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  • 520PODCASTS
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  • Oct 22, 2021LATEST

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Latest podcast episodes about wnyc

The New Yorker Radio Hour
How a Girls' School Fled Afghanistan as the Taliban Took Over

The New Yorker Radio Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 19:02


In the summer, Shabana Basij-Rasikh came on the Radio Hour to speak with Sue Halpern about founding the School of Leadership Afghanistan—known as SOLA—which was the country's only boarding school for girls. She and those around her were watching the Taliban's resurgence in the provinces anxiously, but with determination. “It's likely that Taliban could disrupt life temporarily here in Kabul,” one woman told Basij-Rasikh, “but we're not going to go back to that time. We're going to fight them.”    In fact, Basij-Rasikh had already been forming a plan to take her girls' school abroad, and soon settled on Rwanda. When the U.S. withdrawal from Afghanistan led to a precipitous collapse of the government, she suddenly had to sneak nearly two hundred and fifty students, staff, faculty, and family members to the airport to flee as refugees. She seems traumatized by the terror of that experience. “That thought still haunts me—it suddenly takes over all my senses in a way, just this idea of ‘what if'? What if we lost a student?” She spoke with Halpern about the evacuation to Rwanda, and what she hopes for as the school resettles.

Science Friday
Genome Traces, Beavers and Wildfire, Halloween DIY, Volcanoes. Oct 22, 2021, Part 2

Science Friday

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 47:10


The Ancient Neanderthal Traces Hidden In Your Genome Just how much of your genome is uniquely human? It turns out the number of genetic components in the human genome that trace back only to modern humans, and not to other human lineages or ancient ancestors, are surprisingly small. In a paper published recently in the journal Science Advances, researchers estimate the uniquely human portion of the genome as being under two percent.  Many of the genes thought to be strictly connected to modern humans appear to relate to neural processes. However, traces of genes from Denisovans and Neanderthals can be found scattered throughout the genome—including strong Neanderthal genetic signals in parts of the genome dealing with the immune system.Ed Green, a professor of biomolecular engineering at the University of California Santa Cruz and one of the authors of that paper, joins SciFri's Charles Bergquist to talk about the study, and what can be learned by this approach to studying our genetic code.     Beavers Build Ecosystems Of Resilience Deep in the Cameron Peak burn scar, nestled among charred hills, there's an oasis of green—an idyllic patch of trickling streams that wind through a lush grass field. Apart from a few scorched branches on the periphery, it's hard to tell that this particular spot was in the middle of Colorado's largest-ever wildfire just a year ago. This wetland was spared thanks to the work of beavers. The mammals, quite famously, dam up streams to make ponds and a sprawling network of channels. Beavers are clumsy on land, but talented swimmers; so the web of pools and canals lets them find safety anywhere within the meadow. On a recent visit to that patch of preserved land in Poudre Canyon, ecohydrologist Emily Fairfax emphasized the size of the beavers' canal network. “Oh my gosh, I can't even count them,” she said. “It's a lot. There's at least 10 ponds up here that are large enough to see in satellite images. And then between all those ponds is just an absolute spiderweb of canals, many of which are too small for me to see until I'm here on the ground.” The very infrastructure that gives beavers safety from predators also helps shield them from wildfire. Their work saturates the ground, creating an abnormally wet patch in the middle of an otherwise dry area. Dams allow the water to pool, and the channels spread it out over a wide swath of valley floor. Fairfax researches how beavers re-shape the landscapes where they live. Across the West, she's seen beaver-created wetlands survive wildfires. Ira chats with Fairfax and KUNC's Water in the West reporter Alex Hager about how beavers are creating wetland oases that are surviving the West's new megafires.       DIY Halloween Hacks Trying to liven up your ghosts and goblins this Halloween? In this archival segment from 2013, Windell Oskay, cofounder of Evil Mad Scientist, shares homemade hack ideas for a festive fright fest, from LED jack-o'-lanterns, to 3D printed candy, to spine-chilling specimen jars.      The Burn Of Volcanic Beauty This week, Mount Aso, a volcano in Japan, erupted—spewing clouds of ash and smoke, but fortunately bringing no reported injuries. Meanwhile, on the island of La Palma, the Cumbre Vieja volcano has been erupting for over a month now, causing destruction and evacuations on the island, and dramatically changing the island's coastline.  Robin George Andrews, author of the upcoming book Super Volcanoes, joins Ira to talk about the terror—and wonder—of volcanoes, and why their behavior can be so enigmatic to humans.  

