Podcasts about TSA

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  • 1,905PODCASTS
  • 2,830EPISODES
  • 53mAVG DURATION
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  • Oct 15, 2021LATEST

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Best podcasts about TSA

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Latest podcast episodes about TSA

Rich Zeoli
Travelers Face Nightmare Scenario This Thanksgiving (Non-Stop Talk 10-15-21)

Rich Zeoli

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 55:33


In today's hour of non-stop talk, Rich discussed the growing nightmare travelers are facing with the TSA workforce dwindling due to vaccine mandates. This coming Thanksgiving could be one of the worst travel seasons as the TSA is facing a loss of nearly half its workforce due to vaccine mandates that are not being complied with.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Red Eye Radio
Red Eye Radio 10/15/21 Part 2

Red Eye Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 72:23


TSA says 40% of workforce is unvaxed, inflation, review of the day's stories See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Red Eye Radio
Red Eye Radio 10/15/21 Part 2

Red Eye Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 72:23


TSA says 40% of workforce is unvaxed, inflation, review of the day's stories See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

KIRO Nights
Hour 2 : Un-Packing Heat

KIRO Nights

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 35:50


Jack is joined by KIRO's own Hannah Scott to sit down as react to the first Seattle Mayoral Debate. // The Liberal Menace Billy Sunshine is in to discuss how Passengers are bringing a record number of guns to the airport, according to the TSA. // Bill Cosby Sued by Former Cosby Show Actress See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Chad Hartman
The TSA has found HOW many guns?!

Chad Hartman

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 15:32


The TSA has confiscated a surprising number of weapons at the airport. What should the penalty be - since the current one isn't stopping the problem. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Couple Things with Shawn and Andrew
86 Postpartum Struggles

Couple Things with Shawn and Andrew

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 38:17


Shawn and Andrew go LIVE talking about their postpartum life after having their second baby. From mental health, to identity, to daily routine changes, they delve deep into the struggles and joys of life after baby. Here are a few topics that we cover: 0:00 introduction 2:18 statistics of women who struggle with postpartum depression 3:45 dealing with postpartum with your second child 6:53 hormones after birth 8:31 talking to someone about your mental health 11:13 having the postpartum conversation before birth 12:42 the mom guilt 13:21 ways we've found that may help you through postpartum 13:57 leaning on each other 16:45 losing your identity once you become "mom" 20:58 take care of yourself 23:45 dad struggles 26:57 having a community 27:45 c-section recovery 28:16 the TSA story 32:47 how drew is doing with jett 33:30 getting your husband to understand postpartum 35:09 c-section recovery must haves ANDD....WE ARE GOING ON TOUR!! Check out the link below to see if we are coming to a city near you in 2022! Click here to get your tickets now ▶ https://www.couplethingspod.com/ We are sponsored by these companies that we love. Check them out below:  SlingTV ▶ Go to slingTV.com/EASTFAM to get your first month for just 10 dollars! Athletic Greens ▶ athleticgreens.com/eastfam -with your first purchase today, they are going to give you a FREE 1 year supply of Vitamin D AND 5 free travel packs! ▶ If you haven't yet, please rate Couple Things and subscribe to hear more. Follow us on Instagram to keep the conversation going at https://www.instagram.com/couplething... And if you have suggestions/recommendations for the show, send us your ideas in a video format – we might just choose yours! Email us at couplethingspod@gmail.com. Subscribe for more! http://bit.ly/3rnOdNo Follow My Instagram ▶ http://www.instagram.com/ShawnJohnson Like the Facebook page! ▶ http://www.facebook.com/ShawnJohnson Follow My Twitter ▶ http://www.twitter.com/ShawnJohnson Snapchat! ▶ @ShawneyJ Follow AndrewsTwitter ▶ http://www.twitter.com/AndrewDEast Follow My Instagram ▶ http://www.instagram.com/AndrewDEast Like the Facebook page! ▶ http://www.facebook.com/AndrewDEast Snapchat! ▶ @AndrewDEast Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Next to Madison
How to Eliminate Travel Stress, Vaccine Mandates, Southwest & More with Gateway VIP CEO Michael Cano

Next to Madison

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 52:07


On this episode I sit down with Michael Cano founder and CEO of Gateway Vip Services which helps eliminate airport and travel stress by taking care of everything for you from checkin to checkout. They can make your life easier every step of the way from getting to the airport, checking you in, getting you through security and customs more quickly and more. Michael also touches on some of his most memorable and annoying celebrity clients and if he thinks the vaccine may one day be required to fly.

I AM RAPAPORT: STEREO PODCAST
EP 864 - DINGO CENTRAL PARK GUIDED TOURS/FURY vs. WILDER III & REAL HEAVYWEIGHT BOXING/HEEL STOMPER SAGA/SUPERMAN BEING BISEXUAL/CAPTAINPICKS COOKING

I AM RAPAPORT: STEREO PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 44:44


His name is Michael Rapaport aka The Gringo Mandingo aka Captain Colitis aka The Jewish Jake LaMotta & he's here to discuss: His voice being better than it has been, leaving Los Angeles, being back to Fall in New York City & if he should do guided tours in Central Park, laundry list of antibiotics from Doctors, beating TSA to the airport & saving a plane, going to Philadelphia & The Rocky Steps, Tyson Fury vs. Deontay Wilder & The Paul Brothers making a mockery of boxing, Heavyweight Boxing & the weight difference, The Heel Stompers Saga & Mrs. Rapaport, Superman Being Bisexual, CaptainPicks going off this weekend, the Yankees getting knocked out by the Red Sox, The Bills looking good on the yard & NFL Week 5, upcoming NBA podcasts, Ben Simmons back to Philly & so much more! This episode is not to be missed! Stand Up Comedy Tickets on sale at: MichaelRapaportComedy.com For all things sports wagering use MyBookie.AG with Promo Code: DINGO If you are interested in MLB, NBA, NFL & UFC Picks/Parlays Follow @TheCaptainPicks on Instagram & subscribe to packages at www.CaptainPicks.com www.dbpodcasts.com   Produced by DBPodcasts.com Follow @dbpodcasts, @iamrapaport, @michaelrapaport on TikTok, Twitter & Instagram Music by Jansport J (Follow @JansportJ) www.JansportJMusic.com

Texas History Lessons
The Texas Cattle Drives of 1866 to 1890 Part 5

Texas History Lessons

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 30:18


In this episode we explore the interactions of the cattle drives with the Native American nations, including the Choctaw, Cherokee, Creek, Comanche, and Kiowa. The song heard at the beginning and end of this episode is "Old Dogs" by the great Mando Salas, THL's spotlight artist. Also-be sure to listen to Zach Welch's new song Ada! Mando Salas is a Texas Country musician and a Del Rio, Texas native. Performing under the band name Rosmand, Mando incorporates his roots into his songwriting and he has a great, distinctive voice that conveys a lot of feeling. When he sings about love, you can feel it and when he sings about loss and pain, you feel it.  Mando started his live music career began back in 2015 – and in 2016 he recorded his first single “Devil's River."  In July of 2018 he released a single titled “How It Goes” which was his first song to hit Texas Radio. “How It Goes” is a song that is also featured on his debut album “Forever” which was released August 2018. . And the great news is that Mando is currently working on his second album. I'll let you know when its available. But for now, go to Spotify, iTunes, Amazon, Youtube, or wherever and listen to everything he has released. I guarantee that many of you are going to find a new favorite artist to love.  Mando Salas is on Twitter under @rosmandtex Mando Salas' band Rosmand has a great website. To visit click HERE! Listen to his music on Spotify! If you have any photography project needs from real estate photography to help sell a place or aerial videos of a property or event, I want you to consider contracting Panther City Air. With top notch equipment and expert skill, Panther City Air can fulfill just about anything you need. Panther City Air's drone pilot is TSA background-checked, Part 107 certified, and carries multiple drones (each insured) to meet the challenges of your mission. Upon completion of your flight, the data gathered can sometimes be quickly shared in the field, or taken to be edited/processed in a timely manner to meet your needs. Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS's aka drones) are commonly used for aerial photography or videography, while other solutions include construction progress documentation, roof or tower inspections, crop health analysis, 3D modeling, among many others. Click here to watch the video showing the 1836 San Antonio map transition to the present day. So go visit PANTHER CITY AIR to see how they can fulfill your needs.   texashistorylessons.com email: texashistorylessons@gmail.com Twitter: @TexasHistoryL Facebook Group: Texas History Lessons Help make Texas History Lessons by supporting on Patreon. And a special thanks to everyone that already does. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Unsolicited Response Podcast
September: ICS Security Month In Review

Unsolicited Response Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 57:39


Joel Langill joins Dale in this Live episode. The stories: - CISA's Performance Goals and Objectives for Critical Infrastructure ICS (and a bit on TSA's 2nd Security Directive) - Moody's moving from Visible Risk to Bitsight for Cyber Security Ratings, and the difficulty to create and possible use of Cyber Security Ratings - Who performs what tasks in "OT" Plus Wins, Fails and Predictions. Links: S4x22: https://s4xevents.com Joel's Training: https://icscsi.org

Carmen Ciricillo Show
Worst TSA Agent Ever & the Hairiest Massage | CCS#74

Carmen Ciricillo Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 47:21


Mike interviews Carmen only to find out he would be the worst TSA agent and how he would be consumed with power, and Carmen makes Mike so uncomfortable with describing how he massages hairy people. Mike also tells Carmen his idea for a sci/fi movie and Carmen shits on it. For all things Ciricillo Show: https://linktr.ee/Ciricillo_Show

Eat Your Crust
Back to the Motherland

Eat Your Crust

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 55:07


Whether you go back every chance you get, or you haven't been at all, the "Motherland" can be a mystical place that represents so much - from our cultural heritage, to our familial roots, to even just random memories or references from media. Today we try to define the term in our own words by describing what the Motherland truly represents in our personal lives. From pre-trip rituals (nut shopping anyone?) to language anxiety to getting questioned by the TSA, we delve into some of our favorite memories together in this wholesome, bittersweet episode! Follow us on IG! @eatyourcrustpod Support the show (https://ko-fi.com/eatyourcrust)

A guy in his room
Episode 74: It's lonely at the top ;)

A guy in his room

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 68:44


(episode also on my youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCn_xTpd4lFbYzEU3jzKNyOQ)Topics:It's fall hoodie season ;pg/f gone for a month,It's lonely at the top,I just love working,Working extra hours,Everything not running right since covid,Randomly running out of supplies,Gas prices are a conspiracy,Aliens gave us corona!Phone's have a built in shittyfier after a certain time,Taking breaks from your g/f is worse when you're young,Having to still quarantine in japan,Quarantine for guys = jerking off,Not as much of a gamer as I get older,People stuck on a cruise when covid first hit,The ships have covid,Really strict countries with covid,I'm a loner,Amtrak always packed,Sick of the media not criticizing biden,The virus isn't any better with Biden,I'd do a mandate for everything,PETITO case update (Tracy's true crime corner!),On the run in 2021 ;)My mom put me in a box,Brian Landry thinking he's a survival expert,It'll be sad if social media solves crimes better than cops,5g IS HERE SURVEILLANCE STATE Q IS ON IT.It's all connected.  Disguising voices to protect identities,Social media people super excited to be on tv,Social media people pretending to not be in it for fame,They'll have drones and cameras in every park and forest soon,Grand canyon MYSTERIOUS death of wife!CurtisCrime49,Back with no glasses ;)Glasses too expensive,I broke two pairs of glasses,Not caring about anything during lockdown,Men are so grossssss comedy,We always do one thing then do the opposite after with no in between,Comedy is postponed,Infected with laughter tour ;p ;p,Get vaxxed from laughter,The virus of comedy,Angry insect improv troupe!I'm a little baby,Motivation and ‘rich' youtube people,Investing seems stupid since the world's ending,Mining for BITCOIN.Old jobs were physically demanding and now it's the opposite,Get blacklung from bitcoin,Did 5g cause covid?We don't have any geniuses anymore,There's no good inventions now,Sunken cost fallacy!!!It's ok to quit sometimes,Silver lining to the pandemic,Comedians dissecting lyrics,Rap album sequels,Certain members of bands can ruin the band,Rap concerts ,TSA and having to get patted down dehumanizing, they assume you're trying something,Everyone's on a power trip now w masks,This isn't your mommy's polished podcast k??Shows having a rugged edgy cop in it,Cop figuring out conspiracies,Ironically bad movies,I'm a Trainwreck :p

Bloodround Wrestling Podcast

Tommy & Kevin recap Men's Freestyle at the World Championships in Oslo, and can't help but make a bunch of Urban Meyer jokes. Plus, Tommy got pulled out of TSA check at the airport for Wrestling rule books oddly enough. Enjoy! Follow us at Bloodround.com and on social media @Bloodround @claunchinator @koatig This is a weekly podcast where we aim for Wednesday morning each week. We post on our website, but if you are listening on the go check us out on iTunes, Stitcher, Spreaker, and more! If you would like to sponsor an episode or send in any comments or concerns, please email Tommy at koatig@yahoo.com

The Pete Kaliner Show
Pete Chats With Fox 46's Jody Barr About The TSA Taking Cash From Travelers At North Carolina Airports

The Pete Kaliner Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 32:57


In the final hour of the program, Pete chats with Fox 46's Jody Barr about the TSA taking billions of dollars in cash from airport travelers in several North Carolina airports... Support the show: https://www.patreon.com/petekalinershow See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Pete Kaliner Show
Jody Barr: TSA Is Using Civil Asset Forfeiture To Take Your Money At The Airport

The Pete Kaliner Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 17:31


Fox 46 Investigative Reporter Jody Barr joined Pete Kaliner to talk about his story about the TSA at several North Carolina airports taking billions of dollars in cash from passengers trying to fly out of the state... Support the show: https://www.patreon.com/petekalinershow See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

WGN - The John Williams Full Show Podcast
U.S. Customs and Border Protection: ‘It's just mind boggling the things we see try to get through'

WGN - The John Williams Full Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021


U.S. Customs and Border Protection public affairs officer Steve Bansbach joins John Williams for another day in a row to give more insight on what TSA is constantly looking for and how frequently they stop these specific items.

Whiskey, Beer and Conspiracies Podcast
#86 9/11: The Three Towers Part Three

Whiskey, Beer and Conspiracies Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 118:38


Wow! We made it Hooligans! The three part trilogy is complete with this final installment of the 9/11 three tower series with this episode focusing on Tower 7. The mysterious third tower that fell that fateful day after being struck.........by nothing. The official claim made by the 9/11 commission wait they never mentioned this tower collapsing. "Structure fire." Not likely...spoiler alert...it rhythms with bombs...Sit back relax and enjoy part three! WARNING OFFENSIVE COMMUNISTS JOKES!Please be sure to check out our social media and follow us on Rokfin our newest platform and hit that notification and SUBSCRIBE button! If you like the show and want to help us out leave a 5 star review on whatever podcast platform you listen through and be sure to check out our website where you can purchase t-shirts and watch great documentaries that have been pulled from YouTube!Support our affiliates by taking advantage of these amazing deals and offers and putting these incredible products to use!Kushydreams:Check out premium smokable CBD at www.kushydreams.com and use promo code WBC at checkout for 20% off your first order and smoke your CBD!MyPatriotSupply:Worried about where the future may take you and are you concerned with your family's preparedness? Then take your preparedness in your hands and head on over to my patriot supply and stock up on your family's future today!https://mypatriotsupply.com/?rfsn=5202732.5f284bDr.Cowan'sGarden:Dr. Cowan's Garden offers a wonderful array of vegetable powders that will supercharge your health and diet with just one teaspoon! Head on over to the link below and start investing in your future and your children's future with Dr. Cowan's Vegetable Powder!https://lddy.no/ssidYoungevity:Youngevity is a product we are proud to work with and honored to carry. We have combined a package unique to our listeners that will not only benefit your health but also supercharge your mind, body and spirit! Check out the link below to receive a wonderful package of health products specifically designed for the hooligans at a discounted price. https://wallachswarriors.ca/special/42-starter-pack

pish posh with Lindsey Wilson
#120 Lindsey and Casey - the Salt Lake City recap

pish posh with Lindsey Wilson

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 50:33


A recap on our trip to Salt Lake City including stories on TSA, football, beer, the temple, and more!  Follow the Instagram @pishposhpod --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Your Last Resort Podcast
Ep. 78 My Euro Vacay (Solo Episode)

Your Last Resort Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 25:29


Have you ever been to Europe, wanted to fight TSA, gotten conned by a frenchman, or paid off a drug tester? Then this is the episode for you! Welcome back to Your Last Resort Podcast w/ your host Comedian Brandon Legendre. This week Brandon is joined by himself, it's a quick solo episode. Make sure to rate, review, & subscribe. Most importantly thank you for letting us be your last resort! Brandon's Social: https://linktr.ee/brandonlegendre_

Screaming in the Cloud
Security Challenges and Working for President Biden with Jackie Singh

