Podcasts about uc san diego

Public research university in La Jolla, California

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Recovering From Religion
E168: The Phantom God w/ Dr. John Wathey

Recovering From Religion

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 22, 2023 88:37


This week on RfRx, Dr. John Wathey will return to discuss his latest work, The Phantom God. Does neuroscience have anything to say about the existence of God or the basis of human spiritual beliefs? Many books have been written about this, but most have strayed from the scientific method. In this talk Dr. Wathey will take a more rigorous approach, emphasizing two big ideas.One is religious compulsion, which includes the appeal of ritual, the tenacity of religious belief, and the religious obsession with sex. The other is religious phantoms: the idea that the feeling of God's presence is a phantom sensation, directly analogous to the phantom limb of an amputee. Here we'll explore how the brain handles embodiment and the fascinating illusions that happen when the circuitry of embodiment goes awry. John C. Wathey is a retired computational biologist, whose interests include evolutionary algorithms, the biology of nervous systems, and electoral reform. He got his PhD in Neurosciences at UC San Diego and has spent most of his career working on computer simulations of protein folding. His first book, The Illusion of God's Presence, explores the evolution of the emotions and intuitions behind religious belief, emphasizing behavioral and psychological research. His latest book is The Phantom God: What Neuroscience Reveals about the Compulsion to Believe. It relates the motivating forces behind religiousness to the neural circuitry of embodiment, mother-infant attachment, adult sexual pair-bonding, addiction,selective attention, hallucinations, and many other neurological surprises. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/recovering-from-religion/message

Recovering From Religion
E164: The Illusion of God's Presence w/ Dr. John Wathey

Recovering From Religion

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2023 91:11


This week on RfRx, Jack Wathey will discuss the Illusion of God's Presence. Science has only begun to make sense of religion's powerful grip on the human mind. Why do seven percent of members of the National Academy of Sciences believe in a personal god who answers prayer? The question is important because it probes the most irresistible essence of the appeal of religious and spiritual thinking. Using evidence from visual illusions, behavioral biology, and neuroscience, I offer an explanation for this and other puzzles of religion in terms of a cognitively impenetrable illusion, one that science has largely overlooked. John C. Wathey is a retired computational biologist whose interests include evolutionary algorithms, the biology of nervous systems, and electoral reform. He got his PhD in Neurosciences at UC San Diego and has spent most of his career working on computer simulations of protein folding. His first book, The Illusion of God's Presence, explores the evolution of the emotions and intuitions behind religious belief, emphasizing behavioral and psychological research. His latest book is The Phantom God: What Neuroscience Reveals about the Compulsion to Believe. It relates the motivating forces behind religiousness to the neural circuitry of embodiment, mother-infant attachment, adult sexual pair-bonding, addiction, selective attention, hallucinations, and many other neurological surprises. For RfRx comments, inquiries & topical questions, email us at RfRx@recoveringfromreligion.org. Any time you are struggling with religious doubts or fears you can connect with a trained RfR Helpline agent 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. To chat online go to http://www.recoveringfromreligion.org. To talk over the phone, dial: (844) 368-2848 in the US & Canada If you are in need of professional help, we can offer the Secular Therapy Project to provide options to connect with a professional therapist. All therapists have been thoroughly vetted by our organization and offer only evidence-based and non-religious treatment. Connect with them at http://www.seculartherapy.org. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Tiktok. Volunteer: http://www.recoveringfromreligion.org/volunteer Donate: https://www.recoveringfromreligion.org/donate --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/recovering-from-religion/message

Friends of Franz
Dogtor Zonram Liao, Do Pets Go to Heaven?

Friends of Franz

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2023 56:03


Pet animals and their human owners (or, as our expert guest likes to call them, "pet parents") truly share a special connection that transcends species and biology. According to the American Veterinary Medical Association, over 80 households in the United States owned dogs, cats, birds, and horses back in 2017-2018. Why are we so inclined to consider animals as part of the family, so much so that it is a genuine heartbreak when they leave us? What are the most common diseases pet parents should look out for in their pet's breed and age? Are the anatomy and physiology of animals truly different from humans?We are joined today by Dr. Zonram Liao, a board-certified general practice veterinarian and the Founder and CEO of Wellnergy Pets, the only pet product company fully staffed by actively practicing veterinarians and veterinary nurses. He received his BS in Biology from UC San Diego in 2011 and DVM from Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine in 2017, fulfilling his clinical studies at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign. Dr. Zonram currently practices in multiple small animal clinics throughout Southern California regions, hoping to give back to the community that helped raise him. He appeared on national television in 2021, where the Wellnergy Dental Wipes and Water Additive won "America's Big Deal" on USA Network, making it now available for purchase at Lowe's retail company nationwide. Dr. Liao has also been featured in multiple articles and press, including Fox 40 News, Shoutout LA, and Vet Candy.Livestream Air Date: February 28, 2022Dr. Zonram Liao: IG @dr.zonramliaoWellnergy Pets: IG @wellnergypets & Wed www.wellnergypets.comFriends of Franz: IG @friendsoffranzpod & FB @friendsoffranzpodChristian Franz (Host): IG @chrsfranz & YT Christian FranzThankful to the season's brand partners: Clove, BETR Remedies, Eko, Lumify, RescueMD, Medical School for Kids, Your Skincare Expert, Twrl Milk Tea

Coast to Coast Hoops
1/19/23-Coast To Coast Hoops

Coast to Coast Hoops

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 208:52


Greg recaps Wednesday's college basketball results & picks & analyzes every college basketball game for Thursday! Podcast Highlights 1:53-Recap of Wednesday's results 14:42-Start of picks Rutgers vs Michigan State  17:21-Picks & analysis for UL Monroe vs Georgia Southern 20:39-Picks & analysis for Charleston vs Monmouth  23:29-Picks & analysis for Towson vs North Carolina A&T 25:55-Picks & analysis for Georgia State vs Old Dominion  28:55-Picks & analysis for Cleveland State vs Northern Kentucky  31:45-Picks & analysis for William & Mary vs Delaware  34:21-Picks & analysis for Charlotte vs Middle Tennessee  37:34-Picks & analysis for James Madison  vs Troy 40:34-Picks & analysis for Northeastern vs Stony Brook 43:52-Picks & analysis for The Citadel vs UNC Greensboro  46:59-Picks & analysis for IPFW vs Wright St 49:56-Picks & analysis for Mercer vs VMI 52:35-Picks & analysis for Hampton vs Drexel  55:12-Picks & analysis for UNC Wilmington vs Hofstra 58:13-Picks & analysis for Purdue vs Minnesota  1:01:29-Picks & analysis for Michigan vs Maryland 1:04:33-Picks & analysis for Appalachian St vs Coastal Carolina  1:07:59-Picks & analysis for Oakland vs IUPUI 1:10:49-Picks & analysis for Wichita St vs Memphis 1:14:19-Picks & analysis for Stephen F Austin vs Sam Houston St 1:17:09-Picks & analysis for Louisiana vs Arkansas St 1:20:39-Picks & analysis for Marshall vs Texas State 1:23:31-Picks & analysis for UMKC vs North Dakota  1:26:25-Picks & analysis for South Alabama vs Southern Miss 1:29:17-Picks & analysis for Rice vs North Texas 1:32:18-Picks & analysis for Florida Atlantic vs UT San Antonio  1:35:24-Picks & analysis for Robert Morris vs UW Milwaukee  1:38:08-Picks & analysis for Denver vs South Dakota  1:40:56-Picks & analysis for Eastern Washington vs Northern Colorado  1:43:34-Picks & analysis for Omaha vs South Dakota St 1:46:24-Picks & analysis for UT Rio Grande Valley vs UT Arlington  1:49:14-Picks & analysis for Oral Roberts vs North Dakota St 1:52:05-Picks & analysis for UT Martin vs SE Missouri St 1:54:47-Picks & analysis for Youngstown St vs UW Green Bay  1:57:36-Picks & analysis for Idaho vs Northern Arizona  2:00:17-Picks & analysis for UC Riverside vs UC Davis 2:02:51-Picks & analysis for Tennessee Tech vs Little Rock 2:05:44-Picks & analysis for Morehead St vs SIU Edwardsville  2:08:13-Picks & analysis for Indians vs Illinois 2:10:52-Picks & analysis for Loyola Marymount vs Gonzaga 2:13:21-Picks & analysis for New Mexico St vs Southern Utah 2:16:30-Picks & analysis for San Diego vs Portland 2:19:29-Picks & analysis for Western Kentucky vs Louisiana Tech 2:24:08-Picks & analysis for FL International vs UTEP 2:27:03-DK Nation Pick USC vs Arizona  2:29:34-Picks & analysis for Washing St vs Utah 2:31:48-Picks & analysis for Washington vs Colorado  2:34:28-Picks & analysis for Eastern Illinois vs Tennessee St 2:36:54-Picks & analysis for Portland St vs Weber St 2:39:30-Picks & analysis for Sacramento St vs Idaho St 2:41:51-Picks & analysis for Southern Indiana vs Lindenwood  2:43:49-Picks & analysis for Hawaii vs UC Irvine  2:46:09-Picks & analysis for CS Northridge vs UC Santa Barbara  2:48:10-Picks & analysis for UC San Diego vs Cal Poly 2:50:11-Picks & analysis for CS Fullerton vs Long Beach St 2:51:58-Picks & analysis for Tarleton St vs Seattle 2:53:36-Picks & analysis for UCLA vs Arizona St 2:56:05-Picks & analysis for Pacific vs San Francisco  2:58:09-Picks & analysis for BYU vs Santa Clara 3:00:17-Picks & analysis for St. Mary's vs Pepperdine  3:02:28-Picks & analysis for Oregon St vs Stanford 3:04:19-Start of extra games Binghamton vs Albany 3:06:02-Picks & analysis for NJIT vs Bryant 3:07:50-Picks & analysis for Liberty vs Jacksonville  3:09:37-Picks & analysis for Jacksonville St vs Florida Gulf Coast 3:11:28-Picks & analysis for Maine vs Vermont 3:13:07-Picks & analysis for Queens NC vs North Florida 3:14:49-Picks & analysis for Kennesaw St vs Stetson 3:16:55-Picks & analysis for McNeese St vs Nicholls 3:18:52-Picks & analysis for Texas A&M CC vs Lamar 3:20:29-Picks & analysis for Incarnate Word vs Houston Christian  3:21:59-Picks & analysis for Bellarmine vs Austin Peay 3:23:53-Picks & analysis for Texas A&M Commerce vs New Orleans  3:25:35-Picks & analysis for Eastern Kentucky vs Lipscomb 3:27:10-Picks & analysis for Northwestern St vs SE LouisianaSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Coast to Coast Hoops
1/14/23-Coast To Coast Hoops

