Podcast appearances and mentions of Theresa May

Former Prime Minister of the United Kingdom

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Latest podcast episodes about Theresa May

Planet Normal
Tory Party Psychodrama

Planet Normal

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 51:44


The lights have come down on another Conservative Party conference, but it hasn't been without its political psychodrama.Co-pilot Halligan beams in from the heart of the action in Birmingham, and joining him in the cockpit whilst co-pilot Pearson takes a well-earned rest is columnist and former Chief of Staff to Theresa May, Nick Timothy.Underwhelmed by the turnout and the mood at conference, Nick thinks the party may have underestimated the consequences of the recent 'botched budget'. But Liam saw glimmers of hope in the PM's speech, and in the response to some cabinet members such as conference darling, Kemi Badenoch.Also joining Liam to help break down the conservative conference chaos is Baroness Claire Fox, who tells Liam she fears the Tory party is at risk of splitting. Claire also argues Liz Truss and Kwasi Kwarteng should have done more to explain their economic vision to voters and markets.We'd like to ask you a few questions about the ads in this podcast. Please click here to take a quick survey.Read more from Liam: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/authors/liam-halligan/ |Book tickets for for Planet Normal live event: https://extra.telegraph.co.uk/events/live-planet-normal-event-oct/Listen to Chopper's Politics: https://www.playpodca.st/chopper |Need help subscribing or reviewing? Learn more about podcasts here: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/radio/podcasts/podcast-can-find-best-ones-listen/ |Email: planetnormal@telegraph.co.uk |For 30 days' free access to The Telegraph: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/normal | See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Politics Weekly
In Truss we trust? Politics Weekly UK

Politics Weekly

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 35:35


Liz Truss used her first conference speech as leader of the Conservative party to try to reassert herself. Did she manage it? The Guardian's Gaby Hinsliff is joined by political editor Pippa Crerar and Gavin Barwell, former chief of staff to Theresa May, to find out. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/politicspod

The Red Box Politics Podcast

Matt Chorley and Times Red Box Editor Patrick Maguire take a forensic look at Liz Truss's first speech as party leader to the Conservative conference in Birmingham. PLUS Two former Times Political Editors Phil Webster and Francis Elliott delve into the audio archives to look back at the debut conference speeches of past leaders, from John Major and David Cameron, to Theresa May and Boris Johnson. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Negotiators Podcast
Derek's Monday Night Live interview with John Vine About Security Operations and Policing Massive Crowds

Negotiators Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 41:27


Derek's Monday Night Live interview with John Vine About Security Operations and Policing Massive Crowds John Vine, CBE, QPM - Former Chief Constable of Tayside Police. John was responsible for the security of the G8 conference in Gleneagles, Scotland. Following that he was appointed Chief Inspector of Borders by the Prime Minister at the time Theresa May. John then became a security advisor for IBM. I have asked John to join us tonight to discuss the huge and successful security operation surrounding Her Majesty's funeral in September. John has so much experience in these areas which require intricate planning. He is someone worth listening to and our Prime Minister thought so. Derek Arden https://derekarden.co.ukhttps://negotiatorspodcast.comhttps://www.linkedin.com/in/negotiatingexpert/

Pro Politics with Zac McCrary
What the Hell is Going on in UK Politics? (with British Pollster Keiran Pedley)

Pro Politics with Zac McCrary

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 54:55


Keiran Pedley is a veteran pollster, the Director of Politics for Ipsos/UK, and a regular presence in UK media offering analysis on the latest political data and developments. In this conversation, we set the table as to how the UK system is both similar and different than the US, cover the last few Brexit-fueled chaotic years in British politics, the current state of the Labour opposition, and turn to the rise of new Prime Minister Liz Truss and her tumultous first few weeks in office and implications for UK politics moving forward. Whether you're a novice or expert about British politics, you'll enjoy this conversation with Keiran.IN THIS EPISODE...Keiran gives a primer on the UK political system...Keiran talks political realignment across the UK over the past few years...The importance of the "red wall" in British politics...Keiran talks about the greater gender and racial diversity in the Conservative leadership than in the Labour Party...Keiran on the role Brexit has played on roiling UK politics for years...Keiran talks recent polling on views toward Brexit...Keiran on the downfalls of three consecutive Conservative Prime Ministers David Cameron, Theresa May, and Boris Johnson...Keiran talks the struggles among the Labour opposition over the same period...Keiran's analysis of current Labour leader Keir Starmer...Keiran on the ascent of new Conservative Prime Minsister Liz Truss...Keiran talks the recent economic upheaval in the UK financial system that has led to a rough start for Truss...Keiran's very early thoughts on the next British General Election...Keiran on the state of polling in UK politics...AND anti-Semitism, austerity, the BBC, bang-on polling, the Bank of England, Tony Blair, Britain Elects, Gordon Brown, by-elections, Winston Churchill, the central office, clarifying moments, Susan Collins, Jeremy Corbyn, devolution, the EU, economic competence, electoral quirks, Euro-skeptics, eye-watering figures, Nigel Farage, Fox News, freedom of movement, green benches, honeymoon periods, the House of Lords, Israel, Kwasi Karteng, Lib Dems, Liverpool, long-running sagas, Manchester, manifestos, Ed Miliband, New Jersey wives, Barack Obama, political disasters, Reaganomics, the SNP,  Bernie Sanders, short-lisitng, Matt Singh, stitch ups, Rishi Sunak, taking on Brussels, Jon Tester, Margaret Thatcher, trade unions, Donald Trump, UKIP, vociferous campaigning & more!

Who do we think we are?
BtH1 S5 Beyond the headlines … with Colin Yeo

Who do we think we are?

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 24:59


With a new UK cabinet comes a new Home Secretary, Suella Braverman MP former Attorney General. While there has been a lot of focus on her politics, what does this mean for the Home Office and in particular its approach to immigration? Hosts Ala Sirriyeh and Michaela Benson are joined by Colin Yeo, Barrister at Garden Court Chambers and editor of the Free Movement blog, to talk about all this and consider how it sits in the decade-long context of the Hostile Environment. While our headline focusses on her pledge to bring the numbers of people crossing the Channel in small boats to zero, what is going on behind the scenes? Is this more of the same or a new era? And what's to come?   You can access the full transcripts for each episode over on the Rebordering Britain and Britons after Brexit website.   In this episode we cover … 1 The Hostile Environment 2 The Home Office from Theresa May, Priti Patel and Suella Braverman 3 ID cards, passports and immigration controls   Quote ‘They've got all the tools they need to be as horrible as they like, and you know, All they have to do is change the immigration rules and change regulations. And so I just don't see that they need any primary legislation, but we'll probably see it anyway.' —Colin Yeo, on the UK's immigration legislation   Where can you find out more about the topics in today's episode? Follow Colin on Twitter Read Welcome to Britain and What kind of Home Secreatry will Suella Braverman be? Our headline May Bulman's long read on the Hostile Environment Gwyneth Lonergan's research on migrant women and maternity care Mapping Immigration Controversy Project   Call to action Follow the podcast on all major podcasting platforms or through our RSS Feed. To find out more about Who do we think we are?, including news, events and resources, follow us on Twitter, Instagram or Facebook.

The New Statesman Podcast
Inside Liz Truss and Kwasi Kwarteng's economic meltdown, with David Gauke and Duncan Weldon

The New Statesman Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 31:24


With the cost of debt rising and the pound still falling, just how much damage has the Conservatives' mini-Budget done to the economy?To unpick what's going on, Anoosh Chakelian is joined by David Gauke, who was work and pensions secretary and chief secretary to the Treasury under Theresa May, and by the economist and author Duncan Weldon, along with the New Statesman's business editor, Will Dunn.They discuss why the markets reacted so badly to the Chancellor's statement on 23 September, what the subsequent Bank of England intervention actually did, and what the impact of all of this might be on ordinary voters as well as the electoral prospects of the Tory party.Podcast listeners can subscribe to the New Statesman for just £1 a week for 12 weeks using our special offer. Just visit newstatesman.com/podcastoffer. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Bold as Brass Podcast
Theresa May

Bold as Brass Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2022 32:19


A nosy trombonist (Melissa Brown) chats to fellow brass professionals about their careers, how they got there, and what music they'd happily put in the bin. In this episode trumpet player and educator Theresa May told us about adjusting her studies from music therapy to music performance, about deciding on, and creating, the pathway that best suits you, and she tells us all about the Chromatic Brass Collective. Facebook: Bold as Brass Podcast Instagram: @boldasbrasspodcast Website: boldasbrasspodcast.com Show artwork: Stuart Crane Music credit: Upbeat Forever by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/5011-upbeat-forever License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

