boulenger. Identité graphique : Upian. Photo : Peter Kovalev/TASS/Sipa USA/SIPA. Sons : LCI, @vonderleyen, Arte. Voir Acast.com/privacy pour les informations sur la vie privée et l'opt-out.

The DA Show
Urban Planning: Meyer'd in controversy

The DA Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 44:00


HOUR 4: Did Khan really get duped by Meyer? The crew recaps a two oink performance in Canadian Bacon. Plus, Advanced Analytics, and your Epic Fail.

WorkParty
How to Speak Your Dreams Into Existence with Jennifer Meyer, Founder & Jewelry Designer

WorkParty

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 34:04


Owning one of the most well-known and celebrity-obsessed fine jewelry brands was never part of Jennifer Meyer's plan. But if you ask us, becoming a designer was definitely part of her destiny.  After graduating with a degree in psychology, Jennifer landed an editorial job at Glamour magazine, eventually becoming a PR powerhouse for brands like Giorgio Armani and Ralph Lauren. However, after years of success something shifted. She unearthed a greater connection to her roots and decided it was time to achieve her lifelong dream of becoming a jewelry designer—a secret wish Jennifer had fostered at age 6 when her artist grandmother taught her to make jewelry. Jennifer leaned into her creative vision and launched a namesake jewelry brand—one that would make Jennifer Meyer a household name. On this episode of WorkParty, I talk to Jennifer about her non-linear career path, pushing aside fear, and giving yourself permission to go for it—whatever it may be.     Sponsors:• MasterClass | Get unlimited access to EVERY MasterClass, and as a WorkParty listener, you get 15% off an annual membership! Go to masterclass.com/PARTY now. • Athletic Greens |  Visit athleticgreens.com/party to get a FREE 1 year supply of immune-supporting Vitamin D and 5 FREE travel packs with your first purchase.   Resources:• To join the WorkParty click HERE • To connect with Jennifer Meyer click HERE • To connect with Jaclyn Johnson click HERE • To follow along with Create & Cultivate click HERE • To check out Jennifer Meyer Jewelry click HERE • To submit your questions call the WorkParty Hotline: 1-(833)-57-PARTY (577-2789) Produced by Dear Media

Afternoon Drive
Tue. May 3: Hour 1 - Broncos vs Jags in London, Rockies, Kroenke's development plans, NHL Playoffs

Afternoon Drive

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 47:17


Denver and Jacksonville to face off in London in late October, Urban Meyer poised for return to Fox, plenty of positives for the Rockies so far this MLB season, Chad Kuhl, Connor Joe, Bill Schmidt's performance, Jon Gray, Kroenke's plans for redeveloping area around Ball Arena, Costco, fast food, NHL Playoffs, knock-knock jokes

hr2 Doppelkopf
"Ich höre etwa 125 Hörbücher im Jahr." | Dorothee Meyer-Kahrweg über 25 Jahre hr2-Hörbuchbestenliste

hr2 Doppelkopf

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 52:17


Vor 25 Jahren war das Hörbuch eine Nische im Literaturmarkt, wurde verspottet gar als das Medium der Lesefaulen. Damals gab es gerade mal eine Handvoll Verlage, die an die Durchsetzungsfähigkeit gesprochener Literatur glaubte. Auch in hr2 Kultur glaubte man daran und rief zusammen mit dem Börsenblatt - Wochenmagazin für den Deutschen Buchhandel die hr2-Hörbuchbestenliste ins Leben. Seit Mai 1997 erscheint sie jeden Monat und soll dazu beitragen, auf dem unübersichtlichen Markt für Hörbücher den Zugang zu besonders gelungenen Produktionen zu erleichtern.

Christian Historical Fiction Talk
Episode 77 - Gabrielle Meyer Author Chat

Christian Historical Fiction Talk

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 31:37


Christian Historical Fiction Talk is listener supported. When you buy things through this site, we may earn an affiliate commission.This week, prolific author Gabrielle Meyer joins us on the podcast as her newest release, the first one she's written for her dream publishing house, hits the shelves. She discusses the unique plot for the novel, the theme of God's sovereignty and how that played out in her own life as she wrote the book. and how she researched the story in the middle of Covid restrictions. When the Day Comes by Gabrielle MeyerHow will she choose, knowing all she must sacrifice?Libby has been given a powerful gift: to live one life in 1774 Colonial Williamsburg and the other in 1914 Gilded Age New York City. When she falls asleep in one life, she wakes up in the other. While she's the same person at her core in both times, she's leading two vastly different lives.In Colonial Williamsburg, Libby is a public printer for the House of Burgesses and the Royal Governor, trying to provide for her family and support the Patriot cause. The man she loves, Henry Montgomery, has his own secrets. As the revolution draws near, both their lives--and any hope of love--are put in jeopardy.Libby's life in 1914 New York is filled with wealth, drawing room conversations, and bachelors. But the only work she cares about--women's suffrage--is discouraged, and her mother is intent on marrying her off to an English marquess. The growing talk of war in Europe only complicates matters.But Libby knows she's not destined to live two lives forever. On her twenty-first birthday, she must choose one path and forfeit the other--but how can she choose when she has so much to lose in each life?Get your copy of When the Day Comes by Gabrielle Meyer.Gabrielle lives on the banks of the Upper Mississippi River with her husband and four children. As an employee of the Minnesota Historical Society, she fell in love with the rich history of her state and enjoys writing historical and contemporary novels inspired by real people, places, and events. The river is a constant source of inspiration for Gabrielle, and if you look closely, you will find a river in each of her stories.When Gabrielle is not writing, you might find her homeschooling her children, cheering them on at sporting and theatrical events, or hosting a gathering at her home with family and friends.Visit Gabrielle Meyer's website.Become a patron of Christian Historical Fiction Talk and get some great benefits including early access to extended episodes and the chance to ask the author your questions. Listen to our earlier conversation about split time fiction.

Veterans  Radio
Sr Chief Rob O'Neill talks Navy Seal's life lessons

Veterans Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 29:00


Rob O'Neill and Dakota Meyer are two of the most decorated and recognized US service members: O'Neill killed the world's most wanted man, Osama bin Laden, and Meyer was the first living Marine to receive the Medal of Honor since the Vietnam War. But beyond their actions and courage in combat, O'Neill and Meyer also have much in common in civilian life: they are both sought-after public speakers, advocates for veterans, and share a non-PC sense of humor. Combining the best of military memoirs and straight-talking self-help, The Way Forward alternates between O'Neill and Meyer's perspectives, looking back with humor at even the darkest war stories, and sharing lessons they learned along the way. The Way Forward presents O'Neill and Meyer's philosophy in combat and life. This isn't a book about the glory of war and combat, but one about facing your enemies, some who are flesh and blood and some that are not: Your thoughts. Your doubts. Your boredom and your regrets. From Rob's dogged repetition at the free-throw line of his childhood basketball court to Dakota's pursuit of EMT and firefighter credentials to aid accident victims, these two American heroes turn their experiences into valuable lessons for every reader. Gritty and down-to-earth, O'Neill and Meyer tell their stories with candor and vulnerability to help readers handle stress, tackle their biggest obstacles, and exceed their expectations of themselves while keeping life's battles in perspective with a sense of humor. Rob O'Neill discusses with host Jim Fausone the life lessons learned as a Navy Seal.

Badass Women at Any Age
Discover and Own Your Strength Dr. Susan Meyer

Badass Women at Any Age

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 34:29


Losing her mother at an early age, Dr. Susan Meyers' childhood and adolescent years were tumultuous and filled with uncertainty.   Despite the challenges she faced, Susan was always a leader but she didn't recognize her strength and power until her post graduate years.  This self discovery encouraged her to help others discover and own their own unique power and strength.  Today Susan helps men and women create the life they want and a clear path to success.  Her extensive experience in life, career and transition coaching helps her clients take an informed look at their own life and build on what's revealed.  Her skills in getting to the heart of issues and working with clients to craft clear plans grew out of years of teaching preschool through grad school and training trainers and line staff through executive managers.  Susan's career in municipal government focused on creating innovative programs that helped people realize their full potential, including developing the first city wide managerial certificate program with cross agency mentoring, multi course trainer development certificate programs and the first internal coaching program within a city agency.  She is the author of FIFTY OVER FIFTY: Wise and Wild Women Creating Wonderful Lives (And You Can Too) as well as I'm Susan and I'm a Serial Careerist: 7 Success Strategies for a Unique Career. What You Will Hear in This Episode:  Susan's journey. Recognizing and owning her strength, confidence and leadership skills. Lessons learned  and reflection. What keeps people from creating the life and career they want. Strategic planning and success strategies. Expanding your comfort zone. The importance of a support circle Knowing what you are good and not good at. Quotes “To me it's really important for women to look at their own lives to see what their strengths are because sometimes, even when you're using them, you don't own it.” “I always think it's important to have a plan and also to understand you can ignore that plan.” “What do you want to be remembered for?” “It would benefit everyone to know their own story.” Mentioned: SusanRMeyer.com Fifty Over Fifty: Wise and Wild Women Creating Wonderful Lives (And You Can Too) I'm Susan and I'm a Serial Careerist: 7 Success Strategies for a Unique Career https://bonniemarcusleadership.com/ https://web.facebook.com/bonnie.marcus/  https://www.linkedin.com/in/bonniemarcus https://twitter.com/selfpromote https://www.instagram.com/self_promote_/ Gendered Ageism Survey Results Forbes article 5 Tips to own the superpower of your age Purchase my book Not Done Yet on Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Not-Done-Yet-Confidence-Workplace/dp/1989603785  If you enjoyed this episode of Badass Women Podcast make sure to subscribe to the podcast and drop us a five-star review. 