Coast to Coast Hoops

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2023 350:02


Greg keeps it simple, the college basketball betting board has north of 150 games on it for Saturday and he picks & analyzes EVERY one of them! Podcast Highlights 2:27-Start of picks with Davidson vs George Mason 5:00-Picks & analysis for Miami vs NC State 7:46-Picks & analysis for Seton Hall vs DePaul 10:33-Picks & analysis for Cleveland St vs IUPUI 12:45-DK Nation Pick Kentucky vs Tennessee 16:16-Picks & analysis for Drexel vs Northeastern 18:31-Picks & analysis for West Virginia vs Oklahoma  21:26-Picks & analysis for Loyola Chicago vs St. Joseph's 24:17-Picks & analysis for Bowling Green vs Western Michigan  26:39-Picks & analysis for Western Carolina vs Citadel 29:14-Picks & analysis for Robert Morris vs Detroit 32:06-Picks & analysis for Wisconsin vs Indiana 34:05-Picks & analysis for Georgia vs Ole Miss 37:43-Picks & analysis for Harvard vs Columbia 40:18-Picks & analysis for North Dakota St vs Omaha 42:52-Picks & analysis for Coastal Carolina vs Georgia State 45:31-Picks & analysis for Stony Brook vs North Carolina A&T 48:07-Picks & analysis for North Texas vs Florida Atlantic  51:33-Picks & analysis for UT San Antonio vs Charlotte 54:07-Picks & analysis for North Carolina vs Louisville  56:45-Picks & analysis for Delaware vs Hofstra 59:14-Picks & analysis for Arkansas vs Vanderbilt  1:02:26-Picks & analysis for Pennsylvania vs Darner  1:04:54-Picks & analysis for Miami OH vs Ball St 1:07:27-Picks & analysis for Providence vs Creighton 1:10:22-Picks & analysis for Princeton vs Brown 1:14:55-Picks & analysis for Kansas State vs TCU 1:15:45-Picks & analysis for Central Florida vs Tulane 1:18:20-Picks & analysis for Richmond vs St. Bonaventure  1:19:31-Picks & analysis for Southern Miss vs Arkansas St 1:23:15-Picks & analysis for UTEP vs Rice 1:26:10-Picks & analysis for Texas State vs UL Monroe 1:29:17-Picks & analysis for North Dakota vs Denver 1:31:37-Picks & analysis for Fordham vs La Salle 1:34:18-Picks & analysis for Stephen F Austin vs Southern Utah 1:36:49-Picks & analysis for Youngstown St vs Oakland  1:39:05-Picks & analysis for Pittsburgh vs Georgia Tech 1:41:30-Picks & analysis for Monmouth vs Towson 1:43:28-Picks & analysis for SE Missouri St vs Morehead St 1:45:55-Picks & analysis for Missouri vs Florida 1:48:24-Picks & analysis for UIC vs Murray St 1:50:50-Picks & analysis for Mercer vs East Tennessee  1:53:51-Picks & analysis for UAB vs Louisiana Tech 1:56:26-Picks & analysis for Saint Louis vs George Washington  1:59:21-Picks & analysis for Troy vs Appalachian St 2:01:23-Picks & analysis for Valparaiso vs Evansville  2:03:39-Picks & analysis for Louisiana vs South Alabama  2:06:00-Picks & analysis for UNC Greensboro vs Furman 2:08:39-Picks & analysis for Arizona State vs Oregon St 2:11:16-Picks & analysis for Florida St vs Virginia 2:13:53-Picks & analysis for UC Irvine vs CS Northridge 2:16:40-Picks & analysis for LSU vs Alabama  2:19:03-Picks & analysis for Tennessee State vs Tennessee Tech 2:21:18-Picks & analysis for Elon vs Charleston 2:23:50-Picks & analysis for Iowa St vs Kansas 2:26:12-Picks & analysis for Cincinnati vs SMU 2:28:50-Picks & analysis for Tulsa vs Wichita St 2:30:01-Picks & analysis for Buffalo vs Central Michigan  2:33:36-Picks & analysis for Toledo vs Northern Illinois 2:36:03-Picks & analysis for Rhode Island vs UMass 2:38:40-Picks & analysis for Little Rock vs Eastern Illinois 2:41:05-Picks & analysis for Colorado vs UCLA 2:43:29-Picks & analysis for Northern Iowa vs Belmont 2:45:43-Picks & analysis for Abilene Christian vs Tarleton St 2:48:07-Picks & analysis for CS Fullerton vs UC Davis 2:50:55-Picks & analysis for UC San Diego vs CS Bakersfield 2:53:30-Picks & analysis for Duke vs Clemson 2:55:51-Picks & analysis for Northern Arizona vs Sacramento St 2:57:48-Picks & analysis for William & Mary vs UNC Wilmington  3:00:09-Picks & analysis for Texas A&M vs South Carolina  3:03:09-Picks & analysis for Chattanooga vs Samford 3:06:13-Picks & analysis for California vs Washington  3:09:58-Picks & analysis for Arizona vs Oregon 3:12:30-Picks & analysis for Oklahoma State vs Baylor 3:15:59-Picks & analysis for Weber St vs Montana St 3:17:12-Picks & analysis for Idaho vs Eastern Washington  3:19:00-Picks & analysis for Lindenwood vs SIU Edwardsville  3:21:17-Picks & analysis for VMI vs Wofford 3:23:05-Picks & analysis for Old Dominion vs Marshall 3:25:22-Picks & analysis for FL International vs Western Kentucky  3:27:47-Picks & analysis for Georgia Southern vs James Madison 3:30:15-Picks & analysis for Air Force vs Fresno St 3:32:31-Picks & analysis for Colorado St vs UNLV 3:34:51-Picks & analysis for Northern Kentucky vs UW Green Bay  3:36:29-Picks & analysis for South Dakota St vs South Dakota  3:38:40-Picks & analysis for Wright St vs UW Milwaukee  3:41:07-Picks & analysis for Notre Dame vs Syracuse  3:43:43-Picks & analysis for Chicago St vs UT Rio Grande Valley 3:46:25-Picks & analysis for Bradley vs Drake 3:48:39-Picks & analysis for Illinois St vs Southern Illinois  3:50:59-Picks & analysis for Wake Forest vs Boston College  3:53:25-Picks & analysis for Stanford vs Washington St 3:55:21-Picks & analysis for St. Thomas vs Oral Roberts 3:57:41-Picks & analysis for Seattle vs Utah Valley 4:00:07--Picks & analysis for Western Illinois vs UMKC 4:02:51-Picks & analysis for Texas vs Texas Tech 4:05:27-Picks & analysis for Mississippi St vs Auburn 4:07:49-Picks & analysis for Pepperdine vs BYU 4:09:57-Picks & analysis for UT Arlington vs New Mexico St 4:12:19-Picks & analysis for New Mexico vs San Diego St 4:14:51-Picks & analysis for Idaho St vs Montana  4:16:54-Picks & analysis for UT Martin vs Southern Indiana 4:19:13-Picks & analysis for Sam Houston St vs Utah Tech 4:21:18-Picks & analysis for Santa Clara vs Pacific  4:23:32-Picks & analysis for San Diego vs Loyola Marymount  4:25:34-Picks & analysis for Portland vs Gonzaga  4:27:37-Picks & analysis for Grand Canyon vs Cal Baptist 4:29:44-Picks & analysis for UC Riverside vs UC Santa Barbara  4:31:32-Pick & analysis for Northern Colorado vs Portland St 4:33:30-Picks & analysis for Utah vs USC 4:35:31-Picks & analysis for St. Mary's vs San Francisco  4:37:11-Picks & analysis for Boise State vs Wyoming 4:39:24-Picks & analysis for Long Beach St vs Hawaii 4:43:09-Start of extra games Sacred Heart vs St. Francis NY 4:45:07-Picks & analysis for Maine vs UMBC 4:47:02-Picks & analysis for Bryant vs New Hampshire  4:48:49-Picks & analysis for Fairleigh Dickinson vs Central Connecticut  4:50:27-Picks & analysis for Army vs Boston U 4:52:01-Picks & analysis for North Alabama vs Queens NC 4:53:40-Picks & analysis for Holy Cross vs Lafayette  4:55:27-Picks & analysis for North Florida vs Kennesaw St 4:57:47-Picks & analysis for UNC Asheville vs Gardner Webb 5:00:07-Picks & analysis for Winthrop vs Campbell 5:01:50-Picks & analysis for Merrimack vs Stonehill 5:04:04-Picks & analysis for UMass Lowell vs Binghamton  5:06:18-Picks & analysis for Charleston Southern vs Radford 5:08:11-Picks & analysis for Bucknell vs Colgate 5:09:35-Picks & analysis for American vs Lehigh 5:11:27-Picks & analysis for Stetson vs Eastern Kentucky  5:13:15-Picks & analysis for Miss Valley St vs Bethune Cookman 5:14:51-Picks & analysis for Northwestern St vs Nicholls 5:16:54-Picks & analysis for South Carolina St vs NC Central 5:18:40-Picks & analysis for Delaware St vs Maryland Eastern Shore 5:20:18-Picks & analysis for Howard vs Norfolk St 5:21:47-Picks & analysis for Florida Gulf Coast vs Stetson 5:23:43-Picks & analysis for Long Island vs St. Francis PA 5:25:46-Picks & analysis for Morgan St vs Coppin St 5:27:18-Picks & analysis for Arkansas Pine Bluff vs Florida A&M 5:28:58-Picks & analysis for Grambling vs Southern 5:30:41-Picks & analysis for Houston Christian vs McNeese St 5:32:18-Picks & analysis for New Orleans vs Texas A&M CC 5:33:45-Picks & analysis for Jacksonville vs Jacksonville St 5:35:23-Picks & analysis for SE Louisiana vs Incarnate Word 5:37:05-Picks & analysis for Navy vs Loyola MD 5:38:28-Picks & analysis for Austin Peay vs Lipscomb  5:40:21-Picks & analysis for Lamar vs Texas A&M Commerce  5:41:57-Picks & analysis for Alcorn St vs Texas Southern  5:43:37-Picks & analysis for Jackson St vs Prairie View 5:45:08-Picks & analysis for USC Upstate vs Longwood 5:46:35-Picks & analysis for Central Arkansas vs Liberty 5:48:07-Picks & analysis for Presbyterian vs High Point  5:49:40-Picks & analysis for NJIT vs AlbanySee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

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DesignSafe Radio
NHERI Tallwood and its non-structural wall designs

DesignSafe Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2023 10:49


In this episode, earthquake engineer and #NHERITallwood co-PI Keri Ryan gets specific about #NHERITallwood nonstructural components: non-loadbearing walls — elements extremely prone to earthquake drift and damage. Ryan shows us the cold-formed-steel exterior-wall subassemblies and some of the innovative building components that can prevent non-structural deformations due to ground shaking.CEMCO @CEMCO_steelConstruction Specialities Group @csinconlineSimpson StrongTie @strongtieNeed to know more? Get the backstory on NHERI Tallwood: http://nheritallwood.mines.edu/ Follow the NHERI Tallwood project with the live video stream at UC San Diego: http://nheri.ucsd.edu/video/Find Professor Keri Ryan on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/keri-ryan-29332399/Twitter: @NHERI_UCSD @Unevadareno @UCSanDiego @UCSDJacobs @unrengineering, @NSF @slpei @commresilience @MinesCEE @coschoolofmines @CEMCO_steel @csinconline @strongtie#NHERITallwood #coldformedsteel #CFS #naturalhazards #resilience #NSFfunded #earthquakeEngineering #womeninengineering #NSFStories

American Shoreline Podcast Network
A New Understanding of Ocean Life with the Ocean Biomolecular Observing Network | Ocean Decade Show

American Shoreline Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 48:28


Happy New Year, and happy 3rd official year of the Ocean Decade - and The Ocean Decade Show podcast. To kick off 2023, this month's episode features Taylor a bit out of her scientific depths discussing the Ocean Biomolecular Observing Network (OBON), an endorsed Ocean Decade Programme, which aims to develop a global system of biological observation that will allow science and society to understand ocean life like never before. Guests Dr. Sophie Seeyave - CEO of Partnership for Observation of the Global Ocean (POGO) - and Dr. Maragret Leinen - Director of Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego - expertly guide Taylor through the importance of ocean observation, how OBON is building a global observation network, and what the Programme wants to achieve by 2030. To learn more about OBON, visit https://www.obon-ocean.org/.

UC San Diego (Audio)
Culture Community and Career Plans with Vianey Valdez

UC San Diego (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 12:43


Vianey Valdez grew up knowing she loved to learn. When it came time to pick a college, she found herself outside her comfort zone at UC San Diego. She shares how she found her place, created community, and learned how to balance schoolwork and a social life. A recent graduate who studied global health and human development, she discusses how she turned her interests into a career. Series: "Education Channel" [Education] [Show ID: 38290]

Education Issues (Video)
Culture Community and Career Plans with Vianey Valdez

Education Issues (Video)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 12:43


Vianey Valdez grew up knowing she loved to learn. When it came time to pick a college, she found herself outside her comfort zone at UC San Diego. She shares how she found her place, created community, and learned how to balance schoolwork and a social life. A recent graduate who studied global health and human development, she discusses how she turned her interests into a career. Series: "Education Channel" [Education] [Show ID: 38290]

University of California Audio Podcasts (Audio)
Culture Community and Career Plans with Vianey Valdez

University of California Audio Podcasts (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 12:43


Vianey Valdez grew up knowing she loved to learn. When it came time to pick a college, she found herself outside her comfort zone at UC San Diego. She shares how she found her place, created community, and learned how to balance schoolwork and a social life. A recent graduate who studied global health and human development, she discusses how she turned her interests into a career. Series: "Education Channel" [Education] [Show ID: 38290]