C dans l'air
LES ADIEUX À LA REINE, LES DÉFIS D'UN ROI... – 19/09/22

C dans l'air

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 65:00


EXPERTS CHRISTOPHE BARBIER Éditorialiste politique Conseiller de la rédaction - « Franc-Tireur » ISABELLE RIVÈRE Journaliste et spécialiste de l'histoire des familles royales Auteure de « Elizabeth II, dans l'intimité d'un règne » MARION VAN RENTERGHEM Grand reporter - « L'Express » PHILIP TURLE Journaliste britannique Chroniqueur international - « France 24 » La journée a été répétée et rectifiée pendant près de vingt ans pour que rien ne soit laissé au hasard. Diffusées dans le monde entier comme son couronnement en 1953, les funérailles de la reine Elizabeth II, décédée jeudi 8 septembre, se sont déroulées durant toute la journée de ce lundi en suivant un programme imaginé par la souveraine elle-même et calibré au millimètre. Sous les yeux de milliards de téléspectateurs, le cercueil de la reine a été conduit de Westminster Hall à l'abbaye éponyme où les obsèques ont débuté à 11 heures (midi en France). A l'intérieur, les Windsor au grand complet, des familles royales européennes et des chefs d'État, dignitaires et ambassadeurs. 2000 invités parmi lesquels se trouvaient la leader écossaise Nicola Sturgeon et des anciens Premiers ministres Boris Johnson, David Cameron, Tony Blair, Gordon Brown et Theresa May. Etaient également présents les leaders du Commonwealth mais aussi Joe Biden, Emmanuel Macron, le vice-président chinois Wang Qishan, la présidente de la Commission européenne, Ursula von der Leyen, le président turc Recep Tayyip Erdoğan ou le président brésilien, Jair Bolsonaro. Mais il y avait également un grand absent : Vladimir Poutine et les autorités russes qui n'ont pas été invités à Londres, invasion de l'Ukraine oblige. Moscou a dénoncé une décision « profondément immorale » et même « blasphématoire ». A l'extérieur, un million de personnes étaient attendues pour suivre ces obsèques conçues pour rester dans l'histoire. Sur des kilomètres, le public s'était massé, certains depuis 48 heures pour suivre la procession funéraire jusqu'à la chapelle Saint-Georges du domaine de Windsor, là où ont eu lieu les funérailles du prince Philip. Un pays entier à l'arrêt pour faire ses adieux à la dernière reine planétaire, au règne unique par sa durée, et qui ne voulait rien manquer de cette nouvelle page de l'histoire royale britannique va se poursuivre désormais avec Charles III. Un monarque qui s'est de longue date montré sensible à la cause environnementale mais dont la popularité reste à la traîne comparée à celle de sa défunte mère, mais aussi de son dauphin, William, prince de Galles. DIFFUSION : du lundi au samedi à 17h45 FORMAT : 65 minutes PRÉSENTATION : Caroline Roux - Axel de Tarlé REDIFFUSION : du lundi au vendredi vers 23h40 RÉALISATION : Nicolas Ferraro, Bruno Piney, Franck Broqua, Alexandre Langeard, Benoît Lemoine PRODUCTION : France Télévisions / Maximal Productions Retrouvez C DANS L'AIR sur internet & les réseaux : INTERNET : francetv.fr FACEBOOK : https://www.facebook.com/Cdanslairf5 TWITTER : https://twitter.com/cdanslair INSTAGRAM : https://www.instagram.com/cdanslair/

American Times
Prime Minister Liz Truss speech after Queen Elizabeth II dies - God save the King

American Times

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2022 3:10


Mary Elizabeth Truss (born 26 July 1975) is a British politician who became Leader of the Conservative Party on 5 September 2022, and consequently Prime Minister of the United Kingdom on 6 September. Truss became Member of Parliament (MP) for South West Norfolk in 2010. She held various Cabinet offices under prime ministers David Cameron, Theresa May and Boris Johnson, most recently as Foreign Secretary from 2021 to 2022. Truss was the last of fifteen British prime ministers who served Elizabeth II, who died on 8 September 2022, two days after appointing Truss to the office, and the first prime minister to serve under Charles III.Truss attended Merton College, Oxford, and was the president of Oxford University Liberal Democrats. In 1996, she joined the Conservative Party. She worked at Shell and Cable & Wireless, and was deputy director of the think tank Reform. After two unsuccessful attempts to be elected to the House of Commons, she was elected as the MP for South West Norfolk at the 2010 general election. As a backbencher, she called for reform in several policy areas including childcare, mathematics education and the economy. She founded the Free Enterprise Group of Conservative MPs and wrote or co-wrote a number of papers and books, including After the Coalition (2011) and Britannia Unchained (2012).Truss served as Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Childcare and Education from 2012 to 2014, before being appointed to the Cabinet by Cameron as Secretary of State for the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs in the 2014 cabinet reshuffle. Though she was a supporter of the Britain Stronger in Europe campaign for the United Kingdom to remain in the European Union in the 2016 referendum, she supported Brexit after the result. After Cameron's resignation in July 2016, Truss was appointed Secretary of State for Justice and Lord Chancellor by May, becoming the first female Lord Chancellor in the thousand-year history of the office. Following the 2017 United Kingdom general election, Truss was appointed Chief Secretary to the Treasury. After May resigned in 2019, Truss supported Johnson's bid to become Conservative leader. Following Johnson's appointment as Prime Minister, he appointed Truss as Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade. She took on the additional role of Minister for Women and Equalities in September 2019. She was promoted to Foreign Secretary by Johnson in the 2021 cabinet reshuffle. She was appointed the government's chief negotiator with the European Union and the United Kingdom's chair of the EU–UK Partnership Council in December 2021, and was involved in the UK's response to the 2022 Russian invasion of Ukraine.Truss won the 2022 Conservative Party leadership election following Johnson's resignation amid a government crisis, becoming the prime minister and forming the Truss ministry. Truss entered office amid an ongoing cost of living crisis and an energy supply crisis. She implemented an Energy Price Guarantee limiting energy prices for households, businesses and public sector organisations.

My Time Capsule
Ep. 225 - Eleanor Mills (live at Primadonna Festival)

My Time Capsule

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 54:39


Journalist Eleanor Mills was the Editorial Director of The Sunday Times and editor of The Sunday Times magazine until March 2020. She was the youngest ever features editor at the Daily Telegraph, aged just 26 and then joined the Sunday Times in 1998 where she was a columnist and interviewer, interrogating everyone from Mikhail Gorbachev to Sheryl Sandberg and Theresa May. She left The Sunday Times in 2020 and on 8 March 2021, International Women's Day, Mills launched Noon, an online media platform and community for women in midlife. Eleanor was the chair of the Women in Journalism until 2021. Eleanor Mills is guest number 225 on My Time Capsule and chats to Michael Fenton Stevens about the five things she'd like to put in a time capsule; four she'd like to preserve and one she'd like to bury and never have to think about again .This episode was record live at primadonnafestival.com .Find out more about Noon noon.org.uk .Follow Eleanor Mills on Twitter @EleanorMills .Follow My Time Capsule on Twitter, Instagram & Facebook: @MyTCpod .Follow Michael Fenton Stevens on Twitter: @fentonstevens and Instagram @mikefentonstevens .Produced and edited by John Fenton-Stevens for Cast Off Productions .Music by Pass The Peas Music .Artwork by matthewboxall.com .This podcast is proud to be associated with the charity Viva! Providing theatrical opportunities for hundreds of young people. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Beyond the Noise - the PRWeek podcast
'Less spin, more delivery' - where now for government comms? PRWeek Beyond the Noise podcast

Beyond the Noise - the PRWeek podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 40:23


Former Downing Street comms director Katie Perrior examines Liz Truss' communications style and suggests what comms strategies the new government could, and should, adopt. Perrior - who was comms chief under Theresa May, and currently chairs iNHouse Communications - is the special guest this week, as the period of mourning continues following the passing of Queen Elizabeth. Perrior compares and contrasts Truss' style to that of Theresa May, who, she says, had a "deep suspicion of the media". In addition, Perrior explains why King Charles is "doing brilliantly" with his comms so far. This week's podcast features usual host Frankie Oliver, the founder of PR agency New Society, and PRWeek UK editor John Harrington. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Jonesy & Amanda's JAMcast!

