Podcasts about Granted

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  • 2,480PODCASTS
  • 3,204EPISODES
  • 35mAVG DURATION
  • 2DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Oct 16, 2021LATEST
Granted

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Best podcasts about Granted

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Latest podcast episodes about Granted

BS3 Sports & Music #XSquad
Sudds-R-Us Podcast S2:E34 - “The Things We Take For Granted”

BS3 Sports & Music #XSquad

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 49:54


Host Ben Sudderth, Jr. & Irene Sudderth will be discussing “The Things We Take For Granted”.

AP Audio Stories
Now 41, killer of 4-year-old boy granted parole on 11th try

AP Audio Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 1:32


The Drive
Is TB-12 taken for granted

The Drive

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 14:26


Bob & Jeff discuss if Tom Brady at 44 and his entire career is and has been taken for granted. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Locked On Lakers - Daily Podcast On The Los Angeles Lakers
Should Carmelo Anthony Start With LeBron, Westbrook and Davis? Plus, Minutes for Hillbilly Kobe?

Locked On Lakers - Daily Podcast On The Los Angeles Lakers

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 38:55


Tuesday's preseason loss to Warriors didn't just present the first look at the Lakers' Big Three of LeBron James, Anthony Davis and Russell Westbrook. It raised the question of who should start alongside that trio of All-Stars. Granted, Frank Vogel's hands are a bit tied at the moment, given all the players who are shelved with injuries. But could Kent Bazemore and Carmelo Anthony, the two filling out Tuesday's lineup, fit the bill moving forward? Bazemore feels like a lock by now, but Melo? More debatable. So the Kamenetzkys do just that. What are the pros and cons of the future Hall of Famer vs. Wayne Ellington, Kendrick Nunn or other looks? Whatever the rotation chosen, how much fun will the Lakers actually be to watch? ESPN's Zach Lowe offered up some thoughts in a recent column, and the Kamenetzkys react to his assessment. Finally, undrafted two-way player Austin Reaves has been turning heads of late with some unexpectedly un-rookie play. Is he a viable option once games actually count? Hosts: Andy and Brian Kamenetzky SEGMENT 1: What's the best starting lineup for the Lakers, and does it include Melo? SEGMENT 2: On a pure "fun" scale, how enjoyable will the Lakers be? SEGMENT 3: Is Hillbilly Kobe a thing? Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! SweatBlock Get it today for 20% off at SweatBlock.com with promo code LockedOn, or at Amazon and CVS. Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKED15” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline AG There is only 1 place that has you covered and 1 place we trust. Betonline.ag! Sign up today for a free account at betonline.ag and use that promocode: LOCKEDON for your 50% welcome bonus. Rock Auto Amazing selection. Reliably low prices. All the parts your car will ever need. Visit RockAuto.com and tell them Locked On sent you. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

WorkLife with Adam Grant
How to stop languishing and start finding flow | TED Talks Daily

WorkLife with Adam Grant

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 12:48


We're back soon with new episodes of Taken for Granted, but for now, here's a TED Talk Adam gave recently. Have you found yourself staying up late, joylessly bingeing TV shows and doomscrolling through the news, or simply navigating your day uninspired and aimless? Chances are you're languishing—a psychic malaise that has become all too common after many months of the pandemic. Adam breaks down the key indicators of languishing and presents three ways to escape that "meh" feeling and start finding your flow. This was originally posted on TED Talks Daily, where you'll find a new idea every weekday. Follow TED Talks Daily wherever you get your podcasts.

High Impact Leaders
Differences Between Generations and Style of Communication

High Impact Leaders

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 32:01


Generations in the Workplace.A client recently asked me to do some research on the differences between the generations in the workplace. Specifically, she wanted to know about the different styles of communication between different ages. I like to think of myself as a communication expert. Granted, those who work around me will likely argue with that diagnosis. However, I have to admit, some of the things I uncovered while doing this project really surprised me. So, I thought it might be a good idea to publish the results.This session will cover a few key items. First, we will identify the specific generations. We hear people using terms like Baby Boomers and Millennials, but what do those terms really mean? And do entire generations think similarly. Next, I'll show you the specific communication channels that each generation prefers. Interestingly, the communication channel preferences are pretty obvious when we look at the technology changes that occurred in each generation. Then finally, I'll point out the pros and cons of each type of communication.You might actually find that the channel preferred by a different generation is more efficient. In this episode, we cover what the four generations in the workplace are -- Baby Boomers, Generation X, Millennials, and Gen Z. We also cover the technology that was introduced during each generation's formative year that shape the channel of communication that each prefers. I'll give you a hint... Millennials and Gen Z are pretty much polar opposites in how they like to communicate.For full show notes, visit Differences Between Generations and Style of Communicationhttps://www.leadersinstitute.com/differences-between-generations-and-style-of-communication/

The Art of Love Podcast
Episode 519: How To Get Your Ex Girlfriend Back (If You Took Her For Granted)

The Art of Love Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 13:56


If you took your ex girlfriend for granted, full no contact won't work on her. It will push her further away. Dating/relationship expert Lucia explains how to do no contact properly when you a woman breaks up with you because you took her for granted.Get coaching!

Studio Sherpas
250: The Biggest Takeaways from Five Years of this Podcast

Studio Sherpas

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 44:47


Holy cow! This is episode 250 of the Grow Your Video Business podcast. Five years ago, my buddy Matt and I started this show to help video makers succeed as business owners. It's been an amazing journey. For today's special episode, I want to share the three biggest takeaways I've learned from hosting five years of this podcast. Key Takeaways Your core values are what give your business direction. They're how you structure your company and must be at the center of how you build your team. Having systems and structures in place for your business will allow you to stay on mission when the unexpected occurs. Why You and Your Business Need Core Values Identifying what you want to drive your business is critical. At my studio, knowing our core values has given me clarity on who I want on my team and what we are ultimately striving for.  Your core values should be at the center of how you build your team. When you begin hiring and firing according to our core values, it will find its way into your company culture. It will influence how you interact with clients and complete projects. It will make your job easier by giving you something to measure success against. Have a Vision and the Structure to Put it into Action Having core values is just the start. Part of success is being focused and clear on what you want as a business. Build a plan around that clarity that includes the accountability to get you there. But if you're the business' visionary, you'll likely have more ideas than can be practically put into action. I describe the EOS model and how it provides a framework for applying your business' ideas in practical and productive ways. Becoming the Master of Your Time One thing I've noticed since starting my business is that time moves quickly. The longer I've been a business owner, the more time I've wanted to free up for myself. I want more time with my family and to pursue the things I love.  To this end, I've done my best to make myself redundant at work. I want my business to run efficiently without me. That's why we've created packages and automated systems that allow me to step away from a lot of the responsibility of day-to-day operations. What have you learned by listening to this podcast? How do your core values impact your company? Leave a comment on the episode page! In This Episode: How this podcast and Studio Sherpas got their start [2:00] The importance of having core values [13:20] Having the structures in place to implement your vision [24:00] The importance of time management to create more freedom for yourself [29:00] Quotes “This has transformed my life and business. I've been able to interview people - to sit at the feet of so many incredibly smart and talented people.” [10:39] “Nail down some core values that you would be able to say are requirements for working here. Hire and fire by these core values.” [23:47] “You don't have to be the bottleneck in your business. There are other ways to build a business. Granted, you might be the most amazing, creative director that there is. That's awesome. And you can build on that and not always be the one on call.” [32:05] “I'm getting more used to this idea of delegating and hiring other people to do what they are an expert at. That is allowing me to stay in my zone of genius.” [40:47] Links: Core The E-Myth The Ideal Team Player by Patrick Lencioni Traction by Gino Wickman Additional Links: Check out the full show notes page Do you have something to share on this podcast? Fill out this form here. Be sure to take the Grow Your Video Business survey for a chance to win some incredible prizes (if we do say so ourselves!) Stay up to date with everything we're doing at Grow Your Video Business Tune in to our weekly Facebook Lives Follow Studio Sherpas on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram If you haven't already, we'd love it if you would take 1 minute to leave us a review on iTunes!

Bavarian Football Works: For Bayern Munich fans
Bavarian Podcast Works: Preview Show — Germany vs North Macedonia (World Cup Qualifiers)

Bavarian Football Works: For Bayern Munich fans

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 17:44


Germany are heading into their second game of the international break. This time, they'll be facing North Macedonia, who haven't exactly been easy opponents lately (the 2-1 loss comes to mind). Granted, they now have a coach who can actually make the right decisions and field the right players, but a lot hinges on the forwards being able to convert their chances. It is almost certain that Germany will go into this game pressing from the start, and we will so no dearth of Bayern players, with 8 players getting called up (with Neuer out, that leaves Flick with 7 top quality Bayern options). Let's hope Germany can continue with their winning streak. Here are the talking points: Remembering Germany's time under Loew and that sad loss to North Macedonia A look at the two teams: main options, threats, etc. Defensive options, and who will get the nod The Timo Werner situation, and who starts in attack Overall lineup and scoreline prediction Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Punky Power: An Unofficial Punky Brewster Podcast and Together, We're Gonna Find Our Way:  An Unofficial Silver spoons Podcas

Happy Full House Friday Everyone, Angela Bowen here, the host of Oh Mylanta Holy Chalupas: An Unofficial Full House Fuller House Podcast. Today I covered S4E6: A Pinch for a Pinch, which aired on October 26, 1990. In this episode, Jesse gives Michelle bad advice on how to handle a bully. Also Stephanie takes her horoscope reading a little to seriously as her predictions according to Madame Kimmy start to coincidently come true. Joey's breakfast of a candy apple comes back to bite him in a bad way after his filling is pulled out and he ends up having to get a root canal. GAH! Actually now that I think about it, Jesse's advice in both this episode and Nerd For A Day both backfire for Stephanie and Michelle. Stephanie gets a classmate's unrequited affections forced on her and Michelle lands in time out and is yanked out of school all thanks to Jesse. I have so many things to say about this classroom scene and how this teacher should have been reprimanding Aaron from the start. Granted this is just the beginning of the Jesse/Aaron Bailey antagonizing banter we all come to love as the series goes on. Aaron's jabs just keep cutting Jesse deeper and deeper and we ending laughing harder and harder. Here's the question I pose to you: If Joey had been the volunteer and this happened how do you think he would have handled it? Granted Jesse did go into this volunteer thing with a defeatist attitude of "I don't wanna be here, or actually have to do anything" and I think the kids just fed off his negative energy. But you've gotta admit this isn't as bad as when Jesse pulled out Nicky and Alex from preschool because they wouldn't kiss him goodbye and he decided they weren't ready when really he wasn't ready to let them go. Join me later this month when I cover in honor of Elias Harger's (Max Fuller)Birthday, Fuller House S5E14: Basic Training, which aired on June 2, 1990. In this episode, Max skips a grade and starts middle school. Ramona trains to defeat the reigning champ of a high-stakes sandwich-eating contest. Have a great weekend everyone! To EMAIL The Podcast Go To: omhcfhfhpodcast@gmail.com

Locked On Vikings - Daily Podcast On The Minnesota Vikings
Don't Take The Detroit Lions For Granted

Locked On Vikings - Daily Podcast On The Minnesota Vikings

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 27:42


On today's show, after a quick look at the injury report, we'll talk about the Detroit Lions. How do you analyze a team that is known for being generically bad? What can the Minnesota Vikings do to attack their various weaknesses? We know the Vikings should win, but how do they actualize that? Also, your bold predictions about the game. Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKED15,” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline AG There is only 1 place that has you covered and 1 place we trust. Betonline.ag! Sign up today for a free account at betonline.ag and use that promocode: LOCKEDON for your 50% welcome bonus. Rock Auto Amazing selection. Reliably low prices. All the parts your car will ever need. Visit RockAuto.com and tell them Locked On sent you. Follow the show: @LockedOnVikings Follow the host: @LukeBraunNFL Join the discord community: https://linktr.ee/LukeBraunNFL Submit Twitter Tuesday questions: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSc3mA_-Yke_oIwlZ5vOnIW_TK4d9gRwjmOB7YOLzeLLIz_-3w/viewform?usp=sf_link Sub on YouTube! https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCU9qwCJcClgWI0JNTezBLqQ Injury report: https://www.vikings.com/news/injury-report-week-5-detroit-lions Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Sovereign Man
How to become a billionaire… even if it takes 200 years

Sovereign Man

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 21:49


It's a simple question of arithmetic. Imagine you could go back in time to 1871 and ask one of your long lost ancestors to invest $2,500 for the benefit of future generations. That amount of money wasn't insignificant… but certainly not a major fortune; it would be worth roughly $50,000 in today's money. When placed in the right structure, and benefiting from compounding returns over the next 150 years, that $2,500 initial investment would be worth an astounding $1.4 BILLION today. Now, sadly none of us owns a time machine. But we do have the power to be that long lost ancestor to future generations. In other words, there's little stopping you from setting aside some savings in a long-term structure-- like a trust, or even a smart contract-- that could have an enormous impact on the future. $50,000 invested in the right structure today at, say, a 10% compounding return, will be worth $73 billion in 150 years. Granted we'll all most likely be long gone by then. And inflation will definitely have eaten up a large chunk of that return. But it's still going to be an enormous amount of money. And with the right planning, you have the power to decide, today, how that money will be spent and allocated in the future. If you wanted to, you could leave behind strict instructions (which are legally binding) to have the assets liquidated at a certain point in the future, and donated to your favorite charity. Or you could provide future trustees the discretion to make certain donations based on causes that are important to you today. The point is that it's possible to continue growing your wealth long after you're gone, and to still exercise significant control over how it can impact the world and future generations. This is the topic for today's Freedom Podcast, which you can listen to here.

Pick Up Your Cross | Bible Studies
Parables - Mud Moments And Grace For Granted

Pick Up Your Cross | Bible Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 26:18


Next Week's Reading Assignment: Reading Assignment: Luke Chp. 1-11Challenge: Mud MomentsWhat is one “mud moment” you are willing to share as a testimony of God's goodness? Write it down here in 3-5 sentences:ChallengeFORGIVE – Search your heart. Toward whom in your life have you been “wicked” with your hesitation to forgive? Ask God's help in seeing yourself and them as the Father sees you both.Scriptures For Memory Last Week:“See what great love the Father has lavished on us, that we should be called children of God! And that is what we are! The reason the world does not know us is that it did not know him.- 1 John 3:1“He fell on His face and prayed, “Lord, if it is possible, let this cup pass from me. Yet not my will, but Yours be done.”- Matthew 26:39 Discussion Questions “The Prodigal And The Wicked Servant” What stood out to you in the reading this week? Why?What is a “mud moment”? Do you have one you are willing to share? Jesus had a “mud moment”. Read Matthew 27:46, Psalm 22:1-2, Psalm 22: 21-23, and Psalm 22: 28-31 (4 passages). What is the purpose of a “mud moment” according to King David? Why is it significant that Jesus has had one too?What were your takeaways from the parable of the “Prodigal Son” (Luke 15:11-32)? Which son do you most often relate to? What is Jesus's message to you, personally with this story? Read Matthew 28:16-20. What is the significance of verse 19?What have you learned about God's Kingdom, Jesus, or Spirit-led prayer this week? Speaker - Alex VanHoutenNLC GreenbrierGet on our list! Txt @GBRMEN to 81010 to get bible study reminders and reading assignments!

Fancy Pants Gangsters
Ep. 628 – Not Really Loaded

Fancy Pants Gangsters

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 60:30


Granted, at our age, good beer hits harder than it used to. This week's location: Yoerg The post Ep. 628 – Not Really Loaded first appeared on Fancy Pants Gangsters.

