Podcasts about redwoods

Subfamily of coniferous trees (redwoods)

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Latest podcast episodes about redwoods

Redwood Bureau
"BUDDY" - Redwood Bureau Phenomenon #0406

Redwood Bureau

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 28:25


Usually, dogs are man's best friend. Caring. Helpful. Protective. But sometimes, as is the case with "BUDDY", dogs are your worst nightmare. Hosted by Josh Tomar!  https://twitter.com/tomamoto https://www.twitch.tv/tomamoto Episode Story, Intro and Outro Written by Phoebe Bennet! https://twitter.com/capyhorror Episode Composed by MrBlackPasta! https://twitter.com/MrBlackPasta Episode Proofreading by TDNArtist! https://twitter.com/TDNArtist Subscribe on Spotify!  https://open.spotify.com/show/5OgfQg3svBwSUiU0zGqhet Please Review us on Apple Podcasts!  https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/redwood-bureau/id1597996941 Find more shows like Redwood Bureau at http://eeriecast.com/ Music and sound effects used in the Redwood Bureau has or may have been provided/created by:  CO.AG: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCcavSftXHgxLBWwLDm_bNvA Myuu: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCiSKnkKCKAQVxMUWpZQobuQ Jinglepunks: https://jinglepunks.com/ Epidemic Sound: https://www.epidemicsound.com/ Kevin MacLeod: http://incompetech.com/ Dark Music: https://soundcloud.com/darknessprevailspodcast Soundstripe: https://app.soundstripe.com/ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

RNZ: Country Life
Massive Anzac carving stands tall in Rissington

RNZ: Country Life

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2022 18:59


Two First World War soldiers have emerged from the remnants of a dying redwood at a fork in the road in rural Hawkes Bay. The massive sculpture is a tribute not just to those who went to war from small communities like Rissington but to the present-day locals who have banded together to create the memorial.

PodRocket - A web development podcast from LogRocket
Redwood, startups, and the future with Tom Preston-Werner (Repeat)

PodRocket - A web development podcast from LogRocket

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 47:20


Originally published on July 19th, 2022. We are taking some time off from production. We will be back with new episodes on November 15th. In this episode, we talk to Tom Preston-Werner, creator of RedwoodJS, Jekyll, and cofounder of GitHub, about why he wanted to create RedwoodJS, how it benefits startups, and the future of investing in startups. Links https://twitter.com/mojombo https://redwoodjs.com https://redwoodjs.com/docs/tutorial/foreword Follow us. Get free stickers. Follow us on Apple Podcasts, fill out this form (https://podrocket.logrocket.com/get-podrocket-stickers), and we'll send you free PodRocket stickers! Tell us what you think of PodRocket We want to hear from you! We want to know what you love and hate about the podcast. What do you want to hear more about? Who do you want to see on the show? Our producers want to know, and if you talk with us, we'll send you a $25 gift card! If you're interested, schedule a call with us (https://podrocket.logrocket.com/contact-us) or you can email producer Kate Trahan at kate@logrocket.com (mailto:kate@logrocket.com). What does LogRocket do? LogRocket combines frontend monitoring, product analytics, and session replay to help software teams deliver the ideal product experience. Try LogRocket for free today. (https://logrocket.com/signup/?pdr) Special Guest: Tom Preston-Werner.

An Ounce
The Redwoods

An Ounce

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 7:02


A story told by Maria Jackson, about a family trip to the Redwoods, of California, USA. Maria briefly recounts the trip, the sights, and the three lessons - or ounces - she and her family took from the experience.This episode was recorded through Zoom, and some of the audio quality is not up to par. My Apologies - But, the story is worth a listen! Whether you enjoy this podcast or not, I'm sure you will enjoy my new book, “firehouse philosophy: embers of insight for an exceptional life“. Get your copy now! Search “firehouse philosophy” on Amazon.

The Nonlinear Library
EA - AI Safety groups should imitate career development clubs by Joshc

The Nonlinear Library

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 3:12


Welcome to The Nonlinear Library, where we use Text-to-Speech software to convert the best writing from the Rationalist and EA communities into audio. This is: AI Safety groups should imitate career development clubs, published by Joshc on November 9, 2022 on The Effective Altruism Forum. If you want to get people to do things (like learn about AI Safety) you have to offer them something valuable. Here's one of the posters we used when I was in charge of marketing for the Columbia EA group: It's a pretty graphic, but what valuable thing is it offering? The message is “scan this link to talk about AI.” To be fair, people like talking about AI. We had applicants. But we didn't attract talented ML students. If you want to attract talented people, you have to know what they want. Serious and ambitious people probably don't want to sit around having philosophical discussions. They want to build their careers. Enter ML @ Berkeley, a thriving group of 50 ML students who put 15 hours per week into projects and courses to become better at ML. No one gets paid – not even the organizers. And they are very selective. Only around 7% get in. Why is this group successful? For starters, they offer career capital. They give students projects that often turn into real published papers. They also concentrate talent. Ambitious people want to work with other ambitious people. AI safety student groups should consider imitating ML @ Berkeley. I'm not saying that we should eliminate philosophical discussions and replace them with resume boosting factories. We still want people to think AI Safety and X-risk are important. But discussions don't need to be the primary selling point. Maybe for cultivating conceptual researchers, it makes more sense for discussions to be central. But conceptual and empirical AI Safety research are very different. ML students are probably more interested in projects and skill-building. More rigorous programming could also make it easier to identify talent. Talking about AI is fun, but top ML researchers work extremely hard. Rigorous technical curricula can filter out the ones that are driven. There is nothing like a trial by fire. Instead of trying to predict in advance who will be good at research, why not have lots of people try it and invest in those that do well? USC field builders are experimenting with a curriculum that, in addition to introducing X-risk, is packed-full with technical projects. In their first semester, they attracted 30 students who all have strong ML backgrounds. I'm interested in seeing how this goes and would be excited about more AI Safety groups running experiments on these lines. People could also try: checking whether grad students are willing to supervise group research projects. running deep learning courses and training programs (like Redwood's MLAB) running an in-person section of intro to ML Safety (a technical course that covers safety topics). Conclusion As far as I can tell, no one has AI safety university field-building all figured out. Rather than copying the same old discussion group model, people should experiment with new approaches. A good start could be to imitate career development clubs like ML @ Berkeley that have been highly successful. Thanks to Nat Li and Oliver Zhang for thoughts and feedback and to Dan Hendrycks for conversations that inspired this post. Thanks for listening. To help us out with The Nonlinear Library or to learn more, please visit nonlinear.org.

FreightCasts
Day 1 live from F3 EP509 WHAT THE TRUCK?!?

FreightCasts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 54:43


On this episode of WHAT THE TRUCK?!?  Dooner and The Dude are live from day 1 at F3. They're joined by Krishna Vattipalli at Imaginnovate/Fleet Enable; Eric Rempel at Redwood; Graham Gonzales at Reliance Partners; Frank Hurst at Roadrunner; Joseph Lamb at Ryder and special guests.Visit our sponsorWatch on YouTubeSubscribe to the WTT newsletterApple PodcastsSpotifyMore FreightWaves Podcasts Discover an easier way of doing business with the J.B. Hunt 360°® platform. Manage the entire shipping process from start to finish, all in one place. See what the power of the J.B. Hunt 360 platform can do for you at jbhunt.com/power.

The Whiskey Ring Podcast
Ep. 66: Redwood Empire with Lauren Patz

The Whiskey Ring Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 86:29


Execute episode 66... Fittingly, for Episode 66 we're going to Northern California, the home of Redwood Empire Whiskey and the great redwood forests. Looking up at these primevally-large trees is a stupendous experience, one George Lucas would be inspired by.  Redwood Empire was founded in 2017 with the goal of producing excellent in-house whiskey that could stand on its own or be blended with older, sourced whiskies without being lost. In their Pipe Dream, Emerald Giant, and Lost Monarch blends, Redwood Empire showcases its blending skills - and the cask strength versions just add to that showcase.  The newest outturns are the Redwood Empire Bottled-in-Bond whiskies- the Rocket Top and Grizzly Beast - 100% their own distillate at 5 years old. The Redwood Empire house style shines in these two whiskies, and each are worth trying as soon as you can find them.  With Lauren Patz and Jeff Duckhorn (yes, that family) running the stills, Redwood is quickly ascending the ranks of American whiskey. Lauren is a true whiskey geek, someone you want behind the stills but can also explain complex topics to any audience.  Oh...and did I mention they'll have a single malt soon? _________________ Before we jump into the interview just a few quick notes: If you haven't joined the Patreon community yet, please consider doing so! The $5 tier has access to the Patreon-only segment called “Under the Influencer”, where some of your favorite YouTubers/Instagrammers/Podcasters and more join me to talk whiskey, life, and influencing. This tier will also have priority access to upcoming barrel picks, including one coming up in partnership with the This is my Bourbon Podcast.  The $25 tier - for people who really want to propel the pod and website forward - will have the same benefits as the $5 tier plus right of first refusal to join me on future barrel picks, access to bottles I'm sent to taste and review, and more. The first five boxes of samples have already been sent and only 4 spots remain!  You can still support for as little as $1 a month if you'd like to stay up to date with these changes and news about what we've got coming up.  Finally, please do like and subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or wherever you're listening - it really helps the Whiskey Ring Podcast move up the rankings.  If you haven't yet, please follow Whiskey in my Wedding Ring and the Whiskey Ring Podcast on Instagram, Facebook and Twitter, and subscribe to the newsletter on the website.  Thanks for reading! Now here's Lauren Patz of Redwood Empire Whiskey. Redwood Empire Whiskey Redwood Empire Whiskey Website Redwood Empire Whiskey on Facebook Redwood Empire Whiskey on Instagram Reviews Coming Soon! Thanks to our Presenting Sponsor, ImpEx Beverages https://impexbev.com ImpEx on Instagram ImpEx on Facebook ImpEx on Twitter Thanks to our Sponsor, Scotch Malt Whisky Society SMWS Website SMWS of America Website (Use code WRP for 20% off your membership!) SMWS/A Facebook SMWS/A Instagram SMWS/A Twitter SMWS/A YouTube

What The Truck?!?
Day 1 live from F3

What The Truck?!?

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 54:27


On this episode of WHAT THE TRUCK?!?  Dooner and The Dude are live from day 1 at F3. They're joined by Krishna Vattipalli at Imaginnovate/Fleet Enable; Eric Rempel at Redwood; Graham Gonzales at Reliance Partners; Frank Hurst at Roadrunner; Joseph Lamb at Ryder and special guests.Visit our sponsorWatch on YouTubeSubscribe to the WTT newsletterApple PodcastsSpotifyMore FreightWaves Podcasts

The Nonlinear Library
AF - A Walkthrough of Interpretability in the Wild (w/ authors Kevin Wang, Arthur Conmy & Alexandre Variengien) by Neel Nanda

The Nonlinear Library

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 5:13


Welcome to The Nonlinear Library, where we use Text-to-Speech software to convert the best writing from the Rationalist and EA communities into audio. This is: A Walkthrough of Interpretability in the Wild (w/ authors Kevin Wang, Arthur Conmy & Alexandre Variengien), published by Neel Nanda on November 7, 2022 on The AI Alignment Forum. New paper walkthrough: Interpretability in the Wild: A Circuit for Indirect Object Identification In GPT-2 Small is a really exciting new mechanistic interpretability paper from Redwood Research. They reverse engineer a 26(!) head circuit in GPT-2 Small, used to solve Indirect Object Identification: the task of understanding that the sentence "After John and Mary went to the shops, John gave a bottle of milk to" should end in Mary, not John. I think this is a really cool paper that illustrates how to rigorously reverse engineer real models, and is maybe the third example of a well understood circuit in a real model. So I wanted to understand it better by making a walkthrough. (and hopefully help other people understand it too!) In this walkthrough I'm joined by three of the authors, Kevin Wang, Arthur Conmy and Alexandre Variengien. In Part 1 we give an overview of the high-level themes in the paper and what we think is most interesting about it. If you're willing to watch an hour of this and want more, in Part 2 we do a deep dive into the technical details of the paper and read through it together, and dig into the details of how the circuit works and the techniques used to discover this. If you're interested in contributing to this kind of work, apply to Redwood's REMIX program! Deadline Nov 13th We had some technical issues in filming this, and my video doesn't appear - sorry about that! I also tried my hand at some amateur video editing to trim it down - let me know if this was worthwhile, or if it's bad enough that I shouldn't have bothered lol. If you find this useful, you can check out my first walkthrough on A Mathematical Framework for Transformer Circuits. And let me know if there are more interpretability papers you want walkthroughs on! If you want to try exploring this kind of work for yourself, there's a lot of low-hanging fruit left to pluck! Check out my EasyTransformer library and the accompanying codebase to this paper! A good starting point is their notebook giving an overview of the key experiments or my notebook modelling what initial exploration on any task like this could look like. Some brainstormed future directions: 3 letter acronyms (or more!) Converting names to emails. An extension task is e.g. constructing an email from a snippet like the following: Name: Neel Nanda; Email: last name dot first name k @ gmail Grammatical rules Learning that words after full stops are capital letters Verb conjugation Choosing the right pronouns (e.g. he vs she vs it vs they) Whether something is a proper noun or not Detecting sentiment (eg predicting whether something will be described as good vs bad) Interpreting memorisation. E.g., there are times when GPT-2 knows surprising facts like people's contact information. How does that happen? Counting objects described in text. E.g.: I picked up an apple, a pear, and an orange. I was holding three fruits. Extensions from Alex Variengien Understanding what's happening in the adversarial examples: most notably S-Inhibition Head attention pattern (hard). (S-Inhibition heads are mentioned in the IOI paper) Understanding how are positional signal encoded (relative distance, something else?) bonus point if we have a story that include the positional embeddings and that explain how the difference between position is computed (if relative is the right framework) by Duplicate Token Heads / Induction Heads. (hard, but less context dependant) What are the role of MLPs in IOI (quite broad and hard) What is the role of Duplicate Token Heads outside IOI? Are they used in other Q-compositions with S-Inhibition Heads? Can we describe how their QK cir...

Grown Local
Late Night Humbodlt Arrival

Grown Local

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 33:46


Billy Wayne & Mike have arrived after a long drive to Humbodlt County. Its a very stoned and delirious episode but its good to be back behind the Redwood curtain.

Good Tidings Podcast
Sara Bareilles

Good Tidings Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 19:14


Welcome to the Good Tidings Podcast with host Larry Harper, Founder of the Good Tidings Foundation. Larry interviews his new friend and Good Tidings partner, Grammy Winner Sara Bareilles. The interview takes place in Sara's hometown of Eureka, California at the opening of the new "Sara Studio" at the Boys and Girls Club of the Redwoods. They talk about how this unique partnership was born, all the good they hope to do in the future and Sara's amazing career.

Redwood Bureau
"SALESMAN" - Redwood Bureau Phenomenon #0050

Redwood Bureau

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 45:57


Viral can refer to disease, but it often refers to media. In the case of "SALESMAN", it's a horrible mixture of both to create something else. Something beyond natural and very deadly. Hosted by Josh Tomar!  https://twitter.com/tomamoto https://www.twitch.tv/tomamoto Episode Story, Intro and Outro Written by Joe Ponce! https://www.clippings.me/users/josephmponce https://www.linkedin.com/in/joseph-ponce-9ba83a78/ Episode Composed by / Episode Story Narrated by The Disciple! https://twitter.com/CP_Disciple Episode Proofreading by TDNArtist! https://twitter.com/TDNArtist Episode Artwork by Giovanni Fim! https://twitter.com/ggtfimz Subscribe on Spotify!  https://open.spotify.com/show/5OgfQg3svBwSUiU0zGqhet Please Review us on Apple Podcasts!  https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/redwood-bureau/id1597996941 Find more shows like Redwood Bureau at http://eeriecast.com/ Music and sound effects used in the Redwood Bureau has or may have been provided/created by:  CO.AG: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCcavSftXHgxLBWwLDm_bNvA Myuu: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCiSKnkKCKAQVxMUWpZQobuQ Jinglepunks: https://jinglepunks.com/ Epidemic Sound: https://www.epidemicsound.com/ Kevin MacLeod: http://incompetech.com/ Dark Music: https://soundcloud.com/darknessprevailspodcast Soundstripe: https://app.soundstripe.com/ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Nonlinear Library
AF - Some Lessons Learned from Studying Indirect Object Identification in GPT-2 small by KevinRoWang

The Nonlinear Library

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 15:35


Welcome to The Nonlinear Library, where we use Text-to-Speech software to convert the best writing from the Rationalist and EA communities into audio. This is: Some Lessons Learned from Studying Indirect Object Identification in GPT-2 small, published by KevinRoWang on October 28, 2022 on The AI Alignment Forum. To learn more about this work, check out the paper. We assume general familiarity with transformer circuits. Intro: There isn't much interpretability work that explains end-to-end how a model is able to do some task (except for toy models). In this work, we make progress towards this goal by understanding some of the structure of GPT-2 small “in the wild” by studying how it computes a simple natural language task. The task we investigate is what we call indirect object identification (IOI), where sentences like “When John and Mary went to the store, John gave a drink to” should be completed with “Mary.” We discovered the structure of a circuit of 26 attention heads grouped into 7 main classes, the largest end-to-end attempt to reverse engineer how a LM computes a natural behavior (to our knowledge). There is still much missing from our explanation, however, and our explanation doesn't go to the parameter level. Besides discovering the particular circuit shown above, we gained some interesting insights about low-level phenomena arising inside language models. For example, we found attention heads communicating with pointers (sharing the location of a piece of information instead of copying it). We also identified heads compensating for the loss of function of other heads, and heads contributing negatively to the correct next-token prediction. We're excited to see if these discoveries generalize beyond our case study. Since explanations of model behavior can be confused or non-rigorous, we used our knowledge to design adversarial examples. Moreover, we formulate 3 quantitative criteria to test the validity of our circuit. These criteria partially validate our circuit but indicate that there are still gaps in our understanding. This post is a companion post to our paper where we share lessons that we learned from doing this work and describe some of Redwood's interpretability perspectives. We share high-level takeaways and give specific examples from the work to illustrate them. Goals of Interpretability for this Investigation In this kind of mechanistic interpretability work, we tend to use the circuits abstraction. If we think of a model as a computational graph where nodes are terms in its forward pass (neurons, attention heads, etc) and edges are the interactions between those terms (residual connections, attention, etc), a circuit is a subgraph of the model responsible for some behavior. Note that our work is slightly different from Chris Olah's/Anthropic's idea of a circuit in that we investigate this circuit on a specific distribution (instead of the entire distribution of text) and we also don't attain an understanding of the circuit at the parameter-level. Structure: Having all the nodes and edges One kind of valuable interpretability insight is to ensure that we have the correct subgraph, which is one of the main goals in this work. We formulate three main quantitative criteria to measure progress towards this goal. These criteria rely on the idea of "knocking out" or turning off a node from the computational graph by replacing its activation by its mean on a distribution where the IOI task is not present. (Note that we now believe that our causal scrubbing algorithm provides a more robust way to validate circuits.) Faithfulness: Intuition: The circuit performs the task as well as the model. Computation: A model with everything but the circuit knocked out should achieve the same performance according to some task benchmark. Completeness: Intuition: The circuit contains all the nodes that are important for the task. (Note that completeness implies faithfulness). Computation: For every subset of nodes in the ci...

EcoNews Report
Full Steam Ahead for the Great Redwood Trail!

