Podcasts about hard days

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Best podcasts about hard days

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Latest podcast episodes about hard days

The Chris Plante Show
1-18-23 Hour 2 - KJP Had a Hard Day

The Chris Plante Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 40:27


For more coverage on the issues that matter to you download the WMAL app, visit WMAL.com or tune in live on WMAL-FM 105.9 from 9:00am-12:00pm Monday-Friday. To join the conversation, check us out on twitter @WMAL and @ChrisPlanteShow Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Corona Diaries
Chapter 141. Sounds that nearly weren't made

The Corona Diaries

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2023 62:57


For the purposes of reference this week (you may need to read back after you have listened).Staithes - Staithes is a seaside village in the borough of Scarborough in North Yorkshire, England. The name Staithes derives from Old English and means 'landing-place'. Staithes has numerous narrow streets and passageways; one of these, Dog Loup, with a width of just 18 inches (45.7 cm), is claimed to be the narrowest alley in the world.Old Jacks Boat - The CBeebies series Old Jack's Boat, starring Bernard Cribbins, is set in and filmed in Staithes, with Old Jack's house located at 4 Cowbar Bank in the town. The first two series each had two stories written by Russell T Davies, with whom Bernard Cribbins had previously worked on Doctor Who.Bernard Cribbins - Bernard Joseph Cribbins OBE was an English actor and singer whose career spanned over seven decades. His on-screen roles Albert Perks in The Railway Children, pretentious hotel guest Mr Hutchinson in the Fawlty Towers episode "The Hotel Inspectors", Alfred Mott in Doctor Who and as the narrator of The Wombles. He wasn't however in The Plank or A Hard Day's Night, which proves we haven't got a clue what we are banging on about. Well, bugger me!Love'n'wikipediah TCD Merch StoreBecome Purple and support the showThe Invisible Man Volume 1: 1991-1997The Invisible Man Volume2: 1998-2014FacebookInstagramWebsite

Emotionally Healthy Legacy- Stress management, mindset shifts, emotional wellness, boundaries, self care for moms

I feel you. I just recently had one of those days. Everything was off. Sick kids, attitude and rudeness from older kids, I was worn out. I just needed to shift something. Today I share with you what I do when I have a rough day w/ kids to support myself. How I get the negative energy out and shift into the positive. I honestly don't like feeling stuck in a 'mood'.  I do what I can do get out of it. It's not a matter of if you will have a challenging day...but a matter of when. As moms, well as humans, we all have tough days and I think its important to know what helps you to lower your stress and feel better after a long day. If you ignore things, it will bleed into all other areas of your life. Get support: Stand alone Coaching callEmotionally Healthy Mom Course 1:1 Coaching 

Songs From The Basement
Episode 160: Basement Beatles: Something New / A Hard Days Night Album (Covers)

Songs From The Basement

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2023 41:21


Hello Beatleteers...Happy New Year and welcome back to a series that's been only sleeping.  To start out the fresh new year we will feature an american album from the Beatles called: Something New and some songs from the Hard Days Night SDTK album as well. All these songs were from the same period anyway so we thought why not put them all together.BUT....Listener be where, these songs are mostly from other artists not the Beatles....except one. You will hear songs from: The Beach Boys / Crow / Blue Ash / The Jalopy 5 and The Smithereens and a few more.So here we go with the almost Beatles.....Something New Album   COVERS1. I'll Cry Instead-Joe Cocker2. Things We Said Today-The Sandpipers 3. Anytime At All-Blue Ash4. When I Get Home-Yellow Matter Custer5. Slow Down-Crow6. Matchbox-The Jalopy 57. Tell Me Why-The Beach Boys8. And I Love Her-Roy Hamilton9. I'm So Happy Just To Dance With You-The Cyrcle10. If I Fell-The Smithereens11. Kum Gyp Yo Danna Hand-The BeatlesA Hard Days Night SDTK1. A Hard Days Night-King's Road2. Can't Buy Me Love-Me & The Boys3. I Should Have Known Better-Johnny Rivers

My Favourite Beatles Song
A Hard Day's Night — Ivor Davis

My Favourite Beatles Song

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2022 34:30


Award winning author and journalist Ivor Davis accompanied the Beatles on their first tour of America in 1964. Later, he was present when they met Elvis and Bob Dylan. He reminisces about his time with the band and discusses the hit single and title song from their first movie, A Hard Day's Night.Ivor's website: https://www.ivordavisbooks.comIvor on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ivordavisauthorIvor on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/cockneykid1/

Men, Divorce, Porters, and Hurricanes
Chapter 22- Hard (Day)

Men, Divorce, Porters, and Hurricanes

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2022 7:51


Divorce court is never fun. And it's always hard to talk about.

Trusting God every day
Today was a hard day, but I am still alive

Trusting God every day

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2022 9:45


As hard as it was today I am still here. I'm still alive. I am not giving up.

EXPAND Podcast with Laura Poburan
Ep. 138 - How To Soften On The Hard Days

EXPAND Podcast with Laura Poburan

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2022 38:49


The conversation around self doubt and wanting to give up in our industry needs to change. After a disheartening experience with a past mentor around this ^ topic, I vowed never to make someone else feel alone & never to put myself above another. From that place, I really committed to a new depth of vulnerability with you and with myself. In this episode, I felt emotionally hung over from a day filled with self doubt. It would be so easy for me to pretend that didn't happen. No one saw me yesterday, I didn't have to show up on camera. I wasn't teaching, I wasn't creating, I was just with myself. In those moments as leaders in this space, we have the option to either hide those parts of our journey away or share them. So today, I'm sharing with you that I myself struggle with cyclical patterns of self doubt.So many of the people that I work with are rebels, they are the black sheep...they're the people who don't fit seamlessly into the programs that give you a formula and 'promise' you that it's going to work. I imagine you're probably similar. I want to invite you to practice holding space around what it is that's coming up for you when you're having a day where you feel...misunderstood. When you experience difficult emotions and need to lean back into trust. I hope this episode speaks to you when you most need it.---I'm here to help you develop a sturdy confidence and unique potency in the way you communicate with, connect to, and show up for your clients – and yourself. If you desire to link arms with me in a bigger way, here's a few ways we can do that...

Dr. John Barnett on SermonAudio
ACL-37 - Living Sacrifices in Hard Days

Dr. John Barnett on SermonAudio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2022 11:00


A new MP3 sermon from DTBM, International is now available on SermonAudio with the following details: Title: ACL-37 - Living Sacrifices in Hard Days Speaker: Dr. John Barnett Broadcaster: DTBM, International Event: Sunday Service Date: 12/6/2022 Bible: Authentic Christian Living - James (Short Clips Length: 11 min.

About What?
44. About Movie Time: A Hard Day's Night

About What?

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2022 62:33


Ty and Justin review the first Beatles Movie: A Hard Day's Night. Follow the Beatles through an average day as they travel to the studio for a performance with Paul's very notably clean, but trouble-making granddad in tow. They scrub up at the hotel, meet with the press, then enter the studio for rehearsal before losing Ringo who was upset by Paul's granddad and goes for a walk. Meanwhile the troublemaker gets picked up for trying to sell autographed pictures of the band and winds up in the jail next to Ringo. But true to form, Paul's clean troublemaking granddad decides to break out of the joint and go get the lads to come get Ringo out. And in the end it worked out alright with excellent performances every step of the way. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/about-what/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/about-what/support

The Dreamers Podcast | Motivation and Self improvement
EP. 116 - Make the most of the GOOD days, to COMPENSATE for the INEVITABLE HARD DAYS!

The Dreamers Podcast | Motivation and Self improvement

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2022 14:25


What I have learnt through trying to be as consistent is the importance of making the most of the good days. What I mean by good days, is the days we feel happy, energetic and confident. We need to use these days to work on the things we need to get done. Hard days are inevitable and we need to mitigate the time hard days waste. SUPPORT and EARLY access to the weeks podcasts!: https://www.patreon.com/TheDreamersPodcast JOIN SKILLSHARE: skillshare.eqcm.net/TheDreamersPodcast The Dreamer's Podcast Newsletter: https://www.getrevue.co/profile/thedreamerspodcast TikTok: @LewKirtland Thinking about starting a podcast? (My equipment) Microphone: https://amzn.to/3SmT92n Audio Interface: https://amzn.to/3dri2ev Microphone Cables to interface: https://amzn.to/3LC5zkD Apple Laptop 15 inch but go with whatever you think is best for you: https://amzn.to/3BSRg86 Microphone adjustable arm: https://amzn.to/3xEIg3L The Books I'm reading: https://amzn.to/3eGRbeq https://amzn.to/3hl9TK2 https://amzn.to/3UlpS9v https://amzn.to/3WKukAf https://amzn.to/3Egucl0 30 day FREE trial Audible: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Audible-Free-Trial-Digital-Membership/dp/B00OPA2XFG?tag=dreamerspodca-21

Good Humans with Cooper Chapman
1% Pod - Me sharing my hard day.

Good Humans with Cooper Chapman

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 13:30


Today was rough, and I felt it was important to share this with everyone. Just talking about it on this episode has made me feel so much lighter.This episode is proudly sponsored by Ārepa Brain Performance Drink! Use code - GOODHUMAN for 25% off.SHOP AREPA HERE - https://drinkarepa.com/collections/all-products/AREPA BRAINFOOD POWDER - www.drinkarepa.com/products/arepa-nootropic-powder-150g?variant=43161198624998Use code PODCAST for 25% off GOOD HUMAN FACTORY Merch - www.thegoodhumanfactory.com/collections/allCooper's SocialsINSTAGRAM - www.instagram.com/cooperchapman/?hl=enTIK TOK - www.tiktok.com/@cooperchapman_?lang=enThe Good Human FactoryINSTAGRAM - www.instagram.com/thegoodhumanfactory/?hl=enWebsite - www.thegoodhumanfactory.com/Enquire about a workshop - https://www.thegoodhumanfactory.com/pages/workshopsTHE GOOD HUMAN FACTORY™️ 2020 Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Ranking The Beatles
#129 - Things We Said Today with guest Laurie Jacobson (author, "Top of the Mountain: The Beatles at Shea Stadium 1965")

Ranking The Beatles

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 62:57


Paul McCartney seems to always have a fondness for looking through time. He looks to older age in songs like "When I'm 64," too his own passing in "The End of The End" from Memory Almost Full. He presents quasi case studies in the music of yesteryear with songs like "Honey Pie" or "Your Gave Me The Answer." With "Things We Said Today," he's looking to the future to look at the present, thinking that one day, what he's experiencing NOW will be but a memory. Or something like that. That's how he explains it at least, and who am I to argue? Presented on the back half of A Hard Day's Night, "Things We Said Today" is a somber look at a relationship he already seems to know may not last. Its driven by an energetic acoustic guitar and a fantastic McCartney melody with some nice chord movements. Additionally, being an acoustic based, up-tempo, minor key song, it stands out on an album that's pretty filled up with John-dominated rockers as a song with a bit of sophistication. And while it's definitely a really good song, I don't necessarily think it's a great one. It seems to serve as a blue print for things Paul would go on to do better in the coming years, and as such, I don't find myself thinking of it all that often. When I do though, I definitely enjoy it, it just feels like....it's a bit lighter than I remember it? Joining us this week is author and Hollywood Historian Laurie Jacobson. Her newest book, Top of the Mountain: The Beatles at Shea Stadium 1965 is a fantastic recounting of the entire journey of the concert event that changed live music, as told from interviews with people who helped put the show on, performers on the bill, and people in the audience, many of whom are now well known figures. We can't recommend it enough, it's a great read! We talk about Shea, seeing the Beatles live, nightly Beatle rituals, and also, I had a cold when we recorded this, so apologies if my voice is a bit scratchy at times. The show must go on as they say. Grab a copy of Laurie's book at lauriejacobson.com or anywhere you get good books! What do you think? Too high? Too low? Or just right? Let us know in the comments on Facebook, Instagram @rankingthebeatles, or Twitter @rankingbeatles! Be sure to visit rankingthebeatles.com! Wanna show your support? Buy Us A Coffee! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/rankingthebeatles/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/rankingthebeatles/support

Good Humans with Cooper Chapman
1% Pod - We all have hard days.