Elevate Your Wedding Business
Client Success Stories: Sydney Meyer of In Ink Weddings

Elevate Your Wedding Business

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 36:41


Today I sat down with a past student of my 6 Figure Wedding Planner Program, Sydney Myer of In Ink Weddings. Sydney and I talk all about her transformation in the program, the big "aha" moments, the times that I pushed her out of her comfort zone to make big things happen, and how her business is now on track for her first 6 figure year. Did I mention her business is only 8 months old? Sydney is an example of all of the things possible for you too. Learn more about the 6 Figure Wedding Planner Program here; bit.ly/joinnow6f  Connect with Sydney here: www.instagram.com/ininkweddings

The Treasury Career Corner
The Role of Technology in Treasury with Felix Meyer

The Treasury Career Corner

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 44:20


To use emerging technology, or not to use emerging technology? It's a debate as old as time. Though things have definitely changed since we last spoke with Felix Meyer, Corporate Treasury Business IT Manager at ABB Capital B.V., this debate is still highly relevant. As Felix highlights in this episode of the Treasury Career Corner, treasurers are not known for their risk-taking streak. That's what often holds them back from embracing emerging technology. However, now more than ever, the role of technology in treasury cannot be downplayed. Felix explains why technology is such an integral part of treasury and why it's important to stay open to new ideas, technology, and advancements. ABB is a global treasury technology leader and a driver behind the digital transformation of many industries. With over 130 years under its belt, ABB operates globally in more than 100 countries, with about 147,000 employees. On the podcast we discussed… How Felix got his start in technology Felix's fascination with automation Why technology is necessary for treasury operations The effect of new systems on the treasury unit What keeps Felix enthusiastic about treasury technology The future impact of technology on treasury Felix's advice for aspiring treasurers You can connect with Felix on https://www.linkedin.com/in/felix-meyer-5642141/?originalSubdomain=ch (LinkedIn). Are you interested in pursuing a career within Treasury? Whether you've recently graduated, or you want to search for new job opportunities to help develop your treasury career, The Treasury Recruitment Company can help you in your search for the perfect job. https://treasuryrecruitment.com/jobs (Find out more here). Or, send us your CV and let us help you in your next career move! If you're enjoying the show please rate and review us on whatever podcast app you listen to us on, for Apple Podcasts https://podcasts.apple.com/gb/podcast/the-treasury-career-corner/id1436647162#see-all/reviews (click here)!

Forschung Aktuell - Deutschlandfunk
Wissenschaftsmeldungen 02.05.2022

Forschung Aktuell - Deutschlandfunk

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 3:42


Meyer, Annekewww.deutschlandfunk.de, Forschung aktuellDirekter Link zur Audiodatei

Christ Church
Through All The Seasons | 25 Years of Grace | Rev. Dr. Daniel Meyer | 04.15.2022

Christ Church

Play Episode Listen Later May 1, 2022 40:00


Amazing Action Comics™
Episode: 062 - Indie Creator Spotlight - Justin Bartz & Randy Meyer

Amazing Action Comics™

Play Episode Listen Later May 1, 2022 38:11


This week we sit with creators Justin Bartz and Randy Meyer from Amazing Action Comics™. We discuss their secret origins, history in comics, Project: Shadow Breed Kickstarter, and more. CREATOR LINKS: JUSTIN TWITTER: https://twitter.com/PeaklikeDante RANDY TWITTER: https://twitter.com/Zanco96 KICKSTARTER KICKSTARTER PRE-LAUNCH PAGE NOW LIVE FOR “PROJECT: SHADOW BREED” BY Justin Bartz - https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/amazingactioncomics/project-shadow-breed-volume-2-1 If you would like to be a guest on our show, visit: https://www.amazingactioncomics.com/podcast LINKS Website: https://www.amazingactioncomics.com/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/amazingactionc Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/amazing_action_comics/ PODCAST SCHEDULE FRIDAY - Indie Comic Spotlight (Independent book reviews for the current week) MONDAY/TUESDAY - Indie Creator Spotlight (interviews and s with indie creators and topics) LEAVE US A MESSAGE AT: https://anchor.fm/amazingactioncomics/message --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/amazingactioncomics/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/amazingactioncomics/support

Commonwealth Club of California Podcast
Benjamin Franklin's Last Bet

Commonwealth Club of California Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 30, 2022 66:28


Benjamin Franklin was not exactly a gambling man. But he wagered 2,000 pounds, at the end of his illustrious life, on the survival of the United States. Franklin's bet was that, if the trustees of his legacy funds lent it out over the next 200 years to Boston and Philadelphia tradesmen to jump-start their careers, the U.S. economy would flourish. Each loan was to be repaid with interest over 10 years, and if all went according to Franklin's inventive scheme, the accrued final payout in 1991 would prove to be a windfall. Meyer traces the evolution of these twin funds as they age alongside America itself, bankrolling woodworkers and silversmiths, trade schools and space races. Franklin's wager on this early version of microfinancing was misused, neglected, and contested—but never wholly extinguished. With charm and inquisitive flair, Meyer shows how Franklin's stake in the “leather-apron” class remains in play to this day, and offers an inspiring blueprint for prosperity in our modern era of growing wealth disparity and social divisions. MLF ORGANIZER George Hammond SPEAKERS Michael Meyer Professor of English, University of Pittsburgh; Author, Benjamin Franklin's Last Bet In Conversation with George Hammond Author, Conversations With Socrates In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, we are currently hosting all of our live programming via YouTube live stream. This program was recorded via video conference on April 19th, 2022 by the Commonwealth Club of California. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Hörspiel
«Immer volles Feuer» von Michael Stauffer

Hörspiel

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 30, 2022 45:51


Klimawandel, Pandemie, gendergerechte Sprache. Für den Apokalyptiker Raymond ist das Ende der Welt greifbar nahe. Was ihn am meisten schmerzt: Sein Sohn Frédéric - ein hoffnungsloser Optimist - lächelt die Ängste des Vaters einfach weg. Da hilft nur noch eins: Enterben. «Wahnsinn ist die Vernunft des einzelnen.» Was Spinoza schon wusste, wird bei Stauffer genussvoll in die Tat umgesetzt. Seine Figuren strampeln sich ab und kommen doch keinen Schritt weiter. Hoffnung ist nicht in Sicht. Stattdessen wird über Dinkelbrötchen oder das gestrige Wetter gestritten. Am Ende landen alle in der Gruppentherapie - und der Spass beginnt von Neuem. Mit: Walter Renneisen (Raymond), Christian Ahlers (Frédéric), Elenita Queiróz (Miguelita), Lucia Kotikova (Jessusica), Anne Meyer (Dr. Meyer), Ben Gageik (Janosch) u.a. Technik: Tom Willen - Regie: Johannes Mayr und Michael Stauffer - Produktion: SRF 2022 - Dauer: ca. 55'

Astillero Informa con Julio Astillero
#Clip Lorenzo Meyer | Reforma electoral: una manzana de la discordia más

Astillero Informa con Julio Astillero

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 30, 2022 7:04


El doctor Lorenzo Meyer considera que la iniciativa de reforma electoral se presentó a sabiendas de que no será aprobada en el Congreso. Sin embargo sus objetivos son “cobrarle cuentas” al INE, que retó al presidente al no querer bajar los sueldos de sus funcionarios; y decirle al ciudadano que está pagando por un aparato democrático muy costoso y le están tomando el pelo.Visita: https://julioastillero.com/ Link para hacer donaciones vía PayPal:https://www.paypal.me/julioastillero See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Astillero Informa con Julio Astillero
Entrevista al Dr. Lorenzo Meyer - 29/abril/2022

Astillero Informa con Julio Astillero

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 41:10


Extensa entrevista con el doctor Lorenzo Meyer sobre diversos temas de actualidad política y social. El analista opina que los posibles candidatos de MORENA ahora tienen que lidiar con las corrientes y facciones del “gran universo político que es Centro-izquierda” en el país y además convencer al electorado. A diferencia del pasado en el que “no se tenía que pensar en los electores”, solo era necesario ganar la voluntad del centro rector, que era la presidencia. Visita: https://julioastillero.com/ Link para hacer donaciones vía PayPal:https://www.paypal.me/julioastillero See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

New Thinking Allowed Audio Podcast
Archives of the Paranormal with Walter Meyer zu Erpen

New Thinking Allowed Audio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 55:36


Walter Meyer zu Erpen, MAS, is the founder and a director of the Survival Research Institute of Canada ( https://survivalresearch.ca ). He is a professional archivist. Preserving the Historical Collections of Parapsychology website is https://phcp.nl. The Psychic News Digital Archives can be found at https://libguides.lib.umanitoba.ca/psychicnews. This interview was recorded in Las Vegas, NV, where Walter … Continue reading "Archives of the Paranormal with Walter Meyer zu Erpen"

The Buckeye Weekly Podcast
Two More Transfers To The Portal Testing Buckeyes' Depth Defensively?

The Buckeye Weekly Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 37:18


Ohio State has lost a pair of defenders to the transfer portal in the last week as defensive lineman Noah Potter and safety Andre Turrentine have both announced their transfers since the spring game. Both players had very good outings in the annual Scarlet vs. Gray scrimmage, but both also clearly saw the writing on the wall regarding the depth chart battles they were going to be fighting. In this episode of the Buckeye Weekly Podcast, Tony Gerdeman and Tom Orr discuss their departures and why they made sense given the depth on hand. The fellas then answer a few listener questions, including which Urban Meyer assistant was Meyer's worst hire, and who will make it out of Better Call Saul alive?