EcoNews Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 29:31


This week on the EcoNews Report your host Tom Wheeler chats with Friends of the Eel River's Alicia Hamann about the fantastic news that the Great Redwood Trail is finally in the clear from threats to take the public right of way. It's now full steam ahead on trail master planning - tune in to learn about how you can be involved and check out greatredwoodtrailplan.org. And in other groundbreaking news, Alicia shares information about the lawsuit just filed to protect public trust flows impacted by unregulated groundwater extraction in the Eel River.Links:https://eelriver.org/2022/10/27/protecting-public-trust-flows-in-the-lower-eel-river/https://greatredwoodtrailplan.org/https://eelriver.org/projects/protecting-the-eel-river-canyon/Support the show

The Nonlinear Library
EA - Apply to the Redwood Research Mechanistic Interpretability Experiment (REMIX), a research program in Berkeley by Max Nadeau

The Nonlinear Library

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 19:08


Welcome to The Nonlinear Library, where we use Text-to-Speech software to convert the best writing from the Rationalist and EA communities into audio. This is: Apply to the Redwood Research Mechanistic Interpretability Experiment (REMIX), a research program in Berkeley, published by Max Nadeau on October 27, 2022 on The Effective Altruism Forum. This winter, Redwood Research is running a coordinated research effort on mechanistic interpretability of transformer models. We're excited about recent advances in mechanistic interpretability and now want to try to scale our interpretability methodology to a larger group doing research in parallel. REMIX participants will work to provide mechanistic explanations of model behaviors, using our causal scrubbing methodology (forthcoming within a week) to formalize and evaluate interpretability hypotheses. We hope to produce many more explanations of model behaviors akin to our recent work investigating behaviors of GPT-2-small, toy language models, and models trained on algorithmic tasks (also forthcoming). We think this work is a particularly promising research direction for mitigating existential risks from advanced AI systems (more in Goals and FAQ). Apply here by November 8th to be a researcher in the program. Apply sooner if you'd like to start early (details below) or receive an earlier response. Some key details: We expect to accept 30-50 participants. We plan to have some researchers arrive early, with some people starting as soon as possible. The majority of researchers will likely participate during the months of December and/or January. We expect researchers to participate for a month minimum, and (all else equal) will prefer applicants who are able to come for longer. We'll pay for housing and travel, and also pay researchers for their time. We'll clarify the payment structure prior to asking people to commit to the program. We're interested in some participants acting as team leaders who would help on-board and provide research advice to other participants. This would involve arriving early to get experience with our tools and research directions and participating for a longer period (~2 months). You can indicate interest in this role in the application. We're excited about applicants with a range of backgrounds; we're not expecting applicants to have prior experience in interpretability research. Applicants should be comfortable working with Python, PyTorch/TensorFlow/Numpy (we'll be using PyTorch), and linear algebra. We're particularly excited about applicants with experience doing empirical science in any field. We'll allocate the first week to practice using our interpretability tools and methodology; the rest will be researching in small groups. See Schedule. Feel free to email programs@rdwrs.com with questions. Goals Research output. We hope this program will produce research that is useful in multiple ways: We'd like stronger and more grounded characterizations of how language models perform a certain class of behaviors. For example, we currently have a variety of findings about how GPT-2-small implements indirect object identification (“IOI”, see next section for more explanation), but aren't yet sure how often they apply to other models or other tasks. We'd know a lot more if we had a larger quantity of this research. For each behavior investigated, we think there's some chance of stumbling across something really interesting. Examples of this include induction heads and the “pointer manipulation” result in the IOI paper: not only does the model copy information between attention streams, but it also copies “pointers”, i.e. the position of the residual stream that contains the relevant information. We're interested in learning whether different language models implement the same behaviors in similar ways. We'd like a better sense of how good the current library of interpretability techniques is, and we'd like to get ideas for new techniques. We'd like to have mo...

The Nonlinear Library
AF - Apply to the Redwood Research Mechanistic Interpretability Experiment (REMIX), a research program in Berkeley by maxnadeau

The Nonlinear Library

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 19:07


Welcome to The Nonlinear Library, where we use Text-to-Speech software to convert the best writing from the Rationalist and EA communities into audio. This is: Apply to the Redwood Research Mechanistic Interpretability Experiment (REMIX), a research program in Berkeley, published by maxnadeau on October 27, 2022 on The AI Alignment Forum. This winter, Redwood Research is running a coordinated research effort on mechanistic interpretability of transformer models. We're excited about recent advances in mechanistic interpretability and now want to try to scale our interpretability methodology to a larger group doing research in parallel. REMIX participants will work to provide mechanistic explanations of model behaviors, using our causal scrubbing methodology (forthcoming within a week) to formalize and evaluate interpretability hypotheses. We hope to produce many more explanations of model behaviors akin to our recent work investigating behaviors of GPT-2-small, toy language models, and models trained on algorithmic tasks (also forthcoming). We think this work is a particularly promising research direction for mitigating existential risks from advanced AI systems (more in Goals and FAQ). Apply here by November 8th to be a researcher in the program. Apply sooner if you'd like to start early (details below) or receive an earlier response. Some key details: We expect to accept 30-50 participants. We plan to have some researchers arrive early, with some people starting as soon as possible. The majority of researchers will likely participate during the months of December and/or January. We expect researchers to participate for a month minimum, and (all else equal) will prefer applicants who are able to come for longer. We'll pay for housing and travel, and also pay researchers for their time. We'll clarify the payment structure prior to asking people to commit to the program. We're interested in some participants acting as team leaders who would help on-board and provide research advice to other participants. This would involve arriving early to get experience with our tools and research directions and participating for a longer period (~2 months). You can indicate interest in this role in the application. We're excited about applicants with a range of backgrounds; we're not expecting applicants to have prior experience in interpretability research. Applicants should be comfortable working with Python, PyTorch/TensorFlow/Numpy (we'll be using PyTorch), and linear algebra. We're particularly excited about applicants with experience doing empirical science in any field. We'll allocate the first week to practice using our interpretability tools and methodology; the rest will be researching in small groups. See Schedule. Feel free to email programs@rdwrs.com with questions. Goals Research output. We hope this program will produce research that is useful in multiple ways: We'd like stronger and more grounded characterizations of how language models perform a certain class of behaviors. For example, we currently have a variety of findings about how GPT-2-small implements indirect object identification (“IOI”, see next section for more explanation), but aren't yet sure how often they apply to other models or other tasks. We'd know a lot more if we had a larger quantity of this research. For each behavior investigated, we think there's some chance of stumbling across something really interesting. Examples of this include induction heads and the “pointer manipulation” result in the IOI paper: not only does the model copy information between attention streams, but it also copies “pointers”, i.e. the position of the residual stream that contains the relevant information. We're interested in learning whether different language models implement the same behaviors in similar ways. We'd like a better sense of how good the current library of interpretability techniques is, and we'd like to get ideas for new techniques. We'd like to have more exam...

For The Wild
DORI MIDNIGHT on Spinning Webs of Support /310

For The Wild

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022


“With a prayer to imagine beyond the current structures and systems, and kind of weave ourselves into, and be wrapped inside of, the invisible cloak that is interdependence, that is mutual aid, that supports us to reach towards each other and reach towards a vision of mutually flourishing life.” This powerful vision is shared by this week's guest, Dori Midnight. In this sweet, meaningful, and meandering conversation, Dori discusses magical and liberatory practices, ancestral Jewish healing traditions, and the necessity of reclaiming Judaism from Zionism in the name of collective liberation. She shares sweet stories of garlic and cedar, the generosity of belonging, and the blessing of our collective and intricate work as we stretch toward liberation. Dori Midnight practices intuitive healing, weaves collaborative, liberatory ritual spaces, makes potions, and writes liturgy, spells, prayers, and poems. For over 20 years, Dori has been practicing and teaching on ritual and remedies for unraveling times, reconnecting with traditions of Jewish ancestral wisdom, community care work, and queer magic and healing. Music by 40 Million Feet, Katie Gray, and Aviva Le Fey. Visit our website at forthewild.world for the full episode description, references, and action points.

Ozark Mountain Transformation Conference
A New Earth Rising - Charmian Redwood

Ozark Mountain Transformation Conference

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 60:18


We came to this Earth from many planes, dimensions, planets and star systems to life her out of darkness into light. We have sacrificed and suffered for thousands of lifetimes, we have kept the Flame and the Light alive. This is the lifetime where we complete the mission. We lift ourselves and the Earth out of the density of the third dimension into the eternal life of the fifth. In order to do this we must release all of the memories of being traumatized and victimized so that we can fully embody all of our soul. Charmian will guide a meditation using a crystal bowl to meet the Self that has already ascended and ask what we need to do in order to go through that portal into light.Presentation from the 2015 Ozark Mountain Transformation Conference.FOLLOW US ON:Facebook: https://goo.gl/rwvBfwInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/ozarkmtpubTwitter: https://goo.gl/LunK5DWebsite: https://goo.gl/2d5cX4ASSOCIATED LINKS:Ozark Mountain Publishing, Inc.: https://goo.gl/xhgoAPQuantum Healing Hypnosis Academy: https://goo.gl/64G7RD