Science Friday
Filipino Nurses, Francis Collins Exit Interview. Oct 22, 2021, Part 1

Science Friday

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 47:00


Biden's Administration Preps For A Crucial Climate Conference This week, CDC advisers gave their support to approve COVID-19 vaccine boosters for those who received Moderna and J&J vaccines. The recommendations would follow the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's authorization of “mixing and matching” booster shots from different vaccine developers. Ira provides new updates on the latest vaccine booster approvals, and a story about a successful transplant of a pig kidney… to a human. Plus, climate reporter Kendra Pierre-Louis gives us a closer look at how the United States is living up to its Paris Agreement pledges as a crucial international gathering looms, and Biden's clean energy legislation appears to be faltering.      Seeing The History Of Filipinos In Nursing You may have seen a grim statistic earlier this year: 32% of U.S. registered nurses who died of COVID-19 by September 2020 were of Filipino descent, even though they only make up 4% of nurses in the United States. Yet an event like the pandemic is disproportionately likely to affect Filipino-American families: Approximately a quarter of working Filipino-Americans are frontline healthcare workers. There's a deep history of Filipino immigrants and their descendants in frontline healthcare work. This Filipino-American History Month, Ira talks to nurse and photojournalist Rosem Morton and freelance journalist Fruhlein Econar about their recent collaboration for CNN Digital, using photographs from Morton's “Diaspora on the Frontlines” project.  They talk about the long reliance of the U.S. healthcare system on the Philippines, and the importance of documenting the lives, not just the disproportionate hardship, of these frontline healthcare workers and their families.       Francis Collins, Longest-Running NIH Director, To Step Down Francis Collins, director of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), will be stepping down from his post at the end of the year. Collins is the longest serving NIH director, serving three presidents over 12 years: Barack Obama, Donald Trump, and Joe Biden. Before his role at the NIH, Collins was an acclaimed geneticist, helping discover the gene that causes cystic fibrosis. He then became director of the National Human Genome Research Institute, where he led the project that mapped the human genome.  A lot can happen in 12 years, especially in the fields of health and science. Collins joins Ira to talk about his long tenure at the NIH, as well as how his Christian faith has informed his career in science. 

The Brian Lehrer Show
Geo-Quiz: Staten Island

The Brian Lehrer Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 15:07


James Oddo, Staten Island Borough President (R), quizzes listeners on how well they know Staten Island.

The Brian Lehrer Show
The Questions on the Ballot

The Brian Lehrer Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 35:48


Before early voting starts this weekend, David Cruz, WNYC/Gothamist news editor, explains the 5 questions on the ballot and why they matter.

The Takeaway
Outgoing Congressman David Price Weighs in on Reconciliation Compromises 2021-10-22

The Takeaway

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 52:07


Outgoing Congressman David Price Weighs in on Reconciliation Compromises This week, Democratic Congressman David Price of North Carolina announced his retirement after decades in office. He joined The Takeaway to discuss the present and future of his party. How Corporate Lobbying Influences Lawmakers Democrats are still in the process of negotiating their social spending bill which is proposed to spend $3.5 trillion over 10 years to pay for huge investments in climate change, child care, education and health care. For a look at lobbying on Capitol Hill, The Takeaway talks with Lee Drutman, Senior Fellow at New America and author of “The Business of America is Lobbying.”  New Poll Shows Black Adults Are Increasingly Dissatisfied With The Direction Of The Country A new poll found that Black adults have become increasingly dissatisfied with the direction the country is headed. To discuss the findings of the latest poll, we spoke with Alicia Garza, co-founder of the Black Lives Matter Global Network, and the head of the Black to the Future Action Fund. Labor Is Having a Moment  Workers at several prominent companies across the U.S. have been going on strike in recent weeks. For more on this, The Takeaway spoke to Steven Greenhouse, former New York Times labor reporter and the author of Beaten Down, Worked Up: The Past, Present and Future of American Labor.  For transcripts, see individual segment pages. 

On the Media
Plot Twist

On the Media

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 50:17


From boosters to breakthrough infections, pandemic vocabulary is still all over the news. On this week's On the Media, why the terms we use to talk about the virus obscure as much as they reveal. And, why the history of medical progress is filled with so many twists and turns. Plus, why a preference for simple stories has made it so hard to keep track of the pandemic.  1. Katherine J. Wu [@KatherineJWu], staff writer at The Atlantic, on the slippery definitions of our pandemic vocabulary. Listen. 2. Dr. Paul Offit [@DrPaulOffit], professor of pediatrics at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, on why medical progress always carries risk. Listen. 3. OTM correspondent Micah Loewinger [@MicahLoewinger] speaks with Soren Wheeler [@SorenWheeler] and Rachael Piltch-Loeb [@Rpiltchloeb] about why the narrative arc of the COVID-19 pandemic has been deeply unsatisfying. With some help from Kurt Vonnegut. Listen. Music: In the Bath - Randy Newman Milestones - Bill Evans Trio Paperback Writer - Quartetto d'Archi Dell'orchestra Sinfonica di Giuseppe Verdi Quizas Quizas Quizas - Ramon Sole  Misterioso - Kronos Quartet Bewitched, Bothered and Bewildered - Brad Mehldau Trio  

The Brian Lehrer Show
Friday Morning Politics: Budget Reconciliation Bill Latest

The Brian Lehrer Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 37:36


Luke Broadwater, congressional reporter in the Washington bureau of the New York Times, breaks down the latest on the budget reconciliation bill talks and how the House has voted to find Stephen Bannon in criminal contempt of Congress for obstructing the investigation into the January 6th insurrection.

All Of It
A New Live Recording of John Coltrane's 'A Love Supreme'

All Of It

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 12:32


John Coltrane's album, A Love Supreme, is celebrated as one of the most important jazz albums in history. There had only ever been one known live recording of the album in full, that is...until now. Tapes were recently discovered of a performance on October 2, 1965, when Coltrane was recorded at The Penthouse in Seattle. The album, A Love Supreme: Live in Seattle, has been re-mastered for release on October 22. Ashley Kahn, professor of music history at NYU, and Lewis Porter, professor of music at Rutgers University-Newark, who both wrote liner notes for the new release, join us for a Listening Party to talk about the history and importance of the record.