Good Humans with Cooper Chapman

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 13:30


Today was rough, and I felt it was important to share this with everyone. Just talking about it on this episode has made me feel so much lighter.This episode is proudly sponsored by Ārepa Brain Performance Drink! Use code - GOODHUMAN for 25% off.SHOP AREPA HERE - https://drinkarepa.com/collections/all-products/AREPA BRAINFOOD POWDER - www.drinkarepa.com/products/arepa-nootropic-powder-150g?variant=43161198624998Use code PODCAST for 25% off GOOD HUMAN FACTORY Merch - www.thegoodhumanfactory.com/collections/allCooper's SocialsINSTAGRAM - www.instagram.com/cooperchapman/?hl=enTIK TOK - www.tiktok.com/@cooperchapman_?lang=enThe Good Human FactoryINSTAGRAM - www.instagram.com/thegoodhumanfactory/?hl=enWebsite - www.thegoodhumanfactory.com/Enquire about a workshop - https://www.thegoodhumanfactory.com/pages/workshopsTHE GOOD HUMAN FACTORY™️ 2020 Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Book Bistro
Most Anticipated Releases of December

Book Bistro

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 48:08


This week, Brooke, Kristeen, Shannon, Stacy, and Georgina are discussing some of their most anticipated December releases. Titles mentioned include: Darby Kane, The Last Invitation Hannah Morrissey, The Widowmaker Kosoko Jackson, A Dash of Salt and Pepper Lia Louis, The Key To My Heart Kitty Zeldis, The Dressmakers of Prospect Heights Laura Bates, No Accident Darynda Jones, A Hard Day for a Hangover (Sunshine Vicram #3) Sonali Dev, The Vibrant Years Melissa Baron, Twice In a Lifetime Imogen Clark, An Unwanted Inheritance Terri Parlato, All the Dark Places Dunya Mikhail, The Bird Tattoo Rachel Kapelke-Dale, The Ingenue Freya Barker, High Impact (High Mountain Trackers #4) Mariah Stewart, All That We Are (Wyndham Beach #3) You can always contact the Book Bistro team by searching @BookBistroPodcast on facebook, or visiting: https://www.facebook.com/BookBistroPodcast/ You can also send an email to: TheBookBistroPodcast@gmail.com For more information on the podcast and the team behind it, please visit: http://anchor.fm/book-bistro

The Ledge (mp3)
The Ledge #543: Power Pop, Pt. 1 (The Past)

The Ledge (mp3)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2022 144:10


On a fairly regular basis I’m asked what type of music I most enjoy. It’s a pretty tough question to answer, to be honest. The standard answer I hear in return is “I love all kinds of music”, which to me is code for “I only like what’s popular”. Sorry, but having a playlist on Spotify that includes both Drake, Meghan Trainor, and Luke Bryan isn’t the proof of versatility most of these poeple believe it is. So what is the genre or sub-genre that is closest to my heart? “Punk” is a little too confining, and honestly there is a lot of shitty music under that moniker. “Alternative” doesn’t mean the same today as it did 30 years ago since maintstream rock radio has co-opted it. “Garage rock” is indeed getting closer but still doesn’t feel right. I think deep in my heart the term power pop, or at least my version of the term, best describes my music taste. I was, after all, born the day The Beatles recorded their first single, and the first two rock and roll albums I owned just out of my toddler phase was the first Monkees record and the A Hard Day’s Night soundtrack.  My […]

Real Punk Radio Podcast Network
The Ledge #543: Power Pop, Pt. 1 (The Past)

Real Punk Radio Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2022


On a fairly regular basis I'm asked what type of music I most enjoy. It's a pretty tough question to answer, to be honest. The standard answer I hear in return is “I love all kinds of music”, which to me is code for “I only like what's popular”. Sorry, but having a playlist on Spotify that includes both Drake, Meghan Trainor, and Luke Bryan isn't the proof of versatility most of these poeple believe it is. So what is the genre or sub-genre that is closest to my heart? “Punk” is a little too confining, and honestly there is a lot of shitty music under that moniker. “Alternative” doesn't mean the same today as it did 30 years ago since maintstream rock radio has co-opted it. “Garage rock” is indeed getting closer but still doesn't feel right. I think deep in my heart the term power pop, or at least my version of the term, best describes my music taste. I was, after all, born the day The Beatles recorded their first single, and the first two rock and roll albums I owned just out of my toddler phase was the first Monkees record and the A Hard Day's Night soundtrack.  My […]

Not So Serious with Dani Fernandez
13. Motivation vs. Discipline. How to keep going even on hard days & why motivation is not going to take you far...

Not So Serious with Dani Fernandez

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 31:50


Some of my favorite quotes: "Self-discipline is the act of moving forward in life without losing hope and is the foundation of keeping the soul in perfect balance to help keep the mind at the peak of health" "Self-discipline is an act of cultivation. It requires you to connect today's actions to tomorrow's results." -Gary Ryan Blair. "Small disciplines repeated with consistency every day lead to great achievements gained slowly over time." - John C. Maxwell. "When a man is sufficiently motivated, discipline will take care of itself." -Albert Einstein. In recovery (and in life) YOU WILL HAVE HARD DAYS! And is up to you to keep going even on those days where it feels impossible and almost impossible to keep going :) Here are some of my tips to keep going on those days! IG: @danifernandez.go --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/daniela-fernandez61/support

Overcome the Overwhelm for Special Needs Moms
59. 3 Things to Focus on During the Hard Days

Overcome the Overwhelm for Special Needs Moms

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 20:06


On the days full of anxiety and stress, it can feel like inner peace is downright impossible. In this episode, I share the 3 areas to shift your focus to in order to make things feel a little bit lighter, less overwhelming , and more peaceful. **** Enrollment for Surviving the Holidays is officially open! This four-week group coaching program will help you through the hardest time of year. I'm teaching how to navigate the grief being triggered when buying your special needs child presents, how to handle those dreaded family gatherings, and how to bring back the joy to this season. To sign up, go to: https://lowerylifecoaching.com/holiday/

Broadcasts – Christian Working Woman
Don't Let the Hard Days Win

Broadcasts – Christian Working Woman

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2022 14:28


(Presented by Lisa Bishop) What do you do when the hard days come? Several years ago, a friend recommended a book to me. I was eager to get it and start reading. When I cracked the book open and turned to the first page, the first three words were, “Life is difficult.” I didn't know whether to throw the book across the room and regret paying $14.99 or to keep reading and risk being bummed out for the remaining 243 pages. Who starts a book with “life is difficult?” But it's the truth isn't it? Life is difficult. You will have hard days, weeks, months…. sometimes years. Maybe you are having one now. Maybe you are in a long season of “difficult” and you see no end in sight. Maybe you are experiencing the pain and loneliness of singleness. You feel isolated and alone. Or, your kid is struggling and you don't know what to do. Your marriage is on the rocks and it seems irreparable. Perhaps you are experiencing the repercussions of poor choices. Maybe it's job loss. Sickness. Deafening silence in a broken friendship, heartbreak or the demands of a job that are overwhelming. Financial troubles. Depression. Anxiety. Aging parents. Facing your own mortality. What do you do when life just seems hard to bear? As a friend of mine says, “Life is complex and messy, sometimes brutally so, but…… there is a way to look at the mess.” How do you live in the “but?” How do we live in the mess with the lens of heaven? It will take disciplining your thoughts. It will take trust in God, and oftentimes it takes sheer determination to remember and hold onto truth. It will take courage, the state of mind and belief that enables you to face difficulty and pain. With the shield of faith and the belief in God's nearness and faithfulness, over the filter of fear. It will take resisting the temptation to deconstruct your faith when life is hard and take the disappointment and pain as a cue to lean into Jesus. When you are in pain or doubt, it can be tempting to run from the only source of comfort and trade God in for manmade gods. To be lured away from standing firm and lulled by things you think will bring comfort and relief but are only temporary and will never fulfill the deepest longing of your soul that only Jesus Christ can fill. Instead of lashing out and running away from God, how do we remember to cry out to Jesus and run towards him? It doesn't take long to realize the multitude of examples of the men and women in the Bible whose stories tell us how they faced major trials in their lives, and how God proved himself faithful every single time. We need these stories as reminders because sometimes in the midst of our own pain, we forget. That is why as a follower of Jesus it is absolutely essential that you are in the Word of God, daily. God's Word is what renews your mind and reminds you of what is true. There are so many things vying for your attention and affection on a daily basis, it can be easy to be pulled off track. It can be easy to forget God's character. It can be all too tempting to fail to remember his faithfulness. In order to acknowledge that “life is complex and messy, sometimes brutally so, but…”. In order to live in the “but” we need to look at the Word of God. We need to remember the character of God. Because the world and your circumstances will scream loudly at you. Tempting you to turn away in defeat and forget. One story that you may be familiar with is the story of Job. Now, before you have an allergic reaction to the word Job like I have in the past, hang with me because I promise you when you read and understand Job's story in the way God intended, you will be encouraged in the midst of whatever struggle you are facing. The story of Job seems so complex yet so poignant. The story ultimately and beautifully displays the sovereignty of God in the midst of suffering. Before we look at Job's story there is a quote from A.W. Tozer that has always stuck with me that I want to share with you.

Cracker Classics
#133 - A Rigid Milk Pyramid

Cracker Classics

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 31:05


The movie: A Hard Day's Night (1965) Joshua and Ian throw on their mop-top wigs and scream at The Beatles, giving them a glimpse at what life was like on speed in the mid '60s.

GTFO (Get the Fad Out): A Modern Girl's Guide to Dieting.

Todays episode is all about REAL LIFE, stress, self care when life is hard, and taking care of yourself through it.