THE WONDER: Science-Based Paganism
Samhain/Hallows 2022

THE WONDER: Science-Based Paganism

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 44:12


Remember, we welcome comments, questions and suggested topics at thewonderpodcastQs@gmail.com   S3E37 TRANSCRIPT:----more----     Mark: Welcome back to the Wonder Science-based Paganism. I'm your host, Mark, Yucca: And I'm the other one Yucca. Mark: and welcome to the Halloween season. This is the season when we celebrate Hallows, or whatever you choose to call it. It's a wonderful witchy holiday that we, pagans really enjoy. It's both fun and and kind of wacky and creative and as well as deep and meaningful and solemn. And it's just a really good time all the way around. So, this is our episode to talk about how we celebrate that holiday and what it means to us. Yucca: Right. So welcome. So there's a lot to this. Mark: There is. Yucca: Yeah. So I guess we should start with what and when is this holiday? Mark: Ah, right. Okay. Well, you first, what do you think it is and when? Yucca: Well, I, for me, it's, it's a little fuzzy on both levels. So there are two holidays that overlap with each other. For me. There is Halloween and then there's Hollows or second Autumn or sowing. I'm not really sure. What name? It's a little bit fluid there. But there's the, the kind of secular Halloween, which is just a celebration of the autumn spooky candy, you know, family fun stuff. And then there's also the, the season that we're in, which is this time. Remembering the ancestors honoring of death of the sunset of the year. Really this going into truly going into the cold, dark time of the year. And I know that when we were at Solstice, yes, we kind of flipped over or the Equinox is, is getting closer, but now it really is the cold of. In my climate, we almost always get our first snow as the kids are trick or treating That's what it happens, right? Is the kids are out trick or treating and it snows on them. So it, it's, it's a, Halloween is the 31st, but the other holiday is kind of around that time when it feels. When it feels right for me, right When we, we kind of do the holidays at the closest day, that works for us. We're not too worried about getting the exact moment because it's not like the solstice where the solstice I set an alarm for, right? The moment of the solstice and you know, sometimes that's gonna be two 15 in the morning. I'll just wake up, see some solstice and go back, sleep or, you know, that kind of thing. But with this it's a little bit more wiggle room. So what about for you? Mark: Well, I, I think we have some similarities, but some differences. I have a little bit more formal definition of when the holiday is. I consider this holiday to be a week long. Yucca: Mm-hmm. Mark: And it extends from the 31st through the seventh of Octo of November, which is when the actual midpoint is between the Equinox and the solstice. Yucca: It's my littlest birthday actually. Yes, he's our little saw and Mark: so, so official sown is, is is when your little one's birthday is. That's great. So, and I agree with you. On Halloween, we celebrate the secular holiday, which is the candy and the costumes and the, but it's still got all those thematic pieces wrapped up in it, right? It's all the death imagery all of the sort of scary monsters, most of whom have to do with coming back to life after being dead, which is something that we have a, a real aversion to apparently. Yucca: Discomfort. Yeah. Mark: Yeah, there, that's, that's just not supposed to happen. Yucca: Yeah. There and there's that transformation both in like coming back from the dead, but the Halloween, the costumes and stuff have this, You get to be somebody else as well Mark: Right, Yucca: Yeah. Mark: Yeah. You get to be somebody else. And often the way that that expresses itself is as. Kind of the darker side of your personality or the sexier side of your personality. Things that you don't feel necessarily comfortable to express all the time, but there's this day when you're given permission to be able to do that kind of stuff. And that's really important. I mean, I feel like we need more days like that. And people can dress up weird and not be judged for it. So. The, that's the secular part with the, with the candy and the decorations and all that kind of stuff. But then the rest of the week is the more solemn, kind of contemplative part where there's time to think about those that have died and are gone. And there's time to reflect on my own mortality and update my death packet, which we talked about a couple of weeks ago. Do all that. Mortality oriented work that that I just feel is necessary and this is the right time of year to do it. And then on the first weekend of November, which is typically, I mean, it's typically like the sixth, seventh, fifth, somewhere in there is when my circle holds its sound ritual. we've, this will be our 33rd so, and Ritual in a row one of which was online because of Covid. But other than that, we've done them in person. And and I'll talk about that when we talk about rituals, but that's the more solemn observance really kind of encounter with death. Yucca: Yeah. And this doesn't seem to be for either of our practices, but for many pagans, this is also the new year. Mark: Right, Yucca: So there's different points at which you can start the year, and for some this is, is that that point? Mark: Right. And, and I think that from. I mean, certainly from the standpoint of my orientation to the Wheel of the Year, there's a real logic to starting there because, you know, the, the process of decomposition and then reassembly of new life is metaphorically represented by the the Hallows holiday, right? So this time between now and Yule is the time when the decomposition and recomposition is happening, and then Yule is. Yucca: Right. Mark: So there's a logic there, but for me it's just too hard to try to address new New Years in November. Yucca: Mm-hmm. Mark: so much easier just to say that my new year is at the winter solstice, which is only about 10 days before the the secular. Yucca: Yeah. Mark: Calendar New year. It just is a lot easier to deal with. If I have a New Year's Eve party on November 6th, everybody's gonna look at me funny. But if I have a New Year's Eve party somewhere, you know, in the neighborhood of the solstice, then that makes a little more sense. Yucca: Yeah. Well, and, and I can also certainly see the logic that people have for us, it, it doesn't feel like that as much because this is the time of the year where we've been getting ready for this time of the year. We have the. It doesn't feel like we're starting new yet. It's like this is what we've been preparing for, right? This is, we've got all the harvests, this is stored up, and as we keep going through the months, well then, you know, we get to, to using up our stores of wood and our stores of food and, and that's quite on the literal side, but we could use that metaphorically as well. And so for me, starting anew when things are kind of bare. You know, either the calendar year or even more towards spring really starts to feel like a new year to me. Mark: Mm. Yucca: So, Mark: Yeah, I, I can see that. And of course the thing is time is time is linear, right? Time just goes on. So, you know, we, and the earth, because of our seasonal cycles, it moves in cycles. So there's any point that you put down on the, the 365 and a quarter days that we have in a given revolution around the sun and say that's the beginning has, is inherently arbitrary. Yucca: sure. Mark: I mean, it can't be any more arbitrary than January 1st, which makes, Absolutely has no astronomical relation or anything. I'm sure there's something about the conversion from the Julian to the Gregorian calendar that moved New Year's Eve from Yucca: Well, that's why Christmas and solstice aren't on the same point. Right? And then, and then the way that the months shifted, right? Because the astronomical months, like in terms of lining up the zodiac with our months, they don't quite fit. And then we have to remember. You know, Earth's orbit isn't actually circular in terms of how much we spend in each of the constellations and so I don't know why, but Mark: Yeah. I mean, it's my point being that it's all kind of arbitrary and so, you know, whatever works for you. That's great. For me, doing New Years now just doesn't make as much sense. Especially because this holiday is so much about endings, you know, And I, I think it's a little, it's a little abrupt and peremptory to say, Okay, we're done with endings. Happy New year. I think this, this season is important enough and the processes that it commemorates are important enough that having a whole, what is it? Seven weeks, between seven, eight weeks between the holiday and you'll Yucca: Mm-hmm. Mark: to really kind of let this, the meanings of this season settle in, you know, to reflect on them, to write about them, to think about them. You know that that miraculous process that's happening in the soil right now, which is all of the decomposers are going nuts with all the leaves, the leaves they're being fed, and the water they're getting that they weren't getting before and all that kind of thing I think speaks to a level of being appropriate to recognize decomposition as really what? What's the main gain happening at this time of year in the temperate zone of the Northern Hemisphere? Yucca: Right. And I'm glad that you that you bring that up, right? Because we are speaking from, even though we are from different climates, we're still from this closer to each other. So we're both in temperate, northern hemisphere. Whereas, you know, life is gonna be very different and tropics or southern hemisphere, or if you get farther towards the poles, like it, it really changes over earth. So every place that you are is going to be d. So, Yeah. Mark: Yep. That's, that is so, so that, that's when, and and what we call it I mean, I've heard some other names for this season, but, and I prefer halls because it's not, it's just an English word. It's not Halloween because Halloween is kind of the secular holiday with trick or treating and all that kind of stuff. And Hallows sounds much more sort of solemn and goy, I guess. Yucca: Yeah, but it still is similar enough that there's the, those same sort of themes going on. Mark: Right. And I don't use the, the Celtic word because I'm not of that derivation, and I'm trying not to, in my particular practice, I'm trying not to draw on any particular cultural frame. So I'm not I'm not appropriating I'm just. Just doing something that started in around the, around the turn of the 21st century with some old folkloric practices kind of drawn in and one item of appropriation, which is the Wheel of the Year, which was invented in the 1950s. So I don't feel too badly about it. Yucca: well invented, but but heavily drawing on multiple. Different cultures, traditions, right? They, they took you know, some of the Celtic festivals and Germanic and you know, and they, and the names themselves. You look at their, their mixes from lots of different languages. So, and then that was just sort of stuck together. Yeah. Mark: Yeah. And, and that's all, you know. Fair enough. I mean, I, I think, I think the success of the Wheel of the Year as a kind of near universal, I mean, I can't speak to North Heat folks or etic folks or whatever, but in my experience of the Pagan community of North America, the Wheel of the year is a near universal cycle of holidays that are celebrated Yucca: Well, I think because it's so grounded in. What's happening with the Earth? Mark: in reality. Yeah. Yucca: it's not just arbitrary, right? We don't just pick a day, you know, this day it's, well, why we've got the, the solstice, we've got the equinoxes, we've got the transition between them which is, John has talked about often about it being, you know, the, the temperature shifts rather than what's going on with. Tilt Mark: Right, Right. Yeah. And so that's why I think it's so successful because it is grounded in reality. And I wouldn't have adopted it for AOP Paganism if it wasn't grounded in reality because my whole thing was, let's do a paganism that's grounded in reality, Yucca: Hm. Yeah. Now there's wiggle rooms though, right? When you talk about the particular dates, right? When we are saying May 1st or October 31st, you know, those aren't necessarily the actual midpoints and which midpoint are we using, right? Are we using the, the midpoint in the orbit or are we using the midpoint in the days? Like how are we doing that? So there's, you know, there's wiggle room. Mark: Right, For sure. So having established that the whole thing is kind of fuzzy. Let's talk a little bit about kind of themes and practices and all that good kind of stuff. Yucca: Yeah. So looking at Halls in particular, are we gonna talk about Halloween first? Mark: Well, I suspect that our listeners probably have a pretty good grasp on what Halloween is about. Yucca: I think so, yeah. Mark: And I'm, and I, I mean, I love Halloween. I just, I think it's wonderful. I love all the decorations and the, the, the imagery and all that good kind of stuff. So, and I love dressing up in costumes and I love, you know, playing characters and all that kind of stuff. So it's, it's definitely been a holiday that resonates a lot for. But I think it makes more sense to talk about the, the more solemn and kind of reverential side of this holiday season. You know, we, we just had an episode about ancestors and recognizing ancestors and and about death, about confronting mortality and You know, remembering those that are gone. In our, and we've, we've talked about this before in our naturalistic approach to cosmology, we don't see compelling evidence to believe in an afterlife, Yucca: Yeah. Mark: so we don't believe in one. And what that means is that that death is it's the. Yucca: Mm-hmm. Mark: a very serious thing to contemplate. You know, we have these lives that are so precious to us, and knowing that they're going to end sets the stage for everything else, it creates the context for all the decisions we make. Yucca: Hmm. Yeah. So as we've been talking about for the last few weeks, these. Themes that we're thinking about both our own death, the deaths of others, the those beloved dead that, that are gone already, right? Mark: Right. Yeah. And so, You know, this, this is the time. Like, and not, not necessarily just in the last cycle. I mean, certainly if you've had losses within the last cycle that the, the herd of that is most vivid because it's most recent. Yucca: Yeah. Mark: And so, you know, lighting a candle or lighting candles, you know, for those that you've lost is, it can be a very meaningful thing, you know, reviewing the pictures. Of of the, the people that you've lost and remembering the times that you had with them together. And in this case, I'll say people in a, in a very general and vague sense, people, you know, including cats and dogs and, you Yucca: Yeah. People, not just humans, but people. Yeah. Mark: I mean, I have a practice that includes some recognition of that on an, on an ongoing basis because of my evening ritual where I light a candle on my underworld focus and say the honored dead every night. Yucca: Mm-hmm. Mark: And that is as much to remind myself that I'm going to die as it is about anyone else who. It's, it's really just about keeping me grounded in the fact of my mortality and that I need to, if there's stuff I want to do, I need to get going on it because time is short. Yucca: Right, And as we said so many times, we don't know how much time we have. Mark: Mm-hmm. Yucca: We know that it's limited, but we don't know if it's tomorrow or if it's in 20 years, 50 years, whatever it is, Mark: Yeah. I have an acquaintance who three months ago, Suddenly got a diagnosis of stage three pancreatic cancer, Yucca: Wow. Mark: and so he's gonna be gone really soon. Yucca: Yeah  Mark: barring, barring an extremely unlikely Yucca: it's, It's very rare. Yeah. Mark: Really rare. Yucca: That's how my father-in-law went. Mark: Oh Yucca: It was just, it was a matter of months. Mark: Mm-hmm. . Yeah. So, And, you know, I mean, he had some, he'd had some dietary complaints and some you know, kind of abdominal discomfort, but nothing particularly serious and went to the doctor and next thing he knows he's dying. So these are things that can happen to us. They, they happen to people and we are people. You know, one of the things that is really important to try to get your head around in contemplating your mortality is that you're not special indifferent when it comes to mortality. I know you've been the protagonist of your, your movie since the time you were born, but the truth is that life will kill off the main character. That's just you. Yucca: all, all stories end. Mark: Yes, con consider life to be, you know, the, the process of life to be the George r r Martin of of your personal movie . Just, just cuz you're an important character doesn't mean you get out alive. Yucca: So that's one of the really big themes here, right? And that and remembering our own and the one and the people close to us that sometimes feel almost like us. At times, right? Mark: Yes. That it's unimaginable that they could ever be gone. Yucca: Yeah.  Mark: And my encouragement at this time of year is well imagine it, you know,  Yucca: that won't make it happen sooner. Mark: won't make it happen sooner, and it won't, and it probably won't make it any less painful when it does happen. But it will make you more able to grapple with it when it does happen. I mean, I've known people who have been impacted by the death of a parent, and they've just been so crushed, just so devastated that like inconsolable When the truth is, if you live to be a decent age, this is something kind of to be expected. You know, we, we, we all run outta time and they do too. So, you can help yourself by by these contemplations. I know the, the Tibetan Buddhists have elaborate meditations. your own death about the death of those around you, about I mean the impermanence of your society. They, they're nothing if not thorough.  Yucca: I think that, that all of this just for me highlights just how precious life is, the moments that we have and, and helps to, to act as. It's almost like a filter to help us filter out what matters and what doesn't. What am I wasting my time on? And so, and also having some comfort in the memories, right? Thinking about the, whoever it was and the, in the wonderful things of that, right? So there's, there's the solemness to it, but there's. There's also a little, this, this quiet joy underneath it. Mark: Mm-hmm. Yeah. I think about the Irish tradition of the wake and there's a lot of laughter at awake, Yucca: Mm-hmm. Mark: you know, because people are telling stories of the the one who's dead. And a lot of those are funny stories, happy stories, Yucca: What happened at the pub, right? Mark: exactly. So you remember that time when and and that's. That's all very very much to be embraced and encouraged because grief, I, I heard a great synopsis of grief once, which is grief is love with nowhere to go, Yucca: Hmm. Mark: and I think. When we revisit those stories about the people when they were alive, we're able to feel some of the love that we have for them, you know, there for, for an instant there because we're living in a memory rather than in the current moment. There is a place for the love to go and I think that that is very helpful when we think about funerary rights. Which we talked about when we did a right, A Rite of Passage Yucca: Oh, it's been a couple years at this point. Mark: been a long time ago. We might wanna revisit Yucca: I think so. Yeah. Mark: of passage again. Yucca: I think that probably is still in 2020, Mark: Oh Yucca: right? This has been quite a while. Mark: that is quite a while cuz we're numbing up on 2023. Yucca: Yep. Wow. Mark: yeah. So, Yeah, when you think about that and we think about funeral rights, those are for the living. Yucca: Mm-hmm. Mark: Hopefully they're conducted in accordance with the wishes of the one who has died. But in some cases, you kind of have to overrule the dead person. In my opinion, particularly when the dead person says, I don't want any ceremony, I don't want any memorial, I don't want, you know, any, anything. You know, the reality is the people who survive you, they need that. And whether or not you wanted something or not, it's probably a good idea that somebody organized something like that. Yucca: Yeah, Mark: So,  Yucca: funny thing is at that point, it's not actually about you anymore. Mark: that's, You're the subject or you're the object, but you're not the subject. Right? You're, you're no longer capable of being a subject. So it's it's important, you know, that we, that we revisit those memories. And one of the things that we can do at this time of year is to revisit memories of those that we've lost and what we've lost in the way of relationships. Career steps things that we loved in our life that are no longer there, or that we feel like it's time to put down and move away from. Th this is the time to do it. And so there are lots and lots of pagans all over the place. Casting casting what they are finished with into fires, either metaphorically or. Yucca: Or quite literally Mark: Written on paper or Yucca: in a cauldron. Mark: in, in, in a flaming Cauldron. Yes. And, and there will be during that week between Halloween and the first weekend in November, all over North America. Certainly. Yucca: mm-hmm. Mark: It's good to have a time of year that is for that. Because so much of the rest of the year is really focused on growth and goals and Yucca: Doing, doing. Mark: and then harvesting, which is a bunch more doing, and, and all of that is so important because right, we need, we need to do things in our lives. But there also comes a time when, you know, you recognize that the crop didn't. Or it basically failed and you cut down what is there and you composted. Yucca: Yeah. And that it's okay to rest it's time. To rest, and that's the other half for us, is in my family's tradition, is that we look at this as the, the beginning of night, the end of the year, the sunset. Right. It's the end of the year, but it's not the beginning of the new year Mark: Hmm. Yucca: Right. It's okay. The, the annual season is, is gone now it's time. The, the plants are dying back many. Our annuals and they die back, and the perennial ones are going dormant, and it's just time to go, Okay, the day is done, the year is done. I accept what was and what Mark: Mm, mm-hmm. Yucca: here I am now. Mark: Right? Right. And that, that. Corresponds exactly to my way of viewing the year as mapped along the arc of a human life. Right. You know, middle age is at the autumnal equinox, and then, or I'm sorry, Elderhood is at the autumnal equinox and then deaf at Halls. And then there's this period leading up to Yule, which is the part that we never see of the life cycle, cuz we're not alive during it. Or if we're alive, we're in a, you know, a zygote form. And not conscious enough to be aware of anything going on. But but there's all kinds of amazing stuff happening there. I mean, we're going to, we're, we're gonna talk about decomposition here, coming up I guess in our next episode. Yucca: Yep. Next week. Yep. Mark: And the disassembly of what used to be alive and the reassembly of it by life into more of itself is it's this astounding trick that life does here on earth. It's, it's, I mean, you know, we think of, you know, the, the incredible scientific leap of Dr. Frankenstein, right? Who's able to, Take what's dead and turn it into something living again. Well, that's what life does all the time, Yucca: Yeah, that's what it is. Mark: all the time. That's, that's, that is life. That's what the process is. So it's, it's a great time to recognize that, you know, death comes and, you know, then it's, it's time. It's the end. Time, the, the day is over and it's time to either go dormant and wait for another cycle, or it's time to be disassembled and created into something else. And so going dormant and taking that rest time is really important. I think about all the Scandinavian countries that have these traditions of, you know, huddling up and putting on a fire and reading books. I, I know Christmas Day is a day of reading books in Iceland. Yucca: Hmm Mark: it's traditional to give one another socks. So you have nice, warm feet and there you are, and you sort of huddle up and read books and it's, and that just sounds like a great time. Yucca: That's, that's what we do with the whole Yule season. I love it so much. Every day is about warm, fuzzy socks and hot, you know, nice hot bone broth and the fire crackling and Mark: Mm-hmm. Yucca: cuddling kitties. So yeah, looking forward to that. There's always that, that bit of looking forward to the next season to. Mark: Yes. Yes. Yucca: enjoying this one, but going, Oh, put just around the corner. We have that, That wonderful. The snuggle season. Mark: Right. Right. Yeah. And so that's another thing that sort of sweetens the bitter pill of, of the Death Sabbath Yucca: Mm-hmm. Mark: is knowing that, well, yes. Okay. We're facing some very, very hard realities right now. Which we need to because we are mortal beings and you know, if we're gonna have a reality based practice, I go back to that again, then we're gonna acknowledge that we're temporary and that this is gonna happen to us. But just on the other side of that season is this wonderful celebration of family and connection and friends and loved ones. You know, eating sweets and eating too much and drinking too much, and just having a, a lovely, a lovely time kind of stowing in the last calories that we possibly can before the super cold arrives, Yucca: Right. Hmm. And if your, if your climate gets it, the snow, Mark: right? Yucca: so yeah. Mark: We get a little bit of snow on top of this. The, the peaks around. Every four or five years. But that's it. Yucca: Yeah. Mark: Who knows what's gonna happen with global warming now? Yucca: Yeah. We get, Yeah. Go on. Mark: so why don't we talk about rituals cuz we haven't actually talked about what we do specifically at this time of year. And I, I was gonna tell the story about my circle sow and, but I was wondering what do you do for your, for your hallows ritual or sown ritual? Yucca: Yeah, well, I have a, a personal one that I do, and we haven't really developed a full family one yet. And that, that I think is developing, you know, as, as the kids get older, they get to a point where they can. Different parts of life and reality kind of start to, to set in. And so we'll, we'll see what happens this year. But it's also an extremely busy time of year for us. Lots of birthdays and, and following itself and, and all of that. But so in, maybe in next year or the year after, I might have something different to say about what we do with the kids. But for me, I choose an evening around this time, and this is really the, the, the big one for me where I go out and I sit outside in the garden. And at this point it's crispy. Right. The guard. There's, there's not, maybe there's a few of the leafy greens kind of trying to peek out. But I leave, I leave it all. I haven't cleared it out. And I leave a lot of the, the plants till the spring anyways because of, that's where a lot of the insects will over winter. Right. And I wanna, you know, leave that habitat for them. But I'll sit out and I do not like to be cold . I'm one of those people, you know, if you're seeing the, the recording here I am sitting in my sleeping bag with a little hot water bottle at the c at it with my sweater on. But I'll go out without my big coat on. And so that I am cold. And I will feel that cold on my skin and sit down and, and have a, you know, a personal kind of meditation or journey and just allow myself to feel that cold as the sun setss and just be out in the that cold. Brown crinkled garden, watching the very first stars come out as the sun sets away and just let myself, let all those things go, all those things that, that it's time to let them go from the year. Those fights that I had, that, you know, I've been holding on to and the things that, that didn't work out, the dreams, that didn't work out, the, you know, all of that stuff and just. Let it go. It's, it's gone. It's going. It's dead. It's going to bed. Whatever's happening to it, I've released it and accept it. Yeah. Mark: That's wonderful. That reminds me a little bit of a thing that we do at UL every year, which is to sit out with a cup of something warm, but. To, to sit out in the cold for about a half an hour or so and just feel the air temperature feel, Yucca: Mm-hmm. Mark: feel the cold and dark before we bring the light back into the house. So my circle, as I said, has been getting together for since 1991, this will be our 33rd. Sow and ritual, which is just shocking to me. I don't know how that ever happened, but everybody who was in the circle to begin with is still there. And plus a couple more. Three, three more. And this, we've done some variety of this every year for many, many, many years. The circle started on, on Halloween night. In 1991. So it's, it's also, Yucca: work for that? Mark: Yeah, because I mean count, count 1, 2, 3, Right? It's like this will be the first, Yucca: I was born in 89 and I'm 33 now, but I guess it's because this is the final anyways Mark: is the, this is the next Yucca: year. Yeah. So this is the next, Okay. Mark: Right. This is, this starts the next cycle. Yucca: Okay. Mark: Yeah. So it's 33. The, and what we do is we build a focus, a big altar next to a, a fire circle where there's a fire laid but not lit. And the, the focus has jackal lanterns on it that are. Yucca: Mm-hmm. Mark: So it's glowing and there's all these symbols and bones and skulls and things all over that. And previously we, it was just a raked circle that we made. This is, this is at the home of friends of ours who have forested land, Redwood land. And this is an open clearing where we do this behind their house. And, and previously we just, you know, raked the circle and set it up that way. In recent years, it's a circle of chairs, Yucca: Sure Mark: Because we've gotten to the point where many of us really need a chair and are not gonna stand up for Yucca: Well, we had an episode about that recently, right? About thinking about who is part of your ritual and what are the different needs of the people in that Mark: Exactly. Yeah. And it I mean, I have to say it did feel like somewhat of a concession at some level. To me it was like, Oh boy, we're getting old, but we're getting old . So there's not a lot to be said about it. Yucca: Didn't you say you were the youngest or Mark: I am, I'm the, I'm the youngest. I'm the youngest in the group. And the oldest is 86, 85, Yucca: Okay. Mark: something like that. So, yeah, I mean, and most of the folks are in their sixties or seventies, but you know, we, when we first got together, I was in my twenties, so it's just been a long time. So we get together and then we we do a ritual that's about kind of letting go. Letting go of the things that we no longer need. Letting go of life, letting go of letting go of our physical, you know, letting, letting go of, of, be, of existing in essence. And then, Yes. And we sing a couple of songs and we love to sing together and we harmonize together really beautifully. So it's really an enjoyable thing that we love to do. And then we, when we're ready, march down to down through the forest and it's very dark down to a dark place that we've designated as the land of the. And there we call out to those that we've lost and want to communicate with, and we talk to them. We, we tell them that we're sorry to lose them, and we tell them that we miss them and we tell them that we love them and all those kinds of things. In most cases, when my father died, it was a little different. We do that for quite some time until the, the cold starts kind of seeping into our bones and it starts to feel a little too comfortable being there in the land of the dead. And that's the cue that we need to get up and get out of there. Because otherwise we might stay and that wouldn't be good. So, we make our way back to the, to the fire circle and we light the fire. I use a sprigg of U Tree that I've gathered from a cemetery nearby on Halloween the previous year. So because you know, if I use this year's it would be too green and it wouldn't actually light. So the last year's U Spri is sitting on my focus right now drying and that's what I'll use to light the. And then we share chocolate and wine and pomegranate and sing some more and sing about how happy we are to be alive. And we come back into the joyfulness of this existence, temporary as it is, and how glad we are to be with one another. And then, you know, after, after a while that all kind of peters out and we go inside and have a great big, huge. And enjoy each other's company. And we do that as a, as a stay over event. So we all Yucca: drive home or Mark: right. Exactly. We can, we can hang out and get in the hot tub or whatever and just have a really nice time with one another for that whole, that whole weekend. Yucca: Oh, that's amazing. Mark: It's so lovely and so transformative and you wouldn't think that after doing it so many times that it would be. But every year there are different losses, there are different things to speak to, different circumstances, and we change right from year to year as people we change. Yucca: Yeah. Well, thinking three decades of change. Mark: yes. Yes. So it's, it's a really profound thing and it's not a complicated ritual. And you can, you can, you could do this ritual without having a dark place in the forest to walk to. You could do that as a visualization. Do it as a guided meditation instead. So just, you know, if you, if the space you have is a living room, you could do it right there. You could do it, you know, start in total darkness. You know, do your early, you know, except for maybe, you know, a jackal lantern lit with an l e d candle or whatever. If you don't wanna set off your smoke alarm and you could then do the voyage to the land of the dead. And you could, you could embellish that much more than we can in real life. You could row across the river, sticks to the island of apples and, you know, meet your ancestors and stuff. There's all kinds of cool things you can do in a mental journey. Yucca: Mm-hmm. Mark: So, there's nothing proprietary about what we're doing. If this ritual sounds like it's appealing to you, go ahead and. Yucca: Yeah. And really anything that we share on the podcast, that's, that's, if it's works for you and it sounds like it's something that you wanna try out, please do. Mark: Absolutely. Absolutely. I mean, the reason we produce this podcast is for you, the listeners, to provide ideas, resources, thinking opinion. Take it or leave it, you know, whatever, whatever value you can get out of what we're providing, you know, we're, we're happy to, to provide it. So that's, that's hellos, that's, that's the, the Halloween sew hellos sab it season. Yucca: Yep. Mark: And we hope that you have a, Happy, cheery, spooky, goofy, sexy, solemn, reflective Yucca: chilly. Mark: silly, meaningful passage of the season because it is and can be all of those things at one time or another. Yucca: Yeah. Well, thank you everybody. Mark: Thank you. We'll see you next week.  

Whiskey Straight Up
Redwood Empire Cask Strength with Nate from Three Drinks Down

Whiskey Straight Up

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 51:54


On this episode of Whiskey Straight Up, Nate from Three Drinks Down joins me.  We sip through all three cask strength expressions of Redwood Empire.  Personally, I've been waiting a long time to finally get my hands on them.  With the samples finally here, were they worth the wait?  Do Nate and I agree on which one tastes the best?  Check out this episode to find out!Get your official Whiskey Straight Up Glencairn: https://whiskeystraightup.com/shop/Get better help with BetterHelp! For 10% off your first month: https://betterhelp.com/whiskeystraightupFor 15% off AND FREE SHIPPING, use code "WHISKEYSTRAIGHTUP" @ http://www.liquid-iv.comView all our videos: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCUfOZSqSw1U2HGAy7Jz_uSgApple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/whiskey-straight-up/id1634977533Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/1ZOacL3PuxXxzoTnqxHYRjGoogle Podcasts: https://podcasts.google.com/feed/aHR0cHM6Ly9mZWVkcy5idXp6c3Byb3V0LmNvbS8yMDE2Nzk1LnJzcwiHeartRadio: https://www.iheart.com/podcast/269-whiskey-straight-up-99517397/Amazon Music: https://music.amazon.com/podcasts/39a0119f-da42-469f-a47c-b754105c3698/whiskey-straight-up?refMarker=null&Our website: https://whiskeystraightup.com/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/whiskeystraightupInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/whiskeystraightup/Twitter: https://twitter.com/wsureviews#whiskey #whiskeytube #bourbon #redwoodempire

The Production Line Podcast

The Red Wings have started the Derek Lalonde era by taking five of six possible points through their first three games. In this episode we discuss the Red Wings opening week, the infamous "Redwoods Line", the play of top players, and more! The news of Jakub Vrana being placed in the NHL/NHLPA Player Assistance Program came minutes after recoding. Thanks for listening! Please rate and review our show on your favorite listening platform. Check out our partner's website at www.insidetherink.com for all your latest hockey news.

Minnesota Now
What you need to know about this fall's historic drought

Minnesota Now

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 12:23


The majority of Minnesota communities are experiencing abnormally dry or drought conditions according to the state Department of Natural Resources. Two sections of southern Minnesota are in extreme drought - including southwest Lyon and Redwood counties. Hennepin, Carver, Sibley and Scott counties are also facing serious drought. And late fall is a critical time to get moisture into the ground— but it hasn't come yet. Pete Boulay is the Assistant State Climatologist with the state Department of Natural Resources. Ralph Sievert is Director of Forestry for the Minneapolis Parks and Recreation Board. Both Boulay and Sievert joined Cathy to talk about the Minnesota's grim climate situation. Use the audio player above to listen to the full conversation. Subscribe to the Minnesota Now podcast on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify or wherever you get your podcasts.   We attempt to make transcripts for Minnesota Now available the next business day after a broadcast. When ready they will appear here. 