All Of It
Tin Pan Alley Concert

All Of It

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 13:19


On October 23, a group of performers will celebrate the history and landmark designation of New York's Tin Pan Alley with a free concert at the Flatiron North Plaza. American Songbook interpreter and Nighthawks bandleader Vince Giordano joins us along with George Calderaro, director of the Tin Pan Alley American Popular Music Project, to preview the concert and discuss the importance of the site.

All Of It
Listening Party: Helado Negro, 'Far In'

All Of It

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 19:07


Helado Negro, aka singer/songwriter Roberto Carlos Lange, follows up 2019's acclaimed This Is How You Smile with the album Far In, which he calls "the album I've wanted to make for most of my life." He joins us for a release day Listening Party.

All Of It
Fall Book Friday: Miriam Toews's 'Fight Night'

All Of It

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 18:24


Acclaimed novelist Miriam Toews follows up her celebrated book Women Talking with her latest, Fight Night, which tells the story of three generations of Canadian women, alternating between the voice of the grandmother, and the nine year old granddaughter. We speak to Toews as part of our series highlighting exciting fall books each Friday of October.

All Of It
Liz Garbus's New Documentary on Jacques Cousteau

All Of It

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 25:13


In 2019, the Cousteau Society granted Liz Garbus exclusive access to never-before-seen archival video and audio footage of the famed ocean explorer and conservationist, Jacques Cousteau. The result is the new documentary “Becoming Cousteau.” Director and producer Garbus joins us to talk about the making of the film. "Becoming Cousteau" is in theaters now.

The Brian Lehrer Show
COVID News on Mixing and Matching Booster Shots, Vaccines for Children Under 12, and More

The Brian Lehrer Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 21:35


Céline Gounder, infectious disease specialist and epidemiologist at NYU and Bellevue Hospital, host of the podcasts Epidemic and American Diagnosis, and member of the Biden-Harris Transition COVID-19 Advisory Board, discusses latest COVID news including an FDA decision on booster shots and the White House plan to roll out vaccines to children ages 5-11.

Radiolab
Mixtape: Dakou

Radiolab

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 51:05


Through the 1980s, the vast majority of people in China had never heard western music, save for John Denver, the Carpenters, and a few other artists included on the hand-picked list of songs sanctioned by the Communist Party. But in the late 90s, a mysterious man named Professor Ye made a discovery at a plastic recycling center in Heping.In episode 1 of Mixtape, we talk to Chinese historians, music critics, and the musicians who took the damaged plastic scraps of western music, changed the musical landscape of China, and reimagined rock and roll in ways we never could've imagined.   Mixtape is reported, produced, scored and sound designed by Simon Adler with original music throughout by Simon. Invaluable reporting and production assistance was provided by Eli Cohen. Additional reporting by Noriko Ishigaki, Rebecca Kanthor and our amazing anonymous Chinese reporter.    Special Thanks: to Paul de Gay, Juliette Kristensen, Rebecca Tuhus-Dubrow,Nick Lyons, Michael Bull, Jiro Ishikawa, Hayley Zhao, Megan Smalley and Deanne Totto. This episode would not have happened without each and every one of them. Support Radiolab by becoming a member today at Radiolab.org/donate.   

The Brian Lehrer Show
8-Minute Explainer: Kenneth Davis on Halloween History

The Brian Lehrer Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 8:57


For this membership drive, we'll feature a brief explainer on a different topic each day. Today, Kenneth C. Davis, author of Don't Know Much About History and Don't Know Much About Mythology, explains the pagan origins and evolution of Halloween traditions. 

The Brian Lehrer Show
Brian Lehrer Weekend: Sean Ono Lennon on 'Imagine' at 50; Andy Borowitz on Jane Goodall; Spacing Out With Neil deGrasse Tyson

The Brian Lehrer Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 40:15


Three of our favorite segments from the week, in case you missed them. Sean Ono Lennon, musician and son of John Lennon and Yoko Ono, discusses the cultural impact of the song "Imagine," 50 years later (First) | Andy Borowitz, author, comedian, and creator of The New Yorker's “Borowitz Report,” on his recent interview with Jane Goodall (starts around 14:40) | Neil deGrasse Tyson, astrophysicist and director of the Hayden Planetarium at the American Museum of Natural History, talks about space travel and the need for science education (starts around 28:00). If you don't subscribe to the Brian Lehrer Show on iTunes, you can do that here. 

The Brian Lehrer Show
Geo-Puzzle: Westchester

The Brian Lehrer Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 15:22


Will Shortz, NPR's puzzlemaster and The New York Times' crossword puzzle editor, offers word puzzle challenges all about Westchester County to the listeners.