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 41:45


About JackieJackie Singh is an Information Security professional with more than 20 years of hacking experience, beginning in her preteen years. She began her career in the US Army, and deployed to Iraq in 2003. Jackie subsequently spent several years in Iraq and Africa in cleared roles for the Department of Defense.Since making the shift to the commercial world in 2012, Jackie has held a number of significant roles in operational cybersecurity, including Principal Consultant at Mandiant and FireEye, Global Director of Incident Response at Intel Security and McAfee, and CEO/Cofounder of a boutique consultancy, Spyglass Security.Jackie is currently Director of Technology and Operations at the Surveillance Technology Oversight Project (S.T.O.P.), a 501(C)(3), non-profit advocacy organization and legal services provider. S.T.O.P. litigates and advocates to abolish local governments' systems of mass surveillance.Jackie lives in New York City with her partner, their daughters, and their dog Ziggy.Links: Disclose.io: https://disclose.io Twitter: https://twitter.com/hackingbutlegal TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at VMware. Let's be honest—the past year has been far from easy. Due to, well, everything. It caused us to rush cloud migrations and digital transformation, which of course means long hours refactoring your apps, surprises on your cloud bill, misconfigurations and headache for everyone trying manage disparate and fractured cloud environments. VMware has an answer for this. With VMware multi-cloud solutions, organizations have the choice, speed, and control to migrate and optimizeapplications seamlessly without recoding, take the fastest path to modern infrastructure, and operate consistently across the data center, the edge, and any cloud. I urge to take a look at vmware.com/go/multicloud. You know my opinions on multi cloud by now, but there's a lot of stuff in here that works on any cloud. But don't take it from me thats: VMware.com/go/multicloud and my thanks to them again for sponsoring my ridiculous nonsense.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by “you”—gabyte. Distributed technologies like Kubernetes are great, citation very much needed, because they make it easier to have resilient, scalable, systems. SQL databases haven't kept pace though, certainly not like no SQL databases have like Route 53, the world's greatest database. We're still, other than that, using legacy monolithic databases that require ever growing instances of compute. Sometimes we'll try and bolt them together to make them more resilient and scalable, but let's be honest it never works out well. Consider Yugabyte DB, its a distributed SQL database that solves basically all of this. It is 100% open source, and there's not asterisk next to the “open” on that one. And its designed to be resilient and scalable out of the box so you don't have to charge yourself to death. It's compatible with PostgreSQL, or “postgresqueal” as I insist on pronouncing it, so you can use it right away without having to learn a new language and refactor everything. And you can distribute it wherever your applications take you, from across availability zones to other regions or even other cloud providers should one of those happen to exist. Go to yugabyte.com, thats Y-U-G-A-B-Y-T-E dot com and try their free beta of Yugabyte Cloud, where they host and manage it for you. Or see what the open source project looks like—its effortless distributed SQL for global apps. My thanks to Yu—gabyte for sponsoring this episode.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. The best part about being me—well, there's a lot of great things about being me, but from my perspective, the absolute best part is that I get to interview people on the show who have done awesome and impressive things. Therefore by osmosis, you tend to assume that I'm smart slash know-what-the-living-hell-I'm-talking-about. This is proveably untrue, but that's okay.Even when I say it outright, this will fade into the depths of your mind and not take hold permanently. Today is, of course, no exception. My guest is Jackie Singh, who's an information security professional, which is probably the least interesting way to describe who she is and what she does. Most recently, she was a senior cybersecurity staffer at the Biden campaign. Thank you so much for joining me. What was that like?Jackie: Thank you so much for having me. What was that like? The most difficult and high-pressure, high-stress job I've ever had in my life. And, you know, I spent most of my early 20s in Iraq and Africa. [laugh].Corey: It's interesting, you're not the first person to make the observation that, “Well, I was in the military, and things are blowing up all around, and what I'm doing next to me is like—‘oh, the site is down and can't show ads to people?' Bah, that's not pressure.” You're going the other direction. It's like, yeah, this was higher stress than that. And that right there is not a common sentiment.Jackie: I couldn't anticipate, when I was contacted for the role—for which I had applied to through the front door like everyone else, sent in my resume, thought it looked pretty cool—I didn't expect to be contacted. And when I was interviewed and got through the interviews and accepted the role, I still did not properly anticipate how this would change my life and how it would modify my life in the span of just a few months; I was on the campaign for five to six months.Corey: Now, there's a couple of interesting elements to this. The first is it's rare that people will say, “Oh, I had a job for five to six months,” and, a, put it on their resume because that sounds like, “Ah, are you one of those job-hopper types?” But when you go into a political campaign, it's very clearly, win or lose, we're out of jobs in November. Ish. And that is something that is really neat from the perspective of career management and career planning. Usually is, “Hey, do you want a six-month job?” It's, “Why? Because I'm going to rage quit at the end of it. That seems a little on the weird side.” But with a campaign, it's a very different story. It seems like a different universe in some respects.Jackie: Yes, absolutely. It was different than any other role I'd ever had. And being a political dilettante, [laugh] essentially, walking into this, I couldn't possibly anticipate what that environment would be like. And, frankly, it is a bit gatekept in the sense that if you haven't participated on a campaign before, you really don't have any idea what to expect, and they're all a bit different to, like, their own special snowflake, based on the people who are there, and the moment in time during which you are campaigning, and who you are campaigning for. And it really does change a perspective on civic life and what you can do with your time if you chose to spend it doing something a little bigger than your typical TechOps.Corey: It also is a great answer, too, when people don't pay close enough attention. “So, why'd you leave your last job?” “He won.” Seems like a pretty—Jackie: [laugh].Corey: —easy answer to give, on some level.Jackie: Yes, absolutely. But imagine the opposite. Imagine if our candidate had lost, or if we had had data walk out the door like in 2016. The Democratic National Convention was breached in 2016 and some unflattering information was out the door, emails were hacked. And so it was difficult to anticipate… what we had control over and how much control we could actually exert over the process itself, knowing that if we failed, the repercussions would be extremely severe.Corey: It's a different story than a lot of InfoSec gigs. Companies love to talk like it is the end of the universe if they wind up having a data breach, in some effect. They talk about that the world ends because for them it kind of does because you have an ablative CSO who tries to also armor themselves with ablative interns that they can blame—if your SolarWinds. But the idea being that, “Oh yeah, if we get breached we are dunzo.”And it's, first, not really. Let's not inflate the risks here. Let's be honest; we're talking about something like you're a retailer; if you get breached, people lose a bunch of credit card numbers, the credit card companies have to reissue it to everyone, you get slapped with a fine, and you get dragged in the press, but statistically, look at your stock price a year later, it will be higher than at the time of the breach in almost every case. This is not the end of the world. You're talking about something though that has impacts that have impossible-to-calculate repercussions.We're talking about an entire administration shift; US foreign policy, domestic policy, how the world works and functions is in no small part tied to data security. That's a different level of stress than I think most security folks, if you get them honest enough, are going to admit that, yeah, what I do isn't that important from an InfoSec perspective. What you did is.Jackie: I appreciate that, especially having worked in the military. Since I left the military, I was always looking for a greater purpose and a larger mission to serve. And in this instance, the scope of work was somewhat limited, but the impact of failing would have been quite wide-ranging, as you've correctly identified. And walking into that role, I knew there was a limited time window to get the work done. I knew that as we progressed and got closer and closer to election day, we would have more resources, more money rolls in, more folks feel secure in the campaign and understand what the candidate stands for, and want to pump money into the coffers. And so you're also in an interesting situation because your resourcing is increasing, proportional to the threat, which is very time-bound.Corey: An inherent challenge is that unlike in a corporate environment, in many respects, where engineers can guard access to things and give the business clear lines of access to things and handle all of it in the background, one of the challenges with a campaign is that you are responsible for data security in a variety of different ways, and the interfaces to that data explode geometrically and to people with effectively no level whatsoever of technical sophistication. I'm not talking about the candidate necessarily—though that's of course, a concern—but I'm talking organizers, I'm talking volunteers, I'm talking folks who are lifelong political operatives, but they tend not to think in terms of, “Oh, I should enable multi-factor authentication on everything that I have,” because that is not what they are graded on; it's pass-fail. So, it's one of those things where it is not the number one priority for anyone else in your organization, but it is yours and you not only have to get things into fighting shape, you have to furthermore convince people to do the things that get them there. How do you approach that?Jackie: Security awareness [laugh] in a nutshell. We were lucky to work with Bob Lord, who is former CSO at Yahoo, OAuth, Rapid7, and has held a number of really important roles that were very wide in their scope, and responsible for very massive data sets. And we were lucky enough to, in the democratic ecosystem, have a CSO who really understood the nature of the problem, and the way that you described it just now is incredibly apt. You're working with folks that have no understanding or very limited understanding of what the threat actors were interested in breaching the campaign, what their capability set is, and how they might attempt to breach an organization. But you also had some positives out of that.When you're working with a campaign that is distributed, your workforce is distributed, and your systems are also distributed. And when you lose that centralization that many enterprises rely on to get the job done, you also reduce opportunities for attackers to compromise one system or one user and move laterally. So, that was something that we had working for us. So, security awareness was incredibly important. My boss worked on that quite a bit.We had an incredible IT help desk who really focused on connecting with users and running them through a checklist so everyone in the campaign had been onboarded with a specific set of capabilities and an understanding of what the security setup was and how to go about their business in a secure way. And luckily, very good decisions had been made on the IT side prior to the security team joining the organization, which set the stage for a strong architecture that was resistant to attack. So, I think a lot of the really solid decisions and security awareness propagation had occurred prior to myself and my boss joining the campaign.Corey: One of the things that I find interesting is that before you started that role—you mentioned you came in through the front door, which personally I've never successfully gotten a job like that; I always have to weasel my way in because I have an eighth-grade education and my resume—Jackie: [laugh].Corey: —well, tenure-wise, kind of, looks like a whole bunch of political campaigns. And that's fine, but before that, you were running your own company that was a focused security consultancy. Before that, your resume is a collection of impressive names. You were a principal consultant at Mandiant, you were at Accenture. You know what you're talking about.You were at McAfee slash Intel. You've done an awful lot of corporate world stuff. What made you decide to just wake up one day and decide, “You know what sounds awesome? Politics because the level of civil discourse there is awesome, and everyone treats everyone with respect and empathy, and no one gets heated or makes ridiculous arguments and the rest. That's the area I want to go into.” What flipped that switch for you?Jackie: If I'm completely honest, it was pure boredom. [laugh]. I started my business, Spyglass Security, with my co-founder, Jason [Shore 00:11:11]. And our purpose was to deliver boutique consulting services in a way that was efficient, in a way that built on prior work, and in a way that helped advance the security maturity of an organization without a lot of complex terminology, 150-page management consulting reports, right? What are the most effective operational changes we can make to an organization in how they work, in order to lead to some measurable improvement?And we had a good success at the New York City Board of Elections where we were a subcontractor to a large security firm. And we were in there for about a year, building them a vulnerability management program, which was great. But generally speaking, I have found myself bored with having the same conversations about cybersecurity again and again, at the startup level and really even at the enterprise level. And I was looking for something new to do, and the role was posted in a Slack that I co-founded that is full of digital forensics and information security folks, incident responders, those types of people.And I didn't hear of anyone else applying for the role. And I just thought, “Wow, maybe this is the kind of opportunity that I won't see again.” And I honestly sent my resume and didn't expect to hear anything back, so it was incredible to be contacted by the chief information security officer about a month after he was hired.Corey: One of the things that made it very clear that you were doing good work was the fact that there was a hit piece taken out on you in one of the absolute worst right-wing rags. I didn't remember what it was. It's one of those, oh, I'd been following you on Twitter for a bit before that, but it was one of those okay, but I tend to shortcut to figuring out who I align with based upon who yells at them. It's one of those—to extend it a bit further—I'm lazy, politically speaking. I wind up looking at two sides yelling at each other, I find out what side the actual literal flag-waving Nazis are on, and then I go to the other side because I don't ever want someone to mistake me for one of those people. And same story here. It's okay, you're clearly doing good work because people have bothered to yell at you in what we will very generously term ‘journalism.'Jackie: Yeah, I wouldn't refer to any of those folks—it was actually just one quote-unquote journalist from a Washington tabloid who decided to write a hit piece the week after I announced on Twitter that I'd had this role. And I took two months or so to think about whether I would announce my position at the campaign. I kept it very quiet, told a couple of my friends, but I was really busy and I wasn't sure if that was something I wanted to do. You know, as an InfoSec professional, that you need to keep your mouth shut about most things that happened in the workplace, period. It's a sensitive type of role and your discretion is critical.But Kamala really changed my mind. Kamala became the nominee and, you know, I have a similar background to hers. I'm half Dominican—my mother's from the Dominican Republic and my father is from India, so I have a similar background where I'm South Asian and Afro-Caribbean—and it just felt like the right time to bolster her profile by sharing that the Biden campaign was really interested in putting diverse candidates in the world of politics, and making sure that people like me have a seat at the table. I have three young daughters. I have a seven-year-old, a two-year-old, and a one-year-old.And the thing I want for them to know in their heart of hearts is that they can do anything they want. And so it felt really important and powerful for me to make a small public statement on Twitter about the role I had been in for a couple of months. And once I did that, Corey, all hell broke loose. I mean, I was suddenly the target of conspiracy theorists, I had people trying to reach out to me in every possible way. My LinkedIn messages, it just became a morass of—you know, on one hand, I had a lot of folks congratulate me and say nice things and provide support, and on the other, I just had a lot of, you know, kind of nutty folks reach out and have an idea of what I was working to accomplish that maybe was a bit off base.So yeah, I really wasn't surprised to find out that a right-wing or alt-right tabloid had attempted to write a hit piece on me. But at the end of the day, I had to keep moving even though it was difficult to be targeted like that. I mean, it's just not typical. You don't take a job and tell people you got a job, [laugh] and then get attacked for it on the national stage. It was really unsurprising on one hand, yet really quite shocking on another; something I had to adjust to very quickly. I did cry at work. I did get on the phone with legal and HR and cry like a baby. [laugh].Corey: Oh, yeah.Jackie: Yeah. It was scary.Corey: I guess this is an example of my naivete, but I do not understand people on the other side of the issue of InfoSec for a political campaign—and I want to be clear, I include that to every side of an aisle—I think there are some quote-unquote, “Political positions” that are absolutely abhorrent, but I also in the same breath will tell you that they should have and deserve data security and quality InfoSec representation. In a defensive capacity, to be clear. If you're—“I'm the offensive InfoSec coordinator for a campaign,” that's a different story. And we can have a nuanced argument about that.Jackie: [laugh].Corey: Also to be very clear, for the longest time—I would say almost all of my career until a few years ago—I was of the impression whatever I do, I keep my politics to myself. I don't talk about it in public because all I would realistically be doing is alienating potentially half of my audience. And what shifted that is two things. One of them, for me at least, is past a certain point, let's be very clear here: silence is consent. And I don't ever want to be even mistaken at a glance for being on the wrong side of some of these issues.On another, it's, I don't accept, frankly, that a lot of the things that are currently considered partisan are in fact, political issues. I can have a nuanced political debate on either side of the aisle on actual political issues—talking about things like tax policy, talking about foreign policy, talking about how we interact with the world, and how we fund things we care about and things that we don't—I can have those discussions. But I will not engage and I will not accept that, who gets to be people is a political issue. I will not accept that treating people with respect, regardless of how high or low their station, is a political issue. I will not accept that giving voice to our worst darkest impulses is a political position.I just won't take it. And maybe that makes me a dreamer. I don't consider myself a political animal. I really don't. I am not active in local politics. Or any politics for that matter. It's just, I will not compromise on treating people as people. And I never thought, until recently, that would be a political position, but apparently, it is.Jackie: Well, we were all taught the golden rule is children.Corey: There's a lot of weird things that were taught as children that it turns out, don't actually map to the real world. The classic example of that is sharing. It's so important that we teach the kids to share, and always share your toys and the rest. And now we're adults, how often do we actually share things with other people that aren't members of our immediate family? Turns out not that often. It's one of those lessons that ideally should take root and lead into being decent people and expressing some form of empathy, but the actual execution of it, it's yeah, sharing is not really a thing that we value in society.Jackie: Not in American society.Corey: Well, there is that. And that's the challenge, is we're always viewing the world through the lens of our own experiences, both culturally and personally, and it's easy to fall into the trap that is pernicious and it's always there, that our view of the world is objective and correct, and everyone else is seeing things from a perspective that is not nearly as rational and logical as our own. It's a spectrum of experience. No one wakes up in the morning and thinks that they are the villain in the story unless they work for Facebook's ethics department. It's one of those areas of just people have a vision of themselves that they generally try to live up to, and let's be honest people fell in love with one vision of themselves, it's the cognitive dissonance thing where people will shift their beliefs instead of their behavior because it's easier to do that, and reframe the narrative.It's strange how we got to this conversation from a starting position of, “Let's talk about InfoSec,” but it does come back around. It comes down to understanding the InfoSec posture of a political campaign. It's one of those things that until I started tracking who you were and what you were doing, it wasn't something really crossed my mind. Of course, now you think about, of course there's a whole InfoSec operation for every campaign, ever. But you don't think about it; it's behind the scenes; it's below the level of awareness that most people have.Now, what's really interesting to me, and I'm curious if you can talk about this, is historically the people working on the guts of a campaign—as it were—don't make public statements, they don't have public personas, they either don't use Twitter or turn their accounts private and the rest during the course of the campaign. You were active and engaging with people and identifying as someone who is active in the Biden campaign's InfoSec group. What made you decide to do that?Jackie: Well, on one hand, it did not feel useful to cut myself off from the world during the campaign because I have so many relationships in the cybersecurity community. And I was able to leverage those by connecting with folks who had useful information for me; folks outside of your organization often have useful information to bring back, for example, bug bounties and vulnerability disclosure programs that are established by companies in order to give hackers a outlet. If you find something on hardwarestore.com, and you want to share that with the company because you're a white hat hacker and you think that's the right thing to do, hopefully, there's some sort of a structure for you to be able to do that. And so, in the world of campaigning, I think information security is a relatively new development.It has been, maybe, given more resources in this past year on the presidential level than ever before. I think that we're going to continue to see an increase in the amount of resources given to the information security department on every campaign. But I'm also a public person. I really do appreciate the opportunity to interact with my community, to share and receive information about what it is that we do and what's happening in the world and what affects us from tech and information security perspective.Corey: It's just astonishing for me to see from the outside because you are working on something that is foundationally critically important. Meanwhile, people working on getting people to click ads or whatnot over at Amazon have to put ‘opinions my own' in their Twitter profile, whereas you were very outspoken about what you believe and who you are. And that's a valuable thing.Jackie: I think it's important. I think we often allow corporations to dictate our personality, we allow our jobs to dictate our personality, we allow corporate mores to dictate our behavior. And we have to ask ourselves who we want to be at the end of the day and what type of energy we want to put out into the world, and that's a choice that we make every day. So, what I can say is that it was a conscious decision. I can say that I worked 14 hours a day, or something, for five, six months. There were no weekends; there was no time off; there were a couple of overnights.Corey: “So, what do you get to sleep?” “November.”Jackie: Yeah. [laugh]. My partner took care of the kids. He was an absolute beast. I mean, he made sure that the house ran, and I paid no attention to it. I was just not a mom for those several months, in my own home.Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Oracle HeatWave is a new high-performance accelerator for the Oracle MySQL Database Service. Although I insist on calling it “my squirrel.” While MySQL has long been the worlds most popular open source database, shifting from transacting to analytics required way too much overhead and, ya know, work. With HeatWave you can run your OLTP and OLAP, don't ask me to ever say those acronyms again, workloads directly from your MySQL database and eliminate the time consuming data movement and integration work, while also performing 1100X faster than Amazon Aurora, and 2.5X faster than Amazon Redshift, at a third of the cost. My thanks again to Oracle Cloud for sponsoring this ridiculous nonsense. Corey: Back in 2019, I gave a talk at re:Invent—which is always one of those things that's going to occasion comment—and the topic that we covered was building a vulnerability disclosure program built upon the story of a vulnerability that I reported into AWS. And it was a decent enough experience that I suggested at some point that you should talk about this publicly, and they said, “You should come talk about it with us.” And I did and it was a blast. But it suddenly became very clear, during the research for that talk and talking to people who've set those programs up is that look, one way or another, people are going to find vulnerabilities in what you do and how you do them. And if you don't give them an easy way to report them to you, that's okay.You'll find out about them in other scenarios when they're on the front page of the New York Times. So, you kind of want to be out there and accessible to people. Now, there's a whole story we can go into about the pros and cons of things like bug bounties and the rest, and of course, it's a nuanced issue, but the idea of at least making it easy for people to wind up reporting things from that perspective is one of those key areas of outreach. Back in the early days of InfoSec, people would explore different areas of systems that they had access to, and very often they were charged criminally. Intel wound up having charges against one of their—I believe it was their employee or something, who wound up founding something and reporting it in an ethical way.The idea of doing something like that is just ludicrous. You're in that space a lot more than I am. Do you still see that sort of chilling effect slash completely not getting it when someone is trying to, in good faith, report security issues? Or has the world largely moved on from that level of foolishness?Jackie: Both. The larger organizations that have mature security programs, and frankly, the organizations that have experienced a significant public breach, the organizations that have experienced pain are those that know better at this point and realize they do need to have a program, they do need to have a process and a procedure, and they need to have some kind of framework for folks to share information with them in a way that doesn't cause them to respond with, “Are you extorting me? Is this blackmail?” As a cybersecurity professional working at my own security firm and also doing security research, I have reported dozens of vulnerabilities that I've identified, open buckets, for example. My partner at Spyglass and I built a SaaS application called Data Drifter a few years ago.We were interviewed by NBC about this and NBC followed up on quite a few of our vulnerability disclosures and published an article. But what the software did was look for open buckets on Azure, AWS, and GCP and provide an analyst interface that allows a human to trawl through very large datasets and understand what they're looking at. So, for example, one of the finds that we had was that musical.ly—musical-dot-L-Y, which was purchased by TikTok, eventually—had a big, large open bucket with a lot of data, and we couldn't figure out how to report it properly. And they eventually took it down.But you really had to try to understand what you were looking at; if you have a big bucket full of different data types, you don't have a name on the bucket, and you don't know who it belongs to because you're not Google, or Amazon, or Microsoft, what do you do with this information? And so we spent a lot of time trying to reconcile open buckets with their owners and then contacting those owners. So, we've received a gamut of ranges of responses to vulnerability disclosure. On one hand, there is an established process at an organization that is visible by the way they respond and how they handle your inquiry. Some folks have ticketing systems, some folks respond directly to you from the security team, which is great, and you can really see and get an example of what their routing is inside the company.And then other organizations really have no point of reference for that kind of thing, and when something comes into either their support channels or even directly into the cybersecurity team, they're often scrambling for an effective way to respond to this. And it could go either way; it could get pretty messy at times. I've been threatened legally and I've been accused of extortion, even when we weren't trying to offer some type of a service. I mean, you really never walk into a vulnerability disclosure scenario and then offer consulting services because they are going to see it as a marketing ploy and you never want to make that a marketing ploy. I mean, it's just not… it's not effective and it's not ethical, it's not the right thing to do.So, it's been interesting. [laugh]. I would recommend, if you are a person listening to this podcast who has some sort of pull in the information security department at your organization, I would recommend that you start with disclose.io, which was put together by Casey John Ellis and some other folks over at Bugcrowd and some other volunteers. It's a really great starting point for understanding how to implement a vulnerability disclosure program and making sure that you are able to receive the information in a way that prevents a PR disaster.Corey: My approach is controversial—I know this—but I believe that the way that you're approaching this was entirely fatally flawed, of trying to report to people that they have an open S3 bucket. The proper way to do it is to upload reams of data to it because my operating theory is that they're going to ignore a politely worded note from a security researcher, but they're not going to ignore a $4 million surprise bill at the end of the month from AWS. That'll get fixed tout suite. To be clear to the audience, I am kidding on this. Don't do it. There's a great argument that you can be charged criminally for doing such a thing. I'm kidding. It's a fun joke. Don't do it. I cannot stress that enough. We now go to Jackie for her laughter at that comment.Jackie: [laugh].Corey: There we go.Jackie: I'm on cue. Well, a great thing about Data Drifter, that SaaS application that allowed analysts to review the contents of these open buckets, was that it was all JavaScript on the client-side, and so we weren't actually hosting any of that data ourselves. So, they must have noticed some transfer fees that were excessive, but if you're not looking at security and you have an infrastructure that isn't well monitored, you may not be looking at costs either.Corey: Costs are one of those things that are very aligned spiritually with security. It's a trailing function that you don't care about until right after you really should have cared about it. With security, it's a bit of a disaster when it hits, whereas with those surprise bills, “Oh, okay. We wasted some money.” That's usually, a, not front-page material and, b, it's okay, let's be responsible and fix that up where it makes sense, but it's something that is never a priority. It's never a ‘summon the board' story for anything short of complete and utter disaster. So, I do feel a sense of spiritual alignment here.Jackie: [laugh]. I can see that. That makes perfect sense.Corey: Before we call this an episode, one other area that you've been active within is something called ‘threat modeling.' What is it?Jackie: So, threat modeling is a way to think strategically about cybersecurity. You want to defend, effectively, by understanding your organization as a collection of people, and you want to help non-technical staff support the cybersecurity program. So, the way to do that is potentially to give a human-centric focus to threat modeling activities. Threat modeling is a methodology for linking humans to an effective set of prioritized defenses for the most likely types of adversaries that they might face. And so essentially the process is identifying your subject and defining the scope of what you would like to protect.Are you looking to protect this person's personal life? Are you exclusively protecting their professional life or what they're doing in relation to an organization? And you want to iterate through a few questions and document an attack tree. Then you would research some tactics and vulnerabilities, and implement defensive controls. So, in a nutshell, we want to know what assets does your subject have or have access to, that someone might want to spy, steal, or harm; you want to get an idea of what types of adversaries you can expect based on those assets or accesses that they have, and you then want to understand what tactics those adversaries are likely to use to compromise those assets or accesses, and you then transform that into the most effective defenses against those likely tactics.So, using that in practice, you would typically build an attack tree that starts with the human at the center and lists out all of their assets and accesses. And then off of those, each of those assets or accesses, you would want to map out their adversary personas. So, for example, if I work at a bank and I work on wire transfers, my likely adversary would be a financially motivated cybercriminal, right? Pretty standard stuff. And we want to understand what are the methods that these actors are going to employ in order to get the job done.So, in a common case, in a business email compromised context, folks might rely on a signer at a company to sign off on a wire transfer, and if the threat actor has an opportunity to gain access to that person's email address or the mechanism by which they make that approval, then they may be able to redirect funds to their own wallet that was intended for someone else or a partner of the company. Adversaries tend to employ the least difficult approach; whatever the easiest way in is what they're going to employ. I mean, we spend a lot of time in the field of information security and researching the latest vulnerabilities and attack paths and what are all the different ways that a system or a person or an application can be compromised, but in reality, the simplest stuff is usually what works, and that's what they're looking for. They're looking for the easiest way in. And you can really observe that with ransomware, where attackers are employing a spray and pray methodology.They're looking for whatever they can find in terms of open attack surface on the net, and then they're targeting organizations based on who they can compromise after the fact. So, they don't start with an organization in mind, they might start with a type of system that they know they can easily compromise and then they look for those, and then they decide whether they're going to ransomware that organization or not. So, it's really a useful way, when you're thinking about human-centric threat modeling, it's really a useful way to completely map your valuables and your critical assets to the most effective ways to protect those. I hope that makes sense.Corey: It very much does. It's understanding the nature of where you start, where you stop, what is reasonable, what is not reasonable. Because like a lot of different areas—DR, for example—security is one of those areas you could hurl infinite money into and still never be done. It's where do you consider it reasonable to start? Where do you consider it reasonable to stop? And without having an idea of what the model of threat you're guarding against is, the answer is, “All the money,” which it turns out, boards are surprisingly reluctant to greenlight.Jackie: Absolutely. We have a recurring problem and information security where we cannot measure return on investment. And so it becomes really difficult to try to validate a negative. It's kind of like the TSA; the TSA can say that they've spent a lot of money and that nothing has happened or that any incidents have been limited in their scope due to the work that they've done, but can we really quantify the amount of money that DHS has absorbed for the TSA's mission, and turned that into a really wonderful and measurable understanding of how we spent that money, and whether it was worth it? No, we can't really. And so we're always struggling with that insecurity, and I don't think we'll have an answer for it in the next ten years or so.Corey: No, I suspect not, on some level. It's one of those areas where I think the only people who are really going to have a holistic perspective on this are historians.Jackie: I agree.Corey: And sadly I'm not a cloud historian; I'm a cloud economist, a completely different thing I made up.Jackie: [laugh]. Well, from my perspective, I think it's a great title. And I agree with your thought about historians, and I look forward to finding out how they felt about what we did in the information security space, both political and non-political, 20, 30, and 40 years from now.Corey: I hope to live long enough to see that. Jackie, thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me today. If people want to learn more about what you're up to and how you view things, where can they find you?Jackie: You can find me on Twitter at @hackingbutlegal.Corey: Great handle. I love it.Jackie: Thank you so much for having me.Corey: Oh, of course. It is always great to talk with you. Jackie Singh, principal threat analyst, and incident responder at the Biden campaign. Obviously not there anymore. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast provider of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with a comment expressing an incoherent bigoted tirade that you will, of course, classify as a political opinion, and get you evicted from said podcast provider.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Tim Conway Jr. on Demand
Hour 4 | The Squid Game @ConwayShow