What an amazing story! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Bloomberg Westminster
King Charles at Westminster

Bloomberg Westminster

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 23:11


The new King addresses parliament and vows to uphold democracy. Elsewhere, the UK's economic crises rumble on. We discuss both with Theresa May's de facto deputy, former cabinet minister, David Lidington. Bloomberg's Yuan Potts and Stephen Carroll also hear from former Bank of England policymaker Andrew Sentance on the economic clouds gathering and the challenges facing the central bank. Plus: our reporter Lizzy Burden joins us from outside Buckingham Palace. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

C dans l'air
ELIZABETH II : UNE ÉMOTION MONDIALE – 09/09/22

C dans l'air

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 63:56


EXPERTS CHRISTOPHE BARBIER Éditorialiste politique Conseiller de la rédaction - « Franc-Tireur » FRANCK FERRAND Directeur de « La Cité de l'Histoire » MARION VAN RENTERGHEM Grand reporter - « L'Express » GEORGINA WRIGHT Directrice du programme Europe - Institut Montaigne ÉRIC ALBERT – En direct de Londres Journaliste - Correspondant à Londres - « Le Monde » Elizabeth II : la fin d'une ère Après 70 ans de règne, Elizabeth II, la reine du Royaume-Uni est morte hier à 96 ans. Depuis l'annonce de son décès les hommages se multiplient dans le pays. Dans la capitale, des milliers de personnes se sont rassemblées devant Buckingham Palace pour rendre hommage à la défunte reine. Le gouvernement britannique est «uni dans son soutien» au nouveau roi Charles III qui a accédé au trône à la suite du décès de sa mère Elizabeth II, a indiqué Downing Street à l'issue d'un Conseil des ministres extraordinaire. Charles III et son épouse Camilla ont atterri à l'aéroport de Northolt, dans l'ouest de Londres. Le roi avait quitté le château de Balmoral en Ecosse en début d'après-midi. Il s'adressera aux Britanniques à 19h heure de Paris lors de sa première allocution télévisée comme souverain, a annoncé Lindsay Hoyle. Ce dernier indique que la séance d'hommages au Parlement serait suspendue "pendant que Sa Majesté le Roi s'adresse à la nation". Le roi sera proclamé demain à 10 heures du matin heure de Londres, au sein du palais St James, a déclaré le palais de Buckingham. Le cercueil d'Elizabeth II sera d'abord été exposé à Holyrod Palace, avant une cérémonie à la Cathédrale St Giles d'Edimbourg et un transfert à Londres en train royal. Il doit arriver à la salle du trône du palais de Buckingham. La dépouille de la reine sera déplacée à Westminster Hall, lieu du Parlement, dans une chapelle ardente ouverte au public, pour trois jours. Au dixième jour après la mort d'Elizabeth II se tiendront ses funérailles à l'abbaye de Westminster. Tout autour de la planète, de nombreux chefs d'Etat et officiels ont réagi à l'annonce de la mort de sa mère Elizabeth II, notamment le président français et le secrétaire général de l'ONU. Le président de la République s'est rendu ce vendredi matin à l'ambassade du Royaume-Uni à Paris. Le président y a signé le registre de condoléances et déposé une rose blanche, symbole du peuple anglais, devant le portrait de la reine. Avec la mort de la souveraine, c'est une page de l'histoire du pays qui se tourne. En 70 ans de règne, elle aura nommé et côtoyé pas moins de 15 Premiers ministres. La dernière, Liz Truss, fut nommé tout juste deux jours avant son décès. Chaque mardi, la reine recevait le chef du gouvernement, qui lui faisait part de ses projets pour le Royaume-Uni et recevait en échange des conseils, que Tony Blair jugeait « extrêmement précieux ». Une très stricte confidentialité entourait ces entretiens. Montée sur le trône à 25 ans, en 1952, après la mort de son père George VI, Elizabeth II a hérité d'un premier ministre historique : Winston Churchill. Pour son départ en 1955, la reine et le prince Philippe dîneront à Downing Street. Une rumeur tenace assure que le premier ministre préféré d'Elizabeth II fut le travailliste Harold Wilson, en poste de 1964 à 1970, puis de 1974 à 1976. La relation entre la reine et Margaret Thatcher aura, elle, fait les gros titres des tabloïds britanniques. La dame de fer gouvernera 11 ans et libéralisera l'économie du royaume, entraînant parfois des tensions avec Elizabeth II. Ses relations auront été beaucoup plus cordiales avec Tony Blair, élu en 1997. Ces dernières années, le Brexit aura entrainé une grande instabilité politique dans le pays et Elizabeth II aura côtoyé tour à tour David Cameron, Theresa May, Boris Johnson et enfin Liz Truss. Elizabeth II était également la cheffe de la famille royale. De son mariage avec Philip Mountbatten seront nés quatre enfants : Charles, Anne, Andrew et Edward. Ils donneront à Elizabeth et à Philip huit petits-enfants. Les tensions et soubresauts au sein de sa famille n'ont pas manqué, des relations avec sa sœur Margaret, à celles entre son fils héritier Charles et Lady Diana ou encore du prince Harry avec Meghan Markle. Avec, toujours, le peuple britannique et le monde pour témoins. DIFFUSION : du lundi au samedi à 17h45 FORMAT : 65 minutes PRÉSENTATION : Caroline Roux - Axel de Tarlé REDIFFUSION : du lundi au vendredi vers 23h40 RÉALISATION : Nicolas Ferraro, Bruno Piney, Franck Broqua, Alexandre Langeard, Benoît Lemoine PRODUCTION : France Télévisions / Maximal Productions Retrouvez C DANS L'AIR sur internet & les réseaux : INTERNET : francetv.fr FACEBOOK : https://www.facebook.com/Cdanslairf5 TWITTER : https://twitter.com/cdanslair INSTAGRAM : https://www.instagram.com/cdanslair/

Guy Benson Show
New Era Begins: King Charles III Delivers First Address After Queen's Death

Guy Benson Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 122:09


3:05pm: Guy Benson Show 3:20pm: Herschel Walker Beating Raphael Warnock as Momentum Shifts in Georgia 3:35pm: Guest: Senator Ron Johnson (R-WI) Homeland Security, Foreign Relation, Budget Committees 3:50pm: King Charles Speech 4:05pm: Guest: Shannon Bream, chief legal correspondent & Anchor of Fox News Sunday  4:20pm: Nevada county official charged in connection with death of investigative journalist  4:35pm: Guest: Martha MacCallum, executive editor & anchor of The Story 3pm ET & Fox News Politics co-anchor 4:50pm: Guy Benson Show  5:05pm: Guest: Kennedy, Host of Kennedy on the Fox Business Network  5:20pm: Theresa May recalls when she dropped a cheese in front of the Queen  5:35pm: Boris Johnson on the Queen  5:50pm: Homestretch: Is Cookie Ready For Some Football? Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Politics Weekly
The political legacy of Queen Elizabeth II – Politics Weekly UK

Politics Weekly

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 35:35


As Prince Charles becomes king, the Guardian's John Harris is joined by the columnist Gaby Hinsliff and Gavin Barwell, an adviser to the former prime minister Theresa May and member of the privy council, to discuss the political legacy of the Queen. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/politicspod

Elizabeth II
Les anecdotes de Theresa May sur la Reine provoquent les rires du Parlement

Elizabeth II

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 2:37


Les anciens Premiers ministres, dont Theresa May, ont rendu hommage à la reine en racontant des anecdotes qu'ils ont vécues en sa présence.

The Flying Frisby
Will Liz Truss as PM mark a turning point for the pound?