The Experiment
Justice, Interrupted

The Experiment

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 20:54


Last week, Justice Sonia Sotomayor announced that the Supreme Court had broken with tradition and changed its rules for oral argument. This came after a study revealed that women are disproportionately interrupted by men in the highest court in America. This week, we're re-airing a More Perfect episode about the Northwestern University research that inspired the Court's changes. This story originally aired on More Perfect, a Radiolab spin-off about the Supreme Court. A transcript of this episode will soon be made available. Please check back. Be part of The Experiment. Use the hashtag #TheExperimentPodcast, or write to us at theexperiment@theatlantic.com.

The Takeaway
Why Offshore Oil Drilling is So Bad For The Environment 2021-10-21

The Takeaway

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 40:27


Why Offshore Oil Drilling is So Bad For The Environment On October 1, a ruptured pipeline resulted in 25,000 gallons of crude spilling into the Pacific Ocean near Orange County, California. While the spill wasn't as bad as initially feared, it reignited a debate over offshore drilling. California has an aging pipeline infrastructure with questionable federal oversight. And this wasn't the only large oil spill this year. Less than a month ago, after Hurricane Ida, a federal satellite detected the most oil spills from space in the Gulf of Mexico after a weather event. The federal government started using satellites to track spills and leaks starting a decade ago. The Takeaway spoke with Catherine Kilduff, Senior Attorney at The Center for Biological Diversity, and Wilma Subra, who deals with environmental human health issues, on behalf of the Louisiana Environmental Action Network. Biden Administration Plans to Rein In "Forever Chemicals" On Monday, the Biden administration unveiled its plans to rein in so-called “forever chemicals,” or PFAS. PFAS refers to a group of more than 4,000 toxic chemicals that don't break down in the environment. PFAS are found in everything from our drinking water to our cookware. Even some rain jackets and cosmetics contain PFAS. But PFAS are also hazardous for our health. In fact, they've been linked with certain cancers, thyroid disease, and other health impacts, too. For more on this, The Takeaway spoke to Pat Rizzuto, chemicals reporter with Bloomberg Law.  Ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach Are Now Running 24/7 Last week, President Biden announced that the Port of Los Angeles will move towards operating 24/7 to address the shipping delays that have led to nationwide supply chain disruptions this year. The Port of Long Beach has also expanded its operations towards a 24/7 schedule in an attempt to solve the supply chain issue. The Takeaway hears from Dr. Afif El-Hasan, Physician-in-Charge at Kaiser Permanente San Juan Capistrano Medical Offices and spokesperson for the American Lung Association, as well as Mario Cordero, the executive director of the Port of Long Beach. For transcripts, see individual segment pages.   

The New Yorker: Politics and More
The Complicated Legacy of Colin Powell

The New Yorker: Politics and More

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 19:49


Colin Powell was a Vietnam War veteran, a four-star general, and—among other high-level positions in the U.S. government—the Secretary of State under George W. Bush. Powell was well known for his conviction that the United States should go to war only when the likelihood of victory was overwhelming. But then the Bush Administration used his popularity to persuade the public to support the Iraq War, which became one of the greatest military calamities in U.S. history. Dexter Filkins joins Dorothy Wickenden to discuss Powell's long record of public service, and how he shaped post-Cold War foreign policy.

The Takeaway
Why Offshore Oil Drilling is So Bad For The Environment 2021-10-21

The Takeaway

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 40:27


Why Offshore Oil Drilling is So Bad For The Environment On October 1, a ruptured pipeline resulted in 25,000 gallons of crude spilling into the Pacific Ocean near Orange County, California. While the spill wasn't as bad as initially feared, it reignited a debate over offshore drilling. California has an aging pipeline infrastructure with questionable federal oversight. And this wasn't the only large oil spill this year. Less than a month ago, after Hurricane Ida, a federal satellite detected the most oil spills from space in the Gulf of Mexico after a weather event. The federal government started using satellites to track spills and leaks starting a decade ago. The Takeaway spoke with Catherine Kilduff, Senior Attorney at The Center for Biological Diversity, and Wilma Subra, who deals with environmental human health issues, on behalf of the Louisiana Environmental Action Network. Biden Administration Plans to Rein In "Forever Chemicals" On Monday, the Biden administration unveiled its plans to rein in so-called “forever chemicals,” or PFAS. PFAS refers to a group of more than 4,000 toxic chemicals that don't break down in the environment. PFAS are found in everything from our drinking water to our cookware. Even some rain jackets and cosmetics contain PFAS. But PFAS are also hazardous for our health. In fact, they've been linked with certain cancers, thyroid disease, and other health impacts, too. For more on this, The Takeaway spoke to Pat Rizzuto, chemicals reporter with Bloomberg Law.  Ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach Are Now Running 24/7 Last week, President Biden announced that the Port of Los Angeles will move towards operating 24/7 to address the shipping delays that have led to nationwide supply chain disruptions this year. The Port of Long Beach has also expanded its operations towards a 24/7 schedule in an attempt to solve the supply chain issue. The Takeaway hears from Dr. Afif El-Hasan, Physician-in-Charge at Kaiser Permanente San Juan Capistrano Medical Offices and spokesperson for the American Lung Association, as well as Mario Cordero, the executive director of the Port of Long Beach. For transcripts, see individual segment pages.   

The Brian Lehrer Show
Your (Early) Holiday Gift Guide

The Brian Lehrer Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 12:38


Supply chain issues mean that people should get a jump on their holiday gift shopping and ordering if they can. Maxine Builder, editor-in-chief of The Strategist, offers advice on where to start this season and listeners chime in with their own ideas.