ChinesePod - Intermediate
Upper-intermediate | Shanghai Expo

ChinesePod - Intermediate

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 18:55


Granted, you've heard all about the impending Olympic arrival here, but what about the next big thing? The Shanghai Expo seems to be what everyone is talking about – including you, if you listen. In this podcast, learn some information about the upcoming Shanghai Expo in Mandarin Chinese. Episode link: https://www.chinesepod.com/0332

Her Loyal Sons Podcast
HLS Rantcap: Notre Dame vs. Cincinnati

Her Loyal Sons Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 72:36


Quite frankly, having a final season of HLS at least one "WHAT THE HELL HAPPENED?!" loss seemed unlikely. Granted, Shane and I didn't expect to go through every possible aggravating story line: bad coaching decisions, QB controversy, stupid turnovers, and screaming at the subset of fans that see their Notre Dame ticket as an investment opportunity. This episode got us so heated that even the Homefield Apparel ad read wasn't spared a rant inclusion. We are red, mad, and nude online. Thank Christ this is an audio format. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/herloyalsons/message

EV News Daily - Electric Car Podcast
1231: Question Of The Week Answers and Patreon Thanks | 03 Oct 2021

EV News Daily - Electric Car Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 18:56


Show #1233 If you get any value from this podcast please consider supporting my work on Patreon. Plus all Patreon supporters get their own unique ad-free podcast feed. Good morning, good afternoon and good evening wherever you are in the world, welcome to EV News Daily for Sunday 3rd October. It's Martyn Lee here and I go through every EV story so you don't have to. Thank you to MYEV.com for helping make this show, they've built the first marketplace specifically for Electric Vehicles. It's a totally free marketplace that simplifies the buying and selling process, and help you learn about EVs along the way too. QUESTION OF THE WEEK WITH EMOBILITYNORWAY.COM RAJEEV NARAYAN I can't imagine going back to an ICE vehicle as my daily driver, that being said, I would agree with you, that if I had to, it would be due to the lack of charging infrastructure. Earlier in September I had to make an emergency trip due to a death in the family to Atlanta from San Antonio and back, for which we had to pull out our Honda Odyssey Minivan that has been sitting for 2 years. I would not have been able to do the trip with our 2 EVs. This is also the reason, for now, that I keep an ICE vehicle around. PHIL KEMP I find it hard to envision a case in which I'd get another ICE car. Just one comes to mind - if I was forced to live where my daughter does - a tiny town at the end of a long rough road and a vulnerable power line. Failing that, I'd NEVER revert. DAVID TRIMBLE Why give up On EVs?  For our family it's vehicle choice.  Here in the US there are no electric station wagons.  I need to replace my 2002 Mercedes wagon but with a dog an Electric SUV is not workable.  Older dogs cannot easily manage the high floor height in SUVs.  The other vehicle class not addressed is a small roadster.  I also have a Mazda Miata - I don't see anything on the horizon that will scratch that itch! Use our older Leaf for about 80% of our driving  but am painfully holding on for new offerings to replace our other cars! SCOTT BERGER I think studies showing that BEV drivers went back to ICE are confusing and sound erroneous because they are missing a key clarification. In other words, people/families with more than one car might buy an ICE car after owning EVs. That is my case. Since test driving an EV a few years back it was obvious my daily driver would never revert to a combustion car. I would like to know statistics for those with primary daily drivers that reverted. Those numbers I think would be vanishingly small. However, I'm a motoring enthusiast from a family of enthusiasts and there still remains no mainstream EV 1. sports car, 2. convertible. I'm also extremely passionate about manual transmissions for their engagement, which are hard to find in EVs. I recently bought a 4-seat BMW convertible with a turbocharged six-cylinder ICE engine. Both my siblings daily drive EVs but also own gas-burning manual sports cars. We might be an aberration, but I'm not so sure. So, yes, I technically have bought two ICE sports cars since going primarily EV, but the proportion of my driving on ICE is low since these gas-burners are niche cars used for nice days and weekend joyrides mostly. Once there's a viable, lightweight, sports car EV in convertible, I will strongly consider trading my BMW for such a vehicle. That said, my family will likely keep a few legacy ICE cars in perpetuity for occasional use. KARL CRAMER I imagine if I left electric it would be because of service. Some areas only have one dealership per make of car and if that one is bad you're out of luck for repairs because there aren't many independent garages that do electric. IAN WATKINS Just completed a 10 day holiday down to the Sth France, and we decided to drive and take our dog, including a overnight destination stop half way near Lyon down and Dijon on the way back. As a new ev owner of a iPace model year 20, I am a bit of a novice to the charging planner apps, so used a combination of A better route planner Plug Share Google Maps iPace navigation - rubbish ABRP failed to indicated a stop where we were relying on a 175kW charger was out of order ( the 1 and only) so had to use the 50Kw. Other times were sent down farm tracks to non existent chargers.... So on this basis, I would have loved to have my 500 mile range Diesal Volvo back just to get us down there, stress free with no range anxiety. Granted that was a 1 off, and not likely to do that trip again with the current 220 mile range limit on the i pace, maybe with a EV that had 350 miles and improved motorway infrastructure, which is coming and Ionity was the best and most expensive. PHILLIP OPRIE Price! I bought a third hand used 2013 Fiat 500e when I totaled my previous car. It's real world range (50 miles) just barely works for my daily commute, but doesn't allow for any route changes for errands. With the current price of a decent used EV and new ones having wait times getting longer and longer, I couldn't get another EV if something happens to my current car.  Thank you for the show. DAVID ALLEN 1)           My wife has suffered a blow to the head which has changed her personality such that she would divorce me if I didn't drive one. 2)           Someone has taken my cats/dog or both hostage. 3)           Little Timmy's kidney must get to the hospital and that's all that's available. 4)           Zombie hoards have cut me off from my EV, and that's my only choice of a escape (However, I will circle back and get it at first opportunity). 5)           I have fallen into an alternate dimension where Elon Musk is an evil coal baron. 6)           The LHC at CERN created Strange quarks in an experiment gone awry, and electrons no longer work (which also means I'll have to drive an old diesel). 7)           Jacob Rees-Mogg becomes Emperor Exxon I, and EVs are banned (though I will immediately join the rebellion). 8)           Legacy auto pays me ONE TRILLION DOLLARS! [insert evil laugh here]. Hey, let's be everyone has a price, but I ain't cheap. But then that will mean Model Y's for everyone, especially hardworking British EV podcasters with three-year olds who live in the South of England. ROBERT GRACE I don't ever want to drive ICE again, but I still do for various reasons.  If I had to pull a heavy trailer for a long distance--thousands of miles--I think that both the limited range and the trailer-adverse geometry of US charging stations would make that particular trip much easier with gasoline as an energy source. JEFF IN INDIANA As far as going back to an ICE car, I really can't think of a great reason at this point, aside from perhaps my preference of driving a manual transmission car, which obviously is irrelevant with an EV. But I do find that the regen paddle on my Bolt gives me SOME of that engagement back. My sister, however, did own an EV before me. Her husband and she bought an early Leaf. Unfortunately that also corresponded with one of the coldest winters we had had in recent years, with temperatures often hitting -20F that winter. The Leaf didn't cope well with that. She found that she was barely able to make it home from work, even with only using seat heaters and no heated air. After that, they traded in the Leaf for a Sentra. Today's EVs do much better with the cold, of course, but I have as yet not been able to convince them to give an EV another try. NEW QUESTION OF THE WEEK WITH EMOBILITYNORWAY.COM Back on Sunday 10th Oct! Email me your thoughts and I'll read them out on Sunday – hello@evnewsdaily.com It would mean a lot if you could take 2mins to leave a quick review on whichever platform you download the podcast. Come and say hi on Facebook, LinkedIn or Twitter just search EV News Daily, have a wonderful day, I'll catch you tomorrow and remember…there's no such thing as a self-charging hybrid. PREMIUM PARTNERS PHIL ROBERTS / ELECTRIC FUTURE BRAD CROSBY PORSCHE OF THE VILLAGE CINCINNATI AUDI CINCINNATI EAST VOLVO CARS CINCINNATI EAST NATIONAL CAR CHARGING ON THE US MAINLAND AND ALOHA CHARGE IN HAWAII DEREK REILLY FROM THE EV REVIEW IRELAND YOUTUBE CHANNEL RICHARD AT RSEV.CO.UK – FOR BUYING AND SELLING EVS IN THE UK EMOBILITYNORWAY.COM/ PARTNERS DAVID AND LISA ALLEN BOB BOOTHBY FROM MILLBROOK COTTAGES – 5* GOLD SELF CATERING COTTAGES DARIN MCLESKEY FROM DENOVO REAL ESTATE JUKKA KUKONEN FROM WWW.SHIFT2ELECTRIC.COM RAJEEV NARAYAN IAIN SEAR MICHAEL LUMBLEY EXECUTIVE PRODUCERS ADAM BREWTON ADRIAN BOND ALAN SHEDD ALEX BANAHENE ALEXANDER FRANK @ https://www.youtube.com/c/alexsuniverse42 ANDERS HOVE ANDREA JEFFERSON ANDREW GREEN ANDY NANCARROW AND LILIAN KASS ASEER KHALID BÅRD FJUKSTAD BLUNDERBUSS JONES BRIAN OLEARY BRIAN THOMPSON BRUCE BOHANNAN CHAD LANE CHARLES HALL CHRISTOPHER BARTH COLIN HENNESSY AND CAMBSEV CRAIG ROGERS DAVID FINCH DAVID PARTINGTON DAVID PRESCOTT DC EV DON MCALLISTER / SCREENCASTSONLINE.COM ED CORTEEN EDDIE RAGASA ERIC HANSEN ERU KYEYUNE-NYOMBI FREDRIK ROVIK GENE RUBIN HEINRICH LIESNER IAN GRIFFITHS IAN (WATTIE) WATKINS JACOB KUEHNE JACK OAKLEY JAMES STORR JIM MORRIS JOHN SCHROEDER JOHN VAN DEVOORT JON AKA BEARDY MCBEARDFACE FROM KENT EVS JON MANCHAK JUAN GONZALEZ KEVIN MEYERSON LAURENCE D ALLEN LEE BROWN LUKE CULLEY MARCEL WARD MARTY YOUNG  MIKE WINTER NATHAN GORE-BROWN NATHANIEL FREEDMAN NEIL E ROBERTS FROM SUSSEX EVS OHAD ASTON PAUL STEPHENSON PETE BREMY PETE GLASS PETE GORTON PETER & DEE ROBERTS FROM OXON EVS PHIL MOUCHET PHILIP TRAUTMAN RAYMOND ROWLEDGE RENE KEEMIK ROB FROM THE RSTHINKS EV CHANNEL ON YOUTUBE ROBERT GRACE RUPERT MITCHELL SEIKI PAYNE STEPHEN PENN STEVE JOHN THOMAS J. THIAS  TODD OAKES THE PLUGSEEKER'S EV YOUTUBE CHANNEL

The School of Copy and Messaging - Copywriting, Content Marketing, Messaging Entrepreneurs, Freelancers, VAs, & OBMs

Are you looking for a signature service? Or a unique way to work with nonprofits and for-profit organizations? Today's guest tells us all about what it's like to have grant writing as a signature service. Eliana Echavarria brings energetic, cool-girl vibes to the driest of topics- GRANT WRITING (enter the yawns)! As a grant writer and freelance coach for Christian entrepreneurs, Eliana teaches aspiring freelance grant writers how to launch and scale their business with a Kingdom-focused mentality through her podcast “Nothing for Granted.” Eliana is on fire for God and determined to raise her 4 littles to be the next generation of entrepreneurs by leading by example. Don't hang out with her too often- she'll have you believing you too can build a business where you don't have to compromise motherhood, marriage, travel, and a career you love!   Find Resources from today's episode HERE

ChinesePod - Intermediate
Intermediate | Shanghai Fashion

ChinesePod - Intermediate

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 16:46


Granted, the same person that said Shanghai was the “Paris of the East” also said that baijiu was a tasty drink…so we'll let you decide. Fashion, however, is on the lips of everyone in the area. If you find yourself anywhere in China, Shanghai's ascent into the ranks of a fashion capital will no doubt be a hot topic. In this podcast, learn to talk about fashion and appearance in Mandarin Chinese. Episode link: https://www.chinesepod.com/0116

Market to Market - Market Plus
Market Plus: Dan Hueber

Market to Market - Market Plus

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 0:10


Yeager: Welcome into the Friday, October 1, 2021 Market Plus. Ladies and gentlemen, I present Dan Hueber. Dan, on your drive, percentage of beans out? Hueber: I think we're probably in the 60% to 70% range from the north part of Illinois where I came out of to Des Moines. Granted, some spots were heavier worked into than others, but I was a little bit surprised it was that far along. Yeager: And beans? Oh did I ask beans first? Hueber: I hope you did because it's what I answered. Yeager: Okay, so corn.

Free Agent Lifestyle
THE COST OF A MAN'S COMMITMENT | Always Taken For Granted

Free Agent Lifestyle

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 136:53


THE COST OF A MAN'S COMMITMENT | Always Taken For Granted Coach Greg Adams YouTube Channel Free Agent Lifestyle YouTube Channel

Shark Theory
For Granted

Shark Theory

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 8:27


I've never really been into meditation in the traditional sense, but this morning I did a 5-minute meditation on the Peloton App and heard something that shaped my perspective on what we take for granted. In this episode, we'll discuss: Taking without giving Giving via Thought Where pain comes from Finding joy in times of adversity

Busted Halo Show w/Fr. Dave Dwyer
Why Are People Granted Dispensation to Marry Outside of the Church?

Busted Halo Show w/Fr. Dave Dwyer

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 10:32


In today's podcast, a listener named Tina who works with engaged couples wonders why certain people are granted dispensations to marry outside of a Catholic Church.

Motherhood in ADHD
E112: The #1 Reason Your Day Feels Chaotic and Out of Control as a Mom with ADHD

Motherhood in ADHD

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 17:05


Scatterbrained. Distracted. Overwhelmed. Drowning. No motivation. There's a framework for that! I know why your day feels so chaotic and out of control as a mom with ADHD because I am a mom with ADHD. We'll dive into the frequent ways our ADHD derails us. Then I have three words for you: TIME. MANAGEMENT. MASTERY. For a lot of moms, managing their time looks simple. But we're not like other moms - we're ADHD moms. I'm a mom who is determined to not let my ADHD brain control me. I set out and developed a framework that has helped me (and lots of other ADHD mamas) frame the beautiful life I am creating. Granted the pictures aren't always perfect...but let's just say, they absolutely ALWAYS have character. ;) As a mom living with ADHD you have tons of things to manage - kids' appointments, house things, work, relationships...etcetera...etcetera. Phew...Not to mention finding time to take care of your own health and well-being. Trying to find the time for it all can make you want to crawl back into bed and hide under the covers! When you're ready to emerge from the covers - all you have to do is sign up for Time Management Mastery and implement my simple framework to help you truly understand how you can manage your ADHD brain AND your time - to make them BOTH work for you. I want you to feel amazing about your schedule. I want you to be overjoyed when you reflect on your week and realize - you did SO MANY things that you wanted to do with your time! Today is the LAST DAY to sign up for Time Management Mastery in 2021. Sign up now because we start on Monday, October 4th! (Registrations closes TODAY Sept. 30th so don't "do it later"!) bit.ly/adhdframework **Bonus** All the mamas who join this round of TMM can sign up for Daily Planning for ADHD for $100 off! That's over 50% off. Bundle and save - because who doesn't love a twofer, right!? NOTE: I will NOT be offering Time Management Mastery again for the rest of the year. So grab it now, because it's seriously so good. :) Sign up today: bit.ly/adhdframework   Click here for transcription.

Young Nation Radio
I Almost Took Her For Granted

Young Nation Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 10:04


Cali Rashad shares his love and hate relationship on his special someone. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Calvary Baptist Church - Dundalk, Maryland
Dont Take Grace For Granted - Bro. Buettner

Calvary Baptist Church - Dundalk, Maryland

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 39:55


Message by Bro. Buettner Text: Romans 5 September 29, 2021 - 5 PM

Brilliant Perspectives
Prophetic Word - Expectation: The Power in Taking God for Granted

Brilliant Perspectives

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 30:45


Today I'm sharing Graham's prophetic word from our Live Online Challenge event last week, "Expectation: The Power in Taking God for Granted."This word had thought-provoking truths and powerful keys. It's actually one of my favorite words that Graham has given in a while.As you partake of this, I encourage you to listen with your heart, let it sink in to your spirit, and afterward, discuss the things that stood out to you with the Holy Spirit. He will help you uncover the meaning of its truths in your own life, and unpack the connotations and expectations present in this word.ALSO: Here's a link to the pdf transcript of this prophetic word, which includes space for your notes and Graham's "Seven Steps to Inherit These Promises" activation to help you use this word for yourself.––## STAY CONNECTED with Graham and Team Brilliant by signing up for our weekly newsletter "Brilliant News."  Every week it features Graham's podcasts, videos and articles. Plus FREE resources, upcoming sales and special offers, invitations to our challenges and special events, and more! When you sign up, we will send you a coupon for free shipping on your first order in our store.CLICK HERE TO SIGN UP!––Visit Graham's BLOGExplore his online community at BRILLIANT TVOr visit our STORE to browse Graham's books, downloads and audio teachings

Uncensored Christian
Taking It For Granted - Romans 11:23-27

Uncensored Christian

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 26:04


Is the grass really greener on the other side?  Or have we been fooled into thinking that life without God is good?  As we survey Paul's letter to Rome we can see that Israel took for granted the promise and status they were given as God's covenant partners.  We can fall prey to this same complacency if we are not careful. To find more "Uncensored Christian" content including Video versions of the podcast, Social Media links, and more use the Link down below!https://lnk.bio/dantewIf you would like to support this podcast financially you can give online by clicking here https://paypal.me/uchristianpod?locale.x=en_US . Your gift helps this podcast reach more people around the world!If you have questions or would like to reach out, email uchristianpod@gmail.comInstagram - https://www.instagram.com/dantebwill/Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/UChristianPodcast 

Chicks on the Right Podcast
Hour 3, 09-28-21: Hinckley Jr granted condition, National Guard being deployed to hospitals to help, and Rob Rant

Chicks on the Right Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 38:43


See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Bike Shed
310: Schedule Shut Down, Complete