Coast to Coast Hoops
1/5/23-Coast To Coast Hoops

Coast to Coast Hoops

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 197:08


It's a simple Thursday college basketball podcast, there's over 75 college basketball games on the board & Greg picks & analyzes every one of them! Podcast Highlights 6:11-Start of picks Coastal Carolina vs Appalachian State  8:50-Picks & analysis for Maryland vs Rutgers 11:39-Picks & analysis for Marshall vs Georgia Southern 14:56-Picks & analysis for Hofstra vs Hampton 17:50-Picks & analysis for Stony Brook vs Monmouth  20:46-Picks & analysis for Charlotte vs Florida International 23:11-Picks & analysis for Southern Indiana vs Morehead St 25:50-Picks & analysis for Texas State vs James Madison  29:44-Picks & analysis for Old Dominion vs Troy 32:41-Picks & analysis for UAB vs Florida Atlantic  35:33-Picks & analysis for Robert Morris vs Youngstown St 38:20-Picks & analysis for UW Milwaukee vs Cleveland St 40:55-Picks & analysis for Purdue vs Ohio St 43:49-Picks & analysis for Omaha vs Western Illinois  46:10-Picks & analysis for Drexel vs Towson 49:17-Picks & analysis for UW Green Bay vs IPFW 52:15-Picks & analysis for Northeastern vs William & Mary 55:01-Picks & analysis for SMU vs Houston 57:41-Picks & analysis for Tennessee St vs SIU Edwardsville  1:00:17-Picks & analysis for Georgia St vs UL Monroe  1:02:51-Picks & analysis for Grand Canyon vs Sam Houston St 1:05:43-Picks & analysis for Seattle vs UT Rio Grande Valley 1:08:32-Picks & analysis for South Dakota vs North Dakota  1:11:23-Picks & analysis for Southern Miss vs Louisiana  1:14:02-Picks & analysis for Middle Tennessee vs UT San Antonio  1:16:46-Picks & analysis for Louisiana Tech vs Rice 1:19:21-Picks & analysis for Southern Utah vs Tarleton St 1:22:09-Picks & analysis for Arkansas St vs South Alabama  1:25:02-Picks & analysis for Denver vs St. Thomas 1:28:08-Picks & analysis for Washington St vs Arizona St 1:30:49-Picks & analysis for Montana St vs Northern Colorado 1:33:38-Picks & analysis for Utah Valley vs UT Arlington  1:36:40-Picks & analysis for South Dakota St vs North Dakota St 1:38:54-Picks & analysis for Montana vs Northern Arizona  1:41:07-Picks & analysis for Eastern Illinois vs Tennessee Tech 1:43:32-Picks & analysis for North Texas vs Western Kentucky  1:45:54-Picks & analysis for Portland St vs Eastern Washington  1:48:57-Picks & analysis for Oregon vs Colorado 1:51:37-Picks & analysis for SE Missouri St vs UT Martin 1:54:16-Picks & analysis for Sacramento St vs Idaho 1:56:53-Picks & analysis for UC Irvine vs UC Davis 1:59:47-Picks & analysis for Cincinnati vs Wichita St 2:02:26-Picks & analysis for Indiana vs Iowa 2:05:09-DK Nation Pick USC vs UCLA 2:07:48-Picks & analysis for Santa Clara vs Pepperdine 2:10:18-Picks & analysis for Hawaii vs UC San Diego  2:12:31-Picks & analysis for Pacific vs San Diego  2:15:06-Picks & analysis for Cal Poly vs CS Bakersfield  2:17:10-Picks & analysis for Oregon St vs Utah 2:19:12-Picks & analysis for Utah Tech vs Cal Baptist 2:21:12-Picks & analysis for Long Beach State vs CA Northridge 2:23:05-Picks & analysis for CS Fullerton vs UC Riverside  2:25:12-Picks & analysis for Gonzaga vs San Francisco  2:27:54-Picks & analysis for BYU vs Loyola Marymount  2:30:10-Picks & analysis for Washington vs Arizona 2:32:29-Start of extra games Fairleigh Dickinson vs St. Francis NY 2:34:43-Picks & analysis for Maine vs UMass Lowell 2:36:47-Picks & analysis for Queens NC vs Bellarmine 2:38:52-Picks & analysis for American vs Holy Cross 2:40:40-Picks & analysis for Wagner vs Stonehill 2:42:36-Picks & analysis for Sacred Heart vs Merrimack 2:44:24-Picks & analysis for Albany vs UMBC 2:46:20-Picks & analysis for Jacksonville vs Liberty 2:48:08-Picks & analysis for New Hampshire vs Binghamton  2:50:20-Picks & analysis for Long Island vs Central Connecticut  2:51:57-Picks & analysis for Jacksonville vs Stetson 2:54:01-Picks & analysis for Lafayette vs Boston U 2:55:52-Picks & analysis for Army vs Loyola MD 2:57:45-Picks & analysis for Kennesaw St vs North Florida  2:59:54-Picks & analysis for Bryant vs Vermont 3:02:03-Picks & analysis for Navy vs Colgate 3:04:12-Picks & analysis for Lehigh vs Bucknell 3:05:49-Picks & analysis for Lamar vs New Orleans  3:07:32-Picks & analysis for Florida Gulf Coast vs Austin Peay 3:09:19-Picks & analysis for Eastern Kentucky vs Central Arkansas  3:11:02-Picks & analysis for North Alabama vs Lipscomb  3:12:32-Picks & analysis for Houston Christian vs SE Louisiana  3:14:21-Picks & analysis for Northwestern St vs McNeese St 3:16:10-Picks & analysis for Nicholls vs Texas A&M CommerceSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

PlaybyPlay
1/5/2023 Hawaii vs. UC San Diego Free NCAAB Picks and Predictions

PlaybyPlay

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 0:54


Hawaii vs. UC San Diego College Basketball Pick Prediction 1/5/2023 by Tony T. Hawaii at UC San Diego—Hawaii is 11-3 this season and 2-0 in the Big West. Warriors good defensive team sitting 17th in the nation in effective field goal defense by allowing 27.7% from three and 44.5% inside. Below average shooting team inside and around the bucket.

ASCO Daily News
Fertility Concerns, Family Planning, and Career Decisions Among Female Oncologists

ASCO Daily News

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 21:28


A national survey of more than 1,000 female oncologists explores their difficult career choices amidst attempts to build families, their concerns about fertility, and their issues with discrimination during pregnancy and/or maternity leave. Dr. Fumiko Chino, Dr. Anna Lee, and Dr. Erin Gillespie discuss the survey's findings and share their own insights and experiences as female oncologists. TRANSCRIPT Dr. Fumiko Chino: Hello, I am Dr. Fumiko Chino, a radiation oncologist and health equity researcher at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and the guest host of the ASCO Daily News podcast today. In today's episode, we'll explore gender equity within the oncology workforce. Our discussion is centered on a newly published article in JAMA Network Open. This national survey of over 1,000 female oncologists found that 95% considered their career when planning a family, and about one-third faced fertility concerns when trying to become pregnant. Additional findings include that one-third faced discrimination during pregnancy and/or maternity leaves. Joining me for this discussion are study team members Dr. Anna Lee, an assistant professor in radiation oncology at the University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center, and Dr. Erin Gillespie, an associate professor in radiation oncology at the University of Washington and a member of the Hutchinson's Institute for Cancer Outcomes Research. Our full disclosures are available in the transcript for this episode, and disclosures relating to all episodes of the ASCO Daily News podcast are available on our transcripts at asco.orgpodcasts. We have all agreed to go by our first names today. Anna and Erin, it's great to have you on the podcast today. Dr. Anna Lee: Thank you, excited to be here. Dr. Erin Gillespie: Yeah, thanks so much, Fumiko. Dr. Fumiko Chino: Well, I'm hoping to just dive right in to talk about this study, which I was proud to be on the authorship team with both of you. I just want to give a little bit of setup about how this study started, which was essentially within our own group of junior female faculty. We have semi-regular meetings, and this idea for the study actually came up at a picnic for some young female faculty members. That then led to a small survey that I did on a Facebook group of young female oncologists and then, ultimately, to the national survey. So, Anna, do you mind telling me just a little bit about your research background and why this topic is important to you? Dr. Anna Lee: Yeah. So, when I was a resident along with my co-resident Virginia Osborn, we helped co-found a group called the Society for Women in Radiation Oncology, or SWRO. We were able to bring a group of women in our field who were interested in looking at the experiences of female radiation oncologists, both starting at the residency, the training level, but also into practice. And we had generated an initial survey looking at women's experience, and they found that even though the majority, almost 95% of women, felt like radiation oncology was a family-friendly field, only about half of the group actually felt that it was after their lived experiences. So, this kind of led me to being interested in participating in the development of this study. And personally, I have been going through the fertility journey myself. My partner and I got married last year and, you know, you think that for so long you put an effort into something and get a result and just how I did in academics or in terms of my career aspirations, you think that it'd be very straightforward, but it's been more of a challenge than I expected, and we are going through the whole workup process and considering our options. So this is a study that is of personal interest to me. Dr. Fumiko Chino: Thank you so much for sharing that. And Erin, do you mind just sharing a little bit about your background and why this topic is important for you? Dr. Erin Gillespie: My research really focuses on access to high-quality, patient-centered care. I'm from Anchorage, Alaska, so this idea of variation in quality and differences in care people receive has been central. And one thing that I've noticed over time is that the physician workforce has such an important—and physicians, in general, in oncology—have really big impacts on the care that patients receive. And in radiation oncology, we've seen for many decades now that we have only about 30% of our workforce is women. And to Anna's point, why is that? And I think this study sort of gets at some of the challenges that women may be foreseeing in entering an oncology career. For me personally, I started my first faculty position in my mid-30s. And it being a small field, I've moved around every few years from the best academic medical school to residency to a faculty position. And you know, in my mid-30s, I wasn't in a stable, long-term relationship, so I, as you were describing, went through the fertility preservation process and got to be fortunate to have a group of junior women faculty, like you, Fumiko, who would actually share and discuss. And it was in New York where all these discussions came to light, and in the actual fertility clinic, where you realize there's a lot of other career-oriented women with the same experiences. And so, how does this general phenomenon potentially impact us in oncology and downstream are patients who—there have done some studies that gender and sex sort of concordance between patients and providers can impact the types of treatments that people are receiving, so I think it's very important. Thanks for inviting me. Dr. Fumiko Chino: Yeah, I think that you bring up a really important point, which is that essentially when we think about equity issues, we're not just talking about access to high-quality care for patients, we're also talking about equity within our fields and within the workforce. And this concept of fertility research and gender equity within oncology, I think is, thankfully, rising in importance. And so, I was so happy to be able to be part of this study that looks at it. But, I guess, my next question is, what are the real barriers to doing this type of research, and what are the barriers to actually improving gender discrimination like what this study shows? Anna, do you want to take that first? Dr. Anna Lee: Yeah, sure. Well, there's certainly a strong amount of shame and stigma that comes along with infertility. Even being able to open up about it and share with your colleagues and go through a process that's very personal while you're working, but it kind of bleeds into or affects your day-to-day work life. So, that culture and that inability to be open about it I think is really making it difficult for people to share and discuss it publicly, and also, I think that there's some level of perception that this should not be discussed in an academic environment. But the reality is that even our survey study showed that women certainly thought about their career when it came to family planning. And so the more we discuss it, the more that we normalize this kind of conversation, it will bring to light how women are being affected by their careers. And also, I think that with our survey being completely anonymous, it was able to be an avenue for women to be able to share their experiences too. Dr. Fumiko Chino: Yeah, I know certainly I feel very privileged to have been at a large institution that really did have a very active and engaged group of young female faculty where I felt like almost protected by just numbers, for lack of a better term, and for us to be able to share our experience. Now, Erin, have you noticed anything in terms of, for example, the motherhood penalty on career or productivity in terms of the capacity for even getting the optimal position for yourself? You mentioned a little bit about your own experiences coming from a small area in Alaska and how that really made you have to hustle hard for optimal career outcomes. Dr. Erin Gillespie: I guess like when I think about—to Anna's point earlier, just having open discussion with people in the field, and like you said, being in New York, a fairly progressive environment and women are more open about these things early on, was definitely helpful. What I've heard of a lot of people beyond the career-driven nature, and you know, there was this article from The New York Times several years ago that I remember talked about women that had kids between 25 and 35, never were able to catch up to their peers because those are kind of the really critical career development phase and like really establishing yourself and your independence, which always kind of sat with me and I always justified it. It's just like, "Well, I guess the fact that I'm getting to these things later may have career benefits because I'm not actually ready to go through all these things in residency." And then, the other thing I've heard people talk a lot about in radiation oncology was the extensive oral boards, which just further—we do five years of radiation oncology and then there's another couple years, can be a couple of years of very intense studying and passing exams that used to be even more strictly timed. And so, people were literally delaying family planning in order to make sure that their jobs as a clinical radiation oncologist was safe and protected, and they could flourish in what they've spent their life working on. So, I do think, back to Anna's point, that just starting these conversations and engaging the board of radiology on how to actually accommodate women, a lot of it comes down to accommodations to encourage gender equity. Dr. Fumiko Chino: You know, one thing that was quite striking in our survey was just about essentially what people had to sacrifice in order to actually have kids, and this sort of patchwork formal paid family leave, and the fact that we really don't have a good national policy, and it's just very state- and institution-driven. And I know that Anna and Erin, you both actually each moved institutions within the last couple of years, moving from New York, which, as previously stated, is a pretty liberal state to your current institutions. So, I was just wondering if either of you could speak about how even the fact that we don't have a national policy in this patchwork leaves women sort of at the whims, in terms of planning their career and their family planning, at the whims of wherever they end up. Anna, I know you did a little bit more background research on this, do you want to take that first? Dr. Anna Lee: Yeah. Actually, when I moved out of New York to Texas, unlike New York where they have, I believe, it's a statewide policy for maternity leave paid, and we don't have anything like that here. But also, our insurance policy initially didn't cover OSI preservation or IVF. Recently, they do now cover that. So, I've been able to breathe a sigh of relief in knowing that I can start my journey in exploring these options and knowing that my institution supports me in that way by having that coverage. So, definitely having institutional buy-in allows us to have more freedom and flexibility and feel the relief in knowing that, "Okay, I can prioritize both my career and my personal life, and be able to support both, and have my career also support that part of my life." Dr. Fumiko Chino: Erin, anything to add for that? Again, I know that you just moved institutions. Dr. Erin Gillespie: Yeah. You know, it's interesting. When I was looking, my husband and I were actually not living in the same city. So, as we became pregnant, the desire to be in the same place became more real. But thinking about changing institutions was complicated, and ultimately, the state laws—you know, so, we learned about multiple states, and having state laws is helpful, although FMLA requires you to be in a place for usually about a year in order to qualify for any of the state benefits. And so, what I ended up finding was that the institutions ultimately still played a huge role in determining if you wanted to change your career, that it was up to the institution to really support a maternity leave situation. So, while I think that the state can set like some general guidance that probably helps the culture, ultimately, institutions play a huge role. I was actually just talking to one of my co-residents from UC San Diego, who is in a private practice in Anchorage, and he was asking me, "Are there any general guidelines in family leave for radiation oncology? Have you seen anything to help institutions, large or small, really establish best practices?" And I referred him to SWRO because I said if anybody knows of anything that's been drafted, it would be your organization. But I honestly don't think that there is anything, and I think that is a room for improvement. Dr. Fumiko Chino: That really segues into our next topic, which is how do we really advocate for ourselves and our colleagues to improve the status quo? Because as it stands, it's phenomenal that we have landed in places that have both the insurance and the policy coverage for maternity leave and for fertility concerns, but I think a lot of our colleagues aren't so lucky. Anna, do you want to take that first? Dr. Anna Lee: Yeah. I think when it's available, both men and women should take family leave or paternal leave. Taking leave when either sex has a child, it kind of normalizes the fact that child care should be an equal distribution of work, and also that we need to value both men and women being at home to take care of the first few months of a child's life. So, once we have that, I think that when you improve the culture of an organization, it can automatically help support the institutional buy-in as well. Dr. Fumiko Chino: Yeah, that whole “he for she,” and it's hilarious to think that just men taking paternity leave when allowed really does—number one, they have more bonding with their new baby, but also, it makes it normal that everyone is taking leave because that seems appropriate, what's best for the family and also what's best for the individual person to actually have that time with their child. Erin, additional thoughts in terms of how do we advocate for ourselves? Dr. Erin Gillespie: Yeah. To that point, I will say I really applaud Memorial Sloan Kettering for having people like Sean McBride in our leadership that were young enough to really advocate for having paternal leave in addition to maternal leave and making that something that the junior faculty were like, you know, it's not just something that's possible, but should be expected. And so, I see an opportunity for institutions to really give leadership opportunities to kind of these junior, mid-level faculty that really can have a cultural influence on how people—not that every man in our department has taken that leave, certainly, but I feel like there is this need to change the culture because until men are actually taking significant leave, there is still this disparity. Dr. Fumiko Chino: You know, I have to reflect kind of on my own role models. My mother had 5 kids in 6 years, as being a physician, a radiation oncologist. And in my mind now, as someone who is a radiation oncologist who has zero kids, I have no idea how she did it. I feel like it was so challenging for me to just build the career that I have. So, I was just wondering, are there people that you can look to as role models? I think, honestly, Erin, you said Sean McBride, as you know, an active and engaged father, who is very open and speaks frequently of his, you know, daddy duties. Again, it's hilarious that I'm pointing to Sean as a role model, but he really is. I mean, that's part of his persona. Anna, do you have role models in terms of thinking about how to have that delicate balance in this idea of like you could have it all? Dr. Anna Lee: Fortunately, I have so many peer mentors, and friends, and people in the field going back to residency, seeing my co-resident, Virginia Osborn, going through training, having 2—she had 2 kids during training, and then, you know, seeing even faculty here having children early in their mid-career, just being able to balance everything, and making sure that they really understand the policies of the institution so that they're taking what they can in terms of their leave and their benefits. So, I think that they're showing me that we don't need to be apologetic about taking leave. We don't need to necessarily ask our colleagues or be apologetic to our colleagues or to our institution for taking leave because it's a part of our life, it's a part of our fabric, in terms of being able to have children and raise them. And if that's something that one wants in their personal life, I feel like it's something that is, obviously, going to affect both their careers, but the career will affect their personal life, and being able to achieve both of those is something that we can all strive to help each other. Dr. Fumiko Chino: Yeah, absolutely. And I think, honestly, it's great to have role models and people who are, you know, working to make the environment better in terms of gender equity. I think one of the most surprising findings from this study was that, actually, there was a minority of women who actually felt discrimination during pregnancy and maternity leave that actually came exclusively from other women. Erin, do you have any comment on that? Is that reflective of anything that you've seen? Dr. Erin Gillespie: Yeah. This issue of there is still ongoing challenges of the idea that women discriminate as much or more against women. When I look back on my own mentorship, I've actually had mostly strong male mentors, and they were as family-oriented and work-life balance. I mean, Jim Murphy, as a resident, and then Justin Bekelman, as a faculty member. They've always been very imperative that your personal life is a high priority and that you don't necessarily sacrifice that. And to do that, you have to be smart about the commitments that you make and how you balance these things. But despite that, one of my mentors recently said, you know—and men can give great advice, and they can certainly advocate, and I think it's critical that they provide that. But one of my mentors recently said, "Ultimately, as you enter this new phase of being a mother, you need to find really close, strong, women mentors that have actually been through this because their experience is just not the same. As much as we can talk the talk, there is still a fundamental difference, and mentorship on both sides is critical." Dr. Fumiko Chino: Absolutely. Wrapping up this podcast, do you have any other final thoughts, either Erin or Anna, about our findings on how we can continue to make sure we're making improvements for ourselves but also for the field? Dr. Anna Lee: I am encouraged, though, that I think we're seeing incremental improvements in our field. You know, I can't speak on all of oncology, but in radiation oncology, even the timing is more flexible. We're able to be boarded through Zoom, and we don't have to travel to a single site. So, I think that we are seeing incremental improvements and there's a lot of, now with both the Society for Women in Radiation Oncology, but we have Radiation Oncology Women Physicians' Group, we have different groups that are advocating and making sure that our voices are heard and that, you know, our voices also are translating into policy level changes. And so, we still don't have national level, or I don't think we have blanket society-level recommendations for maternity leave that we can refer to, and I don't think all institutions are adopting them universally, but I think that there's a growing course and a growing movement of people kind of advocating for that, and we're inching towards that slowly, but surely. Dr. Erin Gillespie: Yeah. And I think that to that point, just the thing that I've tried to change in my own practice has been to normalize the conversation because going back to what I said, moving to New York, it was a normal conversation that you talked about these things, which hadn't been the case before. And so, you know, with my medical students, residents, I'm very open about what are some challenges, but what are the solutions and how do you balance these things, so that they feel like this doesn't have to be something that you suffer, or think, or worry about without there being people to talk to. Dr. Fumiko Chino: No, I think that was a really true concept and the idea of like—I know when I was on my interview surge, I was told, “Don't ask about the maternity leave because future employers are going think that you're trying to get everything out of them.” But the idea that we shouldn't even ask about it, it seems insane, so I'm glad we're moving forward. I want to thank you both, Dr. Anna Lee and Dr. Erin Gillespie, for sharing your valuable insights with us today and for your dedication to addressing gender equity issues and oncology. Dr. Anna Lee: Thank you so much. Dr. Erin Gillespie: Thanks so much. Dr. Fumiko Chino: Thanks to our listeners for your time today. You'll find a link to the article discussed today in the transcript of this episode. If you value the insights that you hear on the ASCO Daily News podcast, please take a moment to rate, review, and subscribe, wherever you get your podcasts. Disclaimer:  The purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. This is not a substitute for professional medical care and is not intended for use in the diagnosis or treatment of individual conditions. Guests on this podcast express their own opinions, experience, and conclusions. Guest statements on the podcast do not express the opinions of ASCO. The mention of any product, service, organization, activity, or therapy, should not be construed as an ASCO endorsement.  Find out more about today's speakers: Dr. Fumiko Chino Dr. Anna Lee Dr. Erin Gillespie Follow ASCO on social media:  @ASCO on Twitter  ASCO on Facebook  ASCO on LinkedIn  Disclosures: Dr. Fumiko Chino: None disclosed. Dr. Anna Lee: None disclosed. Dr. Erin Gillespie: Other Relationship: eContour.org