Teacher Talk with Chrissy Nichols
73. No Hard Days at School: How to get to Neutral

Teacher Talk with Chrissy Nichols

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 7:35


Hard days at school actually do not exist without your mind. It's true! The hard or bad is not made by the day. The hard or bad is made by our thoughts about the day. A day at school is neither hard nor easy without your thoughts making it so! In episode 73 you will learn: -how coaching your mind helps you to get to the cause -how to have a more neutral stance about your day -how to make a thought choice about the kind of day you want to have -how you can take responsibility for the kind of day you want to have I reference the thought leader Marianne Williamson. For more about her, go to https://marianne.com. Resources: Follow Chrissy on Instagram @chrissyconcept. Sign up for a FREE 30 minute coaching call. More About Teacher Talk with Chrissy Nichols: Teacher Talk is the podcast for educators like you who are on the brink of burnout, or are already there. It's your guide to feeling better about being at school and being in your life. Your host, Chrissy Nichols, is a life coach for teachers. In her weekly episodes, she will give you quick tools, tips, and brain hacks to understand that there is absolutely nothing wrong with you. It's time to find the joy in teaching again and get back to feeling like the best version of yourself.

Geoffrey Mark Plays Ella
Ella: Live in Germany, Show 1, Part 4

Geoffrey Mark Plays Ella

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 22:45


 This week: The first of two programs celebrating a series of four albums circa 1960 to 1965 in which Ella performed live in Germany, including selections from Ella in Berlin, the famous concert album from 1961 for which Ella won two Grammys. Tracks this segment include Give Me The Simple Life (Live In Berlin, 1961), My Kind Of Boy (Live), Summertime (Live), Too Darn Hot- Mack The Knife, Cheek To Cheek (Live), Good Morning Heartache (Live), A Hard Day's Night, The Lady is a Tramp- Mack The Knife, Jersey Bounce (Live), Old McDonald Had A Farm, You're Driving Me Crazy, Here's That Rainy Day, Wee Baby Blues (Live), Joe Williams Blues (Live In Berlin, 1961). This edition of GPE was produced by Ed Robertson Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Geoffrey Mark Plays Ella
Ella: Live in Germany, Show 1, Part 3

Geoffrey Mark Plays Ella

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 16:34


 This week: The first of two programs celebrating a series of four albums circa 1960 to 1965 in which Ella performed live in Germany, including selections from Ella in Berlin, the famous concert album from 1961 for which Ella won two Grammys. Tracks this segment include Give Me The Simple Life (Live In Berlin, 1961), My Kind Of Boy (Live), Summertime (Live), Too Darn Hot- Mack The Knife, Cheek To Cheek (Live), Good Morning Heartache (Live), A Hard Day's Night, The Lady is a Tramp- Mack The Knife, Jersey Bounce (Live), Old McDonald Had A Farm, You're Driving Me Crazy, Here's That Rainy Day, Wee Baby Blues (Live), Joe Williams Blues (Live In Berlin, 1961). This edition of GPE was produced by Ed Robertson Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Geoffrey Mark Plays Ella
Ella: Live in Germany, Show 1, Part 2

Geoffrey Mark Plays Ella

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 17:30


 This week: The first of two programs celebrating a series of four albums circa 1960 to 1965 in which Ella performed live in Germany, including selections from Ella in Berlin, the famous concert album from 1961 for which Ella won two Grammys. Tracks this segment include Give Me The Simple Life (Live In Berlin, 1961), My Kind Of Boy (Live), Summertime (Live), Too Darn Hot- Mack The Knife, Cheek To Cheek (Live), Good Morning Heartache (Live), A Hard Day's Night, The Lady is a Tramp- Mack The Knife, Jersey Bounce (Live), Old McDonald Had A Farm, You're Driving Me Crazy, Here's That Rainy Day, Wee Baby Blues (Live), Joe Williams Blues (Live In Berlin, 1961). This edition of GPE was produced by Ed Robertson Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Geoffrey Mark Plays Ella
Ella: Live in Germany

Geoffrey Mark Plays Ella

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 22:57


 This week: The first of two programs celebrating a series of four albums circa 1960 to 1965 in which Ella performed live in Germany, including selections from Ella in Berlin, the famous concert album from 1961 for which Ella won two Grammys. Tracks this segment include Give Me The Simple Life (Live In Berlin, 1961), My Kind Of Boy (Live), Summertime (Live), Too Darn Hot- Mack The Knife, Cheek To Cheek (Live), Good Morning Heartache (Live), A Hard Day's Night, The Lady is a Tramp- Mack The Knife, Jersey Bounce (Live), Old McDonald Had A Farm, You're Driving Me Crazy, Here's That Rainy Day, Wee Baby Blues (Live), Joe Williams Blues (Live In Berlin, 1961). This edition of GPE was produced by Ed Robertson Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

No Filler Music Podcast
Rewind: A Hard Day's Nightmare - The Music of Uncle Acid & The Deadbeats

No Filler Music Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 28:52


We get it: if you have to hear Monster Mash one more time, your boombox will be the only thing getting graveyard smashed. If you're in need for some new tunes for your costume party tonight, we've got you covered. Uncle Acid & The Deadbeats takes psychedelic rock and doom metal and mashes it with The Manson Family, Universal Monsters, and all the other horror film essentials on your October watch list. And of course, singer K.R. Starrs is an absolute vocal doppelgänger for John Lennon. What more could you ask for? Turn the lights down low, light some candles, and tune in for our bonus Halloween episode.TracklistWitches GardenWithered Hand of EvilMurder NightsI See Through YouVampire CircusThis show is part of the Pantheon Podcast network.

The Best Show with Tom Scharpling
Improve a Movie by Adding a Dirtbike

The Best Show with Tom Scharpling

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 76:19


BEST SHOW BESTS! What movie could be improved by adding a dirtbike? Listeners call in and pitch Tom on their ideas, including Troy, A Hard Day's Night, Punch Drunk Love, and more! (Originally Aired December 20th, 2020). New to the Best Show? Check out Best Show Bests, the greatest hits of The Best Show! Streaming every Thursday night on Twitch at 6pm PT and available every Friday on your podcast app. WATCH THE BEST SHOW LIVE EVERY TUESDAY NIGHT 6PM PT ON TWITCH https://www.twitch.tv/bestshow4life SUPPORT THE BEST SHOW ON PATREON: https://www.patreon.com/TheBestShow WATCH VIDEO EPISODES OF THE BEST SHOW: https://www.youtube.com/bestshow4life FOLLOW THE BEST SHOW: https://twitter.com/bestshow4life https://instagram.com/bestshow4life https://tiktok.com/@bestshow4life THE BEST SHOW IS A FOREVER DOG PODCAST https://thebestshow.net https://foreverdogpodcasts.com/podcasts/the-best-show Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

4 Badass Bitches ~ Uncensored Wellness 4U
When You're Having a Hard Day

4 Badass Bitches ~ Uncensored Wellness 4U

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 23:05


Info Kim shared in this episode...Sacred Pleasure Membership - https://getyoursexyback.ca/sacred-pleasure-membership/Tantric Weekend Retreats - https://getyoursexyback.ca/tantric-weekend-retreat/Free call to Unleash Your Unapologetic Power & discuss private coaching -https://calendly.com/talk-to-kim/unleash-your-unapologetic-power ---------------------------------------Follow Kim below and continue the convo!Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=569755109Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/get_your_sexy_back_coach/Website - https://getyoursexyback.ca/Private FB Group - https://www.facebook.com/groups/2251812558445958/

Your Own Personal Beatles
Ania Magliano's Personal Beatles

Your Own Personal Beatles

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 77:22


Comedian Ania Magliano joins Jack and Robin this week off the back of sold out stand-up runs in Edinburgh and Soho. The second guest to have a cat named after Paul McCartney, Ania chats to us about fabs-fuelled car journeys, her bizarre youth theatre production of a Beatles musical at the Royal Albert Hall, and her love of A Hard Day's night.Tickets for Ania's show, Absolutely No Worries If Not, at the Leicester Square Theatre are available here: https://www.leicestersquaretheatre.com/ania-magliano-absolutely-no-worries-if-not/ Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Christ Fellowship Baptist Church
A Hard Day's Night: God's Daylight Savings Time

Christ Fellowship Baptist Church

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 43:00


Celluloid Days
A Hard Day's Night (1964)

Celluloid Days

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 31:32


Some Links to the Sources I usedSci-Fi Zone on FacebookThe Beatles Uncommon Chords A HARD DAY'S NIGHT Album by Mike PachelliA Hard Day's Night: Criterion Releases 4K UHD - Solzy at the moviesTHE BEATLES | A HARD DAY'S NIGHT | Documentary FilmRichard Lester on the Beatles and A Hard Day's Night - BFI

Becoming Intuitive with Meg & Maggi
83. Showing Up on the Hard Days: How to Get Through to the Other Side of a Funk

Becoming Intuitive with Meg & Maggi

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 22:37


Have you ever experienced a season where it feels like everything is going wrong and life is extremely difficult? Maybe you're in one of those seasons right now. We've had many of them, and this week is no exception. We were supposed to record this week's episode last Tuesday, and it didn't happen. We both showed up to the call prepared to record but had nothing in the tank. We were both drained and exhausted, and truthfully needed nothing more than a friend. So we didn't record. We decided to take our scheduled time to just be there for one another and give ourselves the space we needed to let out some of the hard things we'd been going through. We trusted that this week's episode would come out better if we waited to record, and we think that was the right decision. Today's episode is the story of how that happened and how giving ourselves the grace we needed on Tuesday turned everything around. If you need a little evidence that it's all going to be okay, this episode is a must-listen. Press play, and let's dive in. We're so excited for you to hear this week's episode, and we truly hope you enjoy it. Be sure to leave a review on Apple Podcasts or Spotify and let us know your favorite part of the episode. Love, Meg & Maggi PS - Follow us on Instagram @becomingintuitivepodcast for behind-the-scenes, tangible tools, and current events and offerings!

Diecast Movie Review Podcast
129 - A Hard Day's Night Discussion, with Thom Shubilla

Diecast Movie Review Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2022 67:25


129 - A Hard Day's Night Discussion, with Thom Shubilla On this episode, Steven has a discussion with Thom Shubilla, about A Hard Day's Night! Thom has written a wonderful book, Primetime 1966-1967: The Full Spectrum of Television's First All-Color Season. His book is available wherever fine books are sold, or you can get it at Monster Bash from October 14-16, 2022. For more information about Monster Bash go to www.monsterbash.us. Thanks for listening! Please send feedback to DieCastMoviePodcast@gmail.com or leave us message on our Facebook page.

Equipping You in Grace
Dealing with the Hard Days with the Hope of the Gospel

Equipping You in Grace

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 32:22


On today's Equipping You in Grace show, Dave considers why hard days are designed to help us trust the Lord and grow in grace, why hard decisions and situations help us dig into God's Word, and help us rest in the sovereignty of God. What you'll hear in this episode Hard days are designed to help us to trust the Lord. Hard situations are designed by God to help us to grow in grace. Hard decisions and situations help us to dig into God's Word. Hard days help us to rest in the sovereignty of God. Subscribing, sharing, and your feedback You can subscribe to Equipping You in Grace via iTunes, Google Play, or your favorite podcast catcher. If you like what you've heard, please consider leaving a rating and share it with your friends (it takes only takes a second and will go a long way to helping other people find the show). You can also connect with me on Twitter at @davejjenkins, on Facebook, or via email to share your feedback. Thanks for listening to this episode of Equipping You in Grace!