The Bike Shed

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 39:16


Chris talks feature flags featuring Flipper (Say that 3x fast!), and Steph talks reducing stress by a) having a work shutdown ritual and b) the fact that thoughtbot is experimenting with half-day Fridays. (Fri-yay?) Flipper (https://featureflags.io/2016/04/08/flipper-a-feature-flipper-feature-toggle-library/) Drastically Reduce Stress with a Work Shutdown Ritual (https://www.calnewport.com/blog/2009/06/08/drastically-reduce-stress-with-a-work-shutdown-ritual/) Iceland's Journey to a Short Working Week (https://autonomy.work/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/ICELAND_4DW.pdf) Burnout: The Secret to Unlocking the Stress Cycle (https://www.burnoutbook.net/) Transcript: STEPH: Hey, do you know that we could have an in-person recording at the end of October? CHRIS: I do. Yes, I'm planning. That is in the back of my head. I guess I hadn't said that to you yet. But I'm glad that we have separately had the same conversation, and we've got to figure that out, although I don't know how to do noise cancellation and whatnot in the room. [laughs] How do we...we'll have to figure it out. Like, put a blanket in between us but so that we can see across it, but it absorbs sound in the middle. It's weird. I don't know how to do stuff. Just thinking out loud here. STEPH: We'll just be in the same place but still different rooms. So it'll feel no different. [laughter] Hello and welcome to another episode of The Bike Shed, a weekly podcast from your friends at thoughtbot about developing great software. I'm Steph Viccari. CHRIS: And I'm Chris Toomey. STEPH: And together, we're here to share a bit of what we've learned along the way. Hey, Chris, what's new in your world? CHRIS: Feature flags. Feature flags are an old favorite, but they have become new again in the application that I'm working on. We had a new feature that we were building out. But we assumed correctly that it would be nice to be able to break it apart into smaller pieces and sort of deliver it incrementally but not necessarily want to expose that to our end users. And so, we opted with that ticket to bring along the feature flag system. So we've introduced Flipper, in particular, which is a wonderful gem; it does the job. We're using the ActiveRecord adapter. All that kind of makes sense, happy about that. And so now we have feature flags. But it was one of those mindset shifts where the minute we got feature flags, I was like, yes, okay, everything behind a feature flag. And we've been leaning into that more and more, and it really is so nice and so freeing, and so absolutely loving it so far. STEPH: I'm intrigued. You said, "Everything behind a feature flag." Like, is it really everything or? Yeah, tell me more. CHRIS: Not everything. But at this point, we're still very early on in this application, so there are fundamental facets of the platform, different areas of what users can do. And so the actual stuff that works and is wired up is pretty minimal, but we want to have a little more surface area built out in the app for demo purposes, for conversations that are happening, et cetera. And so, we built out a bunch of new pages to represent functionality. And so there are sidebar links, and then the actual page itself, and routing, and all of the things that are associated with that, and so all of those have come in. I think there are five new top-level nav sections of the platform that are all introduced behind a feature flag right now. And then there's some new functionality within existing pages that we've put behind feature flags. So it's not truly every line of code, but it's basically the entry point to all new major features we're putting behind a feature flag. STEPH: Okay, cool. I'm curious. How are you finding that in terms of does it feel manageable? Do you feel like anybody can go into the UI and then turn on feature flags for demos and feel confident that they know what they're turning on and off? CHRIS: We haven't gotten to that self-serve place. At this point, the dev team is managing the feature flags. So on production, we have an internal group configured within Flipper. So we can say, "Ship this feature for all internal users so that we can do testing." So there is a handful of us that all have accounts on production. And then on staging, we have a couple of representative users that we've been just turning everything on for so that we know via staging we can act as that user and then see the application with all of the bells and whistles. Down the road, I think we're going to get more intentional with it, particularly the idea of a demo account. That's something that we want to lean into. And for that user, we'll probably be turning on certain subsets of the feature flags. I think we'll get a little more granular in how we think about that. For now, we're not as detailed in it, but I think that is something that we want to expand as we move forward. STEPH: Nice. Yeah, I was curious because feature flags came up in our recent retro with the client team because we've gotten to a point where our feature flags feel complex enough that it's becoming challenging and not just from the complexity of the feature flags but also from the UI perspective. Where it feels challenging for users to understand how to turn a feature on, exactly what that impacts, and making sure that then they're not changing developer-focused feature flags, so those are the feature flags that we're using to ship a change but then not turn it on until we're ready. It is user-facing, but it's something that should be managed more by developers as to when we turn it on or off. So I was curious to hear that's going for you because that's something that we are looking into. And funnily enough, you asked me recently, "Why aren't y'all using Flipper?" And I didn't have a great answer for you. And that question came up again where we looked at each other, and we're like, okay, we know there was a really good reason we didn't use Flipper when we first had this discussion. But none of us can remember, or at least the people in that conversation couldn't remember. So now we're asking ourselves the question of we've made it this far. Is it time to bring in Flipper or another service? Because we're getting to the point that we're starting to build too much of our own feature flag system. CHRIS: So did you uncover an answer, or are you all just agreeing that the question makes sense? STEPH: Agreeing that the question makes sense. [laughs] CHRIS: That's the first step on a long journey to switching from internal tooling to somebody else managing that for you. STEPH: Yeah, because none of us could remember exactly. But it was funny because I was like, am I just forgetting something here when you asked me that? So I felt validated that others were like, "Oh yeah, I remember that conversation. But I too can't recall why we didn't want to use Flipper in the moment or a similar service." CHRIS: I'll definitely be interested to hear if you do end up trying to migrate off to another system or find a different approach there or if you do stick with the current configuration that you have. Because those projects they're the sort of sneaky ones that it's like, oh, we've been actually relying on this for a while. It's a core part of our infrastructure, and how we do the work, and the process, and how we deploy. That's a lot. And so, to switch that out in-flight becomes really difficult. It's one of those things where the longer it goes on, the harder it is to make that change. But at some point, you sometimes make the decision to make it. So I will be very interested to hear if you do make that decision and then, if so, what that changeover process looks like. STEPH: Yeah, totally. I'll be sure to keep you up to date as we make any progress or decisions around feature flags. CHRIS: But yeah, your questions around management and communication of it that is a thing that's in the back of my mind. We're still early enough in our usage of it, and just broadly, how we're working, we haven't really felt that pain yet, but I expect it's coming very soon. And in particular, we have functionality now that is merged and is part of the codebase but isn't fully deployed or fully released rather. That's probably the correct word. We have not fully released this functionality, and we don't have a system right now for tracking that. So I'm thinking right now we're using Trello for product management. I'm thinking we want another column that is not entirely done but is tracking the feature flags that are currently in flight and just use that as a place to gather communication. Do we feel like this is ready? Let's dial this up to 50%, or let's enable it for this beta group or whatever it is to sort of be able to communicate that. And then ideally, also as a way to track these are the ones that are active right now. You know what? We feel like this one's ready. So do the code change so that we no longer use the feature flag, and then we can actually turn it off. Currently, I feel like I can defer that for a little while, but it is something that's in the back of my mind. And then, of course, I nerd sniped myself, and I was like, all right, how do I grep the codebase for all the feature flags that we're using? Okay. There are a couple of different patterns as to how we're using…You know what? I think I actually need an AST-based parser here, and I need to use the Visitor...You know what? Never mind. Stop it. Stop it. [laughs] It was one of those where I was like...I was doing this not during actual work hours. It was just a question in my mind, and then I started to poke at it. I was like, oh, this could be fun. And then I was like, no, no, no, stop it. You need to go read a book or something. Calm down. STEPH: As part of the optimization around our feature flag system that we've created, we've added a few enhancements, which I think is also one of the reasons we're starting to question how far we want to go in this direction. One of them is we want a very easy way to track what's turned on and what's turned off for an environment. So we have a task that will easily check, or it prints out a really nice list of these are all your flags, and this is the state that they're in. And by using the system that we have, we have one file that represents...well, you mentioned migration because we're migrating from the old system to this new one. So it's still a little bit in that space of where we haven't fully moved over. So now, moving over to a third thing like Flipper will be even more interesting because of that. But the current system, we have a file that lists all the feature flags and a really nice description that goes with it, which I know is supported by Flipper and other services as well. But having that one file does make it nice where you can just scan through there and see what's in use. I really think it's the UI and the challenges that the users are facing and understanding what a feature flag does, and which ones they should turn off, and which ones they shouldn't touch that that's the point where we started questioning okay, we need to improve the UI. But to improve the UI, do we really want to fully embrace our current system and make those improvements, or is now that time that we should consider moving to something else? Because Flipper already has a really nice UI. I think there is a free tier and a paid tier with Flipper, and the paid tier has a UI that ships. CHRIS: There's definitely a distinct thing, Flipper Cloud, which is their hosted enterprise-y solution, and that's the paid offering. But Flipper just the core gem there's also Flipper web, I want to say is what it is, or Flipper UI. And I think it's an engine that you mount within your Rails app and that displays a UI so that you can manage things, add groups and teams. So we're definitely using that. I've got my eye on Flipper Cloud, but I have some fundamental questions around I like to keep my data in the system, and so this is an external other thing. And what's the synchronization? I haven't really even looked into it like that. But I love that Flipper exists within our application. One of the niceties that Flipper Cloud does have is an audit history, which I think is interesting just to understand over time who changed what for what reasons? It's got the ability to roll back and maintain versions and whatnot. So there are some things in it that definitely look very interesting to me. But for now, the open-source, free version of Flipper plus Flipper UI has been plenty for us. STEPH: That's cool. I didn't know about the audit feature. CHRIS: Yeah. It definitely feels like one of those niceties to have for a more enterprise offering. So I could see myself talking me into it at some point but not quite yet. On that note though, so feature flags we introduced a week and a half, something like that, ago, and we've been leaning into them more and more. But as part of that, or in the back of my mind, I've wanted to go to continuous deployment. So we had our first official retro this week. The project is growing up. We're becoming a lot of things. We used retro to talk about continuous deployment, all of these things that feel very real. Just to highlight it, retro is super important. And the fact that we haven't had one until now is mainly because up till now, it's been primarily myself and another developer. So we've been having essentially one-on-ones but not a more formal retro that involves others. At this point, we now have myself and two other developers that are working on the project, as well as someone who's stepped into the role of product manager. So we now have communication collaboration. How are we doing the work? How are we shipping features and communicating about bugs and all of that? So now felt like the right time to start having that more formal process. So now, every two weeks, we're going to have a retro, and hopefully, through that, retro will do the magic that retro can do at its best which is help us get better at all the things that we're doing. But yeah, one of the core things in this particular one was talking about moving to continuous deployment. And so I am super excited to get there because I think, much like test-driven development, it's one of those situations where continuous deployment puts a lot of pressure on the development process. Everything that is being merged needs to be ready to go out into production. And honestly, I love that as a constraint because that will change how you build things. It means that you need to be a little more cautious. You can put something behind a feature flag to protect it. You decouple the idea of merging and deploying from releasing. And I like that distinction. I think that's a really meaningful distinction because it makes you think about what's the entry point to this feature within the codebase? And it's, I think, actually really nice to have fewer and more intentional entry points into various bits of functionality such that if you actually want to shut it off in production, you can do that. That's more straightforward. I think it encourages an intentional coupling, maybe not a perfect decoupling but an intentional coupling within the system. So I'm very excited to explore it. I think feature flags are going to be critical for it, and I think also observability, and monitoring, and logging, and all those things. We need to get really good at them so that if anything does go wrong when we just merge and deploy, we want to know if anything goes wrong as quickly as possible. But overall, I'm super excited about all of the other niceties that fall out of it. STEPH: [singing] I wanna know what's turned on, and I want you to show me. Is that the song you're singing to Flipper? [laughs] CHRIS: [laughs] STEPH: Sorry, friends. I just had to go there. CHRIS: That was just in your head. You had that, and you needed to get it out. I appreciate it. [laughter] Again, I got Flipper UI, so that's not the question I'm asking. I think that's the question you have in your heart. STEPH: [laughs] Mid-roll Ad And now we're going to take a quick break to tell you about today's sponsor, Orbit. Orbit is mission control for community builders. Orbit offers data analytics, reporting, and insights across all the places your community exists in a single location. Orbit's origins are in the open-source and developer relations communities. And that continues today with an active open-source culture in an accessible and documented API. With thousands of communities currently relying on Orbit, they are rapidly growing their engineering team. The company is entirely remote-first with team members around the world. You can work from home, from an Orbit outpost in San Francisco or Paris, or find yourself a coworking spot in your city. The tech stack of the main orbit app is Ruby on Rails with JavaScript on the front end. If you're looking for your next role with an empathetic product-driven team that prides itself on work-life balance, professional development, and giving back to the larger community, then consider checking out the Orbit careers page for more information. Bonus points if working in a Ruby codebase with a Ruby-oriented team gives you a lot of joy. Find out more at orbit.love/weloveruby. STEPH: That's funny about the CI deployment adding pressure to the development process because you're absolutely right. But I see it as such a positive and improvement that I don't really think about the pressure that it's adding. And I just think, yes, this is awesome, and I want this to happen and if there are steps that we have to take in that direction. It dawned on me that what you said is very true, but I've just never really thought about it from that perspective about the pressure. Because I think the thing that does add more pressure for me is figuring out what can I deploy, or do I need to cherry-pick commits? What does that look like? And going through that whole cycle and stress is more stressful to me than figuring out how do we get to continuous deployments and making sure that everything is in a safe space to be deployed? CHRIS: That's the dream. I'm going to see if I can live it. I'll let you know how it goes. But yeah, that's a bit of what's up in my world. What else is going on in your world other than some lovely singing? STEPH: Oh, there's always lots of singing. It's been an interesting week. It's been a mix of some hiring work. Specifically, we are helping our client team build their development team. So we have been helping them implement a hiring process. And then also going through technical interviews and then going through different stages of that interview process. And that's been really nice. I haven't done that specifically for a client team where I helped them build a hiring pipeline from scratch and then also conduct those interviews. And one thing that stood out to me is that rotations are really important to me and specifically that we don't ask for volunteers. So as we were having candidates come through and then they were ready to schedule an interview, then we are reaching out to the rest of the development team and saying, "Hey, we have this person. They're going to be scheduled at this time. Who's available? Who's interested? I'm looking for volunteers." And that puts pressure on people, especially someone that may be more empathetic to feel the need to volunteer. So then you can end up having more people volunteer than others. So we've established a rotation to make sure that doesn't happen, and people are assigned as it becomes their next turn to conduct an interview. So that's been a lot of fun to refine that process and essentially make it easier. So the rest of the development team doesn't have to think about the hiring. But it still has an easy way of just saying, "Hey," and tapping someone to say, "Hey, it's your turn to run an interview." The other thing I've been working out is figuring out how to measure an experiment. So we at thoughtbot are running an experiment where we're looking to address some of the concerns around sustainability and people feeling burned out. And so we have introduced half-day Fridays, more specifically 3.5 Fridays, as our half-day Fridays just to help everybody be certain about what a half-day looks like. And then also, you can choose your half-day. Everybody works different schedules. We're across different time zones, so just to make sure it's really clear for folks and that they understand that they don't need to work more than those hours, and then they should have that additional downtime. And that's been amazing. This is the second Friday of the experiment, and we're doing this for nine Fridays straight. And one of the questions that came up was, well, how do we know we did a good thing? How do we know that we helped people in terms of sustainability or addressing some of the feelings that they're having around burnout? And so I've collaborated with a couple of other thoughtboters to think through of a way to measure it. It turns out helping someone measure their wellness is incredibly complex. And so we went for a fairly simple approach where we're using an anonymous survey with a number of questions. And those questions aren't really meant to stand up to scientific scrutiny but more to figure out how the team is feeling at the time that they fill out the survey and then also to understand how the reduced weekly hours have impacted their schedule. And are people working extra hours to then accommodate the fact that we now have these half Fridays? So do you feel pressured that because you can't work a full day on Friday that you are now working an extra hour or two Monday through Thursday to accommodate that time off? So that survey just went out today. And one of the really interesting parts (I just haven't had to create content for a survey in a while.) was making sure that I'm not introducing leading questions or phrasing things in a very positive or negative light since that is a bias that then people will pick up on. So instead of saying, "I find it easy to focus at work," and then having like a multiple choice of true, always, never, that kind of thing, instead rephrasing the question to be, "Are you able to focus during work hours?" And then you have a scale there. Or instead of asking someone how much energy they have, maybe it's something like, "Do you experience fatigue during the day?" Or instead of asking someone, "Are you stressed at work?" because that can have a more negative connotation. It may lead someone to feel more negatively as they are assessing that question. Then you can say, "How do you feel when you're at work?" And then you can provide those answers of I'm stressed, slightly stressed, neutral, slightly relaxed, and relaxed. So it generated some interesting conversations around the importance of how we phrase questions and how we collect feedback. And I really enjoyed that process, and I'm really looking forward to seeing what folks have to say. And we're going to have three surveys total. So we have one that's early on in the experiment since we're only two Fridays in. We'll have one middle experiment survey go out, and then we'll have one at the end once we're done. And then hopefully, everybody's responses will then help us understand how the experiment went and then make a decision going forward. I'll be honest; I'm really hoping that this becomes a trend and something that we stick with. It is a professional goal of mine to slowly reduce the hours that I work each week or quickly; it doesn't have to be slowly. But I really like the four-day workweek. It's something that I haven't done, but I've been reading about it a fair amount lately. I feel like I've been seeing more studies conducted recently becoming published, and it's just very interesting to me. I had some similar concerns of how am I still going to be productive? My to-do list hasn't changed, but my hours are changing. So how am I still going to get everything done? And does it make sense for me to still get paid the same amount of money if I'm only working four out of the five days? And I had lots of questions around that, and the studies have been very enlightening and very positive in the outcome of a reduced workweek, not just for the individuals but for the companies as well. CHRIS: It's such an interesting space and exploration. The way that you're framing the survey sounds really great. It sounds like you're trying to be really intentional around the questions that you're asking and not being leading and whatnot. That said, it is one of the historically hard problems trying to quantify this and trying to actually boil it down. And there are so many different axes even that you're measuring on. Is it just increased employee happiness? Is it retention that you're talking about? Is it overall revenue? There are so many different things, and it's very tricky. I'm super interested to hear the results when you get those. So you're doing what sounds like more of a qualitative study like, how are you feeling? As opposed to a more quantitative sort of thing, is that right? STEPH: Yes, it's more in the realm of how are you feeling? And are you working extra hours, or are you truly taking the time off? CHRIS: Yeah, I think it's really hard to take something like this and try and get it into the quantitative space, even though like, oh yeah, if we could have a number, if it used to be two and now it's four, fantastic. We've doubled whatever that measure is. I don't know what the unit would be on this arbitrary number I made up. But again, that's the hard thing and probably not feasible at all. And so it makes sense the approach that you're taking. But it's super difficult. So I'm very interested to hear how that goes. More generally, the four-day workweek thing is such a nice idea. We should do that more. I'm trying to think how long I did that. So during the period that I was working freelance, I think there were probably at least five months where I did just a true four-day workweek. Fridays were my own. It was fantastic. Granted, I recorded the podcast with you. But that day was mine to shape as I wanted. And I found it was a really nice decompression period having that for a number of weeks in a row. And just getting to take care of personal stuff that I hadn't been and just having that extra little bit of space and time. And it really was wonderful. Now I'm working full five days a week, and my Fridays aren't even investment days, so I don't know what I'm doing over here. But I agree. I really like that idea, and I think it's a wonderful thing. And it's, I don't know, sort of the promise of this whole capitalism adventure we're supposed to go on, increasing productivity. And wasn't this the promise the whole time, everybody, so I am intrigued to see it being explored more, to see it being discussed. And what you're talking about of it's not just good for the employees, but it's also great for the companies. You're getting people that are more engaged on the days that they're working, which feels very true to me. Like, on a great day, I can do some amazing work. On a terrible day, I can do mediocre to bad work. It is totally possible for me to do something that is actively detrimental. Like, I introduce a bug that is going to impact a bunch of customers. And the remediation of that is going to take many more hours. That is totally a realistic thing. I think we often think of productivity in terms of are you at zero or some amount more than zero? But there is definitely another side of that. And so the cost of being not at your best is extremely high in my mind. And so anything we can do to improve that. STEPH: There's a recent study from a non-profit company called Autonomy that published some research called Going Public: Iceland's Journey to a Shorter Working Week. It's very interesting. And a number of people in my social circle have shared it. And that's one of the reasons that I came across it. And they commented in there that one of the reasons...I hope I'm getting this right, but we'll link to it in case I've gotten it a bit wrong. But one of the reasons that Iceland was interested or open to this idea of moving workers to a shorter workweek is because they were struggling with productivity and where people were working a lot of hours, but it still felt like their productivity was dropping. So then Autonomy ran this study to help figure out are there ways to improve productivity? Will shortening a workweek actually lead to higher productivity? And there was a statement in there that I really liked where it talks about the more hours that we work; we're actually lowering our per hour productivity which rings so true for me. Because I am one of those individuals where I'm very stubborn, and so if I'm stuck on something, I will put so many hours into trying to figure it out. But at some point, I have to just walk away, and if I do, I will solve it that much faster. But if I just try to use hours as my way to chip away at a problem, then that's not going to solve it. And my ability to solve that problem takes exponentially more time than if I had just walked away and then come back to the problem fresh and engaged. And some of the case studies I admired the way that they tackled the problem. They would essentially pay the company. So the company could reduce the hours for certain employees so then they could run the experiment. So if they reduced employees to say 32 hours but the company didn't actually want to stop working at 32 hours and they wanted to keep going, so then they brought in other people to work the remaining eight hours. Then as part of that study, they would pay the company to help them stay at their current level of productivity or current level of hours. This way, they could conduct the study. And I thought that was a really neat idea. I do have lots of questions still around the approach itself because it is how do you reduce your to-do list, essentially? So just because you dropped to a four-day workweek. So essentially, you have to just say less stuff gets done. Or, as these case studies promise, they're saying you're actually going to be more productive. So you will still continue to get a lot of your work done. I'm curious about that. I'd like to track my own productivity and see if I feel similarly. And then also, who is this for? Is this for everybody? Does everybody get to move to a four-day workweek? Is this for certain companies? Is it for certain jobs? Ideally, this is for everybody because there are so many health benefits to this, but I'm just intrigued as to who this is for, who it impacts, how can we make it available for everyone? And is the dream real that I can work four days a week and still feel as productive, if not more productive, and healthier, and happier as I do when working five days a week? Mid-roll Ad And now a quick break to hear from today's sponsor, Scout APM. Scout APM is leading-edge application performance monitoring that's designed to help Rails developers quickly find and fix performance issues without having to deal with the headache or overhead of enterprise platform feature bloat. With a developer-centric UI and tracing logic that ties bottlenecks to source code, you can quickly pinpoint and resolve those performance abnormalities like N+1 queries, slow database queries, memory bloat, and much more. Scout's real-time alerting and weekly digest emails let you rest easy knowing Scout's on watch and resolving performance issues before your customers ever see them. Scout has also launched its new error monitoring feature add-on for Python applications. Now you can connect your error reporting and application monitoring data on one platform. See for yourself why developers call Scout their best friend and try our error monitoring and APM free for 14 days; no credit card needed. And as an added-on bonus for Bike Shed listeners, Scout will donate $5 to the open-source project of your choice when you deploy. Learn more at scoutapm.com/bikeshed. That's scoutapm.com/bikeshed. CHRIS: I remember there was an extended period where working remote was this unique benefit that some organizations had. They had adopted that mode. They were async, and remote, and all of these wonderful things. And it became this really interesting selling point for those companies. Now the pandemic obviously pushed public opinion and everything on that in a pretty significant way such that it's a much more common thing. And so, as a result, I think it's less of a differentiator now. It used to be a way to help with recruiting. I wonder if there are organizations that are willing to take this, try it out, see that they are still close to as productive. But if it means that hiring is twice as easy, that is absolutely...especially if it is able to double your ability to hire, that is incredibly valuable or retention similarly. If you can increase retention or if you can make it easier to hire, the value of that is so, so high. And it's interesting in my mind because there's sort of a gold rush on that. That's only true for as long as a four-day workweek is a unique benefit of working at the organization. If this is actually the direction that everything's going and eventually everyone's going to settle to that, then if you wait too long to get there, then you're going to miss all the benefits. You're going to miss that particular benefit of it. And so I do wonder, would it be advantageous to organizations...I'm thinking about this now. Maybe this is the thing I have to do. But would it be advantageous to be that organization as early on as possible and try to get ahead of the curve and use that to hire more easily, retain more easily? Now that I say it all out loud, I'm sold. All right. I got to do this. STEPH: Yeah, I think that's a great comparison of where people are going to start to look for those types of benefits. And so, if you are one of the early adopters and you have the four-day workweek or a reduced workweek in general, then people will gravitate towards that benefit. And it's something that people can use to really help with hiring and retention. And yeah, I love it. You are CTO. So you have influence within your company that you could push for the four-day workweek if you think that's what you want to do. And I would be really intrigued to hear how that goes and how you feel if you...well, you've done it before where you've worked four days a week. So applying that to your current situation, how does that feel? CHRIS: Now you're actually holding me accountable to the things that I randomly said in passing. But it's interesting. So we're so early stage, and there's so much small work to do. There's all…oh, got to set up a website. We've got to do this. We've got to build that integration. There's just kind of scrambling to be done. And so there's a certain version in my mind that maybe we're in a period of time where additional hours are actually useful. There's a cost to them. Let's be clear about that. And so how long that will remain true, I'm not sure. I could see a point perhaps down the road where we achieve a little bit closer to steady-state maybe, who knows? It depends on how fast growth is and et cetera, a lot of other things. So I'm not sure that I would actually lead with this experiment myself, given where the organization is at right now. But I could see an organization that's at a little bit more of a steady-state, that's growing more incrementally, that is trying to think really hard about things like hiring and retention. If those were bigger questions in my mind, then I think I would be considering this more pointedly. But for now, I'm like, I kind of just got to do a bunch of stuff. And so my brain is telling me a different story, but it is interesting. I want to interrogate that and be like, brain, why is that the story you have there, huh? Huh? STEPH: I really appreciate what you're saying, though, because that makes sense to me. I understand when you are in that earlier stage, there's enough to do that that feels correct. Versus that added benefit of having a reduced workweek does benefit or could benefit larger companies who are looking to hire more heavily, or they're also concerned about retention or just helping their people address feelings of burnout. So I really appreciate that perspective because that also rings true. So along this whole conversation around wellness and how we can help people work more sustainable hours, there's a particular book that I've read that I've been really excited to share and chat with you about. It's called Burnout: The Secret to Unlocking the Stress Cycle. It's written by two sisters, Emily and Amelia Nagoski. And they really talk through the impact that stress has on us and then ways to work through that. And specifically, they talk about completing the stress cycle. And I found this incredibly useful for me because I have had weeks where I have just worked hard Monday through Friday. I've gotten to the end of my day Friday, and I'm like, great, I'm done. I've made it. I can just relax. And I walk away from work, and I can't relax. And I'm just like, I feel sick. I feel not good. Like, I thought I would walk away from work, and I would just suddenly feel this halo of relaxation, and everything would be wonderful. But instead, I just feel a bit ill, and I've never understood that until I was reading their book about completing the stress cycle. Have you ever had moments like that? CHRIS: It has definitely happened to me at various points, yes. STEPH: That makes me feel better because I haven't really chatted about this with someone. So until I read this book and I was like, oh, maybe this is a thing, and it's not just me, and this is something that people are experiencing. So to speak more about completing the stress cycle, they really highlight that stress and feelings, capital F feelings, can cause physiological symptoms. And so it's not just something that we are mentally processing, but we are physically processing the stress that we feel. And there's a really big difference between stressors and stress. So a stressor could be something like an unmeetable deadline. It could be family. It could be money concerns. It could be your morning commute, anything that increases your stress level. And during that, there's a very physical process that happens to your body anytime there's a perceived threat. And it's really helpful to us because it's frankly what triggers our fight, flight, or freeze response. And our bodies receive a rush of adrenaline and cortisol, which essentially, if we're using that flight response, that's going to help us run. And a number of the processes in our system will essentially go into a state of hibernation because everything in our body is very focused on helping us run or do the thing that we think is going to save our life in that moment. The problem is our body doesn't know the difference between what's more of a mental threat versus what is a truly physical threat. So this is the difference between your stress and your stressors. So in more of a physical threat, if there's a lion that you are running from, that is the stressor, but then the stress is everything that you still feel after you have run from that lion. So you encounter a lion, you run. You make it back to your group of people where you are safe, and you celebrate, and you dance, and you hug. And that is completing the stress cycle because you are essentially processing all of that stress. And you are telling your body in a body-focused language that I am safe now, and everything is fine. So you can move back, and anything that was in a hibernation state, all of that dump of adrenaline and cortisol can be worked out of your system, and everything can go back to a normal state. Most of us aren't encountering lions, but we do encounter jerks in meetings or really stressful commutes. And whenever we have survived that meeting, or we've gotten through our commute to the other side, we don't have that moment of celebration where we really let our body know that hey, we've made it through that moment of stress, and we are away from that stressor, and we can actually process everything. So if you're interested in this, the book's really great. It talks about ways that you can process that stress and how important it is to do so. Otherwise, it will literally build up in your system, and it can make you sick. And it will manifest in ways that will let us know that we haven't dealt with that stress. And one of the top methods that they recommend is exercise and movement. That's a really great way to let your body know that you are no longer in an unsafe state, and your body can start to relax. There's also a lot of other great ways. Art is a really big one. It could be hugging someone. It could be calling someone that you love. There are a number of ways that you can process it. But I hadn't recognized how important it is that once you have removed yourself from a stressor, that doesn't necessarily just mean you're done, and you can relax. You actually have to go through that physical process, and then you can relax. So I started incorporating that more into my day that when I'm done with work, I always find something to do, and it's typically to go for a walk, or it's go for a run. And I have found that now I really haven't felt that ill-feeling where I'm trying to relax, but I just feel sick. Saying that out loud, I feel like I'm a mess on Fridays. [chuckles] CHRIS: I feel like you're human. It was interesting when you asked the question at the beginning. You were like, "Is this a thing that other people experience?" And my answer was certainly, yes; I have experienced this. I think there's something about me that I think is useful where I don't think I'm special at all on any axis whatsoever. And so whenever there's something that's going on, I'm like, I assume that this is just normal human behavior, which is useful because most of the time it is. And this is the sort of thing where if I'm having a negative experience, I will look to the external world to be like, I'm sure other people have experienced this, and let me pull that in. And I've found that really useful for myself to just be like, I'm not special. There's nothing particularly special about me. So let me go look from the entirety of the internet where people have almost certainly talked about this. And I've not read the book that you're describing here, but it does sound like it does a great job of describing this. There is a blog post that I found that has stayed in the back of my mind and informed a little bit of my day-to-day approach to this sort of thing which is a blog post by Cal Newport, who I think at this point we've mentioned him a handful of times on the show. But the title of the post is Drastically Reduce Stress with a Work Shutdown Ritual. And it's this very interesting little post where he talks about at the end of your day; you want to close the book on it. I think this is especially pointed now that many of us are working from home. For me, this is a new thing. And so, I've been very intentional with trying to put walks at the beginning and end of my day. But in this particular blog post, he describes a routine that he does where he tidies things up and makes his list for the next day. And then he has a particular phrase that he says, which is "schedule shut down, complete." And it's a sort of nonsense phrase. It doesn't even quite make sense grammatically, but it's his phrase that he internalized, and somehow this became his almost mantra for the end of the day. And now when he does it, that's like his all right, okay, turned off the brain, and now I can walk away. I know that I've said the phrase, and I only say the phrase when I have properly set things up. And so it's this weird structure that he's built in his mind. But it totally works to quiet those voices that are like, yeah, but what about…Do we think about…Do we complete…And he's got now this magic phrase that he can say. And so I've really loved that. For myself, I haven't gotten quite to that level, but I've definitely built the here's how I wind down at the end of the day. Here's what I do with lists and what I do so that I can ideally walk away comfortably. Again, this is one of those situations where I sound like I know what I'm doing or have my act together. This is aspirational me. Day-to-day me is a hot mess like everybody else. [laughs] And this is just what I...when I do this, I feel better. Most of the time, I don't do this because I forget it, or because I'm busy, or because I'm stressed, [chuckles], and so I don't do the thing that reduces stress, you know, human stuff. But I really enjoyed that post. STEPH: I haven't heard that one. I like a lot of Cal Newport's work, but I haven't read that particular blog post. Yeah, I think the idea of completing the stress cycle has helped me tremendously because by giving it a name like completing the stress cycle has been really helpful for me because working out is important to me. It's something that I enjoy, but it's also one of those things that's easy to get bumped. It is part of my wellness routine. And so, if I'm really busy, then I will bump it from the list. And then it's something that then doesn't get addressed. But recognizing that this is also important to my productivity, not to just this general idea of wellness, has really helped me recenter how important this is and to make sure that I recognize hey, it's been a stressful day. I need to get up and move. That is a very important part of my day. It is not just part of an exercise routine, but this is something that I need to do to close out my day to then make sure I have a great day tomorrow. So bringing it back, it's been a week that's been filled with a lot of discussions around burnout and then ways that we can measure it and then also address it. And I've really enjoyed reading this book. So I'll be sure to drop a link in the show notes. On that note, shall we wrap up? CHRIS: Schedule shut down, complete. The show notes for this episode can be found at bikeshed.fm. STEPH: This show is produced and edited by Mandy Moore. CHRIS: If you enjoyed listening, one really easy way to support the show is to leave us a quick rating or even a review in iTunes, as it really helps other folks find the show. STEPH: If you have any feedback for this or any of our other episodes, you can reach us at @_bikeshed or reach me on Twitter @SViccari. CHRIS: And I'm @christoomey STEPH: Or you can reach us at hosts@bikeshed.fm via email. CHRIS: Thanks so much for listening to The Bike Shed, and we'll see you next week. All: Byeeeeeeeeeee!!! Announcer: This podcast was brought to you by thoughtbot. thoughtbot is your expert design and development partner. Let's make your product and team a success.

