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  • 572PODCASTS
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  • May 17, 2022LATEST

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Best podcasts about wnyc

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Latest podcast episodes about wnyc

The Takeaway
Turning to Faith in the Wake of Tragedy

The Takeaway

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 11:00


Reverend Jacqui Lewis is Senior Minister at Middle Collegiate Church. She is the author of Fierce Love: A Bold Path to Ferocious Courage and Rule-Breaking Kindness That Can Heal the World and the host of the “Love.Period.” Podcast. Reverend Jacqui Lewis a regular of the show and she always leaves our listeners with a timely message about the power of love and radical acceptance. We spoke with the Reverend Jacqui Lewis, Senior Minister at Middle Collegiate Church about how she's making sense of the tragic Buffalo massacre. 

The Takeaway
The Painful Echoes of 20th Century Racist Violence

The Takeaway

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 15:12


This past weekend, a gunman who appears to have been motivated by white supremacy shot and killed ten people in Buffalo, New York, where he traveled to target the city's Black community. The tragic shooting is one of several disturbing massacres motivated by hate that have occurred in recent years. But the history of race based violence dates back to the beginning of what is now the United States, and some of the recent racially motivated attacks call to mind the racist violence that targeted Black communities in the early 20th century. The Takeaway speaks with Jelani Cobb, historian, staff writer at The New Yorker and incoming dean at the Columbia Journalism School.

The Brian Lehrer Show
How Will Congress Solve the Baby Formula Shortage

The Brian Lehrer Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 20:50


Helena Bottemiller Evich, senior food and agriculture reporter at Politico, joins to discuss what's behind the nationwide shortage of baby formula and how Congress is responding.

Brian Lehrer: A Daily Politics Podcast
We're Sending Troops To Somalia? We Ask Fareed Zakaria Why

Brian Lehrer: A Daily Politics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 23:03


With the ongoing war in Ukraine and the leaked news that President Biden is sending some troops to Somalia, we asked an international affairs expert to explain the latest geopolitics. On Today's Show:Fareed Zakaria, Washington Post columnist, host of CNN's "Fareed Zakaria GPS," and the author of Ten Lessons for a Post-Pandemic World (W. W. Norton & Company, 2020), offers his analysis of the Biden Administration's decision to send troops to Somalia, new members looking to join NATO and the latest on the war in Ukraine. His new CNN special is "Inside the Mind of Vladimir Putin."

The Brian Lehrer Show
Fareed Zakaria on Somalia, Ukraine and More

The Brian Lehrer Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 25:31


Fareed Zakaria, Washington Post columnist, host of CNN's "Fareed Zakaria GPS," and the author of Ten Lessons for a Post-Pandemic World (W. W. Norton & Company, 2020), offers his analysis of the Biden Administration's decision to send troops to Somalia, new members looking to join NATO and the latest on the war in Ukraine. His new CNN special is "Inside the Mind of Vladimir Putin."

The Brian Lehrer Show
51 Council Members in 52 Weeks: District 20, Sandra Ung

The Brian Lehrer Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 25:11


The majority of the New York City Council members are new, and are part of a class that is the most diverse and progressive in city history. Over the next year Brian Lehrer will get to know all 51 members. This week, Councilmember Sandra Ung talks about her priorities for District 20 in Queens, which includes Flushing, Murray Hill, Queensboro Hill, Mitchell-Linden, and Fresh Meadows. 

The Brian Lehrer Show
How Buffalo is Coping

The Brian Lehrer Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 39:03


Tyrell Ford, lead community organizer for VOICE Buffalo, talks about how the community is coping after this past weekend's racist mass shooting, and what they need going forward.

All Of It
Taking Care of You in 2022: 'Big Feelings' and Regret

All Of It

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 20:14


Recently, we were joined by Mollie West Duffy and Liz Fosslein, authors of a new book, Big Feelings: How to Be Okay When Things Are Not Okay. We enjoyed the conversation so much, and had so much more to talk about from the book, that we decided to invite Liz and Mollie back for every show this week to take on one big feeling a day, and take your calls as part of our ongoing series, "Taking Care Of You in 2022" and for Mental Health Awareness month. Today, Liz joins us to discuss regret.

All Of It
Emma Straub's New Novel 'This Time Tomorrow'

All Of It

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 22:11


The latest novel from author and Books Are Magic owner Emma Straub tells the story of a woman who, on the eve of her 40th birthday, is transported back in time to her 16th birthday. This time travel allows her to see her dad, himself 40 in 1996, in an entirely new light. Emma joins us to discuss her novel, This Time Tomorrow.