Tim Conway Jr. on Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 31:40


Zachary Anderson-Yoxsimer// Joe Rogan on this country//WHIP: How many guns TSA has found? 7900 / Sam Kinison// Pronouns / Who's on first?// Noory / The Squid Game - Netflix

TravelCommons
High-Tech Airport Lines; Business Travel Still Missing

TravelCommons

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 28:11


Not much travel, but a lot of travel planning for our first post-lockdown international trip to Italy. Trying to thread our way through changing COVID rules and Alitalia's bankruptcy throes. I'm getting inundated with discount offers for Clear's fast-pass service. I've resisted them so far, because I remember back to when the first incarnation of Clear wanted to sell its members' biometric data. We then talk to Xovis Technology‘s Cody Shulman about how airports are better managing all sorts of lines in airports. Finally, air passenger traffic is dropping again because business travelers are still MIA.Check out this episode's show notes here

John and Ken on Demand
John & Ken Show Hour 1 (09/27)

John and Ken on Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 35:51


John got randomly selected by TSA at the airport over the weekend. Chris Wallace of Fox News grilled DHS Sec. Alejandro Mayorkas on the border crisis over the weekend. Unemployment levels in California were at their highest levels in 5 months last week.

Texas History Lessons
This Month In Texas History - September

Texas History Lessons

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2021 28:00


In this episode we celebrate many important dates in September Texas History including the September 16, 1810 Cry of Dolores that launched the struggle for Mexican independence, the election of Sam Houston as the first president of the Texas Republic and many more. From the settlement of the lower Rio Grande to the Galveston Hurricane of 1900. The song heard at the beginning and end of this episode is "I Love" by the great Mando Salas, THL's spotlight artist. Also-be sure to listen to Zach Welch's new song Ada! Mando Salas is a Texas Country musician and a Del Rio, Texas native. Performing under the band name Rosmand, Mando incorporates his roots into his songwriting and he has a great, distinctive voice that conveys a lot of feeling. When he sings about love, you can feel it and when he sings about loss and pain, you feel it.  Mando started his live music career began back in 2015 – and in 2016 he recorded his first single “Devil's River."  In July of 2018 he released a single titled “How It Goes” which was his first song to hit Texas Radio. “How It Goes” is a song that is also featured on his debut album “Forever” which was released August 2018. . And the great news is that Mando is currently working on his second album. I'll let you know when its available. But for now, go to Spotify, iTunes, Amazon, Youtube, or wherever and listen to everything he has released. I guarantee that many of you are going to find a new favorite artist to love.  Mando Salas is on Twitter under @rosmandtex Mando Salas' band Rosmand has a great website. To visit click HERE! Listen to his music on Spotify! If you have any photography project needs from real estate photography to help sell a place or aerial videos of a property or event, I want you to consider contracting Panther City Air. With top notch equipment and expert skill, Panther City Air can fulfill just about anything you need. Panther City Air's drone pilot is TSA background-checked, Part 107 certified, and carries multiple drones (each insured) to meet the challenges of your mission. Upon completion of your flight, the data gathered can sometimes be quickly shared in the field, or taken to be edited/processed in a timely manner to meet your needs. Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS's aka drones) are commonly used for aerial photography or videography, while other solutions include construction progress documentation, roof or tower inspections, crop health analysis, 3D modeling, among many others. Click here to watch the video showing the 1836 San Antonio map transition to the present day. So go visit PANTHER CITY AIR to see how they can fulfill your needs.   texashistorylessons.com email: texashistorylessons@gmail.com Twitter: @TexasHistoryL Facebook Group: Texas History Lessons Help make Texas History Lessons by supporting on Patreon. And a special thanks to everyone that already does. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Dallas Morning News
9/23/21: Dallas City Council approves $4.35 billion city budget...and more news

The Dallas Morning News

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 4:13


Dallas City Council approves $4.35 billion city budget; Texas lawmakers receive credible threat of violence tied to vote for new abortion law; DFW Airport is testing ‘fast passes' that let you jump to the front of the TSA security line; Abbott asks lawmakers to use $2B of Texas' surplus for more property tax cuts

Veteran On the Move
Connecting Knife Creators and Customers With BladesWork Unlimited

Veteran On the Move

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 29:53


Co-founders of BladesWork Unlimited and Marine Corps Veterans, Christian Helms and Robert ‘Bo' Plante came by the show to share more about their business and the story behind their startup journey. BladesWork Unlimited provides a sales and marketing platform to bladesmiths, connecting them with customers. Through BladesWork's marketplace, customers can create custom knives or shop from qualified, vetted craftsmen. Bo and Christian share how they transitioned from the Marines into entrepreneurship and the value of their military experience. They discuss entering and eventually winning funding through a pitch competition and how that helped grow their business.  Are you a Veteran who is transitioning to Entrepreneurship? Then check out this FREE download for the Top 29 Entrepreneurship Programs for Veterans & their families! Download Here ! About Our Guests Christian Helms served for 12 years in the Marine Corps, five years enlisted in Reserves and seven years on active duty as an Infantry Officer. BladesWork started as Shadow Blades Forge in 2018 and then became BladesWork unlimited in 2020. Christian has been making knives for 10 years and absolutely loves the community and the process of creating masterpieces.  Robert 'Bo' Plante is a former Marine Officer and current business owner, consultant, and MBA Graduate Student at George Washington University. During his time on active duty, Bo began his graduate studies at night and co-founded BladesWork Unlimited. Upon EAS, Bo has begun working as a consultant for TSA and DHS and developing a series of leadership discussions for mid-level employees and future leaders, as well as continuing his service in the National Guard.    Join the conversation on our Facebook! Check out Veteran on the Move on Facebook to connect with our guests and other listeners. A place where you can network with other like-minded veterans who are transitioning to entrepreneurship and get updates on people, programs and resources to help you in YOUR transition to entrepreneurship. About Our Sponsors Navy Federal Credit Union  We've bought a few cars with Navy Federal over my 31 years as a member with their fully loaded car buying experience. When you become a member of Navy Federal Credit Union, life gets better.  You can finance, buy, protect, and enjoy your auto purchase all through one convenient place. They have low rates and preapproval that's good for 90 days, so you know what you can afford while you shop. You can save thousands off MSRP with Navy Federal's car buying service, powered by TrueCar. You can also get exclusive member savings with CARFAX, GEICO and SiriusXM. They're always available with 24/7 member service representatives to answer any questions. Learn more here.  At Navy Federal, our members are the mission.  Credit and collateral subject to approval. Your actual savings off MSRP may vary. Navy Federal Credit Union is federally insured by NCUA. 20 for 20 Podcast It's the 20th anniversary of 9/11 which means that college freshmen weren't even alive then. And with our busy lives and the 24 hour news cycle, the country is in danger of forgetting 9/11. It's why I'm excited to tell you about a podcast called 20 for 20 that's telling 20 heroic stories about 9/11 for the 20th anniversary. It's hosted by a firefighter named Niels Jorgensen who got leukemia from cleaning up Ground Zero and the storytelling is powerful.  To check out these incredible stories, go to 20for20Podcast.com or you can find 20 for 20 wherever you get your podcasts. Want to be our next guest? Send us an email at interview@veteranonthemove.com.  Did you love this episode? Leave us a 5-star rating and review!  Download Joe Crane's Top 7 Paths to Freedom or get it on your mobile device. Text VETERAN to 38470. Veteran On the Move podcast has published over 375 episodes. Our listeners have the opportunity to hear in-depth interviews conducted by host Joe Crane.

FlyingTalkers
Airlines Had Issues Before COVID/Get TSA Out of Air Cargo/ Au Revoir Laurent

FlyingTalkers

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2021 35:39


Bill Boesch is a true air cargo pioneer having served at top posts for Seaboard World, Pan American, American Airlines, Emery, DHL and elsewhere. One of my fondest memories is Bill inside a container with Julie Kupersmit at the TIACA Show in Manhattan 40 years ago drawing sketches for a new container on scrap paper. Little wonder that later that Bill was a force behind Envirotainer. Here Bill who delivers the unvarnished truth about things, and is still quite active with military transport, talks about the state of the airlines today. Mike White told Los Angeles Air Cargo Association (LAACA) luncheon meeting: "Due to the stuck in the mud bureaucracy that maybe it is time that TSA not be the agency in charge of air cargo security and maybe taken over by CBP who has more capabilities and understanding of transportation logistics." Au Revoir Laurent A great pioneer of air cargo in France, and beyond that a genuinely lovely human being, Laurent Bernet died July 7 in Paris of cancer that he had been battling for the past decade. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/geoffrey-arend/support

Understanding Immigration
9/11 and Immigration

Understanding Immigration

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2021 32:28


In this episode, we discuss how President Biden and his administration have outright ignored the 9/11 Commission's national security recommendations.

Day Old Podcast
EP42 - World War III: RELOADED

Day Old Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 107:17


In this EPIC AND KINDA LONG episode, Will(yes, he's back), Rocky and Virgil discuss the warm and fuzzy topics of 9/11 and the TSA, the possibility of World War III (not as good as the first two tbh), The Matrix Resurrections trailer, the new Amazon Lord of the Rings series, and more!  Stay tuned! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/dayoldsushi/message

The Situation Room with Wolf Blitzer
New DHS Warning Of Potential Violence At Upcoming Rally

The Situation Room with Wolf Blitzer

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 37:54


The Department of Homeland Security warns of potential violence at an upcoming pro-January 6 rally in DC on Saturday. Former President Donald Trump says "hearts and minds" are with "persecuted" January 6 rioters ahead of the far-right rally at the Capitol. The National Guard has recruited additional people to help secure the United States Capitol building. The DC-area airports are also adding TSA agents ahead of the September 18 rally. Fencing around the Capitol building is back up as security has been tightened ahead of the rally.  Republican lawmakers are trying to distance themselves from the far-right rally, but the GOP leadership hasn't condemned the rally as of yet. The January 6 committee is seeking records on General Milley's reported actions surrounding Jan 6. America's top general denies wrongdoing amid calls for his resignation over reported moves to protect the United States from Trump. The committee says they will "carefully evaluate" the facts.  There has been booster confusion hours before the FDA vaccine advisers meet.  Murdaugh lawyer says Murdaugh "has fallen from grace" as Murdaugh's bail is set at $20,000. The South Carolina lawyer admits to arranging his own murder for an insurance payout as the killing of his wife and son remains unsolved.  To learn more about how CNN protects listener privacy, visit cnn.com/privacy

Eye on Travel with Peter Greenberg
Administrator of the TSA and former Acting United States Secretary David Pekoske, Former Mayor of Gander Claude Elliott, and more

Eye on Travel with Peter Greenberg

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 52:01


This week's Eye on Travel Podcast with Peter Greenberg reflects on the 20th Anniversary of 9/11, the lessons learned, changes in security and on planes, and the story of a small Canadian town that welcomed thousands of people when all planes were grounded with Administrator of the TSA and former Acting United States Secretary David Pekoske, Former Mayor of Gander Claude Elliott, Commercial Airline Pilot Patrick Smith, and Author of The Only Plane in the Sky, Garrett Graff.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Travel Today with Peter Greenberg
Administrator of the TSA and former Acting United States Secretary David Pekoske, Former Mayor of Gander Claude Elliott, and more

Travel Today with Peter Greenberg

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 52:01


This week's Eye on Travel Podcast with Peter Greenberg reflects on the 20th Anniversary of 9/11, the lessons learned, changes in security and on planes, and the story of a small Canadian town that welcomed thousands of people when all planes were grounded with Administrator of the TSA and former Acting United States Secretary David Pekoske, Former Mayor of Gander Claude Elliott, Commercial Airline Pilot Patrick Smith, and Author of The Only Plane in the Sky, Garrett Graff.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Cast Iron Brains -- A Podcast
Sixty 9/11s Short of a Full Deck

Cast Iron Brains -- A Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 93:17


This week we're chatting amiably about NEVER FORGETTING various things, including the perils of shitty cars, cats, purposely missed social connections, flying with VIPs, and twenty years of the War on Terror. Listen! Has something we said, or failed to say, made you FEEL something? You can tell us all about it on Facebook or Twitter, leave a comment on the show's page on our website, or you can send us an email here. Enjoy!Show Rundown00:30 — Never Forget intro essay05:28 — Remember shitty old cars?13:53 — Cats, dogs, and weaponized bladders20:33 — An unusual flight home from Vermont30:53 — When to talk to strangers (Never.)38:55 — What to remember about 9/111:04:20 — Whining about obnoxious commercialsRelevant LinksCats terrorize football stadium — https://www.usatoday.com/story/sports/ncaaf/2021/09/11/fans-catch-falling-cat-miami-game-american-flag/8303179002/TSA isn't particularly good at doing the job with which it has been tasked — https://abcnews.go.com/US/tsa-fails-tests-latest-undercover-operation-us-airports/story?id=51022188Gronk selling insurance poorly — https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dpqk10L4NdINike isn't so sure about that whole JUST DO IT thing any more — https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rm_aiDpkGmQWe're reading The American War in Afghanistan: A History, by Carter Malkasian. If you'd like a copy, buy it here — https://amzn.to/3AfGDZJ (Brain Iron Dot Com is a (somewhat reluctant) participant in the Amazon Associates program, and we may get a small share of qualifying sales referred to Amazon via these links. Shop local when possible!)