Understand the Bible?  Pastor Melissa Scott, Ph.D.

There isn't a quick fix for loneliness like popular Christianity tells you: "be more friendly, adopt a pet, etc..." The Apostle Paul, Jesus and many others in the Bible are our example. They show us that 1) loneliness is the lot of every Christian and 2) our loneliness is, as F.B. Meyer says, "an opportunity for Christ to make Himself really known to you." By focusing our mind on God's word and His constant presence, He will use these times to permanently fill the void - conforming us into His image and likeness. VF-1875 2 Timothy 4 Watch, Listen and Learn 24x7 at PastorMelissaScott.com Pastor Melissa Scott teaches from Faith Center in Glendale. Call 1-800-338-3030 24x7 to leave a message for Pastor Scott. You may make reservations to attend a live service, leave a prayer request or make a commitment. Pastor Scott appreciates messages and reads them often during live broadcasts. Follow @Pastor_Scott on Twitter and visit her official Facebook page @Pastor.M.Scott. Download Pastor Scott's "Understand the Bible" app for iPhone, iPad and iPod at the Apple App Store and for Android devices in the Google Store. Pastor Scott can also be seen 24x7 on Roku and Amazon Fire on the "Understand the Bible?" channel. ©2022 Pastor Melissa Scott, Ph.D. All Rights Reserved

I Love Old Time Radio
Ep0930: The Abbott and Costello Show - Lynn Bari

I Love Old Time Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2022 31:37


The opening routine is about Costello's wardrobe. Abbott and Costello are working in Meyer's Butcher Shop. Guest Lynn Bari joins Abbott and Costello in a western drama about Buffalo Bill --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/iloveoldtimeradio/message