All Of It
A 1970s Underground Abortion Network in 'The Janes'

All Of It

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 18:53


A new documentary tells the story of seven women who formed an underground network for women seeking a safe abortion in pre-Roe Chicago. Directors Tia Lessin and Emma Pildes join us to discuss their film, "The Janes," which will screen as part of the upcoming Human Rights Watch Film Festival from May 20-26, and will be available to screen on HBO Max starting on June 8.

All Of It
Asian Americans and Mental Health Awareness

All Of It

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 26:58


The month of May in the United States is both Mental Health Awareness Month and Asian American Pacific Islander (AAPI) Heritage Month. Dr. Jenny T. Wang, a Taiwanese-American clinical psychologist who also founded the Instagram account @asiansformentalhealth, has written a new book that combines the spirit of both month-long celebrations, called, Permission To Come Home: Reclaiming Mental Health as Asian Americans. The book comes after the pandemic caused a rise in hate crimes against Asian-Americans in the United States. Dr. Wang joins us to talk about the importance of seeking mental health care as an Asian-American, as well as the obstacles that make care harder, and take your calls.

The Takeaway
Applying to College While Asian

The Takeaway

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 15:24


In her new film, "Try Harder," Debbie Lum takes viewers through the reality of the American college application process and the intersections of race, class, educational opportunity and attainment.  The documentary focuses on students who attend Lowell High School in San Francisco California, a school known for academic excellence. Asians represent the majority of the student body, but all of the students at Lowell high school face intense pressure from their families and peers to get into the most competitive colleges.   

The New Yorker Radio Hour
The Comedian Megan Stalter on Finding Inspiration in American Absurdity

The New Yorker Radio Hour

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 28:18


Before the pandemic, Megan Stalter was an unknown comedian, trying to catch a lucky break at clubs in New York City. But with the arrival of COVID-19, social media became her only outlet, and she quickly found an audience with her short-form, D.I.Y. character videos,  portraying the “breadth of American idiocy,” as Michael Schulman puts it, with such accuracy and heart that it's hard to turn away. After her rise to Internet fame—she was dubbed the “queen of quarantine”—Stalter was offered the part of Kayla, the overprivileged and clueless assistant, on HBO's hit series “Hacks.”  It was her first acting job.  Plus, Helen Rosner joins the chef Andy Baraghani in his home kitchen for a lesson on cauliflower ragu. Baraghani, best known for his YouTube cooking videos for Bon Appetit, is out with a new cookbook called “The Cook You Want to Be.”

The Takeaway
The Political Power of White Evangelicals

The Takeaway

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 32:33


Since the 1970s white evangelicals have become increasingly powerful in American elections and increasingly influential in American policy making.   We explore the history, contemporary power, and likely future of white evangelicals in American politics with Anthea Butler, Geraldine R. Segal Professor in American Social Thought and Chair of Religious Studies at the University of Pennsylvania and author of White Evangelical Racism: The Politics of Morality in America, and Randall Balmer, professor of religion at Dartmouth College and author of several books including Evangelicalism in America and Bad Faith: Race and the Rise of the Religious Right.

The Brian Lehrer Show
On Abortion and Religious Faith

The Brian Lehrer Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 18:32


Many Evangelical Christian churches and The Catholic Church have lobbied for decades to outlaw the right to an abortion, but not all people of faith agree. Reverend Dr. Jacqueline Lewis senior minister at the Middle Church and author of Fierce Love: A Bold Path to Ferocious Courage and Rule-Breaking Kindness that Can Heal the World (Harmony, 2021) talks about how abortion rights fit into her religious and moral values, and listeners from different faiths do the same. Plus, Rev. Dr. Lewis reflects on the racist mass shooting this weekend in Buffalo, and talks about how Middle Collegiate addressed it at church yesterday.

All Of It
New Art Exhibition Explores How the African Diaspora Influenced Cultures Around the World

All Of It

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 12:09


Black Atlantic is a new exhibition from the Public Art Fund, exploring how the African diaspora and history of transatlantic slave network have influenced cultures around the world, from Europe to the Americas. The show features work from black artists born in Africa, the U.S, and Canada. Curators Hugh Hayden and Daniel S. Palmer join to discuss the exhibition, which is on view until November 27. *This segment is guest-hosted by David Furst.