Better Call Daddy
160. How To Be Smarter, Faster, And Harder To Kill Greg Williams and Brian Marren

Better Call Daddy

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 62:28


Some things aren't always what they seem.  Greg Williams and Brian Marren teach people what they need to know about human behavior, pattern recognition, and analysis.  They stick to the basics about how we are wired.   We repeat patterns.  How do I leave my house and read what's not normal?  There has to be an explanation.  Find out  today how to be more aware of the lurkers.  Better Call Daddy: The Safe Space For Controversy. Greg Williams is the President and Founder of Arcadia Cognerati, a consulting firm specializing in assessing, developing, and conducting training and education to address urgent safety and security needs in some of the most challenging environments on the planet. Prior to starting his own company, Greg was the former Director of Human Behavior Pattern Recognition & Analysis / Irregular Warfare for Orbis Operations in McLean, Virginia. Previous to that, Greg was the Director, Human Behavior Pattern Recognition & Analysis / Irregular Warfare for Cubic Applications in San Diego, California USA. Greg is a decorated, veteran urban law enforcement professional and a decorated, veteran former soldier with over 30 years of combined experience and expertise. He is an adjunct professor of Sociology and has done work for Western State University, San Diego State University and the University of Southern California as well as USC's Institute for Creative Technology. Greg is an industry expert in Irregular Warfare for the Defense Community. Greg has worked with the Drug Enforcement Administrations (DEA) Mobile Enforcement Team (MET) and the 5th Judicial District's Drug Task Force and Shooting Task Force in Colorado. Greg has held virtually every law enforcement position from patrol officer, shift supervisor, SWAT director, undercover Narcotics operations supervisor, Undersheriff and Interim Chief of Police.   Greg has a US Department of Defense (DoD) Top Secret security clearance and has worked as a subject matter expert, contractor or consultant for many US DoD Agencies including the Potomac Institute for Policy Studies, the Center for Emerging Threats and Opportunities (CETO), Joint Forces Command (JFCOM), Joint IED Defeat Organization (JIEDDO) and the US Marine Corps Special Operations Training Group (SOTG) to name but a few.   Outside of the USA, Greg has worked with NATO Commands including Strategic Allied Command Transformation (Four Star Command), the Hungarian Defence Forces and the NATO Maritime Interdiction Operational Training Center (NMIOTC). Greg has done work for the Ministry of Defense of Iraq, Afghanistan and the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.     Greg has been a subject matter expert (SME) for the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA) as well as for the future immersive training environment joint capability training demonstration (FITE JCTD).   Greg has trained every Tier One military force in the United States and much of the world. Greg has trained the DEA, FBI, ATF, CIA, DIA, and the US Department of Homeland Security, US Border Patrol, US Border Patrol Tactical Unit (BORTAC), US Border Patrol Search, Trauma, and Rescue team (BORSTAR), US Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) and many other agencies tasked with the protection of US Citizens domestically and abroad. Greg Williams created Combat Profiling and the Combat Profiling Program of Instruction (POI) and the USJFCOMs highly successful Border Hunter Program of Instruction (POI). Greg Williams was the architect of the world-renowned US Marine Corps' highly successful and lifesaving Combat Hunter program. In addition to the Combat Hunter program of instruction (POI); Greg Williams was instrumental in designing and refining the USMCs' Lioness and Law Enforcement Professionals programs for combat zones. Greg has developed programs for Private Security Firms, Delta Air Lines, numerous school systems, First Responders and Law Enforcement agencies. Greg has lectured at Universities in Michigan, Ohio, Florida, Colorado and California. Greg was the co-author on two white papers for scientific journals. Greg has multi-conflict, full spectrum operational experience with conventional and special operations forces, law enforcement professionals, and other government agencies. The Commander of the United States Central Command (CENTCOM) General James Mattis referred to Greg Williams as “a National treasure”. Brian Marren is a decorated Marine, High Threat Protection security professional and Subject Matter Expert on Human Behavior Pattern Recognition & Analysis. He has spent the last eighteen years conducting both real world and training operations all over the United States, the Middle East and both Central and East Asia. Brian is a highly experienced, highly motivated professional that has the ability to adapt to any environment whether he is on the battlefield, in a classroom or at a board meeting. While in the Marine Corps, Brian served as a Marine Scout/Sniper with multiple combat deployments to the Al Anbar Province of Iraq during the height of counterinsurgency operations. As a Team Leader, he successfully led hundreds of both combat and training missions. During this time, Brian was meritoriously promoted ahead of his peers on three separate occasions due to his leadership capability and overall professionalism. After being honorably discharged from the Marine Corps, Brian was hired by Cubic Applications to be a Tactics Analyst at the newly constructed Infantry Immersive Trainer (IIT) aboard Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton. During his time at the IIT Brian trained and advised thousands of Marines on how to make better tactical decisions during highly complex and chaotic live fire training exercises. Under his guidance, thousands of Marines became more adaptable and better at sense making during highly stressful situations. While working as an instructor, Brian assisted with a number of scientific studies conducted by the Office of Naval Research (ONR) and Pacific Science and Engineering (PSE) in order to help determine the efficacy of the Infantry Immersive Trainer and the Marine Corps Combat Hunter program. Brian also worked as a security contractor for the U.S. State Department High Threat Protection program. During this time, he was responsible for personally protecting hundreds of U.S. Government personnel in multiple high threat environments including Iraq and Afghanistan. Brian performed all major duties of a security detail to include leading numerous small teams on highly sensitive protection operations. Brian has trained and advised numerous Tier One military units, conventional forces, and private sector clients on the art and science of Human Behavior Pattern Recognition & Analysis. Brian has also trained and advised hundreds of Law Enforcement Professionals to include US Border Patrol, DEA, ICE, TSA, US Marshals and other federal, state and local law enforcement agencies. Currently, Brian serves as the Vice President of Operations for Arcadia Cognerati, a service provider specializing in assessing, developing and conducting training and education to addressurgent safety and security needs in some of the most challenging environments in the world. Brian continues to serve the veteran community as an Ambassador for Carry The Load. Brian holds a Masters of Science in Applied Psychology from the University of Southern California and a Bachelors of Science in Political Science from Arizona State University. The Left Of Greg Podcast https://linktr.ee/Left_Of_Greg   Me and my daddy would love to hear from you! ratethispodcast.com/bettercalldaddy  

Loving Liberty Radio Network
9-11-2021 Liberty RoundTable with Sam Bushman

Loving Liberty Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 109:37


Hour 1 * Guest: Richard Mack Founder and President of CSPOA – A partnership between citizens and local law enforcement, especially sheriffs. Mack encourages those not in law enforcement to stand with their sheriffs. – CSPOA.org. * 9/11 Truth, We don't Trust Government, Do You? * Is Joe Persecuting the Unvaccinated? Has Biden finally overplayed his hand with vaccine mandates? * The CDC has acknowledged that the vaccines do not prevent the spread of the delta variant, which comprises nearly 100% of the current cases. * Biden says unvaccinated have to get shots to protect those already vaccinated. * Did the president just claim that COVID-19 vaccines don't work? – He did say, “We're going to protect vaccinated workers from unvaccinated coworkers”. * Biden: Our Patience Is Wearing Thin. * Anthony Fauci said Thursday night on CNN that he didn't have a “firm answer” as to why those who have been previously infected with Covid and have natural immunity are being required to take the vaccine. * WH press secretary Jen Psaki refused to explain why American workers are required to be vaccinated but migrants coming across the southern border are not. * Biden welcomed a legal challenge from several Republican governors to his sweeping and Unconstitutional federal vaccine and testing requirements. “Have at it,”. * Sheriff Mack provides Solutions from His Supreme Court Win, The Greatest 10th amendment Decision Rendered in History. * Governors You Don't Need to Sue, You Need to Do! – Nullify Now! Hour 2 * Almost 3 out of 4 Americans “would quit their jobs if they were required to take a COVID-19 vaccine,” according to a poll released by ABC News and The Washington Post. Only 18% would take the jab to keep their job. * Biden to Maskless Travelers: ‘Be Prepared to Pay' TSA to double fines for those who refuse to don face coverings, with minimum penalty of $500. * Ben Shapiro announced Friday that he and his company have prepared for a legal battle to “defy” Biden's vaccine mandate. * YouTube has removed over one million videos on its platform containing alleged misinformation related to COVID-19. * The US Department of Health and Human Services established an office to make climate change a health issue. * Stanford Bans Indoor Parties For Its 95 Percent Vaccinated Student Body. * College Textbook Blames COVID Deaths On Americans Who Oppose Lockdowns. * LA School District Implements Vaccine Mandate For Eligible Students. * DeSantis Scores Legal Win In Fight To Ban School Mask Mandates. * News Outlet Retracts Story Claiming Ivermectin Causes Male Infertility, Third Time Media Has Failed To Accurately Cover Drug. * Babies breastfeeding from Covid Vaxxed mothers are becoming ill and dying – Health Impact News. * Vaccine Passports are already here. WORLDWIDE PROTEST IS ORGANIZED FOR SEPT 18, 2021 – WorldWideDemonstration.com. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/loving-liberty/support

The Do Gooders Podcast
88: Pathway of Hope: Introducing The Salvation Army's initiative to solve intergenerational poverty with Ron Skeete

The Do Gooders Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 32:01


Studies suggest children who spend at least half of their lives in poverty are 32 times as likely to be poor as adults. Which means a continued, intergenerational cycle of life-long poverty. But it doesn't have to be this way. With access to adequate resources, support and guidance, there is a way out. That's the premise of TSA's national initiative—the Pathway of Hope—which started 10 years ago to provide individualized services to families with children. By addressing immediate material needs AND providing long-term engagement, it aims to stabilize families and stop the chronic cycle. The essential ingredient? Hope. This season on the Do Gooders Podcast, we're delving into Pathway of Hope and its many facets to explore poverty in America and how The Salvation Army is fighting back.  Starting with Ron Skeete who is on the show to introduce us to Pathway of Hope. Until just a few weeks ago, Ron was the initiative's Director for The Salvation Army in the southern U.S. He also volunteers as a mentor for young men of color as a member of 100 Black Men of North Metro Atlanta—and was named in 2021 to the media agency Pocstock's inaugural Future of Black America Top 50 list. In his role with The Salvation Army, he led the coordination and implementation of Pathway of Hope across the south. He saw families change forever. And he'll tell you he's seen the organization change for the better, too. It's meant a paradigm shift from serving the poor to solving intergenerational poverty. To digging out the root causes of a family's poverty. EPISODE SHOWNOTES: Read more. WHAT'S YOUR CAUSE? Take our quiz. THE SALVATION ARMY 101. Get the info. STUDY SCRIPTURE. Get inside the collection. GATHER WITH CARING MOMS. Join the group. BE INSPIRED. Follow us on Instagram. FIGHT FOR GOOD. Give to The Salvation Army.

The News with Shepard Smith
9/11 Remembrance, Andy Card, Cyber Attacks, Retired Navy Admiral James Stavridis

The News with Shepard Smith

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2021 50:10


Former George W. Bush Chief of Staff Andy Card recalls the day he whispered in President Bush's ear, “A second plane hit the second tower. America is under attack.” CNBC's Ylan Mui takes a look at the long-term medical issues and health problems impacting the first responders who worked at Ground Zero. CNBC's Eamon Javers explores cyber attacks, the new terror threats facing our national security, something airport pat downs and watch lists won't prevent. 19-year-old Claudia Szurkowski was still in utero when her father died in the 9/11 attacks, she never got to meet him, but she says she still talks to him every day. Retired Navy Admiral James Stavridis recalls his experience at the Pentagon when one of the hijacked planes hit it on 9/11. Plus, host Shepard Smith reflects on September 10, 2001, the day before the attacks, and a world without either the Department of Homeland Security or the TSA.

Craig Peterson's Tech Talk
Do You Know How to Identify a Fake Web Page? - Whole Show