For The Wild
ISMAIL LOURIDO ALI, J.D. on Post-Prohibition Realities /309

For The Wild

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022


It's undeniable that right now we are in a rapidly changing and complex relationship with the consumption, production, and reality of drugs, substances, and medicines, and their usage. This week, guest Ismail Lourido Ali, J.D. guides listeners through an overview of where we are in our relationship with drugs in the American context, and how this relationship is indicative of our relationship with the Earth and with humanity broadly. We cannot move to a healthy and healing relationship with substances without acknowledging the violent realities brought about by criminalization, exploitation in drug production, and the exorbitant costs of pharmaceutical medicine. Ismail encourages us to move beyond the black and white view that some drugs are medicine while others are criminal. This expansive conversation encourages listeners to ask what deep, collective healing looks like, and to reflect on complicated relationships with consumption across substances. As we think more deeply on these issues, we must ask: what voids are we filling, what imagination do we need to tap into, what kind of reconciliation do we need? As MAPS' Director of Policy and Advocacy, Ismail advocates to eliminate barriers to psychedelic therapy and research, develops and implements legal and policy strategy, and supports MAPS' governance, non-profit, and ethics work. Ismail is licensed to practice law in the state of California, and is a founding board member of the Psychedelic Bar Association. He also currently serves on the board of the Sage Institute, contributes to Chacruna Institute's Council for the Protection of Sacred Plants, and participates on the advisory council for the Ayahuasca Defense Fund. Ismail is passionate about setting sustainable groundwork for a just, equitable, and generative post-prohibition world. Music by Harrison Foster, Book of Colors, and Autumn Hawk Percival. Visit our website at forthewild.world for the full episode description, references, and action points.

Redwood Bureau
"SKERRY" - Redwood Bureau Phenomenon #0451

Redwood Bureau

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 33:40 Very Popular


They say when you stare into the abyss, the abyss stares back into you - The ocean is just such an abyss, and only the darkest terrors lie in wait there. Hosted by Josh Tomar!  https://twitter.com/tomamoto https://www.twitch.tv/tomamoto Narrated by NaturesTemper! https://www.youtube.com/c/NaturesTemper Episode Story Written by M. M. Kelley! https://linktr.ee/mmkelley Episode Composed by MrBlackPasta! https://twitter.com/MrBlackPasta Episode Thumbnail Illustrated by Giovanni Fim! https://twitter.com/ggtfimz Episode Proofreading and Intro/Outro Written by Spencer Baughman! https://www.spencerbaughman.com/ Subscribe on Spotify!  https://open.spotify.com/show/5OgfQg3svBwSUiU0zGqhet Please Review us on Apple Podcasts!  https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/redwood-bureau/id1597996941 Find more shows like Redwood Bureau at http://eeriecast.com/ Music and sound effects used in the Redwood Bureau has or may have been provided/created by:  CO.AG: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCcavSftXHgxLBWwLDm_bNvA Myuu: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCiSKnkKCKAQVxMUWpZQobuQ Jinglepunks: https://jinglepunks.com/ Epidemic Sound: https://www.epidemicsound.com/ Kevin MacLeod: http://incompetech.com/ Dark Music: https://soundcloud.com/darknessprevailspodcast Soundstripe: https://app.soundstripe.com/ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Whiskey Straight Up
Interview with Lauren Patz of Redwood Empire

Whiskey Straight Up

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 61:28


On this episode Derek sits down with Lauren Patz of Redwood Empire. Lauren shares her journey from growing up in a family of winemakers to becoming one of the head distillers at Redwood Empire. Find out more about Redwood Empire and what they have coming out in the future.Get your official Whiskey Straight Up Glencairn: https://whiskeystraightup.com/shop/Get better help with BetterHelp! For 10% off your first month: https://betterhelp.com/whiskeystraightupFor 15% off AND FREE SHIPPING, use code "WHISKEYSTRAIGHTUP" @ http://www.liquid-iv.comView all our videos: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCUfOZSqSw1U2HGAy7Jz_uSgApple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/whiskey-straight-up/id1634977533Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/1ZOacL3PuxXxzoTnqxHYRjGoogle Podcasts: https://podcasts.google.com/feed/aHR0cHM6Ly9mZWVkcy5idXp6c3Byb3V0LmNvbS8yMDE2Nzk1LnJzcwiHeartRadio: https://www.iheart.com/podcast/269-whiskey-straight-up-99517397/Amazon Music: https://music.amazon.com/podcasts/39a0119f-da42-469f-a47c-b754105c3698/whiskey-straight-up?refMarker=null&Our website: https://whiskeystraightup.com/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/whiskeystraightupInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/whiskeystraightup/Twitter: https://twitter.com/wsureviews

For The Wild
SLOW STUDY: Bayo Akomolafe's We Will Dance With Mountains: Into the Cracks!

For The Wild

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022


This Slow Study Course is a series of lectures and practice prompts from Bayo Akomolafe's 2021 edition of "We Will Dance With Mountains: Into the Cracks!" wherein 1000+ people gathered. It is a carnivalesque course in postactivism, a matter of fissures, fault lines, cracks, openings, seismic shifts, endings, and fugitive marronage. This learning journey is available for you to explore from home at your own pleasurable pace. Visit our website at forthewild.world to learn more.

The Nonlinear Library
LW - Help out Redwood Research's interpretability team by finding heuristics implemented by GPT-2 small by Haoxing Du

The Nonlinear Library

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 6:06


Welcome to The Nonlinear Library, where we use Text-to-Speech software to convert the best writing from the Rationalist and EA communities into audio. This is: Help out Redwood Research's interpretability team by finding heuristics implemented by GPT-2 small, published by Haoxing Du on October 12, 2022 on LessWrong. Some of Redwood's current research involves finding specific behaviors that language models exhibit, and then doing interpretability to explain how the model does these behaviors. One example of this is the indirect object identification (IOI) behavior, investigated in a forthcoming paper of ours: given the input When John and Mary went to the store, Mary gave a flower to, the model completes John instead of Mary. Another example is the acronym generation task: given the input In a statement released by the Big Government Agency (, the model completes BGA). We are considering scaling up this line of research a bunch, and that means we need a lot more behaviors to investigate! The ideal tasks that we are looking for have the following properties: The task arises in a subset of the training distribution. Both the IOI and the acronym tasks are abundant in the training corpus of language models. This means that we are less interested in tasks specific to inputs that never appear in the training distribution. The ideal task can even be expressed as a regular expression that can be run on the training corpus to obtain the exact subset, as is the case for acronyms. The IOI task is less ideal in this sense, since it is harder to identify the exact subset of the training distribution that involves IOI. There is a simple heuristic for the task. For IOI, the heuristic is “fill in the name that appeared only once so far”. For acronyms, the heuristic is “string together the first letter of each capitalized word, and then close the parentheses”. Note that the heuristic does not have to apply to every instance of the task in the training distribution, e.g. sometimes an acronym is not formed by simply taking the first letter of each word. The gold standard here is if the heuristic can be implemented in an automated way, e.g. as a Python function, but we would also consider the task if a human is needed to supply the labels. GPT-2 small implements this heuristic. We are focusing on the smallest model in the GPT-2 family right now, which is a 117M parameter model that is frankly not that good at most things. We are moderately interested in tasks that bigger models can do that GPT-2 small can't, but the bar is at GPT-2 small right now. Examples The following is a list of tasks that we have found so far/are aware of. Induction and acronym generation remain the tasks that best meet all of the above desiderata. Induction: If the model has seen . A B . in the input, then it is more likely to output B immediately after A when encountering A again. A common use case of induction is remembering complicated names: T|cha|ik|ovsky . T| -> cha|ik|ovsky Acronym generation IOI Email address generation: Hi! My name is John Smith, and I work at Apple. My email address is -> johnsmith@apple.com Subject-verb agreement: The keys to the cabinet -> are and not is, even though the singular “cabinet” is also present in the prompt. (Credit to Nate Thomas) Incrementing citation numbers: Most metals are excellent conductors [1]. However, this is not always the case [ -> 2] (Credit to Lucas Sato) Variations of induction and IOI Extended IOI: identify the right person out of a group with more than two names Inferring someone's last name from name of relative dog_in_house.jpg”> (Credit to Rob Miles) Some examples that we are less excited about include: Closing doc strings, parentheses, etc Close variations of known examples We would love for interested people to contribute ideas! Below are some resources we put together to make the search as easy as possible: You can play with GPT-2 small here in a web app that we built specifically for investigating model b...

Radio Wave
On Air: Pražská kapela Orient vydala novou desku Redwood, elektroniku na ní mění za živé nástroje

Radio Wave

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 12:15


Pražská kapela Orient získala v roce 2017 cenu Vinyla v kategorii Objev roku, a to ještě předtím, než vydala dlouhohrající desku. Ta přišla až v následujícím roce. Na začátku letošního září vyslala do světa následovníka debutu, nové album Redwood. Na sedmi skladbách navíc nabízí kompletně odlišný zvuk. Experimentální elektroniku vyměnili členové Orientu za prog rock s celou paletou živých nástrojů.

For The Wild
LARK ELODEA on Appalachians Against Pipelines /308

For The Wild

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022


The Mountain Valley Pipeline, which runs through West Virginia to Virginia is on the verge of completion following intense legislative and legal battles. This episode reminds us of the danger in this, and amidst such battles, Appalachians Against Pipelines shows us what might be possible if we allow ourselves to imagine a world outside of extraction. Lark Elodea joins Ayana to discuss the relentless and direct activism Appalachians Against Pipelines has been doing to stop the pipeline, build community resistance, and advocate for the needs of their communities in the face of developers, oil and gas advocates, and a continued disregard for Appalachian voices. Lark roots the conversation in reverence for the land and the complex legacies of violence and oppression within it. Fighting against the pipeline is, as Lark says, “not only fighting for a world with no pipelines, but also no borders, or prisons or colonialism.” Our decisions here matter for communities and matter for the collective future we are building. Lark is a person of settler descent living in the beautiful mountains of Appalachia. They have been working with Appalachians Against Pipelines in the campaign resisting the 300+ mile Mountain Valley Pipeline for over 4 years, and have lived in the region for years longer. Lark is one of many, many pipeline fighters and water protectors and forest defenders contributing to the fight against reckless fossil fuel infrastructure and extraction (across Appalachia, across Turtle Island, and all over the world). Music by 40 Million Feet, Alexandra Blakely, Camelia Jade, and Cold Mountain Child. Visit our website at forthewild.world for the full episode description, references, and action points.

Rooted In Christ
We Have to Keep the Unity in the Church | The Rooted in Christ Podcast 008 | Sermon Series

Rooted In Christ

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 40:00


In this episode of The Rooted in Christ Podcast, we're doing something a little different. We're going to dive into a sermon that Redwood's founder, Eric Stephens, gave at New Life Church in Lakewood, Ohio. The sermon touches on why it's so vital that we as Christians Keep the Unity in the Church and in the body of Christ, and how we can go about doing it. We hope this message blesses you, and please share this with someone so we can strengthen the body of Christ! Be blessed, be encouraged! Support Redwood Christian Ministries: Click Here to Donate to Redwood Click Here For Our Website Click Here For All Other Social Media Links! --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/redwood-christian-ministries/support

Gratitude Blooming Podcast
Gentleness: Pouring with heart

Gratitude Blooming Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 49:41


Being there for each other. That's the code inspiration for bar owner and author Cedd Moses. He says, “It's not worth growing unless we can be there for each other.” He is on the path to redefine the hospitality industry with his bars and company Pouring with Heart, which is also the title of his new book: Pouring with Heart: The Essential Magic Behind the Bartenders We Love.This week we explore active listening, moving from technical skills to human skills and with Cedd Moses we are reminded of the aphorism that culture eats strategy for breakfast. His company is 450 people strong and his vision is to grow to 2,030 by 2030 based on values of lovingkindness. His book starts with this quote: "In the past, jobs were about muscles, now they're about brains, but in the future, they'll be about the heart." -Dame Minouche Shafik, London School of EconomicsScience also supports this heartfulness approach. Meditation leader Jack Kornfield shares that researchers like Richard Davidson have amassed evidence that measurable changes to our brain and nervous system occur ten times faster when heart practices like compassion and lovingkindness are incorporated with mindful attention.The flower for this podcast is inspired by the gardenia and the theme of gentleness. The art is an animated gif, which moves a soft pink circle into the black and white sketch of the gardenia. It creates the feeling of permeability and invites us to soften our edes. How would you interpret the art? We appreciate your support and help so we can bloom! Please take a moment to give us 5-stars and share a review.You can always email us at hello@gratitudeblooming.com. We want to hear from you!Check out the new Gratitude Blooming journaling notecards at www.gratitudeblooming.com.Find more about Cedd Moses here: https://www.pouringwithheart.com

95 Belleview
Fall In The Redwoods

95 Belleview

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 54:11


95 Belleview Podcast ・Season 2 Episode 33 ・Fall In The Redwoods - Jen and Sage talk about their busy schedules and life with a full schedule. - Keep up with us on our social media - Instagram // @95belleviewpodcast Email // 95belleviewpodcast@gmail.com

Teaching Your Brain to Knit
Ep. 141. Book Review of Behave; Knitting Pumpkins, Dishcloths and Shawls; Redwoods Skywalk

Teaching Your Brain to Knit

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 34:37


Brainy Thing: 15:45. Behind the Redwood Curtain. 25:45   What We're Learning from Our Knitting Margaret fulfills her multi-year goal of knitting some decorative mini-pumpkins, using Susan B. Anderson's Fall Harvest Charm Set https://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/fall-harvest-charm-set. Catherine completed her dishcloths for her Dishcloth exchange. She used the classic Ballband Dishcloth by Kay Gariner and Ann Shayne. https://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/ballband-dishcloth And despite her efforts to resist, Catherine is starting the Westknits MKAL 2022: Twists & Turns shawl.   Brainy Thing: The book Behave: The biology of Humans at our Best and Worst by Robert Sapolsky is five years old now but is chock full of information about human behavior and told is Sapolsky's witty style. Margaret reviews it.   Behind the Redwood Curtain: Catherine tells of her visit to the new Redwood Skywalk in Eureka's Sequoia Park, suspended 100 feet above the ground. https://www.redwoodskywalk.com/   Welcome to Episode 141 of Teaching Your Brain to Knit where we review highlights from the book Behave by Robert Saplosky, discuss learning from knitting pumpkins, dishcloths and a mystery shawl, and report on the new Skywalk among the Redwoods at Eureka's Sequoia Park.    