The Takeaway
Comedian Matt Rogers on the Joys of Pop Culture

The Takeaway

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 25:44


Comedian Matt Rogers is well known as co-host of the podcast “Las Culturistas” with Bowen Yang. On the show, Rogers and Yang dissect everything from the Real Housewives franchise to Taylor Swift to the Oscar frontrunners. The podcast has a devoted following, and this spring, Rogers is set to break out on screen in the Showtimes series, “I Love That for You,” and the Hulu movie, “Fire Island.” Rogers joins The Takeaway to talk about his new roles and weigh in on some of the pieces of pop culture that most excite him today.

The Takeaway
Comedian Matt Rogers on the Joys of Pop Culture

The Takeaway

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 25:44


Comedian Matt Rogers is well known as co-host of the podcast “Las Culturistas” with Bowen Yang. On the show, Rogers and Yang dissect everything from the Real Housewives franchise to Taylor Swift to the Oscar frontrunners. The podcast has a devoted following, and this spring, Rogers is set to break out on screen in the Showtimes series, “I Love That for You,” and the Hulu movie, “Fire Island.” Rogers joins The Takeaway to talk about his new roles and weigh in on some of the pieces of pop culture that most excite him today.

All Of It
New Podcast Investigates Jan. 6 U.S. Capitol Attack

All Of It

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 28:24


Andrea Bernstein and Ilya Marritz join to talk about their new podcast, Will Be Wild, from Pineapple Media, which investigates the preludes to, and the aftermath of, the January 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol. *This segment is guest-hosted by David Furst.

The Takeaway
The Political Power of White Evangelicals

The Takeaway

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 32:33


Since the 1970s white evangelicals have become increasingly powerful in American elections and increasingly influential in American policy making.   We explore the history, contemporary power, and likely future of white evangelicals in American politics with Anthea Butler, Geraldine R. Segal Professor in American Social Thought and Chair of Religious Studies at the University of Pennsylvania and author of White Evangelical Racism: The Politics of Morality in America, and Randall Balmer, professor of religion at Dartmouth College and author of several books including Evangelicalism in America and Bad Faith: Race and the Rise of the Religious Right.

All Of It
Taking Care of You in 2022: Managing Perfectionism

All Of It

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 15:44


Recently, we were joined by Mollie West Duffy and Liz Fosslien, authors of a new book, Big Feelings: How to Be Okay When Things Are Not Okay. We enjoyed the conversation so much, and had so much more to talk about from the book, that we decided to invite Liz and Mollie back for every show this week to take on one big feeling a day, and take your calls as part of our ongoing series, "Taking Care Of You in 2022" and for Mental Health Awareness month. Today, Liz will join us to discuss the dangers of perfectionism. *This segment is guest-hosted by David Furst.

The New Yorker: Politics and More
The Battle After Roe v. Wade

The New Yorker: Politics and More

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 19:24


Assuming that Justice Samuel Alito's final opinion in the Mississippi abortion case Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization gets majority support, there will be profound social, political, and health-care implications across the United States. Margaret Talbot, Peter Slevin and Jia Tolentino assess the world after Roe. Opponents will surely not stop by leaving abortion at the state level but will try to ban it under federal law. Tolentino discusses fetal personhood, the legal concept that a fertilized egg is entitled to full legal rights, which severely compromises the bodily autonomy of a pregnant woman. There is already speculation that access to birth control and same-sex marriage could be challenged. “If people feel panicked about all those things, I wouldn't invalidate that,” Tolentino says. But focussing on the immediate post-Roe future, she says, presents enough to worry about. “This is a universe of panic on its own.”

Brian Lehrer: A Daily Politics Podcast
How Liking and Retweeting Made The Buffalo Massacre More Likely

Brian Lehrer: A Daily Politics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 22:43


How has social media shaped society, and particularly, how has it contributed to some of the violence and bigotry we see in our culture today? On Today's Show:It may have begun with promise, but Jonathan Haidt, social psychologist for New York University's Stern School of Business, argues that social media has ripped apart the fabric of society over the past decade. He offers his analysis, and thoughts on how to overcome the major problems it has created.