The Flying Frisby

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 8:21


“Pound crashes to weakest level since 1985 in blow to Truss” ran the headline on the Telegraph website yesterday.“The Bank of England had one job today”, as economist Shaun Richards put it, “which was to talk up the pound and instead their waffling sees it at US $1.14.” Theresa May Flash Crash aside, that's a 37-year low.And that's measuring it against the dollar. If you measure the pound's purchasing power against essential basics such as energy or houses, its performance has been way more woeful.It's not just the pound, even if it is one of the worst offenders. It's all fiat money. I've been banging on about it for 20 years but I may as well bang on some more: fiat money and its devaluation is the greatest and most pernicious intergenerational theft in history. Devaluing your currency boosts assets but devalues labour When you devalue money, among numerous other things, you devalue salaries, which is to devalue labour. All the young have is their labour. You boost the value of assets meanwhile, which is what the old have acquired over the course of their lives. The net result is to transfer wealth from young to old. Compounded over decades, 5% one year, 8% another, this process has been devastating. Don't get me started on the knock-on effects: smaller families started later in life and all the rest of it. So many people of my generation and above think they are business geniuses because they paid the market rate for a house 30 or 40 years ago. You are not. Systematic and incremental devaluation by successive administrations was “what did it”.The Bank of England, the Federal Reserve Bank, the European and Japanese Central Banks – central banking has a lot to answer for. It feels like we might finally be in some kind of endgame for fiat money now. Mind you, I thought we were in the endgame in 2008, so I'm probably wrong this time around as well. I've no doubt some new magic words even more unintelligible than “quantitative easing” are being conjured up as I write.Right rant over. I had to get that off my chest. Let us move on. Does a new PM mean you should go long the pound?We have a new government. Money is the issuance of government. The weak pound is all over the headlines. So I thought it would be an interesting exercise today to look, first, at the performance of the pound by successive governments over the past generation. And then to consider whether one should be buyer or seller here.“Buy on silence, sell on headlines,” is a good little investment motto that I've just invented. When something makes the headlines, there is often not a lot of narrative left in the tank,  the story is mature and the next stage is exhaustion. It's standard contrarian market psychology. Does the fact that the weak pound has made the headlines mean it's time to take the other side of the trade and go long? Could be.We'll start with a chart of the pound against the dollar – aka cable – since 1970. And by the way, the dollar has a much larger market cap than the pound, so what is going on on the other side of the pond tends to have a greater effect on cable than what is happening here. That is the case at present. The pound is weak, but so is the euro, the yen and any other number of currencies you care to mention – except the Russian rouble. Current pound weakness is as much a function of US dollar strength as anything. The chart of the pound against the euro over the last three years is much flatter.In any case, cable is the benchmark, so here is the pound against the dollar since 1970, when it was $2.40 (!).The broader trend is down, but there are periods of relative strength – 1976-1981, 1985-1991, 2000-2007. We've basically been in a downtrend since 2007, shortly after Tony Blair stood down and Gordon Brown became PM. It is what is known in the game as a secular bear market. Now we consider the same chart, but this time I have overlaid the government. Even though several prime ministers have led successive governments – Wilson, Thatcher, Major and Blair for example – for the sake of clarity and simplicity I have marked the chart by PM. Needless to say the dates of the red and blue lines are approximate. The first observation I make is that, despite their reputation for fiscal competence, the Tories have not been good stewards of the currency. In the case of Edward Heath and David Cameron, the pound was marginally stronger when they stood down than it was when they took office. Despite his presiding over Black Wednesday and the ERM fiasco, for John Major the pound was only a few per cent lower than it was when he started.But in the case of – and this surprised me – Margaret Thatcher, plus Theresa May and Boris Johson it was lower. Labour's record is mixed. Harold Wilson saw it lower, Jim Callaghan higher (that surprised me too). Tony Blair has the best record of all – it went from roughly $1.60 to $2.10 – and Gordon Brown the worst.That said Blair was one of the few PMs – perhaps the only one – to stand down from a position of strength. Normally PMs are stood down because there is something voters or MPs or both are not happy with, which will be reflected in a weak currency.Lower taxes and higher spending should encourage growthBack to today. This latest move in the dollar has been extraordinary. I've long been suggesting the US dollar index could go as high as 120 (another 10% from here – though exhaustion indicators are starting to appear), but at a certain point purchasing power parity will kick in and currencies will reflect relative valuations. On a purchasing power parity basis the pound is very cheap at $1.14. The other observation I make about the above chart is that new administrations have often marked turning points in the currency. This, one could argue, was the case for Wilson, Callaghan, Major, Brown, Cameron, May and Johnson.Despite the Tories' record for incompetence, Liz Truss has put together a cabinet that is, broadly speaking, actually conservative. Unlike previous administrations, it is not full of wets and social democrats, who happen to be in the Conservative Party. Lower taxes and less spending (I'll believe that when I see it) should lead to economic growth, which should help the currency. The big kahuna though is where the Bank of England base rate goes – and indeed the Fed Funds Rate.I'd say there is a not unreasonable chance that, with a new government, we could mark a turning point for the pound. We're at a point of extremity where such a turn could happen. But let's see what government does first, before we get too excited. As I say, another not totally unreasonable possibility is that we are in the endgame for fiat. In that case the pound slides below parity. If you want to buy gold to hedge yourself against all of this, my recommended bullion dealer is the Pure Gold Company with whom I have an affiliation deal. If you are in London on September 28 or 29, my lecture with funny bits, How Heavy?, about the history of weights and measures is coming to the Museum of Comedy. It's a 7-8pm show so you can come along and go out for dinner after. You can buy tickets here. This is a very interesting subject - effectively how you perceive the world. Hope to see you there.The Flying Frisby is a reader-supported publication. To receive new posts and support my work, consider becoming a free or paid subscriber.This article first appeared at Moneyweek. This is a public episode. If you'd like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit frisby.substack.com/subscribe

5 Live News Specials
Truss and Starmer's first PMQs

5 Live News Specials

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 54:12


New Prime Minister Liz Truss and Labour leader Sir Keir Starmer faced each other for the first time at Prime Minister's Questions. Chris Warburton was joined by Joey Jones, a former spokesman for Theresa May, and John McTernan, a former political secretary to Tony Blair, to get their thoughts, analysis and reaction to the events in the House of Commons. You can listen to PMQs in full on 5 Live every Wednesday at 12:00 via the BBC Sounds app.

The Signal Daily
Liz Truss Inherits a Trembling Economy

The Signal Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 10:57


The verdict is out and the United Kingdom has a new Prime Minister. Liz Truss is the country's third female prime minister, following Theresa May and Margaret Thatcher. But Truss will not have time to celebrate her victory, as the winter is coming her way. In other news, we discuss the growing number of road accidents in India. According to NCRB, over 155,000 people died in road accidents in 2021. And the most common causes of accidents are believed to be speeding, overtaking, and careless driving. Tune in to know more on both stories! You can listen to this show and other awesome shows on the IVM Podcasts app on Android, iOS or any other podcast app.You can check out our website at https://ivmpodcasts.com/.Do follow IVM Podcasts on social media.We are @IVMPodcasts on Facebook, Twitter, & Instagram.Follow the show across platforms:Spotify, Google Podcasts, Apple Podcasts, Amazon Prime Music.

SBS Italian - SBS in Italiano
Liz Truss è la cinquantaseiesima prima ministra britannica

SBS Italian - SBS in Italiano

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 10:04


Per la terza volta in Gran Bretagna una donna raggiunge i vertici del governo, dopo Margaret Thatcher e Theresa May è la volta di Liz Truss, che ieri è stata investita ufficialmente dell'incarico dalla regina Elisabetta.

Il Corsivo di Daniele Biacchessi
Liz Truss, il nuovo corso britannico | 06/09/2022 | Il Corsivo

Il Corsivo di Daniele Biacchessi

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 2:38


A cura di Daniele Biacchessi Il nuovo corso britannico mostra il volto di Liz Truss. È stata eletta alla guida del Partito Conservatore britannico, forza di maggioranza alla Camera dei Comuni, e da oggi subentra come premier al dimissionario Boris Johnson, costretto a farsi da parte a luglio sull'onda di scandali e congiure interne Tory. Liz Truss, 47 anni, è la terza donna nella storia del Regno Unito a ricoprire la carica di premier, dopo Margaret Thatcher e Theresa May. La Truss ha sconfitto l'ex cancelliere dello Scacchiere Rishi Sunak nel ballottaggio finale deciso dal voto postale degli iscritti. Sul piano politico, però, la Truss non cambierà granché le linee dettate da Johnson. "Attuerò il programma. Sono conservatore e mi comporterò come tale", ha spiegato Liz Truss. Del resto, sui temi forti di politica estera, la Truss ha ricoperto la carica di ministro degli Esteri del Governo Johnson. Nessun cambio di passo sul conflitto militare in Ucraina, sugli aiuti economici a Zelenski, sulle sanzioni contro la Russia. Nessun dietrofront sulla Brexit. Anzi, la Truss è una neo-thatcheriana di ferro, ultraliberista, fautrice dello Stato minimo e del taglio delle tasse per aziende e ceti più abbienti. Sul piano internazionale, è ancora più massimalista di Johnson nel sostegno all'Ucraina e considera la Cina una minaccia da fronteggiare con fermezza. Liz Truss è pronta a sfidare l'Europa stracciando gli accordi sull'Irlanda del Nord. Se Johnson non aveva vere convinzioni e andava dove tirava il vento, la Truss è il prototipo thatcheriano moderno. Figlia di militanti di sinistra, attivista all'Università, sempre in prima fila alle marce anti-nucleari, oggi è l'alfiere dell'ultra liberismo. Liz si è trasformata nella portabandiera della Global Britain, quella Gran Bretagna globale che grazie alla Brexit ha recuperato una politica commerciale autonoma, fuori da quella Unione europea che lei bolla come «protezionista». Credits: Agenzia Fotogramma

Corriere Daily
Più Thatcher che Johnson: chi è Liz Truss, la nuova premier britannica