RAD Radio
Rob's Soapbox - Labradors Are Enablers

RAD Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2021 6:52


In my first 44 years of life, I never understood people who loved Labrador Retrievers…for starters, they're the basic bitch dog, everyone has one, especially black labs.Plus, they're dumb. Studies say that they are smart, but they're not. They walk into walls, forget your commands, and constantly do the opposite of what they're told. Hunters tell me that they're great at doing their job of retrieving, most notably ducks, but that's a pretty narrow field of expertise that don't impress me much.And then came Scout.Well, technically first came, my wife Christina, who happened to have a black lab named Scout. At the time we met, the irony was palpable; my German Shepherd, Shep, had passed away and my newest, Maestro, wasn't born yet so I had only Nellie, my all-white GSD. So here we were…me, white as snow, with my white dog, and my now wife, Christina, milk chocolate “black” with her lab. White guy, white dog, black chick, black dog. Get it?Anywho…I stole Scout from her. More accurately, he stole me. From the moment I met him, all of my rigid dog rules went out the window. I didn't care that he got up onto the sofa or the bed and I certainly understood why he got random treats throughout the day like bacon, potato chips, and steak for no reason. There was a reason…he was Scout.Meanwhile, poor Maestro was in boot camp and on lockdown, being taught that there is only one way to be a dog, and that is the hardcore German Shepherd way. Fortunately for him, Christina agreed to marry me and she labbed-up my Shepherd. He's the most lovable, adorable 105-pound killing machine I've ever met, and that's all on her (the lovable part…I made him a killing machine…well, me and Hitler).For the first year of our relationship, Christina and I lived 1700 miles apart; her in Dallas, me in Sacramento. We would visit each other whenever we could, and to be completely candid, I'm not sure if I was more excited to see her or Scout…okay, that's a little ridiculous, but that damn dog was probably the reason I asked her to marry me…I wasn't letting him go.Ok, ok, ok…I love my wife more than anything and I'd kill anyone who even came close to looking at her sideways…but still, I love that dog. Over the past 6 years, Scout has taught me to loosen up, break the rules, and embrace being lazy. As I type this, he is asleep on the guest room bed, where he has been for hours, since I took a nap there after coming home from the grocery store. I was up before the sun, fed the dogs, went to the store, and came home exhausted (or with mono, I'm not sure yet) so I plopped my ass into our guest room bed and took a nap…and guess who joined me? Yup…Scout the lab. He's still there, even though I left hours ago…well, that's not technically true…I was just there 20 minutes ago and an hour ago for only one reason; he's there. Who can resist a slumbering Labrador and his 90 pounds of dead weight just begging you to manipulate him into your arms? Only a psycho, that's who.And that's the point…I have so much to do, yet all I can think about is curling up in that bed with that damn Labrador in my arms. He's an enabler! And he's relentless…he stays there, happy and comfortable, daring me to join him, knowing that I am the one losing if I don't. What kind of madness is this?!?!?By the way, he's not dumb at all; he's actually the ultimate manipulator. He runs this house, and we all know it, including Maestro. Scout knows his commands, he just chooses when to obey them, and of course, when people come over he's the most loving, perfect dog ever…more manipulation. Everyone loves the little asshole.Granted, some of this is somewhat melancholy as we've had a rough week and a half with our boy, starting with a massive vomit-fest of blood late Thursday night a week ago. So, yes, if you thought my birthday show on 9/17 sucked, it was my fault, I hadn't slept and I thought my wife's Labrador was dying…I mean, puking blood is kinda serious.Fortunately, $1200 and a night later we knew absolutely nothing! How fun…no causes found, just take him home and care for him, which we did. 10 days later, he's turned the corner and is back to himself; lazy, lovable, fat and perpetually hungry. Just the way we want him. I don't think I ever seriously thought we were losing him, but God knows I was gearing up for the worst pain of my wife's life and how I would manage it. Trust me, she'll be far more sad the day Scout leaves the earth than the day I die…and she should be, that dog is one of a kind, and everyone who meets him knows it.With that, I feel I've earned some Scout time…he's still on the bed, waiting for me…I can't let him down, so off I go to the land of a loving Labrador, who doesn't care about anything other than the fact that I am warm and know how to cuddle.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

In Your Right Mind with Monique Rhodes

There is so much we take for granted. It's powerful when we stop and realise this.