The Clean Energy Show
Rejecting and Embracing EV Charging in Rural North America

The Clean Energy Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 69:12


A small town in Alberta thinks solar panels give off radiation and won't allow an important fast charger be built. But a small Saskatchewan Co-op embraces electrifcation and kindness! Link to video version of the commercial we made for the Riverbend Co-op in Davidson, Saskatchewan to thank them for support electric vehicles. Small modular nuclear reactors will not solve climate change. Loblaws has deployed fully driverless trucks on city streets in Toronto. The upcoming Tesla Cybertruck will work as a boat for short periods of time. My first repair to my 10 year old Nissan LEAF The green community that survived Hurricane Ian and kept the lights on India's home-grown ten thousand dollar EV And in spite of supply chain constraints, EV sales are on track to where they need to by by their 2030 benchmark for global warming Brian and I welcome the long-awaited 3rd party charging to a much needed location where we live. And it has soft serve ice cream! Thanks for listening to our show! Consider rating The Clean Energy Show on iTunes, Spotify or wherever you listen to our show. Follow us on TikTok! Check out our YouTube Channel! Follow us on Twitter! Your hosts: James Whittingham https://twitter.com/jewhittingham Brian Stockton: https://twitter.com/brianstockton Email us at cleanenergyshow@gmail.com Leave us an online voicemail at http://speakpipe.com/cleanenergyshow Transcript Yesterday, the governor announced that all new cars purchased in New York State will be zero emission cars, which is what lawmakers in California mandated in our state last month. This will take effect starting in 2035, if we make it to 2035. And while it's never going to be the same when a cabbie's yelling you to go F yourself from a Nissan Leaf, it's definitely for the best. Hello, and welcome to episode 133 of the Clean Energy Show. I'm Brian Stockton. I'm James Woodtingham. This week, small modular nuclear reactors will not solve climate change. This in spite of the fact one powers Brian's $1700 expression machine. It was only 1400. Loblaws has deployed fully driverless trucks on city streets. In Toronto, there is still a human in the passenger seat. Just as a courtesy so other drivers have someone to give the finger to. We reveal the stupidest place in North America, and it's not wherever Donald Trump is. The upcoming Tesla Cyber truck will work as a boat for short periods of time. If it floats, maybe it can toss a lifeline to the Tesla stock price. Oh, all that admora this edition of the a Clean Energy Show. Brian, we also have this week my first repair. My knees are leaf. It's ten years old. And in spite of supply chain constraints, EV sales are back on track where they need to be by their 2030 benchmark for global warming targets. And Brian and I welcomed the long awaited third party charging to a much needed location where we live. And it has soft serve ice cream. Wow. I can give it the charging long charging sessions with lots of ice cream. All right, so update on my house. We spray foam the ceiling in our kitchen, and it was, like, super messy and dusty for about a week, but the drywallers have finished, so that's now all sealed up, well, drywallers. They have to keep coming back and back over and over again, don't they? Yeah. They don't have to spend a whole day. They come, they do some mudding, they have to let it dry, and they come back and sand do a bit more mudding. So the whole thing took about eight days, which wasn't too bad, but the kitchen was kind of closed off with sheets of plastic, and so we had kind of limited access to our kitchen, which was annoying, but that's now all done. And then next week, they're going to do the other half where the living room is, and so it continues. So we'll have a very wellinsulated ceiling, which is great. Did you eat out a lot? We did a lot of door dashing and that kind of thing. What's your favorite during that time period? Bar burrito. I'm a big fan of bar burrito. What kind of food is that? Mexican burritos and tacos. So what specifically did you eat? I need to know. Ground beef burrito. Ground beef burrito. Classic. Nothing too fancy. Nothing too unusual. But you're Taco Time fan, but you like that. Tell me about that. Yeah, I think, Barbara, it's a little bit more like real food, really. TacoTime is very fast foody kind of thing. But how much more expensive would you say it was? Not 20%. Maybe I should try it. They have multiple locations or just one? No, multiple locations. Let's do it. Barbaros well, we could use a sponsorship on the show, too. Please reach out. Barbarito. Oh, I have another one. Milu. Vietnamese place. It's been here a while, but I just discovered it. Fantastic. Vietnamese vermicelli, noodle bowls. Love it. Amazing. I guess we both got the Bivalent vaccine. Is that what's yeah, I had a lot of side effects. I might still be feeling that after a week. It was mainly one day, but I kind of felt good the second day. But then when I actually did something and then when I mean did something, I mean, go to the fridge or something, I didn't have a lot of stamina. Like, it wore down fairly quickly. It's a good thing I wasn't employed or something. Yeah. So yesterday we had wonderful news because we've talked about the two cities in the province where we live is Regina and Saskatoon. They're two and a half hours away. My son is up there now, coming back on Friday, and he's going to school there. We make lots of trips. You make lots of trips. You make more trips than most people do out there. And it's a great, stupidly great city. It's just I don't know if I've told this story before, but the ones I was doing a madly off in All Directions, a CBC radio comedy series, a one off where I was guesting on stage at the Broadway Theater in front of 500 people with my comedy partner. And we naively. We both grew up in Regina, the sister city kind of, to that city. And we said, we're from Regina, and the whole place booed us. Why? Why would they do that? I had no idea that they hated us just because we have the center of government here. I mean, they have everything else. And my assessment of the situation is the people in Saskatoon have a rivalry with Vagina, but the Regina people don't care. I've always considered them superior. Why would they care? Why would they not just pity us now? They're much bigger. When I was a kid, they were smaller than us. That's right. So the halfway point is a town called Davidson, Saskatchewan, and it got a Tesla V, three supercharger stalls a few years ago, right? Two or three years ago. Yeah, about three years ago, which changed life for Tesla's. People like you could easily go to Saskatoon and top up for the hell of it, or use it in very cold weather when your range is reduced and give you security. It was one of the reasons I bought my Tesla. Was it made that trip by there was no third party charger there for three years. And we've been begging everyone online. I've been Tweeting A and W who says there's these cluster of different businesses. There Tim Hortons, the Esso station, which is one thing at a Dairy Queen, and then there's a across the street there's an ANW, which I sometimes go to. You've gone to the and w, sure you've gone. You've probably done everything there. But up the road there's a Coop gas station, and that's where the supercharger is. That's kind of the Prairie Gas Station, one of the brands that also run grocery stores. So they have that. But they just announced yesterday that they're getting the flow charges, which are 100 kilowatt. Before, these gas stations had different branded chargers, which are 50 kilowatt. And they were always broken, like always. Yeah, the Coop branded ones, yeah. So apparently these flow chargers are, I'm told by the EV Association, a lot more rock solid because it's something we talk about on the show all the time, is the reliability of charging non Teslas like non Tesla charging networks are terrible. And I hear that all the time, especially in the States. It's no different. So I naively expressed regret online yesterday that I wished it was at the place where I go, which is the AEW, and I don't go to the Tim Hortons, but it seems like I might because I enjoy the Tim Hortons donut shop in return. And I found out that the EV people have been trying really hard for years behind the scenes to do something, and I'm not supposed to talk about what went on, but I'm very happy that the co op is in charge. Right, but I also made a joke online when I said that. Why isn't that this other place? They said, Are you disappointed? I said, I'm not disappointed. The Coop responded to me and said, Are you disappointed? I said, no, but I will be reviewing your pizza. Clearly they said they welcomed it. Then they offered to give me free pizza. But is it a review if they give you a free pizza? I mean, is it an honest review if you get something for free? I mean, as a clean energy food critic, I should be going in there in disguise or something. That's just the way it is. Yeah. Okay, well, this is great. I should add, too. So Tesla has finally made the CCS adapter available for tesla vehicles in north America. So 99% of the time, if you've got a Tesla, you're going to charge. It a Tesla station, and there's lots of them, but other cars use the CCS connector, and the adapter is finally available in North America. So if I were stuck some time and the Tesla supercharger wasn't working, I could get this adapter and charge at the flow or charge at the co op or whatever. Anyway, I went to order one online and it said, oh, sorry, your car can't use this yet. We're going to do a retrofit next year. So cars built before a certain date are missing something that the CCS adapter doesn't work. So my car was built just before that date. So sometime next year there'll be a retrofit available and then I'll be able to buy one. So they didn't sell it to me. They're probably trying to control the number of these that go out, and since they know that my car can't use it, they wouldn't sell it. How old is your model? Three? It's about two and a half years old. Two and a half years. Wow. Time flies. It's a quarter of a decade, Brian. Yeah, it really has. Yeah, I guess we had just started the podcast, I think. Oh, right, that's true. There was a couple of months into the pandemic and they did a touchless delivery to you. But I'm not done with the Riverband co op in Davidson because I asked them. I was in a discussion with my son who's going through there on Friday. As I said, if they have fresh donuts, because the co ops are known for great donuts at grocery stores, especially in small towns, they're somehow better in small towns like that. Yeah, for sure. My wife's not right is maybe the best owner sake one outside of the gourmet shop. So anyway, I asked them if they did and they said no. But for you, though, I can say we are discussing it. We are discussing it at the highest levels in the boardroom of the Davidson coop, whether to bring in fresh baking from the grocery store inside town. And I said, well, give us a heads up when you're passing through. At least we could do is get some donors to the grass bar for you. And everyone is just so happy that because without the co op, we would not have charging in Davidson, there was no other possibility to do it. No one willing to do it. So this is incredibly important to EV adoption for people who not only live near there, but live anywhere else, or you're traveling through the province in that direction. And so I'm incredibly grateful to them. And Matthew Pointer from the Sask EV association says this is arguably one of the most important charging locations in the province. So, Brian, what I did, I made them a commercial. Okay? I made the Riverband coop in Davidson a commercial because they deserve it. And here it is. Come to the Riverband Coop gas bar in beautiful Davidson, Saskatchewan, conveniently located on scenic highway eleven. Enjoy our pristine citrus, citrus washrooms as you stop to charge your Tesla, one of our lightning fast superchargers. And for our nontech industry friends, we are pleased to announce 100 kilowatt flow chargers coming in January. If you're still driving a gasguzzler, be assure that we here at coop sell only talk to your gasoline made to the highest Canadian standards. While you're here, satisfy your cravings with fresh cut veggies and sandwiches lovingly made at our grocery store just for you. Or twist it up with a smoothie by mixing a slushy soft drink of your choice with ice cream. Why pee anywhere else? The River Band. Coop in Davidson. More than a gas bar to heavenly oasis on a long road home. This commercials have improved by riverbank Coop flow charges 23 no responsible price screen trips on your floor of the seats. Very nice. So there you go. Free commercial for the Riverband Coop. Put that online, too, in video form. Thank you, Riverband Coop, for being good people. Yeah. And Davidson, Saskatchewan, they still have a newspaper as of a couple of years ago, and they were having a contest to give away the newspaper. I don't know if you remember that I considered, yeah, and you're supposed to write a letter and whoever writes the best letter would get the newspaper. I don't know what ever happened with that. Maybe somebody knows. We'll have to Google. We have a lot of local people listening. Okay, another personal news. The Leaf I had to take in to get fixed because I determined for a long time now, almost a year, that I had this tire noise. And I thought it was because my original tires were wearing out, they were becoming bald, and I thought, okay, no trad, they're becoming noisy, bought new tires, but they were cheap. They were half the price of the tires that you're supposed to buy. And so I thought, okay, well, it's a bit better, but it's still pretty noisy, and then I get noisier noiser. So I determined through online sleuthing that it's my bearings, my wheel bearings on my front left wheel, and because it gets noisier when you steer in one direction than the other. So I did that. But there's no place my Nissan dealership doesn't service EVs. And I looked up on how to do this repair, and you do have to kind of take one of the EV motor drive components out of the wheel hub, because it's a whole not just the actual little tiny bearing, but whole hub of bearings that has to be replaced, any specialized torque tools in order to do this. And I considered it, but then I thought, no. And anyway, I got the price from a place called okay Tire on Park Street in Regina. Because they are certified, they actually sent their people away to the United States to get training in servicing EVs and hybrids. Whereas the one Nissan dealership we have here and even several around us don't do they're not certified to do TVs. Even though Nissan sells the Leaf for well, minecar is ten years old, and twelve years ago they started selling them. So it was frustrating, but I took it there on the advice of others, and I wasn't happy with how it went because it's $1,400 for the front two hubs. And I thought it was just one hub, but they say, oh, no, the other one's going to be making noise as well. And also they charge you, like, $200 just to diagnose things. Okay. Right. It could be $200 to diagnose it. But then they diagnose everything on your car and get a big print out to make sure that everything else is okay. And they don't need to spend money fixing it out of your money. So that's complimentary. But the diagnose the problem is up to $200. So it's just BS. And I hate dealerships, and I can't afford it. So I'm in a pickle because my kid, my youngest, is going on a trip, a school trip to Quebec because we sent the first one. And as soon as we send the first one somewhere and my wife, by the way, wanted to set up the Uruguay was it Ecuador or Ecuador? To the ecological things out there. And I said, we do this. It's twice as much as you think it is because we have to send the other kid. There's no way of not sending the other kid. It doesn't work that way. So whatever you do for one, you do for the other. And so we're doing that for her now, and we have to get her to raise money. But they don't raise very much. And it's got to be a hard, economical year. Bad timing. That's too bad. And I'm giving away free commercials to cooperate anyhow that's that the car is supposed to be done. The beautiful thing is I've lost the EV joy because it's noisy. It's not giving me the luxury. And I can't wait. I can't wait, Brian, to get that back. But I also have to get more work done on the later. It's all related to tie rods and ball joints and stuff like that. And they send you a little video clips, part of their app to do that, to show you the wiggle. It's always great when you can spend money and really notice a difference. Like, that at least makes you feel better about it. Like our ceiling in the kitchen, it costs a fortune to do that. And all it does is look like it's supposed to. All it does is look like a ceiling. You don't get any satisfaction of it suddenly somehow being better. Right. It just doesn't lease. Now, this is hopefully something that I will just fall in love with again. But I started to fall out of love with car ownership because it's been a long time since I had to deal with car repairs because we've bought new cars. And the Leaf I've had for five years, and I haven't done anything to it. Like, it's just there's no oil to change. There's nothing to break down. I did buy the new tires a year ago, but other than that, I haven't done anything. How many kilometers on it? About 115 or something like that. It doesn't have fast charging. It was a rock bottom price. So it's only been a city car for anyone. But my family has been asking me, how long do I think it's going to go? And I don't see it not going indefinitely. Like I said, I don't have any reason to believe it won't go indefinitely. But if you don't do the tie rods or something, then maybe the tires are going to wear out. Well, the car could crash, things like that. One of the wheels could go. I've seen people do this on the roads. The wheel just goes all the way to one way and you get it towed. I won't be using it on the highway, let's put it that way. So, yeah, it's frustrating. And I can see the joy of maybe a subscription service to a robot taxi one day where you pay $20 a month and you never have to worry about car repairs because that is the biggest pain in the butt. That's why people buy newer cars. No, that's the future for sure. I mean, yeah, that's so much simpler. I've been talking about the pipeline plane that flies over my house. And then we got into it and I mentioned that there was a crash 13, 2013. And then there was one between our last two episodes of our podcast. Well, curiously, there's been no pipeline plane since that crash. So I got to feel weird about that because I feel like I have a connection with them because I'm in the mespeedo floating in the pool. God knows we've had some intimate contact. You've never seen me in my Speedo. These people have, and now they're gone. They're perished. So I just feel or maybe they've rounded pipeline planes or I don't know. But on the other hand, on the flip side, who's looking at my pipeline to see if it's not being inspected? Yeah. So that's kind of concerning for me as well. So here's a bit of trivia for you. In the year my Leaf was made, 2013, 130,000 EVs were sold globally that whole year. Brian yeah. Now more than that are being sold every week in the world. And that road, of course, is expanding rapidly. That's fantastic. That's great to hear. So my Leaf is like almost I've seen it referred to in videos on YouTube now by car reviewers as kind of like the Model T of EVs because it was the first mass produced it was produced even before Tesla's Model S. It was really the first mass produced EV in the world. So it's iconic, maybe worse, something someday. And I wanted to get to some updates to some stories that we've covered in the past. And we were talking about hurricanes in Florida and Will Walker in Florida. He was happily charging his allelectric Chevy bolt at a gas station charger while all the gas pumps were roped off, not because of electricity. The gas station was on a gas? Yes. And you can't just snap your fingers and get more gas in when there's a hurricane. So these places and we found this in the maritimes of Canada when Hurricane Fiona went through a couple of weeks ago. Gas stations are out of gas because everybody wants their generator running and everything. Right. Well, this is another reason gas stations don't operate with electricity during these situations, but they often don't operate when they do have electricity because they are out of gas. But he had electricity there and he was happily charging away. So he says, I can't count all the times that people ask me about what do you do when the power goes out? So it's just a joke to people who own TVs. Yeah. The New York Times, Florida, the post hurricane here, Jerry Jewelsk waited for about 6 hours to fill up for cans of gas. He was frustrated. Where is all the fuel? He asked. Every gas station or filling station was supposed to, under Florida law, have a generator prepared to go at all times. But that did not happen. Wow. In a news conference a couple of Saturdays ago, mr. DeSantis, or Satan, as I like to call him, said 1.6 million gallons of fuel had been removed pardon me? Had been moved to southwest Florida. But he acknowledged that some stations may not have had the electricity to operate their pumps. I'm laughing if you're in Florida, I'm not laughing at you. I'm laughing at the whole freaking idea and stupid things that happen. You need both. You need the fuel and you need the electricity. And on the electric car side, you just need the electricity. We've been talking about India a lot over the course of our podcast episodes, and we have concerns over the air quality and how great it would be for EVs to move in there. Well, Tata Motors, one of India's largest vehicle manufacturers, has announced a new Made in China pardon me, a new Made in India electric five door hatchback starting around $10,000 US. And it only has a 19.2 kilowatt hour battery with only 3.2 charging. That's kind of what my car is now. Started at 24. That's kind of your leaf range and charging speed. Look at this. It's supposed to have a range of 250 km. Yeah, well, I've made improvements since your car was made. Well, I'm thinking A is pretty darn light and it may not have an airbag and seatbelts or high tension steel or anything to protect the person. I don't know. I'm being kind of cynical about it. Yeah, but as we talked about, there's a lot of, like, two stroke engine vehicles in India. Small mopeds and motorcycles and stuff like that. And those things cause extra pollution. So if those kind of small vehicles, which is what this is going to sort of replace, can go electric, this will go a long way to improving the air quality in India. So for around 14, 500, US. Drivers can upgrade to a 24 kilowatt hour battery. That is what my car wasn't doing. But 315 range and 7.2 kilowatt charging, which is twice my car now. So that's I don't know, man. Maybe I should go to Indian, buy a car. Parts will be hard to get. Yeah. So driverless trucks in Toronto, we have reported on this before, but there's sort of more updates for it. So there are level four autonomous trucks, which began in August after the Ministry of Transportation approved them after a big audit. So this is Lablaws, the grocery chain from Canada, and they've got five routes going between Labs retail stores and a micro fulfillment center. So you can order your groceries online, go to this place, and pick them up. And this appears to be moving the groceries from the stores to this pickup center. So they've got five routes and five trucks. They are now driving fully autonomously. They do still have a human driver in the passenger seat. I'm not sure why he doesn't just sit in the driver's seat just in case they're showing off, but they say they have a safety record so far. This has been going on for quite a while now. And the person in the passenger seat is just there kind of as a courtesy. And also from feedback from the police department and the fire department, who said in case they need to pull the truck over, they wanted a human to interact with. And that does make sense. And of course, these are electric, and they can charge at sort of both ends of their trip, and that's what they do. And they're planning to expand this to something like 15 trucks in the near future. So, yeah, level four autonomous trucks. So this is Geofenced. They can only go on these specific routes. They couldn't just snap their fingers and expand this to other markets or other cities. They've carefully mapped out these routes. And the trucks take the same routes every day, but still quite remarkable that it is totally working. And they've driven tons of miles with these things, and 100% safe so far. Teller me surprised. I'm actually quite surprised by that, especially if you told me it was Los Angeles docks or something, I would believe you. But I'm surprised it's Toronto. Yes, Toronto streets can be kind of busy and crazy. That's an understatement. And some of the worst streets, worst traffic in North America. But you just start thinking about the math for this in terms of business. So not only are you saving on fuel because it's electric instead of gasoline or diesel, and then saving on the driver. And just imagine, as this slowly rolls out and expands, the amount of money that can be saved by so many businesses. Expect your grocery prices to go down, thanks to freedom of energy in the world like that. And I do use their service in our city. It's PC Express. How's that work? It works well. You order online, you pick up. We have had it delivered one time. All right. I have an update from the International Energy Agency and EVs are now at 13% of all new car sales globally this year. That's world market share. That's fantastic. I didn't know we were there yet. That is an inflection point, Mr. Stockton. We are toying with inflection rates here. It's doubled since last year, so that has not been happening. It's taken more than two years to double. A little bit more than two years. But now doubling in a year is not two years. So it's like 1718 months or something. Something weird like that. Like a year and a half. But now it's a year and we are on track. According to the IEA of reaching when they did the Paris Climate Accord, we need to do this, this and this to reach our climate targets. While the number of EVs on the road by 2030 was a checkpoint goal and they have saying that we are on track for it, in fact, we're better than on track. Areas not on track include improving the energy efficiency of building designs, developing clean and efficient district heating. That's when you hit like a heat. A neighborhood with one heating system phasing out coal powered generation. That's a little behind. Eliminating methane flaring, shifting aviation and shipping to cleaner fuels and making cement, chemical and steel production cleaner. That's from CNBC. Yes. So the transportation sector doing well. These other sectors, not so well. Yeah, but it's encouraging because we live in a place where there's so much cynicism about EVs that it's always good to see these stories. Yeah, that's great. All right, we have several Tesla stories this week. The first was, of course, they had AI day 2022, where they had a big presentation, basically a recruitment event. They're trying to convince people to come work for Tesla and work on their artificial intelligence stuff. They demonstrated the prototype of the Tesla bot. I didn't watch the whole thing because it was like three or 4 hours long. I watched a condensed 20 minutes version. So the robot doesn't do that much. So the stock market and casual observers were not for you. Was the robot more human than Elon Musk? Yes, it was okay. But I don't know if you had any thoughts about the Tesla bought. I do, and I did watch a lot of it. And I came away feeling pretty negative about Tesla and Musk and AI because there was nothing major announced. The robots didn't impress a lot of people because who's the company? I can't remember. The Boston Dynamics. Boston Dynamics. Who's been making those robots that flip and dance and they seem like years ahead. They're not humanoid, but do we need what is the need of having a humanoid robot rather than. Being creepy. I don't care what the thing looks like that does my dishes. It can look like a scorpion for all I care. Just do my dishes, you stupid robot, and answer my door and brush my teeth. Well, I think it's the same principle behind, like, what they're doing with selfdriving in the car. Like, the idea behind the Tesla selfdriving car is to replicate the humans. So humans drive with eyes in a brain. So Tesla's taking that approach with their car cameras and a computer eyes and a brain in the car. So my feeling would be that since the world is designed for humanoid form, that that's the most useful form for somebody who's going to do work. Well, are you going to test an FSD Beta Tesla robot in your home and hope it doesn't break your dishwasher handle? Sure, if they want to send me one, I'll take the interesting thing is they think that one day they'll sell them for $20,000. Seems low. I don't know. Does it? Brian, does the $35,000 model three seem low to you? That never happened. It was sold for, like, a couple of weeks, I think. Yeah, and very frustrating. Why announce these things? You have to have faith in their AI software for cars. We're not at that point yet. We're having a lot of faith because things are dragging on so slowly. It's just a super long process. So this stuff is potentially decades away. So what bothered me about the event was they invited all their Internet fanboys to it, so it became like a Tesla event. Oh, you're God, present your genitals. I wish to photograph them. This is stupid. I just hate that stuff. But the whole point of the event was to recruit because they want to bring on people to recruit. They need the best and AI people to develop this product. It's a recruiting day, so why invite all the fanboys? I guess you get some free advertising that way. But it just seemed I don't know, I'm pretty cynical about this, and I'm pretty cynical about Mr. Musk, who has decided, apparently, to buy Twitter. Yeah, it sounds like that's going through. Yeah, and I'm not happy about that. I'm not. I'm not happy at all. I mean, Twitter's not golden, but I need somewhere to go, Brian. I can't go on Facebook. It's not safe. It's killing the world. And now he's got to put what's his name back on there, the former POTUS. And why am I going to hurricane have killed him? Why is it killing his people? See him floating away on a piece of rock anyway? I don't understand. I'm worried. I'm worried about the world. And the world was quieter. It was quieter without him on it, and now he's going to be on it and all these horrible voices of conspiracy and BS. I don't know. I'm not happy with Musk. I mean, Musk is the guy I doubt for saving the world because he puts a cyber truck on stage, smashes the window, and suddenly Ford is releasing electric trucks a couple of years later. Right. I mean, they're in dealerships say they're at dealerships around our province, even a lot of them have moved here, I'm told. But kudos to Ford for actually making some vehicles because the Amaqui is like, I think, the number two selling electric vehicle in North America. No, there's actually some EVs in stock around us, and it's mostly like the Mustang and the F 150. So, yeah, the needle has moved. And I guess we're at 13%. We're at a near time where they say they have the stock and they don't actually have it. It's coming in. It's like it's coming into somebody who's ordered it. So unless somebody canceled their order and somebody did cancel their order for Chevy Bolt, but it was an older one and I didn't want to take it, people were pointing me towards that. But yeah, I'm told there's a year wait list, but I mean, even that's not bad for a truck. But I don't know. Megapack is arriving in Hawaii, and I just