Corriere Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 12:12


Lunedì 5 settembre ha vinto la sfida con Richie Sunak per la leadership del Partito conservatore. E il giorno dopo ha ricevuto dalla regina Elisabetta l'incarico di formare il governo che succede a quello di BoJo. Il corrispondente da Londra Luigi Ippolito racconta chi è la terza donna che entra a Downing Street. Mentre Beppe Severgnini spiega in che cosa assomiglia (e in che cosa no) alla Lady di ferro e a Theresa May.Per altri approfondimenti:- Da giovane di sinistra, poi ultrà conservatrice: la grande ascesa di Liz Truss, nel segno di Margaret Thatcher https://bit.ly/3cT6T5M- Il “kissing hands” con la regina: per Elisabetta Liz Truss è il quindicesimo capo di governo nel suo regno da record https://bit.ly/3QpUi7M- Il primo discorso da premier di Liz Truss: “Porterò il Regno Unito fuori da questa tempesta” https://bit.ly/3RGteSN

O Antagonista
Cortes do Papo - Liz Truss assume como premiê do Reino Unido

O Antagonista

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 2:02


Liz Truss (foto) assumiu oficialmente o cargo de premiê do Reino Unido nesta terça-feira (6), após se encontrar com a rainha Elizabeth II no Castelo de Balmoral, na Escócia. Como mostramos, ela venceu a disputa interna do Partido Conservador contra Rishi Sunak. A ex-ministra das Relações Exteriores foi eleita pelos conservadores com quase 57,4% dos votos e assume o posto deixado por Boris Johnson, que renunciou após uma série de escândalos. Hoje, ela conheceu a rainha para ser formalmente nomeada como a terceira mulher a assumir o cargo de premiê do Reino Unido -- a primeira foi Margaret Thatcher e a segunda foi Theresa May. A dupla foi fotografada apertando as mãos e conversando em frente a uma lareira. Assim que deixar o Castelo de Balmoral, Truss retornará para Londres e seguirá direto para Downing Street. "A rainha recebeu em audiência a honorável primeira-ministra Elizabeth Truss e solicitou a ela que forme uma nova administração. A senhora Truss aceitou o oferecimento da rainha e sua nomeação como primeira-ministra e chefe do Tesouro", diz o documento oficial sobre o encontro. A nova premiê deve anunciar os nomes que formarão seu gabinete ainda hoje. Inscreva-se e receba a newsletter: https://bit.ly/2Gl9AdL​ Confira mais notícias em nosso site: https://www.oantagonista.com​ Acompanhe nossas redes sociais: https://www.fb.com/oantagonista​ https://www.twitter.com/o_antagonista​ https://www.instagram.com/o_antagonista No Youtube deixe seu like e se inscreva no canal: https://www.youtube.com/c/OAntagonista

Highlights from Moncrieff
Moving into 10 Downing Street

Highlights from Moncrieff

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 9:28


Chris Wilkins, Former director of strategy and chief speechwriter to the former prime minister, Theresa May, joined Sean on the show.

The Bunker
Liz-teria Outbreak – Weekly Edition

The Bunker

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 64:50


Stop pinching yourself, this isn't a bad dream – Liz Truss will be Prime Minister. She's sworn she'll deliver – but how? And will she stick to her campaign stances or, unlike her icon Thatcher, will she be for turning? Plus, we look across the pond and assess Biden's new combative stance. From being set for a midterm wipeout, has the tide turned?   - “Truss has a litany of things she has to deal with in a relatively short period of time.” – Yasmeen Serhan  - “Truss is going to have a very modern work honeymoon – it'll be one week long.” Yasmeen Serhan - “People that worked for Theresa May are saying Truss has an awful in-tray.” – Yasmeen Serhan - “We aren't in for the most scintillating PMQs over the next two years.” – Justin Quirk   https://www.patreon.com/bunkercast    Presented by Alex Andreou with Ahir Shah, Justin Quirk and Yasmeen Serhan. Producers: Jacob Archbold and Jelena Sofronijevic . Assistant producer Kasia Tomasiewicz. Music by Kenny Dickinson. Audio production by Alex Rees. Lead producer: Jacob Jarvis. Group Editor: Andrew Harrison. The Bunker is a Podmasters production. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Décryptage
Liz Truss, nouvelle Première ministre britannique

Décryptage

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 19:30


Lizz Truss sera demain Première ministre de la Grande-Bretagne. C'est la troisième fois qu'une femme dirigera le pays après Margareth Thatcher et Theresa May. À 47 ans, Lizz Truss a déjà une longue et tortueuse carrière politique. Elle affiche un libéralisme sans frein et assume ses revirements. La nouvelle Première ministre prend la tête d'un pays en crise et va affronter de sérieux défis : l'inflation atteint 10% et risque de grimper encore en flèche, les mouvements de grève se succèdent. Elle arrive aussi au pouvoir dans un contexte international compliqué avec la guerre en Ukraine et la gestion de l'après Brexit. Quels sont ses projets ? Parviendra-t-elle à répondre aux préoccupations des Britanniques ? Quelles sont ses positions sur la scène internationale ?   Décryptage avec :  Catherine Coron, maître de conférences HDR en civilisation britannique l'Université Panthéon-Assas et membre du centre de recherche CREW à l'Université Sorbonne Nouvelle, auteure de Les programmes du New Deal au Royaume-Uni : pour une nouvelle donne du marché du travail ? Presses universitaires de Lorraine.  Florence Faucher, professeure à Sciences Po, directrice du Centre d'études européennes et de politique comparée, auteure de plusieurs ouvrages sur les partis politiques et les institutions britanniques et de l'article Breaking Up is Hard to Do. Royaume-Uni et Union européenne après le Brexit dans la revue Politique étrangère.   Une émission préparée par Anne Corpet, Sigrid Azeroual, réalisée par Claude Battista. 

The Mike Hosking Breakfast
Chris Wilkins: Theresa May's former advisor says Liz Truss has been underestimated many times

The Mike Hosking Breakfast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 3:38


Liz Truss has been elected as the Conservative Party's new leader, the party announced Monday, and she will take office Tuesday as Britain's new prime minister to steer the country through an acute cost-of-living crisis. Theresa May's former advisor Chris Wilkins told Mike Hosking Liz Truss has been underestimated so many times in her career. “People have sort of written her off and thought that at times she was almost a bit of a joke, but, tonight she stands at the head of the Conservative Party, tomorrow she takes over as Prime Minister.” LISTEN ABOVESee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

C dans l'air
ROYAUME-UNI : APRÈS BORIS, QUI ? – 03/09/22

C dans l'air

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2022 65:56


ROYAUME-UNI : APRÈS BORIS, QUI ? – 03/09/22 Experts : Philip TURLE - Journaliste britannique, chroniqueur international à France 24 Agnès POIRIER - Correspondante en Grande-Bretagne à L'Express Catherine MATHIEU - Économiste à l'OFCE, spécialiste du Royaume-Uni et des questions européennes Clémence FOURTON - Maîtresse de conférences en études anglophones à Sciences-Po Lille Le vote est terminé, il est crucial. Les quelques 200.000 membres du parti conservateur britannique ont été appelé à voter jusqu'à hier pour désigner leur nouveau leader, celui ou celle qui succédera à Boris Johnson au poste de Premier ministre dès mardi prochain. Le nom du vainqueur sera annoncé la veille, lundi 5 septembre. Selon les instituts de sondage, la ministre des Affaires étrangères Liz Truss est donnée favorite face à son rival Rishi Sunak. Ce serait la troisième femme à faire son entrée au 10 Downing Street après Margaret Thatcher et Theresa May. C'est donc la fin de l'ère Johnson outre-manche. Trois années marquées par une série de scandales et la rupture avec l'Union européenne. Un divorce difficile qui a exacerbé les problèmes économiques : l'inflation est aujourd'hui record et la croissance en berne. Les pénuries de marchandises et de main d'oeuvre se sont multipliées également, alors que les exportations vers l'UE sont maintenant au ralenti. La personne qui remplacera Boris Johnson aura donc fort à faire face, entre un parti cabossé par les scandales et un pays en pleine crise. Le Royaume-Uni est en effet le membre du G7 le plus gravement frappé par l'inflation. Celle-ci pourrait atteindre les 22 % en janvier prochain. Avec des factures d'énergie qui seront 80 % plus importantes qu'un an plus tôt, l'hiver sera rude dans les foyers britanniques. Plus de 129 000 citoyens ont d'ailleurs signé la pétition « Don't Pay UK » qui incite à ne pas régler ses factures d'énergie à partir du 1er octobre. La hausse exponentielle des dépenses énergétiques force déjà des millions de personnes à choisir entre se nourrir ou se chauffer l'hiver prochain. Autre bilan à tirer des années Bojo : celui concernant son vaste programme « Global Britain ». Celui-ci visait à restaurer la grandeur de la Grande-Bretagne post-Brexit, et à lui redonner de la valeur sur la scène internationale. Le développement d'une politique pro-business pour une meilleure attractivité était un des leviers, mais les résultats restent nuancés. Sur le plan géopolitique, Boris Johnson a indéniablement chercher à exister, entre visites surprises à Kiev et unité affichée avec Joe Biden. Mais l'accord de libre échange tant vantée par Johnson avec les Etats-Unis ne parvient pas à se conclure. Les difficultés apparaissent aussi au sein même du Commonwealth, cette vaste organisation intergouvernementale composée de 54 anciennes colonies. L'empire paraît aujourd'hui se déliter, l'île de la Barbade, par exemple, s'est affranchit l'an dernier de la couronne britannique en se déclarant République. Alors, qui pour remplacer Boris Johnson ? Quel bilan faire de son mandat ? Quelle serait la politique menée par Liz Truss si elle lui succède ? Comment le Royaume-Uni peut-il faire face à la crise économique ? Quelle peut être encore la place de la Grande-Bretagne à l'international ? DIFFUSION : du lundi au samedi à 17h45 FORMAT : 65 minutes PRÉSENTATION : Caroline Roux - Axel de Tarlé REDIFFUSION : du lundi au vendredi vers 23h40 RÉALISATION : Nicolas Ferraro, Bruno Piney, Franck Broqua, Alexandre Langeard, Benoît Lemoine PRODUCTION : France Télévisions / Maximal Productions Retrouvez C DANS L'AIR sur internet & les réseaux : INTERNET : francetv.fr FACEBOOK : https://www.facebook.com/Cdanslairf5 TWITTER : https://twitter.com/cdanslair INSTAGRAM : https://www.instagram.com/cdanslair/