MSUM Dragons Podcasts
Sarah Petrbok isn't taking anything for granted

MSUM Dragons Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021


One of the biggest themes I've heard from our Dragons this year after losing seasons in the last 2 years because of COVID…is making sure not to take this year, this season, each game…for granted.  They all saw that the opportunity to compete is not promised and could be ripped away at a moments notice.  But this isn't new for athletes who have suffered a severe injury.  Someone who has experience both for the Dragons Volleyball team is Sarah Petrbok who joins us to day to share her outlook how she plans to make the most of every opportunity…and based on how busy her schedule is…this isn't lip service folks…real deal…right here…RIGHT NOW!

James Sturtevant Hacking Engagement
154 Virtual Instruction Spinoffs...Starring Ethan Miller

James Sturtevant Hacking Engagement

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 34:32


One of my passions since the semi-return to normal instruction in hopefully the receding wake of COVID, is to retain successful aspects of virtual instruction and then to include them in-person instruction. I've heard a lot of students and instructors say, “I never want to be on another Zoom call again.” Well, that's not realistic. There were aspects of virtual instruction that facilitated learning. We need to keep those. In this episode, four powerful virtual tactics will be explored. Granted, each of these ideas is much older than the pandemic and had been utilized extensively in in-person instruction, but they were particularly well-suited to virtual instruction and they should absolutely be included now in face-to-face learning. Here are the four tactics:the use of a virtual interactive syllabuspopulating the virtual syllabus with highly interactive HyperDocsincorporating higher level thinking promptsutilizing landing pads where students can submit work and then collaborateTo help me explore these ideas, I conscripted Ethan Miller—a primary source. Ethan is an education major at Muskingum University. He's been in a class I taught in-person and one that I taught virtually. He's passionate about how much better in-person instruction is, but he's coming around to virtual learning's potential. He's the perfect guest for this episode and he's going to be a magnificent teacher.

Reflections on Ziyarat Ashura - Mizan Institute
23. I Ask That Allah Grants Me the Greatest Reward He Has Granted Anyone Upon Whom a Tragedy Has Befallen

Reflections on Ziyarat Ashura - Mizan Institute

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 12:48


RN Drive - Separate stories podcast
Nadesalingam family granted 12 month visas but future uncertain

RN Drive - Separate stories podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 6:17


A surprising turn of events for the Nadesalingam tamil asylum seeker family today with the Immigration Minister Alex Hawke granting 12 month bridging visas.

Think About It
Take It For Granted

Think About It

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 13:14


#Winsday!

The Truth Quest Podcast
Ep. 166 - The Truth About Tyranny

The Truth Quest Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 24:33


Unlike the previous episode, If I Were the Devil, this episode is less about how to destroy America and more about how the totalitarians and tyrants get away with their destructive policies. We examine "the fear factor", the safety of the mob, and the mindset of these control freaks; in particular, how they view those of us who love freedom and liberty. Just between you and me: the dirty little secret is, all of these totalitarian politicians are cowards who stumbled into a gold mine of power and control. They are unwilling to breach their contract with the devil which keeps them in their position of power. The sad part is they are supported by an army of ill-informed, weak-kneed sheep. Granted, most of the sheep are victims of, what amounts to, psychological warfare in the form of propaganda, lies and manipulation by their chosen news outlets, however, others are perfectly willing to go along for their own sadistic reasons. I rely heavily on Brandon Smith's article entitled, Why Do Some People Support Tyranny While Others Defy It? Show Notes Why Some People Support Tyranny While Others Defy It Truth Quest Podcast Episode #87 - The Truth About Secession - Part I Episode #88 - The Truth About Secession - Part II Episode #103 - The Truth About Political Blasphemy and Heresy Episode #128 - The Truth About Opposition to Secession Episode #136 – The Truth About Politically-Induced Mental Illness Episode #165 – If I Were the Devil The Truth Quest Podcast Patron Page Join the conversation at The Truth Quest Facebook Fan Page Order a copy of one of my books, Pritical Thinking, The Proverbs Project, The Termite Effect. The video of this episode is available on Rumble, BitChute and Brighteon. Check out short highlight videos of each episode on Instagram.

PowerFall Project
Top 5 Things we take for GRANTED ! Episode: 60 + Cheese Curds & OnlyFans

PowerFall Project

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 103:48


Welcome to the PowerFall Project!We are known for our TOP 5 lists!  We discuss everything from top 5 movies, athletes, cars and sometimes venture into hypothetical lists such as top 5 things we'd want for the zombie apocalypse.A handsome, mild mannered, ex motocross, former fitness coach and media production entrepreneur...Nick Powers!A goof ball, former athlete, coach and serial entrepreneur...Addy Drip DaddyThis week: Top 5 Things we take for granted!!Last week:  Podcast collab!Next week:  Top 5 People we'd like to throat punch! Also Discussed:  Cheese curds and beer, sturdy Wisconsin folk, Addy's European Tour, Southern Hospitality, 9/11, Bill Cosby, Addy's OnlyFans, whats your price and rapid fire questions.  If you have an idea for a list you would like us to discuss, send us a message!Be sure to follow us on Instagram!>>> PowerFallProject

Sixteen:Nine
David Labuskes, AVIXA

Sixteen:Nine

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 36:32


The 16:9 PODCAST IS SPONSORED BY SCREENFEED – DIGITAL SIGNAGE CONTENT There is a whole pile of back seat driving happening lately in the pro AV and digital signage communities about how to run a trade show in the COVID-19 era, and much of the focus has squarely been on Dave Labuskes, the CEO of AVIXA, which runs InfoComm and co-owns the even larger trade show ISE. The show is happening in about a month in Orlando, and with other big trade shows saying never mind for 2021, there are endless questions and suggestions about the prospects of the show even happening. It will, says Labuskes, unless there are measures like government-mandated closures. Given that the show is in Florida, that's probably not going to happen. Labuskes has done some frank interviews lately that went into deep detail about InfoComm and COVID, and the business. I spoke with Labuskes late last week and did not see the value in rehashing and revisiting a lot of what he said, so in our chat we talk a little about how things will come off and why. But we spend a lot more time on bigger picture stuff about how trade shows fit, and whether a niche industry like digital signage can find a well-defined home and community at big, omni AV shows like Infocomm and ISE. Subscribe to this podcast: iTunes * Google Play * RSS TRANSCRIPT Mr Labuskes, thank you for joining me. I wanted to get into a number of things, but I also didn't want to just rehash some recent conversations you had in an hour long interview last week with Tim Albright from AVnation that went into a lot of frank discussion about where InfoComm is at and everything associated with that, but I can't cCompletely ignore that, and I just wanted to ask, where are things now , has anything changed in the last week since I watched that interview?  Dave Labuskes: Mr. Haynes, it's good to be here. There have been a couple of other events that have announced cancellations, but there's been nothing that's changed in AVIXA's policy with regards to InfoComm. We still see a runway to a fantastic event with fantastic people conducting fantastic business. It's been described as being the last trade show standing this fall, but that's not really true. There's all kinds of events going on here, there, and everywhere.  Dave Labuskes: Yeah. There's a lot that's described that isn't necessarily really true, David. But yeah there's events and trade shows happening every day, all around the world, and I'm actually a little confused. For an industry that is really based on overcoming challenges and doing the impossible and making things happen that nobody believed could actually happen, there is that sort of a sentiment that trade shows can't take place right now and that just simply is not true. They're taking place every day.  So I have mixed opinions personally. I was supposed to be doing a mixer down at InfoComm and decided not to do that, and that wasn't really so much about I don't think InfoComm should even happen or anything else, it was just as simply a fact of, I didn't quite see how a cocktail party, where everybody was wearing a mask and being asked to stand six feet apart would work terribly well and the optics were weird.  It's one of those things where I could see a trade show happening, but I didn't see that happening well, and we don't need to get into all of that. I'm curious more about whether or not you're enjoying all the armchair opinions from people who say what you should be doing, but have never actually run a tradeshow?  Dave Labuskes: Before I had this job, I was a partner at a large architectural engineering firm, and one of the gentlemen that was on the search committee that was interviewing me for this job, James Ford, owner of Ford AV and I'll never forget where he was sitting in the boardroom, he leaned forward and said, “Dave, you've got a really good gig, like why would you want this job?” And I'm like that's a great question, and I try to answer it, and he's like, “But Dave, here's the thing: You're running one of the largest consulting practices in the world and if you have a management meeting and you decide to go liveleft, then everybody's going to leave that meeting and they're going to go left, and the jobs that you're interviewing for you and your team are going to decide to go left, and then 50,000 people are going to tell you, you should go right!” I actually celebrate varied opinions. I do think a lot of people express an expertise that is perhaps inflated in their own perception. Trade shows, they're a complicated industry. I've been doing this now for eight years and I have people on my team that have forgotten twice what I'll ever know. The interplay between the various different constraints, the challenges that people throw out there as though they're simple challenges. Yeah, they're a little frustrating, but I signed up for it. Nobody made me do this job. I was forewarned, so maybe I'm the one that has an exaggerated impression of my expertise. Is part of the problem just simply that it's Florida and Florida is this eternally weird place at the best of times, but it's got a particular problem and people all the way up to the governor of the state who don't seem to recognize that, “Hey, maybe there's a bit of a problem happening here.”? Dave Labuskes: Yeah. I think I'll be a little more politically correct than that, and it was nice for you to try it, but it isn't my first rodeo here.  (Laughter) I wasn't trying to bait you. I just think that's a big part of it and the people, the armchair opinion makers who say why don't you just move it or why didn't you just do it in another city? There's a little bit of baggage associated with doing that but just simply speaking, it's a part of the country that has a particular exacerbated problem, but doesn't seem to want to recognize that it has an exacerbated problem. Dave Labuskes: It all comes from the jurisdictions and it all comes down to point of reference, right? You can also just say, is it the problem that the event is in the United States, right? Because if you look at the United States and compare the United States to other countries, we're not necessarily getting a straight-A report card. What I have said, and I know we don't want to have the same conversation I've had already with others, is that I don't think the brush that should be used in making that decision is Florida. I think the brush that we should use in painting that picture is Orange County. There's parts of California that may or may not be behaving in the same fashion you or I would do. So I think you have to look at where are you going to fly into, where you're going to be, where are you going to have dinner, where are you going to sleep? Those types of things, and when you get to that stage orange county this morning had 79.4% of their population over the age 18 having had one shot of the vaccine. They've got a mask order that was issued by the mayor strongly recommending that masks be worn inside any public space. They've got plummeting hospitalization rates, death rates, positivity rates at 12.4%, I believe.  So, I think, unfortunately the world and this country and all of the states have this polarization thing going on, and yeah, would it be more comfortable for people to attend an event somewhere else that are looking from afar and don't take time to do all that research? Probably. The headline, the abbreviated picture, is challenging, but I do think that there are people that are going to make a decision that attending a trade show weighed against other factors just isn't for them this year, and I think they'd make that decision regardless of where it is.  Yeah. I guess that's the other thing that you didn't know you were signing up for was having an extensive ability to talk in genealogical terms. Dave Labuskes: This is a true story, David. Last year, I came home from the office, and at dinner I said to my wife and son I spent an hour today reading a scientific study about the efficacy of washing your hands with cold water versus hot water, and that is not something I ever anticipated taking place in my career, I will admit that. (Laughter) By the way, it is just as good. You just don't tend to wash them as long because it's less comfortable, but...  I'm just impressed I was able to say epidemiology.  Dave Labuskes: Happy with that. These are words that were not part of our vocabulary two years ago, right?  Just drafting off of some of that: CEDIA which AVIXA has a relationship with because you co-own ISC had their event last week or the week before in Indianapolis and I won't go into how that went business-wise or anything else, but I'm curious if you had AVIXA folks there and did they see how things were done? I know they had signage and kind of cues on whether you are comfortable with people coming close and all that sort of stuff. Did those things work?  Were there things that you learned from that you can take away and apply to InfoComm?  Dave Labuskes: First part of the question: No, we didn't have anybody from AVIXA at that event that I'm aware of. Not that I know of, but I'm sure there were people there that were AVIXA members. We do have a close relationship with CEDIA. Obviously we have a partnership over a very large joint venture that owns and operates ISC and ISR and DSS. The show itself is owned by Emerald Expositions, and we have our conversational talking relationship with Emerald as well. In fact I have a call next week with Emerald to talk through lessons learned.  I was in Louisville, Kentucky a couple of weeks ago at a SISO conference, which is the Society of Independent Show Operators. So it's Emerald, Informa, and mostly the for-profit trade show organizers and AVIXA was invited to attend. The industry of trade show organizers and meeting planners and event planners, we've joined arms and we recognize that this is a problem for all of us that we have to share best practices with, we have to share learnings with, we have to talk about what works and doesn't work. It's kinda like the AV industry and as I'm learning more about it, the digital signage industry where people compete, but they also have a comradery where a rising tide lifts all ships kind of a thing, and so I think all trade show operators are working through this, associations as well are famously collaborating with regards to sharing information and learning and helping each other. So that's a good part of the pandemic.  I would imagine one of the things that all these organizations collectively learned, if they didn't already know it, is that the whole virtual trade show thing just really doesn't work. Does it? Dave Labuskes: It certainly didn't work in v1.0 of 2020. I think v1.5, and we're starting to get closer to 2.0, I think there's hope for it. The best visual I saw over the last 18 months is talking about books versus movies, and you don't convert a book to a movie by putting it on a podium and filming somebody turning the pages. And I think that probably is a closely apt description of what we all did with our first version of the virtual events. But I think you can tell a story, very effectively in print or in film, leveraging and celebrating the differences of the media.  Where I am at now and where AVIXA is driving towards, and you'll see more developments about this in the next couple months is more about how AVIXA delivers on its mission, leveraging physical  events and digital platforms, and how do they interface and interact with each other? How do they mutually benefit each other? What's good in one, that's not good in the other? Not a lot of good, special effects when you're reading a book, but a lot of great imagination when you're reading a book. Not a lot of ability to be character development through introspection in a movie, but it's really easy to do that when you're reading. I think if you look at education, you look at delivery of information from provider to consumer, that can be done pretty effectively digitally. I think about human interaction and the break time during class is almost impossible to create digitally. That doesn't mean it is impossible. So I see a lot of assumptions that we made in order to achieve X, we needed to convene people face-to-face being challenged. But I also think that all of the pundits that got online in March and April of last year and said, this is the end of face-to-face, and we're going to be digital for the rest of our lives, have seen that they were probably not right with that either.  I think the one thing that I took away, or what I have enjoyed about these virtual events is the ability to attend round tables panels presentations on demand. So I don't need to be somewhere or sit at a certain place, set aside things then at 10:00 AM, I'm going to watch this. Just the simple fact that I got stuff going on. I can't do this today or right now, that I could click on it and see. Yeah, somebody from Brand X explaining this to me on my terms, and if I'm bored, I just click out, I don't have to stand up and walk out of the room and embarrass the presenter or anything like that. That part I like. Dave Labuskes: I do too, and that's the irony of it is. If one of the things that all of us like is the absence of time and geography constraints, right? So it doesn't matter if that panel discussions take place in London or Nova Scotia or Orlando, you can still receive the outcome of that panel.  Why are we saying that they should be organized and delivered between 9:00 AM and 4:00 PM Eastern time on Tuesday and Wednesday of next week? That's where I get to this. I think it's more about a digital presence and digital community, a place where people interact when it's appropriate for them to interact, where they can organize their interaction times. I'm old enough to have been in chat rooms on Prodigy and AOL and you remember you would organize with people like I'm going to be on at eight o'clock tonight for an hour, because you can only afford an hour. Because we were charged by the minute, and then I think that's what we have to recognize. So in that regard, I'm really excited about the fact that I'm not a trade show organizer, instead I'm an association that is committed to an industry and an industry community, and what I can do is build that community both digitally and physically.  What do you think of the suggestion that the days of the big macro show are cloudy and that regionalized events make more sense, so an InfoComm Southwest, an ISE UK, that sort of thing? And granted that was tried a little bit in the past year, but that was out of necessity as opposed to design.  Dave Labuskes: Yeah, I'm intrigued by it. But I think the loudest proponents of it are the attendees, not the exhibitors and the attendees don't pay. Doing ten small shows only costs a little less than doing one big show or less than doing then ten times doing one big show. The cost of doing a show has a fixed amount. Even in the smallest show, you're going to pay an X and then get to the big show, you may only be paying 2X where if you're doing a regional show, like 10 times, you are close to 10X, and your ROI on each of those events is smaller because your audience is small.  Now that's using all the old rules. So if we go back to the last question, if I can segment an audience for an exhibitor and say, I'm going to bring people that have spending authority over half a million dollars that have a project next three months, it's going to require a high-end audio system. That's going to change that algebra, and so I don't think you throw it out the window, but economics has a factor in these things and it's easy to say I would rather go to a small event in Nashville, but the problem is I have to find somebody to pay for it, and even if you say I'm happier to go to a small event in Nashville, I bet you don't want to spend $195 for a ticket to go to that event?  I get the hunger for it. I get the desire for it, but I don't see a business model around it right now. We've never been successful at small events being profitable. There have been good strategies like, before ISE launched. We did small roadshow events from country to country, it was before my time, but I hear stories from the old timers about the amazing sort of experience of going from hotel room or hotel conference to hotel conference across from Warsaw to Budapest to Rome type thing. And we've done them in advance of launching our Bangkok show. We did it in advance of launching our Mumbai show, but those become feeders to a larger event that has a more sustainable business model. We did a lot of what we used to call round tables, for example, we did the AVIXA round table in Baltimore where you'd have 15, 20, maybe 30 people come to them, and so you were spending a lot of money on an event that served 15, 20 or 30 people, and we just felt like there were better ways of spending the industry's money than that.  The demise of Digital Signage Expo certainly raised the eyebrows at AVIXA and got you guys thinking, although you've always had digital signage as a component, you've had pavilions for many years, but there was an opportunity and a sense that something needed to fill that void. Granted, it's been refilled to some degree since then, but the show hasn't happened yet so we'll see how that comes off.  How do you build up the digital signage affinity for InfoComm? Cause I've gone for many years, but I go to have a look at the gear. I'm not a gear head, but I write about it and everything else, but I don't really see it as an end-user show where a big retailer, those kinds of people are going to come to that they maybe they send their gearheads, but more likely it's the integrators that sell into big retail and so on are there are there, so how do you make all that kind of come together over the next couple of years? Dave Labuskes: Boy, there's so much in that question, David. We should talk more often, I enjoy this. Yes, it is an unfortunate demise and it didn't get folks in the AVIXA thinking. Yes, we've been looking at the digital signage industry for a long time. I do think it's a community within the larger industry that needs to be celebrated, and that's that other point with regards to small regional shows versus big shows. I think we see lots more shows within shows taking place, and I think that's probably the right solution, and I'm biased. I think AVIXA has the right place to build a home within a home for the digital signage community.  First of all: there was this interesting dynamic between the association and the show operator, right? From an association perspective AVIXA has been having conversations with DSF, with DS-LATAM, with digital signage of Asia, and the various different entities in Europe. When you move from our association to association, one of the ways I think I actually described it to Rich Ventura, he and I were talking probably years ago and it's like you and I, David, are best friends, but our dads owns the competing gas stations on the corner, and so we can go to school and everything and be friends there but when we came home there's limits.  That was kinda how I felt like it was and I felt like there's a window there to not have that dynamic. Now, some of that's changed and I respect Questex. I respect Paul and don't know him well, but I know him and I've had conversations with him and he's a smart guy and I believe he's committed to delivering a successful event. I think it's being honest, looking at what does an organization want, what is the community best one? And making honest agreements and commitments to each other, and then keeping them. There are advantages to working together, and I think the end goal is that “home within a home” and “a community within a community.”  I think the challenge and opportunity for digital signage and InfoComm is the scale of the InfoComm show and the specificity and the heart and relationship with the digital signage community, and I think if we work together, we can build that home within a home. I think it can be more than a guest room. It can be an in-law apartment. It can be a place where it's identified and that's, yeah, I'm disappointed that you're not going to be there, and I know the mixture is just one manifestation of that home within a home, and we look forward to being able to do it in the future.  Absolutely. One of the logistical problems or mechanical problems, so to speak, with a big show like an InfoComm is: yes, you've created these pavilions through the years of digital signage pavilion and some of the vendors have been in that, designated zone, so to speak, but the biggest players are the display manufacturers, and they've always had their spots, their Primo spots, and they're serving a whole bunch of audiences at InfoComm, not just the digital signage people. So how do you figure out a way to create a show within a show when you've got Sony in the front row, Samsung's got a giant booth in the middle of the hall and so on. You're never going to be able to herd them all into one hall, so to speak?  Dave Labuskes: Yeah, so what do you do then? I think what you have to do and we're down to the details of tactics, right? But I think you start to curate attendees' journeys. You use content as the honey to attract and people will come where content is and content can be delivered where people are, and that's the challenge of starting a trade show, but we've done that. We know how to form a trade show and it takes time and it takes continual feeding until it becomes a self-feeding cycle, and then you have to create a journey that is guided a bit so the attendees that are coming from retail or the attendees that are coming from the advertising agencies can get to where they will be able to extract value and some of that will require tour guides, not maps and serendipity, because it's too big to just let somebody lose, but we have that problem now with end users in general at the show, you described as gearheads, but about 40% of the attendees at a typical InfoComm are end user buyers. It's part of what makes that show so valuable to exhibitors.  A lot of them are brought there by channel members. The consultants are bringing their customers, the integrators are bringing their customers. But a lot of them are brought there by us too, with promoting them and developing conference content that would be of interest to them, creating a nucleus of community. It's all very explicit, but it doesn't happen by chance. There are hosted buyers that are brought in to shows around the world. There are groups that are sponsored. There are other associations that are partnered with. Richard runs our Asian subsidiary. He's a genius at identifying influential associations within the geographies and partnering with them to offer programs. Organizations like the Indian Architects Association are partnered with our InfoComm Mumbai event, and they are holding content conferences for architects in conjunction with our event. All of our channels want architects at it. Those types of strategies are part of the town and the team that works on these. Last question, looking ahead a few months to ISE and it's hard to do the crystal ball thing, but I gather things are calmer in Spain. I don't hear very many people at all saying, hell no, we're not going to Barcelona or anything else, maybe that'll bubble up, who knows? But is ISC in Barcelona going to be normal-ish? Dave Labuskes: Yes, I think so. Again, like you said, the crystal balls are not crystal clear and now, after the last series of conversations, I think I'm going to put the crystal ball into the same place where I put “pivot” and “agile” and “unprecedented” but yeah, the biggest indicator that you would have about and event like ISC at this stage five months out is sold show floor space, right?  I don't think we've even opened registration for attendees yet, and show floor sales are, I think they're probably about 8% off of 2020. I guess there's no such thing as quoting me because we're recording this, but it's within that ballpark of the size of the last event at the Rye, which is, really the last event to compare it to. So if it's 90% of that size, 80% of that size, I think that's, that absolutely fits into your technical definition of normal.  And there were lots of people who said, because you're going to Barcelona, as awesome a place as it is, it may mean you see a slight drop because people who might go to ISC in Amsterdam, because they can drive there, maybe would not go all the way to Barcelona?  Dave Labuskes: Yeah, but there's other people that are going to drive to Barcelona that wouldn't have driven to Amsterdam. And yeah not a hundred percent a repeat audience, but… Well, I'm not driving to Barcelona.  Dave Labuskes: Yeah, me neither. (Laughter) That's those armchair spectators that you talked about earlier, right? We did the homework to make a determination about that, and we love the Rye. We would love to have stayed at the Rye, but the Rye isn't big enough to hold the show as it was moving forward in the future and it was starting to have a negative impact on attendee experience and you start to have those different factors impact a show and reach the value of the show.  I'll just be happy if I can find my way around.  Dave Labuskes: Yeah, it's a beautiful city. I'll tell you what it's like. It's the opposite of the Rye. It was one of the things I joked with Mike about. Finally I figured out how to get through the Eye without getting lost, and now we've decided to move the show.  Yeah, me too.  All right. I appreciate you taking some time with me. I suspect you're a busy fellow these days. Dave Labuskes: Never too busy for you, sir. Congratulations on your recent deal. I'm really happy for you.  Thank you!