The Werk
THE WERK Season 4 Episode 05: Climate Change Work With Intersectional Climate Scientist and Mystic Dr. Chandler Puritty

The Werk

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2023 60:25


Dr. Chandler Puritty is an intersectional climate scientist and mystic. She received her doctorate from UC San Diego in Biology. She now teaches classes on how climate science, environmental science, capitalism, white supremacy, and race issues intersect and all contribute to our climate crisis. Dr. Chandler creates content and teaches on Tik Tok.    In This Episode: Dr. Chandler shares her origins story on how she became a scientist and then eventually, a doctor in biology with a concentration in plant community ecology. Dr. Chandler shares how through colonization, the invasive plant species introduced by the settlers were the contributing factor to the ongoing climate crisis in Southern California.  How humans are a part of nature's ecosystems but are often taught not to interfere with it and that ideology further harms our planet.  Dr. Chandler talks about speciesism and hierarchies that distort our relationship with each other and the planet.  Dr. Chandler compares the climate crisis and its potential cure to the three-headed dog from Harry Potter. Dr. Chandler explains why capitalism is the root of all evil. The antidote to capitalism is a community and Dr. Chandler explains the necessity of community to combat the effects of capitalism. The narrative around the urgency of the climate crisis.  Full Show Notes: Dr Chandler's Tik Tok Laura Chung Instagram Brittany Simone Anderson's Instagram The Werk Podcast Instagram The Werk Podcast Website YouTube Channel Connect with The Werk: If you enjoyed the podcast and you feel called, please share it, and tag us! Subscribe, rate, and review the show wherever you get your podcasts. Your rating and review help more people discover it! Follow on Instagram @thewerkpodcast Let us know your favorite guests, lessons, or any topic requests.

University of California Audio Podcasts (Audio)
Global Healthy Aging - A Review of Efforts to Support Healthy Aging From Around the World

University of California Audio Podcasts (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2023 47:35


The world's population is aging. How can we improve the lives of older people, their families, and their communities? Alison A. Moore, M.D., UC San Diego, shares the impacts of studying healthy aging globally. From the World Health Organization (WHO) to the UN and locally in San Diego, learn how the world community is studying aging to improve health, equity, longevity and more. Series: "Stein Institute for Research on Aging" [Health and Medicine] [Show ID: 38425]

Health and Medicine (Video)
Global Healthy Aging - A Review of Efforts to Support Healthy Aging From Around the World

Health and Medicine (Video)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2023 47:35


The world's population is aging. How can we improve the lives of older people, their families, and their communities? Alison A. Moore, M.D., UC San Diego, shares the impacts of studying healthy aging globally. From the World Health Organization (WHO) to the UN and locally in San Diego, learn how the world community is studying aging to improve health, equity, longevity and more. Series: "Stein Institute for Research on Aging" [Health and Medicine] [Show ID: 38425]

Health and Medicine (Audio)
Global Healthy Aging - A Review of Efforts to Support Healthy Aging From Around the World

Health and Medicine (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2023 47:35


The world's population is aging. How can we improve the lives of older people, their families, and their communities? Alison A. Moore, M.D., UC San Diego, shares the impacts of studying healthy aging globally. From the World Health Organization (WHO) to the UN and locally in San Diego, learn how the world community is studying aging to improve health, equity, longevity and more. Series: "Stein Institute for Research on Aging" [Health and Medicine] [Show ID: 38425]

Global Health (Audio)
Global Healthy Aging - A Review of Efforts to Support Healthy Aging From Around the World

Global Health (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2023 47:35


The world's population is aging. How can we improve the lives of older people, their families, and their communities? Alison A. Moore, M.D., UC San Diego, shares the impacts of studying healthy aging globally. From the World Health Organization (WHO) to the UN and locally in San Diego, learn how the world community is studying aging to improve health, equity, longevity and more. Series: "Stein Institute for Research on Aging" [Health and Medicine] [Show ID: 38425]

Aging and Senior Health (Audio)
Global Healthy Aging - A Review of Efforts to Support Healthy Aging From Around the World

Aging and Senior Health (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2023 47:35


The world's population is aging. How can we improve the lives of older people, their families, and their communities? Alison A. Moore, M.D., UC San Diego, shares the impacts of studying healthy aging globally. From the World Health Organization (WHO) to the UN and locally in San Diego, learn how the world community is studying aging to improve health, equity, longevity and more. Series: "Stein Institute for Research on Aging" [Health and Medicine] [Show ID: 38425]

UC San Diego (Audio)
Global Healthy Aging - A Review of Efforts to Support Healthy Aging From Around the World

UC San Diego (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2023 47:35


The world's population is aging. How can we improve the lives of older people, their families, and their communities? Alison A. Moore, M.D., UC San Diego, shares the impacts of studying healthy aging globally. From the World Health Organization (WHO) to the UN and locally in San Diego, learn how the world community is studying aging to improve health, equity, longevity and more. Series: "Stein Institute for Research on Aging" [Health and Medicine] [Show ID: 38425]