The Fit CEO Podcast with Chad Molyneux
The Mindset To Collect 100k/Mo (Ep. 89)

The Fit CEO Podcast with Chad Molyneux

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 24:57


Our First Ever 100k COLLECTED client Jen Richards is joining me today (and her possible fake background you decide if you check out the Youtube video) on the show to discuss who she had to become in order to collect 100k a month, getting loved ones to get bought in, key moves for success, and so much more!   (0:20) Our First 100k a Month Client (2:09) Who is Jen? (4:38) The Person Jen Had to Become (7:04) Getting Loved Ones Bought In (8:30) Sacrifices (11:45) Not a Fake Background (12:20) Key Moves for Success (12:45) Our Free Facebook Group (15:05) Quit Full Time Job Sooner? (18:35) The Hard Days (20:05) More Money More Problems (22:18) NLCA's Impact on Jen (23:28) Where to Find Jen ----------- Check Out Our Free Facebook Group - https://www.facebook.com/groups/nlcacommunity ----------- Follow Me on Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/the_fitceo/  ----------- If you are feeling stuck and you're ready to take the next step, check out Next Level Coaching Academy - https://www.thenextlevelcoachingacademy.com

Here, There, and Everywhere: A Beatles Podcast

Brenna Ehrlich is Chief Research Editor at Rolling Stone as well as a young adult author, short story writer, and freelance journalist. In this episode, Jack and Brenna discuss how The Beatles can be introduced to you at any age, how the John & Paul Dynamic is evident in many other bands, the best cover of "Monkberry Moon Delight", and more!   Follow Brenna on Twitter @BrennaEhrlich and check out her new book, "Killing Time", here.   If you enjoy this episode, please remember to subscribe to this podcast so you can receive a notification on your phone every week when a new episode is released! Follow us on Twitter Follow us on Instagram Follow us on YouTube ------------------------------ The Beatles were an English rock band, formed in Liverpool in 1960, that comprised John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Ringo Starr. They are regarded as the most influential band of all time[1] and were integral to the development of 1960s counterculture and popular music's recognition as an art form. Rooted in skiffle, beat and 1950s rock 'n' roll, their sound incorporated elements of classical music and traditional pop in innovative ways; the band later explored music styles ranging from ballads and Indian music to psychedelia and hard rock. As pioneers in recording, songwriting and artistic presentation, the Beatles revolutionised many aspects of the music industry and were often publicised as leaders of the era's youth and sociocultural movements. Led by primary songwriters Lennon and McCartney, the Beatles evolved from Lennon's previous group, the Quarrymen, and built their reputation playing clubs in Liverpool and Hamburg over three years from 1960, initially with Stuart Sutcliffe playing bass. The core trio of Lennon, McCartney and Harrison, together since 1958, went through a succession of drummers, including Pete Best, before asking Starr to join them in 1962. Manager Brian Epstein moulded them into a professional act, and producer George Martin guided and developed their recordings, greatly expanding their domestic success after signing to EMI Records and achieving their first hit, "Love Me Do", in late 1962. As their popularity grew into the intense fan frenzy dubbed "Beatlemania", the band acquired the nickname "the Fab Four", with Epstein, Martin and other members of the band's entourage sometimes given the informal title of "fifth Beatle". By early 1964, the Beatles were international stars and had achieved unprecedented levels of critical and commercial success. They became a leading force in Britain's cultural resurgence, ushering in the British Invasion of the United States pop market, and soon made their film debut with A Hard Day's Night (1964). A growing desire to refine their studio efforts, coupled with the untenable nature of their concert tours, led to the band's retirement from live performances in 1966. At this time, they produced records of greater sophistication, including the albums Rubber Soul (1965), Revolver (1966) and Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band (1967), and enjoyed further commercial success with The Beatles (also known as "the White Album", 1968) and Abbey Road (1969). Heralding the album era, their success elevated the album to the dominant form of record consumption over singles; they also inspired a greater public interest in psychedelic drugs and Eastern spirituality, and furthered advancements in electronic music, album art and music videos. In 1968, they founded Apple Corps, a multi-armed multimedia corporation that continues to oversee projects related to the band's legacy. After the group's break-up in 1970, all principal members enjoyed success as solo artists and some partial reunions have occurred. Lennon was murdered in 1980 and Harrison died of lung cancer in 2001. McCartney and Starr remain musically active. The Beatles are the best-selling music act of all time, with estimated sales of 600 million units worldwide. They hold the record for most number-one albums on the UK Albums Chart (15), most number-one hits on the Billboard Hot 100 chart (20), and most singles sold in the UK (21.9 million). The band received many accolades, including seven Grammy Awards, four Brit Awards, an Academy Award (for Best Original Song Score for the 1970 documentary film Let It Be) and fifteen Ivor Novello Awards. They were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1988, and each principal member was inducted individually between 1994 and 2015. In 2004 and 2011, the group topped Rolling Stone's lists of the greatest artists in history. Time magazine named them among the 20th century's 100 most important people.

Don’t Call Me Skinny
Friday NO Filter - Hard Days Happen

Don’t Call Me Skinny

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 11:08


This may be the rawest and most real you have heard Coach Sarah.  She hits hard on why perfection doesn't work.  On why we need to have grace and be forgiving of ourselves.  On why we end up quitting so easily.  Do you often find yourself aiming to be perfect, and you quit the moment it doesn't happen?This one is not for the faint of heart.  Grab a tissue if you're emotional.  Settle in for a hard and heavy one this week.   —---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------To apply for 1-1 coaching: 1-1 coachingWays to work with me: Ways to work with me!Macros Madness Masterclass: Join Here!For some amazing resources and FREE SHIT FRIDAY - be sure to be a part of Coach Sarah's Fitness Freedom Forever community on FB:Free FB GroupTo schedule a Strategy Session w/Coach Sarah: Strategy SessionFollow Sarah on IG: Vetwifefitmom—----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Theology Mix Network
“There Are No Bad Days…Only Hard Days:” JT Jester on Turning Challenges into Blessings

Theology Mix Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022


Today's guest has an incredible story to tell. Born with a number of rare disabilities, spending 250 days in the hospital and enduring 16 surgeries in the first three years of life, he has gone on to become an experienced mountaineer, extreme skier, boater, hunter, and adventurer—even conquering Mount Kilimanjaro, among other amazing accomplishments. Now a best-selling author, motivational speaker, and Podcaster, JT Jester is with us today to tell us about his newest book, No Bad Days: How to Find […] The post “There Are No Bad Days…Only Hard Days:” JT Jester on Turning Challenges into Blessings appeared first on Theology Mix.

Hope Survives® | Brain Injury Podcast
64. How to Improve Symptoms on Hard Days (with Dr Jeremy Schmoe)

Hope Survives® | Brain Injury Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 47:48


Symptom flare-ups and hard days will happen when recovering from a brain injury / concussion - and it can be exhausting and disheartening. But there are actually things we can do to help, if we learn the right things to check and respond to our brain & body's signals. Our nervous system is more adaptable than we may think! Dr. Jeremy Schmoe is here to teach us exactly how to help ourselves feel better on those hard days. Connect with Dr. Schmoe: theFNC.com 0:00 Intro w/Cristabelle 10:00 Introducing Dr. Schmoe 17:00 Your Nervous System can Adapt 18:50 Topic Intro: Keeping Recovery Going 19:50 Check In with Yourself 20:25 Checking Autonomics 22:45 Checking Gut Inflammation 25:10 If Cardio Flares Up Symptoms… 26:00 How to Know if Cardio Will Help 29:45 Checking Vestibular 31:15 Adaptive Exercise 33:00 Checking Eye Movements 34:30 Finding the “Perfect Recipe” For Yourself 36:50 Checking Cerebellum 38:25 Checking Neck 40:40 Checking Dual Tasking 42:15 Learning to Recognize Flare-Ups 45:00 Finding a Good Provider CONNECT Join the online community & monthly zoom support group: hopeafterheadinjury.com/community Listen to Cristabelle's "Hope Survives" song on all music streaming platforms! Hosted by Cristabelle Braden: @cristabellebraden | cristabellebraden.com Hope After Head Injury: @hopeafterheadinjury | hopeafterheadinjury.com Brain Injury Bible Study: @braininjurybiblestudy | hopeafterheadinjury.com/brain-injury-bible-study Thank you to Council on Brain Injury for supporting this podcast by providing a microphone as part of their grant program to the brain injury community. Check out the amazing work done by CoBI at: councilonbraininjury.com This podcast is for education and informational purposes only, and not intended for medical advice. If you need specific medical advice, please consult your physician. More: hopeafterheadinjury.com/hopesurvives

Couples' Cut
A Hard Days Night & Spice World

Couples' Cut

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 118:40


It's time for a British Invasion with The Beatles: A Hard Day's Night (Paul McCartney, John Lennon, George Harrison, and Ringo Starr) and Spice World (Victoria Beckham/Posh, Melanie Brown/Scary, Emma Bunton/Baby, Melanie Chisholm/Sport, and Geri Halliwell/Ginger).  We discuss the rise and fall of the bands and the scandalous moment between the Spice Girls and King Charles III.(This episode contains spoilers)Where to watch Beatles: A Hard Day's Night?HBO MaxWhere to watch Spice World?Not available for rent or streaming :(* As of September 2022 in the USAFor more shenanigans, follow us on Instagram @couplescutpodcast or TikTok @couplescutpodcast, Twitter @couplescutpod or send us an e-mail at CouplesCutPodcast@gmail.comTranscript available on our website: https://CouplesCut.buzzprout.com/

Here, There, and Everywhere: A Beatles Podcast
Ep. 28 - Jake Fogelnest (Pt. 2)

Here, There, and Everywhere: A Beatles Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 76:58