The United States of Anxiety
Somebody, Sing a Black Girl's Song

The United States of Anxiety

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 49:25


An intergenerational meditation on Ntozake Shange's iconic Broadway play, For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Suicide/When the Rainbow Is Enuf. First, host Kai Wright and producer Regina de Heer speak with the director and choreographer of the current Broadway Revival, Camille A. Brown. Then, performers Trezana Beverley, Aku Kadogo, and Carol Maillard reminisce on the original production and working with the show's legendary creator, Ntozake Shange.   A special thanks to actor Francina Smith for her reading of "Dark Phrases." Companion listening for this episode: Lynn Nottage: Unexpected Optimist (1/3/2022) Playwright Lynn Nottage breaks down her remarkable career and shares how, as an optimist at heart, she finds the light and resilience in unexpected stories.  “The United States of Anxiety” airs live on Sunday evenings at 6pm ET. The podcast episodes are lightly edited from our live broadcasts. To catch all the action, tune into the show on Sunday nights via the stream on WNYC.org/anxiety or tell your smart speakers to play WNYC.    We want to hear from you! Connect with us on Twitter @WNYC using the hashtag #USofAnxiety or email us at anxiety@wnyc.org.

Soundcheck
Wardruna: Nordic Folk Music of the Ancients, Rooted in Nature (Archives)

Soundcheck

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 34:50


Norwegian band Wardruna creates music born of Nordic history, Norse runes and nature - and is led by multi-instrumentalist and songwriter Einar Selvik, who composed music for the TV series Vikings. (He was formerly the drummer in the black metal band Gorgoroth under stage name Kvitrafn, for those keeping track.)  Hear a captivating combination of old and recreated Norse historical instruments: Tagelharpa (bowed harp-lyre), birchbark lure (a trumpet), goat horns, Kraviklyra, instruments from nature: stones, bones, trees, fire and ice, along with sounds captured in nature, vocal techniques of many kinds, and ancient poetry. The 2018 record, Runaljod – Ragnarok, is the third of a trilogy of musical interpretations of each of the twenty-four old Nordic runes (the word rune can also mean magical song). Wardruna performs some of their unusual, spiritual, ancient sounding-modern ritual music in-studio. (From the Archives, 2018.)  -Caryn Havlik Set list: "Wunjo," "Isa," "Helvegen" Watch "Helvegen":

All Of It
A New Documentary About A 21-Year-Old Millionaire's Announcement to Give Away His Fortune In 1970

All Of It

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 18:18


In 1970, 21-year-old millionaire Michael Brody Jr. announced that he would give away his 25-million-dollar fortune to anyone in need. A new documentary, "Dear Mr. Brody," traces Brody's story and the frenzied fallout from his announcement. We speak to the film's director, Keith Maitland. *This segment is guest-hosted by David Furst.

All Of It
Devo Play Their Hits at Pier 17

All Of It

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 19:42


New Wave band DEVO will be performing their hits at Pier 17 on May 18. Founding members Mark Mothersbaugh and Gerald Casale join us with a preview.

The Brian Lehrer Show
What Social Media Did to the World

The Brian Lehrer Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 22:48


It may have begun with promise, but Jonathan Haidt, social psychologist for New York University's Stern School of Business, argues that social media has ripped apart the fabric of society over the past decade. He offers his analysis, and thoughts on how to overcome the major problems it has created.

The Brian Lehrer Show
Culture Wars and New York's School Boards

The Brian Lehrer Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 40:35


New York's school board elections are on Tuesday. Gary Stern, education editor and reporter for The Journal News/lohud.com, part of the USA TODAY Network, and Craig Burnett, political science professor at Hofstra University, talk about how culture war issues, such as critical race theory and mask mandates, have cropped up in school board races across the state.

The Brian Lehrer Show
Yet Another Racist Mass Shooter

The Brian Lehrer Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 28:06


Michael Edison Hayden, senior investigative reporter and spokesperson with the Southern Poverty Law Center's Intelligence Project, talks about the racist, white supremacist motivations of the shooter who allegedly killed 10 people in a supermarket in Buffalo, New York.

The Takeaway
Listening to Black Holes? You Heard Me!

The Takeaway

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 8:53


On Thursday, May 12th, astronomers announced that they finally had proof of a super massive black hole in The Milky Way after years of speculation. The Event Horizon Telescope Team shared an image of the black hole named Sagittarius A*, which is 4 million times the mass of our sun. We speak with Chanda Prescod-Weinstein, professor of physics and astronomy and core faculty in women's and gender studies at the University of New Hampshire and author of The Disordered Cosmos: A Journey into Dark Matter, Spacetime, and Dreams Deferred, to talk about Sagittarius A* and the significance of this discovery. Music in this Segment by Sarah Mucho: (https://sarahmucho.bandcamp.com/track/black-hole-sun)

The Takeaway
Study Finds Many American Mayors Face Political Violence

The Takeaway

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 7:37


Recent results from a survey conducted by the Women Mayors Network indicates that nearly all mayors report experiences with threat and harassment. The problem is particularly acute for women and women of color mayors. We speak with Heidi Gerbracht, Founder and director of the Equity Agenda and Co-founder of the Women Mayors Network, about what this reveals about the health of our democracy.  