Coast to Coast Hoops
12/31/22-Coast To Coast Hoops

Coast to Coast Hoops

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2022 291:36


A simple Saturday podcast to end 2022, there are 113 college basketball games on the Saturday betting board and Greg picks & analyzes every one of them Podcast Highlights 3:36-Start of picks Virginia vs Georgia Tech 6:23-Picks & analysis for Louisville vs Kentucky 8:49-Picks & analysis for Virginia Tech CVS Wake Forest  11:26-Picks & analysis for Charleston vs Towson 14:26-Picks & analysis for St. John's vs Seton Hall 16:59-Picks & analysis for UW Milwaukee vs Detroit 19:57-Picks & analysis for UConn vs Xavier 22:32-Picks & analysis for Texas Tech vs TCU 25:13-Picks & analysis for Yale vs Columbia  28:10-Picks & analysis for Stony Brook vs Northeastern  30:31-Picks & analysis for St. Louis vs St. Joseph's  32:41-Picks & analysis for Rhode Island vs Duquesne  34:54-Picks & analysis for Samford vs The Citadel  37:34-Picks & analysis for East Tennessee vs VMI 40:26-Picks & analysis for North Carolina A&T vs Hofstra 43:17-Picks & analysis for Harvard vs Princeton  45:58-Picks & analysis for Florida St vs Duke 48:57-Picks & analysis for UW Green Bay vs Oakland  51:23-Picks & analysis for Texas vs Oklahoma  54:09-Picks & analysis for Boston College vs Syracuse  56:44-Picks & analysis for Baylor vs Iowa St 59:33-Picks & analysis for Chattanooga vs Mercer  1:02:25-Picks & analysis for South Alabama vs Georgia St 1:05:17-Picks & analysis for James Madison vs Marshall 1:08:04-Picks & analysis for Nevada vs Air Force 1:10:39-Picks & analysis for Louisiana vs Old Dominion  1:13:12-Picks & analysis for Fresno St vs Utah St 1:15:24-Picks & analysis for Elon vs Delaware 1:17:51-Picks & analysis for Dayton vs Davidson 1:21:07-Picks & analysis for La Salle vs VCU 1:23:43-Picks & analysis for UIC vs Bradley 1:26:15-Picks & analysis for UMass vs St. Bonaventure  1:28:55-Picks & analysis for Western Illinois vs South Dakota  1:31:34-Picks & analysis for Louisiana Tech vs Charlotte  1:34:30-Picks & analysis for Arizona vs Arizona St 1:37:22-Picks & analysis for William & Mary vs Drexel 1:39:50-Picks & analysis for Richmond vs George Mason 1:41:56-Picks & analysis for Georgia Southern vs Coastal Carolina  1:44:34-Picks & analysis for UNC Greensboro vs Wofford 1:47:19-DK Nation Pick Marquette vs Villanova 1:50:36-Picks & analysis for Hampton vs UNC Wilmington  1:53:18-Picks & analysis for Northern Kentucky vs IUPUI 1:56:09-Picks & analysis for Oklahoma St vs Kansas 1:58:14-Picks & analysis for Central Florida vs Houston 2:00:48-Picks & analysis for Stephen F Austin vs UT Arlington  2:03:17-Picks & analysis for UMKC vs Omaha 2:05:50-Picks & analysis for IPFW vs Youngstown St 2:08:33-Picks & analysis for Northern Iowa vs Illinois St  2:11:15-Picks & analysis for Rio Grande Valley vs Southern Utah 2:13:56-Picks & analysis for UL Monroe vs Arkansas St 2:16:19-Picks & analysis for Appalachian St vs Southern Miss 2:18:18-Picks & analysis for Cleveland St vs Robert Morris 2:20:50-Picks & analysis for St. Thomas vs South Dakota St 2:23:28-Picks & analysis for SIU Edwardsville vs SE Missouri St 2:26:00-Picks & analysis for Oral Roberts vs Denver 2:28:53-Picks & analysis for San Jose St vs Colorado St 2:33:16-Picks & analysis for Furman vs Western Carolina  2:35:26-Picks & analysis for Florida International vs North Texas 2:38:12-Picks & analysis for UT San Antonio vs UAB 2:40:24-Picks & analysis for George Washington vs Loyola Chicago  2:42:47-Picks & analysis for Western Kentucky vs Middle Tennessee  2:45:24-Picks & analysis for New Mexico vs Wyoming  2:48:28-Picks & analysis for San Diego St vs UNLV 2:51:32-Picks & analysis for Rice vs UTEP 2:54:12-Picks & analysis for Utah vs Stanford 2:56:22-Picks & analysis for Eastern Washington vs Montana St 2:58:51-Picks & analysis for Northern Arizona vs Weber St 3:01:00-Picks & analysis for East Carolina vs Wichita St 3:03:17-Picks & analysis for Utah Tech vs Utah Valley 3:05:54-Picks & analysis for Tarleton St vs Abilene Christian  3:08:35-Picks & analysis for Idaho vs Montana 3:11:16-Picks & analysis for UC Irvine vs CS Bakersfield  3:14:04-Picks & analysis for Little Rock vs Tennessee St 3:17:04-Picks & analysis for UT Martin vs Morehead St 3:19:17-Picks & analysis for Southern Indiana vs Eastern Illinois 3:22:14-Picks & analysis for Tennessee Tech vs Lindenwood 3:25:05-Picks & analysis for Loyola Marymount vs Pacific  3:27:38-Picks & analysis for Troy vs Texas St 3:29:28-Picks & analysis for Pepperdine vs Gonzaga 3:32:11-Picks & analysis for Portland St vs Sacramento St 3:36:06-Picks & analysis for UC Riverside vs Long Beach St 3:38:42-Picks & analysis for Sam Houston St vs New Mexico St 3:41:13-Picks & analysis for Colorado vs California  3:43:41-Picks & analysis for Cal Baptist vs Seattle  3:46:04-Picks & analysis for West Virginia vs Kansas St 3:48:15-Picks & analysis for St. Mary's vs Santa Clara 3:50:43-Picks & analysis for San Diego vs San Francisco  3:53:26-Picks & analysis for UC San Diego vs UC Santa Barbara  3:55:58-Picks & analysis for CS Northridge vs CS Fullerton 3:58:26-Picks & analysis for Oregon St vs Oregon 4:00:46-Picks & analysis for Northern Colorado vs Idaho St 4:03:37-Picks & analysis for Portland vs BYU 4:05:26-Picks & analysis for Cal Poly vs Hawaii 4:07:40-Picks & analysis for Mount St. Mary's vs Niagara 4:09:48-Picks & analysis for Rider vs Canisius  4:13:07-Start of extra games New Hampshire vs Albany 4:15:26-Picks & analysis for Binghamton vs Bryant  4:17:26-Picks & analysis for St. Francis NY vs Central Connecticut  4:19:30-Picks & analysis for Jacksonville vs Florida Gulf Coast  4:21:46-Picks & analysis for Merrimack vs Wagner 4:23:42-Picks & analysis for Sacred Heart vs Long Island  4:25:48-Picks & analysis for Central Arkansas vs Kennesaw St 4:27:46-Picks & analysis for UNC Asheville vs Winthrop 4:29:23-Picks & analysis for UMass Lowell vs NJIT 4:31:37-Picks & analysis for Campbell vs Longwood 4:33:38-Picks & analysis for Gardner Webb vs High Point 4:35:46-Picks & analysis for Presbyterian vs Radford 4:37:57-Picks & analysis for Austin Peay vs North Florida  4:39:42-Picks & analysis for USC Upstate vs Charleston Southern  4:41:56-Picks & analysis for Texas A&M CC vs Northwestern St 4:44:27-Picks & analysis for Stonehill vs St. Francis PA 4:46:25-Picks & analysis for Queens NC vs Eastern Kentucky  4:48:20-Picks & analysis for McNeese St vs Lamar 4:50:23-Picks & analysis for Incarnate Word vs Texas A&M CommerceSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Unstoppable Mindset
Episode 88 – Unstoppable Neurodiversity Specialist with Khushboo Chabria