Jake Fogelnest is an Emmy Award nominated writer, producer, and broadcaster. In 1994, when Jake was 14 years old, he started his own pop culture TV show called "Squirt TV on MTV". Jake has since worked on shows such as Comedy Central's “Corporate”, Marvel's "Runaways", and "Wet Hot American Summer". Jake's a huge Beatles fan and loves all kinds of music. In this episode, Jake and Jack discuss how COVID affected the creative process that The Beatles once innovated, Magic Alex and his legacy, why The Beatles bring the world together, the mysterious Carnival of Light song, and more. Follow Jake on Twitter: @jakefogelnest If you enjoy this episode, please remember to subscribe to this podcast so you can receive a notification on your phone every week when a new episode is released! Follow us on Twitter Follow us on Instagram Follow us on YouTube ------------------------------ The Beatles were an English rock band, formed in Liverpool in 1960, that comprised John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Ringo Starr. They are regarded as the most influential band of all time[1] and were integral to the development of 1960s counterculture and popular music's recognition as an art form. Rooted in skiffle, beat and 1950s rock 'n' roll, their sound incorporated elements of classical music and traditional pop in innovative ways; the band later explored music styles ranging from ballads and Indian music to psychedelia and hard rock. As pioneers in recording, songwriting and artistic presentation, the Beatles revolutionised many aspects of the music industry and were often publicised as leaders of the era's youth and sociocultural movements. Led by primary songwriters Lennon and McCartney, the Beatles evolved from Lennon's previous group, the Quarrymen, and built their reputation playing clubs in Liverpool and Hamburg over three years from 1960, initially with Stuart Sutcliffe playing bass. The core trio of Lennon, McCartney and Harrison, together since 1958, went through a succession of drummers, including Pete Best, before asking Starr to join them in 1962. Manager Brian Epstein moulded them into a professional act, and producer George Martin guided and developed their recordings, greatly expanding their domestic success after signing to EMI Records and achieving their first hit, "Love Me Do", in late 1962. As their popularity grew into the intense fan frenzy dubbed "Beatlemania", the band acquired the nickname "the Fab Four", with Epstein, Martin and other members of the band's entourage sometimes given the informal title of "fifth Beatle". By early 1964, the Beatles were international stars and had achieved unprecedented levels of critical and commercial success. They became a leading force in Britain's cultural resurgence, ushering in the British Invasion of the United States pop market, and soon made their film debut with A Hard Day's Night (1964). A growing desire to refine their studio efforts, coupled with the untenable nature of their concert tours, led to the band's retirement from live performances in 1966. At this time, they produced records of greater sophistication, including the albums Rubber Soul (1965), Revolver (1966) and Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band (1967), and enjoyed further commercial success with The Beatles (also known as "the White Album", 1968) and Abbey Road (1969). Heralding the album era, their success elevated the album to the dominant form of record consumption over singles; they also inspired a greater public interest in psychedelic drugs and Eastern spirituality, and furthered advancements in electronic music, album art and music videos. In 1968, they founded Apple Corps, a multi-armed multimedia corporation that continues to oversee projects related to the band's legacy. After the group's break-up in 1970, all principal members enjoyed success as solo artists and some partial reunions have occurred. Lennon was murdered in 1980 and Harrison died of lung cancer in 2001. McCartney and Starr remain musically active. The Beatles are the best-selling music act of all time, with estimated sales of 600 million units worldwide. They hold the record for most number-one albums on the UK Albums Chart (15), most number-one hits on the Billboard Hot 100 chart (20), and most singles sold in the UK (21.9 million). The band received many accolades, including seven Grammy Awards, four Brit Awards, an Academy Award (for Best Original Song Score for the 1970 documentary film Let It Be) and fifteen Ivor Novello Awards. They were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1988, and each principal member was inducted individually between 1994 and 2015. In 2004 and 2011, the group topped Rolling Stone's lists of the greatest artists in history. Time magazine named them among the 20th century's 100 most important people.  

Club Jazzafip
Ramsey Lewis, créateur incontournable du jazz

Club Jazzafip

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 60:34


durée : 01:00:34 - Club Jazzafip - Le pianiste de Chicago nous a quittés lundi à l'âge de 87 ans, laissant à la postérité près de 80 albums et quelques tubes des années 60 comme ses reprises de "Hang on Sloopy", "The 'In' Crowd" ou "A Hard Day's Night".

Please Don't Send Me into Outer Space
Burst City: (New) PDSMiOS 169

Please Don't Send Me into Outer Space

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2022 83:01


Hello everyone. We're back. Well... to be more precise, I am back. This is the new version of PDSMiOS. One guest with me (Joel) talking about a sci-fi movie we decided on together. An Important WARNING for those with young ones or those sensitive to cursing, I AM NO LONGER BLEEPING OUT THE CURSE WORDS. This decision is based on feedback from a few listeners. I imagine most people won't notice, but for those of you who do, reach out to me on Twitter or at PleaseDontPodcast@gmail.com. We can probably figure something out. Anyway, enough house keeping. My guest on this episode is someone I can now call an old friends of mine. He has been my recording partner on Shoot the Piano Player, We Cut Heads, and High and Low. He has been part of the perfect trio that performs on The Arbitrary Indiscriminate Movie Podcast. He is the one called Spencer Seams and he has picked an amazing movie called Burst City from 1982! It is difficult to describe Burst City in terms of subgenre. Let me just say it is part Repo Man, part Fury Road, part A Hard Day's Night, and the rest is some of the most interesting stuff put on film. I hope you enjoy the discussion we had. I have 4 more episodes ready for me to edit, so keep an eye on your podcast feeds. It's going to be wild. Check out Spencer's writing on Jailhouse 701: Japanese Cult Cinema and Red Black and Green: A Celebration of African History

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
Episode 151: “San Francisco” by Scott McKenzie