The New Yorker Radio Hour
The Battle After Roe v. Wade

The New Yorker Radio Hour

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 20:51


The leaked opinion from the Supreme Court on the Mississippi abortion case Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization seems to promise a transformation. Assuming the final opinion by Justice Samuel Alito gets majority support, there will be profound social, political, and health-care implications across the United States—not only in the states that will immediately ban abortion.  David Remnick speaks with three New Yorker writers who have been considering the future of abortion access: Margaret Talbot, Peter Slevin, and Jia Tolentino. Plus, Michael Schulman talks with the comedian Meg Stalter of HBO's hit show “Hacks,” and Helen Rosner pays a visit to the chef Andy Baraghani in Brookhaven, New York.

The Brian Lehrer Show
Brian Lehrer Weekend: Eric Holder; Baby Formula Shortage; The Future of Ocean Life

The Brian Lehrer Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 88:34


Three of our favorite segments from the week, in case you missed them. Eric Holder and Sam Koppelman on Voting Rights  (First) | Parents Grapple with the Baby Formula Shortage (Starts at 38:00) | Unchecked Emissions and the Threat of Mass Marine Extinction (Starts at 55:10) If you don't subscribe to the Brian Lehrer Show on iTunes, you can do that here.

Science Friday
Abortion Medication, Rat Island, Access To Parks, Climate And Seafood. May 13, 2022, Part 2

Science Friday

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 47:24


Abortion Pills Are Used For Most U.S. Abortions. What Are They? The draft Supreme Court decision overturning Roe v. Wade means abortion access is once again in jeopardy. Nearly half of U.S. states will immediately ban abortion upon a Roe v. Wade overturn. Medication abortion, or abortion by pill, is currently the most common method of abortion in the United States. In 2020, 54% of abortions in the United States were medication abortions, according to research from the Guttmacher Institute. If the Supreme Court decision is overturned, it's expected that the ease and convenience of an abortion pill may make medication abortion an even larger share of all abortions nationwide. Ira talks with Ushma Upadhyay, associate professor of obstetrics, gynecology and reproductive sciences at Advancing New Standards in Reproductive Health at UC San Francisco. Upadhyay explains how medication abortion works, how its regulated, and its role in a possible post Roe v. Wade era.   One Alaskan Island's Fight For A Rodent-Free Future For millions of years, birds lived nearly predator free in the Aleutian Islands. The volcanic archipelago stretches westward for 1,200 miles from the Alaska Peninsula, dotting a border between the North Pacific Ocean and Bering Sea. Hundreds of bird species thrived here. But then came the rats. When a Japanese boat sank in the Western Aleutians around 1780, stowaway rats jumped ship and made it to one of the islands, wreaking havoc on the ecosystem. The rodents proliferated during World War II, when American Navy ships traveled along the chain, expanding the rats' domain. “The rats are like an oil spill that keeps on spilling, year after year,” said Steve Delehanty, the refuge manager for the Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge. “We would never allow an oil spill to go on for decades or centuries, nor should we allow rats to be a forever-presence on these islands.” Read the rest at sciencefriday.com. Campsites At National Parks ‘Harder Than Getting Beyonce Tickets' Access to the outdoors has long had an equity problem. Whether it's the expense of equipment or hostility from fellow hikers, marginalized groups have had more barriers to enjoying recreation in nature. Now, new research in the Journal of Park and Recreation Administration has data on one tool that was supposed to improve access for more people: the online system of reserving campgrounds at national parks. Compared to people camping at first-come first-serve campsites in the same parks, the people who successfully use the reservation systems are wealthier, better-educated, and more likely to be white. Ira talks to research co-author Will Rice about the factors that make reservations harder to access, how wealthier people succeed in working the system to their advantage, and how publicly-funded campgrounds like the national parks could more fairly manage rising demand.   How Restaurant Menus Mirror Our Warming Ocean Before the 1980's, you probably wouldn't have found Humboldt squid on a restaurant menu in Vancouver. But now, the warm water-loving critter has expanded towards the poles as ocean temperatures rise, and you can see that change on restaurant menus. In a new study in the journal Environmental Biology of Fishes, researchers from the University of British Columbia looked at more than 360 menus, dating back to 1880. They found a connection between climate change and which seafood types rose to fame on restaurant menus over the years… and which ones flopped off. Ira speaks with study co-author Dr. William Cheung about how our menus mirror what's happening to our oceans. Plus, a conversation with Chef Ned Bell about why it's important that our plates adapt to changes in our local ecosystems.   Transcripts for each segment will be available the week after the show airs on sciencefriday.com.