wanted to mention this, mostly because we had reported on the final shipment of coal going to Hawaii a few weeks ago. The last shipment of coal for their coal fired electricity plant, which they're going to close down. Well, it turns out at pretty much the same time, a whole whack of Tesla Megapack batteries were delivered to Hawaii. Hawaii's got an aggressive goal to get off fossil fuels. I think they've got some time. I think it was like 2045. They're going to be 100% green. I have a feeling they might be able to do it sooner than that. But they have tons of solar. Hawaii has the highest amount of solar deployed per capita, and they just need more batteries. And they are on their way to 100% clean energy, which is great. Yeah. You don't hear about non Tesla companies making power packs. I know they exist because they do exist. Yeah, they're putting some up around us. I don't know who's making them, though. We don't hear about who's making them. I don't know. I mean, the main battery makers are probably making them, like LG and what's the other one? Panasonic? Yeah. Or CATL. Yeah. I have heard other brands and their storage solutions, I just don't know off the top of my head. Well, that's something to look forward to. It's pretty cool that Hawaii can do that. And most people disregard batteries. I say this all the time. They poopoo them like you can't power. I know it seems far fetched because there's like thousands and tens of thousands and millions of little AA sized almost batteries, right? That power a grid. Come on. That's science fiction. But they are doing it and it works. And it meets the power fluctuations and saves them money. Instantly saves the money. If you're a casual observer, it probably seems absurd, but to the casual observer, I often hear hydrogen as the solution. But solar wind and batteries, as we often say, that's all you need. It is all you need. Not for maybe airliners and stuff like that, but for a lot of things. And the cybertruck musk has been talking about the cyber truck as well. Yeah, I guess, prompted by the recent hurricanes and flooding in Florida, that the cyber truck will travel temporarily as a boat for approximately 1100ft. Really? Yeah, it'll operate as a boat tweeted that's enough to get through a flooded underpass. Yeah. So we have seen this before, like with regular teslas and flooded underpasses that they can do fairly well getting through. We did a guy in the EV association who flooded his car in saskatoon and other claims, big fat insurance claim, battery gone, ruined his battery. So it's certainly and it's not an advertised feature, but this is now technically an advertised feature of the cyber truck that it can operate as a boat for a short period of time. So presumably they're just thinking about this more. I don't imagine they were thinking about it too much with the cars. But now that they know that the cars are fairly waterproof, they've, I guess, done a little bit of extra work and, you know, cyber truck will float for a while. Well, the rivian r 150 pickup truck, the all electric pickup truck from them, it was supposed to do a meter and a half of water, and they didn't say for how long, but they said anymore, and it floats. So they didn't want it to float floating back. Yeah, because then you lose control there. Yeah. Well, what do you do in the cyber truck? Do you take out a paddle? I mean, what do you do? I'm not sure, but they often show it with those big knobby tires. So it's possible the big knobby tires would give you a little bit of traction and steering. Give me the aqua tread when you're ordering tires, like summer all season and water. Well, there was that water aqua car. Somebody in town owns one from, like, in the 50s. Somebody made a car that works in the car? Yes. It's a convertible, right? Yeah, it's a convertible. Somebody in town owns one and every once in a while drives it in our local lake, which is saying a lot. You go down there, you're a dead person. Because it's nasty water. Yeah. So it has technically been done before. I don't know. Maybe they could add a little propeller on the back of that because that's what the aqua car has, like the one from the 50s. It has a little propeller at the back for one. Floating in the car. That would be an option, I suppose. Maybe you could outboard it to your trailer hitch or something and just sort of put a propeller on back there. Yeah, that would be great. Well, I wanted to talk about it over small nuclear reactors because CBC had an article on it and there's been well, there's always lots of stuff, and I'm always reading from people. I'm not against it. It's just not realistic. People love the new solutions. We'll solve climate change with this. This is great. I saw a video on it. I saw six videos on it. It's great. It's not great because they don't exist. You can't go to Walmart and buy one. You can go to Walmart and buy a solar panel. You can go to Walmart and buy a battery. You can go to Walmart and even buy a wind turbine in some stores. Come on. What we have is all we need. And I'm not saying other things aren't good, but if they cost ten times as much for one unit of electricity, and if you don't need them, then why are you wasting your time on it? Because our government, another government, and the Ontario government as well, are investing, and they're going to waste all our money in these damn things, putting money into it, and it's also just delaying climate action. Yeah. So here's something. This is Suzanne O'Donnell. She is an adjunct professor at the University of New Brunswick and St. Thomas University also works with a coalition for responsible energy development. And she has been researching SMR specifically during the last two years. And she was asked, what do you think of Saskatchewan and your province looking at building a small modular nuclear reactor? She says there's a huge leap she says diplomatically, there's a huge leap between having a design for an SMR and then getting to the point of having an engineer design where you can actually apply for a license to build one. The most advanced design for an SMR in the US is called New Scale, and they've spent almost a billion dollars on the engineered design, and they just got a license to build it. It's another huge leap between building a prototype that might actually work in a laboratory to getting one that actually commercially works in the real world. Why then, she was asked, with four provinces be looking at them? And she says, I'd have to say that the decisions around SMRs, at the federal level and certainly at the provincial level, where they're all conservative provinces, are political decisions rather than based on science. From reading peerreviewed science in three different countries, canada, the US. And the UK. It really doesn't make any economic sense. However, what we have happening here is very, very powerful industry, the nuclear industry, that has a long history in Canada, and they have been lobbying like crazy to get these things off the ground, because unfortunately, nuclear power hasn't been very successful financially, especially lately. So in New Brunswick, the Point La Puerto reactor has been a financial disaster for the province, has put US $3.6 billion in debt. And that's what we have to look forward to in our province because of idiots. I don't want any more debt. I don't want to know we got enough debt. My God. But making stupid decisions because you want to put off the climate action and not make the woke left happy, then you gotta do what you gotta do and waste all taxpayers money and then you drive the provinces of the ground. So I'm mad about that. Mad, mad, mad. So it's just bad. I don't like it. Okay, so I've got a story here from CP 24, which is a news outlet in the Toronto area of Canada. I thought this, it reminded me of the Apple story that we mentioned a couple of days ago that Apple is working on software for their phones that will sort of calculate the cleanest time of the day to charge your phones. I don't know, there's just a lot of activity around smartening up the grid. And so what they're going to do in Ontario is pay some customers to run their air conditioning less as part of an investment in energy efficiency program. So they're going to have networked smart thermostats in people's homes that can literally be controlled remotely by the power utility. So when they have these days when the grid is strained and everybody's air conditioning is cranked up, if you've agreed to be part of this program, you have one of these smart meters, they're going to creep up the temperature in your house, take away some of your nice cooling airflow from your air conditioner. And if you've got enough homes in this program and enough people willing to do it, and they will pay you to do it, like there's an incentive to do it, they'll give you some money for this. They will just turn up your thermostat a couple of degrees and you'll use less electricity for your air conditioning. And the more of these kind of smart grid strategies we can come up with, the more we can weather these coming storms of power supply as we kind of transition over into all clean energy. Well, again, I'm surprised. I'm surprised that Ontario is doing that. And it's very interesting. It would be interesting to see how it goes, what they learned from that. It reminds me of the summer heat wave in California where they texted people or an emergency alert and they responded, and they responded in times when they turned down the power because they said, if you don't, then we're going to have a power outage. I would rather have some power and maybe a couple of degrees warmer in my house than no power at all. And that's another great tool to have. But just imagine if somebody at the California Power Commission just has a switch where they can just turn up everybody's air conditioning. Like just imagine how that would drop the power going to the grid, like instantly. I'm not sure what some people would like the government coming to their homes. But you get paid for it. But you get paid for it, so you're compensated for it, that's the thing. But this is kind of the future that when we talk about smart grids, we are also talking about homes where we can suck a little bit of juice out of your EV for ten minutes just to balance the grid. And you get paid for that more than what it costs you to put it in. So, yeah, there's all kinds of different things and if this is one of those methods, then cool. No, and there was some progress on that in the US. They introduced the Bidirectional Act, it was introduced in the US Senate to promote electric school buses feeding into the grid. So I don't think this is all kind of fully plat passed or anything, but as they expand to electric school busses, they're trying to work this into the infrastructure where all of these school buses can feed into the grid. So it's nice to have some actual legislation to support that. Coming up in the show is the lightning Round, where we speed through the week's headlines in fast format. Brian, I've got a surprise new segment for you this week. What it's called? The Tweet of the week. Oftentimes I see a great tweet that I'd like to highlight on the show. Yeah. This is until I leave Twitter next week, so it could be a very shortlived segment. Here it is. It says, you know, who isn't in denial about climate change? The entire insurance industry. There will be entirely uninsurable areas of the populous places near coast sooner than you think. This is from MMA, who works in the real estate industry and was reteeded by many of my climate follows on Twitter. It's something I think about a lot in Florida, of course, top of mind because of the recent hurricane, but Florida, so many low lying areas in Florida and you just got to wonder when the real estate prices are going to hit the wall and people are going to have to retreat it. That hasn't happened yet, as far as I know. But, yeah, certainly I think there is already some places that are uninsurable in flood prone areas and the insurance industry doesn't mess around. I know because my life insurance just went up last week, tripled for some reason, because they saw you eating a box of donuts and they're like, damn it, they heard me talking about Davidson Gas Station donuts and just bingo. So my other tweet that I was considering has something to do with a politician down there saying, well, we will rebuild. And the other person said, Why? Yeah, why would you rebuild a place that's destroyed by a hurricane? You think it's not going to happen again? I mean, these happening, they're happening more frequently and more importantly, more powerfully and slower moving and more damaging. The same hurricanes because of climate change. Brian, we got a whole host of feedback this week. Sometimes the mailbag empty, dust bunnies fall out, nothing there, you know? And then sometimes it just rains, rains feedback. So I wanted to dip into it. Here's an email, says, hey, guys, big fan of the show from Martinsburg, West Virginia, USA. Not all of us in mumf, Egypt, are as narrow minded as our former commander in Cheeto when it comes to the environment. I can't swear on the show. You see, if I swear on the show, I have to change it to explicit. That's a whole lot of paperwork. I can't do that. So I just got an email from my power company asking if I was interested in enrolling in a new program they are starting up, which seems to be a solar collective. Do you think these types of programs the page is very vague. Have a place in the future for those who can't afford or non solar friendly areas like us? Cheers to here in Mendez. Now, I looked at it and basically, if your household uses X amount of kilowatts per month, you pay extra to have solar, to have clean power. Now, this is something that we did here 1215 years ago in my old house. Yeah, I would pay for extra money for clean energy credits. And we had wind back then and only when basically still do for the most part, and a small amount of wind. And of course, they sold out. So they stopped the program. They couldn't do it anymore, or that was their excuse. But you could pay a little bit extra on your power bill every month and know that you were getting clean power. Right, but here's my point. Clean power is cheaper than regular power. Yeah, right. And they want to charge you. Shitloads, sir, I swore crap loads of money more. It's like $40 a month extra just to have clean power, which is cheaper to them than it is the coal power or whatever. Like in West Virginia, solar is going to be incredibly cheaper than coal. It's displaced coal as the cheapest form of electricity by far. So my question is, where will the solar facilities be located? So they plan to build, own and operate five solar facilities located within West Virginia on property owned by the power company or its affiliates. They include a 26 acre reclaimed ash disposal site, a 51 acre adjacent to the power substation, 27 acres of retired ash disposal site. This is all coal terminology that I'm not familiar with, even though we do have coal mines here. So, yeah, they're reclaiming all this land from coal and putting solar panels on it and then charging people extra. Do you have any thoughts on this? My thought is the typical. It says for little $2 a month, but nobody uses 50 month. And my garden shed used more than that. You're more likely to spend over $40 a month to have clean electricity for that money. I think there's places that will. Sometimes if they let you put solar on your roof, you can lease solar for your roof and for like the same price as electricity, you're not paying anything extra. And then eventually, I think you make extra money. Yeah, it's going to be different. In every province, state, every city, it's going to be different. I know around here there is one or two solar cooperatives, and that's mainly for people who live in apartment buildings. So you don't necessarily have access to a roof that you can put solar panels on. So a bunch of people can get together and spend like, $100,000 on a solar farm somewhere. And basically, you live in an apartment. You can buy a share in that, and just everybody owns a piece of the action, and it feeds into the grid, and you get your benefit from your share of the thing. Whether this particular one makes any sense, I don't know. But certainly people should look into this wherever they live. Well, shout out to Mornsburg, West Virginia. And Mr. Mendez. Thanks for writing us. We really appreciate it. So here's another one. Good evening, gentlemen. My name is Landon Yereski, and I discovered your show earlier this year as listening material while taking our newborn for walks to fall asleep, which is interesting, Brian, because I always wonder what people do when they listen to our shows. I remember my first podcast in the very early days of podcasting in the early 2000s. Somebody said that they listened to me on the subway in Australia, and it blew my mind. It's like, wow, there's somebody doing that to my little show. Like, wow. Yeah. Community and of course is a popular thing, but taking your newborn out for walks to fall asleep, hadn't thought of that one, you know? By the way, I listen to podcasts to fall asleep when I want to have a nap sometimes. Ours, it's not that they're boring. The more interesting they are, the more I can focus my mind on something and then drift off. Right. They can't be too boring. That works for me, too. Yeah, it's got to be something to focus my mind. So I have been listening weekly ever since. He says the content is fantastic. And given I also live in the same city you do, I find all the commentary very relatable. Now he says I'm a business owner, and that piqued my interest, Brian. So I Googled his name, and it came up with his LinkedIn page and found out that he owns my favorite pot shop, Wid w I ID it's actually on the other end of the city from me. They have a great online portal, okay. And they have a whole craft load of inventory of all kinds of different things. And you can order it and pick it up in your leaf you're cartastic. And little did I know that the pot shop that I've been supporting supports green energy. That's great. And we're always looking for sponsors. Remember, everyone got free beer. The first plug is free. Brian made a joke. Okay, so he's also a board member of the Saskatchewan Electric Vehicle Association, something I reference here a lot. And he says, I love to use the insight on your show to help align my business with sustainable goals and get insight for the association. A fellow board member recently sent me this article I thought would be a great discussion point on your show, and it is, from Airdry today. Now, Airdri is a little city north of Calgary, the big mega city of Calgary, Alberta. I wouldn't call it a mega city, but it's a big city. Millions of people, he says a Rocky Mountain. I think it's a great discussion that could be had regarding NIMBYism, which is I had to look that up. Not in my backyard ism and fudd. You want to explain what fudd is again? Fear, uncertainty and doubt. That is things that people put around misinformation and bad information about new technologies to discourage either investment or adoption. And especially in this changing world that people are uncomfortable with how fast things are changing. The fact that that municipality rejected tens of millions in investment and permanent jobs due to false information is astounding. Keep up the good work. Now, the story is about somebody who wanted to pull up a charging station, much like we were talking about, because it's between two major cities, calgary and Emmetton. Just like that corridor needs lots of charging with people going back and forth. Ours does between Regina and Saskatoon. And this town also ran into problems because they didn't want anything to do with the charging station. Now they claim the problem with the charging station. I'll read you an excerpt. Okay, this is from the story objections raised because they wanted to put a solar installation with it, which is a business decision for them, because you supply electricity for someone, you want the cheapest electricity wholesale, right? That is what it is. So you build a little solar farm for your charging station, for your highway supercharging station. But the objections raised were more to do with the solar than the EV chargers. Apparently. He says objections raised included potential noise concerns with the cooling plant associated with the proposed solar farm, which is absurd. A person's air conditioner in their home is less noisy than that, and it's certainly closer to people than that would be increased vehicular traffic on highway 72. The solar farm would have increased traffic. I guess people going to see the solar farm or people going to charge their EVs next one taking farmland out of production. This is something that is coming up a lot lately, which is of course, crap. If the farmer wants to take his damn farmland out of production, he can, or she can. But you could also do mixed use. Farmers don't use every square inch of their land. Sometimes they have little bits of land that they mold with garden tractors that they could put up a huge installation on. And some more speculative complaints about the potential radiation hazards of building such a facility in close proximity to people living in the area. Rocky View, County Alberta you are officially the stupidest place on earth. So is that like solar radiation? Like everyone's going to get a suntan? Is that what they're saying? If I knew, I'd be in pain. You think you've heard it all? You think you've heard all the stupidest things that were people get passed around on Facebook. It's just utter BS. And by the way, whenever there's somebody like this, whenever there's people like this, they're always racist. You know, if you're stupid in one way, you're probably a racist too. So screw you. Rocky View, County Alberta. Get off the planet. Go somewhere else. Elon's, got a place for you on Mars. Lots of radiation up there. And Brian, I hope you're sitting down because we've got a rare voicemail click from our speak pipe page. Can you believe it? What? I cannot believe it. I thought that we should stop doing the speak pipe because nobody was calling. Well, I crossed my mind too, but this is Sean in Ireland. Hi. It's Sean from Ireland. Dublin, Ireland. Just want to say we love the show, love listening to it every Wednesday when it comes out. There is two big announcements in Ireland in the last few weeks regarding solar. Is no planning permission needed. Now, if you have solar panels on your roof before, if you wanted solar panels on your roof, you have to get planning permission. And there's been houses where people put up solar panels didn't get planned permission. The government made them take them down. So now you don't need plan permission. And also they've announced that they are going to give schools free solar panels so school supplies, and if they're suitable, they will get the price of the solar panels covered 100% by the government. Thanks, that's fantastic. I mean, that's crazy, right? Why isn't everybody doing that? We often ask questions like that. Schools, perfect place for solar panels, but giving them to them and then what do they do with the savings? They can put more money to music programs and educating your damn children. Yeah. I will say the high school right next to me where I went to high school, they've actually had solar panels on their roof for about 20 years now. And it was because I think some students and maybe a teacher or two were interested in the technology and they realized it was a good learning experience. So it was about 20 years ago, so they would have been much lower powered solar panels. But still, they've been generating power over there for 20 years and educating kids, and they could probably. Look up the doohickies to see what the sun is doing and probably be aware that solar panels generate electricity and cloudy days, for example. Yeah. And so also, the other thing Sean brought up is we got to get rid of the red tape involved in installing solar clean energy of all kinds. This is a climate emergency. We got to move fast. We got to make all this stuff as easy as possible. Now, Sean, we're so thankful that we said that. We would wish you a happy birthday on your birthday. So let us know when your birthday is, and if not, happy birthday in advance. Thank you, Sean. Yeah. I appreciate it. It's lovely to hear your voice and we'd love to hear from you. Contact us at cleanenergy show@gmail.com or on Twitter. We're on TikTok for now. Clean energy pod. Is our handle there? Don't forget to check out our YouTube channel for special features. Leave us a voicemail like Sean did@speakpipe.com. Cleanenergyshow. It's time for the lightning round, Brian. We have to whizz through this one quickly and it's a fat one, so it's going to be a challenge to get through. This is a fast paced look at the week and clean energy news. California becomes the first state to commit to ending the sale of polluting heaters. All fossil fuel heaters are gone by 2030, not far from now. Right, that's fantastic. And California often sets the tone for the rest of the US on clean energy things, so hopefully other states follow suit. Clean Energy canada predicts 1840 people will be employed in the Canadian EV industry by 20, 30, 26 times what there was in 2020. And, you know, I think that number is more than the number of people in oil and gas. So that's just EVs. That's not clean energy in total. Yeah, that's just EVs. Time for a fast fact. According to the IEA, the International Energy Agency the International Energy Agency, only 50% of the worldwide market is now using Led bulbs. Outraged, are you? Wow. Yeah, I mean, I guess that makes sense. It does take a hell of a long time to change all the how many humans does it take to change all the light bulbs in the water? I could do them all. I'll start tonight. Come on, people. Unscrew those stupid incandescent bulbs and put in an Led from your local dollar store because they're cheap. And imagine how much energy will be saved once we do that. Well, you know, those old bulbs don't last very long, so it's not going to take that long. Would it last a year at best or something like that? It's not good. The Nordstream Pipeline, which is the one that they claimed was bombed or sabotaged, it stopped leaking, but not before emitting the equivalent of what UK cars consume in a year. And there are 1.8 million oil pipelines in the world, some of them apparently leak. Yeah. So this is the pipeline between Russia and Germany, which has been the site of much discussion and problems in the UK world. But, yeah, this is a leaking and even just in your home, right? Like if you have a gas cooktop that can leak and release pollutants and ruin the air quality in your house and contribute to all these problems. From Bloomberg. The United States utility scale solar is now about one third cheaper than gas fired power. Wow. Well, onshore wind is 44% less expensive than gas fired. This is onshore wind, which is notoriously more expensive than offshore wind. So solar and wind now present a deflationary opportunity for electric supply costs. Deflation something I like to hear. Let's hope the inflation rates come down. You know, I watched this video by an engineer, a wind engineer, talking about how big can wind turbines get offline? I love that topic. It's very in depth, but apparently there's a cost of the machine returns. But I might get to that in a bit. We'll see. Another fast fact in 2022 and 600 million people in Africa still don't have access to electricity. And I can go to the hardware store and buy a solar panel and power my camper and lights and stuff and phones. Much of those without power are in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. The DRC, Ethiopia, Nigeria, Tanzania and Uganda. Research suggests that covering all of California's canals, which span roughly 4000 miles with solar panels could save up to 63 billion gallons of water. That's just putting them people say there's no place to put solar panels. You take up farmland, put them on the damn canals, safe water, billions of gallons of water. And I believe they have started at least one pilot project. So that's what it would look like if they did it all. That's amazing. Yes. And there's even some going on in Europe. And they said if you did that, you'd have like 13 nuclear reactors worth of peak output. So that's pretty cool. The two Chevy bulk variants set a quarterly sales record at 14, 700. GM says it will increase global production. This is interesting to me. So I'm following it to more than 70,000 units for the 2023 calendar year, which is almost double if it's 44,000 this year. So they're selling all the damn things and they've got to make more. Yeah, and presumably they've ramped up their battery supply, which is the other thing. So they presumably have enough batteries to do that, which is great. And for the regional leader, Post, our local newspaper, we have an oil ban. New York follows California in banning the sale of gas cars by 2035. That legislation is moving forward. So good to hear. World's largest wind solar hybrid complex. This is wind and solar in one piece of land is now 600. It goes online in India. It's the largest hybrid complex. Fairly big. Toyota president calls meeting California zero mission requirements difficult, even though in 2035, you can still have 20% of your new car sales from your company be long range PHEVs plug in hybrids. Yeah, well, it's not like Toyota is like a world leader in making cars or anything. No, I don't know how they could possibly do it. They don't want to. Tesla Giga, Nevada to receive recycled battery materials from Redwoods closed loop campus. That means, Brian, you could buy a Tesla and people say, oh, where did that battery come from? It was mine. While some of it might be recycled now already, and that's going to weigh go up in the future as more that's great. Yes, redwood is one of the big players in battery recycling started by one of the founders of Tesla. But, yeah, we were always worried about not having enough supply of batteries to recycle. But it's slow, but sure it'll come. It'll be a closed loop system one day. The Harris Ranch Tesla supercharger in California, that is the big one, the first one actually ever, and it's between San Francisco and Los Angeles, will have a 25 megawatt of solar installed. That is two, five times the solar farms they're putting in Saskatchewan. Okay, just for reference, at a very rural part of the I 500 stalls, that's 100 stalls, including some for towing. They're going to have some stalls. People are calling for that now that the trucks are out. So it's a halfway mark between La. And the Bay Area. So, yeah, cool. The EPA is doubling money for electric school buses, which you mentioned earlier due to overwhelming demand from all 50 states. Yeah, so the 50 states asked for money, and it was way more than they expected them to ask for. The state, the people, the school boards, the people, they want electric school buses, and they should because diesel bad for kids. Currently, only 1% of the country school buses are at electric. And you know what? I'm a little surprised that it's even 1% more than maybe I would have thought. And Brian, finally this week I'm going to end on good news from Asad Razuk, which I sometimes do, and good news on the climate fight that we could all use this week, ireland to put solar panels on every school. Okay, our caller already covered that. James, you didn't need to put that there, but we broke that news. India to go 50% renewables by 2030. Some more Indian news. We have listeners in India, so they're going to go 50% renewables. That's not bad for a country that said that maybe we can't because we want the middle class to expand and you guys have already had for 100 years, and we're a huge country, but, you know, things may be starting to move along there. That's great. That's our time for this week. Remember, clean energy show@gmail.com. We really appreciate you listening. Please subscribe to the show. So you get our shows every week. And we'll see you again next time. Next week. See you next week. Close Video.  