The Brian Lehrer Show
Iconic at 50: John Lennon's 'Imagine'

The Brian Lehrer Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 13:01


Sean Ono Lennon, musician and son of John Lennon and Yoko Ono, discusses how John Lennon's 1971 song "Imagine" was shaped by its time and has influenced music for generations to come.

All Of It
'Freestyle Love Supreme' Returns to Broadway

All Of It

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 22:14


"Freestyle Love Supreme" returned to Broadway with a star-studded premiere October 19. We speak to Anthony Veneziale, who co-created the group with Lin Manuel Miranda, along with cast members Andrew Bancroft, Kaila Mullady and Aneesa Folds, about their return to Broadway and the FLS Academy. "Freestyle Love Supreme" is on Broadway at the Booth Theatre through January 2022.

All Of It
An Epic Journey Through 60 Years of Marvel Comics

All Of It

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 14:13


Following our conversation about LGBTQ+ and other representation in comic books, we'll look at the Marvel universe, and the interconnected world that's built between the speech bubbles of dozens of beloved superhero franchises. Douglas Wolk joins us to discuss his new book, All of the Marvels: A Journey to the Ends of the Biggest Story Ever Told, for which he read all of the Marvel comics, or at least around 27,000, give or take.

All Of It
New LGBTQ+ Storylines in Classic Superhero Franchises

All Of It

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 12:35


With the announcement that Superman's son will be bisexual in an upcoming comic, Glen Weldon, host of NPR's Pop Culture Happy Hour, joins to talk about comic culture, and the recent trend of writing LGBTQ+ storylines into classic superhero franchises.

All Of It
'Six' The Musical

All Of It

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 22:15


The British musical “Six” was set to open in March 2020… and then Broadway was shut down. Now the pop musical, which tells the story of the six wives of King Henry VIII, has finally opened. Stars Brittney Mack, Samantha Pauly, and Anna Uzele join us to discuss the show, on now at the Brooks Atkinson Theater.

The Brian Lehrer Show
NYC Mayoral Debate Recap

The Brian Lehrer Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 17:08


Brigid Bergin, WNYC's senior political correspondent and Elizabeth Kim, senior editor for Gothamist, recap the NYC mayoral debate between Republican Curtis Sliwa and the Democratic nominee Eric Adams.

Make Time for Success with Dr. Christine Li
Part 2: Here's What Happened When I Worked with a Professional Organizer with Linda Samuels

Make Time for Success with Dr. Christine Li

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 28:44


This is a special double feature of my guest Linda Samuels, professional organizer.  After appearing in Episode 44 to share her thoughts about how to handle clutter and how to create spaces that feel right, Linda and I worked together during three virtual organizing sessions to address the clutter and organizational needs within my home.  This second episode is a review of what transpired and the important lessons I learned from Linda about handling clutter, organizing for success, and living well.You're going to hear not only my “a-ha” moments, but you're also going to get a sense of what it is like to work with a professional organizer too.  Linda's style of coaching is both warm and highly effective...so listen in to our conversation to join in.Linda Samuels, CPO-CD®, CVPO™, is a compassionate, enthusiastic Professional Organizer and Coach, founder of Oh, So Organized!, Professional Organizer Advisor for Executive Mom Nest, and blogger on organizing and life balance. In addition to offering virtual organizing to clients worldwide, Linda presents workshops, writes, and mentors other Professional Organizers. Media features include WNYC's All of It, The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, HuffPost, Westchester Magazine, and Entrepreneur.com. Linda lives with her husband between two rivers 30 miles north of New York City, in a small, colorful home with a purple front door. They are empty-nesters as their children are in the world living their adult lives.Timestamps: [14:26] The first lesson: Get your thinking in order to avoid overwhelm[17:24] The second lesson: Be aware of your ways of being and your energy as you organize[19:19] How Linda listens for what her clients need and wish for[20:37] The third lesson: Consider what you really want to have happen[21:41] Why clutter often leads to feelings of paralysis and procrastination__________________________________________________________For more information on the Make Time for Success podcast, visit:https://www.maketimeforsuccesspodcast.comConnect with Us!Dr. Christine Li -Website: https://www.procrastinationcoach.comFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/procrastinationcoachInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/procrastinationcoach/Linda Samuels -Website: https://www.ohsoorganized.com/Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/lindasamuels/Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/ohsoorganizedlindasamuels/LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/ohsoorganized/Note: To get access to my free workbook Cut the Clutter based on the work I was able to do in my sessions with Linda Samuels, go to https://www.maketimeforsuccesspodcast.com/clutter

All Of It
Carla Lalli Music's New Cookbook 'That Sounds So Good'