Science Friday
Second Black Hole Image, Last Days Of The Dinosaurs, Rising COVID Cases. May 13, 2022, Part 1

Science Friday

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 47:21


As COVID Cases Rises, Effectiveness Of Vaccines Lessens In Kids As parts of the country continue to see waves of infection from the omicron variant of COVID-19, parents of children over age five have taken heart at the availability of vaccines—while parents of kids five and under have continued to wait for an approved dose. But even as the case numbers continue to climb, the vaccines are less effective against the more-virulent omicron variants—and, for some reason, dramatically less effective in kids. Koerth joins Ira to discuss the story, and why experts say it's still worthwhile getting vaccinated even if the vaccines don't have the dramatic performance seen at the beginning of the vaccination phase of the pandemic. They also talk about a bird flu outbreak troubling poultry farms around the world, the odd immune system of the sleepy lizard, and how scientists are trying to catch a whiff of the odors of ancient Egypt.   Meet The ‘Gentle Giant,' Your Friendly Neighborhood Black Hole It wasn't long ago that the idea of capturing an image of a black hole sounded like a joke, or an oxymoron. How do you take a picture of something so dense that it absorbs the very light around it? But three years ago, we got our first good look with help from the Event Horizon Telescope, which is actually multiple radio telescopes all linked together. That picture was a slightly blurry, red-and-orange doughnut—the best picture to date of the supermassive black hole at the center of a galaxy called Messier 87, which is called Messier 87* or M87*. (Black holes are given an asterisk after the name of their location). Today, it's possible to buy jewelry and t-shirts with that picture, drink out of a M87*-adorned coffee cup, or just make it your phone background. Now that the first picture of a black hole is practically a pop culture meme, how do you one-up that? In the past weeks, the Event Horizon Telescope team alluded to a new ‘breakthrough' hiding in the Milky Way. On Thursday, the team unveiled that breakthrough: the first image of our nearest black hole neighbor in the heart of our galaxy. Sagittarius A* is a “gentle giant,” says Feryal Ozel, a member of the global collaboration that created this image. It consumes far less of the gas swirling nearby than M87*, and is far fainter as a result. The Milky Way's black hole also lacks the galaxy-spanning jets of M87* and, due to its smaller size, the gas around it moves so fast that it took years longer to capture a clear picture. Ira talks with Ozel about what it takes to obtain such a picture, and what it can tell us about the extreme, high-temperature physics of black holes throughout the universe.   What Was It Like To Witness The End Of The Dinosaurs? 66 million years ago, a massive asteroid hit what we know today as the Yucatán Peninsula of Mexico. Many people have a general idea of what happened next: The age of the dinosaurs was brought to a close, making room for mammals like us to thrive. But fewer people know what happened in the days, weeks, and years after impact. Increased research on fossils and geological remains from this time period have helped scientists paint a picture of this era. For large, non-avian dinosaurs like Triceratops and Tyrannosaurus rex, extinction was swift following the asteroid impact. But for creatures that were able to stay underwater and underground, their post-impact stories are more complicated. Joining Ira to discuss her book The Last Days of the Dinosaurs is Riley Black, science writer based in Salt Lake City, Utah.   Transcripts for each segment will be available the week after the show airs on sciencefriday.com.

The Brian Lehrer Show
The iPod Days Are Over

The Brian Lehrer Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 15:15


Apple announced this week it will stop manufacturing the iconic iPod. Tripp Mickle, New York Times reporter covering Apple, talks about the end of this era for Apple, and listeners call in to share their nostalgia for the way we listened to music on the go in the aughts.  

Brian Lehrer: A Daily Politics Podcast
Bill de Blasio Has Some Popularity Advice For Joe Biden

Brian Lehrer: A Daily Politics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 22:02


In politics, popularity is about selling a policy agenda to the public. On Today's Show:Bill de Blasio, former mayor of New York City, draws from his experience and offers advice to President Biden and the Democratic Party on messaging.