Beyond Currency by CurrencyTransfer.com
2 September 2022 - Sterling hits another two-year low

Beyond Currency by CurrencyTransfer.com

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 3:00


A combination of stronger yields in the U.S. risk aversion and the prospect that inflation could reach 23% early next year saw Sterling fall to a fresh two-year low. Boris Johnson goes into his final weekend as Pr4ime Minister convinced that there are sufficient reasons to believe that the country can survive and thrive, despite the pressures that are building within the economy. It has been a feature of Johnson's Premiership that he has been infected by an almost blind optimism, when forward-thinking and planning would have served him far better. If the voting members of the Conservative Party want forward-thinking, they will, or at least should, cast their vote for Rishi Sunak. The former Chancellor is pragmatic about the current situation and is honest enough to say that the country faces serious concerns in the short term. He accepts that there is no quick fix nor is there, to quote Johnson's predecessor, Theresa May, a magic money tree.

BYLINE TIMES PODCAST
The Crosby Show

BYLINE TIMES PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 24:02


This time it's the Crosby Show…as we examine the influence of political strategist Sir Lynton Crosby, advisor to David Cameron, Theresa May and Boris Johnson. Australian Crosby – sometimes known as the 'Wizard of Oz' - is credited with founding the “dead cat” strategy, which involves creating a diversion if your favoured candidate is coming under intense pressure. It's a tactic which has arguably defined Boris Johnson's tenure in Downing Street...Max Colbert who has written about Crosby for Byline Times joins Adrian Goldberg in conversation.Produced in Birmingham by Adrian GoldbergFunded by subscriptions to Byline Times. Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

NonCensored
12: NonCensored Live, with guest Simon Brodkin

NonCensored

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2022 37:55


NonCensored is a weekly round up of Harriet Langley-Swindon's very popular, very real daily radio show, completely non-Censored (but with all of the rubbish edited out). This week we bring you a very special LIVE episode of NonCensored, recorded as part of LATER at Paines Plough Roundabout. Harriet and Martin are joined by Diversity Correspondent Eshaan Akbar, who explains why Lawrence Fox is the most woke man alive, and by Culture Secretary For Culture And Digital Media Sport Nadine Dorries, who takes questions from the audience and reads an EXCLUSIVE extract from her forthcoming erotic political thriller His Front Bench Woman. There's also an extended interview with the man who brought down Theresa May, Simon Brodkin who talks pranks, arrests, and how being a character comedian means sometimes people get confused about whether you're real or not.  Thanks to all the staff at Paines Plough and Summerhall for making this recording happen, and to Hamish Campbell at Sound Sound for recording it.  Tickets to our live show at the London Podcast Festival are still available - that's on Saturday 10th September, at 2pm, at King's Place. Book now at https://www.kingsplace.co.uk/whats-on/comedy/noncensored-with-rosie-holt/ If you are going to the Edinburgh Fringe, we recommend shows by Rosie Holt (https://tickets.edfringe.com/whats-on/rosie-holt-the-woman-s-hour), Brendan Murphy (https://tickets.edfringe.com/whats-on/buffy-revamped) and Eshaan Akbar (https://tickets.edfringe.com/whats-on/eshaan-akbar), who will be on tour in 2023 - you can get tickets from https://www.eshaanakbar.com/tour. We'd also recommend Sooz Kempner: PlayStation (2.20pm at the Banshee Labrynth) and Simon Brodkin: Screwed Up (9.40pm at the Pleasance Courtyard). Thanks to Rosie Holt (@RosieIsAHolt), Brendan Murphy (@NotMurphy), Eshaan Akbar (@EShaanAkbar), Sooz Kempner (@SoozUK), Simon Brodkin (@SimonBrodkin) and Ed Morrish. Show photography by Karla Gowlett (photoperspective.co.uk) and show design by Chris Barker (chrisbarkerprints.co.uk). Music and jingles by Paddy Gervers & Rob Sell (torchandcompass.com). This episode was recorded by Hamish Campbell at Sound Sound (soundsound.co.uk) NonCensored is a Lead Mojo production (leadmojo.co.uk). 

Politics Weekly
Britain's not got political talent – Politics Weekly UK

Politics Weekly

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 34:57


The Conservative leadership race has been derailed by U-turns, highlighting the weaknesses of the candidates. But with Keir Starmer also seemingly unable to decide if Labour frontbenchers should or shouldn't join picket lines, the Guardian's John Harris is joined by our chief political correspondent, Jessica Elgot, and Gavin Barwell the former chief of staff to Theresa May to ask why we don't have any political leaders of substance any more. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/politicspod