All Of It

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 14:20


James Beard Award-winning cookbook author Carla Lalli Music joins us to discuss her new book, That Sounds So Good: 100 Real-Life Recipes for Every Day of the Week. In the new cookbook, Lalli Music splits the recipes between weekday and weekend cooking so that you can make great food no matter how much time you have.    Fat Noodles with Pan-Roasted Mushrooms and Crushed Herb Sauce 4 to 6 servings This method of cooking mushrooms—by pan-roasting them, then finishing with browned butter—is incredibly effective, whether you're adding them to pasta or not. In the second step, the butter and aromatics wash a ton of flavor over the mushrooms, glossing them up. Kosher salt; freshly ground pepper6 garlic cloves, divided1 lemon½ cup extra-virgin olive oil, divided1 teaspoon mild chile flakes, such as Aleppo pepper1 shallot1 pound maitake mushroomsChunk of Parmigiano, for grating and serving2 cups lightly packed herbs (leaves and tender stems), such as parsley, mint, and/or arugula2 tablespoons unsalted butter1 pound wide pasta noodles, such as lasagnette or pappardelle Bring a large pot of water to a boil and season it very aggressively with salt (figure ¼ cup salt per 6 quarts water). Pick out the smallest garlic clove and finely grate it into a small bowl. Grate in the zest of the lemon, then stir in 2 tablespoons olive oil and the chile flakes. Season oil mixture with salt and pepper and set aside.  Thinly slice the remaining 5 garlic cloves and the shallot. Trim the mushrooms; tear into bite-size pieces. Juice the zested lemon into a small bowl. Grate enough Parm to yield ¼ cup (save what's left for passing at the table). Set all aside.  Add the herbs to the boiling water and cook until very softened, 2 minutes. (Cooking the herbs both mellows and deepens their flavor; they will have less fresh brightness but take on a richer, more vegetal flavor.) Use a mesh spider or tongs to remove the herbs and hold them under cold running water until cool enough to handle, about 10 seconds. Squeeze out as much excess liquid as possible. Thinly slice the herbs and stir them into the oil mixture. Taste and adjust with more salt and chile flakes, if desired. Set the herb sauce aside.  Lower heat under the boiling water to maintain a simmer—you want to get your mushrooms going before starting the pasta. Heat a large Dutch oven over medium-high for 1 minute, then add 3 tablespoons olive oil and half the mushrooms. Cook, tossing, until the mushrooms are coated with oil, then cook, undisturbed, until browned on the underside, 2 to 3 minutes. Season with salt and toss, then cook, stirring occasionally, until the mushrooms are browned all over and cooked through, 4 to 5 minutes more. Transfer mushrooms to a large plate and repeat with the remaining 3 tablespoons oil and mushrooms, then add these mushrooms to the first batch. Bring the water back to a boil. Melt the butter in the Dutch oven over medium heat until it foams, 15 to 30 seconds. Add the sliced garlic and shallot and cook until the garlic and butter are golden brown and the shallot is translucent, about 2 minutes. Return the mushrooms to the pot, along with any accumulated juices, and cook, tossing, until well combined. Lower the heat to keep warm. Meanwhile, add the pasta to the boiling water and cook, stirring occasionally, until very al dente, 2 to 3 minutes less than the time indicated on the package. Use a mesh spider to transfer pasta to the pot with the mushrooms, then add 1 cup of the pasta cooking liquid. Increase the heat to medium and cook, tossing energetically, until a sauce forms that coats the pasta, 2 minutes. Add the ¼ cup grated cheese, 1 tablespoon lemon juice, and another big splash of pasta water and cook, tossing, until cheese is melted and the sauce is clinging to the noodles, 1 to 2 minutes more. Add a few spoonfuls of herb sauce to the pasta and stir to combine. Serve with remaining herb sauce and more cheese at the table. -------------------------From the MarketMild chile flakesShallotTender herbsMaitake mushroomsWide pasta noodles Spin ItInstead of Aleppo pepper, use a smaller quantity of regular red pepper flakes or lots of blackReplace the shallot with ¼ onionThe herbs are truly interchangeable, in any ratio, and can include basil, chives, tarragon, and/or dill Use shiitake, oyster, and/ or cremini mushrooms instead of maitakeBig tubes like rigatoni or paccheri are good too-------------------------At HomeSalt and pepperGarlicLemonOlive oilParmigianoButter Spin ItA few dashes of sherry vinegar or white wine vinegar can replace the lemon juice and zestGrana Padano or pecorino can replace the Parm-------------------------Tall Pot AltIf you don't have a Dutch oven, use a large heavy skillet to cook the mushrooms and combine with the shallot and garlic. Scoop out 2 cups of pasta cooking liquid, then drain the pasta and return to the pot, and build your sauce from there. If the sauce gets tight or sticky, or the cheese clumps together, lower the heat and add more water than you think you should. Cook over low heat, stirring gently but constantly, until the cheese melts and the sauce is smooth. Reprinted from That Sounds So Goodby Carla Lalli Music. Copyright © 2021 by Carla Lalli Music. Photographs copyright © 2021 by Andrea Gentl and Martin Hyers.Published by Clarkson Potter, an imprint of Random House, a division of Penguin Random House LLC.

All Of It
The Impact of 'Squid Game'

All Of It

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 15:03


Morgan Ome, assistant editor at The Atlantic, joins us to talk about the new Netflix smash hit, "Squid Game." The Korean series has captured viewers worldwide as it follows hundreds of cash-strapped contestants who have accepted an invitation to compete in children's games for a tempting prize, but of course, the stakes are deadly. Ome discusses the show and its impact in her recent article, "In Netflix's Squid Game, Debt Is a Double-Edged Sword."