On the Media
Seeing Is Believing

On the Media

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 50:17


With Roe v Wade under threat, some politicians and media outlets are trying to turn the national conversation away from abortion and toward civility. On this week's On the Media, how the GOP has mastered the art of setting the narrative. Plus, how moral panics surrounding dangerous TikTok trends follow a century-old pattern of blaming new technology for the deviant behavior of teenagers. 1. Paul Waldman [@paulwaldman1], opinion writer for the Washington Post, on Republicans decrying the draft opinion leak and protests to motivate their base ahead of the midterms. Listen. 2. Micah Loewinger [@MicahLoewinger], OTM correspondent, on alarmist news coverage of TikTok challenges and its misleading influence on panicked parents. Listen. 3. Brandy Zadrozny [@BrandyZadrozny], senior reporter for NBC News, on the story of Tiffany Dover, and how misinformation about her death fueled anti-vax messaging. Listen. Music: Fallen Leaves by Marcos Ciscar The Camping Store by Clive Carroll and John Renbourn Coffee Cold by Galt MacDermot Middlesex Times by Michael Andrews 

The Brian Lehrer Show
The Marcos' Return to Power in the Philippines

The Brian Lehrer Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 27:18


Adrian De Leon, assistant professor of American Studies & Ethnicity at the University of Southern California, discusses the election of Ferdinand “Bongbong” Marcos Jr., gives context of the Marcos family history and what this means for democracy in the Philippines.

The Brian Lehrer Show
Former Mayor de Blasio on Democratic Politics

The Brian Lehrer Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 43:11


Bill de Blasio, former mayor of New York City, draws from his experience and offers advice to President Biden and the Democratic Party on messaging.

The Takeaway
The Federal Prison System is in Crisis

The Takeaway

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 19:58


An ongoing Associated Press investigation into the Federal Bureau of Prisons is uncovering rampant employee misconduct, coverups, under-staffing and neglect across the agency's 122 prisons. We speak with The Marshall Project reporter, Keri Blakinger, and president of the AFGE Local 506 union for correctional officers, Joe Rojas, about the corruption and abuse and how that impacts the lives of employees and incarcerated people.

The Brian Lehrer Show
What Went Wrong With a School Diversity Plan in Queens?

The Brian Lehrer Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 21:33


Queens is one of the most diverse places on earth. But like a lot of New York City, it's also segregated. Mark Winston Griffith, executive editor of Brooklyn Deep and co-host of the podcast School Colors, now on NPR's Code Switch and Max Freedman, co-host of the podcast School Colors and the creator and producer of the podcast Unsettled, talk about their reporting into a school diversity plan in District 28 in Queens that proved to be hugely controversial.

The Takeaway
ICE Restarts Visitations at Detention Facilities

The Takeaway

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 8:22


This week, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) announced that they will be phasing visitations back in for people being held at their detention facilities. In-person visitations from family, friends, and advocates have been halted since the start of the pandemic based on Covid-19 concerns, according to ICE. Unlike ICE, the federal prison system allowed visitations to resume starting in October 2020. The move is a promising sign for people being held by ICE and their loves ones, but the fact that it took so long reveals the extent to which the needs of ICE detainees are often ignored by the federal government. The Takeaway speaks with Luis Romero, assistant professor in the department of Comparative Race and Ethnic Studies at Texas Christian University, with a focus on immigration enforcement, about the importance of visitation for those held in ICE detention and other changes that immigrant rights advocates want ICE to make.

All Of It
'18 New York City Hacks to Make Your Life Easier'

All Of It

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 16:46


In April, TimeOut editors released "18 New York Hacks to Make Your Life Easier" from apps that tell you where clean bathrooms are or where to stand for the subway. We'll review the list with TimeOut New York editor Shaye Weaver and take listeners calls about their own personal hacks.

All Of It
Dan Auerbach on His Production Career

All Of It

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 13:29


[REBROADCAST FROM MARCH 9, 2021] Dan Auerbach of The Black Keys has won eight Grammys, including Producer of the Year in 2013. In 2019, he was nominated in the same category, and at the 63rd annual awards ceremony he was nominated for the award a third time. He joins us to discuss his career and the production credits that earned him the nomination.

All Of It
A New Album from The Black Keys

All Of It

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 24:24


The Black Keys are back with a new album, Dropout Boogie, their 11th studio album. The release comes one year after their last record, Delta Kream, and around the 20th anniversary of the release of their debut album, The Big Come Up. Drummer Pat Carney joins us for a release day Listening Party.