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022


We start season four of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs with an extra-long look at "San Francisco" by Scott McKenzie, and at the Monterey Pop Festival, and the careers of the Mamas and the Papas and P.F. Sloan. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. Patreon backers also have a ten-minute bonus episode available, on "Up, Up, and Away" by the 5th Dimension. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ Resources As usual, all the songs excerpted in the podcast can be heard in full at Mixcloud. Scott McKenzie's first album is available here. There are many compilations of the Mamas and the Papas' music, but sadly none that are in print in the UK have the original mono mixes. This set is about as good as you're going to find, though, for the stereo versions. Information on the Mamas and the Papas came from Go Where You Wanna Go: The Oral History of The Mamas and the Papas by Matthew Greenwald, California Dreamin': The True Story Of The Mamas and Papas by Michelle Phillips, and Papa John by John Phillips and Jim Jerome. Information on P.F. Sloan came from PF - TRAVELLING BAREFOOT ON A ROCKY ROAD by Stephen McParland and What's Exactly the Matter With Me? by P.F. Sloan and S.E. Feinberg. The film of the Monterey Pop Festival is available on this Criterion Blu-Ray set. Sadly the CD of the performances seems to be deleted. Patreon This podcast is brought to you by the generosity of my backers on Patreon. Why not join them? Transcript Welcome to season four of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs. It's good to be back. Before we start this episode, I just want to say one thing. I get a lot of credit at times for the way I don't shy away from dealing with the more unsavoury elements of the people being covered in my podcast -- particularly the more awful men. But as I said very early on, I only cover those aspects of their life when they're relevant to the music, because this is a music podcast and not a true crime podcast. But also I worry that in some cases this might mean I'm giving a false impression of some people. In the case of this episode, one of the central figures is John Phillips of the Mamas and the Papas. Now, Phillips has posthumously been accused of some truly monstrous acts, the kind of thing that is truly unforgivable, and I believe those accusations. But those acts didn't take place during the time period covered by most of this episode, so I won't be covering them here -- but they're easily googlable if you want to know. I thought it best to get that out of the way at the start, so no-one's either anxiously waiting for the penny to drop or upset that I didn't acknowledge the elephant in the room. Separately, this episode will have some discussion of fatphobia and diet culture, and of a death that is at least in part attributable to those things. Those of you affected by that may want to skip this one or read the transcript. There are also some mentions of drug addiction and alcoholism. Anyway, on with the show. One of the things that causes problems with rock history is the tendency of people to have selective memories, and that's never more true than when it comes to the Summer of Love, summer of 1967. In the mythology that's built up around it, that was a golden time, the greatest time ever, a period of peace and love where everything was possible, and the world looked like it was going to just keep on getting better. But what that means, of course, is that the people remembering it that way do so because it was the best time of their lives. And what happens when the best time of your life is over in one summer? When you have one hit and never have a second, or when your band splits up after only eighteen months, and you have to cope with the reality that your best years are not only behind you, but they weren't even best years, but just best months? What stories would you tell about that time? Would you remember it as the eve of destruction, the last great moment before everything went to hell, or would you remember it as a golden summer, full of people with flowers in their hair? And would either really be true? [Excerpt: Scott McKenzie, "San Francisco"] Other than the city in which they worked, there are a few things that seem to characterise almost all the important figures on the LA music scene in the middle part of the 1960s. They almost all seem to be incredibly ambitious, as one might imagine. There seem to be a huge number of fantasists among them -- people who will not only choose the legend over reality when it suits them, but who will choose the legend over reality even when it doesn't suit them. And they almost all seem to have a story about being turned down in a rude and arrogant manner by Lou Adler, usually more or less the same story. To give an example, I'm going to read out a bit of Ray Manzarek's autobiography here. Now, Manzarek uses a few words that I can't use on this podcast and keep a clean rating, so I'm just going to do slight pauses when I get to them, but I'll leave the words in the transcript for those who aren't offended by them: "Sometimes Jim and Dorothy and I went alone. The three of us tried Dunhill Records. Lou Adler was the head man. He was shrewd and he was hip. He had the Mamas and the Papas and a big single with Barry McGuire's 'Eve of Destruction.' He was flush. We were ushered into his office. He looked cool. He was California casually disheveled and had the look of a stoner, but his eyes were as cold as a shark's. He took the twelve-inch acetate demo from me and we all sat down. He put the disc on his turntable and played each cut…for ten seconds. Ten seconds! You can't tell jack [shit] from ten seconds. At least listen to one of the songs all the way through. I wanted to rage at him. 'How dare you! We're the Doors! This is [fucking] Jim Morrison! He's going to be a [fucking] star! Can't you see that? Can't you see how [fucking] handsome he is? Can't you hear how groovy the music is? Don't you [fucking] get it? Listen to the words, man!' My brain was a boiling, lava-filled Jell-O mold of rage. I wanted to eviscerate that shark. The songs he so casually dismissed were 'Moonlight Drive,' 'Hello, I Love You,' 'Summer's Almost Gone,' 'End of the Night,' 'I Looked at You,' 'Go Insane.' He rejected the whole demo. Ten seconds on each song—maybe twenty seconds on 'Hello, I Love You' (I took that as an omen of potential airplay)—and we were dismissed out of hand. Just like that. He took the demo off the turntable and handed it back to me with an obsequious smile and said, 'Nothing here I can use.' We were shocked. We stood up, the three of us, and Jim, with a wry and knowing smile on his lips, cuttingly and coolly shot back at him, 'That's okay, man. We don't want to be *used*, anyway.'" Now, as you may have gathered from the episode on the Doors, Ray Manzarek was one of those print-the-legend types, and that's true of everyone who tells similar stories about Lou Alder. But... there are a *lot* of people who tell similar stories about Lou Adler. One of those was Phil Sloan. You can get an idea of Sloan's attitude to storytelling from a story he always used to tell. Shortly after he and his family moved to LA from New York, he got a job selling newspapers on a street corner on Hollywood Boulevard, just across from Schwab's Drug Store. One day James Dean drove up in his Porsche and made an unusual request. He wanted to buy every copy of the newspaper that Sloan had -- around a hundred and fifty copies in total. But he only wanted one article, something in the entertainment section. Sloan didn't remember what the article was, but he did remember that one of the headlines was on the final illness of Oliver Hardy, who died shortly afterwards, and thought it might have been something to do with that. Dean was going to just clip that article from every copy he bought, and then he was going to give all the newspapers back to Sloan to sell again, so Sloan ended up making a lot of extra money that day. There is one rather big problem with that story. Oliver Hardy died in August 1957, just after the Sloan family moved to LA. But James Dean died in September 1955, two years earlier. Sloan admitted that, and said he couldn't explain it, but he was insistent. He sold a hundred and fifty newspapers to James Dean two years after Dean's death. When not selling newspapers to dead celebrities, Sloan went to Fairfax High School, and developed an interest in music which was mostly oriented around the kind of white pop vocal groups that were popular at the time, groups like the Kingston Trio, the Four Lads, and the Four Aces. But the record that made Sloan decide he wanted to make music himself was "Just Goofed" by the Teen Queens: [Excerpt: The Teen Queens, "Just Goofed"] In 1959, when he was fourteen, he saw an advert for an open audition with Aladdin Records, a label he liked because of Thurston Harris. He went along to the audition, and was successful. His first single, released as by Flip Sloan -- Flip was a nickname, a corruption of "Philip" -- was produced by Bumps Blackwell and featured several of the musicians who played with Sam Cooke, plus Larry Knechtel on piano and Mike Deasey on guitar, but Aladdin shut down shortly after releasing it, and it may not even have had a general release, just promo copies. I've not been able to find a copy online anywhere. After that, he tried Arwin Records, the label that Jan and Arnie recorded for, which was owned by Marty Melcher (Doris Day's husband and Terry Melcher's stepfather). Melcher signed him, and put out a single, "She's My Girl", on Mart Records, a subsidiary of Arwin, on which Sloan was backed by a group of session players including Sandy Nelson and Bruce Johnston: [Excerpt: Philip Sloan, "She's My Girl"] That record didn't have any success, and Sloan was soon dropped by Mart Records. He went on to sign with Blue Bird Records, which was as far as can be ascertained essentially a scam organisation that would record demos for songwriters, but tell the performers that they were making a real record, so that they would record it for the royalties they would never get, rather than for a decent fee as a professional demo singer would get. But Steve Venet -- the brother of Nik Venet, and occasional songwriting collaborator with Tommy Boyce -- happened to come to Blue Bird one day, and hear one of Sloan's original songs. He thought Sloan would make a good songwriter, and took him to see Lou Adler at Columbia-Screen Gems music publishing. This was shortly after the merger between Columbia-Screen Gems and Aldon Music, and Adler was at this point the West Coast head of operations, subservient to Don Kirshner and Al Nevins, but largely left to do what he wanted. The way Sloan always told the story, Venet tried to get Adler to sign Sloan, but Adler said his songs stunk and had no commercial potential. But Sloan persisted in trying to get a contract there, and eventually Al Nevins happened to be in the office and overruled Adler, much to Adler's disgust. Sloan was signed to Columbia-Screen Gems as a songwriter, though he wasn't put on a salary like the Brill Building songwriters, just told that he could bring in songs and they would publish them. Shortly after this, Adler suggested to Sloan that he might want to form a writing team with another songwriter, Steve Barri, who had had a similar non-career non-trajectory, but was very slightly further ahead in his career, having done some work with Carol Connors, the former lead singer of the Teddy Bears. Barri had co-written a couple of flop singles for Connors, before the two of them had formed a vocal group, the Storytellers, with Connors' sister. The Storytellers had released a single, "When Two People (Are in Love)" , which was put out on a local independent label and which Adler had licensed to be released on Dimension Records, the label associated with Aldon Music: [Excerpt: The Storytellers "When Two People (Are in Love)"] That record didn't sell, but it was enough to get Barri into the Columbia-Screen Gems circle, and Adler set him and Sloan up as a songwriting team -- although the way Sloan told it, it wasn't so much a songwriting team as Sloan writing songs while Barri was also there. Sloan would later claim "it was mostly a collaboration of spirit, and it seemed that I was writing most of the music and the lyric, but it couldn't possibly have ever happened unless both of us were present at the same time". One suspects that Barri might have a different recollection of how it went... Sloan and Barri's first collaboration was a song that Sloan had half-written before they met, called "Kick That Little Foot Sally Ann", which was recorded by a West Coast Chubby Checker knockoff who went under the name Round Robin, and who had his own dance craze, the Slauson, which was much less successful than the Twist: [Excerpt: Round Robin, "Kick that Little Foot Sally Ann"] That track was produced and arranged by Jack Nitzsche, and Nitzsche asked Sloan to be one of the rhythm guitarists on the track, apparently liking Sloan's feel. Sloan would end up playing rhythm guitar or singing backing vocals on many of the records made of songs he and Barri wrote together. "Kick That Little Foot Sally Ann" only made number sixty-one nationally, but it was a regional hit, and it meant that Sloan and Barri soon became what Sloan later described as "the Goffin and King of the West Coast follow-ups." According to Sloan "We'd be given a list on Monday morning by Lou Adler with thirty names on it of the groups who needed follow-ups to their hit." They'd then write the songs to order, and they started to specialise in dance craze songs. For example, when the Swim looked like it might be the next big dance, they wrote "Swim Swim Swim", "She Only Wants to Swim", "Let's Swim Baby", "Big Boss Swimmer", "Swim Party" and "My Swimmin' Girl" (the last a collaboration with Jan Berry and Roger Christian). These songs were exactly as good as they needed to be, in order to provide album filler for mid-tier artists, and while Sloan and Barri weren't writing any massive hits, they were doing very well as mid-tier writers. According to Sloan's biographer Stephen McParland, there was a three-year period in the mid-sixties where at least one song written or co-written by Sloan was on the national charts at any given time. Most of these songs weren't for Columbia-Screen Gems though. In early 1964 Lou Adler had a falling out with Don Kirshner, and decided to start up his own company, Dunhill, which was equal parts production company, music publishers, and management -- doing for West Coast pop singers what Motown was doing for Detroit soul singers, and putting everything into one basket. Dunhill's early clients included Jan and Dean and the rockabilly singer Johnny Rivers, and Dunhill also signed Sloan and Barri as songwriters. Because of this connection, Sloan and Barri soon became an important part of Jan and Dean's hit-making process. The Matadors, the vocal group that had provided most of the backing vocals on the duo's hits, had started asking for more money than Jan Berry was willing to pay, and Jan and Dean couldn't do the vocals themselves -- as Bones Howe put it "As a singer, Dean is a wonderful graphic artist" -- and so Sloan and Barri stepped in, doing session vocals without payment in the hope that Jan and Dean would record a few of their songs. For example, on the big hit "The Little Old Lady From Pasadena", Dean Torrence is not present at all on the record -- Jan Berry sings the lead vocal, with Sloan doubling him for much of it, Sloan sings "Dean"'s falsetto, with the engineer Bones Howe helping out, and the rest of the backing vocals are sung by Sloan, Barri, and Howe: [Excerpt: Jan and Dean, "The Little Old Lady From Pasadena"] For these recordings, Sloan and Barri were known as The Fantastic Baggys, a name which came from the Rolling Stones' manager Andrew Oldham and Mick Jagger, when the two were visiting California. Oldham had been commenting on baggys, the kind of shorts worn by surfers, and