All Of It
What Linda Evangelista's Lawsuit Reveals About Toxic Beauty Standards

All Of It

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 21:20


This month, supermodel Linda Evangelista announced she was suing the company behind the cosmetic procedure CoolSculpting, alleging that she had been “brutally disfigured.” Rhonda Garelick, dean of the School of Art and Design History and Theory at Parsons, joins us to discuss the case, and cosmetic procedures more broadly. She wrote about Evangelista's lawsuit in a piece for The New York Times titled “The Cruel Paradox of Linda Evangelista's Fate.”

The Brian Lehrer Show
8-Minute Explainer: Dion Rabouin on NFTs

The Brian Lehrer Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 8:50


For this membership drive, we'll feature a brief "explainer" on a different topic each day. Today, Dion Rabouin, Wall Street Journal reporter, explains what NFTs are and how they work as investment tools in the economy. 

The Brian Lehrer Show
Your Workplace Politics

The Brian Lehrer Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 14:06


All during the fall pledge drive, Brian is talking to some of our favorite professional advice givers on thorny issues like parenting, creativity and money. Today, Karla L. Miller, columnist for The Washington Post, offers advice on listener's workplace dramas and traumas.

The Brian Lehrer Show
Andy Borowitz on Jane Goodall

The Brian Lehrer Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 12:24


Andy Borowitz, author, comedian, and creator of The New Yorker's “Borowitz Report,” a satirical news column, recaps his New Yorker festival interview with Jane Goodall.

The Takeaway
Deep Dive with Dorian Warren: Child Care 2021-10-20

The Takeaway

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 47:38


Deep Dive with Dorian Warren: Child Care In this installment of The Takeaway Deep Dive, we tackle the very personal system of child care. Affordable child care is often inadequately addressed in the United States. That was laid bare during the height of the pandemic which exposed the inequities of a system that is in need of drastic changes and repair. Joining our hosts to discuss what changes need to be made to the child care system is Aqeela Muntaqim, Michigan Deputy Director of Mothering Justice, and Karen D'Souza, a writer at Ed Source, an organization that works to engage Californians on key education challenges with the goal of enhancing learning success. Sept. 16, 2021, file photo Pre-K teacher Vera Csizmadia teaches 3-and 4-year-old students in her classroom at the Dr. Charles Smith Early Childhood Center in Palisades Park, N.J. (Mary Altaffer/AP Photo) The Shadow Pandemic: Covid Creates Population of Orphaned Children A devastating number of children have lost a parent or caregiver to Covid, and they lack the financial and emotional support they need. Federal statistics are not yet available on how many U.S. children went into foster care last year; however, researchers estimate COVID-19 drove a 15% increase in orphaned children. JoNel Aleccia, senior correspondent at Kaiser Health News, discusses the impact of Covid on our children and the need for more support. For transcripts, see individual segment pages.     

The New Yorker: Poetry
Forrest Gander Reads Ada Limón

The New Yorker: Poetry

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 31:22


Forrest Gander joins Kevin Young to read “Privacy,” by Ada Limón, and his own poem “Post-Fire Forest.” Gander is a Chancellor of the Academy of American Poets, a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the winner of a Pulitzer Prize for his collection “Be With.”

Death, Sex & Money
Succession's J. Smith-Cameron On Old Haunts and New Normals

Death, Sex & Money

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 34:26


A few weeks ago, I was back in New York City for the first time since 2019. It was great—I saw coworkers in person, and I had lunch at one of my old spots, the Waverly Diner, with actor J. Smith-Cameron. She's best known for playing no-nonsense general counsel Gerri on Succession, but J. has had a long career as a stage actress in New York, on- and off-Broadway. She's also a neighborhood mainstay in the West Village, and over omelets and egg creams, she and I talked about the many phases of her life she's spent there, getting ready to send her only daughter off to college abroad this fall, and how acting has taught her to slow down and observe the world going by, one thing at a time—a skill she says was invaluable during the pandemic.

The Takeaway
Deep Dive with Dorian Warren: Child Care 2021-10-20

The Takeaway

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 47:38


Deep Dive with Dorian Warren: Child Care In this installment of The Takeaway Deep Dive, we tackle the very personal system of child care. Affordable child care is often inadequately addressed in the United States. That was laid bare during the height of the pandemic which exposed the inequities of a system that is in need of drastic changes and repair. Joining our hosts to discuss what changes need to be made to the child care system is Aqeela Muntaqim, Michigan Deputy Director of Mothering Justice, and Karen D'Souza, a writer at Ed Source, an organization that works to engage Californians on key education challenges with the goal of enhancing learning success. Sept. 16, 2021, file photo Pre-K teacher Vera Csizmadia teaches 3-and 4-year-old students in her classroom at the Dr. Charles Smith Early Childhood Center in Palisades Park, N.J. (Mary Altaffer/AP Photo) The Shadow Pandemic: Covid Creates Population of Orphaned Children A devastating number of children have lost a parent or caregiver to Covid, and they lack the financial and emotional support they need. Federal statistics are not yet available on how many U.S. children went into foster care last year; however, researchers estimate COVID-19 drove a 15% increase in orphaned children. JoNel Aleccia, senior correspondent at Kaiser Health News, discusses the impact of Covid on our children and the need for more support. For transcripts, see individual segment pages.     