Craig Peterson's Tech Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 81:44


Do You Know How to Identify a Fake Web Page? The FBI's reporting that more than 70% of all business hacks are because of our employees. They're clicking on emails, they're going to websites, what can we do? How do we know if a website is legitimate or not? [Automated transcript] [00:00:19] There's a great little article that McAfee published now, McAfee is a company that's been in the cybersecurity business for quite a while. [00:00:28] I do not use their products. I use some competing products. I have not been impressed with their products. [00:00:35] Let me tell you this particular web post that they put up is fantastic and you'll see it in my newsletter this week. Make sure you get that. [00:00:45] Have you ever come across a website that didn't look quite right if you haven't, you haven't been on the internet very much because whether you're an individual at home or you are in a business environment, we are likely going to end up on websites that are not legitimate. Sometimes we'll see these things, that company logo might be wrong. There's not enough information on the page. You've been there before and this looks down page. The odds are that you were on a hack site, a site that's trying to get you to do something most of the time when you end up on these sites, they're trying to get you to put in your username and password. [00:01:31] Already that the bad guys have stolen your username and password from so many websites out there. So why would they try and do it this way? It's because if they're pretending to be your bank and you try and log in, They know this as your bank account, and many times they immediately try and get into your bank account or your phone account, whatever it might be. [00:01:56] This is a very long-standing tactic that's relied on by hackers everywhere. Usually it's a knockoff of a real page. They'll take it and they will recreate it. Then it's easy to do if you're in a web browser right now, when you go to your bank's website. You can just go to file, save as, and go ahead and save the entire webpage and you'll get everything. [00:02:23] You'll get all of the links that are on there. All of the graphics that are there, it'll pull it in for you all automatically. And that's all they do. That's what they use. Just a copy. How do they get in front of you in the first place? Typically the hackers will go ahead and send a phishing email. [00:02:43] They'll make the email sound legitimate. They'll make it look legitimate. They'll often even use a URL that looks a lot like it. B the real banks email. I've seen it before where the URL is bank of america.safe site.com. That sort of a thing. I'm not blaming safe site. They could be a great company. [00:03:04] I don't know. I just made it up as we're going, but that type of a URL where it's not really bank of america.com or it's a misspelling of bank of America, that's the sort of thing that gets to be pretty darn common and. Clicking on that link and then submitting your information. It hasn't been leading to credit card fraud, data extraction, wire transfers, identity theft, and a whole lot more. [00:03:34] Now with the COVID relief, that's been out there. All of these things from filing for unemployment claims through filing for PPP protection as a business, the whole. Industry has changed. I'm talking about the hacker industry here, because there are so many people who are falling for these scams and ransomware as well has gone up over 300%. [00:04:08] It's just absolutely amazing. Now, if you go online and you duck, duck, go. Fake login pages. And for those of you who don't know what I mean by that duck go is the search engine I've been recommending lately. It is a search engine that doesn't take politics into play like Google does. And it also does not track you. [00:04:31] And what you're looking at it is ad based. It gets its revenue from advertisement, but it's not selling your information just on the basic search. That you're doing. I think it's a very good alternative, but if you go ahead and your search for fake login pages, you're going to find thousands of guides on how to create websites. [00:04:53] And these bad guys can create these websites in absolutely no time at all. It just a minute or two in order to make one of them. Now it can be difficult nowadays to figure out if it's a fake site, because the, again, the hackers are constantly updating their techniques to be more sophisticated. So it's made it more difficult for consumers to really recognize when something's fraudulent. [00:05:22] Now I want to get it into a psychological term. In attentional, blindness. You've probably heard of this. I remember this from, I think it was college days for me, so a very long time ago, but there's a study that was done on inattentional blindness called the invisible gorilla test. If you go right now online and just search for invisible gorilla test, you'll see a bunch of these coming. [00:05:52] No, there's even a book called that the invisible gorilla test that came out about 11 years ago, 12 years ago, I think. But here's the bottom line on this? They tell you to do something in this study. What they did here is there's a video. People there's six people, three of them are dressed with white shirts and three of them have black shirts and they're passing basketballs back and forth. [00:06:20] The white shirts are only passing to the white shirts and the black shirts under the black shirts. And what they ask you to do is count the number of times the team in white past. Now, you're sitting there watching, knowing they're going to try and fool you, you're paying a whole lot of attention to it. [00:06:40] And then at the end, they ask you a question that may be not expecting the video. I just watched on this, that was called the monkey business. Illusion is the name of this. I counted and I counted carefully and I came up with 16 passes. So the monkey business, illusion, 16 times the people in the white shirts passed the basketball back and forth. [00:07:06] So I got that. But then they said did you notice the person in the gorilla costs? Who walked through the game. He didn't just walk through the game, walked in, beat on this chest and then walked out of the game. If you didn't know about this and okay. In chorus, all honesty, I always try and put everything upfront here. [00:07:29] I knew about it beforehand. I remember from college days. But eight, most people actually about 50% of people who did not know, there is a gorilla in the middle of this. Would not have noticed the gorilla walking through the game, but this monkey business illusion video, there's something else too. [00:07:52] And I've got to admit, I did not notice that. And that is the curtain color change. From red to gold, this curtain that was in the background of all of these players. And I didn't notice one other thing. I'm not going to tell you what that is. You'll have to watch the video of yourself too, to figure that out again, just go online and search for the monkey business illusion. [00:08:19] And I think you'll find it. So the reason I brought this up is because if you come across a well forged login page and you're not actively looking for signs of fraud, you're fairly likely to miss a cybercriminals gorilla. You're likely to miss that the logo's not quite right, or the placement isn't the same as I'm used to. [00:08:45] Because you're focused in, on doing what you're supposed to be doing. It's the whole concept as well of have tunnel vision. And I'm sure you're aware of that. We've all had that before, where we're really focused on this one little thing and we don't notice everything else going on. It particularly happens in high stress times. [00:09:08] So how do you steer clear of the fake login pages? We're going to talk about that when we get. But it's absolutely crucial for everyone, even if you've had phishing training and you are trying to be cautious, you could fall for this invisible gorilla and enter in your personal details, not something that you really want. [00:09:36] Hopefully you guys got my newsletter last weekend. I got a lot of comments on it. People are saving. In fact, that's the first thing I said in this email last week is don't lose this because it went through point by point on about 10 different things that you should be doing too. Yourself and your business safe during the holidays. [00:10:03] Now, of course we had labor day coming up. We're going to have more holidays, right? There's always more holidays in the future and less it's after the first of the year, then you got to wait a long time. Make sure you get it, make sure you dig it out. If he didn't notice it just search for me@craigpeterson.com. [00:10:23] That's where the email comes from and have a look at that. I have links on how to do all of those things. It's very important. FBI warning out just last week. [00:10:33] I just told you about one of the biggest problems we are facing right now, when it comes to hackers and then has to do with fishing and going to fake login pages. Now I'm going to tell you exactly what to do. [00:10:47] How do you steer clear of these fake log-in pages and how do you protect yourself in case you accidentally do provide the bad guys with the information that you shouldn't have? [00:11:01] If they've got your email address or your login name and they have your password, it's pretty easy for them to log in. In most cases right into your bank account. So first of all, don't fall for phishing, but as we just described because of this whole inattentional blindness that we have, it's easy enough to fall, pray for this. [00:11:28] Beat yourself up too bad if you followed, if you fell for some of that stuff, but there is a great little website the Google has that you might want to check out. And that website gives you a real quick quiz, is the best way to. And it shows you some emails and you get to determine whether or not you think it's fishing and then it tells you what the reality of it is. [00:11:59] So go to fishing quiz. Dot with google.com. If you miss that, you can always email me M e@craigpeterson.com and I'll send it off to, but phishing quiz dot with google.com. And of course, phishing is spelled P H I S H I N G fishing. Dot with google.com. So you can go there and right there on the screen, it says, take the quiz. [00:12:30] You can hit it and make up a name and an email address. So it doesn't have to be your real name or your real email address. Okay. It's not going to send you anything. It's not going to sign you up for stuff. It just wants to use it in. Phishing email examples. That's going to give you, so I put in a fake name and a fake email address and it is showing me an email. [00:13:00] So to me, from a Luke, John. And it says Luke Johnson shared a link to the following document, Tony 21 budget department dot doc. So if I click on that, I have now told them, Hey, I'm open to all that sort of stuff. It's so anyways, it's got the link and it's got the opening docs and you now up above say, is this phishing or is it. [00:13:27] Legitimate. Okay. So if we say fishing that says, correct, this is a phishing email. You might have spotted the look alike, you are out. And that is indeed exactly what it is cause it it wasn't legitimate. And remember when you mouse over a link, you can see down at the bottom. The URL that is going to open up for you. [00:13:51] So you can just go through this at your own speed at your own pace and figure it out again. If you didn't get that, you can always email me M E ed Craig peterson.com. And I'll be glad to get back to you. So that's a good way to learn about fishing. I want to con really warn, I should say businesses. If you are sending out phishing emails to your employees to see if they are opening fake phishing emails or not. [00:14:23] That's an okay. Practice. The problems really come in with the companies that are sending out phishing emails and are then following up in such a way that employee is punished in some places they are being punished by if you've opened three fake emails over the last year or whatever it might be. [00:14:47] But over the last year, you're. It's that bad. So we have to be careful. You're not going to increase the confidence of your employees by doing that. And what's, you're actually going to end up doing is slowing down the productivity of your employees. Because now they're going to be really worried about opening, any emails that look like they might be legitimate. [00:15:14] And so your business is going to slow right down. So having some more training about it. Okay. I can see that everyone makes mistakes and we've got to remember that as well, but watch free, man. But we really are trying to get you to move quickly, act fast, or I need this answer right away. Or one of the big ones is we've got this vendor and in fact, I'll, let me give you a real world example. [00:15:41] It's a manufacturing company and of course they. To buy product from vendors, as supplier. And then they use that product or whether it's copper or whatever it might be now to put it all together to make their products. And this one person, this one, hacker a lady again in Eastern Europe, she went and found out about this company. [00:16:08] Okay, great. Found on their website, who the CEO was, who the CFO was. Okay, great. And was able to find the CEO online on Facebook and on his Facebook account, he said, yeah, we're going to The Bahamas. Rear-ending a sailboat. We're going to be out there, the whole family for two weeks. This is going to be fantastic disconnected. [00:16:37] So she found all of that. Now what she had to do was she found out who it was. The CEO, what school he went to. So first she had to get around the restrictions. Cause he had said, don't share my posts with anyone other than friend. So she sent him a message because she found his LinkedIn profile. You see how easy this is to do. [00:16:59] She found his LinkedIn profile and that he went to Harvard and got his MBA. So she sent him. A little note saying, Hey, remember me Janie from X, Y, Z class at Harvard, and want to be friends catch up a little bit. And then he doesn't remember who she is, but the picture looks cute enough. I might as well say yes. [00:17:21] And now she had his contact information over on LinkedIn, send him a friend request over on Facebook as well. That's how she found out he was going to be gone for two weeks. And so now she knows when he's gone. And where he's going to be completely out of touch. So once he's gone about two or three days later, she sent an email off to the CFO inside the company and said, Hey. [00:17:49] We've got this new vendor they've been providing us with product for the last three months. We haven't paid them at all yet. I need you to wire. It was a little more than $40 million because she'd done her homework. She knew how much money the company made, what their expenses probably were. I need you to wire $40 million to this account, or they're going to stop. [00:18:17] All shipments to us. And instead of the CFO doing a little bit more homework into it and digging in and finding out because talking to the people in receiving that we've never received anything from that company. I don't know what you're talking about. And then talking with the guy on the manufacturing floor, the CFO didn't do any of that, just okay. This looks legit. And by the way, it is so easy for these hackers to also gain access to personal email accounts. And we're not going to spend time going into that right now. So he wired. Yes indeed. So there's an example of falling for fishing. A little bit of follow up on the part of the CFO would have shown him that this was not legitimate. [00:19:07] Even over on Shark Tank. Barbara Cochran. She fell prey to this, actually it was her assistant and who wired some $400,000 to a vendor that wasn't real. Now the good news is the assistant copied Barbara who saw the email right away and said, whoa, wait a minute. They called the bank and they put a stop on it.. [00:19:34] Doing a little training here on how to spot fake log-in pages. We just covered fishing and some real world examples of it, of some free quiz stuff that you can use to help with it. And now we're moving on to the next step. [00:19:50] The next thing to look for when it comes to the emails and these fake login pages is a spelling mistake or grammatical errors. [00:20:02] Most of the time, these emails that we get that are faking emails are, have really poor grammar in them. Many times, of course the commas are in the wrong place, et cetera, et cetera. But most of us weren't English majors. So we're not going to pick that up myself included. That's why I use Grammarly. [00:20:21] If you have to ever write anything or which includes anything from an email or a document you probably want to get Grammarly. There's a few out there, but that's the one I liked the best for making sure my grammar. So a tip, to the hackers out there, but the hackers will often use a URL that is very close to it. [00:20:45] Where are you want to go? So they might put a zero in place of an O in the domain, or they might make up some other domain. So it might be amazon-aws.com or a TD bank-account.com. Something like that. Sometimes the registrars they'll catch that sort of thing and kill it. Sometimes the business that they are trying to fake will catch it and let them know as well. [00:21:19] There's companies out there that watch for that sort of thing. But many times it takes a while and it's only fixed once enough people have reported it. So look at the URL. Make sure it's legitimate. I always advise that instead of clicking on the link in the email, try and go directly to the website. [00:21:41] It's like the old days you got a phone call and somebody saying, yo, I'm from the bank and I need your name and social security numbers. So I can validate the someone broke into your account. No, they don't. They don't just call you up like that nowadays. They'll send you a message in their app. [00:21:56] That's on your smart. But they're not going to call you. And the advice I've always given is look up their phone. And by the way, do it in the phone book, they remember those and then call them back. That's the safest way to do that sort of thing. And that's true for emails as well. If it's supposedly your bank and it's reporting something like someone has broken into your account, which is a pretty common technique for these fissures, these hackers that are out there, just type in the bank URL as it not what's in the email. [00:22:33] There will be a message there for you if it's legitimate, always. Okay. So before you click on any website, Email links, just try and go directly to the website. Now, if it's one of these deep links where it's taking new Jew, something specific within the site, the next trick you can play is to just mouse over the link. [00:22:58] So bring your mouse down to where the link is. And typically what'll happen is at the bottom left. Your screen or of the window. It'll give you the actual link. Now, if you look at some of them, for instance, the emails that I send out, I don't like to bother people. So if you have an open one of my emails in a while, I'll just automatically say, Hey, I have opened them in awhile, and then I will drop you off the list. [00:23:28] Plus if you hit reply to one of my newsletters, my show notes, newsletters. That's just fine, but it's not going to go to me@craigpeterson.com and some people you listeners being the best and brightest have noticed that what happens is it comes up and it's some really weird URL that's so I can track. [00:23:51] Who responded to me. And that way I can just sit down and say, okay, now let me go through who has responded? And I've got a, kind of a customer relationship management system that lets me keep track of all of that stuff so that I know that you responded. I know you're interacting, so I know I'm not bothering you. [00:24:11] And I know I need to respond. Much the same thing is true with some of these links. When I have a link in my newsletter and I say, Hey, I'm linking to MIT's article. It is not going to be an MIT. Because again, I want to know what are you guys interested in? So anytime you click on a link, I'll know, and I need to know that, so I know why, Hey, wait a minute. [00:24:36] Now, 50% of all of the people that opened the emails are interested in identifying fake login pages. So what do I do? I do something like I'm doing right now. I go into depth on fake logs. Pages. I wouldn't have known that if I wasn't able to track it. So just because the link doesn't absolutely look legit doesn't mean it isn't legit, but then again, if it's a bank of it involves financial transactions or some of these other things be more cautious. [00:25:11] So double check for misspellings or grammatical errors. Next thing to do is to check the certificate, the security certificate on the site. You're on this gets a little bit confusing. If you go to a website, you might notice up in the URL bar, the bar that has the universal resource locator, that's part of the internet. [00:25:38] You might've noticed a. And people might've told you do check for the lock. That lock does not mean that you are safe. All it means is there is a secure VPN from your computer to the computer on the other side. So if it's a hacker on the other side, you're sending your data securely to the hacker, right? [00:26:05] That's not really going to do you a whole lot of good. This is probably one of the least understood things in the whole computer security side, that connect. May be secure, but is this really who you think it is? So what you need to do is click on their certificate and the certificate will tell you more detail. [00:26:29] So double check their certificate and make sure it is for the site. You really. To go to, so when it's a bank site, it's going to say, the bank is going to have the bank information on it. That makes sense. But if you go for instance on now, I'm going to throw a monkey wrench into this whole thing. [00:26:48] If you go to Craig peterson.com, for instance, it's going to. Connection is secure. The certificate is valid, but if you look at their certificate and the trust in the details, it's going to be issued by some company, but it's going to just say Craig peterson.com. It's not going to give a business name like it would probably do for a bank. [00:27:14] So you know, a little bit of a twist to it, but that's an important thing. Don't just count on the lock, make sure that the certificate is for the place you want to contact. Last, but not least is multi-factor authentication. I can't say this enough. If the bad guys have your username or email address and your password for a site, if you're using multifactor authentication, they cannot get in. [00:27:53] So it's going to prevent credential stuffing tactics, or they'll use your email and password combinations that have already been stolen for mothers sites to try and hack in to your online profile. So very important to set up and I advise against using two factor authentication with your, just a cell phone, as in a text message SMS, it is not secure and it's being hacked all of the time. [00:28:23] Get an authorization. Like one password, for instance, and you shouldn't be using one password anyways, for all of your passwords. And then Google has a free one called Google authenticator. Use those instead of your phone number for authentication. [00:28:40] You're listening to Craig Peterson, cybersecurity strategist, and online@craigpeterson.com. [00:28:48] I've been warning about biometric databases. And I sat down with a friend of mine who is an attorney, and he's using this clear thing at the airport. I don't know if you've seen it, but it's a biometric database. What are the real world risks? [00:29:04] This clear company uses biometrics. [00:29:08] It's using your eye. Brent, if you will, it's using your Iris. Every one of us has a pretty darn unique Iris, and they're counting on that and they're using it to let you through TSA very quickly. And this attorney, friend of mine thinks it's the best thing since sliced bread, because he can just. On through, but the problem here is that we're talking about biometrics. [00:29:34] If your password gets stolen, you can change it. If your email account gets hacked, I have another friend who his account got hacked. You can get a new email account. If your Iris scan that's in this biometric database gets stolen. You cannot replace your eyes unless of course you're Tom cruise and you remember that movie, and it's impossible to replace your fingerprints. It's possible to replace your face print. I guess you could, to a degree or another, some fat injections or other things. Could be done to change your face sprint, but these Iris scans fingerprints and facial images are something I try not to provide any. [00:30:29] Apple has done a very good job with the security of their face print, as well as their fingerprint, because they do not send any of that information out directly to themselves or to any database at all. Period. They are stored only on the device itself. And they're in this wonderful little piece of electronics that can not be physically compromised. [00:30:59] And to date has not been electronically compromised either. They've done a very good job. Other vendors on other operating systems like Android, again, not so much, but there are also databases that are being kept out there by the federal government. I mentioned this clear database, which isn't the federal government, it's a private company, but the federal government obviously has its fingers into that thing. [00:31:29] The office of personnel. For the federal government, they had their entire database, at least pretty much the entire database. I think it was 50 million people stolen by the red, Chinese about six years ago. So the communists. Copies of all of the information that the officer personnel management had about people, including background checks and things. [00:31:55] You've probably heard me talk about that before. So having that information in a database is dangerous because it attracts the hackers. It attracts the cybercriminals. They want to get their hands on it. They'll do all kinds of things to try and get their hands. We now have completely quit Afghanistan. [00:32:20] We left in a hurry. We did some incredibly stupid things. I just, I can't believe our president of the United States would do what was done here. And now it's been coming out that president and Biden completely ignored. The advice that he was getting from various military intelligence and other agencies out there and just said, no, we're going to be out of there. [00:32:46] You have to limit your troops to this. And that's what causes them to close the air base battleground that we had for so many years. Apparently the Chinese are talking about taking it over now. Yeah. Isn't that nice. And whereas this wasn't an eternal war, right? We hadn't had anybody die in a year and a half. [00:33:05] It's crazy. We have troops in south Vietnam. We have troops in Germany. We have troops in countries all over the world, Japan, you name it so that we have a local forest that can keep things calm. And we were keeping things calm. It's just mind blowing. But anyhow, politics aside, we left behind a massive database of biometric database. [00:33:38] Of Afghanis that had been helping us over in Afghanistan, as well as a database that was built using us contractors of everyone in the Afghan military and the basically third genealogy. Who their parents were the grandparents blood type weight, height. I'm looking at it right now. All of the records in here, the sex ID nationality. [00:34:11] Date of exploration, hair color, favorite fruit, favorite vegetables, place of birth, uncle's name marker signature approval. Signature date, place of birth. Date of birth address, permanent address national ID number place of ISS. Date of ISS native language salary data salary, group of salary, police of salary education, father's name, graduation, date, weapon and service now. [00:34:41] These were all in place in Afghanistan. We put them in place because we were worried about ghost soldiers. A gold soldier was someone who we were paying the salary of taxpayers of the United States were paying the salaries of the Afghan military for quite some time. And we were thinking that about half of the. [00:35:06] Payroll checks. We were funding. We're actually not going to people who were in the military, but we're going to people who were high up within the Afghan government and military. So we put this in place to get rid of the ghost soldiers. Everybody had to have all of this stuff. In the database, 36 pieces of information, just for police recruitment. [00:35:39] Now this information we left behind and apparently this database is completely in the hand of the Taliban. Absolutely. So we were talking about Americans who helped construct Afghanistan and the military and the telephone. The looking for the networks of their Ponant supporters. This is just absolutely amazing. [00:36:07] So all of the data doesn't have clear use, like who cares about the favorite fruit or vegetable, but the rest of it does the genealogy. Does they now know who was in the police department, who was in the military, who their family is, what their permanent address is. Okay. You see the problem here and the biometrics as well in the biometrics are part of this us system that we were using called hide H I D E. [00:36:41] And this whole hide thing was a biometric reader. The military could keep with them. There were tens of thousands of these things out in the field. And when they had an encounter with someone, they would look up their biometrics, see if they were already in the database and in the database, it would say, yeah, they're friendly, they're an informant. [00:37:03] Or we found them in this area or w we're watching them. We have concern about them, et cetera, et cetera. All of their actions were in. Turns out that this database, which covered about 80% of all Afghans and these devices are now in the hands of the Taliban. Now, the good news with this is that a lot of this information cannot be easily extracted. [00:37:32] So you're not going to get some regular run of the mill Taliban guy to pick one of these up and start using. But the what's happening here is that we can really predict that one of these surrounding companies like Pakistan that has been very cooperative with the Taliban. In fact, they gave refuge to Saddam, not Saddam Hussein, but to a bin Ladin and also Iran and China and Russia. [00:38:04] Any of those countries should be able to get into that database. Okay. So I think that's really important to remember now, a defense department spokesperson quote here, Eric Fay on says the U S has taken prudent actions to ensure that sensitive data does not fall into the Tolo bonds. And this data is not at risk of misuse. [00:38:29] Misuse that's unfortunately about all I can say, but Thomas Johnson, a research professor at the Naval postgraduate school in Monterey, California says not so fast, the taller Bon may have used biometric information in the Coon dues. So instead of taking the data straight from the high devices, he told MIT technology review that it is possible that Tolo bond sympathizers in Kabul, provided them with databases of military personnel, against which they could verify prints. [00:39:07] In other words, even back in 2016, it may have been the databases rather than these high devices themselves pose the greatest risk. This is very concerning big article here in MIT technology review. I'm quoting from it a little bit here, but there are a number of databases. They are biometric. Many of these, they have geological information. [00:39:35] They have information that can be used to round up and track down. Now, I'm not going to mention world war two, and I'm not going to mention what happened with the government too, before Hitler took over, because to do that means you lose that government had registered firearms, that government had registered the civilians and the people and Afghanistan. [00:40:04] The government was also as part of our identification papers, registering your religion. If you're Christian, they're hunting you down. If you were working for the military, they're hunting you down. And this is scary. That's part of the reason I do not want biometric information and databases to be kept here in the