Unstoppable Mindset

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2022


Khushboo Chabria describes herself as a “Neurodiversity Specialist and a Transformational Leader”. She comes by this description honestly. However, while she has her own neurodivergent characteristic, (she has been diagnosed as ADHD), she did not discover about her diagnosis until she was 30 years of age. Those of you who have listened to many of our episodes have heard me talk with others who have different characteristics such as ADHD, Autism and even blindness and low vision that were not discovered or properly diagnosed until they became adults. I would suspect in part this is due to our own growing knowledge base about such things. As you will hear from Khushboo, however, increased knowledge does not mean more positive attitudes. As she will explain, while in some quarters we are learning more, we do not spread this education and improved attitudinal advance throughout our culture.   Today, Khushboo works for a not-for-profit agency called Neurodiversity Pathways, (NDP) in the Silicon Valley She will tell us how NDP has created an in-depth program to help Neurodivergent individuals grow to gain and keep employment as well as simply learning how to live meaningful and productive lives.   I believe you will be inspired by Khushboo Chabria. She has lessons all of us can use about how to move forward in life.     About the Guest: Deeply passionate about diversity and inclusion, Khushboo is a Neurodiversity Specialist and a Transformational Leader, on a mission to advocate for and help provide access to high-quality services for neurodivergent individuals. Khushboo aims to make a meaningful impact in the world through education, empowerment, authentic engagement and unbridled compassion. With varied experiences in supporting neurodivergent individuals of all ages and their family members, working as a therapist and clinician, studying Organizational Leadership and discovering her own ADHD, Khushboo brings an interesting mix of skills and experiences to this field of work. Khushboo is currently a Program Manager, Career Coach and Program Facilitator at Neurodiversity Pathways (NDP) - a social impact program under the Goodwill of Silicon Valley focused on educating and supporting neurodivergent individuals to help launch their career and supporting organizations to integrate ND employees into the workplace through belonging and intentional empowerment. The tagline is “Inclusion for Abilities and Acceptance of Differences” and NDP is on a mission to inspire and improve the intentional inclusion of neurodistinct individuals in the workplace. Khushboo also sits on the board of Peaces of Me Foundation and is involved in consulting and speaking on the topics of Neurodiversity, DEIB, Transformational Leadership, Psychological Safety, Cultural Competency, Mental Health + Employee Wellbeing as well as Coaching. I believe in diversity in who we are, but also in how we see the world.   Social Media Links/Websites: Personal Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/khushboochabria/ Connect with Neurodiversity Pathways: https://ndpathways.org/ https://www.facebook.com/NDpathways https://www.linkedin.com/company/ndpathways https://www.instagram.com/ndpathways/ https://twitter.com/pathways Neurodiversity is Normal website:  https://sites.google.com/goodwillsv.org/neurodiversity/home   About the Host: Michael Hingson is a New York Times best-selling author, international lecturer, and Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe. Michael, blind since birth, survived the 9/11 attacks with the help of his guide dog Roselle. This story is the subject of his best-selling book, Thunder Dog.   Michael gives over 100 presentations around the world each year speaking to influential groups such as Exxon Mobile, AT&T, Federal Express, Scripps College, Rutgers University, Children's Hospital, and the American Red Cross just to name a few. He is Ambassador for the National Braille Literacy Campaign for the National Federation of the Blind and also serves as Ambassador for the American Humane Association's 2012 Hero Dog Awards.   https://michaelhingson.com https://www.facebook.com/michael.hingson.author.speaker/ https://twitter.com/mhingson https://www.youtube.com/user/mhingson https://www.linkedin.com/in/michaelhingson/   accessiBe Links https://accessibe.com/ https://www.youtube.com/c/accessiBe https://www.linkedin.com/company/accessibe/mycompany/ https://www.facebook.com/accessibe/       Thanks for listening! Thanks so much for listening to our podcast! If you enjoyed this episode and think that others could benefit from listening, please share it using the social media buttons on this page. Do you have some feedback or questions about this episode? Leave a comment in the section below!   Subscribe to the podcast If you would like to get automatic updates of new podcast episodes, you can subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher. You can also subscribe in your favorite podcast app.   Leave us an Apple Podcasts review Ratings and reviews from our listeners are extremely valuable to us and greatly appreciated. They help our podcast rank higher on Apple Podcasts, which exposes our show to more awesome listeners like you. If you have a minute, please leave an honest review on Apple Podcasts.     Transcription Notes Michael Hingson  00:00 Access Cast and accessiBe Initiative presents Unstoppable Mindset. The podcast where inclusion, diversity and the unexpected meet. Hi, I'm Michael Hingson, Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe and the author of the number one New York Times bestselling book, Thunder dog, the story of a blind man, his guide dog and the triumph of trust. Thanks for joining me on my podcast as we explore our own blinding fears of inclusion unacceptance and our resistance to change. We will discover the idea that no matter the situation, or the people we encounter, our own fears, and prejudices often are our strongest barriers to moving forward. The unstoppable mindset podcast is sponsored by accessiBe, that's a c c e s s i  capital B e. Visit www.accessibe.com to learn how you can make your website accessible for persons with disabilities. And to help make the internet fully inclusive by the year 2025. Glad you dropped by we're happy to meet you and to have you here with us.   Michael Hingson  01:20 Hi there and welcome to unstoppable mindset. It is late in August when we're recording this getting near the end of what they call the dog days. Speaking of dogs Alamo is over here asleep on the floor and quite bored. However, here we are. And our guest today is Khushboo Chabria. And Khushboo is a person who is very much involved in the world of neurodiversity, and providing services for people who are neurodivergent. She has her own things that she has dealt with along the way. And I'm sure that we'll get into all of that. And she had an adventure last week, which we might get into. If she wants to talk about it and set you went a little so we'll get there anyway. Welcome to unstoppable mindset. Glad you're with us.   Khushboo Chabria  02:07 Thank you. Thank you so much for having me.   Michael Hingson  02:09 And you are up in Northern California, right? That's correct. In the Silicon Valley. What's the weather up there?   Khushboo Chabria  02:17 It's really warm right now. It's hot.   Michael Hingson  02:21 We're about 96 degrees today. It was 104 yesterday, so   Khushboo Chabria  02:26 yeah, maybe not that hot. Yeah, I   Michael Hingson  02:29 know. But at least neither of us are in Palm Springs or Sacramento.   Khushboo Chabria  02:33 That's true. That's true, that would definitely be harder.   Michael Hingson  02:37 Well, let's start Would you just begin by telling us a little bit about you growing up and all that kind of stuff? And give us a little background like that?   Khushboo Chabria  02:46 Yeah, sure. Um, so I was actually born in India. My mom's sister had moved to the US in the late 80s. And we had applied for green card when we were little kids. And it wasn't until I was 10 years old that we got our green card, and I moved here with my family. So my parents and my brother and I, we all moved here in 1999.   Michael Hingson  03:15 Okay, and what was it like moving to obviously, a whole new country and all that what? What motivated your parents to come over here? And what was it like for you growing up in a new country? Yeah,   Khushboo Chabria  03:29 it was honestly very challenging. I was very young. And I was the I was at the kind of time in my life where I was very impressionable. So when we moved to America, my parents, they had to reestablish their careers here. And for the time being, we had stayed with different aunts and uncles, along the way, until my parents could afford their own place. And both my parents worked multiple jobs, in order to make sure that we had everything we needed. They wanted to move to America so that my brother and I would have additional opportunities, and a chance to really succeed at life. So that was, it was a whole American Dream story.   Michael Hingson  04:21 You when you moved here did or did not speak much English.   Khushboo Chabria  04:26 I actually spoke a lot of English because I went to an English school in India. So a lot of people don't know this, but the British when they had occupied India, took over the school system. So if you went to an English school in India, that means you got a really good education. And I went to a school called St. Mary's School in Pune, Maharashtra. And I had a little bit of a British accent, actually, when I moved here,   Michael Hingson  04:58 you've lost that   Khushboo Chabria  05:01 Yes, it's gone. It's been too long.   Michael Hingson  05:04 But what you don't have is, I guess more of a traditional Indian accent having been born and lived there for 10 years.   Khushboo Chabria  05:13 Yeah, I mean, I do speak in Hindi with my mom every day. But when anyone else hears me speaking Hindi, they think I have an American accent. So I feel like I've definitely lost the Indian accent. But it comes out every now and then when I'm speaking with my family.   Michael Hingson  05:34 It just always fascinates me to talk with people who have come from another country who have spent a lot of time here, but maybe grew up elsewhere. Some end up retaining an accent, and some don't. And I've always been fascinated by that and never understood how it works out that some do. And some don't, it must just plain be the listening or just the amount of work they put into what they choose their accent to be.   Khushboo Chabria  06:04 I think it also depends on age. So my brother still has a very much an Indian accent. Because when he moved here, he was 15. And because I was 10, I was still kind of at that age where it was easier for me to assimilate than it was for him.   Michael Hingson  06:23 So you, you, you get right in as it were,   Khushboo Chabria  06:26 yeah, definitely. Oops. So   Michael Hingson  06:29 you came here, you obviously were able to settle in from a language standpoint, and so on. But you say it was a little bit hard when you came, how come?   Khushboo Chabria  06:39 Um, it was challenging, because as I mentioned before, our family was staying with our extended family members. So we would stay at this aunt's house for six months, and then this uncle's house for three months. And then this uncle's house. So I ended up going to several different schools for sixth grade. And after that, my parents had enough, just enough to put a downpayment on a one bedroom apartment. And so when we moved into the apartment, those my parents were working all the time. And so often, I grew up in the apartment with my brother. And it was many times it was we were on our own. And it was a long time before my parents had established themselves enough in their careers that we had a more comfortable lifestyle.   Michael Hingson  07:37 What kind of career should they have? What did they do?   Khushboo Chabria  07:39 So my dad, he actually ended up going and getting a real estate license and is a broker. And full time for his job. He works at FedEx. And my mother, she took night classes at a school and got a certification and accounting. And then she basically became an accountant. And she worked for companies before. But now she manages the accounts for several different businesses from home.   Michael Hingson  08:15 Wow. That's still that's pretty cool. And then it shows the typical work ethic. I see, oftentimes, from people who move here from elsewhere, they're going to work hard, they're going to do whatever they need to do, to be able to establish themselves and care for families and so on. And I think that's personally so cool. My parents grew up here. And were born here. But still, they very much had that kind of an attitude. And they worked very hard to make sure that my brother and I also kept that same kind of attitude. And I, I don't think that that's a bad thing at all. And I think that we all can work pretty hard at trying to succeed, and we can do it in a good way.   Khushboo Chabria  09:03 Definitely. It was really important to learn that too.   Michael Hingson  09:07 Yeah, I agree. How long after you moved here? Did you guys finally get your own apartment?   Khushboo Chabria  09:13 Um, it must have been about what to say nine months or nine to 12 months before we did. Wow. Yeah.   Michael Hingson  09:25 For a 10 year old kid. That is a long time not to be able to put down roots somewhere and call someplace home.   Khushboo Chabria  09:34 Yeah. And you know, when I started in the public school system, I started first and a middle school. And then I ended up in an elementary school and then I ended up in a junior high. So it was a lot of switching around as well in between different school systems and trying to kind of figure out what where I fit into this whole education piece too?   Michael Hingson  10:03 Well, what was it like growing up just physically and so on? I know you have said that you, you have ADHD is something that you live with, when did you discover that?   Khushboo Chabria  10:16 I didn't discover that until I was 30 years old. So, you know, growing up, I was always a busy child, my mom had enrolled me and lots and lots of different classes when I was in India. So I was learning dance, I was learning singing, I was learning art, I was learning ceramics, I had a lot of different things that I was involved in, and my parents had a lot of structure in our lives. So I didn't for a long time even know that I had this different brain and that I actually struggled with ADHD. Even after I graduated college and started working in the field of behavior analysis, I didn't know that I had ADHD. And then at some point, when I became a board certified behavior analyst, and I actually move forward in my career, I went from being a therapist that spent 100% of my time with clients, to now becoming a clinician that spent 90% of my time with spreadsheets and 10% of my time fighting with insurance companies. And with all of that, I got further and further away from the clients, and further and further away from solving problems in real time, to just being behind the screen. And that's when my ADHD really started to show up.   Michael Hingson  11:54 So what made you finally realize that ADHD was part of your life.   Khushboo Chabria  11:59 Um, you know, to be honest, at first, I was just burned out, I was a burnt out clinician with a huge caseload, I was driving all over the Bay Area all day long. And I ended up in a clinic, and I got, I got diagnosed with depression. And I first got misdiagnosed with bipolar disorder, because that's something that a lot of people confuse, especially in regards to ADHD. And then I got a therapist who started to recognize that all the things that I was discussing in our sessions, all the areas of my life that I felt anxious and depressed about, were areas that are related to executive functioning, and ADHD. So she was, she was bright enough and keen enough to notice that, and to suggest that I be tested for ADHD, which is when they started the actual diagnosis process.   Michael Hingson  13:14 How do they test for ADHD?   Khushboo Chabria  13:17 Well, first, they took all of my notes that they had from the therapist, and they also interviewed my mother to find out what I was like as a child. And then lastly, they had me go through a bunch of different assessments where they were tracking my ability to focus. And these were usually tests on a computer where they showed different images. And I had to press specific keys when certain images popped up. And I did that for hours and hours and hours. And based on what they found, I definitely had ADHD. So I got the official diagnosis. Then I was connected with a cycle analyst who was able to then prescribe medication for me, which I didn't end up staying on. But that was the beginning.   Michael Hingson  14:13 A lot of it, though, is ultimately recognition. And then once you know it and believe it, then you can really work to understand it and not medications can't help but a lot of times it's more what you do internally that makes a difference.   Khushboo Chabria  14:32 Exactly. That's true.   Michael Hingson  14:35 So for you, you, you finally got diagnosed with that. But by that time you had been very much involved in a lot of psychology oriented kinds of things, which do you like better being a clinician or actually practicing and being in front of clients?   Khushboo Chabria  14:55 You know, to be honest, I think the field had completely changed. inch by the time I graduated with my master's, because at that point, the Affordable Care Act had passed. And what that what happened with that is all the insurance companies were now in the system. And while that made the services more available to lots and lots of people, it also meant that there was now this huge demand for the services. So I think my experience was the way it was because of the timing of that bill passing, as well as at that point, the need that was there for more service providers in this field. But that being said, I think that it was, it's much more reinforcing for me to engage with people, rather than engaging with spreadsheets. And as someone who has ADHD, since the time I was diagnosed, and all the years that I continued to struggle with ADHD, I have learned that I work best in an environment where I'm constantly solving novel problems, that are allowing me to research different kinds of things. And also to use everything in my toolbox to solve problems. And any problem that has a fast response in terms of solving it is one, that's the most reinforcing to me.   Michael Hingson  16:36 So does that translate today into you, looking at cases from kind of the outside or working more with people and being in front of them,   Khushboo Chabria  16:46 I think it's a little bit of both. Now, I would say that the most amazing part of my career is the coaching. And what the coaching allows me to do is to work with neurodivergent people with all kinds of different backgrounds. Because that makes it so that one day, I might be researching how to get a marketing internship. And the next day, I might be understanding how I should help my coachee brand themselves as a musician. And then maybe the third day, I'm working with someone who has a computer science background. And so I'm working with a lot of different skill sets and a lot of different abilities. And the great thing about what I get to do now is that it is fully aligned with how I work best. And that I get to continue solving novel problems. I get to continue teaching, I get to continue engaging with organizations on increasing the awareness of neurodiversity. So I get to solve these issues, and improve that awareness for neurodiversity in a lot of different ways that are very much in line with how I work best.   Michael Hingson  18:05 So what are the star diversity take in obviously ADHD would be a factor. What other kinds of things fall under that category?   Khushboo Chabria  18:15 Yeah, definitely. So ADHD is a big one. Autism is a big one. Dyslexia, dyscalculia. dyspraxia, bipolar disorder, as well as Tourette's   Michael Hingson  18:30 are all considered part of neurodiversity, or neuro divergent world.   Khushboo Chabria  18:36 Yeah, and neurodiversity as an umbrella term, just to explain what it is. You know, just like when, you know, you see any people we see, we say that, you know, people have different height, people have different hair color, people have different eye color. And just like how there's so much variability in humans, in terms how we present physically, the same way, our brains have just as much variability. So the term neuro diversity is to describe the natural variability in people's brains and behavior functioning.   Michael Hingson  19:15 When you talk about neurodiversity. Do people try to create some sort of box and fit everyone into it? Or do people generally recognize that it is a really broad category that takes in a lot of stuff?   Khushboo Chabria  19:29 I think different people have different ways of looking at it. You know, there are companies that instead of having specific groups for neurodiversity, we'll put everything in an ability group, which is about including anyone with any kind of disability, whether it's invisible or visible. In terms of neurodiversity. A lot of people know the main ones to be autism, dyslexia and ADHD. But we're still learning so much about bipolar does over and about to rats. And so there's a lot of understanding that still needs to happen around neurodiversity. There's still a lot of stigma there, there's still a lot of people who aren't really aware of what this term means. So I would say that people have different levels of understanding about this. But I think it's all kind of related, right? I mean, if we have different ways of processing information from the world, then we all kind of have a different way of going about it. And when we say neuro divergent, we're talking about one person who may or may not have one of those labels. When we say neuro diverse, we're talking about everyone, because everybody's in that umbrella of having a brain that's unique and processing information in a unique way, and making sense of the world in a unique way. So it depends, I guess that's the answer to the question.   Michael Hingson  21:06 No, it does. And I could make the case that we're all part of a neuro divergent world in a way, and I think that's what you're saying. But there, there are specific kinds of categories that mostly we deal with when we talk about neurodiversity. I'm a little bit familiar with Tourette's, but can you define that a little bit? Yeah,   Khushboo Chabria  21:27 definitely. Um, Tourette's has to do with basically, it has to do with just kind of its has to do with tics and involuntary repetitive movements. So in terms of how that relates to neurodiversity, we're just talking about individuals who have different behaviors, whether that sounds, whether that's saying the same words in the same way, or having physical behavioral differences that are stereotypical, well,   Michael Hingson  22:02 how was it for you grew up? Well, not growing up so much, but being in the workplace and not being diagnosed with ADHD and so on? That had to be quite a challenge?   Khushboo Chabria  22:13 Yeah, definitely. Um, you know, to be honest, one of the biggest things that I found out right off the bat was that when I had a lot of different cases, and different deadlines, and different things that I needed to accomplish in my job, I really struggled with keeping control over everything that was going on. And as a clinician, you know, there was a lot of things that I was responsible for I was responsible for training all the staff that was on my cases, I was responsible for keeping track of all the materials that were needed. On every case, I was responsible for parent training, I was responsible for scheduling meetings, I was responsible for completing reports, I was responsible for staying connected to insurance companies. And with all of those different things, I had a really hard time with managing all my responsibilities. And in the beginning, you know, it was just a write up about being more punctual and being more timely to meetings. Then it became about making sure that all my reports are complete, then it was about making sure that my reports had all the feedback taken into consideration. And throughout every single step of it, I was feeling more and more disheartened about where I was and how I was working. And it really made me question, you know, is something wrong with me? Why is it that everyone else is able to do all this without any issues, but when it comes to me, here, I am struggling so much. And I was really depressed. I, I thought I was depressed, and I thought I was burnt out. And in trying to get treatment for that I ended up finding out I had ADHD.   Michael Hingson  24:22 Did other supervisors or colleagues see kind of all the stress and the things that were going on? Or were you able to kind of hide it?   Khushboo Chabria  24:30 A lot of people were able to see the stress and to be honest, for the longest time, despite being in a field that was there to support children with neurodiverse conditions. I found myself in a workplace that was very toxic. And I was basically just told, Well, you need to meet your billable hours and maybe you need to do this or maybe you need to do Under planning, but nobody was sitting down and telling me how to go about doing that, or what steps I needed to take to get the support I needed. And not a single person in that office had identified what I was dealing with as something that could be related to ADHD. Instead, I was just being told that I wasn't working hard enough, or I wasn't working fast enough, or I wasn't being organized enough. And I took all of that to heart. For a long time, it took me a long time to unlearn those messages. Because I kept beating myself up over the simple things. And I felt like I wasn't a good employee. And I felt at times that I was being discriminated against. But I realized now looking back at it all, that I made a lot of mistakes as well. And I should have known how to ask for that support early on. But I didn't know what I didn't know. So there's a lot of thinking that's gone behind everything that happened then. But looking back at it, now I'm able to see all the different sides of that equation.   Michael Hingson  26:15 When did you start in the workforce?   Khushboo Chabria  26:17 I started in the workforce in 20. I would say 2007.   Michael Hingson  26:26 Okay, so you Where were you in school at that time?   Khushboo Chabria  26:33 At that time, I was in community college, okay. And I was working at a daycare center with a whole bunch of children. And I was also working as a campus activities coordinator at our school.   Michael Hingson  26:50 So that was 15 years ago. Do you see that there has been a lot of change in dealing with ADHD and and neuro diversity. And I don't mean, just talking about a real substantive change, that would nowadays make a difference. If you were starting out today, as opposed to what happened to you 15 years ago? Um, is it different? Yeah,   Khushboo Chabria  27:23 I think the way that we do work with children who are neurodiverse has changed a lot. Like the way that things are done. Now the way that treatment is carried out, is very neurodiversity affirming, which means that it's not really about fixing anything, it's about really understanding what are the challenges that this individual is facing? And how can we support them such that they can live fulfilling independent lives without having to depend on other people. And so a lot of what I did before, was in regards to teaching skills. So I might be teaching a two year old how to make eye contact, I might be teaching a five year old how to tie their shoelaces. I taught everything from toilet training, to how to make a purchase at the store, how to start a conversation with someone how to speak, a lot of my clients were nonverbal when I was in the field. So that whole space has changed a lot. In regards to working and working conditions. I don't know if there have been a lot of changes in how we provide care, and how we provide support to people who are providing that care. And I think that as a society, we need to do a better job of supporting the people who are providing health care to the disability population. Yeah, and we could do a lot better with that. Right?   Michael Hingson  29:08 Oh, no doubt about it. I was thinking, though, of how you described your work situation is you needed to work harder, you needed to work better, and so on. Do you think those attitudes in the workforce toward people who may be experiencing the same thing that you experience? Do you think that those kinds of conditions have changed much?   