On the Media
Colin Powell's Pivotal Moment That Wasn't

On the Media

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 29:37


Colin Powell, former Secretary of State, Joint Chiefs chairman, and omnipresence in American foreign policy for the past 20 years, died on Monday from complications from COVID-19. He was 84-years-old and been sick for years with multiple myeloma, a rare blood cancer.  Colin Powell was many things to many people. A symbol of the American dream. The public voice — for a time — of the Iraq War. A so-called “RINO,” or Republican-in-name-only. A good soldier. Though widely remembered as a barrier-breaking hero by folks across the aisle, in his death, as in life, there are those who are using Colin Powell as an opportunity for scoring political points.  Looking back at the life of Colin Powell, it is worth recalling that he was once one of America's most popular public officials, polling favorably among 85 percent of Americans in a 2002 Gallup poll. But what Colin Powell is perhaps most remembered for is his 2003 presentation to the UN Security Council explaining the existence of weapons of mass destruction in Iraq. A little over a year later, Powell went on NBC's Meet the Press and essentially retracted his assertion, saying it "turned out that the sourcing was inaccurate and wrong and in some cases deliberately misleading." Brooke speaks with Fred Kaplan, a veteran reporter on foreign policy and national security, long-time writer of Slate's "War Stories" column, and even longer-time husband of Brooke, about the life and legacy of Colin Powell.

All Of It
Tom Petty Documentary on the Making of 'Wildflowers'

All Of It

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 19:58


Wildflowers is widely considered Tom Petty's greatest solo album and some of the best writing of his whole career. A new documentary uses unearthed footage of Petty and present-day interviews with the people involved to show how it came together. Director Mary Wharton joins alongside Petty's daughter Adria Petty and Heartbreakers guitarist Mike Campbell (who played on all Petty's solo ventures) to discuss "Tom Petty, Somewhere You Feel Free: The Making of 'Wildflowers.'" The film premieres in theaters worldwide today, October 20th, on what would have been Petty's 71st birthday, with encore screenings in select locations starting October 21st. 

The Brian Lehrer Show
Geo-Quiz: New Jersey

The Brian Lehrer Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 17:11


U.S. Senator Cory Booker (D, NJ), a former mayor of Newark, quizzes listeners on how well they know the Garden State.  ...Where is E Street?

The Brian Lehrer Show
World Politics Roundup, And A Climate Summit Preview

The Brian Lehrer Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 17:42


Ishaan Tharoor, Washington Post columnist and author of Today's WorldView and the Post's international affairs newsletter joins to talk about the latest in world news, including a preview of the global COP26 summit on climate change.

The Brian Lehrer Show
8-Minute Explainer: SallyAnn Mosey on Weather Forecasting

The Brian Lehrer Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 9:11


For this membership drive, we'll feature a brief explainer on a different topic each day. Today, meteorologist SallyAnn Mosey explains what goes into creating a weather forecast.

The Brian Lehrer Show
Are You In a Cooking Rut?

The Brian Lehrer Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 13:32


All during the fall pledge drive, Brian is talking to some of our favorite professional advice givers on thorny issues like parenting, creativity and money. Today, Melissa Clark, New York Times food columnist and cookbook author, answers listener's cooking questions and ingredient quandaries.

The Brian Lehrer Show
Spacing Out With Neil deGrasse Tyson

The Brian Lehrer Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 14:13


Neil deGrasse Tyson, astrophysicist and director of the Hayden Planetarium at the American Museum of Natural History, a host of the StarTalk Radio podcasts, one of the authors of A Brief Welcome to the Universe: A Pocket-Sized Tour (Princeton University Press, 2021), and the author of Cosmic Queries: StarTalk's Guide to Who We Are, How We Got Here, and Where We're Going (National Geographic, 2021), talks about space travel and the need for science education.

The Brian Lehrer Show
Tuesday Morning Politics: Congress Investigating Jan. 6, Biden Pushing 'Build Back Better' Agenda

The Brian Lehrer Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 17:08


Claudia Grisales, congressional reporter at NPR, brings the latest national political news, including Trump's lawsuit against the Jan. 6 Select Committee and the National Archives, and Biden's efforts to convince Congress to move on his legislative priorities.

The Brian Lehrer Show
Geo-Quiz: Long Island

The Brian Lehrer Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 16:53


Larry Levy, vice president of Economic Development and Professional Studies and executive dean of the National Center for Suburban Studies at Hofstra University, quizzes listeners on how well they know Long Island.

The New Yorker Radio Hour
Jon Stewart: “That's Not Cancel Culture”

The New Yorker Radio Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 21:51


“The Daily Show with Jon Stewart” defined an era. For more than sixteen years, Stewart and his many correspondents skewered American politics. At the 2021 New Yorker Festival, Stewart spoke with David Remnick about his new show, “The Problem with Jon Stewart”; the potential return of Donald Trump to the White House; and the controversy around cancel culture in comedy. “What do we do for a living?” Stewart asks, of comedians. “We criticize, we postulate, we opine, we make jokes, and now other people are having their say. And that's not cancel culture, that's relentlessness.”