had asked Jagger what he thought of The Baggys as a group name. Jagger had replied "Fantastic!" and so the Fantastic Baggys had been born. As part of this, Sloan and Barri moved hard into surf and hot-rod music from the dance songs they had been writing previously. The Fantastic Baggys recorded their own album, Tell 'Em I'm Surfin', as a quickie album suggested by Adler: [Excerpt: The Fantastic Baggys, "Tell 'Em I'm Surfin'"] And under the name The Rally Packs they recorded a version of Jan and Dean's "Move Out Little Mustang" which featured Berry's girlfriend Jill Gibson doing a spoken section: [Excerpt: The Rally Packs, "Move Out Little Mustang"] They also wrote several album tracks for Jan and Dean, and wrote "Summer Means Fun" for Bruce and Terry -- Bruce Johnston, later of the Beach Boys, and Terry Melcher: [Excerpt: Bruce and Terry, "Summer Means Fun"] And they wrote the very surf-flavoured "Secret Agent Man" for fellow Dunhill artist Johnny Rivers: [Excerpt: Johnny Rivers, "Secret Agent Man"] But of course, when you're chasing trends, you're chasing trends, and soon the craze for twangy guitars and falsetto harmonies had ended, replaced by a craze for jangly twelve-string guitars and closer harmonies. According to Sloan, he was in at the very beginning of the folk-rock trend -- the way he told the story, he was involved in the mastering of the Byrds' version of "Mr. Tambourine Man". He later talked about Terry Melcher getting him to help out, saying "He had produced a record called 'Mr. Tambourine Man', and had sent it into the head office, and it had been rejected. He called me up and said 'I've got three more hours in the studio before I'm being kicked out of Columbia. Can you come over and help me with this new record?' I did. I went over there. It was under lock and key. There were two guards outside the door. Terry asked me something about 'Summer Means Fun'. "He said 'Do you remember the guitar that we worked on with that? How we put in that double reverb?' "And I said 'yes' "And he said 'What do you think if we did something like that with the Byrds?' "And I said 'That sounds good. Let's see what it sounds like.' So we patched into all the reverb centres in Columbia Music, and mastered the record in three hours." Whether Sloan really was there at the birth of folk rock, he and Barri jumped on the folk-rock craze just as they had the surf and hot-rod craze, and wrote a string of jangly hits including "You Baby" for the Turtles: [Excerpt: The Turtles, "You Baby"] and "I Found a Girl" for Jan and Dean: [Excerpt: Jan and Dean, "I Found a Girl"] That song was later included on Jan and Dean's Folk 'n' Roll album, which also included... a song I'm not even going to name, but long-time listeners will know the one I mean. It was also notable in that "I Found a Girl" was the first song on which Sloan was credited not as Phil Sloan, but as P.F. Sloan -- he didn't have a middle name beginning with F, but rather the F stood for his nickname "Flip". Sloan would later talk of Phil Sloan and P.F. Sloan as almost being two different people, with P.F. being a far more serious, intense, songwriter. Folk 'n' Roll also contained another Sloan song, this one credited solely to Sloan. And that song is the one for which he became best known. There are two very different stories about how "Eve of Destruction" came to be written. To tell Sloan's version, I'm going to read a few paragraphs from his autobiography: "By late 1964, I had already written ‘Eve Of Destruction,' ‘The Sins Of A Family,' ‘This Mornin',' ‘Ain't No Way I'm Gonna Change My Mind,' and ‘What's Exactly The Matter With Me?' They all arrived on one cataclysmic evening, and nearly at the same time, as I worked on the lyrics almost simultaneously. ‘Eve Of Destruction' came about from hearing a voice, perhaps an angel's. The voice instructed me to place five pieces of paper and spread them out on my bed. I obeyed the voice. The voice told me that the first song would be called ‘Eve Of Destruction,' so I wrote the title at the top of the page. For the next few hours, the voice came and went as I was writing the lyric, as if this spirit—or whatever it was—stood over me like a teacher: ‘No, no … not think of all the hate there is in Red Russia … Red China!' I didn't understand. I thought the Soviet Union was the mortal threat to America, but the voice went on to reveal to me the future of the world until 2024. I was told the Soviet Union would fall, and that Red China would continue to be communist far into the future, but that communism was not going to be allowed to take over this Divine Planet—therefore, think of all the hate there is in Red China. I argued and wrestled with the voice for hours, until I was exhausted but satisfied inside with my plea to God to either take me out of the world, as I could not live in such a hypocritical society, or to show me a way to make things better. When I was writing ‘Eve,' I was on my hands and knees, pleading for an answer." Lou Adler's story is that he gave Phil Sloan a copy of Bob Dylan's Bringing it All Back Home album and told him to write a bunch of songs that sounded like that, and Sloan came back a week later as instructed with ten Dylan knock-offs. Adler said "It was a natural feel for him. He's a great mimic." As one other data point, both Steve Barri and Bones Howe, the engineer who worked on most of the sessions we're looking at today, have often talked in interviews about "Eve of Destruction" as being a Sloan/Barri collaboration, as if to them it's common knowledge that it wasn't written alone, although Sloan's is the only name on the credits. The song was given to a new signing to Dunhill Records, Barry McGuire. McGuire was someone who had been part of the folk scene for years, He'd been playing folk clubs in LA while also acting in a TV show from 1961. When the TV show had finished, he'd formed a duo, Barry and Barry, with Barry Kane, and they performed much the same repertoire as all the other early-sixties folkies: [Excerpt: Barry and Barry, "If I Had a Hammer"] After recording their one album, both Barrys joined the New Christy Minstrels. We've talked about the Christys before, but they were -- and are to this day -- an ultra-commercial folk group, led by Randy Sparks, with a revolving membership of usually eight or nine singers which included several other people who've come up in this podcast, like Gene Clark and Jerry Yester. McGuire became one of the principal lead singers of the Christys, singing lead on their version of the novelty cowboy song "Three Wheels on My Wagon", which was later released as a single in the UK and became a perennial children's favourite (though it has a problematic attitude towards Native Americans): [Excerpt: The New Christy Minstrels, "Three Wheels on My Wagon"] And he also sang lead on their big hit "Green Green", which he co-wrote with Randy Sparks: [Excerpt: The New Christy Minstrels, "Green Green"] But by 1965 McGuire had left the New Christy Minstrels. As he said later "I'd sung 'Green Green' a thousand times and I didn't want to sing it again. This is January of 1965. I went back to LA to meet some producers, and I was broke. Nobody had the time of day for me. I was walking down street one time to see Dr. Strangelove and I walked by the music store, and I heard "Green Green" comin' out of the store, ya know, on Hollywood Boulevard. And I heard my voice, and I thought, 'I got four dollars in my pocket!' I couldn't believe it, my voice is comin' out on Hollywood Boulevard, and I'm broke. And right at that moment, a car pulls up, and the radio is playing 'Chim Chim Cherie" also by the Minstrels. So I got my voice comin' at me in stereo, standin' on the sidewalk there, and I'm broke, and I can't get anyone to sign me!" But McGuire had a lot of friends who he'd met on the folk scene, some of whom were now in the new folk-rock scene that was just starting to spring up. One of them was Roger McGuinn, who told him that his band, the Byrds, were just about to put out a new single, "Mr. Tambourine Man", and that they were about to start a residency at Ciro's on Sunset Strip. McGuinn invited McGuire to the opening night of that residency, where a lot of other people from the scene were there to see the new group. Bob Dylan was there, as was Phil Sloan, and the actor Jack Nicholson, who was still at the time a minor bit-part player in low-budget films made by people like American International Pictures (the cinematographer on many of Nicholson's early films was Floyd Crosby, David Crosby's father, which may be why he was there). Someone else who was there was Lou Adler, who according to McGuire recognised him instantly. According to Adler, he actually asked Terry Melcher who the long-haired dancer wearing furs was, because "he looked like the leader of a movement", and Melcher told him that he was the former lead singer of the New Christy Minstrels. Either way, Adler approached McGuire and asked if he was currently signed -- Dunhill Records was just starting up, and getting someone like McGuire, who had a proven ability to sing lead on hit records, would be a good start for the label. As McGuire didn't have a contract, he was signed to Dunhill, and he was given some of Sloan's new songs to pick from, and chose "What's Exactly the Matter With Me?" as his single: [Excerpt: Barry McGuire, "What's Exactly the Matter With Me?"] McGuire described what happened next: "It was like, a three-hour session. We did two songs, and then the third one wasn't turning out. We only had about a half hour left in the session, so I said 'Let's do this tune', and I pulled 'Eve of Destruction' out of my pocket, and it just had Phil's words scrawled on a piece of paper, all wrinkled up. Phil worked the chords out with the musicians, who were Hal Blaine on drums and Larry Knechtel on bass." There were actually more musicians than that at the session -- apparently both Knechtel and Joe Osborn were there, so I'm not entirely sure who's playing bass -- Knechtel was a keyboard player as well as a bass player, but I don't hear any keyboards on the track. And Tommy Tedesco was playing lead guitar, and Steve Barri added percussion, along with Sloan on rhythm guitar and harmonica. The chords were apparently scribbled down for the musicians on bits of greasy paper that had been used to wrap some takeaway chicken, and they got through the track in a single take. According to McGuire "I'm reading the words off this piece of wrinkled paper, and I'm singing 'My blood's so mad, feels like coagulatin'", that part that goes 'Ahhh you can't twist the truth', and the reason I'm going 'Ahhh' is because I lost my place on the page. People said 'Man, you really sounded frustrated when you were singing.' I was. I couldn't see the words!" [Excerpt: Barry McGuire, "Eve of Destruction"] With a few overdubs -- the female backing singers in the chorus, and possibly the kettledrums, which I've seen differing claims about, with some saying that Hal Blaine played them during the basic track and others saying that Lou Adler suggested them as an overdub, the track was complete. McGuire wasn't happy with his vocal, and a session was scheduled for him to redo it, but then a record promoter working with Adler was DJing a birthday party for the head of programming at KFWB, the big top forty radio station in LA at the time, and he played a few acetates he'd picked up from Adler. Most went down OK with the crowd, but when he played "Eve of Destruction", the crowd went wild and insisted he play it three times in a row. The head of programming called Adler up and told him that "Eve of Destruction" was going to be put into rotation on the station from Monday, so he'd better get the record out. As McGuire was away for the weekend, Adler just released the track as it was, and what had been intended to be a B-side became Barry McGuire's first and only number one record: [Excerpt: Barry McGuire, "Eve of Destruction"] Sloan would later claim that that song was a major reason why the twenty-sixth amendment to the US Constitution was passed six years later, because the line "you're old enough to kill but not for votin'" shamed Congress into changing the constitution to allow eighteen-year-olds to vote. If so, that would make "Eve of Destruction" arguably the single most impactful rock record in history, though Sloan is the only person I've ever seen saying that As well as going to number one in McGuire's version, the song was also covered by the other artists who regularly performed Sloan and Barri songs, like the Turtles: [Excerpt: The Turtles, "Eve of Destruction"] And Jan and Dean, whose version on Folk & Roll used the same backing track as McGuire, but had a few lyrical changes to make it fit with Jan Berry's right-wing politics, most notably changing "Selma, Alabama" to "Watts, California", thus changing a reference to peaceful civil rights protestors being brutally attacked and murdered by white supremacist state troopers to a reference to what was seen, in the popular imaginary, as Black people rioting for no reason: [Excerpt: Jan and Dean, "Eve of Destruction"] According to Sloan, he worked on the Folk & Roll album as a favour to Berry, even though he thought Berry was being cynical and exploitative in making the record, but those changes caused a rift in their friendship. Sloan said in his autobiography "Where I was completely wrong was in helping him capitalize on something in which he didn't believe. Jan wanted the public to perceive him as a person who was deeply concerned and who embraced the values of the progressive politics of the day. But he wasn't that person. That's how I was being pulled. It was when he recorded my actual song ‘Eve Of Destruction' and changed a number of lines to reflect his own ideals that my principles demanded that I leave Folk City and never return." It's true that Sloan gave no more songs to Jan and Dean after that point -- but it's also true that the duo would record only one more album, the comedy concept album Jan and Dean Meet Batman, before Jan's accident. Incidentally, the reference to Selma, Alabama in the lyric might help people decide on which story about the writing of "Eve of Destruction" they think is more plausible. Remember that Lou Adler said that it was written after Adler gave Sloan a copy of Bringing it All Back Home and told him to write a bunch of knock-offs, while Sloan said it was written after a supernatural force gave him access to all the events that would happen in the world for the next sixty years. Sloan claimed the song was written in late 1964. Selma, Alabama, became national news in late February and early March 1965. Bringing it All Back Home was released in late March 1965. So either Adler was telling the truth, or Sloan really *was* given a supernatural insight into the events of the future. Now, as it turned out, while "Eve of Destruction" went to number one, that would be McGuire's only hit as a solo artist. His next couple of singles would reach the very low end of the Hot One Hundred, and that would be it -- he'd release several more albums, before appearing in the Broadway musical Hair, most famous for its nude scenes, and getting a small part in the cinematic masterpiece Werewolves on Wheels: [Excerpt: Werewolves on Wheels trailer] P.F. Sloan would later tell various stories about why McGuire never had another hit. Sometimes he would say that Dunhill Records had received death threats because of "Eve of Destruction" and so deliberately tried to bury McGuire's career, other times he would say that Lou Adler had told him that Billboard had said they were never going to put McGuire's records on the charts no matter how well they sold, because "Eve of Destruction" had just been too powerful and upset the advertisers. But of course at this time Dunhill were still trying for a follow-up to "Eve of Destruction", and they thought they might have one when Barry McGuire brought in a few friends of his to sing backing vocals on his second album. Now, we've covered some of the history of the Mamas and the Papas already, because they were intimately tied up with other groups