For The Wild
TUSHA YAKOVLEVA on the Invitation of Invasive Plants /307

For The Wild

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022


This week guest Tusha Yakovleva calls on us to remember our millennium-old relationship with weedy beings and the gifts of wild and invasive plants. It's estimated that worldwide spending on invasive species exceeds one trillion dollars annually. But if we were to cease our violent relationship with weeds and invasive species, what might we find? Cultural cooperation between plants and people? A whole slew of plant-relatives that are thriving in increasingly challenging landscapes? We are challenged to think about our capacity, or willingness, to know invasive plants - Tusha queries listeners to ask “Do we know their reasons for making home in unfamiliar soils? Or what gifts and responsibilities they carry?” We are left with much to think about in the realm of curiosity and acceptance, two muscles that need an exceptional amount of exercise in a time where so much is rapidly changing environmentally and socially. Tusha Yakovleva is an educator, gatherer and ethnobotanist whose work revolves around generating strong, respectful relationships between plants and people. The foundations of her life-long foraging practice come from her family and first home - the Volga River watershed in Russia - where tending to uncultivated plants and mushrooms for food and medicine is common practice. Tusha is the author of Edible Weeds on Farms: Northeast Farmer's Guide to Self-growing Vegetables. Tusha is currently completing graduate work at SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry on Onondaga Nation homelands. Her research is in support of cross-cultural partnerships for biocultural restoration and takes place under the guidance of the Center for Native Peoples and the Environment. Music by Ali Dineen and Violet Bell. Visit our website at forthewild.world for the full episode description, references, and action points.

Redwood Bureau
"GENESIS" - Redwood Bureau Phenomenon #0103

Redwood Bureau

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 28:16 Very Popular


Carnivorous plants are quite fascinating, though they aren't something to be afraid of. At least, that's what we thought until the discovery of "GENESIS". Hosted by Josh Tomar!  https://twitter.com/tomamoto https://www.twitch.tv/tomamoto Story Voiced by the Rogue Darkness! https://twitter.com/rogue_darkness Episode Written by James Adkins! https://superjt87.squarespace.com/ Episode Composed by MrBlackPasta! https://twitter.com/MrBlackPasta Subscribe on Spotify!  https://open.spotify.com/show/5OgfQg3svBwSUiU0zGqhet Please Review us on Apple Podcasts!  https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/redwood-bureau/id1597996941 Find more shows like Redwood Bureau at http://eeriecast.com/ Music and sound effects used in the Redwood Bureau has or may have been provided/created by:  CO.AG: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCcavSftXHgxLBWwLDm_bNvA Myuu: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCiSKnkKCKAQVxMUWpZQobuQ Jinglepunks: https://jinglepunks.com/ Epidemic Sound: https://www.epidemicsound.com/ Kevin MacLeod: http://incompetech.com/ Dark Music: https://soundcloud.com/darknessprevailspodcast Soundstripe: https://app.soundstripe.com/ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Backwards Star Galactica

POINTS OF INTEREST THIS WEEK INCLUDE:• Second Opinion• Turbo Tent• Goo• Must Love Rocks~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~(Holler atcha boys on Twitter and check out our MERCH)~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