The Divorced Woman's Guide Podcast
Does Divorce Make You Happier?

The Divorced Woman's Guide Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 14:16


Does Divorce Make You Happier? A question that I get asked all the time is, are you happier after divorce or, better yet, does divorce increase your chances of happiness? My experience tells how separation in itself is definitely a tedious, painstaking process. Regardless of whose choice it was or the reasons behind it, you do have the opportunity to create a better life after divorce. In this episode, we go deep into how to be happier after divorce. Top points you'll discover:  ✔️ Women tend to be happier after divorce. Women are more likely than men to seek out support and community for the emotional trauma they are experiencing. Traditionally, men try to keep it close to the vest (not all, but most try to deal with things on their own with emotional upheaval.) So the amount of time they spend in suffering is prolonged, and therefore the time it takes to heal takes that much longer.  ✔️ Women seek out new experiences. Activities that enrich your life and gives you a sense of hope is an excellent way to cope. If you love attending women's retreats, I host one in October in Tucson at Miraval Arizona Resort. This is a splendid way to nurture ourselves with a fantastic community. ✔️ Women are more likely to prioritize their needs. Granted, many of us put other people first. But one of the things that I know to be true is that we do put our physical health and wellness at the forefront. And sometimes, we need a reminder around that. One of my saving graces, when I was dealing with the trauma of my divorce, was running. It helps my mind sort through where I was, what I was doing, and the right direction for me.   ✔️ Women have a strong sense of perseverance. Our resilience demonstrates our ability to get things done. We moms tend to take on a lot of responsibility as it relates to the home and also as it relates to our kids. And I know that when I was presented with the opportunity to be single and raise my kids, it wasn't even a question of whether I can do it right? It was a question of what gets to happen, what is it going to look like? And I relished stepping into that role and taking it head-on. We always figure it out.  ✔️ Women can be comfortable in our skin being alone. When you understand that jumping into a new relationship is not the answer, what ends up happening is that you start dating yourself, rediscovering things you enjoy and are never allowed to explore.  ______________________________________________________________ Connect with Wendy Sterling: Website: https://wendysterling.net/ Instagram: @divorcerehabwithwendy Twitter: @thedivorcerehab Facebook: @wendytsterling  Need an opportunity to share your pain points and receive judgment-free support? Want to create a vision of a future after your divorce? Click here to schedule your Free Divorce Recovery Call: https://calendly.com/wendysterling/support-call-with-wendy?month=2021-07

Snapshots
When the Wind Stops Blowing, Taking Elections for Granted, and More

Snapshots

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 43:16


Today's views on the news: -Norway's Labor Party on track for election win -In some countries, people travel 12 hours by mule to vote -2021 National Toy Hall of Fame Finalists -Energy prices in Europe hit a record after the wind stops blowing -Most nations will fall short of climate goals -China subsidies are targeted by the US -The Parana river dropped to its lowest level since the 1940s -Scientists potty train cows Blaine's Twitter: @furpep _____ Support Us: https://amalfimedia.com/support More Shows: https://amalfimedia.com

The Podcast Accelerator
Podcast Overwhelm Coping Tactics

The Podcast Accelerator

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 26:17


The more you strive to grow your podcast, the more your plate fills up with things you need to do and eventually, you end up with more and more plates to the point that you could enter the world plate spinning championships. The point is: there are a lot of people giving you advice on how to grow your podcast and most of it is decent advice (except those dodgy LinkedIn "podcast promoters") and so when you begin to think about actually what to do about your audience growth, you can feel so overwhelmed that you do nothing because you have no idea where to start or what is the most important thing to do, and when. I have a way to fix that. Read on my wonderful friend. (Before you do, we have this https://www.captivate.fm/maker/ (free Podcast Maker Day) event this week that will give you a few hours of focus time to work on your podcast with our team. It's open to everyone.) I hate the word "coping" - I want you to experience more than that. I work best under pressure. The shorter a deadline is, the better my work is and until a few years ago I thought that was something that was a problem but that couldn't be further from the truth - it's a real power. When I owned my digital and design agency (from 2005 to 2017) I used to be the "face person" of the business - I'd produce the content and lead the vision of the agency whilst also working on the tendering and pitching for some of our biggest contracts.  Tenders, in particular, were a complete and utter pain in the proverbial, though. We would receive a request for quotation (RFQ) a few months before the tender closing date but every single time our tender documentation would be submitted just before the deadline closed - I was never ahead with it. Granted, there was a little strategy to that (look up "Primacy, Frequency and Recency" to understand that a little more) but if I'm completely honest I left things to the last minute because I knew that my work would be better with some pressure. Sure, in the early days I'd make a deep start really early and get things done way ahead of time but the work was never as good as a "rush" job and I had absolutely no idea why.  On the days that we got the heads up on a tender that closed "tomorrow", I did better work than on those tenders that we'd had months to work on and it baffled me. I mean it really baffled me. Once I noticed it I began to relish it, though. I knew my business, I knew my industry and I knew how to write good tenders; I had come to understand myself enough to know that my "quick" decisions were actually highly thought out plans and strategies that I'd been mulling over in my head for months before and it was just the getting it on paper that was done at the last minute. On the morning of a big tender deadline I knew that I usually had until 1pm to submit it, so I would get up at 4am, grab a Yorkshire Tea and get to the studio for 5am. Once I got there, I would put on some loud rock music and forget that anything else existed for the few hours that I worked on the tender. At around 12:30pm the tender would have been checked by Don and off it went, getting submitted and often, won. When I moved into public speaking, I'd do the same. I'd have a talk planned for some time way in the future and would leave the prep until the very, very last minute - I even did it with my TEDx talk! But it was the same scenario: I'd already planned the story, takeaways and the beats of the talk in my head and had been practicing it, refining it and rehearsing it for weeks prior to simply getting it down on paper. In short: I do my best work under pressure and with far too "little time" to do the job - yet it always, always gets done and it's always, always good. Parkinson's Law. This isn't something unique to me, though. In fact, there's an old adage that speaks to the phenomenon...

This Day in History Class
Scott Joplin granted copyright for his "Maple Leaf Rag" - September 18th, 1899

This Day in History Class

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2021 9:31


On this day in 1899, musician Scott Joplin was granted the copyright for a song he wrote called the “Maple Leaf Rag.” Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Snow Files
S2-EP37: In the Interest of Justice - Motion Granted!

Snow Files

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2021 62:07


On September 8, 2021, the Honorable Ramon Escapa, in the Eleventh Judicial Circuit County of McLean County, ruled in favor of Jamie Snow, for the first time in 22 years. Jamie's lawyers from the Exonoration Project argued fervently, that the contents of 8000 missing discovery documents would weigh heavily upon his proof of innocence, and that by law, his defense is entitled to them. Judge Escapa presented a four prong litmus test to determine if he should grant the motion, including the scope of the request, length of time since conviction, the burden on the state, and availability of the documents from other sources. He issued a fair and just ruling with Jamie's family and supporters present. Listen in to hear how this is the beginning of the end for Jamie's wrongful conviction and incarceration. Related Case Documents: Discovery: http://www.docs.snowfiles.net/court-filings/08-03-21_FS_Motion-for-Discovery_Redacted.pdf (http://www.docs.snowfiles.net/court-filings/08-03-21_FS_Motion-for-Discovery_Redacted.pdf) State's response to the motion for discovery: http://www.docs.snowfiles.net/filings/08-13-21_State-Response-to-Discovery-Motion.pdf (http://www.docs.snowfiles.net/filings/08-13-21_State-Response-to-Discovery-Motion.pdf) Lauren's response to the state's response for the motion for discovery: http://www.docs.snowfiles.net/filings/08-23-21_PetitionerReply-Discovery.pdf (http://www.docs.snowfiles.net/filings/08-23-21_PetitionerReply-Discovery.pdf) Music: YouTube Audio Library: https://www.youtube.com/audiolibrary/music (https://www.youtube.com/audiolibrary/music) Theme Song: Black Moons, The 126ers Epidemic Sound: https://www.epidemicsound.com/ (https://www.epidemicsound.com/) Followed by the Dancer, Alexandra Woodward Support this podcast

Scalzo & Brust
4PM: Take The Pledge, Join The Family

Scalzo & Brust

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 47:17


Live From Summerfest. Have the Packers taken the season for Granted? Is Aaron Rodgers ALL IN on the 2021 Packers? 1 or 0. Take the Pledge and join the Scalzo and Brust Family.