Khushboo Chabria  29:35 I think they have to some degree, but I wouldn't say all across the board. And what I've mean when I say that is because even now, when people have disclosed their neurodiversity to their employer, there are times where people are just saying, Well, you know, I understand that you're struggling with a XYZ, but this work needs to be completed. So this idea of kind of painting this color on somebody who's a little bit differently, who works differently, who thinks differently, who processes information differently, I think we still have these assumptions that we make about people and those assumptions of, oh, this person's just lazy, or this person's just not doing it, or this person's just not the right fit. And as soon as we start using that terminology, we've now made assumptions before trying to understand what it is that that person might be struggling with. Right? Oh,   Michael Hingson  30:46 I agree. And it sounds like that, even with the passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act. And now 32 years ago, and 31 years ago, actually being enacted and going into law, it hasn't made a lot of difference in these kinds of things, because we just haven't really dealt with the educational aspect of it yet.   Khushboo Chabria  31:11 Right? Yeah. I think you know, the problem is really with the stigma we have in society about people who are different, anyone who's another, right? It's very easy to say, Oh, this is just not working out, instead of approaching that person and saying, Hey, I noticed that in our last interaction, this is what happened. Is there something that I'm seeing that's confusing you? Or can you talk to me about what's going on, so I can help, right? And that moment, where you have the chance to question somebody, to understand that better before you judge them. That is something that we as a society just need to be better at, we need to be better managers, we need to be better educators, we need to be better leaders. And that comes with not trying to just rush things along and thinking that someone is going to be exactly the perfect candidate. But instead saying, You know what this is a human being. And the way that they might think, or work might be different than the way I think and work. So before I put them in a box, it's important to show that curiosity and that compassion to learn more about that person.   Michael Hingson  32:41 And I think you hit it on the head when you talk about curiosity very much. How do we get people to be more curious to be more open to ask why and why not? As opposed to just assuming? Yeah, definitely. That's a real general question. I really,   Khushboo Chabria  33:05 ya know, you know, and our presentations at neurodiversity pathways, we have this terminology called compassionate curiosity. And what that is, is that when you have a moment where something doesn't make sense, or someone's behavior is just not adding up to what you know about them. Or if some interaction happened, that leaves you feeling confused. Before you jump to, I can't believe this person hasn't gotten this to me. If we could all take a moment to say, Hey, I haven't heard from you. I just wanted to follow up is everything. Okay? Right. That's a really great way that we can sort of foster that kind of a culture, which capitalizes on empathy and understanding versus judgment and expectations. But that being said, to change that, I think that begins with increasing awareness. Right. So in the work that we do with neurodiversity pathways, the first thing we do when any company engages with us, and they say, We want to hire people with autism, or we want to hire neurodivergent people. The first thing we say to them is, there's no point in bringing anyone into your organization, unless and until you're able to foster a culture of inclusion, and a culture of understanding and awareness that's built around neurodiversity because as someone who is responsible for placing neurodivergent people into organizations, I know that if I place somebody in an organization that is not supportive neurodivergent talent, then that person is, forget, thrive or succeed, that person is not even going to be able to retain that position.   Michael Hingson  35:10 Do you hear people often say, Oh, we don't need to do that, because I'm certainly open. I'm glad to bring somebody in. Who is who has autism? Or who is neuro divergent in some way? Do you? Do you see that a lot? Or do people get it and then tend to be open to say, how do we really make that happen?   Khushboo Chabria  35:31 I would say probably a few years ago, there was a lot less awareness about neurodiversity. And I know that probably with every client that we engage with, they're at different levels of understanding about it. And maybe some of them have received trainings from other sources. But that being said, I think that there are definitely some companies who do try to rush these things. None of those are companies that we've engaged with. But the ones who try to rush into these diversity and inclusion efforts are usually the ones that fail. Because without that understanding, and that real culture of inclusion, and that culture of psychological safety, it's just kind of a recipe for disaster, when you have people who don't understand how to work with that population,   Michael Hingson  36:28 and don't really want to take the time to do it. Right.   Khushboo Chabria  36:32 Exactly. Exactly.   Michael Hingson  36:34 Well, how did you get involved in being interested in disabilities, and well, neurodiversity, and so on, because that clearly had to happen a long time before you were diagnosed with ADHD. So how did all that happen?   Khushboo Chabria  36:47 Yeah, definitely. Um, you know, so when I was in college, at UC San Diego, I had a major human development. And I was actually pre med at the time, because I thought that I wanted to go into medicine. And after I graduated from college, it was actually right when we had had our first sort of economic collapse as a country. And so there were still not a lot of jobs, I thought I wanted to do PhD programs in social psychology. And I had started applying to graduate programs all over the country in that degree. And it wasn't until I started working in the field of behavior analysis, that I felt I had kind of found a home. So growing up, I had a cousin, who had Global Developmental Delay, previously known as Mr. And I grew up with him. And I had always had a really special bond with them, I was very close to him. And I also had another cousin who grew up with schizophrenia. So I grew up kind of seeing how that had affected him. And when I graduated college, I needed a job, I applied to a part time job as a behavior therapist. And I worked for a very small company in Oakland, California. And my first client was an eight year old, nonverbal, autistic boy from Ethiopia. And he was the most beautiful child I had ever seen in my entire life. And I just fell in love with him. And within a few months of working with them, he started speaking his first words. And the first sentence he ever spoke was, I want more cookies. And that was it. I think that as soon as he started speaking, I knew that whatever I did, I wanted to be helping this population. And I wanted to work with neurodivergent people. And it started out with working with children. But when that client spoke his first words, I felt like the trajectory of my life had changed. And I decided to rescind all my applications for social psych. I reset for my GRE exams, and I reapplied to grad schools in behavior analysis. That's kind of what started the journey in that direction. And then obviously, as we spoke about before, when I was finally a clinician, I found out I had ADHD. i At that point, had worked for a school district. I had worked as an assessor. I had started a social skills group, I had tried to start a parent training program. I had done a lot of other things before I found neurodiversity pathways. Well,   Michael Hingson  39:59 the big Question, of course is did you give him more cookies?   Khushboo Chabria  40:03 Of course we did. Definitely   Michael Hingson  40:07 reward good behavior.   Khushboo Chabria  40:09 Yeah, he just it was amazing because as soon as he started speaking, just like babies do, he started babbling as well. And he would wake his mom up early in the morning and Babble Babble Babble for hours to her trying to communicate and everything that we pointed to and labeled for him was a word he picked up immediately. So it was a transformative case.   Michael Hingson  40:38 That is so cool. And do you? Do you hear anything about him nowadays?   Khushboo Chabria  40:46 Yeah, actually, I'm still in touch with his mom. And he just graduated high school a year ago. So he's starting in community college.   Michael Hingson  40:56 How old is he?   Khushboo Chabria  40:57 He is now 19 years old.   Michael Hingson  41:00 Wow. That's so cool.   Khushboo Chabria  41:04 Isn't that amazing?   Michael Hingson  41:05 It is. It's wonderful. Well, that's what doing good work like that. And being thorough is all   Khushboo Chabria  41:11 about. Exactly, exactly.   Michael Hingson  41:14 So for you, having eventually been diagnosed with ADHD that that certainly had to give you a great amount of well, relief on one hand, but then also, it gave you the ability to really sit back and look at your options and decide how you go forward. What kind of tools did you end up then starting to use that maybe you didn't use so much before tools that help you be more productive and deal with what you had to deal with?   Khushboo Chabria  41:46 Yeah. So at first, I had therapy, which is what I had started out with, and I had continued. At some point, I had also tried meds, but I found out that the meds were just too difficult on my body, and I couldn't handle staying on those. So I had to find other strategies. And some of those strategies were things like using a Google calendar using more reminders, planning ahead, having more of a morning routine, really building healthy habits around eating, sleeping hygiene and meditation so that I had a better handle on things, and also had to learn coping and resilience strategies for when things did not go my way. A lot of these tools and strategies got solidified when I joined neurodiversity pathways. And we actually used all this information to create the curriculum for our students who were going into the workplace. But for the time being, when I first gotten diagnosed, I started reading about things online. And I found people who were sharing strategies, on websites and on LinkedIn and on social media. And I slowly started piecing together the things that worked best for me, the things that were the most instrumental. In the beginning, were buying a habit calendar. And having a morning routine. With those two things, I was really able to get started. Then with the executive functioning, I started planning out reminders for things that I had do weeks in advance so that I was more on top of getting my tasks completed. And as I learned more and more about ADHD, I recognize that most of the things that I struggled with in regards to executive functioning, they weren't necessarily related specifically to cognitive differences, but they were more related to the emotional and behavioral aspects of executive functioning. So the anxiety of having to start a task that I've never done before, or just the fear of not getting it correct, that would just paralyze me from even beginning on the task. Those were the things that I needed tools around the most and that's where therapy came into play.   Michael Hingson  44:26 Do you still deal with therapy today?   Khushboo Chabria  44:29 I, I have been on and off therapy. I'm currently on a lookout for therapists. So if anyone's listening, I'm looking for one and I'm on many waitlist. The therapists in my area are all booked up because of COVID. And so there's been a little bit of challenge with that. But since the diagnosis, I have tried individual therapy. I've worked with different kinds of therapists so it was really important to me to try to find someone who was a South Asian therapist, because I felt like there were a lot of things that someone with a South Asian background would understand that someone who doesn't have that background would have a lot of difficulty in regard to cultural competency. In addition, I've also tried group therapy. And I've also done a workshop on ADHD that helped with learning how to be more organized. And with better planning.   Michael Hingson  45:34 You mentioned meditation, how does that play into what you do? And in your own progress in psyche? Yeah,   Khushboo Chabria  45:43 definitely, I think, you know, meditation is one of those things that a lot of people throw around. And it's kind of like, you know, the pop psychology thing to talk about, right? Like, let's all do mindfulness and meditation. And for me, because my mind is constantly racing at 100 miles per hour, what meditation and mindfulness practices allow me to do is to steal my mind, and to really focus on my breathing, and to really sort of observe the things that are making me anxious, without starting to act upon them right away. And so when I meditate, it's, that's my time to steal my mind of all the racing thoughts, to take account of the things that I'm anxious about. And instead of jumping on them, just observing them, reflecting on them, and noticing them before I can actually start to begin what it is that I want to do. And that single moment of clarity is enough for me to kind of be in a better headspace, so that I can tackle all the tasks on my to do list,   Michael Hingson  47:06 show what happens when you do that.   Khushboo Chabria  47:10 I think that it helps me relax, it helps me focus. It helps me prioritize on the things that I need to get done. And it allows me to have some breathing room to really plan things out in a way that doesn't take over my entire life. But instead, it helps me remember what things I have to do, what things I need to do, and what things I want to do. And as soon as I have that division and that clarity, in my mind, I'm better able to tackle the things I need to get done.   Michael Hingson  47:51 Cool. Well, you've mentioned neurodiversity pathways many times. And so we should get to that. Tell me about that. What led you to finding it, what it is, and so on?   Khushboo Chabria  48:04 Sure. So actually, when I decided to pivot to neurodiversity, in 2020, it was because at that point, I had tried to work in the field of behavior analysis for years, and continued to struggle and fail at that endeavor. And the reason being that I just didn't feel like the field was aligned with what I wanted to do. And I needed to figure out a different thing that I could take or a different path that I could take going forward with my career. So in the beginning of 2020, shortly before COVID, I had just left a position as a behavior specialist at a school district, where I was helping to support a class of students that were under the IDI category or emotionally disturbed. And at that point, I had decided that I wanted to shift away from all of the behavioral stuff and focus more on neurodiversity, because I wanted to be neurodiversity affirming in my career, and I wanted to be working with adults and I wanted to expand my skill set. And I didn't feel like my previous work was aligned with me anymore. So I ended up hiring a career coach. And this was in January of 2020. And he was someone who had a completely different background than me, but he was very good at learning what was awesome about me and what my strengths were, and how I could best showcase those strengths to the world. So together you him and I started our research into neurodiversity. And we learned a lot about how the field works. And then I started networking. And it's kind of ironic that I started with a career coach, because now I am a career coach to neurodivergent people. But in my networking, I ended up meeting someone named Jessica Lee, who has a neurodiversity program in Southern California. And she told me that I should speak to Ranga Rahman, who is the program director of neurodiversity pathways, and we set up a networking call, I opened up to him and honestly shared with him about everything that I had faced and where I was with my career, and what it is that I wanted to do. And to be honest with you, Michael, I cried to him. And 20 minutes later, he sent me a job description and said, I can only hire you as a volunteer for now. But you will get the work experience that you need in this space. And if at any point, you get another job, you're welcome to leave. But this would be a great starting place for you. And we will be happy to have you on the team. So that's how I came on to neurodiversity pathways. And when I joined the team, we have lost all our funding due to COVID. And we had to basically build our program from the ground up. So at the time, me Ranga, and a small group of volunteers work together to build our first online course. And that was growth mindset. And we went from building one course to three courses, to five courses, to 10 courses to 14 courses. And what our career launch program is now is a 14 course program training program called Career Readiness Training, followed by six months of one on one coaching. The entire program is called Career launch programs. And it is aimed at neurodivergent individuals who have a two or four year college degree and those who are unemployed or underemployed, in relation to their strengths, their qualifications and their interest. And it's focused on those who are really motivated to get a job and be good at it. And those who need the motivation and drive to get to their goals.   Michael Hingson  52:41 Well, overall, what is neuro diversity pathways as an organization, what what does it do? How do you start? Tell us a little more about that, if you would?   Khushboo Chabria  52:52 Yeah, definitely. So Rhonda J. Rahman, who's our program director, was actually responsible for starting a lot of coalition building around neurodiversity at Stanford University. And when he left Stanford, he joined goodwill, and started neurodiversity pathways, which used to be known as expandability. Colon autism advantage. And then after about two years, they rebranded themselves to not just focus on autism, but to be focused on the full neurodiversity umbrella, which is when they became neurodiversity pathways. We've been around since 2017. And we are a social impact program under the mission services umbrella at the goodwill of Silicon Valley. So we Oh, go ahead. Go ahead. I was gonna say we work on two sides. On one side, we work with individuals, which is the career launch program, which I was just telling you about. And on the organization side, we have workplace inclusion services, where we train companies on neuro Diversity Awareness, and we provide business process consultation. And we provide coaching and we provide half day and full day workshops to train companies on how to work with neurodivergent people. So those are the two ways in which we support   Michael Hingson  54:26 do you work on both sides of the company or mainly in the work?   Khushboo Chabria  54:31 I work on both sides. So on the individual side, I teach all the job development courses. And I do a lot of the coaching that we do with our students to get them placed into jobs. And on the organizational side and part of all the presentations and the consulting that we do with companies that want to hire neurodivergent people.   Michael Hingson  54:56 Are there other kinds of career launch programs around the country? Similar to what neurodiversity pathways does, or yeah,   Khushboo Chabria  55:05 there are, but there are many different kinds. And they're offering many different kinds of services. But I would like to say that there isn't a single program in the country that as in depth as ours, that has a 10 month commitment to neurodivergent individuals, where we teach everything from personal effectiveness to workplace competency skills, and job development. And a two week workplace experience, followed by six months of coaching,   Michael Hingson  55:38 is the program free to people who need it.   Khushboo Chabria  55:41 The program is free to anyone who is connected to any DLR office in California. However, if you live in a different state, if you live in a different country, we're willing and able to work with any local service providers or government agencies in order to get you the funding that you need to cover the costs of the program.   Michael Hingson  56:08 So you get funding from the Department of Rehabilitation now, for example. So there is funding, unlike there was at the beginning of the COVID time.   Khushboo Chabria  56:19 Yeah, so actually, I was only I was a volunteer for a part of the time. And then I was my manager pushed for me to become a contractor. And then I became a full time employee. So I have been a full time employee for a little bit. And we have gotten the program off the ground. So when we were building the courses, we did several test runs. We had our official first cohort launched in spring of this year, which went from March 1 to July 1. And we are now recruiting for our fall program, which begins on September 13.   Michael Hingson  57:00 How can organizations and people support or help what you're doing and neurodiversity pathways in the Korean lunch program.   Khushboo Chabria  57:09 There are so many different ways. So if you actually go to our website, you can make a donation to our mission. You can also sponsor the education of a student if you're interested in that you can hire us to come speak to your work groups, to your community groups, to your team, to your organization, about neurodiversity, you can also sign up to be a volunteer coach to help support one of our students while they're working, or look looking for jobs. So there are lots of different ways we host two neurodiversity awareness sessions that are free to anyone in the world online. And those are offered two times a month, you can sign up on our website when you click on awareness sessions, and go to individual and click on the Google Form there. Additionally, if you want to hire us for Neuro Diversity Awareness, or to help hire neurodiverse people into your company, we're happy to speak to you about that as well.   Michael Hingson  58:19 In it all operates under the umbrella of goodwill of Silicon Valley's 501 C three tax status, or do you have your own?   Khushboo Chabria  58:28 We're all under the goodwill and   Michael Hingson  58:32 it makes sense. Well, so what do you do when you're not working?   Khushboo Chabria  58:37 Um, to be honest, lately, I've been mostly just working. But I'm also working on my dissertation, which is kind of related to work.   Michael Hingson  58:49 Congratulations. So you're working toward a PhD?   Khushboo Chabria  58:52 Yeah, it's actually an EDD in organizational leadership.   Michael Hingson  58:57 Okay. Where, what what?   Khushboo Chabria  59:01 So I'm going to UMass global, which used to formally be known as Brandman University, under the Chapman umbrella. And I am getting my degree in organizational leadership. So I'm going to abd right now, which is all but dissertation, which means I have completed my coursework, but I haven't completed my dissertation yet. And so I am completing that now. My dissertation is going to be looking at the lived experience of colleagues of neurodivergent employees.   Michael Hingson  59:40 When do you think you'll get to defend it and become a doctor?   Khushboo Chabria  59:46 Well, to be honest with you, Michael, with my ADHD, I only have until August of next year to defend so I have to get it done by August of next year. Or school. Yeah, I do much better. They have deadlines. So when they told me I had a year left, I wish they had emailed me that, that actual email a few years prior, so I could have been scared enough to just get it done. But here we are towards the end of it outside of my dissertation. I am learning Tarot. So I'm moonlighting as a tarot reader. And I do a lot of different networking things. And I'm part of social groups, and I do speaking engagements. And I spend a lot of time with friends and family and I travel as well. Where have you traveled? I've traveled to a lot of places in Asia. So I've traveled to the Philippines, Thailand, Indonesia, Malaysia, Hong Kong, Macau. I've also traveled a little bit in Europe. So I've traveled to Spain and to France. But I'm hoping to increase that once things settle down with COVID.   Michael Hingson  1:01:11 Yeah. Hopefully that will happen sometime in the near future, or at least in the future, but it's so unpredictable still.   Khushboo Chabria  1:01:20 Exactly, definitely.   Michael Hingson  1:01:23 Well, this has been a heck of a lot of fun. And I've learned a lot I appreciate all that you have had to say. So you haven't written any books or anything yet, your thesis is probably going to be your first major project.   Khushboo Chabria  1:01:37 Yes, definitely. I have been published as a poet and a couple of books, but that's not related to this.   Michael Hingson  1:01:45 Okay. Well, it's, it's great that you're doing some writing. And that is always exciting to do. Well, if people want to learn more about you, or reach out, if they want to explore neurodiversity pathways, and so on, if you would tell us all about how to contact you and how to learn about the program and so on.   Khushboo Chabria  1:02:05 Yeah, definitely. So when this podcast is published, I know you're going to be posting some links on our website, and all of those other things. But if you go to ndpathways.org. That is our website, all our information is there, our contact information is there as well. You can reach out to me directly, you can connect with me on LinkedIn, I'm happy to answer any questions that you have. And to be able to help you in any way that I   Michael Hingson  1:02:36 can. How do people connect with you on LinkedIn,   Khushboo Chabria  1:02:40 my LinkedIn profile will also be linked to this podcast, but it is actually just linked in.com and my U R L, let me just pull it up is linkedin.com backslash Khushboo Chabria, which is K h u s h B for boy, o o C a b r i a. And that's my full name after the LinkedIn and the backslash.   Michael Hingson  1:03:18 Khushboo. Thank you very much for being here. And I think it's always fun when we get to learn more and new and different things. And we get to explore new ideas, at least to some of us. They're new, but explore ideas and even picking up new things. Even though we may have heard some of it before. There's always new stuff. So thank you for bringing that to all of us.   Khushboo Chabria  1:03:46 Thank you so much for having me, Michael, I appreciate you.   Michael Hingson  1:03:49 Well, I appreciate you being here. And I hope you enjoyed this out there, please reach out to Khushboo. And also, I'd love to hear from you. Let me know what you thought about this. You can reach me at Michaelhi at accessibe.com or go to www dot Michael hingson.com/podcast. We also really would appreciate a five star review from you wherever you're listening to this podcast. Please do that. Your support is what makes this worthwhile and possible and we love to hear the things you have to say. So we appreciate you doing that. And we hope that you'll be here again next weekend Khushboo you thank you for once more for being here with us today.   Khushboo Chabria  1:04:35 Thank you so much for having   Michael Hingson  1:04:41 You have been listening to the Unstoppable Mindset podcast. Thanks for dropping by. I hope that you'll join us again next week, and in future weeks for upcoming episodes. To subscribe to our podcast and to learn about upcoming episodes, please visit www dot Michael hingson.com slash podcast. Michael Hingson is spelled m i c h a e l h i n g s o n. While you're on the site., please use the form there to recommend people who we ought to interview in upcoming editions of the show. And also, we ask you and urge you to invite your friends to join us in the future. If you know of any one or any organization needing a speaker for an event, please email me at speaker at Michael hingson.com. I appreciate it very much. To learn more about the concept of blinded by fear, please visit www dot Michael hingson.com forward slash blinded by fear and while you're there, feel free to pick up a copy of my free eBook entitled blinded by fear. The unstoppable mindset podcast is provided by access cast an initiative of accessiBe and is sponsored by accessiBe. Please visit www.accessibe.com. accessiBe is spelled a c c e s s i b e. There you can learn all about how you can make your website inclusive for all persons with disabilities and how you can help make the internet fully inclusive by 2025. Thanks again for listening. Please come back and visit us again next week.