FSJam Podcast
Episode 80 - Eleventy with Ben Myers

FSJam Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 41:01


We need your vote to win a Jam stack Jammie! So, go to https://fsjam.org/vote. There will also be previous guests in other categories, so make sure you vote for them too!-------------------In this episode we discuss the fundamentals of Eleventy, how to approach web development from a conservationist's point of view, and utilizing Eleventy Serverless for deferred, on-demand rendering.Ben Myers Homepage Twitter GitHub Twitch Some Antics showmy.chat Eleventy Homepage Twitter GitHub Discord Links Fullstack Accessibility with Ben Myers (FSJam31) Slinkity with Ben Holmes (FSJam49) Eleventy Data Cascade Documentation I Finally Understand Eleventy's Data Cascade events.lunch.dev Eleventy Serverless A First Look at Eleventy Serverless with Zach Leatherman (Some Antics) Modern CSS with Stephanie Eckles (FSJam63) Incremental Static Regeneration Distributed Persistent Rendering Understanding Rendering in the Jamstack by Brian Rinaldi Eleventy Glossary Learn Eleventy From Scratch by Andy Bell Amit Sheen Codepens THE Eleventy Meetup Full Time Open Source Development for Eleventy, Sponsored by Netlify Transcript[Pre-show Clip]BenWhen I was on Learn with Jason talking about Eleventy Serverless, I actually spent a fair amount of time talking about... "hey, Eleventy doesn't work for every use case." There are certain websites you have in mind that Eleventy would not be a good fit for. That's okay, that just means it's better suited for other kinds of sites. I think there is this instinct in Jamstack communities to try to kludge Jamstack into a fundamentally un-Jamstacky problem space.ChrisWhat do you mean? Gatsby is the best for everything and we should have never moved off Gatsby and there's no need for Svelte or Solid or anything like that. Gatsby, it did everything.[Opening Theme Song]AnthonyBen Myers, welcome back.BenHey! It's good to be back.AnthonyYou were on an earlier episode, 30-something, talking about web accessibility. You are a web developer and accessibility advocate at Microsoft. Today, we're going to be talking to you about Eleventy cause Eleventy is a project that I know you're really passionate about. We've had others on the show talk about it a little bit, especially Ben Holmes who is building a meta framework on top of Eleventy called Slinkity. But, today we're going to be talking about Eleventy proper. What it is, why people are excited about it, and what kind of stuff they're building with it. BenI'm thrilled, I absolutely love Eleventy as a tool and it's one of those things that's been an absolute privilege to get to introduce people to. Fair disclosure! I totally have not introduced people to it through a podcast medium, so this is gonna be very interesting. Super excited to chat about it with y'all.AnthonyWhy don't we first start with what Eleventy is. I think if anyone has heard about it, they know that it's a static site generator. They may have heard that it's based a bit on Jekyll, so if you can talk a little bit about what it does and what you would build with it.BenYeah, so I find that simply saying, "Jekyll but JavaScript" is enough for some people to just get it. I will say that the fact that it is powered by JavaScript makes it more approachable than other static site generators for many people because JavaScript is the language of the web. If you're doing front end development, JavaScript is something you're very likely to be very familiar with. A static site generator that leverages JavaScript, specifically the Node.js ecosystem, is a very compelling sell for a lot of people. But, I should definitely back up and explain the bigger picture.You described it as a static site generator in the vein of Jekyll. I think that's absolutely, absolutely fair. But personally, I don't have experience with Jekyll. That's not something that really helps me understand what it is. The simplest way to think of Eleventy is, it is a tool that will take content, typically in a format such as markdown. It'll take that content, it'll just convert it to some pure, raw, boring, fantastic HTML (or other assets). That is, I think, the simplest way to think of it. You've got some content, maybe it's blog posts, maybe it's documentation pages. Maybe it's a landing page for some product. Some content that is mostly static and you want some output, typically HTML.That is what Eleventy is and what it's really, really good at. What Eleventy isn't, is a tool for building highly dynamic interactive experiences. For those, you might still consider a client side web application framework such as React or Vue. Eleventy simply isn't as interested in addressing those kinds of websites and I think that's totally fair. But if you've got something that could be expressed in static HTML, Eleventy is possibly a very good project for you.AnthonyI actually first started learning about Eleventy for a big reason cause of you, Ben. We were building out the lunch.dev calendar with it. That was a really interesting project because we were trying to create like an events calendar. What we did is we had a Git repo that was building the static site and then we had markdown files for the individual events. Then the individual events would be transformed into little cards on the front end. If you wanna talk a little bit about why you picked Eleventy specifically for building that cause I think Chan also, the reason why we went with that was cause you were really passionate about, we wanted to learn more about it. So I'd be curious about the thought process behind that.BenAn event calendar like that is, if you think about it, nothing but a bunch of articles. At the time, we were not heavily invested in doing anything interactive with that calendar. We just needed a place to stick a bunch of descriptions and details of different events going on, different links that we could send people to. That is, again, something that is very well suited for that kind of static markup. When you think about a lot of web application frameworks, a common criticism that some folks in various web dev spaces will point to, is that web app frameworks can be quite large and bloated.That means if you are building your site with those, your end user very likely will have to download all of that and construct an experience from that. Whereas, you could get more or less the same experience but very, very lightweight. I think that lightweight websites are fundamentally good and responsible. I try to take a very conservation mindset to the web. I like to only use what I need and I apply this to users resources such as their data. If they're out and about on their mobile phone and they're using their data plan, chances are good that they could have a really slow connection and they could have data caps.I think that if we don't need to send them an entire web app framework, we probably shouldn't send them a web app framework. That is, I think, not being the best steward of their resources. They're gonna have a slower chunkier experience as a result. So, why did I choose Eleventy for this project? It's because the project, at least as we were thinking of it at the time, didn't need anything more than that. We just wanted some lightweight HTML pages out there on the web that could build quickly, that anyone could add to.Eleventy is really based around this concept of a template. A template is a content file written in a language such as Markdown or HTML and sometimes with templating languages such as Liquid or Nunjucks that Eleventy builds into a page or pages of HTML (or sometimes other static assets). It's weird because there always feels like there needs to be some asterisks. But broadly, think of a template as a content file that gets transformed into some output pages.The nice thing is Markdown for most developers is a fairly ergonomic experience. That meant that if people wanted to add things to that site, they didn't have to worry about the whole instrumentation and orchestration of the entire project. They could contribute simply a Markdown file and that was really nice. Eleventy also has built into it this concept called the data cascade which I think is one of the most crucial things to understand about Eleventy. It's also one of the things that took me the longest time to wrap my head around. When you're in a template, again a content file, you can use template syntax.Eleventy allows you the opportunity to expose variables essentially in that template syntax that you can either print out onto the page as part of the content or you can transform or operate on them in different ways. It's data, it's variables that you have access to. Eleventy has this amazing order of operations for how it lets you aggregate that data. So you can say, "oh, I've got some data that will be made available to every template of my site." Or, "I've got data that's available to every template that uses a certain layout." Or "I've got data that applies to every template in a given directory or its sub directories." Or, "I have data that corresponds exactly to one template."The lovely thing about this is, it exactly follows the mental model you would hope for something like that. It is powered by co-location. Data that applies much more specifically to an individual template will have a higher precedence over data that corresponds globally. This mental model (once you start playing with it) allows for some really, really powerful configuration of your website. You can almost afford to set it and then forget it which I think is incredibly powerful. You could set some sensible defaults at the global level, such as maybe "every blog post uses this blog post layout that I've defined."Then one blog post you could override that and use a different layout, maybe to accomplish some art direction. You've got a very special blog post that you want to have a special layout. You can change that data as you go. That kind of configuration (once you start wrapping your head around the order of operations) is incredibly powerful and flexible. At the same time, it's magic enough that you can bring new people into the project and they don't have to worry about any of it. I think that is super cool.AnthonySomething that was interesting that came up while we were working on it was, we ended up in a situation where we had to rebuild certain things at certain times. Because the way events work, there'll be an event upcoming then there'll be an event that has passed. You don't want to have stale events still on the homepage. We ended up setting up a cron job type thing with a GitHub Action.But I think that this is the type of thing that now, today if we had been building that there would be other ways to do that. Not even mentioning the new scheduled jobs functions that Netlify just added. But, what I was curious to get more into was the serverless bit. There is now Eleventy Serverless, and you've actually been on the forefront of this. You did a stream with Zach when this first came out and you've been building stuff out with it this whole time.We talked with Stephanie Eckles a little bit about it and I'm really curious to get your take on it cause we've talked about serverless a ton of times here at Redwood it was built on serverless. We love serverless - well I love serverless, I don't know if Chris loves serverless - but I'd love to hear what is Eleventy Serverless and why was it built?BenEleventy Serverless is an opt-in build mode for Eleventy. Typically with Eleventy, everything is pre-rendered. You have a build step, you run probably `npm run build` if we're being honest. Eleventy kicks in and picks up all your templates and then converts them into HTML files. Once they're built, they're built. If data changes behind the scenes, such as data that was fueled by an API, you don't get any updates to that because there's nothing in the HTML linking that data like real data in any sort of backend. It's just pure HTML.This meant that Eleventy has historically been very limited. Eleventy could only reflect what was true at build time. Eleventy Serverless is this new opt-in build mode for Eleventy, where you can say certain templates are built whenever you request them. Again, non-Eleventy people should probably read that as either "certain pages are built when you request them", or I prefer to think of it as "certain routes are built when you request them." I think that framing gets really, really powerful because you can use Eleventy's data cascade, you can use Eleventy's front matter and templating languages.All the stuff that you absolutely love about Eleventy, you can use but in this on-demand way, this on request way. You create a page as you request it and if you're using, for instance, Netlify's on-demand builders, you can then cache that page. It's as if you had built that page in the build step. This is hugely powerful for a couple of reasons. I use this demonstration when I go on people's streams to talk about Eleventy Serverless. It's a color contrast checker. Take two Hex codes and display in this pretty format, the color contrast ratio. If you have two Hex codes, which are six digits long each, then that is - I want to say 2.75 times 10 to the 14th contrast ratio.I don't wanna build that. I don't want my dev server building that. I don't want my Netlify high build minutes building that, that's incredibly wasteful. I love to defer building those kinds of things until they're needed, because chances are the vast majority of those contrast ratios will never see the light of day. Very few of the ratios on that site will ever be explored, so why build them? Eleventy Serverless is a great way to defer building a large data set that folks might not ever look at. You also don't have to cache by default. Eleventy Serverless built pages don't cache. You have to use specific things like on-demand builders to cache.But what that means is that you can have up to date data. During the on request build you can hit an API and you can get the latest, greatest up-to-datest data. I think that is incredibly powerful. That is something that we haven't really had in Eleventy before. But at the end of the day, what gets sent over the wire is still an incredibly lightweight HTML page. It's not a whole client side page that's holding in a large framework. You don't have to worry about things like loading spinners because all the fetching is done server-side. You don't have to worry about things like authentication because all the fetching is done server-side.You get to take advantage of everything that you love about serverless functions and everything that you love about Eleventy. I've also brought up a couple times that this is opt-in. I really love this because you aren't turning your whole site suddenly into a quote unquote "serverless site." You first opt-in by installing the serverless plugin and then you still have to opt-in on a template by template basis. The core of your website, the main pages that guaranteed people are gonna hit (like your landing page, about page, and stuff like that) are still built during the build step and are still totally cached.They're still available for search engines to crawl and all of that. It's just that this one subsection of your site is now served on-demand. I think that that is super exciting. Another benefit of Eleventy Serverless routes is that you can take advantage of arguments passed in the URL. You have parameters in the path, or you could have query parameters, for instance. This allows for some really dynamic experiences all. Anthony, you've alluded to, I've got this project that I built that is designed really to test what I believe is the absolute limit of Eleventy Serverless.This product is showmy.chat. Anyone who's been in the streaming biz will know that it's very common for Twitch streamers to use websites as part of their stream layout. A very common use case for this is showing your chat bot as part of your stream so that folks can see who's interacting with the stream. It's really exciting, "look at me, Mom, I'm famous. I'm on my favorite Twitch streamers stream." Doing anything like that requires some understanding of web development and WebSockets to be able to read from the chat. This is not something I feel like people should not have to worry about.So, I built this site, showmy.chat. It allows you to put in your channel name as well as set a couple of other properties, configure a couple of extra values there. It will generate using Eleventy Serverless a page that has all of the WebSocket logic, the action to display the chat, and all of the theming all set in place for you. You get this on-demand themed chat that responds to the arguments that you passed in through the query parameters. Do I think that Eleventy Serverless was the right tool for that job? I'm not entirely sure.I've actually been kind of considering maybe looking and seeing if I could have done the same thing, but maybe more flexibly using something like SvelteKit. But I think that it's incredibly exciting that Eleventy, which has been this kind of beloved pre-build tool now affords you this extra flexibility where just because you wanted a page that always had dynamic stuff or the latest information, you don't have to like opt into a completely different framework. Now, you can still say within the Eleventy ecosystem that you love.ChrisThat was a lot. I've literally just been sitting here just like absorbing it all in. I feel like a mega React, Chad, when I say, "Yeah, but you didn't say any of the buzzwords. SSG, ISR, SSR..."AnthonyI think DPR would be one of them technically, right? Distributed persistent rendering?ChrisYeah, haha.BenThe Venn diagram of all of these words is a very pretty butterfly and also inscrutable to anyone outside of the space. For folks at home who are playing buzzword bingo, it's Eleventy's implementation of distributed persistent rendering, or sometimes not distributed persistent rendering, Brian Rinaldi calls it deferred rendering. That's the term I like. It's deferred rendering. Everyone's got their own different take depending on whether they're a framework or whether they're a CDN. It's deferred rendering that's most similar to - I think Gatsby now has, I forget what they're calling it now.ChrisI think they're calling it deferred... incremental deferred rendering? Something like that.Ben MyersThis is exactly why I'm just using Brian's term of deferred rendering. If you're looking at this and going, "What's Eleventy's version of incremental static regeneration" or something like that, the closest thing is Eleventy Serverless. What is distributed persistent rendering? It's Eleventy Serverless hooked up to on-demand builders. That's what we're talking about. Hopefully that helps for people who are hoping to play buzzword bingo. The crux of it is you hit a route and Eleventy is run in the serverless function to create a page for you in basically real time.ChrisThe reason I say all the buzzwords is because sometimes they help define where it sits in the market, and sometimes they really do not. And this is where we talk about like functionality is obviously what really makes people understand what all these terms. Things like Next have this, Gatsby have this. For example, you build a website, let's say an e-commerce store, really easy and you add a new product. Does that product then just get rendered onto the website using like a webhook, or does that product only show if that specific URL is then entered? Because then Serverless knows to run and make that page?BenServerless is still in its infancy, but it would really depend on your implementation. I know Zach is still working on having serverless routes that have been created, but then saved can now get added to like what Eleventy calls collections (which are arrays of templates). You could be able to then display it on the rest of the site. Truthfully, I haven't done a whole lot with that. I think it would depend a lot on your implementation. It's in the moment the on request (your server function that's handling that) is looking for any arguments that you supply it in the URL. Either through the structure of the URL itself or through query parameters. You're probably passing in a SKU or some other identifier in there. It would look up some known database or API and be able to render that for you.ChrisThis is actually what I've personally seen with all these different types of rendering methods is that you chuck out the complete build, they add a new product and go, "it's not in the store." I'm like, "well it is on the store," if you know the URL, but you need to go to the URL for it to appear on the rest of the store. Cause that means the website now knows about it. It's like, how do you explain that to someone not technical? They need to know the URL to go to the right product to then appear on the rest of the website. It's like, "I thought this was meant to save millions and time on all these things." It's still a really complicated subject. One of the really big things that I wanted to ask is, what Serverless is sending down the pipe back to the client is not rehydrated JavaScript or JavaScript JSON, it's just HTML?BenYes. Just pure boring, lovely, fantastic, delightful HTML. Which means that it's gonna be fairly lightweight. Really, the way to think about this is, "this is how the web used to work and in many places still does." This is what we now call server rendering. Except you don't have to own a persistent server and you're very likely not doing anything with sustained sessions or anything like that. But the meat of, "I go talk to a server and I ask for a page and the server builds me that page on the fly," it's that, that's what's going on. I'm waving my hands doing jazz hands - imagine sparkles around this - it's now **Jamstack**! That's what it is. But it's bringing that kind of server functionality into a tool (into a framework, whatever you wanna call it) that previously has been prebuilt.You create a directory of HTML files and then that directory of HTML files is yours to do whatever you want with. You could FTP that into some server and just host that directly. You could FTP that into a CDN. Or you could do what I do, which is I have a Git based workflow hooked up to a CDN (in this case, Netlify). Every time I push to my repo, Netlify rebuilds but you don't have to have any of that instrumentation and orchestration. You could just upload some boring old HTML to a server and host that. This provides the same lightweight end user experience where you're getting just HTML. It's not HTML that we then rehydrate down the road and replace your entire page with this app behind the scenes that hopefully you won't notice. It's just HTML, it's lightweight, it's easy to cache.It's a little friendlier for search engines to optimize. When all you need is static HTML on a page and not a whole lot of dynamic interactive stuff, it's fantastic. It's glorious. I think the performance thing is an interesting conversation. I don't know if y'all know this. But right now we are in the middle of a pandemic and this means businesses have taken measures around this pandemic. There have been a small handful of times I have gone out to eat at a restaurant. On the tables, instead of giving me menus, there are table tents that have QR codes I can scan to pull up their menu. This, to me, is an example of a wonderful idea to meet user's needs that typically fails miserably in the execution.When I scan the QR code, it pulls up the restaurant's website and the restaurant has used some site builder or something else that sends over gobs and gobs of JavaScript. A whole framework likely or at the very least probably jQuery, sending over a whole lot of stuff. I don't know if y'all have this experience, but every restaurant I seem to go to seems to have poor internet connection there. I don't have great connection there; I don't have great reception. It takes me, like, 20 seconds where there's just this spinner and then I get to see a list of foods, which is mostly text. Sometimes there's pictures but the pictures are strictly optional. That feels to me like no one quite anticipated this pandemic (restaurants least of all) and rearchitecting your website is an expensive process that you can't just say, "oh, just remake your website with faster stuff."But we are several years into this now. Folks haven't looked at this and gone, "huh, those slow websites at our own restaurant to pull up our own menu, that's an area of opportunity for improvement there." Especially considering that when people are out and about, they're often in those kind of reception dead zones, such as a restaurant. They're operating off of finite data caps. They don't need gizmos and widgets and all sorts of interactive stuff. They just want to see what kind of food they can buy at your restaurant. There are times where having tools that make it really easy and flexible to just serve some boring, static HTML is exactly what your users need. Having that developer experience to make that easier is just gorgeous.ChrisYes, but I have two counterpoints.BenI'm ready to hear them.ChrisOne, "But JavaScript. I can write my CSS in JavaScript. I can write my HTML in JavaScript. I can just write JavaScript" and two, "Hey, you're a captive audience in a restaurant. Of course, they want you to sit there a little bit longer."BenWell, I mean, I think both of those arguments are very fair. But I think that too often we look at JavaScript as this great enabler and don't think of it as also a responsibility and a possible point of failure. Here's an example I sometimes use because I think documentation sites are a fantastic use case for Eleventy. I would like you to envision we're building a documentation site for some library we've made. As is the custom, we want to show how many GitHub stars this library. In the React ecosystem, it's fairly commonplace to set up a fetch to the GitHub API and display that. But what if the GitHub API is down? Well, I sure hope you set up some error boundaries and stuff like that.What if the GitHub API isn't down but it's really sluggish? Well, I certainly hope that you set up loading states. You have a lot of complexity around a part of the page that honestly no one cares about. You incur risk and you incur complexity over such a minor part of the page. I think that sometimes that stuff is incredibly valuable and stuff to consider and to consider how do we do this responsibly? Of course, yes, we could work around the foot guns. We could build a robust, resilient experience. But I think it's also interesting sometimes to ask, "how critical is this really?" Could we get away with having the result of how many stars our GitHub project has? Could we get away with having that be just hard coded texts in the built HTML that gets updated with a nightly built? Is that acceptable in some cases?No, it won't be, but in many cases it totally could be. You say, "oh, we've got JavaScript" and I say, "sure, but it might be more resilient in the backend." We don't have to worry about the costs and the risks and the complexity around doing all this stuff client side. As for a captive audience, I mean sure, but no one's gonna look at that and go, "ah yes, this restaurant was very fancy and stuff like that and I sure did feel very fancy waiting on my phone to pull up this menu in the middle of this steak restaurant going, 'it'll load, I promise. Do I need to refresh this another few times?'" It's all about different experiences and there is no one size solution that fits everything.ChrisYeah, I would've walked out the restaurant if the website was made in PHP. Just not for me. I don't care how rare you like your steak, this ain't for me! Um... no, all jokes aside, Eleventy Serverless looks really, really cool. I think one of the things that is really cool about it is, what it's spitting out is HTML. So many times when it comes to like, if you even think about Next's implementation or Gatsby, do I even know what it's spitting out? Kind of... to what I understand, it's just JSON. It spits out a massive JSON chunk that then gets stored in the HTML file that then gets rehydrated into the client. To what I understand! When you see those messages in Next.js saying, "Hey, your ISSG step is a bit too big," it's because you are literally dumping a massive JSON object into a script tag for Next.js to read later. If you didn't know.Ben MyersI don't want bash on those tools. I think there's absolutely a time and a place for them. But there's a time and a place for boring old HTML as well. And Eleventy... amazing.ChrisAnd I think what's the most amazing thing about all this is that we're still very early. It's still all very early. Even what Next.js is doing, who you could say have been doing SSG for the longest time. We're still so early when we talk about things like frameworks like Marko who have been in the industry for like 10 years. Everything is still so early in this area. The more capabilities that we have with less abstraction, I think the better. I think what's really interesting is what you just said about it's opt-in, not automatically there. It still works as expected, but if you want to add this, then you get it.So many times when it comes to things like say Next.js or Gatsby, I use next Next.js all day every day, so I don't mind bashing it. Do I even know how much JavaScript it sends to the client by default? Well, I hope it's not a lot. What we tend to forget is when I say about the question, "I know JavaScript, I could just write everything," is that I've made an abstraction line that is so high because it's all in JavaScript that so much performance can be potentially lost. You are technically compiling down CSS, HTML, JavaScript by default. What Eleventy is doing is just saying, "Look, you know HTML, you know CSS. Just send that down the wire and that is good enough for 80% of use cases like a blog or documentation."BenAnd now with Serverless, you compliment the sites that are already built with static. A fantastic example, and I wanna give a shout out to both Brian Robinson and Stephanie Eckles who have done this kind of stuff. You can have your blog and the meat of your blog is all built statically ahead of time during a pre-build step. Great, using serverless you could add a search bar to that site. Now your search pages are generated serverless based on your search query. But the meat of your website is still that static, cached, search engine friendly version of your site so it's all additive.ChrisThat's what makes it really good. So much of the ecosystem right now is taking, like, your Ford Rapture by default. You're not starting with the smallest car you possibly can. It's like, "we got the biggest engine to do the school trip in." It's not like, "let's start with a really small city car," it's like, "take everything and just use it."BenAbsolutely.AnthonyOne of the other things I wanted to get into is, I know that you've been working a lot on adding to the Eleventy documentation. You've written a ton of blog posts about Eleventy. I think for the most part, when people want to explain the data cascade to people, your blog post is kind of the canonical example that is usually linked to. I would be curious, when you were looking at the Eleventy docs, where did you see areas that you felt you could add value?BenOne pull request that actually got merged in not long ago was I defined a bunch of terms because I was looking around for a definition of, for instance, the word "template." The definition that I eventually ended up adding to the site was the one that I gave y'all. "A content file, typically in a language such as HTML and Markdown that gets processed by a template language and gets built as output." I had the opportunity to add that to the site because I actually couldn't find anything like that anywhere on the site. I think that the Eleventy documentation right now is fantastic at showing you the breadth of Eleventy's API.But a room for opportunity I see is, onboarding new people to Eleventy. As it stands, the getting started guide as you build a template and then run Eleventy to build a site using that template, and then it kind of just goes, "Tada! Welcome to Eleventy!" I would love to see more resources from the ecosystem, but especially more resources in the core Eleventy documentation around how to take that getting started guide and build a fully fledged application that you could host something pro on. So that's a room for growth, I think. I think that is going to require kind of some more explicit step-by-step walkthroughs.I think that's also going to require a bit more tying pieces together, like painting a bigger picture of that. Which is why, for instance, I wrote that data cascade post. Eleventy has some great pages about each step of the data cascade. But painting that as one big picture - with the sense of when should you use one step or method versus when should you use another step or method - that was something that I felt was missing. that's something that I'm hoping to contribute more and more. I think it's a bit of a slow process. You don't wanna boil the ocean. You don't want to contribute every update all at once. This is something that I'm doing in a bit of my free time just here and there. Maybe I'll add a page or I'll add to a page that already exists but provide a bit more of the context in (what I hope is) a beginner, newcomer, friendly way to help them really understand why does this fit into the bigger picture of an Eleventy project.This is a sentiment I've heard a couple times in the Eleventy space and I don't wanna bash on the Eleventy docs. I do think that they are great and again, they reflect the breadth of Eleventy's API. But this is something that, right now, there is a need for. People are writing blog posts and making videos that rise to that need. If you're listening to this and you, yourself do Eleventy (or if you're learning Eleventy) I would say right now the community needs you. The community could really benefit from you writing about your experiences and the things you learned. The real practical step by step process of how you built the thing that you've built whether that's on your own blog post or on your own YouTube channel or maybe it's in some way contributed to the documentation.I have no official affiliation with Eleventy, but this is something that I'm seeing more and more that folks should benefit from. That is the encouragement I would give. I think this is what we need to see. Eleventy just hit 1.0 recently and that marks it as a mature product. I would love to see us figure out more and more ways to bring people into the fold. I myself learned Eleventy through Andy Bell's course "Learn Eleventy from Scratch," which used to be a paid course. It's now open and free, but no longer being updated. I think more resources like that, which take you from the docs (which can sometimes be very API focused) to something that is instead methodological in its design. I think it's something that Eleventy could benefit from.AnthonyI would use the term explanatory.ChrisOne of the favorite things that I love, something you said earlier that I wish all frameworks said is as simply this. We can do everything, but we are not good at everything. You should use this for X and Y type of websites and if it's not X or Y, go look at something else. And you said documentation and blogs and homepages, that's what Eleventy is really good at. Don't go try build a dashboard in it.BenAbsolutely and it's like, it could be done and I think that there is value in experimenting. Using a thing far beyond what it was meant to do is something I see a lot with the CSS space. Amit Sheen's work is using CSS to create hyper realistic 3D animations. This is so far beyond the realm of what anyone ever intended of CSS. But we learned something as a community from pushing CSS to its limits. We learned techniques that we can use in the day to day. So it's not to say you can't build hyper interactive dashboards with Eleventy. You can certainly learn some things from that. But if you're trying to publish, if you're trying to deploy to production and you're trying to have a resilient app - those kinds of things - probably Eleventy isn't on the table for you and that's okay.But I've definitely had this moment where I'll be working someone individually through Eleventy to rebuild their blog. They'll be coming from like a React mindset. Suddenly I show them how they could create something that looks identical to their blog but as HTML. There's that moment that clicks where they've been using a tool that wasn't intended for the. Now, they have a tool that was actually meant for that kind of thing, and it unlocks something in them. That is, I think, a huge takeaway. There's no one size fits all, but that means that the one size that fits all that you're thinking of, isn't a one size fits all.ChrisVery true. Building blogs with Next and Gatsby, it's pretty overkill when you could just send sweet, sweet HTML.BenMm-hmm.AnthonyYeah. I was really happy that you were working on the docs cause I know I've struggled with the docs and I know others have as well. But as you said, just bashing the docs doesn't solve anything or make anyone feel good. Especially when Zach spent so much of his own, free time creating this project. When you see things like that, contribute back. Especially if you're someone who's in a position to help with things like documentation and explanation. That's really awesome, that's very much the spirit of open source, so I'm happy you did that.BenI think in general, people benefit from having multiple possible explanations for things. If Zach is the only person writing documentation, then everything is going to be oriented around how Zach understands things. Zach has a lot of great context into the inner workings of Eleventy, as well as the inner workings of the web. But Zach is not everyone. I'm not everyone. The two of y'all aren't everyone, right? Bringing more people to the table documentation wise, means we can get a better diversity of explanations that can work better for a wider diversity of people who are coming to this project. That is awesome.AnthonyIs there anything else about Eleventy you want to talk about before we wrap it?BenWe touched a bit on how it's HTML and I think that part itself is really huge. I feel like I've become a more robust developer as a result because I can't just rely on a component to do things for me. I have to think about, what is the best markup for this and what are the scripts that I have to write to make this work robustly? I've been very fortunate that Eleventy has improved me as a developer and I'm super, super excited to see how much the community is growing. It feels like it's exploded in popularity recently, I think in part to the Learn Eleventy from Scratch Course by Andy Bell and I think in part due to things like The Eleventy meetup that have been organized by Sia Karamalegos, Stephanie Eckles, and Thomas Semmler.There's a lot more community outreach and stuff like that. I'm just incredibly excited to see this project grow. It just received full-time open source funding from Netlify, which means Zach is now paid to work on Eleventy full time. Already we've seen some longstanding pull requests get merged in that have enabled different things. The more people we could get in on this project, the more cool things we can build. Absolutely dive into Eleventy. See what you can build and see what you can break. See how you can make something that you previously might have wanted a whole framework for. See if you can build something lightweight, robust, semantic, performant, and just see what a different way to build is.AnthonyYep. And if you hit any roadblocks, check out Slinkity.BenThere we go. Yes.AnthonyGo ahead and let our listeners know where they can find more about Eleventy or more about yourself.BenYeah, so if you want to learn about Eleventy, the documentation can be found at their website, which is 11ty.dev. Eleventy kind of has two spellings. It's a whole thing. I'm sure the link will be in the show notes. There's multiple links on there to find the documentation. Poke around, see if you can find the Easter eggs there because it's delightful. The documentation button is incredible. If you wanna find me out and about on the web, I'm on Twitter at BenDMyers. Again, I'm sure that link will be in the show notes. And I host a weekly Twitch show, which Anthony has been a part of four times now.I think he was the inaugural guest and he's still the person who's been on the most times. It's called Some Antics. Every week I bring on a guest from around the web development and web design industry to teach me something about building a great user experience for the web in a hands on way with a focus on accessibility and/or core web technologies. You can find that at twitch.tv/someanticsdev. That's S-O-M-E-A-N-T-I-C-S-D-E-V, someanticsdev. I look forward to hearing from y'all. I look forward to seeing what y'all build, what y'all make, what y'all are learning, what you're doing. My cat has just jumped off the bed in a clunky, noisy way.AnthonyTuna wants to be on the show.BenYes. I think that probably means he is done with this podcast as well.AnthonyThank you so much, Ben. It's always a pleasure getting to speak with you.BenLikewise!AnthonyWe appreciate your time and hope to have you back soon.BenSee y'all later.[Post-show Clip]ChrisI remember back in the Gatsby days when you'd have 10,000 pages. You're like, "I just wanna rebuild just that one page!"BenYep. Even Eleventy beat them to that punch.ChrisWow, I should learn more about Eleventy.BenIt's almost as though we need a podcast episode about it.AnthonyOkay, that's our pre-show clip. Perfect. Okay, let's do it. Ready?BenYes sir.

The Loh Down on Science
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Hometown History
79: Redwoods National Park

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Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 35:55


One of my favorite movies as a kid was The Lorax. When I first saw The Lorax, I had some sense that it was about protecting the environment. But it's more than a cartoon. It's a thinly veiled environmental manifesto. I didn't realize, until I was older, that it was also strange masterpiece of historical fiction.-Visit us online at: Itshometownhistory.com-Find us on all podcasting platforms: https://link.chtbl.com/hometownhistory-Support our podcast by becoming a patron at: Patreon.com/itshometownhistory-Check out our other podcasts: itsarclightmedia.com

Virtual Real Estate Investing
Experience Re-convene with Frank, John, and Redwood Ryan

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