Screaming in the Cloud
The Sly Skill of the Subtle Tweet with Laurie Barth

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 40:14


About LaurieLaurie is a Senior Software Engineer at Netflix. You can also find her creating content and educating the technology industry as an egghead instructor, member of the TC39 Educators committee, and technical blogger.Links: Twitter: https://twitter.com/laurieontech Netflix: https://www.netflix.com Egghead: https://egghead.io The Art of the Subtle Subtweet: https://laurieontech.com/book-launch/ TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: You could build you go ahead and build your own coding and mapping notification system, but it takes time, and it sucks! Alternately, consider Courier, who is sponsoring this episode. They make it easy. You can call a single send API for all of your notifications and channels. You can control the complexity around routing, retries, and deliverability and simplify your notification sequences with automation rules. Visit courier.com today and get started for free. If you wind up talking to them, tell them I sent you and watch them wince—because everyone does when you bring up my name. Thats the glorious part of being me. Once again, you could build your own notification system but why on god's flat earth would you do that?Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at VMware. Let's be honest—the past year has been far from easy. Due to, well, everything. It caused us to rush cloud migrations and digital transformation, which of course means long hours refactoring your apps, surprises on your cloud bill, misconfigurations and headache for everyone trying manage disparate and fractured cloud environments. VMware has an answer for this. With VMware multi-cloud solutions, organizations have the choice, speed, and control to migrate and optimizeapplications seamlessly without recoding, take the fastest path to modern infrastructure, and operate consistently across the data center, the edge, and any cloud. I urge to take a look at vmware.com/go/multicloud. You know my opinions on multi cloud by now, but there's a lot of stuff in here that works on any cloud. But don't take it from me thats: VMware.com/go/multicloud and my thanks to them again for sponsoring my ridiculous nonsense.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. I'm joined this week by Laurie Barth, but no one really knows that's her last name. In fact, @laurieontech is how most people think of her. She's a senior software engineer at a company called Netflix, which primarily streams movies and gives conference talks—in the before times—about how you're doing it wrong.She also creates a lot of content and educates the technology industry as an instructor at Egghead. She's a member of the TC39 Educator's Committee, and of course, is a technical blogger. Laurie, thank you for suffering the slings and arrows I'm no doubt going to be hurtling your way.Laurie: This is the most fun I've had all week. [laugh].Corey: Well, it's a pandemic on, so presumably that isn't that high of a bar for the pony to stumble over.Laurie: Yeah, unfortunately not. I think that's maybe the problem.Corey: So, you're someone that I have been aware of for an awfully long time. You're always sort of omnipresent in conversations. You are someone who has a lot of great opinions that present well; you talk about an awful lot of things that are germane to my interests, educating the next generation of engineers, for example. And of course, you recently started at Netflix, at which point, well, if you're not familiar with what Netflix is doing in the cloud, have you ever even talked to an AWS employee for more than 35 seconds because they'll go reference Netflix for a variety of wonderful reasons, both based on technical excellence, as well as because AWS is so bad at telling the story of what you can build out of their popsicle stick service collection that they just punt to companies like Netflix to demonstrate what you could do. So, you're sort of this omnipresent force on Twitter, but we've never really had a conversation before, so it was long past time to rectify this.Laurie: I mean, you sent me two cents. So… I think that was pretty—[laugh].Corey: That's what the Tip Jar is for. You just wind up hurling very small amounts of money at people along with insulting comments, and it's a new form of social media. That is the micro-transaction way.Laurie: I quite enjoyed that. So, for context, I was one of the first people to be part of the A/B testing for Tip Jar on Twitter and Corey was the first person to send me money with, of course, a very on-brand Corey message, which there's a screenshot of on Twitter somewhere. And a couple of people followed, but it was great fun. And I think that's the first time we had ever directly interacted in a message or something, other than obviously, in threads and that sort of thing.Corey: Yeah, that's an interesting point to lead into here because I'm also in the A/B test for Tip Jar and I've largely turned it off, except for when I'm doing something very small and very focused, usually aimed at some sort of charitable benefit or whatnot, and even then, it's not the right way to do it. And it's weird, there was a time I absolutely would have turned it on, but it doesn't seem right for me to do it now and that's partially due to the fact that—first, I don't need tips from the audience in order to sustain myself. I'm not that kind of creator. I have a company that solves very expensive problems for large companies and that works out really well for, you know, keeping the lights on here.I'm not trying to disparage creators in any way, folks who are in a position of needing that to cover their lifestyle a variety of different ways. And even if they're well beyond that, I don't begrudge that to them at all. I mean, from a very selfish capitalist perspective, I don't want you to feel that you've paid your debt to me for entertaining you by sending me $5. I want you to repay that debt by signing a five-figure consulting agreement.Laurie: Yeah, those aren't really the same thing, are they?Corey: No, no. Turns out signing authority caps out at different places for different folks.Laurie: [laugh].Corey: Who knew? But it was a fun experiment. I'm glad that they're doing it. I'm glad to see Twitter coming out of its stasis for a long time and trying new things, even if we don't like some of them.Laurie: Well, they have this whole Super Follows thing now, and I got waitlisted for it the other day because they said they accepted too many people, whatever that means. I think—Corey: Same here.Laurie: Yeah, I think a bunch of us got that. And I'm interested, my sense is it's sort of like a Patreon hosted in Twitter sort of thing. And I've never had a Patreon; I have a mailing list that I made based on an April Fool's joke this past year where I made an entire signup workflow for the pre-order of my new book, The Art of the Subtle Subtweet. I was very pleased with this joke.This was, like, very elaborate: I had a whole website, I had a signup flow, and I now have a mailing list which I've done nothing with. So, I have all of these things, but that's not really been my—there's too many things to do as a content creator, and so I've sort of not explored most of those other avenues. And so, Super Follows, I was like, “This could be interesting. I could try doing it,” but, you know, alas, they don't want me to. So, [laugh] I don't know that it matters.Corey: It's an interesting problem, too, because at the start of the pandemic, I had a third of the Twitter followers that I do as of the time of this recording, which is something like 63,000. When I started what I do, five years ago, and I had just left a company which was highly regulated, so, “Don't tweet,” was basically their social media policy, it was a, okay, I had something like 2000 followers at the time. I was—it had taken me seven years to get there, let's be very clear here. And since then, my following has exploded, and yours has as well. You have, I think the last time we checked, was it something like 30,000 and change?Laurie: Yeah, something like that.Corey: And it changes the way that people interact with you. This is one of those things that there aren't that many people that we can have this kind of honest conversation with because let's be very clear here, for folks who have not established an audience like that it sounds absolutely like it's either a humblebrag—which I'm not intending that to come across that way—or it's one of those, “Wish I had those problems.” And in some ways, yeah, it's a weird problem to have, and it's also not a sympathetic problem to have, but something that has been very clear to me has been that the way that people perceive me and the way that they interact with me has shifted significantly as my Twitter notoriety has increased.Laurie: Yeah.Corey: I'm curious about how you have experienced that?Laurie: Yeah, so I'm half your size and especially in the front-end universe, there's plenty of people with between 100,000 to, you know, I think Dan Abramov is at, like, 400,000 at this point. Like—Corey: Oh yeah, my Twitter following would explode if I either knew JavaScript or was funny. Either one would just absolutely kick me into the stratosphere, but we work with what we've got.Laurie: I either don't know JavaScript or I'm not funny or maybe both because apparently not. But yeah, there's these huge, huge, huge, huge scales, and I'm sure by many people's judgment, pretty, pretty large. But comparing to other people in my ecosystem, maybe not so much. And I didn't understand it until I was living it. I actually had the opportunity to meet Emily Freeman at a conference in DC, probably… three years ago now, when I had less than a thousand followers. And I thought getting my first hundred was a big deal; I thought getting my first 500—and it is. Don't get me wrong. Those things are very cool milestones. And I [crosstalk 00:07:18]—Corey: I still celebrate the milestones, but I do it less publicly now.Laurie: Yeah, exactly. And I had a whole conversation with her and she gave me some really, really helpful advice: sort of, don't look at your follower count as it goes back and forth, five people, six people you'll think people are unfollowing you; they're probably not. It doesn't matter. And recognize that the larger you get, the more careful you have to be, and try to keep me sane before I was ever there. And it's all sort of come true.There's two things that have stuck out to me, I think, during the pandemic, especially. One is I can write the most nonsensical, silly tweet and people will like it because they think it says something insightful whether it does or it doesn't. They're projecting onto the tweet something funnier, or more relevant than the reason I wrote it in the first place. Which, okay, that's cool. I'm not as smart as you're giving me credit for, but sure.The other thing which is the downside to that is, everyone assumes that if they're having a conversation with me, they're having a conversation with me. So one-on-one, back and forth. That's not untrue, but I'm having a similar conversation in parallel with—if it's a popular tweet—a hundred other people at the same time. And what that means is, if you're being a little bit of a jerk, and a little bit troll-y, you're not being a little bit troll-y, you're being a little bit troll-y times the a hundred other little bit troll-y people. And so my reaction to you is not going to be necessarily equivalent to what you say, and that can get me in trouble. But there's no mental, emotional spectrum that was designed to work with the scale of social media.Corey: Oh, absolutely not. In fact, let's do an experiment now, while we're having this conversation. I am making a tweet as we speak. “Some mornings, it's just not worth chewing through the leather straps.” It's not particularly insightful.It's not particularly deep, and before the end of this episode, we will check and see what that does in terms of engagement just because you can say anything, and there's some folks who will wind up automatically engaging. And again, that's fine; everyone engages with Twitter in a bunch of different ways. For me, what's been very odd is I have talked to a couple of very large companies who I talk about on Twitter from time to time, and it turns out that they are reluctant to engage with me directly on Twitter or promote anything that I do or do retweets of me, not because of me, but because of an element of the audience, in some cases, of what people will chime in and say because it doesn't align with corporate brands and a bunch of different perspectives. Which, again, I have some sympathy for this; it's hard to deal with folks who are now suddenly given a soapbox and a platform that rewards clever insults better than it does meaningful heartfelt content, and that is something that I think everyone is still struggling with. Let's also be very clear here. I'm a white dude in tech; my failure mode is a board seat and a book deal.Laurie: [laugh].Corey: When I post something about Git, for example—which I did a few days ago—and someone responds explaining the joke back to me, my response to them was, “Thank you for explaining Git to me.” And that was all I said, and it's led to a mini-pile-on of this person because it's like—Laurie: Oh, yeah.Corey: “Don't you know who Corey is?” Yet I have seen the same dynamic happen with women tweeting about these things and it's not just one response that explains Git; it's all of them. And when people say—like, Abby Fuller, for example—Laurie: Yep.Corey: —will tweet about password manager challenges and how annoying some of them are, and it leads to a cavalcade of people suggesting password managers to her. That is not why she's tweeting it, and she explicitly says, “I do not want you to recommend password managers to me.” And people continue to do it. And I don't for the life of me understand what goes on in some people's heads.Laurie: Yeah. I mean, I've watched that happen countless times. I think the frustration—there's a point at which no matter how big of a following you have, you just want to be yourself. I think most people who get to that amount of interaction have been theirself most of the way, along the way. Or they're just being totally fake for the sense of growth hacking, in which case, okay, you do you.But most people, I think, are being themselves because it's exhausting to spend that much time on a platform and pretend to be someone else or be fake the whole time. So, I'm pretty much myself. And that means that sometimes when someone's being a total jerk, I really want to treat them and be like, “Yeah, you suck.” But the problem is when I say that, I'm siccing 30,000 other people on them to defend me. And I can't do that.So instead, I've become sort of famous for subtweeting. And I will wait a couple of days to do it, or I will totally change the framing of the situation so I can get out my same sort of frustration, and annoyance, and just needing to blow off steam, or venting, or whatever it is and not point at the person. Because if I point at the person, I discovered very, very quickly that there's a whole crowd of people willing to take them down. If they're being blatantly terrible, I will do it. There is a line here.Someone recommending that I use a different tool because I decided to bitch about TypeScript, for example, or telling me I don't understand TypeScript, okay, fine. Someone's saying, “You only have followers because you're a pretty girl.” Yeah, you're an asshole. No, I'm not protecting you. Also, by the way, I tweeted two minutes ago, do all tweets deserve a ‘like,' question mark, and we'll see how much that—Corey: Yeah.Laurie: —interaction gets. [laugh].Corey: I'm looking forward to seeing how that plays out. It's a responsibility, which sounds odd, but if I complain about a company, what I'm fundamentally doing is I have the potential to be calling out an airstrike on top of them. And not every customer service failure deserves that. I deleted all of my tweets prior to 2015 a while back. And the reason most people delete tweets, or the reason we hear about most people deleting tweets, there was nothing especially problematic in my tweets other than jokes that were mean in different ways and punching down in ways that I didn't realize were at the time.It was not full of slurs; it was just things that weren't particularly great. But that wasn't the real reason I did it. The honest reason was is that I looked at my early tweets and they were cringy beyond belief. I was shilling for the company I worked for in many respects, and there were swaths which I didn't engage with Twitter, and the only time I really did is I was out there complaining about various customer service failures, so it's just this neverending stream of complaints about different companies that had wronged me in trivial ways.Laurie: [laugh].Corey: And, I don't know at some point if somebody is going to build something where it's easy to explore early tweets of a particular account. I don't want them to do that and then figure out that this is how you get started being me. It's like, I succeeded in spite of that nonsense, not because of it. And it's not something good that I want to put out into the world.Laurie: Yeah. So, I have, I think, only once added a company when I was having a customer service issue on a weekend, and we were in really dire straits. And I was just like, “Okay, it's a weekend. I'm going to at.” And I've never gotten a response so fast.And my husband looked at me and he was like, “Wait, what?” And I'd done this with an ol—I have this really ancient Twitter account that I got rid of because I was mostly just screaming about politics [laugh] and I didn't want—I think I got @laurieontech in like, 2016, 2017—and I'd done that before. I'd been like, “Hey, you know”—I'm making something up—“At Spirit Airlines”—they seem like an easy one to—I've never flown Spirit, so—but I mean, I never got a response. And so there—realizing that you have power from a brand perspective is really weird.But I almost want to go back to your point when you were talking about when you worked for a company and you had your account and, you know, they don't want you to tweet, basically. Or companies are not going to tweet at you now, in your current state. I think it's really hard to be a company on the internet in tech because you're either going to make a joke that lands well, or everyone's going to think that you're shilling for yourself. There's no in-between and so—this is a hot take and I might get in trouble for that—companies have realized that the best way to get around that is to hire people who have their own personal names and get your company name associated with them. And all of a sudden, it looks less disingenuous.Corey: And even that's a problem because I've talked to companies who are hiring folks with large followings for DevRel style jobs, and—I've interviewed for a few of those, once upon a time, about midway through when I was debating do I shut this consulting thing down and get a real job again because that's always how I sort of assumed it would be for the first couple years. And then, “No, I'm going to get serious about it.” And I took on a business partner and got very serious, and here we are. But talking to folks, my question was, in the interview process, I would talk to my prospective manager and ask questions of the form, “So, what is your plan for when we eventually part ways? How are you structuring that?”And they looked at me like that was a bizarre question. It's, understand that, done right, my personal brand will, in some areas and some corners, eclipse that of the company, so as soon as I leave for whatever reason, the question is going to be, “Were you mistreated? Did someone wrong you there? We'll drag them just preemptively on the off chance.” And you need to have a plan in place to mitigate some of that and have a structured exit for what that is going to look like. And they looked at me like I was coming from a different planet. But I still think I'm right.Laurie: You are right. And, oh goodness, I've seen this in a lot of different places. I mean, I have left companies in the past and I have had to decide how I was going to position that publicly. And how much I was going to say or not say, how complimentary I was going to be or not because the thing is, when you leave a place, you're not just leaving the company, you're also leaving your colleagues. And what does that mean for their experience?You're gone. You don't want to be saying, “Hey, this place is horrible, while your really close friends you were working with on Friday are still there.” At the same time, companies don't think about this from the DevRel perspective and, I want to be very clear, I have friends who work in DevRel who are themselves brands. They are all fantastic people; they work incredibly hard; this is not a knock on them in any way—Corey: It looks easy from the outside. I want to be very clear on that.Laurie: [laugh]. It's not easy. All this stuff is great, but part of the reason I decided to go to a place like Netflix is because I knew my brand had no bearing on them and so I could be myself and just do my own thing and they weren't going to try and leverage me, or there was no hit to them based on who I was. Granted, did I go after someone the other day, sort of, in deep in a thread for being a jerk and did they try and at Netflix engineering and say, “Is this the kind of person you want representing your brand?” And at egghead.io, “Is this the kind of person wanting your brand?” Yeah, they did.So, that part's still a problem, but that's a problem for me rather than being a problem for my company, if I decide that, you know, I don't always want to—like, no one cares if I talk about the new Marvel show. No one cares. I like Marvel; I'm allowed to like Marvel. I also love the stuff on Netflix, right, but when you're at a company that isn't like that, honestly, when I was at Gatsby, I couldn't be tweeting about Next or Nuxt, or even Vue for that matter, because it just doesn't look right. Because my brand had more of an impact in that smaller pond than it does now.Corey: People have said, “Oh, well, what if AWS acquires you so you can work on their behalf?” Or, “What if Google acquires you?” Or something like that, and it's—what people don't get is that my persona—again, to be clear, I am genuine on Twitter. I emphasize aspects of my personality, but I don't get up there and say things I don't necessarily believe. We'll get back to that in a minute.But what I do as a small company, making fun of trillion-dollar publicly traded entities is funny and it works, but if suddenly I work at a different publicly-traded company, it just looks like I work for my employer, bagging on a competitor. And even if I'm speaking in ‘an opinions my own' sense, which is apparently Amazon's corporate motto, based on how often I see it in their employee's Twitter bios—Laurie: Oh, yeah. [laugh].Corey: —is going to be perceived as me smacking at a competitor regardless. Further, I will not be the person that craps on my own employer on Twitter because that sends terrible signal in many respects. I won't even crap on previous employers who frankly kind of deserve it because when you do that, it does not look good to people who are not familiar with the situation, and no one's as familiar with it as you are. It just looks like sour grapes, regardless of how legitimate your grievance was. To be very clear, I'm not saying don't call out abuse when you encounter it—Laurie: Yeah.Corey: —that's fine. I'm not going down that path—Laurie: Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah.Corey: —let's clear here. But, “Yeah, they have a terrible management culture, and they don't promote internally, and I hate those people,” it just makes you look bad, and it doesn't help anything.Laurie: Yeah. I had always made a commitment to never talk about a former employer in any way that was easily identifiable. I've changed that policy a little bit. There's a story I shared a couple of times where my CEO didn't want to give me a pay raise because he thought it was my parents' and boyfriend at the time's job to take care of me financially. Like, that kind of stuff, I will say publicly.No one's going to know who it is; you'd have to go back and figure it out and, like, you don't have enough context so how would you know? But it's stuff like that, that I'm like, okay. I don't want to hide stories like that because that's not protecting anybody.Corey: No, I'm not talking about covering up for misbehavior. I'm talking run-of-the-mill just bad management, poor company culture, terrible technical decisions, et cetera. Yeah, if it's like, yeah, they sexually harassed every woman on the team, out. Yeah, tell that story. I—thank you, I should absolutely clarify my stance. Heaven forbid I get letters.Laurie: But yeah, it's the problem is that you can't—and everyone has a slightly different experience with this, but from what I've seen, it doesn't matter if you say their management is shitty and they didn't promote versus there was a ton of sexual harassment. If you're one person saying it—if it's the Blizzard situation where there's tons of receipts and it's made it into national media, then that's a little bit different. But if you're one person saying it about one company, people are going to think it's sour grapes. And unfortunately, it doesn't reflect on the company; it reflects on you. So, unless there's a sort of like, where there's smoke, there's fire situation where a bunch of people are doing it at once, you have to weigh stuff really carefully.Especially because your next employer doesn't want you out there talking about your previous employer because then their fear is what are you going to say about them when you leave? There's lots of nuance and it gets—if you are screaming into the void—we're screaming into the cloud here—Corey: Ahhhh. Yes.Laurie: Ahhhh. [laugh]. If you're screaming into the void, it doesn't matter if you're you. And I mean… [sigh] I hate saying, “If you're me,” right? That's such an obnoxious statement to make, but at 30,000, they probably care.Corey: There are inflection points. I started seeing—around 40,000 is when I started seeing a couple of brands reaching out to me to, “Hey, you want to promote some nonsense.” And I've never sold any social media promotion for anything. I sell sponsorships for newsletters, this podcast, I do webinars stuff, I do paid speaking engagements. My Twitter account is mine.It is not the company's and that is by design. It's me; that's what it comes down to. That does lead to challenges in some arenas because I talk to companies about their AWS bill and these companies do not have much of a sense of humor about spending tens of millions of dollars, in some cases a month, on a cloud provider. These are serious problems and they're a little worried, in some cases, the first time we have conversations that they're dealing with some kind of internet clown.Laurie: [laugh].Corey: And often with talking to folks to convince them to come on this podcast, it's, “Look, this is not me dragging you and making you look awful because if I do that, I'll never get another guest again.” And if I do it in the context of a consulting project it's, “That was a hilarious entertaining intro here. Get out and never come back.” It is not useful. People have generally taken a risk personally on bringing the Duckbill Group in.If we can't deliver and cannot present professionally, then they have some serious damage control to do, for a variety of excellent reasons. And we've never put someone in that position and we won't. I talked to brands who sponsor all of these things, and the ones that are the best sponsors intrinsically understand it, that [unintelligible 00:23:56] once I start getting after some serious maleficence style stuff—no one is going to not do business with you because I make fun of your company on Twitter—Laurie: Yeah.Corey: —but an awful lot of people are going to hear about you for the first time and advertising in the newsletter and having fun with that, or I talk about you in the podcast ads, it winds up being engaging in many cases depending how far I can stretch it. And it works. I did a tour at re:Invent last year—virtual re:Invent—where I led a Twitch tour for an hour around the virtual expo hall into a bunch of different sponsored virtual booths and made fun of them all, and I got thank you notes from the sponsors because that led to a bunch of leads because people cared about the—oh, people paying attention because Amazon did a crap job of advertising the Sponsor Expo. And it was something that people could grasp, and have fun with, and get attention for. It's top-of-funnel work and that's fine, but I just don't do it with the boring stodgy stuff. I like to have fun with it. Bring a personality or don't bother.Laurie: Yeah. And you can't take yourself too seriously. I'm not the stand-up comedian that you are. I like to fashion myself as a little bit funny but not that funny. I'm not a stand-up comedian and I don't have a consultancy to represent anymore.There was a time where I did; I was not the owner of it but I worked there. So, now it's sort of, I represent me, which is good in the way that you say it. Like, it's clearly you. It's not Duckbill Group; it's your account. But at the same time, it freaks me out when in real life people know that it's me.So, in my brain, Twitter is the internet and I have my actual real day-to-day life, and never the two shall cross. [laugh]. And my—one of my—I had this popular tweet where I talked about all the companies I'd been rejected from, and it turned into a bit of a retweet situation with everyone sharing all these companies that they'd been rejected from. And the screenshots made it onto LinkedIn and made it into my cousin's feed, and she sent me a text message with a screenshot. And she's like, “You're on my LinkedIn.”And I was like, “No, no, this is not okay. This is not”—I have my little circle of the world and it should not expand beyond that. I go to a conference, even a tech conference, and someone's like, “Oh, you're blue shirt, crossed arms.” I'm like, “No, this is not okay.” Like, [laugh] I only exist on the internet.Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Oracle HeatWave is a new high-performance accelerator for the Oracle MySQL Database Service. Although I insist on calling it “my squirrel.” While MySQL has long been the worlds most popular open source database, shifting from transacting to analytics required way too much overhead and, ya know, work. With HeatWave you can run your OLTP and OLAP, don't ask me to ever say those acronyms again, workloads directly from your MySQL database and eliminate the time consuming data movement and integration work, while also performing 1100X faster than Amazon Aurora, and 2.5X faster than Amazon Redshift, at a third of the cost. My thanks again to Oracle Cloud for sponsoring this ridiculous nonsense.Corey: My business partner was, a week or so ago, at a cafe and someone came by and saw his Last Week in AWS sticker on his laptop. It's like, “Oh, you read that, too? I love Corey's work.” Turns out the guy works at IBM Cloud. And yes, you should hear the air quotes around the word, ‘cloud' in there. But still.Laurie: [laugh].Corey: It's—I haven't been out in the world since I really started focusing on this, and now it's—like, I wear a mask so it's fine, but I'm starting to wonder, am I going to get stopped on the street when I go back into the universe out there? And it's weird because you can't really unring that bell?Laurie: No.Corey: It's a weird transition, and on some level, it's constraining in some ways. Like, at some point of celebrity—I don't know if I'm there yet or not—there's going to become a day where I can't just unload on a waiter for crappy service at a restaurant—not that that's how I—Laurie: I mean, you shouldn't do that anyway. [laugh].Corey: —operate anyway—without it potentially going viral, and, “Oh, he's a jerk when you actually get to know him.” And everyone has this idea of you and this impression of who you are, based upon the curated selection of what it is you put out into the world. I've tried to be as true to life as I can on this. In conversations, I generally don't drop nothing but one-liners, but I think I'm pretty true to life as far as how I present on the internet versus how I present in person.Laurie: More than I expected, to be honest.Corey: Yeah. That also does surprise people. Like, they think there's some sort of writing team behind me. And it's, if you look at the timing of some of my tweets where I will respond with a witty, snarky thing in less than a minute, it's, I wish I had a writing team with that kind of latency. I think that'd be terrific.Laurie: I always assumed it was you, but I figured there was like a persona that you turn on and turn off and I realize now that it's an always on sort of thing. [laugh].Corey: One thing I did experiment with for a little bit was having my team write tweets for my approval to promote episodes of this podcast, for example, because I am not the sort of person going to sit there and build the thing out correctly and schedule at the right time. And I have people who can do things like that, but it's the sort of thing that led to a situation of never getting much engagement and those tweets never did very well, so why even bother? We have a dedicated Twitter feed for that stuff and everyone's happier. Especially since I don't have to share access to this thing through anyone. Speaking of, let's see her tweets did.Laurie: Oh, yeah. Okay, hold on. How'd we do? All right. So, I have, “Do all tweets deserve a like?” Was posted 19 minutes ago. It has 12 comments, 1 retweet, and 22 likes.Corey: My, “Some mornings, it's just not worth chewing through the leather straps.” Was posted at a similar timeframe has 10 likes and 3 replies. Someone said that, “Organic, eh? Probably better than nylon.” Someone said, “Is this an NDA subtweet?” And someone said—with a GIF of Leonardo DiCaprio, saying, “You had my curiosity. Now, you have my attention.” That's it. So yeah, not exactly a smash-it-out-of-the-park success.Laurie: Yeah, but I got to say, “Do all tweets deserve a like?” Is pretty mundane. For that amount of response.Corey: You included a question mark, which is an open invitation—Laurie: Oh, right.Corey: —to the internet randos to engage, so there is—Laurie: Oh, yeah.Corey: —a potential there.Laurie: I going to have to retweet this and say that I'm not grifting and it was done for this podcast [laugh] and they should all listen to it. [laugh].Corey: Oh, of course. By all means. I am thrilled in any point to wind up helping people learn more things about the environment.Laurie: [laugh].Corey: I want to thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me. I have to honestly say that I wasn't quite sure what was coming, but of all the things you could have asked me to predict about this episode, not talking about how Netflix works in cloud was absolutely not one of them. So wow, are you sure you work at Netflix? That's one of those odd moment things.Laurie: Yeah, I got to say I'm pretty abstracted from the cloud these days, so that—maybe that means that I don't know enough to talk about it intelligently.Corey: I would argue that extends to lots of folks. To be clear, Netflix has a lot of really neat thing.Laurie: That never stopped anyone before? Bu-dum-shh.Corey: Oh, yeah. It's like, I like to get up there, sometimes I'll talk about how we do things at Netflix, periodically, on conference stages even though I've never worked there, but people don't correct me because why not? I'm a white man in tech. And I say something, of course, it's right. It's just—if you don't want them to get right, you just don't have enough context. That's the rule.Laurie: Corey, I'm going to need you to take the last minute or so of this episode, and please explain your feelings on how to optimize your use of JavaScript on the front-end, please.Corey: Oh, wonderful; you pay smart people who know what they're doing to look deep into the JavaScript side of it—Laurie: [laugh].Corey: —because honestly, every time I've tried to get into JavaScript, I go back at it and I feel even more foolish than when I started. Async stuff just completely blows my mind, especially by default. How in God's flat earth is that supposed to work? And—Laurie: You work in cloud. [laugh].Corey: It doesn't make sense to me, in a clear sense. At least with Python, which is the—I would say it's the language I know best, but it's not. Crappy Python is. And I can at least do things top to bottom and it works about like I would expect unless explicitly instructed otherwise. But the JavaScript world is just a big question mark and doesn't work the way that I would expect to. To be clear, the failure here is entirely mine.Laurie: ‘JavaScript is a big question mark and doesn't work the way I would expect it to' should be JavaScript's tagline.Corey: That's fair because I have this ridiculous belief from the Dark Ages—because I spent 20 years as a systems admin—that computer behavior should be deterministic and if there's one thing that we learned about the internet, it's not.Laurie: Yeah, no. There's that whole user thing, and then that whole browser thing, and then that whole device thing. It's a whole bunch of non-deterministic behaviors. Just stick to the cloud, and there's one consumer and one producer, and you're good.Corey: One thing I will say—in the moment of pure seriousness here—is that if I were looking at getting into tech today, the first language I would learn would be JavaScript. It is clearly the way of the future. It is a first-class citizen on every platform out there. It is the lingua franca of, effectively, everyone coming out of a boot camp. And it is going to be the way that computers are built.I say this not from a position of being an advocate for JavaScript. I don't know it; I can't stand it personally, but it is clear as day to me that is the direction the world is moving in, so if you're debating what language to pick up, you'd be hard-pressed to convince me not to recommend JavaScript as the first one.Laurie: And do you want me to be my serious self, and you're going to laugh at what I'm about to say?Corey: Hit me with it.Laurie: If you're looking to get into technology because of boot camps and some other things, we have an oversaturation of newbie front-end developers and they're all way more talented than I was at that point in my career, and yet there aren't nearly the front-door opportunities for being a—I hate the term junior, but newbie. And where there is the opportunity, it's cloud. And security.Corey: I will absolutely point out further that I understand this runs the risk of being ‘boomer gives career advice'—Laurie: Yeah, right? [laugh].Corey: —but let's be clear here. I think that if you are going to enter the front-end space—and this does speak to cloud and it speaks to security as well—distinguish slash differentiate yourself by having another discipline or area of intense interest that you can bring into it as well because when you have a company that's looking to hire from a sea of new boot camp grads that generally tend to look more or less identical from a resume perspective, the one that will stand out is the one that can bring in another discipline and especially if that niche winds up aligning with a company's business, or at least an intense interest in something that is directly germane to the company, that will distinguish you. And everyone has something like that; no one is one-dimensional. So, find the thing that is the in-between space, and focus on finding jobs in companies that do those things. And if you're a mid-career switcher, let me be very clear here.It is not a go back to entry-level roles-style story. I've never understood that philosophy. I do have steps from thing I'm doing now toward thing I want to go to. Well, is there a job I can find to do next that blends the two of them together in different ways, and then once I'm there, then make a further transition. And of course, find someone who's—in any career, in any path you're on, find someone who is five years ahead of you, and ask them for their advice.“What would you do in my shoes?” If the answer is, “Go to a boot camp,” okay. Talk to a few people who've done this and make sure it validates it. If it's, “Get a degree,” okay, but make sure you're not doing it because you think that's what you're supposed to do. You'll very rarely find me recommending six figures of debt in order to advance your career, but there are occasions.By and large, they'll find someone who's been there before who knows what's going on, you can have a conversation with and give them context appropriate to your situation and then see what's right. We turned this into last-minute career advice and I'm not even—I don't even [unintelligible 00:34:45] have a problem with that.Laurie: Well, I was about to say that it's 2020. 21 2020—wow, I—you knew what I meant—it's 2021, and I guess I need to start taking my half-steps towards becoming a Lego master before I retire. [laugh].Corey: Oh, yes, the Lego world is vast and deep, and they have gotten no worse since I was a child at separating parents from money to buy LEGO sets. My daughter's four and his way into them already. So, it's great. It's something that we can bond over.Laurie: If I ever have kids, we're going to need separate sets because they're not touching mine. [laugh].Corey: Yeah, I'm looking at stuff like, oh, well, I'd love to buy that awesome big Star Destroyer—wait, it's how much money? And it turns into this—yeah. It's wow, on some level, I never ever thought I would find a hobby that was more expensive than my mechanical keyboards hobby, but here we are.Laurie: Oh, yeah, I blame Cassidy Williams for getting me into that one, too. I have a shiny one beneath me. And that's my first.Corey: She is a treasure and a delight.Laurie: She's a treasure, a delight, and dangerous if you want to save money because she will draw you into the mechanical keyboards, and there's just, there's no resisting. I tried for a very long time. I failed, ultimately.Corey: One of these days, she and I are going to have a keyboard-off at some point, once it's no longer a deadly risk to do so. It'll be fun.Laurie: Do it.Corey: I'm looking forward to it. Thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me. I really appreciate it.Laurie: Absolutely. Thanks for having me.Corey: Of course. Laurie Barth, senior software engineer at Netflix, also instructor at Egghead, also a member of the TC39 Educator Committee, and prolific blogger. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with a horrifying comment explaining anything we just talked about, back to us.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Grace in Focus
What is the Biblical Extent of the Prohibition on Women Teaching / Teachers? How Would Seminary Teaching and Church Teaching Differ? Also: What is the “Prayer of Faith,” and How is it Granted?