51 Percent
#1709: Women in Business, Part One | 51%

51 Percent

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2022 39:30


On this week's 51%, we kick off our series on women in business. Financial advisors Kathleen Godfrey and Gretchen Meyer offer up some Investing 101, and Judy Herbst of Savvy Ladies stresses the importance of building financial independence. Guests: Gretchen Meyer, president of Gretchen Meyer Financial; Kathleen Godfrey, president of Godfrey Financial Associates; Judy Herbst, executive director of Savvy Ladies 51% is a national production of WAMC Northeast Public Radio. It's produced by Jesse King. Our executive director is Dr. Alan Chartock, and our theme is "Lolita" by the Albany-based artist Girl Blue. Follow Along You're listening to 51%, a WAMC production dedicated to women's issues and experiences. Thanks for tuning in, I'm Jesse King. Today we're launching our Women in Business series. Over the next few weeks, we'll be hearing from a host of women financial experts, entrepreneurs, and volunteers. To kick things off, we're talking financial literacy and investing. As a somewhat-recent college grad myself, this is an area that I have been particularly intrigued, confused, and intimidated by over the past few years - and I figure I can't be the only one. I feel it's important to note that, for many people living paycheck to paycheck, getting to set aside fund for the future is a privilege in and of itself - but the tools we'll discuss today are helpful for everyone. Our first guest today is Gretchen Meyer, owner and president of Gretchen Meyer Financial in Latham, New York. Meyer says she never initially thought she'd go into financial planning, particularly because her first experiences with money were stressful and unstable. As a kid, money became scarce when her parents took a risk and quit their jobs to open a small business, which, ultimately, proved unsuccessful. Meyer credits a theater scholarship with allowing her to attend Boston University, and it was there that she ultimately met her first husband. “To me, he represented more, like, financial security. He was in law school, he came from an affluent family, and I thought maybe [he was] somebody who could protect me. And so we got married when I was 22, and, unfortunately, the marriage didn't work out. And I found myself in my mid 20s, suddenly single, with a boatload of debt. And I had to crawl my way out of a situation that I found myself in, and kind of learned the hard way that financial empowerment, financial independence is all within – and you can't rely on anybody else to protect you,” says Meyer. “There's a book that I like called Prince Charming Isn't Coming, and it's all about how you can't expect anybody else to ever take care of you. You really need to take care of yourself. Using my story, frankly, of what not to do, I thought I can really empower women to become financially independent themselves. So I started my business here with one client, and then she told her friends, and they told their friends, and now we have collectively, maybe 1,300 / 1,400 clients all over the United States. And we help women of all ages and income levels achieve their financial goals.” Just to start and cover some of the basics, what types of investments are there? And how do you decide which path is the best for you? Different investments involve things like stocks. So a stock is like an equity. When you own home, you own equity, right? And you take the good with the bad. So if your roof is shot, you're gonna have to buy a new roof. And so you're building equity, yes, but also there are some downturns in having a home, right? Same with an equity. Yesterday, Netflix was down about 40%. When you own an equity, sometimes you make money, and sometimes you could also lose money. But a bond is a debt, a bond is an IOU. Governments will issue bonds, and so you have more stability, generally speaking, with bonds, because when you put your money in a bond, you're going to expect to get it all back, plus a little bit in terms of interest. So you have stocks, you have bonds, there's other things like ETFs, which are called exchange traded funds. You have mutual funds – those are mixtures of all sorts of stocks and bonds put together in a pot. You've got annuities, you have structured products, you have CDs. And you're absolutely right. How does anybody ever determine which is the right program for them? And not only that, which stocks to pick, and which bonds to pick? And what percentage of your overall portfolio should be in any one of those given things? So that is absolutely the mystery, and thankfully, that keeps me employed. It really all stems with a client's goals and what they are specifically looking to do. So we always start with “Are you looking to save for retirement? Are you looking to buy a house? Are you looking to fund your child's education?” You know, what exactly are you looking to do? And then secondly, how long do you have to go before you're going to reach that goal? If you have 20 years, 30 years, 40 years until retirement, you may decide that maybe your portfolio can take on a little bit more risk then if you have a year before you're going to buy a house. So once goals are determined, then you can start to pinpoint which types of investments would be a good fit for your specific goal and time horizon. Somebody's portfolio may look completely different when they're young and getting started, where they don't really have anything to lose, versus somebody who's, you know, been saving for their entire life in their retirement, and they maybe have $1 million or $2 million in their retirement. They may want to protect their wealth. So their goal and their circumstances may inform, more or less, what they're investing in. One thing we always hear about is how it's important to diversify your investments. Can you elaborate on that for me on why that is? Not even the best of us have a crystal ball and can identify exactly what's going to happen when. So you have not all of your eggs in one basket, right? We have different things going on. They can ying and yang one another at the same time. So there's different kinds of diversification too. So a mutual fund might enable you to have anywhere from 30 stocks to 1,000 different stocks in one fund. So even if you have one fund, you may have lots of different things going on within that one fund. Besides that, you may have diversification in the type of investment that you're in. In other words, are you investing in large companies? Are you investing in international companies? Are you investing in commodities? Are you investing in bonds? So you may have not only different stocks, but also different asset classes, as we call them. And those asset classes are going to give you different perspectives. I'll give an example: in 2017, international companies developed markets, and emerging markets were at the top, and they were doing really, really well. And cash investments were at the bottom. But then in 2018, it completely flip-flopped, and all of a sudden, international holdings were not doing as well, and cash jumped to the top. So had we had all of our funds in that one international bucket, we could easily lose all of it. I think the thing to keep in mind is a diversified portfolio can assist in mitigating volatility. But remember that it's not necessarily going to outperform a non-diversified portfolio. With a nice diversified portfolio, you kind of have guard rails, and you can have your investments sort of be less volatile, with a very decent return over time. So if someone wants to start investing or just make a new investment, where do they go for that? Like, would I go to someone like you, or my bank, or maybe like an app like Robinhood? What are those first steps? That's such a great question, and thankfully, there are so many resources. Yes, financial advisors, we will sit down with folks and help our clients understand what they are trying to do. I think half the battle with financial planning is really all about articulating your specific goals, because the financial plan can't be formulated until you actually know what you want. And then we have to figure out how much you can afford to save and put away. So usually, there's a budget involved in that articulation. Following that, once you sort of know what you want, and you know how you can afford to save in that regard – or some folks have credit card debt or student loan debt, you know, and it's not all about savings, it might just be part of your financial plan – then in order to set up an account, you can get together like a Roth IRA or a child's 529 account. You can go absolutely go to a financial advisor to do that. There are financial advisors at banks. My operation is in the independent financial planning channels, so we're not affiliated with a large establishment. You may go to other organizations, like Merrill Lynch, Northwestern Mutual, you know, some other very large organizations that you can tap into. Some organizations have minimums, so they don't necessarily always allow everybody to meet with them, to meet with a financial advisor. You have online resources available to you like Schwab. And yes, Robinhood is as a brand new one that people can tap into. So there's so many resources out there, more so than ever before. And it really depends on the level at which you feel like you would like to be supported, I think. Certain entities will provide very little support, and therefore the cost will be very low. Other entities might be much more supportive, but again, the cost might be a little bit more expensive. OK, so you mentioned how important it is to know where you want to go. Once you've established what your goals are, how does one go about making a proper budget to achieve those goals? I think it's important to break down a budget into your fixed expenses versus your variable expenses. And by fixed, I mean these are the things that don't change over time: your mortgage or your rent, your car, your insurances, your cell phone. But sneaky little things can get in there sometimes, like subscriptions that you might have forgotten about, or maybe you haven't checked in on lowering your cable bill for a long time, and it keeps creeping up, right, it keeps getting more and more expensive. Car insurances tend to get more expensive, cell phones tend to add little bits. So starting a budget with your fixed expenses, and identifying maybe opportunities to easily weed things out that you're not either using in terms of a subscription, or contacting your vendor to see if there are better deals out for you, make a lot of sense. From there, your variable expenses are really kind of where the opportunities lie. And by variable I mean, those are like your gas, and your groceries, and your wine. That's where you can really kind of track your expenses over time and get a sense for patterns in terms of what you spend your money on. And when are you spending your money, maybe you can start to identify, “OK, well, I want to go on a trip once a year, and my average travel is going to be $3,000.” And so you can set yourself that goal and start to save on a monthly basis toward that trip, rather than getting to that vacation, throwing it on a credit card, and then scrambling to figure out how to pay for it after. So, in terms of the budget, it does take a little bit of time to get it set up, and to figure out what you should be spending your money on – but once that process is done, and we do that with our clients all the time, then it's just a matter of tracking it to see where opportunities lie, and how much you can put toward your goals. Is that planning any different, or are there things people should keep in mind, for big ticket items? Like if they're going to buy a house, get a mortgage, or save up for college? Yeah, absolutely. So big ticket items can be so daunting, especially if somebody says, “Hey, you need to save $50,000 for a down payment on a mortgage. “ You're going, “Whoa, where am I gonna get that?” As they say, the journey of 1,000 miles begins with a single step. So there is a thing called the rule of 72. Have you heard of it before? No, I haven't. OK, it's one of my favorite little tips and tricks. So the rule of 72 is a mathematical concept. It's not like it can guarantee any rate of return, or it's not a predictor of a rate of return – it's just a concept whereby you take 72 divided by an interest rate to get you the anticipated number of years that it would take for your money to double. If you were to take out your calculator, you can do 72 divided by the interest rate. Banks right now are paying, let's say, on average, .01 percent. I don't know, that's what's going on in my world. So it takes 7,200 years for your money to double in your bank account. An average investment in, let's say, the S&P 500, which is stocks, has earned around 7 percent. So that means it takes 72 divided by seven – it's a little over 10, which means your money would double in a stock account every 10 years. That talks about compound interest. By investing your money, your money is growing on itself. So you are both actively saving for your goal, and again, little bits at a time actually add up. But in addition to your own savings, allowing your investments to help you earn your money, and hopefully double your money, which then doubles your money and then doubles your money again, over time. One thing I feel like I hear people debate is how you should tackle your debt. So for things like a mortgage or student loans, is it better to pay them off as soon as possible or to follow that extended payment plan? Right now, with interest rates as historically low as they are, money is inexpensive to borrow. The average home loan in the last few years has been somewhere between 2.5 to 4 percent, whereas if the market is earning you, on average, 7 percent, you're better off continuing to save in the market than you are to try to hurry up and pay down your mortgage faster. Having said that, I think doing maybe a little bit of everything makes a lot of sense. So for example, if your goal is to pay down your mortgage a little earlier, maybe you make one extra payment per year toward your mortgage. And that would shave off, you know, several years on your mortgage payment. Your student loans, maybe just do a little bit more. But in the meantime, don't sacrifice your saving for retirement or saving for other things all at the cost of paying down debt. If you're trying to do a little bit of both, you're using that compound interest, that rule of 72, doubling your money every 10 years or so, you're using that inertia to build your wealth. And at the same time you're taking small steps to pay down your debts. What do you do if you feel like you've missed the boat on saving early or investing early? What do you do in the event that you have to start over? Nobody's ever missed the boat. Everybody's just fine. You know, sometimes people feel so guilty, and that guilt can be debilitating. You don't want to feel as though it's already too late for you, there's nothing you can do, and so therefore you just don't do anything. We really try to encourage our clients to start where they are, and be happy and proud that they're starting exactly where they are. The thing is that if you are starting on the later side, you will have to save a bit more than you would have, maybe, if you started on the earlier side. But it doesn't mean that all bets are off, that you can't do anything. So I would say that figuring out how much you can save, what sacrifices you're going to make if you're starting a little bit later, is important – but don't be discouraged if you are starting late. The important thing is just to start. Well lastly, are there any investing myths that you'd like to dispel for us? The biggest watch out I would have for folks is the expectation that you can get rich quick. If I were to give advice to somebody, it just really, truly is one step at a time. It's systematic, and it does require a little bit of sacrifice to save, but really our most successful clients are those clients who set a goal for themselves, put a chunk away on a monthly basis. You know, they forget about it, they pay themselves first, and they check in with their financial advisor at least once a year to see whether or not they're on track to meet their goals. It really isn't any more glamorous than that. It's just being disciplined and engaged in your own financial success. Gretchen Meyer is a financial consultant and owner and president of Gretchen Meyer Financial in Latham, New York. You can learn more about her work at gretchenmeyerfinancial.com. Of course, one of the biggest things we hope to save for is our retirement. Whether your goal is to retire early, or just to retire, period, the question remains: what are you going to do, when you can no longer work? According to the CDC, women in the U.S., on average, live