U S Hey, make sure you get my show notes every week on time, along with free training, I try to help you guys out. [00:40:41] If you've never heard of the Carrington event, I really hope, frankly, I really do hope we never have to live through one of these. Again, there is a warning out there right now about an internet apocalypse that could happen because of the sun. [00:40:58] Solar storms are something that happens really all of the time. The sun goes through solar cycles. About every seven years, there are longer cycles as well. You might know. I have an advanced class amateur radio license I've had for a long time, and we rely a lot when we're dealing with short wave on the solar cycle. [00:41:22] You see what happens is that the sun charges, the atmosphere. That if you've ever seen the Northern light, that is. Part of the Sunzi missions, hitting our magnetic field and getting sucked into the core of the earth, if you will, as they get caught in that field. And the more charged the atmosphere is, the more bounce you get. [00:41:46] That's what we call it bounce. And the reason us hams have all these different frequencies to use is because of the bow. We can go different frequencies with different distances, I should say, using different frequencies. So think about it right now. You've got the earth and I want to talk from Boston to Chicago. [00:42:08] For instance, I know about how many miles it is, and I have to figure out in the ionosphere up in the higher levels of the atmosphere, what frequency. To use in order to go up into the atmosphere, bounce back, and then hit Chicago. That's the idea. It's not quite as simple or as complex in some ways, as it sounds, a lot of people just try different frequencies and a lot of hams just sit there, waiting for anybody anywhere to talk to, particularly if they are. [00:42:41] It's really quite fun. Now what we're worried about, isn't so much just the regular solar activity. We get worried when the sun spots increase. Now, the solar cycle is what has primary image. On the temperature on earth. So no matter what, you might've heard that isn't your gas, guzzling car or a diesel truck that causes the Earth's temperature to change. [00:43:10] Remember the only constant when it comes to the Earth's temperature has been changed over the millions of years. We had periods where the earth was much warmer than it is now had more common that carbon dioxide in the atmosphere than it does now had less. In fact, right now we are at one of the lowest levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere in earth long. [00:43:36] So the sun, if you might remember, comes up in the morning, warms things up, right? And then it cools down. When the sun disappears at nighttime, it has a huge impact. It's almost exclusively the impact for our temperatures. There's other things too, for instance. eruption can spew all to hold a lot of carbon dioxide. [00:44:01] In fact, just one, just Mount St. Helens wanted erupted, put more carbon dioxide into the atmosphere than man has throughout our entire existence. Just to give you an idea, right? So these alarms that are out there, come on, people. Really, and now we're seeing that in this last year, we had a 30% increase in the ice cap up in the, in, up in the north, up in Northern Canada, around the polls. [00:44:32] We also had some of these glaciers growing. It was so funny. I saw an article this year, or excuse me, this week that was showing a sign that was at one of our national parks. And it said this glacier will have disappeared by 2020. Of course it hasn't disappeared. In fact, it has grown now and it's past 2020. [00:44:54] Anyhow, the sun has a huge impact on us in so many ways. And one of the ways is. Something called a coronal mass ejection. This is seriously charged particles. That tend to be very directional. So when it happens, when there's one of these CMS coronal, mass ejections, it's not just sending it out all the way around the sun everywhere. [00:45:21] It's really rather concentrated in one. One particular spot. Now we just missed one not too long ago. And let me see if I can find it here. Just mast, a cm E near miss. Here we go. There a solar super storm in July, 2012, and it was a very close shave that we had most newspapers didn't mention it, but this could have been. [00:45:51] AB absolutely incredible. We'd be picking up the pieces for the next 50 years. Yeah. Five, zero years from this one particular storm. And what happens is these solar flares, if you will, are very extreme, the CME. You're talking about x-rays extreme UV, ultraviolet radiation, reaching the earth at the speed of light ionizes, the upper layers of atmosphere. [00:46:19] When that happens, by the way, it hurts our communications, but it can also have these massive effects where it burns out saddle. And then causes radio blackouts, GPS, navigation problems. Think about what happened up in Quebec. So let me just look at this back hit with an E and yeah, here we go. And March 13th, 1989. [00:46:50] Here we go. Here's another one. Now I remembered. And this is where Quill back got nailed. I'm looking at a picture here, which is looking at the United States and Canada from the sky and where the light is. And you can see Quebec is just completely black, but they have this massive electrical blackout and it's becomes. [00:47:13] Of this solar storm. Now they, these storms that I said are quite directional depending on where it hits and when it hits things can get very bad. This particular storm back in 1989 was so strong. We got to see their Rora Borealis, the Northern lights as far south, as Florida and cute. Isn't that something, when we go back further in time to this Carrington event that I mentioned, you could see the Northern lights at the eclipse. [00:47:50] Absolutely amazing. Now the problem with all of this is we've never really had an internet up online. Like we have today when we had one of the storms hit. And guess what we're about to go into right now, we're going into an area or a time where the sun's going to be more active, certainly on this 11 year cycle and possibly another bigger cycle too, that we don't really know much about. [00:48:22] But when this hit us back in the 1850s, what we saw was a a. Telegraph system that was brought to its knees. Our telegraphs were burned out. Some of the Telegraph buildings were lit. They caught on fire because of the charges coming in, people who were working the telegraphs, who are near them at the time, got electric shocks or worse than that. [00:48:48] Okay. 1859 massive Carrington event compass needles were swinging wildly. The Aurora Borealis was visible in Columbia. It's just amazing. So that was a severe storm. A moderate severity storm was the one that hit in Quebec here knocked out Quebec electric. Nine hour blackout of Northeast Canada. What we think would happen if we had another Carrington event, something that happened to 150 years ago is that we would lose power on a massive scale. [00:49:27] So that's one thing that would happen. And these massive transformers that would likely get burned out are only made in China and they're made on demand. Nobody has an inventory. So it would be at least six months before most of the country would get power back. Can you believe that would be just terrible and we would also lose internet connectivity. [00:49:52] In fact, the thinking that we could lose internet connectivity with something much less than a severe storm, maybe if the Quebec power grid solar, a massive objection here. Maybe if that had happened, when. The internet was up. They might have burned out internet in the area and maybe further. So what we're worried about is if it hits us, we're going to lose power. [00:50:20] We're going to lose transformers on the transmission lines and other places we're going to lose satellites and that's going to affect our GPS communication. We're going to lose radio communication, and even the undersea cables, even though they're now no longer. Regular copper cables. It's now being carried of course, by light in pieces of glass. [00:50:45] The, those cables need to have repeaters about every 15 miles or so under underwater. So the power is provided by. Copper cables or maybe some other sort of power. So these undersea cables, they're only grounded at extensive intervals, like hundreds or thousands of kilometers apart. So there's going to be a lot of vulnerable components. [00:51:12] This is all a major problem. We don't know when the next massive. Solar storm is going to happen. These coronal mass ejections. We do know they do happen from time to time. And we do know it's the luck of the draw and we are starting to enter another solar cycle. So be prepared. Of course, you're listening to Craig Peterson, cybersecurity strategist. [00:51:42] If you'd like to find out more and what you can do, just visit Craig peterson.com and subscribe to my weekly show notes. [00:51:52] Google's got a new admission and Forbes magazine has an article by Zach Dorfman about it. And he's saying you should delete Google Chrome now after Google's newest tracking admission. So here we go. [00:52:09] Google's web browser. It's been the thing for people to use Google Chrome for many years, it's been the fastest. Yeah, not always people leapfrog it every once in a while, but it has become quite a standard. Initially Microsoft is trying to be the standard with their terrible browser and yeah, I to Exploder, which was really bad and they have finally completely and totally shot it in the head. [00:52:42] Good move there on their part. In fact, they even got rid of their own browser, Microsoft edge. They shot that one in. They had to, I know I can hear you right now saying, oh, Craig, I don't know. I just use edge browser earlier today. Yeah. But guess what? It isn't edge browser. It's actually Google Chrome. The Microsoft has rebranded. [00:53:04] You see the guts to Google Chrome are available as what's called an open source project. It's called chromium. And that allows you to take it and then build whatever you want on top of. No, that's really great. And by the way, Apple's web kit, Kat is another thing that many people build browsers on top of and is part of many of these browsers we're talking about right now, the biggest problem with the Google Chrome. [00:53:35] Is they released it so they could track you, how does Google make its money? It makes us money through selling advertising primarily. And how does it sell advertising if it doesn't know much or anything about you? So they came out with the Google Chrome browser is a standard browser, which is a great. [00:53:55] Because Microsoft, of course, is very well known for not bothering to follow standards and say what they have is the actual standard and ignoring everybody else. Yeah. Yeah. I'm picking on Microsoft. They definitely deserve it. There is what is being called here in Forbes magazine, a shocking new tracking admission from. [00:54:17] One that has not yet made headlines. And there are about what 2.6 billion users of Google's Chrome worldwide. And this is probably going to surprise you and it's frankly, Pretty nasty and it's, I think a genuine reason to stop using it. Now, as you probably know, I have stopped using Chrome almost entirely. [00:54:42] I use it when I have to train people on Chrome. I use it when I'm testing software. There's a number of times I use it, but I don't use it. The reality is that Chrome is an absolute terror. When it comes to privacy and security, it has fallen way behind its rivals in doing that. If you have an iPhone or an iPad or a Mac, and you're using safari, apple has gone a long ways to help secure your data. [00:55:19] That's not true with Chrome. In fact, it's not protecting you from tracking and Dave data harvesting. And what Google has done is they've said, okay we're going to get these nasty third party cookies out of the whole equation. We're not going to do that anymore. And what they were planning on doing is instead of knowing everything specifically. [00:55:43] You they'd be able to put you in a bucket. So they'd say, okay, you are a 40 year old female and you are like driving fast cars and you have some kids with a grandkid on the way, and you liked dogs, not cats, right? So that's a bucket of people that may be a few hundred or maybe up to a thousand. As opposed to right now where they can tell everything about you. [00:56:12] And so they were selling that as a real advantage because they're not tracking you individually anymore. No, we're putting you in a bucket. It's the same thing. And in fact, it's easier for Google to put you in a bucket than to track everything about you and try and make assumptions. And it's easier for people who are trying to buy ads to place in front of you. [00:56:34] It's easier for them to not have to reverse engineer all of the data the Google has gathered in instead. To send this ad to people that are in this bucket and then that bucket. Okay. It makes sense to you, but I, as it turns out here, Google has even postponed of that. All right. They really have, they're the Google's kind of hiding. [00:56:59] It's really what's going on out there. They are trying to figure out what they should do, why they should do it, how they should do it, but it's going to be a problem. This is a bad habit. The Google has to break and just like any, anybody that's been addicted to something it's going to take a long time. [00:57:19] They're going to go through some serious jitters. So Firefox is one of the alternatives and to Google Chrome. And it's actually a very good one. It is a browser that I use. I don't agree with some of the stuff that Mozilla and Firefox does, but again, nobody agrees on everything. Here's a quote from them. [00:57:41] Ubiquitous surveillance harms individually. And society Chrome is the only major browser that does not offer meaningful protection against cross site tracking and Chrome will continue to leave users unprotected. And then it goes on here because. Google response to that. And they admit that this massive web tracking out of hand and it's resulted in, this is a quote from Google and erosion of trust, where 72% of people feel that almost all of what they do online is being. [00:58:19] By advertisers, technology firms or others, 81% say the potential risks from data collection outweigh the benefit by the way, the people are wrong. 72% that feel almost all of what they do on online is being tracked. No. The answer is 100% of what you do is probably being tracked in some way online. [00:58:41] Even these VPN servers and systems that say that they don't do logs. Do track you take a look at proton mail just last week. Proton mail it's in Switzerland. Their servers are in Switzerland. A whole claim to fame is, Hey, it's all encrypted. We keep it safe. We don't do logging. We don't do tracking guess what they handed over the IP addresses of some of the users to a foreign government. [00:59:09] So how can you do that? If you're not logging, if you're not tracking. Yeah, they are. And the same thing is true for every paid VPN service I can think of. So how can Google openly admit that their tracking is in place tracking everything they can, and also admit that it's undermining our privacy. [00:59:36] Their flagship browser is totally into it. It's really, it's gotta be the money. And Google does not have a plan B this anonymized tracking thing that they've been talking about, the buckets that I mentioned, isn't realistic, frankly. Google's privacy sandbox is supposed to Fitbit fix it. [00:59:56] I should say. The whole idea and the way it's being implemented and the way they've talked about it, the advertisers on happy. So Google is not happy. The users are unhappy. So there you go. That's the bottom line here from the Forbes article by Zach Dorfman, delete Google Chrome. And I said that for a long time, I do use some others. [01:00:20] I do use Firefox and I use. Which is a fast web browser. That's pretty good shape. Hey, if you sign up for my shows weekly newsletter, not only will you get all of my weekly tips that I send to the radio hosts, but you will get some of my special reports that go into detail on things like which browser you shouldn't be using. [01:00:46] Sign up right now. Craig peterson.com. [01:00:50] Many businesses have gone to the cloud, but the cloud is just another word for someone else's computer. And many of the benefits of the cloud just haven't materialized. A lot of businesses have pulled back and are building data centers. [01:01:07] Now, the reason I mentioned this thing about Microsoft again, and the cloud is Microsoft has a cloud offering. [01:01:17] It's called Microsoft Azure. Many people, many businesses use it. We have used it with some of our clients in the past. Now we have some special software that sits in front of it that helps to secure. And we do the same thing for Amazon web services. I think it's important to do that. And we also use IBM's cloud services, but Microsoft is been pitching for a long time. [01:01:45] Come use our cloud services and we're expecting here probably within the next month, a big announcement from Microsoft. They're planning on making it so that you can have your desktop reside in Microsoft's cloud, in the Azure cloud. And they're selling really the feature of it doesn't matter where you are. [01:02:11] You have your desktop and it doesn't matter what kind of computer you're on. As long as you can connect to your desktop, using some just reasonable software, you will be able to be just like you're in front of a computer. So if you have a Chromebook or a Mac, Or windows or tablet, whatever. And you're at the grocery store or the coffee shop or the office, you'll be able to get it, everything, all of your programs, all your files. [01:02:41] And we, Microsoft will keep the operating system up to date for you automatically a lot of great selling points. And we're actually looking into that, not too heavily yet. We'll give them a year before we really delve into it at all. Cause it takes them a while to get things right. And Microsoft has always been one that adds all kinds of features, but most of the time, most of them don't work and we can document that pretty easily, even in things like Microsoft. [01:03:11] The verge is now reporting that Microsoft has warned users of its as your cloud computing service, that their data has been exposed online for the last two years. Yeah, let me repeat that in case you missed it, you yeah. I'm I might've misspoken. Let me see, what does it say? It says users of Azure cloud competing service. [01:03:36] So that's their cloud. Microsoft's big cloud. Okay. Their data has been. Exposed online. Okay. So that means that people could get the data, maybe manipulate the data that's exposed means for the last two years. Are you kidding me? Microsoft is again, the verge. Microsoft recently revealed that an error in its Azure cosmos database product left more than 3,300 as your customer's data. [01:04:12] Completely exposed. Okay guys. So this is not a big thing, right? It can't possibly be big thing because you know who uses Azure, nobody uses a zer and nobody uses hosted databases. Come on, give me a break. Let me see, what else does this have to say? Oh, okay. It says that the vulnerability was reported, reportedly introduced into Microsoft systems in 2019, when the company added a data visualization feature called Jupiter notebook to cosmos DB. [01:04:46] Okay. I'm actually familiar with that one and let's see what small companies let's see here. Some Azure cosmos DB clients include Coca Cola. Liberty mutual insurance, Exxon mobile Walgreens. Let me see. Could any of these people like maybe Liberty mutual insurance and Walgreens, maybe they'd have information about us, about our health and social security numbers and account numbers and credit cards. Names addresses. That's again, why I used to get so upset when these places absolutely insist on taking my social security number, right? It, first of all, when it was put in place, the federal government guaranteed, it would never be used for anything other than social security. [01:05:34] And the law even said it could not be used for anything other than social security. And then the government started expanding it. And the IRS started using it. To track all of our income and that's one thing right there, the government computers, they gotta be secure. All of these breaches we hear about that. [01:05:52] Can't be true. So how about when the insurance company wants your personal information? Like your social security number? What business is it of? There's really no. Why do they have to have my social security number? It's a social security number. It's not some number that's tattooed on my forehead. That's being used to track me. [01:06:18] Is it this isn't a socialist country like China is, or the Soviet union was right. It's not social. So why are they tracking us like that? Walgreens? Why do they need some of that information? Why does the doctor that you go to that made the prescription for Walgreens? Why do they need that information? [01:06:40] And I've been all over this because they don't. Really need it. They want, it makes their life easier, but they don't really need it. However, it exposes us. Now, if you missed the email, I sent out a week ago, two weeks ago now, you missed something big because I, in my weekly newsletter went through and described exactly what you could do in order to keep your information private. [01:07:13] So in those cases where websites asking for information that they don't really need, right? You don't want to lie, but if they don't really need your real name, why you're giving them your real name? Why do you use a single email address? Why don't you have multiple addresses? Does that start make sense to you guys? [01:07:33] And now we find out that Microsoft Azure, their cloud services, where they're selling cloud services, including a database that can be used online, a big database 3,300 customers looks like some of them are actually big. I don't know. ExxonMobil pretty big. Yeah. I think so. Walgreens, you think that might be yeah. [01:07:57] Why. Why are we trusting these companies? If you have a lot of data, a lot of customers, you are going to be a major target of nation states to hack you and bat just general hackers, bad guys. But you're also if you've got all this information, you've also got to have a much higher level of security than somebody that doesn't have all of that information. [01:08:24] Does that make sense to you? Did I say that right? You don't need the information and I've got to warn anybody that's in a business, whether you're a business owner or you're an employee, do not keep more data than you need the new absolutely need to run your company. And that includes data about your customers. [01:08:48] And maybe it's even more specifically data about your customer. Because what can happen is that data can be stolen and we just found it. That? Yes, indeed. It could have been, it was exposed Microsoft the same. We don't know how much it was stolen. If anything was stolen. Yeah, Walgreens. Hey, I wonder if anyone's going to try and get some pain pills illegally through a, this database hack or a vulnerability anyways. [01:09:17] All right, everyone. Stick around. We'll be back. Of course, you listening to Craig Peterson. I am a cybersecurity strategist for business, and I'm here to help you as well. You can ask any question any time consumers are the people I help the most, I wish I got a dime for every time I answered a question. [01:09:38] Just email me@craigpeterson.com and stick around. [01:09:44] Whether or not, you agree with the lockdown orders that were put in place over this COVID pandemic that we had. There are some other parts of the world that are doing a lot more. [01:10:00] Australia has. I don't know. I think that they went over the deep end that much, the same thing is true right next door to them. [01:10:11] And I am looking at a report of what they are doing with this new app. You might be aware that both apple and Google came out with an application programming interface. That could be used for contract tack tracking, contact tracking. There you go. It wasn't terribly successful. Some states put some things in place. [01:10:38] Of course you get countries like China. I love the idea because heaven forbid you get people getting together to talk about a Tannen square remembrance. Now you want to know who all of those people were, who were in close proximity, right? Good for China a while, as it turns out, Australia is putting something in place they have yet another COVID lockdown. [01:11:03] They have COVID quarantine orders. Now I think if you are sick, you should stay here. I've always felt that I, I had 50 employees at one point and I would say, Hey, if you're sick, just stay home. Never required a doctor's note or any of that other silliness, come on. People. If someone's sick, they're sick and let them stay home. [01:11:26] You don't want to get everybody else in the office, sick and spread things around. Doesn't that just make sense. They now in Australia, don't trust people to stay home, to get moving. Remember China, they were taking welders and we're going into apartments in anybody that tested positive. [01:11:42] They were welding them into their apartment for minimum of two weeks. And so hopefully they had food in there and they had a way to get fresh water. Australia is not going quite that far, but some of the states down under. Using facial recognition and geolocation in order to enforce quarantine orders and Canada. [01:12:07] One of the things they've been doing for very long time is if you come into the country from out of the country, even if you're a Canadian citizen, you have to quarantine and they'll send people by your house or you have to pay to stay for 10 days in a quarantine hope. So you're paying the, of course now inflated prices for the hotel, because they're a special quarantine hotel. [01:12:34] You have to pay inflated prices to have food delivered outside your door. And that you're stuck there for the 10 days, or if you're at home though, they, you're stuck there and they'll send people by to check up on you. They'll make phone calls to check up on you. They have pretty hefty fines. [01:12:54] What Australia has decided to do is in Australia is Charlene's even going from one state to another state are required to prove that they're obeying a 14 day quarantine. And what they have to do is have this little app on their phone and they, the app will ping them saying, prove it. And then they have to take a photo of themselves with geo location tag on it and send it up via the app to prove their location. [01:13:32] And they have to do all of that within 15 minutes of getting the notification. Now the premier of the state of south Australia, Steven Marshall said, we don't tell them how often or when on a random basis, they have to reply within 15 minutes. And if you don't then a police, officer's going to show up at the address you're supposed to be at to conduct an in-person check. [01:13:59] Very intrusive. Okay. Here's another one. This is an unnamed government spokesperson who was apparently speaking with Fox news quote. The home quarantine app is for a selected cohort of returning self Australians who have applied to be part of a trial. If successful, it will help safely ease the burden of travel restrictions associated with the pandemic. [01:14:27] So there you go. People nothing to worry about. It's just a trial. It will go away. Just for instance, income tax, as soon as rule, number one is over, it will be removed and it will never be more than 3% and it will only apply to the top 1% of wage-earners. So there you go. And we all know that world war one isn't over yet. [01:14:47] So that's why they still have it in somehow. Yeah, some of the middle class pays the most income tax. I don't know. Interesting. Interesting. So there you go. Little news from down under, we'll see if that ends up happening up here. News from China, China has China and Russia have some interesting things going on. [01:15:08] First of all, Russia is no longer. Country, they are. They aren't, they are a lot freer in many ways than we are here in the United States. Of course, China, very heavily socialist. In fact, they're so socialists, they are communist and China. And Russia both want their kids to have a very good education in science, engineering, and mathematics. [01:15:35] Not so much on history, not so much on, on politics. But definitely heavy on the sciences, which I can see that makes all the sense. I think everybody should be pretty heavily on the science. According to the wall street journal this week, gamers under the age of 18 will not be allowed to play online games between 8:00 PM and 9:00 PM on Friday, Saturdays and Sundays. [01:16:02] Okay. So basically what they're doing, I reverse that what they're doing is they're only allowing the kids three hours of gaming per week. In other words, they can play between eight and 9:00 PM, Friday, Saturday, and Sundays. I think that might overload some gaming servers. Cov gaming addiction has affected studies and normal lives. [01:16:23] And many parents have become miserable. That's China's press and public administration. Sedna state. Okay. There's going to be some relief during the school holidays. Children will be allowed 60 minutes per day for gaming hard to say how China plans didn't force it, but they have their ways, identity cards. By the way required for playing online. They've got a facial recognition system introduced in July by 10 cent. Remember all of the uproar around 10 cent and their apps and president Trump trying to get them blocked here in the U S yeah, there you go. Facial recognition bill right into the app, and it's proven effective at catching children pretending to be adults in order to get around government gaming curves. [01:17:12] So this goes on and on and Korea as well, South Korea has had some very big problems. You might remember it was headlines just a few years ago of some of these south Korean kids dying because they were playing video games four days straight with no sleep, no real food. Just taking all of these energy. [01:17:37] And we'll literally gaming themselves to death. So South Korea passed a law that prevented young people from playing online video games late at night. So that was introduced back in 2011 and it's targeted at players 16 or up. And south Korean miners were prevented from playing online PC games between midnight and six, 8:00 AM. [01:18:03] Now South Korea has scrapped that law. Interesting. So they're saying it's out of respect for younger citizens, right? They're going to abolish this law, replace it by. Permit system that allows players to request a permit per game and play during self-assigned hours that their parents will sign off on. [01:18:27] This is in an article from GameSpot, by the way, a gamespot.com. You might remember them too, the whole Robin hood scandal. But I think it's an interesting question. When my kids were young lo those many years ago I got this box that the, you took the TV wire, you ran it into the box and you could program. [01:18:51] So that each kid had their own code and you could specify how much time the kid could watch TV or how much time or when they could watch TV and how much time cumulative the kids could have. And it actually worked pretty well. And the kids certainly complained a lot about it. And a couple of them tried to work the way around it hard to when the plug is inside the box. [01:19:17] Yeah, ingenuity as they are. They were able to do that. They cut the wire off and put another power connector on the end of the TV wire. Anyhow Microsoft, we've been talking about them a lot. This show. I do not like Microsoft, that already the windows 11 is coming out and we talked about. [01:19:38] Before, because windows 11 is plying. Microsoft is planning on requiring you to have a very modern computer. You need to have a TPM in it, which is this special security module. You need to have a certain speed, et cetera, but the TPM is a big thing. That's going to make it. So most of your computers won't work. [01:20:04] Tons of pushback on that. I can see what Microsoft is trying to do it. They really would love to have a clean operating system that really wasn't getting hacked all the time. And this will help it won't solve their problem, but it will help. So that they're going to be doing now is they're going to over