Sermons from Grace Cathedral
The Very Rev. Malcolm Clemens Young, ThD

Sermons from Grace Cathedral

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 24, 2022 17:57


The Holy Spirit is here. An urban legend has it that when David Cameron, the former Prime Minister of the United Kingdom packed up his office he left three envelopes for his successor Theresa May with a note saying, “Open one of these when you get into trouble.” When negotiations with the European Union over Brexit started she opened the first envelope. It said, “Blame your predecessor.”[i] Later when she lost the first Brexit vote she opened the second envelope which read, “Reshuffle your cabinet.” Finally, after she lost the third vote on her Brexit plan she opened the final envelope. It said, “Prepare three envelopes.” This story comes from Sam Wells the Vicar of St. Martin in the Fields. We met with him in London early in our journey this summer. He says there are two primary anxieties in our time, that can be simply expressed by two questions: First, is the universe simply meaningless and accidental, merely dead matter decomposing according to the principle of entropy into isolation and coldness? Second, will I be okay? In the face of this situation Jesus presents us with three far more helpful envelopes for us to open when things go wrong. I want to talk about these instructions in the context of our Cathedral Tour journey. As we move into the next phase of the pandemic this is a crucial moment in the history of Christianity. Over the winter 31 trustees attended dinners I arranged to talk about how Grace Cathedral can lead and serve in this context. This week my wife Heidi and I returned from visiting over fifty churches in England and France where me met with church leaders to talk about what they see. We took 80 pages of notes, recorded twenty-five video interviews, posted dozens of pictures on social media – I have not yet fully assimilated what we saw or learned but I want to share this experience with you today.[ii] Repentance. When Jesus returns to his friends after being away in prayer, they seem anxious and they ask him to teach them to pray. Jesus gives them what we call the Lord's Prayer, the Our Father. You can carry this around in your heart and when you need help, it gives you a place to begin. This week I especially noticed how the way we say this prayer differs from the words in this gospel. We pray, “forgive us our sins as we forgive those who sin against us.” But this translation of the Bible says, “Forgive us our sins, for we ourselves forgive everyone indebted to us” (Lk. 11). Preachers often make a big deal about the conditional nature of this instruction – if we do this, then God will do something for us. But this morning what strikes me most is that people who love God will naturally want to be forgiving. The struggle over forgiveness and repentance lies at the heart of the spiritual life. A mature believer knows that as we want justice for ourselves, others desire this too. This leads me to a difficult subject that I need to address. It was very hard for me to leave and to go on this cathedral tour because of tensions here at home in our own community. This is embarrassing for me to talk about, but not long before departing I and many others learned that some Executive Committee trustees were very disappointed in my leadership. After the pandemic we never resumed meeting in person and what I have to repent for is my role in not doing a better job of communicating and staying connected to them. COVID twists, distorts and confuses so much. It kills relationships as well as people. One of my most cherished moments of the summer came when we visited the cathedral nearest to our former dean Alan Jones' childhood home. I kept wondering what Winchester taught him about how to be a dean here 5,000 miles away. A docent named Matt Winter took us on an alarming tour that began with graphic evidence of an ongoing and serious flooding problem in the crypt. He showed us how the very walls of the apse had begun to buckle in the late 1800's. Then he talked about the hero who saved the cathedral. A diver named William Wallace rode the train from his home in Croyden every day (on occasion he biked home, but that is another story). At first he had a partner, but that person had to quit because the work was too terrifying. Wallace was a diver in one of those old fashioned suits with the metal fishbowl helmets. His helper had to continuously pump air for him as he went into the dark murky water beneath the massive and collapsing cathedral walls in order to carefully place heavy bags of concrete which then hardened in place. For eight hours a day over five and a half years he did this. Repentance and forgiveness can be like this – terrifying, difficult and demanding, but this is how a cathedral is really built. Persistence. Jesus tells about a man knocking on his neighbor's door at midnight. The neighbor will give him bread not out of generosity but because he wants to be left alone. It's a strange image that Jesus uses to encourage us to be persistent in seeking God. In his book on St. Augustine, Rowan Williams the former Archbishop of Canterbury writes about memory and time.[iii] When we sing a song from memory, the whole song is not available to us at once, just the part of it that we are singing at that moment. In a sense the end and the beginning of the song are with us but not in our immediate consciousness. It's like that feeling we have when we are trying to think of a word or name. We say, “it will come to me in a minute.” This gives us a picture of who we are. In a sense we are our memories and yet our memories are not totally available to us. This is how we experience our self and God. The whole is never completely present to us. Our memories and their meaning are shifting according to the stories we tell. Church gives us the chance to recalibrate, so that our stories again harmonize with the truth. That is a central reason we need to persist in worship. One of my favorite conversations this summer was with Sub-Dean Richard Peters at Christ Church Cathedral in Oxford. A week ago after spending four hours with us (drinking sherry in the garden, touring and evensong) he said what he had just inadvertently demonstrated, “Hospitality is fundamental to the Christian life.” This generosity of spirit comes from someone who has been and is constantly not welcomed by the church because for thirty-five years he has loved his life partner Nicholas who happens to be another man. Richard went on. He said, “Prayer is not that difficult.” We struggle with it, but really it is simply talking to God. This is what allows us to receive the gifts of wonder and awe that are one way that we enjoy God and take delight in God.[iv] God's love. The final envelope that Jesus leaves us is his description of God's love. How we love our children is an analogy for how God loves us. We know how to give good gifts and God does too. The most important thing I want to share with you today is this. What God is giving us is enough, because what we receive is the Holy Spirit. One of the best of summer was time with our twenty-one year old daughter Melia. We were not together. I would do anything to please her. We wandered through thrift shops on Brick Lane, small shops in Notting Hill, outdoor markets and the Sky Garden. We said goodbye sitting at a picnic table in a small Bloomsbury park at dusk. Because I will not be helping her to move into college this year, we don't know when we will see each other again. Deep feelings like this help us to understand God's love for us. As we walked away into the night I felt an enormous sense of gratitude for my wife Heidi. She is not just the Executive Producer of our films but a delightful, bright companion through every moment of the summer. The day after David Ison retired as dean of St. Paul's Cathedral, London, he took us on a behind the scenes tour. At the very end he talked about hearing a confession that upset him so much that he went to pray in a small crypt chapel. Although he had already been dean for years, he discovered something new about his cathedral. Behind the memorials for Horatio Nelson and the Duke of Wellington there is a small grave for the first modern professional dean of St. Paul's. Before his time deans might collect a salary from, but not often visit, their own cathedrals. Dean Millman though was a poet and an Oxford University professor who loved his cathedral ministry. Around his coffin an inscription lists the books he wrote and the nineteen years he served. But a larger inscription encompasses his grave and another. It says, ““IN PIOUS MEMORY OF MARY ANNE THE BELOVED WIFE OF HENRY HART MILLMAN SOMETIME DEAN OF THIS CATHEDRAL CHURCH. BENEATH THIS STONE RESTs IN ONE GRAVE WITH HIM FOR WHOM SHE MADE THE POETRY OF LIFE REALITY.”[v] My friends, I missed you so much this summer. What a blessing it is to be home with you again and to hear the words of Jesus together. We inhabit a world in agony, struggling over anxiety that can be expressed in two questions: “Is this a dead universe? Will I be okay?” But Jesus does not leave us unprepared. Jesus shows us how to pray. Although we cannot fully know ourselves or God, let us continue to keep repentance and forgiveness at the heart of our shared life. Let us be known for our persistence in seeking God and in offering hospitality. And finally let us not forget that what God is giving us, is enough. The Holy Spirit is here.

PRmoment Podcast
Alex Aiken on the PRmoment Podcast

PRmoment Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 29:31


Welcome to the PRmoment Podcast.This week we're chatting to Alex Aiken, long-time executive director, of the UK Government's Communication Service.We're going to talk to Alex about his career in government communications, the personalities of the Prime Ministers he's worked with and the changes he made during his time heading up the Government Communications Service.Before we start, just to tell you about PRmoment's new Patron Scheme. If you are a regular consumer of our content, including this podcast, and you're getting value from it, if you fancy making a contribution to help fund PRmoment - now you can.We have three different Patron Tiers—The Daney Parker Tier, The Chadlington Tier and Edward Bernays Tier.And do check out the home page of PRmoment for our latest webinars, including PR Analytics, LinkedIn as a B2B Marketing Channel and The intersection of Data, Insight and PR Planning.Finally, thanks to our PRmoment Podcast sponsors, The PRCA.This interview was recorded before the resignation of Boris Johnson as the UK's Prime Minister.Alex welcome to the show: 2 mins Alex talks us through his new job!3 mins Alex reflects on his 9 years heading up the UK's Government Communications Service, a period which covered The Referendum, Brexit, COVID and Putin's war in Ukraine“What I wanted to do is create an exceptional standard of government communication”5 mins Alex compares the 3 Prime Ministers he's worked with  - David Cameron, Theresa May and then Boris Johnson. How would you compare their leadership styles?6 mins Alex discusses the leadership styles of Cameron, May and Johnson.“The demands on PMs is so much greater in 2022 than when I started”7 mins How Prime Ministers have had to adapt their leadership styles over the last 10 years.“The UK Government is a £700 bn beast that operates 24/7”8 mins Does the work of GCS's change depending on who is the leader of the government? Or is the approach fairly standard?9 mins Due to the volume of communications channels - has the complexity of government communications become too complex?11 mins As a government communicator does Alex worry about the impact of the current “party” scandals on the public's trust in government?13 mins Alex about his passion for effective government communications and how “effective public service communications can change, improve, enhance and save lives”14 mins“The issue, whether your private sector or public sector, is evaluation”16 mins How can governments fight disinformation? Alex recommends the RESIST toolkit for further reading. 20 mins Alex talks about the risk of the UK coming under a cyber security attack from a foreign government.20.30 mins Alex discusses the behavioural science strategy behind the UK's COVID communications.22.30 mins Will Alex's work on the UK government's evaluation framework be his legacy from his 

The Bunker
Are the Tories Mad to Cut Taxes?

The Bunker

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 17, 2022 29:07


As Tory leadership hopefuls pledge tax cuts galore, we ask if this would make any sense. What impact would these moves have? What else could they do instead? Andrew Harrison speaks to Giles Wilkes, a senior fellow from the Institute for Government and former special adviser to Theresa May on industrial and economic policy.  “I suspect they're hoping the Tory membership don't have a memory of the 70s and 80s.”  “These people running for the leadership are thinking in a three month timescale.”  “It's a terrible idea to pump money into the economy right now.”  https://www.patreon.com/bunkercast Written and presented by Andrew Harrison. Lead Producer: Jacob Jarvis. Producers: Jacob Archbold and Jelena Sofronijevic. Assistant Producer: Kasia Tomasiewicz. Audio production by Jade Bailey. THE BUNKER is a Podmasters Production Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Brexitcast
11-ish Horse Race

Brexitcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2022 35:42


It's sweltering in Westminster... and the Conservative leadership race is hotting up too. Adam is joined by Chris and Alex, as well as Nick Timothy, who ran Theresa May's campaign back in 2016, to talk about the timetable to become the next PM and the long list of candidates jockeying for position. And the Met Office has issued an extreme weather warning for this weekend. Professor Hannah Cloke, a natural hazards researcher at the University of Reading, gives us her tips how to keep cool in the heatwave. Today's Newscast was made by Daniel Wittenberg, with Chris Flynn and Alix Pickles. The technical producer was Emma Crowe. The assistant editor was Sam Bonham.