about five years longer than men, but they're less likely to have the funds to support them in those later years. In 2018, the U.S. Census Bureau's Survey of Income and Program Participation found about 50 percent of women ages 55 to 66 had no personal retirement savings, and on the opposite end of the spectrum, women were less likely than men to have $100,000 or more saved up for retirement. Kathleen Godfrey joined me to share her advice when it comes to saving for retirement. Godfrey is a financial advisor and president of Godfrey Financial Associates, a fiduciary that's specialized in serving women in Glenmont, New York for over 25 years. She says one of the most frequent questions she gets at her job is, “Am I gonna be able to retire?” “Whenever we're talking about women and money, I like to start at the beginning. Early in life, girls and boys are taught different messages about money. Girls are taught how to budget, how to spot a bargain, how to spend smartly. And boys are taught how to earn and invest and grow money. And so in a nutshell, girls learn how to spend money, and boys learn how to earn and invest money,” says Godfrey. “And so as a result, there are many adult women who have deep-seated anxieties and deep-seated insecurities around money and around wealth. Many women are fearful of risk, they don't want to lose. So they avoid investing in the stock market, where growth is actually the greatest over time. Many women, not all but many women, opt for CDs and other low-earning financial products because they're “safe.” And this can be really disastrous, because as inflation keeps rising, they're actually losing money. Women typically live longer than men, so their money has to last longer. And if it's all very safe, it can be disastrous really.” So specifically when planning for retirement, what are the different options out there? For retirement planning, women need to start saving early, early, early. I would say your first job, right out of college, or when you get your first job, start saving. Even if your employer doesn't offer a retirement plan, like a 401k or a 403b, every person who has earned income can open an IRA, which is an individual retirement account, or a Roth IRA. A traditional IRA allows you to put money aside, it grows tax deferred. So in other words, you don't pay any tax on the growth until you make withdrawals in retirement. Right now the limit on traditional IRAs is $6,000 a year, and if you're over age 50, you can put in $7,000 a year. A Roth IRA is a little bit different. It has the same contribution limits, so $6,000 if you're under age 50, and $7,000 if you're over age 50. But with a Roth IRA, you don't get any kind of deduction upfront. And when you make your withdrawals in retirement, you don't pay any tax. We recommend that you contribute as much as possible every single year, and learn that compounding is your best friend. And you just have to let your money grow, and try not to get too caught up when the market is down – because that's a good buying opportunity. When the stock market is down is a good time to be investing, it shouldn't be a time to be pulling out your money. Is there ever a moment when it's a good time to throw in the towel and pull out your money? You shouldn't pull it out, really, until you're retired. You really need to be disciplined enough to keep it in for the long run. In fact, there are penalties for taking your money out too early. So with most retirement plans, you would pay a 10 percent penalty if you made a withdrawal prior to age 59.5. And yeah, there will be days that the market is going to be down. There could be a couple of weeks when the market's going to be down. Or if we go back just to 2020, in March of 2020, the stock market was horrible. So there's always going to be something going on in the world. Right now, it's inflation, it's the war in Ukraine. There's always something that's going to affect how the stock market is doing. But investing for the long term and resisting the urge to pull your money out when things start to look a little scary – that's how you succeed as an investor, and that's how you actually grow your funds long term. When people are looking at potential stocks to invest in, what are some of the things that they should be keeping in mind? That depends on how much money you have to invest and how much volatility you can handle. And I don't want to use the word risk, because risk is very relative. But you know, there are certain kinds of stocks that are less volatile, like blue chip stocks, big company stocks that pay dividends. Those tend to be less volatile. The growth is not as exciting as say, Apple or Google or tech stocks, but those stocks tend to be a lot more volatile. You also want to look at investing internationally. The United States only makes up about 40 percent of the total world economy, so you're missing out on a lot of growth opportunities by not investing overseas, in other markets. The biggest advice I can give is you want to be diversified, you want to be invested in a lot of different things. So we recommend that you look at large stocks, mid-sized stocks, small stocks, international stocks, balance that out with bonds, corporate bonds, treasury bonds, and it's helpful to work with a professional. How do you know if you're on track? If you're trying to retire at 65, what's a good amount to feel comfortable? There are plenty of websites where you can check your progress. I like to have people start out by saving and investing 10 percent, if they can in the beginning, with a goal of 20 percent. So if you can save and invest 20 percent of your income, that's a really great thing to do. And that's going to get you really far. Because, you know, you figure you're going to be working 20, 30, maybe 40 years. And again, compounding is your best friend when it comes to investing. I'm curious as to your thoughts on the retirement gap, both on what you think the causes are and what women should keep in mind as a result. Well, the retirement gap is caused by a few things. First of all, historically women tend to earn less than men. So there's less to contribute. We live longer than men, and many women take time off from their careers to have children and to care for aging parents. And so those contributions that might have been made to their retirement plan are not getting made. And so now they're behind even more. So you want to make sure that you're invested wisely, that you're invested for growth, and that you know, beyond a shadow of a doubt, that you're not going to be taking the money out. It's really designed for long term accumulation. Overall, what would you say is the biggest mistake people make with their money? They live beyond their means, and they spend more than they're earning and they don't save. Those are the biggest mistakes. You can build a great deal of wealth if you learn how to manage your money, not spend it all, save a good amount of it, and invest wisely. Kathleen Godfrey is president of Godfrey Financial Associates in Glenmont, New York. You can learn more about her work at godfreyfinancial.com. Godfrey Financial Associates is a WAMC underwriter. As Kathleen Godfrey mentioned, there are plenty of resources, both online and offline, to help you identify your goals and research potential investment strategies. Our last guest today is Judy Herbst, the executive director of Savvy Ladies, a nonprofit organization that has been such a resource for more than 25,000 women since 2003. Herbst says founder Stacy Francis started the organization with the belief that financial education and independence is key to getting women out of abusive relationships and situations. "She saw that her grandmother suffered from financial abuse and couldn't get out of a marriage, and was held there because of finances. She was scared, she lacked the confidence to move herself forward, and ultimately died living in a financial abuse marriage. And Stacy, when she learned this and saw this as she was growing up, she saw the need for financial education," Herbst explains. "You know, women do not get educated about finances, we always think it's a “man's role.” And with more and more women having careers and making their own money, they need to take control, not just of their daily budgets with their family, but of their future. And it's really important for couples and individuals to know their financial situation and learn how to get out of debt and not be scared. So it's a conversation that we want to bring to the forefront." Tell me about Savvy Ladies. What's really unique about Savvy Ladies is that we have a free financial helpline. And with that we have a community of pro bono financial advisors from across the country that are certified CFPs, also financial executives and professionals, that are offering their expertise for one hour of time, to listen to a woman's question who comes to the helpline and give them guidance. We are not giving them like where to invest, but we are giving them the guidance of what to do to set them on the right path. So out of college: do you pay down debt? Do you save? How do you pay your rent? These are the questions we're getting. Our audience are women anywhere from age 18 to over 60. Many of the women are single women that come to Savvy Ladies. And they're single because they're right out of college, or they've been divorced, and they are now starting over – or they are widowed, and they're looking to now manage their money for the first time, and they're 65. And how do they do that successfully? What advice do you have when it comes to maintaining financial independence in a relationship, or perhaps at the end of a relationship, whether someone is widowed or it gets a divorce? I think the key is transparency. So there should be an open conversation. We seem to have, as women, we love to talk about our families and sex – but we never talked about money out there on the table. So many of the advisors will say have an open conversation about money and your spending habits, so you can actually list a budget. And one of the best ways to do that, there's many different apps out there. We love to refer people to Mint. Mint is a great one out there that people are using. But just list in a notebook what are your fixed and variable expenses, and I think that is a really key place to start. And then what are the variable expenses that can actually trigger a change? So even some of those fixed expenses, you might think you can't change, but maybe you can. That could be your rent, based on your location. Do you need roommates? If you're a widower, do you take in a border? Or do you need to downsize? Many women going through divorce want to keep the home. We hear that a lot, and probably about a third of the women coming to us are going through a divorce. And many, many want to keep the house. It really is a hard look to say, “Can I really afford the house? Or is it better to cash it out and split it now?” As you go through that divorce, that's a question you need to ask yourself, and ask your lawyer as you go through it. It's really important to understand the costs associated with keeping that house, whether you can afford them. Or is it better to downsize? Maybe stay in the same school district for your kids, but not pay those expenses? Because those expenses add up. The care of the lawn, just maintenance of the house, you never know. And then, selling the house, it becomes taxable possibly, and you need to understand those tax implications if you ultimately own it outright yourself. What are your thoughts when it comes to having joint versus separate accounts in a relationship or marriage? Many women commingle everything together with their spouses or their future spouses. You know, prenups are really an easy piece of paper to look at and have a conversation with your spouse. There's also postnups, you can do postnups after (the wedding). So this is becoming more and more common, and in the past it would have been totally taboo, I think, to talk about a prenup. But I think that brings the money conversation to the table. Commingling is OK, but it's also a good idea to keep a separate account in your own name. And if you are thinking about getting a divorce, and you haven't gone through all the steps yet, it is important that you begin to separate, and you can create your own account – and you should at this point, because it's probably easier for you to set up a new account in your own name, by still being married. So I would recommend to think about having a separate bank account. And there's no reason not to have your commingled as well. And understanding the commingled is what bills are being paid, and then where are you keeping [your funds]. But if you're going to get a divorce, many states are common laws. So everything from that marriage date onward is shared income, shared assets. So it is reportable, and it is traceable, and it will be looked at. But it is very important, I think from a timeline perspective, to have your own accounts. So how early do you think we should be teaching kids in general, but especially girls, about money? And are there ways you think we can better provide financial education? I think absolutely. And I think women are having the conversation more and more now. So I think as girlfriends and as groups speaking about it, we should have the confidence to talk about money. And that's also the income gap, you know, we should have the confidence to go in and ask for a higher wage, and a higher income based on the work we do. And I think that negotiation can happen upfront now. And you should feel very confident to have that conversation with an employer, especially with many women being independent contractors now as well, based on the Great Resignation thing – it's a huge opportunity for women to understand that they can work from home. And it's easy to pick up and set up a business, it could be a side hustle first before you dive into it as a full time independent contractor, but we're seeing many writers, digital marketing, social media, even virtual assistants, where women can take on these jobs that fit their schedules. Where they can do them at any time of day, but they get the job done. And I think it the important thing is to ask for your worth – understand your value and understand your worth, and don't underprice yourself. It's actually better to price yourself for the value of what you do and what you produce, and have fewer clients, and make more money that way so you're not juggling 12 clients – it's probably better to juggle four to five clients, and just price it right. We worked with one woman, and she actually thought she was pricing herself too high for the services she was offering. She was offering career coaching for colleges, so she was charging parents for giving advice to their kids looking for colleges. She went higher in her pricing than anyone in her neighborhood, and she actually made more money than pricing herself lower. Because I think that people thought with a higher price that she was more valuable – and of course, she was, and she was able to really balance her time with six clients versus taking on 12. Don't undervalue yourself, I think is really important. And absolutely – you asked when to have [the conversation]. I think mothers and parents should begin to have it with their children, and begin to have that conversation. We just did a focus group on your relationship with money, and we ask people to think about, “What was the first time you thought about money, or you remember money? And did you work for it? Or was it a gift to you?” So that's really interesting, because how did that set you up your emotional relationship with money? And then how do you then use that to teach your children? So for me, my first memory of money was a gift, which is very different, other people's was around working. So I think that sets you up in how we, as parents, don't think of money when we think of our children, and how to set them up for success early on. Judy, thanks so much for taking the time to speak with me. Is there anything that I'm missing that you'd like me to know or that you'd like our listeners to know? The general advice is do not be scared to ask a question. Any question is a good question. And this free financial helpline is here as a resource to help all women answer that financial question, whatever age you are, whatever your question might be, whatever your income is. We have a community of over 100 volunteers that we match based on your question and expertise. Judy Herbst is executive director of Savvy Ladies, a nonprofit dedicated to improving financial education for women. You can access their financial helpline at their website, savvyladies.org. 51% is a national production of WAMC Northeast Public Radio. It's produced by Jesse King. Our executive director is Dr. Alan Chartock, and our theme is "Lolita" by the Albany-based artist Girl Blue.