The 41 Files
What 9/11 changed and how Kansas City remembers

The 41 Files

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 11:22


To this day, airport security is one of the most recognizable, direct changes made in the aftermath of the 9/11 terrorist attacks.  The federal government established the Transportation Security Administration, or TSA, which is now responsible for keeping airports safe.  In the fourth episode of KSHB 41 News' five-part podcast mini-series on the 20th anniversary of 9/11, digital producers Casey Murray and Katharine Finnerty will explore how the Kansas City International Airport was impacted by 9/11, and why people in the metro continue to keep the memory of the attacks alive.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

My Minute of News with Jeff Caplan

You might remember that flying… used to be fun.   ——Sh— Classic moment from the movie Airplane… a comedy from 1980 that couldn't be made today.  Because of September 11th.   If you flew on September 10th, 2001… your family walk with you to the gate to say goodbye.  Nobody checked nuthin.  The plane had a flimsy  cockpit door with a lock as secure as the one on your bedroom door. Do you remember this…  sometimes… they'd fly with the door open.  And you'd see scenes like this.  Ahhhh the slapstick days of air travel … long gone…. and that movie couldn't be made today.  A comedy about air travel?  Unthinkable… after September 11th  In a heartbeat…. the experience flipped from  fun to a nerve-wracking battle with your patience, steeped in fear that a fellow passenger might be a terrorist.    In those weeks after the attacks… the words “this is your captain speaking” were met with applause. Jetliners flying past ground zero would dip their wings as passengers whispered a prayer. But I am here to tell you flying used to be fun.  No masks… no TSA.  And they used to give you legroom.  It was an entirely different kind of flying.  Or …as they put it in Airplane….  I loved that movie as much as I hate flying.   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Steve & Captain Evil: The Podcast

You add fries and a drink now you're at 1,500 calories.  Yup the duo talks getting into shape. Plus, on the last episode Steve ranted about TSA at the airport.  The couple traveled this week, how do you think that went?  Spoiler Alert: Not great. 

Drew and Mike Show
Drew And Mike – September 9, 2021

Drew and Mike Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 171:07


Adam Carolla joins us, Elizabeth Holmes/Theranos trial, Ex-Tiger Delmon Young's 911 calls, Lindsey Buckingham v. Stevie Nicks, a new Bonerline, Maz checks in, and we prepare for a sporgy.SPORGY WEEKEND: Some people are saying the Detroit Lions are going to be really bad this year. D'Andre Swift is apparently a murderer according to Redditt. Michigan plays Washington. MSU plays Youngstown State. Virginia Tech plays Middle Tennessee. ITT Tech isn't a school anymore and will not be playing football.Adam Carolla comes to town Friday. Jim Norton drops in on Saturday.Howard Stern hates the unvaccinated, doesn't want them to receive healthcare and can't come to work because he's scared of COVID.Drew fears being recorded in public like Monica Lewinsky.Jack Morris will return from his suspension on Friday. Check out his new car.What's John Rocker up to these days?90% COVID Rule: Joe Biden is attacking COVID with a 6-pronged attack. Government employees must get vaxxed up. Federal unions are not happy.Terror alerts are up on the 20-year anniversary of 9/11.Elizabeth Holmes is on trial and her fans have packed the court. Her defense: failure.Miggy has 7 straight hits, but probably won't reach 3,000 this year.Delmon Young and his girlfriend's multiple 911 calls are released.Lindsey Buckingham is sour grapes and popping off. Drew declares him separated at birth with Jim Fouts.Donald Trump & DTJ are doing color commentary for the Evander Holyfield vs Vitor Belfort.Newsweek's Michael Isikoff can't believe Linda Tripp was such a bad friend.Britney Spears takes a literal victory lap. Her ex-husband has been officially charged for his scuffle with the TSA.Manscaped.com brings you a brand new Bonerline (use promo code DREW). Call or text 209-66-Bonerline!Brandon keeps you up to date with the newest members of the Cameo Family.Adam Carolla is NOT in the Radio Hall of Fame, but he'll be an inaugural Podcast Hall of Fame. He joins us prior to his 9/10 appearance at the Royal Oak Music Theater.Steve-O is making the rounds promoting the new Jackass movie. Meanwhile, Bam Margera is a mess.We passed How U Livin' J. Piven in the rankings. You're next, Long.We interrupt Tom Mazawey's bowling league to try and do our weekly chat, but he's a little busy tossing gutter balls.MORE sexual assaults at EMU.Warde Manuel claims he did NOT apologize to Chris Webber.Social media is dumb but we're on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter (Drew and Mike Show, Marc Fellhauer, Trudi Daniels and BranDon).

LOA Uncorked
Episode 51: Vortex Inspired Everyday Magic!

LOA Uncorked

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 27:48


The LOA gals recorded this episode on their first ever ‘LOA Bucketlist Trip' to Sedona, AZ.  From the balcony of their suite at the Enchantment Resort, the LOA gals share this episode that they looked forward to recording during their trip to Sedona, but had NO idea how incredibly powerful this episode could be once they experienced the everyday magic of Sedona and the wonderful souls they met along the way! You'll hear all about: Holli's bomb-making body souffle and the ‘TSA rubdown'.  Listen, GG missed this security ‘incident' but promises to video the next one.  And, trust us, with Holli and her body souffle, there will be another ‘incident'! Buzzards, lizards, foxes, and scorpions - hide the sweet meat! Where else in the world would you get GG to hike (for hours on end) twice in one day?  Is that a fluist on the top of Warrior Man rock?  Nope, it is the legendary incredibly inspired, magical flautist Robert! From the guides, to the incredible staff, and the wonderful friends they met along the way - Holli and Jeanna were humbled and inspired!  Sedona is epic everyday magic - it is a town full of energy, mysticism, beauty and generous people doing their work straight from the heart! LOA Uncorked Uplevel Assignment: Take your practical mind and practice shutting it off See people around you that inspire you, bring great wisdom and perspective into your life, can teach you lessons, and let that inform/change the fabric of who you are as a person.  Integrate all that into your life Find ways that you can light up the world through your heart and spirit - one person at a time!  That is how we recharge the collective and evolve! Authentic action inspires you and anyone you touch! Everyday magic - make it happen! As always, thanks for listening and we look forward to sharing more LOA badassery conversations with you!  Please consider leaving a review and subscribing or dropping us a note to say hi and share your thoughts via: Our Website / Contact via Email / YouTube / Instagram / Facebook: loauncorked

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 09.08.21

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 59:55


    20 Years of Government-Sponsored Tyranny: The Rise of the Security-Industrial Complex from 9/11 to COVID-19   By John W. Whitehead & Nisha Whitehead September 7, 2021 “I tell you, freedom and human rights in America are doomed. The U.S. government will lead the American people in — and the West in general — into an unbearable hell and a choking life.”—Osama bin Laden (October 2001), as reported by CNN What a strange and harrowing road we've walked since September 11, 2001, littered with the debris of our once-vaunted liberties. We have gone from a nation that took great pride in being a model of a representative democracy to being a model of how to persuade a freedom-loving people to march in lockstep with a police state.   Our losses are mounting with every passing day.   What began with the post-9/11 passage of the USA Patriot Act  has snowballed into the eradication of every vital safeguard against government overreach, corruption and abuse.   The citizenry's unquestioning acquiescence to anything the government wants to do in exchange for the phantom promise of safety and security has resulted in a society where the nation has been locked down into a militarized, mechanized, hypersensitive, legalistic, self-righteous, goose-stepping antithesis of every principle upon which this nation was founded.   Set against a backdrop of government surveillance, militarized police, SWAT team raids, asset forfeiture, eminent domain, overcriminalization, armed surveillance drones, whole body scanners, stop and frisk searches, police violence and the like—all of which have been sanctioned by Congress, the White House and the courts—our constitutional freedoms have been steadily chipped away at, undermined, eroded, whittled down, and generally discarded.   The rights embodied in the Constitution, if not already eviscerated, are on life support.   Free speech, the right to protest, the right to challenge government wrongdoing, due process, a presumption of innocence, the right to self-defense, accountability and transparency in government, privacy, press, sovereignty, assembly, bodily integrity, representative government: all of these and more have become casualties in the government's war on the American people, a war that has grown more pronounced since 9/11.   Indeed, since the towers fell on 9/11, the U.S. government has posed a greater threat to our freedoms than any terrorist, extremist or foreign entity ever could.     While nearly 3,000 people died in the 9/11 attacks, the U.S. government and its agents have easily killed at least ten times that number of civilians in the U.S. and abroad since 9/11 through its police shootings, SWAT team raids, drone strikes and profit-driven efforts to police the globe, sell weapons to foreign nations (which too often fall into the hands of terrorists), and foment civil unrest in order to keep the security industrial complex gainfully employed.   The American people have been treated like enemy combatants, to be spied on, tracked, scanned, frisked, searched, subjected to all manner of intrusions, intimidated, invaded, raided, manhandled, censored, silenced, shot at, locked up, denied due process, and killed.   In allowing ourselves to be distracted by terror drills, foreign wars, color-coded warnings, pandemic lockdowns and other carefully constructed exercises in propaganda, sleight of hand, and obfuscation, we failed to recognize that the U.S. government—the government that was supposed to be a “government of the people, by the people, for the people”—has become the enemy of the people.   Consider that the government's answer to every problem has been moregovernment—at taxpayer expense—and less individual liberty.   Every crisis—manufactured or otherwise—since the nation's early beginnings has become a make-work opportunity for the government to expand its reach and its power at taxpayer expense while limiting our freedoms at every turn: The Great Depression. The World Wars. The 9/11 terror attacks. The COVID-19 pandemic.   Viewed in this light, the history of the United States is a testament to the old adage that liberty decreases as government (and government bureaucracy) grows. Or, to put it another way, as government expands, liberty contracts.   This is how the emergency state operates, after all, and we should know: after all, we have spent the past 20 years in a state of emergency.   From 9/11 to COVID-19, “we the people” have acted the part of the helpless, gullible victims desperately in need of the government to save us from whatever danger threatens. In turn, the government has been all too accommodating and eager while also expanding its power and authority in the so-called name of national security.   This is a government that has grown so corrupt, greedy, power-hungry and tyrannical over the course of the past 240-plus years that our constitutional republic has since given way to idiocracy, and representative government has given way to a kleptocracy (a government ruled by thieves) and a kakistocracy (a government run by unprincipled career politicians, corporations and thieves that panders to the worst vices in our nature and has little regard for the rights of American citizens).   What this really amounts to is a war on the American people, fought on American soil, funded with taxpayer dollars, and waged with a single-minded determination to use national crises, manufactured or otherwise, in order to transform the American homeland into a battlefield.   Indeed, the government's (mis)management of various states of emergency in the past 20 years has spawned a massive security-industrial complex the likes of which have never been seen before. According to the National Priorities Project at the progressive Institute for Policy Studies, since 9/11, the United States has spent $21 trillion on “militarization, surveillance, and repression.”   Clearly, this is not a government that is a friend to freedom.   Rather, this is a government that, in conjunction with its corporate partners, views the citizenry as consumers and bits of data to be bought, sold and traded.   This is a government that spies on and treats its people as if they have no right to privacy, especially in their own homes while the freedom to be human is being erased.   This is a government that is laying the groundwork to weaponize the public's biomedical data as a convenient means by which to penalize certain “unacceptable” social behaviors. Incredibly, a new government agency HARPA (a healthcare counterpart to the Pentagon's research and development arm DARPA) will take the lead in identifying and targeting “signs” of mental illness or violent inclinations among the populace by using artificial intelligence to collect data from Apple Watches, Fitbits, Amazon Echo and Google Home.   This is a government that routinely engages in taxation without representation, whose elected officials lobby for our votes only to ignore us once elected.   This is a government comprised of petty bureaucrats, vigilantes masquerading as cops, and faceless technicians.   This is a government that railroads taxpayers into financing government programs whose only purpose is to increase the power and wealth of the corporate elite.   This is a government—a warring empire—that forces its taxpayers to pay for wars abroad that serve no other purpose except to expand the reach of the military industrial complex.   This is a government that subjects its people to scans, searches, pat downs and other indignities by the TSA and VIPR raids on so-called “soft” targets like shopping malls and bus depots by black-clad, Darth Vader look-alikes.   This is a government that uses fusion centers, which represent the combined surveillance efforts of federal, state and local law enforcement, to track the citizenry's movements, record their conversations, and catalogue their transactions.   This is a government whose wall-to-wall surveillance has given rise to a suspect society in which the burden of proof has been reversed such that Americans are now assumed guilty until or unless they can prove their innocence.   This is a government that treats its people like second-class citizens who have no rights, and is working overtime to stigmatize and dehumanize any and all who do not fit with the government's plans for this country.   This is a government that uses free speech zones, roving bubble zones and trespass laws to silence, censor and marginalize Americans and restrict their First Amendment right to speak truth to power.   This is a government that persists in renewing the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA), which allows the president and the military to arrest and detain American citizens indefinitely based on the say-so of the government.   This is a government that saddled us with the Patriot Act, which opened the door to all manner of government abuses and intrusions on our privacy.   This is a government that, in direct opposition to the dire warnings of those who founded our country, has allowed the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) to establish a standing army by way of programs that transfer surplus military hardware to local and state police.   This is a government that has militarized American's domestic police, equipping them with military weapons such as “tens of thousands of machine guns; nearly 200,000 ammunition magazines; a million hollow-point bullets; thousands of pieces of camouflage and night-vision equipment; and hundreds of silencers, armored cars and aircraft,” in addition to armored vehicles, sound cannons and the like.   This is a government that has provided cover to police when they shoot and kill unarmed individuals just for standing a certain way, or moving a certain way, or holding something—anything—that police could misinterpret to be a gun, or igniting some trigger-centric fear in a police officer's mind that has nothing to do with an actual threat to their safety.   This is a government that has created a Constitution-free zone within 100 miles inland of the border around the United States, paving the way for Border Patrol agents to search people's homes, intimately probe their bodies, and rifle through their belongings, all without a warrant. Nearly 66% of Americans (2/3 of the U.S. population, 197.4 million people) now live within that 100-mile-deep, Constitution-free zone.   This is a government that treats public school students as if they were prison inmates, enforcing zero tolerance policies that criminalize childish behavior, and indoctrinating them with teaching that emphasizes rote memorization and test-taking over learning, synthesizing and critical thinking.   This is a government that is operating in the negative on every front: it's spending far more than what it makes (and takes from the American taxpayers) and it is borrowing heavily (from foreign governments and Social Security) to keep the government operating and keep funding its endless wars abroad. Meanwhile, the nation's sorely neglected infrastructure—railroads, water pipelines, ports, dams, bridges, airports and roads—is rapidly deteriorating.   This is a government that has empowered police departments to make a profit at the expense of those they have sworn to protect through the use of asset forfeiture laws, speed traps, and red light cameras.   This is a government whose gun violence—inflicted on unarmed individuals by battlefield-trained SWAT teams, militarized police, and bureaucratic government agents trained to shoot first and ask questions later—poses a greater threat to the safety and security of the nation than any mass shooter. There are now reportedly more bureaucratic (non-military) government agents armed with high-tech, deadly weapons than U.S. Marines.   This is a government that has allowed the presidency to become a dictatorship operating above and beyond the law, regardless of which party is in power.   This is a government that treats dissidents, whistleblowers and freedom fighters as enemies of the state.   This is a government that has in recent decades unleashed untold horrors upon the world—including its own citizenry—in the name of global conquest, the acquisition of greater wealth, scientific experimentation, and technological advances, all packaged in the guise of the greater good.   This is a government that allows its agents to break laws with immunity while average Americans get the book thrown at them.   This is a government that speaks in a language of force. What is this language of force? Militarized police. Riot squads. Camouflage gear. Black uniforms. Armored vehicles. Mass arrests. Pepper spray. Tear gas. Batons. Strip searches. Surveillance cameras. Kevlar vests. Drones. Lethal weapons. Less-than-lethal weapons unleashed with deadly force. Rubber bullets. Water cannons. Stun grenades. Arrests of journalists. Crowd control tactics. Intimidation tactics. Brutality. Contempt of cop charges.   This is a government that justifies all manner of government tyranny and power grabs in the so-called name of national security, national crises and national emergencies.   This is a government that exports violence worldwide, with one of this country's most profitable exports being weapons. Indeed, the United States, the world's largest exporter of arms, has been selling violence to the world in order to prop up the military industrial complex and maintain its endless wars abroad.   This is a government that is consumed with squeezing every last penny out of the population and seemingly unconcerned if essential freedoms are trampled in the process.   This is a government that routinely undermines the Constitution and rides roughshod over the rights of the citizenry, eviscerating individual freedoms so that its own powers can be expanded.   This is a government that believes it has the authority to search, seize, strip, scan, spy on, probe, pat down, taser, and arrest any individual at any time and for the slightest provocation, the Constitution be damned.