Grace in Focus

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 13:50


Welcome to Grace in Focus radio. Today on the show, Bob and Shawn will be answering a question about the role of woman in the church, specifically in teaching. There are two passages that are often brought up regarding women teaching. The first is found in 1 Corinthians 14, and the other in 1 Timothy

Short Stories for Kids: The Magical Podcast of Story Telling
Emma gets 3 Wishes granted by the Magic Frog

Short Stories for Kids: The Magical Podcast of Story Telling

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 11:49


Emma gets 3 Wishes granted by the Magic Frog but what will she wish for?Written by AlexCheck out our merch store where you can get some really cool STFK merch like T-shirts, mugs and stickers! 15 percent off Code: m7e4h98Merch Store: https://www.teepublic.com/user/short-stories-for-kidsYou can follow us on Instagram and if you draw a picture of your favourite story and tag us. We will post it up on our feed!If you would like the chance to be featured in a story, send your ideas on an Apple Review!

Judge John Hodgman
The Motion is Cary Granted

Judge John Hodgman

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 69:51


Film Fanatic Rick files suit against his wife, Nikki. Rick saves his Golden Age film viewing for his own time because Nikki is usually not interested. Together, the two of them tend to watch TV shows. But, Rick was shocked one day to find Nikki watching the 1963 film CHARADE without him, and asked that she save that movie for him. She doesn't think she should have had to stop watching it! Who's right? Who's wrong?Thank you to David Hoffman for naming this week's case! To suggest a title for a future episode, follow Judge John Hodgman on Facebook. We regularly put out a call for submissions there.