51 Percent
#1709: Women in Business, Part One | 51%

51 Percent

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2022 39:30


On this week's 51%, we kick off our series on women in business. Financial advisors Kathleen Godfrey and Gretchen Meyer offer up some Investing 101, and Judy Herbst of Savvy Ladies stresses the importance of building financial independence. Guests: Gretchen Meyer, president of Gretchen Meyer Financial; Kathleen Godfrey, president of Godfrey Financial Associates; Judy Herbst, executive director of Savvy Ladies 51% is a national production of WAMC Northeast Public Radio. It's produced by Jesse King. Our executive director is Dr. Alan Chartock, and our theme is "Lolita" by the Albany-based artist Girl Blue. Follow Along You're listening to 51%, a WAMC production dedicated to women's issues and experiences. Thanks for tuning in, I'm Jesse King. Today we're launching our Women in Business series. Over the next few weeks, we'll be hearing from a host of women financial experts, entrepreneurs, and volunteers. To kick things off, we're talking financial literacy and investing. As a somewhat-recent college grad myself, this is an area that I have been particularly intrigued, confused, and intimidated by over the past few years - and I figure I can't be the only one. I feel it's important to note that, for many people living paycheck to paycheck, getting to set aside fund for the future is a privilege in and of itself - but the tools we'll discuss today are helpful for everyone. Our first guest today is Gretchen Meyer, owner and president of Gretchen Meyer Financial in Latham, New York. Meyer says she never initially thought she'd go into financial planning, particularly because her first experiences with money were stressful and unstable. As a kid, money became scarce when her parents took a risk and quit their jobs to open a small business, which, ultimately, proved unsuccessful. Meyer credits a theater scholarship with allowing her to attend Boston University, and it was there that she ultimately met her first husband. “To me, he represented more, like, financial security. He was in law school, he came from an affluent family, and I thought maybe [he was] somebody who could protect me. And so we got married when I was 22, and, unfortunately, the marriage didn't work out. And I found myself in my mid 20s, suddenly single, with a boatload of debt. And I had to crawl my way out of a situation that I found myself in, and kind of learned the hard way that financial empowerment, financial independence is all within – and you can't rely on anybody else to protect you,” says Meyer. “There's a book that I like called Prince Charming Isn't Coming, and it's all about how you can't expect anybody else to ever take care of you. You really need to take care of yourself. Using my story, frankly, of what not to do, I thought I can really empower women to become financially independent themselves. So I started my business here with one client, and then she told her friends, and they told their friends, and now we have collectively, maybe 1,300 / 1,400 clients all over the United States. And we help women of all ages and income levels achieve their financial goals.” Just to start and cover some of the basics, what types of investments are there? And how do you decide which path is the best for you? Different investments involve things like stocks. So a stock is like an equity. When you own home, you own equity, right? And you take the good with the bad. So if your roof is shot, you're gonna have to buy a new roof. And so you're building equity, yes, but also there are some downturns in having a home, right? Same with an equity. Yesterday, Netflix was down about 40%. When you own an equity, sometimes you make money, and sometimes you could also lose money. But a bond is a debt, a bond is an IOU. Governments will issue bonds, and so you have more stability, generally speaking, with bonds, because when you put your money in a bond, you're going to expect to get it all back, plus a little bit in terms of interest. So you have stocks, you have bonds, there's other things like ETFs, which are called exchange traded funds. You have mutual funds – those are mixtures of all sorts of stocks and bonds put together in a pot. You've got annuities, you have structured products, you have CDs. And you're absolutely right. How does anybody ever determine which is the right program for them? And not only that, which stocks to pick, and which bonds to pick? And what percentage of your overall portfolio should be in any one of those given things? So that is absolutely the mystery, and thankfully, that keeps me employed. It really all stems with a client's goals and what they are specifically looking to do. So we always start with “Are you looking to save for retirement? Are you looking to buy a house? Are you looking to fund your child's education?” You know, what exactly are you looking to do? And then secondly, how long do you have to go before you're going to reach that goal? If you have 20 years, 30 years, 40 years until retirement, you may decide that maybe your portfolio can take on a little bit more risk then if you have a year before you're going to buy a house. So once goals are determined, then you can start to pinpoint which types of investments would be a good fit for your specific goal and time horizon. Somebody's portfolio may look completely different when they're young and getting started, where they don't really have anything to lose, versus somebody who's, you know, been saving for their entire life in their retirement, and they maybe have $1 million or $2 million in their retirement. They may want to protect their wealth. So their goal and their circumstances may inform, more or less, what they're investing in. One thing we always hear about is how it's important to diversify your investments. Can you elaborate on that for me on why that is? Not even the best of us have a crystal ball and can identify exactly what's going to happen when. So you have not all of your eggs in one basket, right? We have different things going on. They can ying and yang one another at the same time. So there's different kinds of diversification too. So a mutual fund might enable you to have anywhere from 30 stocks to 1,000 different stocks in one fund. So even if you have one fund, you may have lots of different things going on within that one fund. Besides that, you may have diversification in the type of investment that you're in. In other words, are you investing in large companies? Are you investing in international companies? Are you investing in commodities? Are you investing in bonds? So you may have not only different stocks, but also different asset classes, as we call them. And those asset classes are going to give you different perspectives. I'll give an example: in 2017, international companies developed markets, and emerging markets were at the top, and they were doing really, really well. And cash investments were at the bottom. But then in 2018, it completely flip-flopped, and all of a sudden, international holdings were not doing as well, and cash jumped to the top. So had we had all of our funds in that one international bucket, we could easily lose all of it. I think the thing to keep in mind is a diversified portfolio can assist in mitigating volatility. But remember that it's not necessarily going to outperform a non-diversified portfolio. With a nice diversified portfolio, you kind of have guard rails, and you can have your investments sort of be less volatile, with a very decent return over time. So if someone wants to start investing or just make a new investment, where do they go for that? Like, would I go to someone like you, or my bank, or maybe like an app like Robinhood? What are those first steps? That's such a great question, and thankfully, there are so many resources. Yes, financial advisors, we will sit down with folks and help our clients understand what they are trying to do. I think half the battle with financial planning is really all about articulating your specific goals, because the financial plan can't be formulated until you actually know what you want. And then we have to figure out how much you can afford to save and put away. So usually, there's a budget involved in that articulation. Following that, once you sort of know what you want, and you know how you can afford to save in that regard – or some folks have credit card debt or student loan debt, you know, and it's not all about savings, it might just be part of your financial plan – then in order to set up an account, you can get together like a Roth IRA or a child's 529 account. You can go absolutely go to a financial advisor to do that. There are financial advisors at banks. My operation is in the independent financial planning channels, so we're not affiliated with a large establishment. You may go to other organizations, like Merrill Lynch, Northwestern Mutual, you know, some other very large organizations that you can tap into. Some organizations have minimums, so they don't necessarily always allow everybody to meet with them, to meet with a financial advisor. You have online resources available to you like Schwab. And yes, Robinhood is as a brand new one that people can tap into. So there's so many resources out there, more so than ever before. And it really depends on the level at which you feel like you would like to be supported, I think. Certain entities will provide very little support, and therefore the cost will be very low. Other entities might be much more supportive, but again, the cost might be a little bit more expensive. OK, so you mentioned how important it is to know where you want to go. Once you've established what your goals are, how does one go about making a proper budget to achieve those goals? I think it's important to break down a budget into your fixed expenses versus your variable expenses. And by fixed, I mean these are the things that don't change over time: your mortgage or your rent, your car, your insurances, your cell phone. But sneaky little things can get in there sometimes, like subscriptions that you might have forgotten about, or maybe you haven't checked in on lowering your cable bill for a long time, and it keeps creeping up, right, it keeps getting more and more expensive. Car insurances tend to get more expensive, cell phones tend to add little bits. So starting a budget with your fixed expenses, and identifying maybe opportunities to easily weed things out that you're not either using in terms of a subscription, or contacting your vendor to see if there are better deals out for you, make a lot of sense. From there, your variable expenses are really kind of where the opportunities lie. And by variable I mean, those are like your gas, and your groceries, and your wine. That's where you can really kind of track your expenses over time and get a sense for patterns in terms of what you spend your money on. And when are you spending your money, maybe you can start to identify, “OK, well, I want to go on a trip once a year, and my average travel is going to be $3,000.” And so you can set yourself that goal and start to save on a monthly basis toward that trip, rather than getting to that vacation, throwing it on a credit card, and then scrambling to figure out how to pay for it after. So, in terms of the budget, it does take a little bit of time to get it set up, and to figure out what you should be spending your money on – but once that process is done, and we do that with our clients all the time, then it's just a matter of tracking it to see where opportunities lie, and how much you can put toward your goals. Is that planning any different, or are there things people should keep in mind, for big ticket items? Like if they're going to buy a house, get a mortgage, or save up for college? Yeah, absolutely. So big ticket items can be so daunting, especially if somebody says, “Hey, you need to save $50,000 for a down payment on a mortgage. “ You're going, “Whoa, where am I gonna get that?” As they say, the journey of 1,000 miles begins with a single step. So there is a thing called the rule of 72. Have you heard of it before? No, I haven't. OK, it's one of my favorite little tips and tricks. So the rule of 72 is a mathematical concept. It's not like it can guarantee any rate of return, or it's not a predictor of a rate of return – it's just a concept whereby you take 72 divided by an interest rate to get you the anticipated number of years that it would take for your money to double. If you were to take out your calculator, you can do 72 divided by the interest rate. Banks right now are paying, let's say, on average, .01 percent. I don't know, that's what's going on in my world. So it takes 7,200 years for your money to double in your bank account. An average investment in, let's say, the S&P 500, which is stocks, has earned around 7 percent. So that means it takes 72 divided by seven – it's a little over 10, which means your money would double in a stock account every 10 years. That talks about compound interest. By investing your money, your money is growing on itself. So you are both actively saving for your goal, and again, little bits at a time actually add up. But in addition to your own savings, allowing your investments to help you earn your money, and hopefully double your money, which then doubles your money and then doubles your money again, over time. One thing I feel like I hear people debate is how you should tackle your debt. So for things like a mortgage or student loans, is it better to pay them off as soon as possible or to follow that extended payment plan? Right now, with interest rates as historically low as they are, money is inexpensive to borrow. The average home loan in the last few years has been somewhere between 2.5 to 4 percent, whereas if the market is earning you, on average, 7 percent, you're better off continuing to save in the market than you are to try to hurry up and pay down your mortgage faster. Having said that, I think doing maybe a little bit of everything makes a lot of sense. So for example, if your goal is to pay down your mortgage a little earlier, maybe you make one extra payment per year toward your mortgage. And that would shave off, you know, several years on your mortgage payment. Your student loans, maybe just do a little bit more. But in the meantime, don't sacrifice your saving for retirement or saving for other things all at the cost of paying down debt. If you're trying to do a little bit of both, you're using that compound interest, that rule of 72, doubling your money every 10 years or so, you're using that inertia to build your wealth. And at the same time you're taking small steps to pay down your debts. What do you do if you feel like you've missed the boat on saving early or investing early? What do you do in the event that you have to start over? Nobody's ever missed the boat. Everybody's just fine. You know, sometimes people feel so guilty, and that guilt can be debilitating. You don't want to feel as though it's already too late for you, there's nothing you can do, and so therefore you just don't do anything. We really try to encourage our clients to start where they are, and be happy and proud that they're starting exactly where they are. The thing is that if you are starting on the later side, you will have to save a bit more than you would have, maybe, if you started on the earlier side. But it doesn't mean that all bets are off, that you can't do anything. So I would say that figuring out how much you can save, what sacrifices you're going to make if you're starting a little bit later, is important – but don't be discouraged if you are starting late. The important thing is just to start. Well lastly, are there any investing myths that you'd like to dispel for us? The biggest watch out I would have for folks is the expectation that you can get rich quick. If I were to give advice to somebody, it just really, truly is one step at a time. It's systematic, and it does require a little bit of sacrifice to save, but really our most successful clients are those clients who set a goal for themselves, put a chunk away on a monthly basis. You know, they forget about it, they pay themselves first, and they check in with their financial advisor at least once a year to see whether or not they're on track to meet their goals. It really isn't any more glamorous than that. It's just being disciplined and engaged in your own financial success. Gretchen Meyer is a financial consultant and owner and president of Gretchen Meyer Financial in Latham, New York. You can learn more about her work at gretchenmeyerfinancial.com. Of course, one of the biggest things we hope to save for is our retirement. Whether your goal is to retire early, or just to retire, period, the question remains: what are you going to do, when you can no longer work? According to the CDC, women in the U.S., on average, live