Inside Outside
Ep. 263 - Jason Birnbaum, SVP of Digital Technology at United Airlines on Innovating During a Crisis

Inside Outside

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 18:07


On this week's episode of Inside Outside Innovation, we sit down with Jason Birnbaum, Senior Vice President of Digital Technology at United Airlines. Jason and I discuss what it takes to innovate during a crisis and how United continues to adapt to evolving customer, employee, and market changes. Let's get started.Inside Outside Innovation is the podcast to help you rethink, reset, and remix yourself and your organization. Each week, we'll bring you the latest innovators, entrepreneurs, and pioneering businesses, as well as the tools, tactics, and trends you'll need to thrive as a new innovator.Interview Transcription of Jason Birnbaum, Senior Vice President of Digital Technology at United AirlinesBrian Ardinger: Welcome to another episode of Inside Outside Innovation. I'm your host, Brian Ardinger and as always, we have another amazing guest. Today we have Jason Birnbaum. He is a SVP of Digital Technology at United Airlines. Welcome to the show, Jason, Jason Birnbaum: It's a pleasure to be here. Brian Ardinger: Jason, I am excited to have you on the show. You are in an industry that is in the midst of disruption as we all are. But I think the travel industry is even facing more dilemmas. So, I wanted to get somebody on who's focused on innovation in this trying times, to see what it's like to be in the trenches in this world. So, tell us a little bit about what's your role at United and how it deals with it.Jason Birnbaum: I really am responsible for all of the technology associated with our employees, but also all the customer experiences that you would have at the airport, on board, really anywhere that you're physically involved with United Airlines. So, if you like the kiosks or you don't like the kiosk, that's what we do. All the signage in the airports moving you around. That's all part of my team as well. So wide scope, but lots of fun. Brian Ardinger: And when we had a chance to be introduced, one of the reasons I wanted to have you on the show is because the United Airlines takes a broad approach to innovation. You know, I think a lot of companies focus on innovation and think about it from a, like a product perspective only, but you seem to focused on more holistic. Talk a little bit about how you perceive innovation and what goes into making those particular types of decisions.Jason Birnbaum: First of all, when you think about the airlines, our product is the airline. And so our product is the employees. And the product is the experience, and so for us, almost every part of it, including people that actually work and fix the airplanes, people that actually, you know, load the bags and all of those are so intimately connected to the whole experience, that we have to think of innovation in a broad way.And so, when we started thinking about it, we realized that we needed to enable our employees to deliver great service. And connect that to the way our customers traveled. So, a lot of our innovation was really employee focused so that they could deliver great service. And when you start thinking about it in that thread, it really opened the door for a lot of really, really amazing innovation, whether it's freeing up employees, so they can actually spend time with customers. Right. Or it's just giving them information or data to anticipate your need, or if it's making that technician able to get the plane going faster. So, you are not late, like all of that fits together. And the way we think about innovation, Brian Ardinger: I imagine you get bombarded with new ideas and challenges and problems that are coming from their employees or from your customer set saying, hey, fix this or make this better. What's the process to go about looking at, across the ideas, and doing something about them. Jason Birnbaum: Yeah. Well, it's a, it's a great question. There is a lot and we do get bombarded. You know, I, I think one of the pivots we made as an organization was moving from thinking of more of a traditional information technology organization that really took orders, got prioritization lists, to thinking of the whole group as a really like a product development organization. We had a much stronger opinion as to what the next steps were going to be. And really partnered and drove an agenda. And so, for us, the transformation was really about, I have a team of product designers, design thinking experts, people who help us build those roadmaps, whether the product owners are on our team or in some other place, and really lay out, not necessarily a prioritization process, but what's the road map.And then from there we've moved very quickly to how do we prototype, test the theory, move quickly, move in small pieces, to get to the product. We've tried to get away from two-year projects. Four-year projects. You know, we try to think about how do I solve a problem, get something going, start it and empower.And I think when a big company, especially companies have been around for a long time, you know, they built a lot of control mechanisms and we've really worked to strip those out and say, hey, if you're the decision maker, if you're in the front, You've got the product. Make the change, see if it works, and let's move forward from there.Now that's certainly for the customer experience and for efficiency, obviously, you know, when I think about things like safety and those things, obviously all those controls are really important, and we take those very seriously. But there's a lot of places where experimentation can really lead to innovation.Brian Ardinger: Can you talk about some examples of where you've deployed technology and some of the changes that you've made over the years to make the experience better for employees and customers? Jason Birnbaum: Yeah, no, we have so many great examples. I'll hit two things. The first thing we realized, and this was a few years ago is none of our employees sit behind a desk. They, none of them have seats. Yet we built all these applications and all these tools for them on a PC. And so, we started to say, well, how do we un-tether is the word we used, our employees from these desks. And so, we rolled out one of the first innovations was creating and building a mobile ecosystem for our employees. Where, whether you're a gate agent, a technician, you're on the ramp, pilot, flight attendant, you had a mobile device and that mobile device, first and foremost, gave you tools to do your job. So, you could board a plane, help a passenger, take an order for a drink. That was like the base case. Then we said, well we've got this mobile ecosystem, what else can we do? And the second thing we said was how do we give people data to anticipate what they're going to need to do? So now I've got this delivery mechanism. How do I say all right, this passenger is getting ready to reach a milestone on their mileage. So why don't we thank them? Or this passenger has had a couple of bad flights. Take care when you're on this flight. So, we started giving that information. And then lastly, and this is where the real excitement came in. We connected everybody via just communications and chat functionality. We created a product, we call it Easy Chat, that connects everybody involved with the flight. The pilots, flight attendants, the gate agents, the catering company, everybody together in one chat space so that everyone knows what's going on.And that's been an amazing advantage for our employees. And it's really created the capability to deliver unbelievable customer service. I was thinking about it. I got a note from a customer, and they said, you know, my father was 80. He was traveling on the plane and he got on the plane. He realized he left his bag in the lobby, like at the gate.Right. And in the old days, like that would have been a myriad of phone calls and radio calls and running back and forth. And so, the flight attendant just typed on the chat. Hey, does anyone see a bag out there? And the gate agent got it and brought it back on. And it was just a much better experience. And they were really happy for that level of customer service.And I think the other thing we're really excited about right now, I mean, there's many, but the other thing we're really excited about is, we call it Agent On Demand. In a COVID time, one of the things we're seeing is that one people don't necessarily want to be face-to-face as, as much. And two, with a lot of different staffing shortages and things going on right now. And just general air travel, you know, there can be problems. Getting a hold of somebody at an airport can be tricky and there can be lines and it can take some time. And so, we said, well, what if we could scale it by creating just a way that I can hit a QR code or walk up to a kiosk. Push a button and speak to an agent who maybe isn't at the airport, you're at, maybe they're in another airport or some other location, but maybe they aren't as busy as the ones happening right now, where there's a storm or a disruption.And we started really simply and about eight months ago, and we started testing it. Caught on fire. We've gotten it in all of our hubs and another handful of stations and we're continuing to roll it out. But customers really love it because it marries the technology and the ease of using your phone or kiosk with an actual person.And so, they do get the personal touch, but they do it in a way that the technology really supports. So, it's been a big win for us. And it's certainly something we're going to see more of that kind of innovation. Brian Ardinger: You mentioned customers playing a role in that innovation process and giving you feedback in that. How do you go about rolling out a new product like the agent on demand? Did you do that across everything all at once? Or how did you go about testing and building out that particular example? Jason Birnbaum: Yeah, look, we go out and we test, like, we send our people out to the airports and our designers and our researchers. We'll prototype something. We'll grab our employees and our customers and just test it out. And we use our airports as labs almost. Living labs. And we learn from it. We're very transparent about what we're doing. So, we will tell our customers, Hey, we're trying a new process or a new technology. We'd love to get your feedback on it. We stood up a kiosk for Agent on Demand. We sort of had some of our people standing around. We said would you like to try this? What do you think? Did it work? Did it not work? And it just grows from there. So, it's a pretty organic process, but it's certainly not going into a conference room for six months. Emerging with the answer, the answer. What we find out is we're not very good at solutioning in that bubble.The Ewing Marion Kauffman FoundationSponsor Voice: The Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation is a private nonpartisan foundation that works together with communities in education and entrepreneurship, to increase opportunities that allow all people to learn, to take risks, and to own their success. The Kauffman Foundation is based in Kansas City, Missouri and uses its $2 billion in assets to collaboratively help people be self-sufficient productive citizens. For more information, visit www.kauffman.org. That's www.kauffman.org.Brian Ardinger: Well, you mentioned COVID. Obviously, that's affecting all of us, but it's affecting the travel industry quite a bit. What have you seen over the last 18 months of how fast your processes have had to change or what's the impact been on both the industry and how United reacts to it? Jason Birnbaum: Yeah. It's been, obviously for our business, the most disruptive event in the history of the airline industry. And I think travel in general. So, and a tragedy in terms of the loss of human life and really the whole problems and pain that it's caused. But for us, our mission was to keep the airline alive, because we believe that it was critical to provide support for the doctors that needed to get to places. It's a lifeline for our economy. And so, the mission was really clear. And it, but it did force a tremendous amount of innovation, really fast, whether it's ever-changing requirements to travel both domestically and in other countries and how we empower our employees to know that in real time. We had to build a lot of tools and connections to that.We've had to become very smart on the big innovations, partnering with Abbott and other providers on how to get testing done, whether your international travel or employee testing. We had to set up clinics in our airport to do both vaccination and testing. As you know, we recently just today announced that we are going to have all of our employees vaccinated over the next few months. And you know, that involved us setting up a system where people could upload their vaccine cards and then use that information to give it to the various systems that people schedule their work. So, we know who is and who isn't and where they are and et cetera. And so, there's been a lot of innovation in that space, but it's been a very proud moment for me of the team and the way they've risen to the occasion. And the way they thought differently to really keep the whole industry alive.Brian Ardinger: You know, a lot of times we think about, you know, all the negative effects of COVID and, and that, but I've seen not only with United, but other companies, like rising to the occasion and understanding that innovation is now not just something that we think about in the future, but something we have to do on a regular basis. Are there any particular surprises or positive effects that have come out because of the crisis? Jason Birnbaum: Yeah. In the beginning of the pandemic, you know, we had to go through like everyone else, some tough cuts, reprioritize. And, and we got through it all. And we said, we've still got an airline to run. And so, we got together and said, you know what we need, we coined a phrase, and we call it, we need to get scrappy. So, we actually created a little manifesto around it. And at the heart of it was, it said, you know, we got to start thinking like a small business. We got to start thinking about how to move forward. It's going to be about, everyone's got to do more, do different roles, take chances. You know, maybe you don't do testing. When are you going to do testing or maybe you don't know how to do this kind of coding, but you're going to do this kind of coding, because we just don't have a lot of people in time that we were used to. And I think that really caught on and the idea that we can find scrappy answers to tough problems is something now that's really sort of taken over the whole company. And we talk a lot about how do we get scrappy, which is code for how do we find simple, fast solutions to tough problems, and then scale them from there. And I think when I talk to my team, especially, they're like, we don't want to go back. We don't want to go back to the bureaucracy. We don't want to go back to the way it was before. We want to stay scrappy. And I think that's going to be a legacy coming out of this, that we're going to continue. Brian Ardinger: Well, that's a great segue for the trends that you're seeing, both in the travel industry and within United. What, what are you most excited about in moving into the future and maybe what are you most worried about or scared about?Jason Birnbaum: Well, first of all, I'm excited people are traveling again. Which is fantastic. I think there's a lot of work and thought happening right now about the travel experience. And I think we are going to be on the front end right now of a lot of innovation and travel in terms of how do we take the friction out of it. Is biometrics a big part of that?And we're working with the TSA. But make that a much more seamless opportunity. There's a lot more personalization that can happen. Whether it's food on board or different kinds of services. So, I, I'm really excited that as we emerged from the pandemic that I think we're going to be able to really continue to make the experience better.And I know some people love it and some people don't, but I think there's going to be a lot of new things that come out using technology to make it just a much better experience for folks. And connect your whole journey, beyond just the airline, but maybe to the hotel and to the rental car as well. And how do we think of it in a more seamless way?So, I think that's what I'm excited about. I think I'm excited as we continue to just the new business models that we're thinking about in terms of, you know, are we more Uber. You know, use your mobile app more, we've got the best mobile app in the industry. How do we continue to make that experience better? So, there's a bunch of stuff I'm really excited about. Nervous, I think again, you know, it's a tough industry. There is innovation happening there is disruption happening. So, I think we have to continue to get better. We have to continue to prove to our customers that we have the best product. And whether that's through a great operation and getting you there on time. Whether it's through the technology that we offer. Whether it's through the great employees and the customer service and their anticipation of your needs through the journey. Like we just got to win on all those fronts.And so, the thing that I'm worried about is complacency as we come out of this. And as people come back that we cannot forget that we've got to continue to up our game because there's always folks out there that will come and try to compete with us. Brian Ardinger: And it's so important that culture aspect, like you said, you know, rallying around the new, new, and the new next and that culture and that. Are there particular things you have looked at as far as being effective at implementing that culture of innovation?Jason Birnbaum: The culture of innovation, I think it's for us, it's about having our innovators or our technology team or people that are driving change as close as possible to the frontline and to the employee and to the customer. If you get bright, creative, motivated people, with people that actually are serving our customers or our customers, they will naturally find a million great ideas.And then our job is to help support them in the creation and the development of those things. And so for me, the culture comes from actually having our folks right there with them shoulder to shoulder, out in the operations, out on the planes. And I think my message to anybody is the fewer people between the user and the customer and the person who's building it, the better off you are. Because you lose some, every step, you lose something in that translation. And you don't end up with the kind of innovation that you want to get to For More InformationBrian Ardinger: Jason, thank you for coming on Inside Outside Innovation and sharing what you're seeing in the trenches. Again, I appreciate the time. If people want to find out more about yourself or more about what the United Airlines is doing in this space, where should they go? Jason Birnbaum: I mean, certainly you can hit me up on Twitter @Jason_ UAL or my LinkedIn profile is available. I've got links to some articles on some of the things that we've done in more detail. So happy to take any comments there and questions, and any feedback you might have on what's happening out there as your audience is out and starts traveling again. Brian Ardinger: Well, Jason, thanks again for being on Inside Outside Innovation, look forward to continuing the conversation and best of luck. And where are you going to travel next?Jason Birnbaum: We just got back. We were just in Mexico. We were just in California, and now I'm setting my sights on trying to figure out how to get to Europe when that opens up. And so, I love to travel, and I've got a long list of places I need to get to. Brian Ardinger: Well, I hope to see you on the road, and I appreciate your time again. Thank you very much. Jason Birnbaum: Thank you very much. It's been a pleasure. Brian Ardinger: That's it for another episode of Inside Outside Innovation. If you want to learn more about our team, our content, our services, check out InsideOutside.io or follow us on Twitter @theIOpodcast or @Ardinger. Until next time, go out and innovate.FREE INNOVATION NEWSLETTER & TOOLSGet the latest episodes of the Inside Outside Innovation podcast, in addition to thought leadership in the form of blogs, innovation resources, videos, and invitations to exclusive events. SUBSCRIBE HEREYou can also search every Inside Outside Innovation Podcast by Topic and Company.  For more innovations resources, check out IO's Innovation Article Database, Innovation Tools Database, Innovation Book Database, and Innovation Video Database.  

Change Your Mindset
S4E36. It's All About the Attitude We Choose

Change Your Mindset

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 8:01


It was bizarre not traveling most of 2020 due to the pandemic. Going from an average of 130 days over the past ten years to only traveling five in all of 2020 was a shock to the system. At first I didn't miss it – the hustle and bustle, crowded airports and planes, and the TSA – but after reflecting on it, I have some travel memories that I'd like to share, along with the lessons I picked up from them. To learn more, and for the complete show notes, visit: petermargaritis.com Change Your Mindset is a production of Crate Media Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Patriotically Correct Radio Show with Stew Peters | #PCRadio
Unhinged Mayo Clinic Surgeon Believes ”Unvaxxed” Should Die - Dr. Zelenko LIVE (EXCLUSIVE) - Also, FIRED Pediatrician Speaks Out After Refusing Jab - Patriot Wrangled by TSA - Sex Offender

The Patriotically Correct Radio Show with Stew Peters | #PCRadio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 55:49


Stew exposes a radical (seemingly homicidal) Mayo Clinic surgeon that wishes to kill "unvaccinated" patients by putting them to the "back of the line". Stew talks with a fired pediatrician who refused the jab, and that doctor has a message for EVERYONE! Dr. Zev Zelenko LIVE in EXCLUSIVE interview says the real treatments are a weapon against the genocide globalists are trying to unleash. Ivan Raiklin, former Green Beret Commander and outspoken election fraud analyst, was targeted by TSA as the weaponized enforcement arms of the regime attack Patriots.  

Making Sense with Sam Harris
#259 — The Reckoning to Come

Making Sense with Sam Harris

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 72:59


In this episode of the podcast, Sam Harris speaks with Balaji Srinivasan about several civilizational challenges and possible paths forward. They discuss the evidence of American decline, the rise of India and China, centralizing and decentralizing trends in politics, the relationship between politics and technology, the failures of the FDA and TSA, how regulation preserves monopolies, the significance of Bitcoin and blockchain technology, the problem of cybersecurity, the Chinese government's attack on Bitcoin, the threat of US regulation of cryptocurrency, blockchain scalability, creator coins, life in Singapore, virtual government, the future of decentralized journalism, independent replication in science, wealth inequality, ubiquitous investing, social status, non-zero-sum capitalism, “start-up countries”, and other topics. SUBSCRIBE to listen to the rest of this episode and gain access to all full-length episodes of the podcast at samharris.org/subscribe.   Learning how to train your mind is the single greatest investment you can make in life. That's why Sam Harris created the Waking Up app. From rational mindfulness practice to lessons on some of life's most important topics, join Sam as he demystifies the practice of meditation and explores the theory behind it.

Consider This from NPR
Why Are Millions Of U.S. Workers Still On The Sidelines?

Consider This from NPR

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2021 12:45


School districts can't find bus drivers. The TSA is short on security screeners. Ports can't find enough workers to load and unload shipping containers. Across many different sectors, the unavailability of workers is holding the economy back, and sending prices even higher. NPR's Scott Horsley reports. Fuel truckers are another critical job that employers can't fill fast enough, explains NPR's Camila Domonoske. Also in this episode: reporting from NPR's Andrea Hsu on why millions of older workers have decided to retire early during the pandemic. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.