Coast to Coast Hoops
12/29/22-Coast To Coast Hoops

Coast to Coast Hoops

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2022 208:25


Greg recaps Wednesday's college basketball results, & picks & analyzes every college basketball game for Thursday! Podcast Highlights 2:27-Recap of Wednesday's results 15:44-Start of picks Brown vs Northwestern  19:03-Picks & analysis for UNC Greensboro vs Western Carolina  21:54-Picks & analysis for Elon vs Drexel 24:25-Picks & analysis for Middle Tennessee vs Charlotte 27:24-Picks & analysis for Providence vs Butler 30:15-Picks & analysis for James Madison vs Georgia St 33:37-Picks & analysis for Wright St vs Northern Kentucky  37:14-Picks & analysis for Arkansas St vs Old Dominion  40:13-Picks & analysis for Appalachian St vs Marshall 43:17-Picks & analysis for Rice vs Western Kentucky  46:09-Picks & analysis for UT San Antonio vs Louisiana Tech 48:37-Picks & analysis for Hofstra vs Delaware 51:17-Picks & analysis for Central Michigan vs Michigan  54:09-Picks & analysis for IPFW vs Robert Morris  57:09-Picks & analysis for Chattanooga vs Citadel 59:55-Picks & analysis for VMI vs Furman 1:02:42-Picks & analysis for UW Milwaukee vs Oakland  1:05:19-Picks & analysis for UW Green Bay vs Detroit 1:07:54-Picks & analysis for Iowa vs Nebraska 1:10:28-Picks & analysis for Louisiana vs Coastal Carolina  1:13:21-Picks & analysis for East Tennessee St vs Wofford 1:15:5-Picks & analysis for North Carolina A&T vs Northeastern  1:18:12-Picks & analysis for Hampton vs Charleston 1:20:40-Picks & analysis for UTEP vs UAB 1:23:17-Picks & analysis for Abilene Christian vs Stephen F Austin  1:25:39-Picks & analysis for Evansville vs Indiana St 1:28:17-Picks & analysis for Southern Illinois vs Murray St 1:30:29-Picks & analy