about five years longer than men, but they're less likely to have the funds to support them in those later years. In 2018, the U.S. Census Bureau's Survey of Income and Program Participation found about 50 percent of women ages 55 to 66 had no personal retirement savings, and on the opposite end of the spectrum, women were less likely than men to have $100,000 or more saved up for retirement. Kathleen Godfrey joined me to share her advice when it comes to saving for retirement. Godfrey is a financial advisor and president of Godfrey Financial Associates, a fiduciary that's specialized in serving women in Glenmont, New York for over 25 years. She says one of the most frequent questions she gets at her job is, “Am I gonna be able to retire?” “Whenever we're talking about women and money, I like to start at the beginning. Early in life, girls and boys are taught different messages about money. Girls are taught how to budget, how to spot a bargain, how to spend smartly. And boys are taught how to earn and invest and grow money. And so in a nutshell, girls learn how to spend money, and boys learn how to earn and invest money,” says Godfrey. “And so as a result, there are many adult women who have deep-seated anxieties and deep-seated insecurities around money and around wealth. Many women are fearful of risk, they don't want to lose. So they avoid investing in the stock market, where growth is actually the greatest over time. Many women, not all but many women, opt for CDs and other low-earning financial products because they're “safe.” And this can be really disastrous, because as inflation keeps rising, they're actually losing money. Women typically live longer than men, so their money has to last longer. And if it's all very safe, it can be disastrous really.” So specifically when planning for retirement, what are the different options out there? For retirement planning, women need to start saving early, early, early. I would say your first job, right out of college, or when you get your first job, start saving. Even if your employer doesn't offer a retirement plan, like a 401k or a 403b, every person who has earned income can open an IRA, which is an individual retirement account, or a Roth IRA. A traditional IRA allows you to put money aside, it grows tax deferred. So in other words, you don't pay any tax on the growth until you make withdrawals in retirement. Right now the limit on traditional IRAs is $6,000 a year, and if you're over age 50, you can put in $7,000 a year. A Roth IRA is a little bit different. It has the same contribution limits, so $6,000 if you're under age 50, and $7,000 if you're over age 50. But with a Roth IRA, you don't get any kind of deduction upfront. And when you make your withdrawals in retirement, you don't pay any tax. We recommend that you contribute as much as possible every single year, and learn that compounding is your best friend. And you just have to let your money grow, and try not to get too caught up when the market is down – because that's a good buying opportunity. When the stock market is down is a good time to be investing, it shouldn't be a time to be pulling out your money. Is there ever a moment when it's a good time to throw in the towel and pull out your money? You shouldn't pull it out, really, until you're retired. You really need to be disciplined enough to keep it in for the long run. In fact, there are penalties for taking your money out too early. So with most retirement plans, you would pay a 10 percent penalty if you made a withdrawal prior to age 59.5. And yeah, there will be days that the market is going to be down. There could be a couple of weeks when the market's going to be down. Or if we go back just to 2020, in March of 2020, the stock market was horrible. So there's always going to be something going on in the world. Right now, it's inflation, it's the war in Ukraine. There's always something that's going to affect how the stock market is doing. But investing for the long term and resisting the urge to pull your money out when things start to look a little scary – that's how you succeed as an investor, and that's how you actually grow your funds long term. When people are looking at potential stocks to invest in, what are some of the things that they should be keeping in mind? That depends on how much money you have to invest and how much volatility you can handle. And I don't want to use the word risk, because risk is very relative. But you know, there are certain kinds of stocks that are less volatile, like blue chip stocks, big company stocks that pay dividends. Those tend to be less volatile. The growth is not as exciting as say, Apple or Google or tech stocks, but those stocks tend to be a lot more volatile. You also want to look at investing internationally. The United States only makes up about 40 percent of the total world economy, so you're missing out on a lot of growth opportunities by not investing overseas, in other markets. The biggest advice I can give is you want to be diversified, you want to be invested in a lot of different things. So we recommend that you look at large stocks, mid-sized stocks, small stocks, international stocks, balance that out with bonds, corporate bonds, treasury bonds, and it's helpful to work with a professional. How do you know if you're on track? If you're trying to retire at 65, what's a good amount to feel comfortable? There are plenty of websites where you can check your progress. I like to have people start out by saving and investing 10 percent, if they can in the beginning, with a goal of 20 percent. So if you can save and invest 20 percent of your income, that's a really great thing to do. And that's going to get you really far. Because, you know, you figure you're going to be working 20, 30, maybe 40 years. And again, compounding is your best friend when it comes to investing. I'm curious as to your thoughts on the retirement gap, both on what you think the causes are and what women should keep in mind as a result. Well, the retirement gap is caused by a few things. First of all, historically women tend to earn less than men. So there's less to contribute. We live longer than men, and many women take time off from their careers to have children and to care for aging parents. And so those contributions that might have been made to their retirement plan are not getting made. And so now they're behind even more. So you want to make sure that you're invested wisely, that you're invested for growth, and that you know, beyond a shadow of a doubt, that you're not going to be taking the money out. It's really designed for long term accumulation. Overall, what would you say is the biggest mistake people make with their money? They live beyond their means, and they spend more than they're earning and they don't save. Those are the biggest mistakes. You can build a great deal of wealth if you learn how to manage your money, not spend it all, save a good amount of it, and invest wisely. Kathleen Godfrey is president of Godfrey Financial Associates in Glenmont, New York. You can learn more about her work at godfreyfinancial.com. Godfrey Financial Associates is a WAMC underwriter. As Kathleen Godfrey mentioned, there are plenty of resources, both online and offline, to help you identify your goals and research potential investment strategies. Our last guest today is Judy Herbst, the executive director of Savvy Ladies, a nonprofit organization that has been such a resource for more than 25,000 women since 2003. Herbst says founder Stacy Francis started the organization with the belief that financial education and independence is key to getting women out of abusive relationships and situations. "She saw that her grandmother suffered from financial abuse and couldn't get out of a marriage, and was held there because of finances. She was scared, she lacked the confidence to move herself forward, and ultimately died living in a financial abuse marriage. And Stacy, when she learned this and saw this as she was growing up, she saw the need for financial education," Herbst explains. "You know, women do not get educated about finances, we always think it's a “man's role.” And with more and more women having careers and making their own money, they need to take control, not just of their daily budgets with their family, but of their future. And it's really important for couples and individuals to know their financial situation and learn how to get out of debt and not be scared. So it's a conversation that we want to bring to the forefront." Tell me about Savvy Ladies. What's really unique about Savvy Ladies is that we have a free financial helpline. And with that we have a community of pro bono financial advisors from across the country that are certified CFPs, also financial executives and professionals, that are offering their expertise for one hour of time, to listen to a woman's question who comes to the helpline and give them guidance. We are not giving them like where to invest, but we are giving them the guidance of what to do to set them on the right path. So out of college: do you pay down debt? Do you save? How do you pay your rent? These are the questions we're getting. Our audience are women anywhere from age 18 to over 60. Many of the women are single women that come to Savvy Ladies. And they're single because they're right out of college, or they've been divorced, and they are now starting over – or they are widowed, and they're looking to now manage their money for the first time, and they're 65. And how do they do that successfully? What advice do you have when it comes to maintaining financial independence in a relationship, or perhaps at the end of a relationship, whether someone is widowed or it gets a divorce? I think the key is transparency. So there should be an open conversation. We seem to have, as women, we love to talk about our families and sex – but we never talked about money out there on the table. So many of the advisors will say have an open conversation about money and your spending habits, so you can actually list a budget. And one of the best ways to do that, there's many different apps out there. We love to refer people to Mint. Mint is a great one out there that people are using. But just list in a notebook what are your fixed and variable expenses, and I think that is a really key place to start. And then what are the variable expenses that can actually trigger a change? So even some of those fixed expenses, you might think you can't change, but maybe you can. That could be your rent, based on your location. Do you need roommates? If you're a widower, do you take in a border? Or do you need to downsize? Many women going through divorce want to keep the home. We hear that a lot, and probably about a third of the women coming to us are going through a divorce. And many, many want to keep the house. It really is a hard look to say, “Can I really afford the house? Or is it better to cash it out and split it now?” As you go through that divorce, that's a question you need to ask yourself, and ask your lawyer as you go through it. It's really important to understand the costs associated with keeping that house, whether you can afford them. Or is it better to downsize? Maybe stay in the same school district for your kids, but not pay those expenses? Because those expenses add up. The care of the lawn, just maintenance of the house, you never know. And then, selling the house, it becomes taxable possibly, and you need to understand those tax implications if you ultimately own it outright yourself. What are your thoughts when it comes to having joint versus separate accounts in a relationship or marriage? Many women commingle everything together with their spouses or their future spouses. You know, prenups are really an easy piece of paper to look at and have a conversation with your spouse. There's also postnups, you can do postnups after (the wedding). So this is becoming more and more common, and in the past it would have been totally taboo, I think, to talk about a prenup. But I think that brings the money conversation to the table. Commingling is OK, but it's also a good idea to keep a separate account in your own name. And if you are thinking about getting a divorce, and you haven't gone through all the steps yet, it is important that you begin to separate, and you can create your own account – and you should at this point, because it's probably easier for you to set up a new account in your own name, by still being married. So I would recommend to think about having a separate bank account. And there's no reason not to have your commingled as well. And understanding the commingled is what bills are being paid, and then where are you keeping [your funds]. But if you're going to get a divorce, many states are common laws. So everything from that marriage date onward is shared income, shared assets. So it is reportable, and it is traceable, and it will be looked at. But it is very important, I think from a timeline perspective, to have your own accounts. So how early do you think we should be teaching kids in general, but especially girls, about money? And are there ways you think we can better provide financial education? I think absolutely. And I think women are having the conversation more and more now. So I think as girlfriends and as groups speaking about it, we should have the confidence to talk about money. And that's also the income gap, you know, we should have the confidence to go in and ask for a higher wage, and a higher income based on the work we do. And I think that negotiation can happen upfront now. And you should feel very confident to have that conversation with an employer, especially with many women being independent contractors now as well, based on the Great Resignation thing – it's a huge opportunity for women to understand that they can work from home. And it's easy to pick up and set up a business, it could be a side hustle first before you dive into it as a full time independent contractor, but we're seeing many writers, digital marketing, social media, even virtual assistants, where women can take on these jobs that fit their schedules. Where they can do them at any time of day, but they get the job done. And I think it the important thing is to ask for your worth – understand your value and understand your worth, and don't underprice yourself. It's actually better to price yourself for the value of what you do and what you produce, and have fewer clients, and make more money that way so you're not juggling 12 clients – it's probably better to juggle four to five clients, and just price it right. We worked with one woman, and she actually thought she was pricing herself too high for the services she was offering. She was offering career coaching for colleges, so she was charging parents for giving advice to their kids looking for colleges. She went higher in her pricing than anyone in her neighborhood, and she actually made more money than pricing herself lower. Because I think that people thought with a higher price that she was more valuable – and of course, she was, and she was able to really balance her time with six clients versus taking on 12. Don't undervalue yourself, I think is really important. And absolutely – you asked when to have [the conversation]. I think mothers and parents should begin to have it with their children, and begin to have that conversation. We just did a focus group on your relationship with money, and we ask people to think about, “What was the first time you thought about money, or you remember money? And did you work for it? Or was it a gift to you?” So that's really interesting, because how did that set you up your emotional relationship with money? And then how do you then use that to teach your children? So for me, my first memory of money was a gift, which is very different, other people's was around working. So I think that sets you up in how we, as parents, don't think of money when we think of our children, and how to set them up for success early on. Judy, thanks so much for taking the time to speak with me. Is there anything that I'm missing that you'd like me to know or that you'd like our listeners to know? The general advice is do not be scared to ask a question. Any question is a good question. And this free financial helpline is here as a resource to help all women answer that financial question, whatever age you are, whatever your question might be, whatever your income is. We have a community of over 100 volunteers that we match based on your question and expertise. Judy Herbst is executive director of Savvy Ladies, a nonprofit dedicated to improving financial education for women. You can access their financial helpline at their website, savvyladies.org. 51% is a national production of WAMC Northeast Public Radio. It's produced by Jesse King. Our executive director is Dr. Alan Chartock, and our theme is "Lolita" by the Albany-based artist Girl Blue.