La ContraCrónica
La caída de Boris Johnson

La ContraCrónica

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2022 44:23


El jueves pasado Boris Johnson anunció públicamente su renuncia como primer ministro del Reino Unido. Ponía así fin a una agonía que duraba ya un mes desde que su propio partido le pusiese una moción de confianza a principios de junio. El capítulo final se escribió la semana pasada durante 36 horas trepidantes en las que más de cincuenta altos cargos dimitieron uno tras otro dejando al Gobierno en estado de parálisis y sin posibilidad alguna de mantenerse en pie. Su renuncia marca un final sin gloria alguna para uno de los primeros ministros más polémicos de la historia del Reino Unido. Desde que Boris Johnson asumiese por primera vez el cargo el 24 de julio de 2019, hace ya casi tres años, no ha habido un solo día tranquilo en Downing Street. Durante su mandato, primero como sucesor de Theresa May y luego, tras las elecciones de diciembre de 2019, como artífice de una victoria histórica, el país ha salido de la Unión Europea, ha lidiado con la pandemia y se ha metido en una crisis económica que no hace más que empeorar. Entre medias le dio tiempo para casarse, tener dos hijos, contraer la covid y encadenar un escándalo tras otro que ha ido minando su popularidad. La salida de Johnson deja el camino libre para que se abra un largo proceso interno en el que los conservadores tienen que encontrar un nuevo líder. Los diputados del partido irán cribando mediante una serie de votaciones a los candidatos hasta reducir la lista a dos. Una vez hecho eso los militantes escogerán al ganador y se lo presentarán a la reina para que le encargue la formación de Gobierno. No hay un favorito claro, aunque el secretario de Defensa, Ben Wallace, ocupa el primer lugar en una encuesta rápida que se hizo entre los miembros del partido el jueves pasado. Wallace, por su parte, no ha dicho por ahora ni que sí, ni que no. Otro candidato posible es el antiguo secretario del Tesoro y ministro de Hacienda Rishi Sunak, considerado por muchos el gran favorito. Junto a estos dos se habla también del ex ministro de educación Nadhim Zahawi, y de la ministra de Comercio Penny Mordaunt. Esos son los favoritos, pero habrá más, unos quince según espera la ejecutiva del partido, que se lanzarán al ruedo para tantear su suerte. Las elecciones internas del partido Conservador son impredecibles y se demorarán semanas. Entretanto Boris Johnson seguirá como primer ministro, aunque, eso sí, se ha comprometido a no tomar ninguna decisión importante hasta que se encuentre un sucesor. Quienquiera que sea ese sucesor se encontrará con una inflación galopante y una serie interminable de problemas derivados del Brexit y de la pandemia. En La ContraRéplica: - Impuestos - La educación reglada - La decadencia del primer mundo · “La ContraHistoria de España. Auge, caída y vuelta a empezar de un país en 28 episodios”… https://amzn.to/3kXcZ6i · “Lutero, Calvino y Trento, la Reforma que no fue”… https://amzn.to/3shKOlK · “La ContraHistoria del comunismo”… https://amzn.to/39QP2KE Apoya La Contra en: · Patreon... https://www.patreon.com/diazvillanueva · iVoox... https://www.ivoox.com/podcast-contracronica_sq_f1267769_1.html · Paypal... https://www.paypal.me/diazvillanueva Sígueme en: · Web... https://diazvillanueva.com · Twitter... https://twitter.com/diazvillanueva · Facebook... https://www.facebook.com/fernandodiazvillanueva1/ · Instagram... https://www.instagram.com/diazvillanueva · Linkedin… https://www.linkedin.com/in/fernando-d%C3%ADaz-villanueva-7303865/ · Flickr... https://www.flickr.com/photos/147276463@N05/?/ · Pinterest... https://www.pinterest.com/fernandodiazvillanueva Encuentra mis libros en: · Amazon... https://www.amazon.es/Fernando-Diaz-Villanueva/e/B00J2ASBXM #FernandoDiazVillanueva #Borisjohnson #ReinoUnido Escucha el episodio completo en la app de iVoox, o descubre todo el catálogo de iVoox Originals

The Quicky
The Scandal That Finally Broke Boris Johnson

The Quicky

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 10, 2022 19:56


UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson has finally announced his resignation as Conservative Party leader after 50 MPs and senior colleagues quit over his latest scandal, involving the appointment of an MP to a top job even though Boris knew he was accused of sexual misconduct. But why has it taken so long to oust him, given that he has been embroiled in one scandal after another for decades? What happens now in Westminster and who is most likely to be Boris' successor? The Quicky speaks to a former British MP who spent nearly two decades serving the public to find out how Boris Johnson managed to rise to power despite a litany of affairs and controversies, and who is now battling it out to replace him. Subscribe to Mamamia GET IN TOUCH Feedback? We're listening! Call the pod phone on 02 8999 9386 or email us at podcast@mamamia.com.au CONTACT US Got a topic you'd like us to cover? Send us an email at thequicky@mamamia.com.au CREDITS  Host: Claire Murphy With thanks to: Sir Norman Lamb - Chair of the South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust. Norman is a former Liberal Democrat Member of the British Parliament representing the constituency of North Norfolk from 2001-2019 Producer: Claire Murphy Executive Producer: Siobhán Moran-McFarlane Audio Producer: Thom Lion Subscribe to The Quicky at...https://mamamia.com.au/the-quicky/ Mamamia acknowledges the Traditional Owners of the Land we have recorded this podcast on, the Gadigal people of the Eora Nation. We pay our respects to their Elders past and present, and extend that respect to all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures. Just by reading our articles or listening to our podcasts, you're helping to fund girls in schools in some of the most disadvantaged countries in the world - through our partnership with Room to Read. We're currently funding 300 girls in school every day and our aim is to get to 1,000. Find out more about Mamamia at mamamia.com.auv Become a Mamamia subscriber: https://www.mamamia.com.au/subscribe See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Turley Talks
Ep. 1040 Boris Johnson RESIGNS as Liberal World Order CRASHING DOWN!!!

Turley Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022


Highlights:      “The latest poll shows that 70% of the British public, in general, wanted Boris gone. And interestingly, I have to note, that's actually less than the 71% who want Biden gone! So maybe  Biden's next after this?” “Johnson is the third prime minister in a row to resign before the end of their term following on the heels of Theresa May, and before her, David Cameron. All Conservative Party leaders, all failures in their won rights, precisely because each one of them failed to see that a new world was dawning where the old liberal globalist playbook simply no longer applies.” “Boris did in fact get Brexit done, but rather than recognize that Brexit was a symbol of a much wider political realignment around nation, culture, custom, and tradition, he turned around and governed like a typical liberal technocratic globalist. And that again ironically, I believe is the key to his downfall that all the pundits are missing.”  Timestamps:         [03:08] Why Boris Johnson resigns as prime minister of Britain [05:04] How Johnson squandered a major political realignment [09:43] The real reason Johnson collapsed and the fall of the liberal world order Resources:   Give your skin a healing feeling. Soothing benefits of pure Bentonite Clay. Made the Amish Way on a farm in South Dakota. Use Promo Code: TURLEY for an exclusive discount. Olde Country Soap. Experience the Tradition. Go to https://www.oldecountrysoap.com/ JULY 4th SPECIAL! Buy 2 T-Shirts and Get 1 FREE! https://store.turleytalks.com/ Get your own MyPillow here. Enter my code TURLEY at checkout to get a DISCOUNT: https://www.mypillow.com/turley Ep. 1039 MASSIVE UPRISING as Dutch Protestors CRUSH Leftist Globalists!!! Become a Turley Talks Insiders Club Member and get your first week FREE!!: https://insidersclub.turleytalks.com/welcome Become a Turley Productions Founder! You will get your name in the movie credits and be part of a video meet n greet with Dr. Turley when you support the production of the documentary. Get details and Give here: https://www.givesendgo.com/thereturnofamericanpatriotmovie Learn how to protect your life savings from inflation and an irresponsible government, with Gold and Silver. Go to http://www.turleytalkslikesgold.com Register HERE for our EARLY BIRD SPECIAL: https://conferences.turleytalks.com/ It's time to CHANGE AMERICA and Here's YOUR OPPORTUNITY To Do Just That! https://change.turleytalks.com/ Fight Back Against Big Tech Censorship! Sign-up here to discover Dr. Steve's different social media options …. but without censorship! https://www.turleytalks.com/en/alternative-media.com   Thank you for taking the time to listen to this episode.  If you enjoyed this episode, please subscribe and/or leave a review. Do you want to be a part of the podcast and be our sponsor? Click here to partner with us and defy liberal culture! If you would like to get lots of articles on conservative trends make sure to sign-up for the 'New Conservative Age Rising' Email Alerts.