Radiolab
Frailmales

Radiolab

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 35:52


This week, we bring you two stories about little guys trying to do big big things. First, self-proclaimed animal grinch producer Becca Bressler introduces us to perhaps the one creature that has warmed her heart: a cricket. And more specifically, a male cricket. This is a tale about a tiny Romeo insect trying to find a mate, and the ingenious lengths he'll go to have his beckoning heard. And second, producer Annie McEwen journeys through perhaps the zaniest game of football that has ever been played. When a ragtag group of players take on the top team, will it be an underdog tale for the ages or an absolute disaster? Special thanks to Stephen Spann and Joshua Baxter at the Doris and Harry Vice University Library at Cumberland University as well as Alison Reynolds at Georgia Tech Library. Thanks also to Rick Bell, and to Scott Larson who wrote a book all about this game called Cumberland: The True Story of the Highest Scoring Football Game in History. And finally, thanks so much to our tape syncer Ambriehl Crutchfield for her help with this episode.  If you're still interested in learning more about this epic football game, be sure to check out this brilliant and hilarious video by sportswriter Jon Bois.   Support Radiolab by becoming a member of The Lab today.     Radiolab is on YouTube! Catch up with new episodes and hear classics from our archive. Plus, find other cool things we did in the past — like miniseries, music videos, short films and animations, behind-the-scenes features, Radiolab live shows, and more. Take a look, explore and subscribe!

On the Media
How the Depp v. Heard Trial Became a Meme

On the Media

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 12:53


This week, we take a look at the latest celebrity trial to ensnare the national attention. Johnny Depp is suing Amber Heard, his ex-wife, for defamation, and she's counter suing him for the same. Depp's suit takes issue with an op-ed Heard wrote back in 2018 for the Washington Post in which she identifies herself as a survivor of domestic violence. She first came forward with allegations against Depp in 2016. In 2018, Depp sued British tabloid, The Sun, for defamation over headlines that accused him of abuse, but he lost that case. Given the history, you might expect to see fewer headlines over this latest trial. But, not so. The ratings for Court TV, which is broadcasting every moment of the trial, have more than doubled. Pair the live visuals with Depp's rabid online fanbase, and you've got a case being watched billions of times over — in fact, the #JusticeforJohnnyDepp hashtag has upwards of 10 billion views on TikTok and it's spawned several viral sounds and trends and … comedy sketches. Guest host Brandy Zadrozny asks EJ Dickson, senior writer for Rolling Stone, about how pro-Depp coverage of the case took over TikTok, and its consequences.

The Experiment
Teenage Life After Genocide

The Experiment

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 47:39


At 19 years old, Aséna Tahir Izgil feels wise beyond her years. She is Uyghur, an ethnic minority persecuted in China, and few of her people have escaped to bear witness. After narrowly securing refuge in the United States, Aséna's now tasked with adjusting to life in a new country and fitting in with her teenage peers.  This week on The Experiment, Aséna shares her family's story of fleeing to the U.S., navigating newfound freedom, and raising her baby brother away from the shadows of a genocide.  This episode's guests include Aséna Tahir Izgil and her father, Tahir Hamut Izgil, a Uyghur poet and author. This episode of The Experiment originally ran on August 19, 2021. A transcript of this episode is available. Further reading: “One by One, My Friends Were Sent to the Camps,” “Saving Uighur Culture From Genocide,” “‘I Never Thought China Could Ever Be This Dark,'” “China's Xinjiang Policy: Less About Births, More About Control” Be part of The Experiment. Use the hashtag #TheExperimentPodcast, or write to us at theexperiment@theatlantic.com. This episode was produced by Julia Longoria, with help from Gabrielle Berbey and editing by Katherine Wells and Emily Botein. Fact-check by Yvonne Rolzhausen. Sound design by David Herman, with additional engineering by Joe Plourde. Translations by Joshua L. Freeman. Music by Keyboard (“Over the Moon,” “Mu,” “Water Decanter,” and “World View”), Laundry (“Lawn Feeling”), Water Feature (“Richard III (Duke of Gloucester)” and “Ancient Morsel”), Parish Council (“New Apt.”), and H Hunt (“C U Soon), provided by Tasty Morsels. A translation of Tahir Hamut Izgil's poem “Aséna” is presented below.  Aséna By Tahir Hamut Izgil Translation by Joshua L. Freeman   A piece of my flesh torn away. A piece of my bone broken off. A piece of my soul remade. A piece of my thought set free.   In her thin hands the lines of time grow long. In her black eyes float the truths of stone tablets. Round her slender neck a dusky hair lies knotted. On her dark skin the map of fruit is drawn.   She is a raindrop on my cheek, translucent as the future I can't see.   She is a knot that need not to be untied like the formula my blood traced from the sky, an omen trickling from history.   She kisses the stone on my grave that holds down my corpse and entrusts me to it.   She is a luckless spell who made me a creator and carried on my creation.   She is my daughter.