She's Just Getting Started -  Building a business you truly love!
Ep 131: 3 Copywriting tips for new business owners - with Melissa Meyer

She's Just Getting Started - Building a business you truly love!

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2022 33:35


In today's episode, I have a very special guest: the one and only Melissa Meyer of Bets And Ben Creative.  Melissa is not only an amazing woman & gifted copywriter, but she is also one my Grow-Getters members - so this episode is extra special for me! She has some great tips to help you as you write for your business & you get to hear how she started her business as well. Read more HEREMelissa is a copywriter for business owners & owns Bets And Ben Creative. If you need help writing any part of your website, blog, articles, & more, you can reach out to her for help - she is amazing! Be sure to Follow Melissa here: https://www.facebook.com/BetsAndBenCreativehttps://www.linkedin.com/in/melissa-meyer-1482991b4/New here?GET PLUGGED IN:

Creating Wealth through Passive Apartment Investing
EP#197 Sourcing And Acquiring Best Deals with Keith Meyer

Creating Wealth through Passive Apartment Investing

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 21:16


Keith Meyer is a purposeful commercial real estate operator and investor who has participated in a diverse set of investment vehicles within the industry. Keith's family and network of investors have owned and significantly increased the worth of several large manufactured housing communities over the past 25 years. Keith leads the deal sourcing and acquisitions side of SCG, working directly with brokers and co-sponsors to acquire properties that meet his team's distinct criteria. Keith focuses on developing win-win partnerships which are well-defined from inception, and highly productive upon implementation.Episode Spotlights- Building Track Record to Win Deals- Closing Multiple Deals In A Short Span - Streamlining with Systems and Processes- Forecasting Real Estate Markets- Dealing with challenges in Sourcing and Acquiring DealsBook Recommendations: Raising Capital for Real Estate by Hunter ThompsonConnect with KeithWebsite: https://www.symphonycapitalgroup.com Email: keith@symphonycapitalgroup.comGrab your freebie - Tips for Multifamily Investing at www.ushacapital.comFound this episode insightful? Show us some love by spreading the word on social media Rate and review the show on apple podcast - https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/multifamily-ap360/id1522097213Follow Rama on socials!LinkedIn | Meta | Twitter | InstagramConnect to Rama KrishnaE-mail: info@ushacapital.comWebsite: www.ushacapital.com

People Business w/ O'Brien McMahon
The Entrepreneur's Attorney w/ Tricia Meyer

People Business w/ O'Brien McMahon

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2022 52:04


Tricia Meyer is the Founder and Managing Attorney of Meyer Law, one of the fastest-growing law firms in the United States. Meyer helps entrepreneurs and technology companies from startups to large corporations, Shark Tank contestants to companies gracing the Inc. 500. Tricia has been named on the Forbes Next 1000 list, is one of the Most Influential Female Lawyers in Chicago according to Crain's Chicago Business, and has been recognized as a top 10 technology lawyer. As an entrepreneur, attorney, and mother to a large family Tricia has a unique perspective. In this conversation, we cover a little bit of everything, including legal pitfalls, advice for entrepreneurs, and how to blend the chaos of work and family life. Mentioned in this Episode:Meyer Law memberships and coursesMeyer Law packages for startupsMeyer Law packages for growing companiesRequest a roadmapThe Psychology of Money by Morgan HouselThe Optimal Amount of Hassle by Morgan HouselLinnea Gandhi on People Business PodcastThe Clever BabyTopics:(3:02) - Tricia's background starting her own business and positioning it as a tech company.(9:32) - How much of your time in law school is spent on contracts and the way laws work vs. negotiation and strategy?(13:30) - How should decision-makers and business leaders approach their attorneys?(14:52) - Where can there be great partnerships between business leaders and attorneys outside of contracts?(17:03) - What is your approach to negotiations?(18:28) - What's your husband's background in entrepreneurship and how did you both get onto this career path?(20:48) - What were the conversations like when you decided to start your first business together?(24:13) - What do you believe about business that is controversial?(29:27) - Was there something about your childhood that instilled your work ethic and confidence? How do you foster that within your own team?(34:10) - How do you think about the balance of building your businesses and raising a large family?(39:16) - Setting boundaries and being able to say “no.”(42:43) - How do you think about sacrifice, when it comes to work and family?(47:17) - What are you sick of talking about?(48:15) - What are you most excited to be talking about?(49:25) - What aren't people talking about enough?(50:30) - What is the purpose of business?

The Shrieking Shack
Episode 165: The Money Fandom

The Shrieking Shack

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2022 145:20


Twilight Chapter 3/Midnight Sun Chapter 3 The money fandom is dying! We tally up Fantastic Beast 3's international box office numbers. How is it faring in the Season of Morbius? Speaking of vampires, we have some juicy character stuff to explore this week. How long will Edward's roguish charms and gatekeep-gaslight-girlboss vampire secret hiding routine stay charming, and how long can Bella successfully navigate being world-weary and wizened without tipping too far in that direction? We also have a lot of thrilling action--from Edward's Superman powers to deep dives into the lore of Meyer's vampires (and their houses that they apparently do CRIMES in). Some housekeeping notes: new podcast art is coming! I will get it out ASAP but I have been very busy recently. Also, there's a strange sound on the recording that sounds like something wobbling that I tried my absolute best to get rid of but couldn't completely remove--if you hear a faint oscillating sound, that's what that is!