like the Byrds and the Lovin' Spoonful, and with the folk scene that led to songs like "Hey Joe", so some of this will be more like a recap than a totally new story, but I'm going to recap those parts of the story anyway, so it's fresh in everyone's heads. John Phillips, Scott McKenzie, and Cass Elliot all grew up in Alexandria, Virginia, just a few miles south of Washington DC. Elliot was a few years younger than Phillips and McKenzie, and so as is the way with young men they never really noticed her, and as McKenzie later said "She lived like a quarter of a mile from me and I never met her until New York". While they didn't know who Elliot was, though, she was aware who they were, as Phillips and McKenzie sang together in a vocal group called The Smoothies. The Smoothies were a modern jazz harmony group, influenced by groups like the Modernaires, the Hi-Los, and the Four Freshmen. John Phillips later said "We were drawn to jazz, because we were sort of beatniks, really, rather than hippies, or whatever, flower children. So we used to sing modern harmonies, like Lambert, Hendricks, and Ross. Dave Lambert did a lot of our arrangements for us as a matter of fact." Now, I've not seen any evidence other than Phillips' claim that Dave Lambert ever arranged for the Smoothies, but that does tell you a lot about the kind of music that they were doing. Lambert, Hendricks, and Ross were a vocalese trio whose main star was Annie Ross, who had a career worthy of an episode in itself -- she sang with Paul Whiteman, appeared in a Little Rascals film when she was seven, had an affair with Lenny Bruce, dubbed Britt Ekland's voice in The Wicker Man, played the villain's sister in Superman III, and much more. Vocalese, you'll remember, was a style of jazz vocal where a singer would take a jazz instrumental, often an improvised one, and add lyrics which they would sing, like Lambert, Hendricks, and Ross' version of "Cloudburst": [Excerpt: Lambert, Hendricks, and Ross, "Cloudburst"] Whether Dave Lambert ever really did arrange for the Smoothies or not, it's very clear that the trio had a huge influence on John Phillips' ideas about vocal arrangement, as you can hear on Mamas and Papas records like "Once Was a Time I Thought": [Excerpt: The Mamas and the Papas, "Once Was a Time I Thought"] While the Smoothies thought of themselves as a jazz group, when they signed to Decca they started out making the standard teen pop of the era, with songs like "Softly": [Excerpt, The Smoothies, "Softly"] When the folk boom started, Phillips realised that this was music that he could do easily, because the level of musicianship among the pop-folk musicians was so much lower than in the jazz world. The Smoothies made some recordings in the style of the Kingston Trio, like "Ride Ride Ride": [Excerpt: The Smoothies, "Ride Ride Ride"] Then when the Smoothies split, Phillips and McKenzie formed a trio with a banjo player, Dick Weissman, who they met through Izzy Young's Folklore Centre in Greenwich Village after Phillips asked Young to name some musicians who could make a folk record with him. Weissman was often considered the best banjo player on the scene, and was a friend of Pete Seeger's, to whom Seeger sometimes turned for banjo tips. The trio, who called themselves the Journeymen, quickly established themselves on the folk scene. Weissman later said "we had this interesting balance. John had all of this charisma -- they didn't know about the writing thing yet -- John had the personality, Scott had the voice, and I could play. If you think about it, all of those bands like the Kingston Trio, the Brothers Four, nobody could really *sing* and nobody could really *play*, relatively speaking." This is the take that most people seemed to have about John Phillips, in any band he was ever in. Nobody thought he was a particularly good singer or instrumentalist -- he could sing on key and play adequate rhythm guitar, but nobody would actually pay money to listen to him do those things. Mark Volman of the Turtles, for example, said of him "John wasn't the kind of guy who was going to be able to go up on stage and sing his songs as a singer-songwriter. He had to put himself in the context of a group." But he was charismatic, he had presence, and he also had a great musical mind. He would surround himself with the best players and best singers he could, and then he would organise and arrange them in ways that made the most of their talents. He would work out the arrangements, in a manner that was far more professional than the quick head arrangements that other folk groups used, and he instigated a level of professionalism in his groups that was not at all common on the scene. Phillips' friend Jim Mason talked about the first time he saw the Journeymen -- "They were warming up backstage, and John had all of them doing vocal exercises; one thing in particular that's pretty famous called 'Seiber Syllables' -- it's a series of vocal exercises where you enunciate different vowel and consonant sounds. It had the effect of clearing your head, and it's something that really good operetta singers do." The group were soon signed by Frank Werber, the manager of the Kingston Trio, who signed them as an insurance policy. Dave Guard, the Kingston Trio's banjo player, was increasingly having trouble with the other members, and Werber knew it was only a matter of time before he left the group. Werber wanted the Journeymen as a sort of farm team -- he had the idea that when Guard left, Phillips would join the Kingston Trio in his place as the third singer. Weissman would become the Trio's accompanist on banjo, and Scott McKenzie, who everyone agreed had a remarkable voice, would be spun off as a solo artist. But until that happened, they might as well make records by themselves. The Journeymen signed to MGM records, but were dropped before they recorded anything. They instead signed to Capitol, for whom they recorded their first album: [Excerpt: The Journeymen, "500 Miles"] After recording that album, the Journeymen moved out to California, with Phillips' wife and children. But soon Phillips' marriage was to collapse, as he met and fell in love with Michelle Gilliam. Gilliam was nine years younger than him -- he was twenty-six and she was seventeen -- and she had the kind of appearance which meant that in every interview with an older heterosexual man who knew her, that man will spend half the interview talking about how attractive he found her. Phillips soon left his wife and children, but before he did, the group had a turntable hit with "River Come Down", the B-side to "500 Miles": [Excerpt: The Journeymen, "River Come Down"] Around the same time, Dave Guard *did* leave the Kingston Trio, but the plan to split the Journeymen never happened. Instead Phillips' friend John Stewart replaced Guard -- and this soon became a new source of income for Phillips. Both Phillips and Stewart were aspiring songwriters, and they collaborated together on several songs for the Trio, including "Chilly Winds": [Excerpt: The Kingston Trio, "Chilly Winds"] Phillips became particularly good at writing songs that sounded like they could be old traditional folk songs, sometimes taking odd lines from older songs to jump-start new ones, as in "Oh Miss Mary", which he and Stewart wrote after hearing someone sing the first line of a song she couldn't remember the rest of: [Excerpt: The Kingston Trio, "Oh Miss Mary"] Phillips and Stewart became so close that Phillips actually suggested to Stewart that he quit the Kingston Trio and replace Dick Weissman in the Journeymen. Stewart did quit the Trio -- but then the next day Phillips suggested that maybe it was a bad idea and he should stay where he was. Stewart went back to the Trio, claimed he had only pretended to quit because he wanted a pay-rise, and got his raise, so everyone ended up happy. The Journeymen moved back to New York with Michelle in place of Phillips' first wife (and Michelle's sister Russell also coming along, as she was dating Scott McKenzie) and on New Year's Eve 1962 John and Michelle married -- so from this point on I will refer to them by their first names, because they both had the surname Phillips. The group continued having success through 1963, including making appearances on "Hootenanny": [Excerpt: The Journeymen, "Stack O'Lee (live on Hootenanny)"] By the time of the Journeymen's third album, though, John and Scott McKenzie were on bad terms. Weissman said "They had been the closest of friends and now they were the worst of enemies. They talked through me like I was a medium. It got to the point where we'd be standing in the dressing room and John would say to me 'Tell Scott that his right sock doesn't match his left sock...' Things like that, when they were standing five feet away from each other." Eventually, the group split up. Weissman was always going to be able to find employment given his banjo ability, and he was about to get married and didn't need the hassle of dealing with the other two. McKenzie was planning on a solo career -- everyone was agreed that he had the vocal ability. But John was another matter. He needed to be in a group. And not only that, the Journeymen had bookings they needed to complete. He quickly pulled together a group he called the New Journeymen. The core of the lineup was himself, Michelle on vocals, and banjo player Marshall Brickman. Brickman had previously been a member of a folk group called the Tarriers, who had had a revolving lineup, and had played on most of their early-sixties recordings: [Excerpt: The Tarriers, "Quinto (My Little Pony)"] We've met the Tarriers before in the podcast -- they had been formed by Erik Darling, who later replaced Pete Seeger in the Weavers after Seeger's socialist principles wouldn't let him do advertising, and Alan Arkin, later to go on to be a film star, and had had hits with "Cindy, O Cindy", with lead vocals from Vince Martin, who would later go on to be a major performer in the Greenwich Village scene, and with "The Banana Boat Song". By the time Brickman had joined, though, Darling, Arkin, and Martin had all left the group to go on to bigger things, and while he played with them for several years, it was after their commercial peak. Brickman would, though, also go on to a surprising amount of success, but as a writer rather than a musician -- he had a successful collaboration with Woody Allen in the 1970s, co-writing four of Allen's most highly regarded films -- Sleeper, Annie Hall, Manhattan, and Manhattan Murder Mystery -- and with another collaborator he later co-wrote the books for the stage musicals Jersey Boys and The Addams Family. Both John and Michelle were decent singers, and both have their admirers as vocalists -- P.F. Sloan always said that Michelle was the best singer in the group they eventually formed, and that it was her voice that gave the group its sound -- but for the most part they were not considered as particularly astonishing lead vocalists. Certainly, neither had a voice that stood out the way that Scott McKenzie's had. They needed a strong lead singer, and they found one in Denny Doherty. Now, we covered Denny Doherty's early career in the episode on the Lovin' Spoonful, because he was intimately involved in the formation of that group, so I won't go into too much detail here, but I'll give a very abbreviated version of what I said there. Doherty was a Canadian performer who had been a member of the Halifax Three with Zal Yanovsky: [Excerpt: The Halifax Three, "When I First Came to This Land"] After the Halifax Three had split up, Doherty and Yanovsky had performed as a duo for a while, before joining up with Cass Elliot and her husband Jim Hendricks, who both had previously been in the Big Three with Tim Rose: [Excerpt: Cass Elliot and the Big 3, "The Banjo Song"] Elliot, Hendricks, Yanovsky, and Doherty had formed The Mugwumps, sometimes joined by John Sebastian, and had tried to go in more of a rock direction after seeing the Beatles on Ed Sullivan. They recorded one album together before splitting up: [Excerpt: The Mugwumps, "Searchin'"] Part of the reason they split up was that interpersonal relationships within the group were put under some strain -- Elliot and Hendricks split up, though they would remain friends and remain married for several years even though they were living apart, and Elliot had an unrequited crush on Doherty. But since they'd split up, and Yanovsky and Sebastian had gone off to form the Lovin' Spoonful, that meant that Doherty was free, and he was regarded as possibly the best male lead vocalist on the circuit, so the group snapped him up. The only problem was that the Journeymen still had gigs booked that needed to be played, one of them was in just three days, and Doherty didn't know the repertoire. This was a problem with an easy solution for people in their twenties though -- they took a huge amount of amphetamines, and stayed awake for three days straight rehearsing. They made the gig, and Doherty was now the lead singer of the New Journeymen: [Excerpt: The New Journeymen, "The Last Thing on My Mind"] But the New Journeymen didn't last in that form for very long, because even before joining the group, Denny Doherty had been going in a more folk-rock direction with the Mugwumps. At the time, John Phillips thought rock and roll was kids' music, and he was far more interested in folk and jazz, but he was also very interested in making money, and he soon decided it was an idea to start listening to the Beatles. There's some dispute as to who first played the Beatles for John in early 1965 -- some claim it was Doherty, others claim it was Cass Elliot, but everyone agrees it was after Denny Doherty had introduced Phillips to something else -- he brought round some LSD for John and Michelle, and Michelle's sister Rusty, to try. And then he told them he'd invited round a friend. Michelle Phillips later remembered, "I remember saying to the guys "I don't know about you guys, but this drug does nothing for me." At that point there was a knock on the door, and as I opened the door and saw Cass, the acid hit me *over the head*. I saw her standing there in a pleated skirt, a pink Angora sweater with great big eyelashes on and her hair in a flip. And all of a sudden I thought 'This is really *quite* a drug!' It was an image I will have securely fixed in my brain for the rest of my life. I said 'Hi, I'm Michelle. We just took some LSD-25, do you wanna join us?' And she said 'Sure...'" Rusty Gilliam's description matches this -- "It was mind-boggling. She had on a white pleated skirt, false eyelashes. These were the kind of eyelashes that when you put them on you were supposed to trim them to an appropriate length, which she didn't, and when she blinked she looked like a cow, or those dolls you get when you're little and the eyes open and close. And we're on acid. Oh my God! It was a sight! And everything she was wearing were things that you weren't supposed to be wearing if you were heavy -- white pleated skirt, mohair sweater. You know, until she became famous, she suffered so much, and was poked fun at." This gets to an important point about Elliot, and one which sadly affected everything about her life. Elliot was *very* fat -- I've seen her weight listed at about three hundred pounds, and she was only five foot five tall -- and she also didn't have the kind of face that gets thought of as conventionally attractive. Her appearance would be cruelly mocked by pretty much everyone for the rest of her life, in ways that it's genuinely hurtful to read about, and which I will avoid discussing in detail in order to avoid hurting fat listeners. But the two *other* things that defined Elliot in the minds of those who knew her were her voice -- every single person who knew her talks about what a wonderful singer she was -- and her personality. I've read a lot of things about Cass Elliot, and I have never read a single negative word about her as a person, but have read many people going into raptures about what a charming, loving, friendly, understanding person she was. Michelle later said of her "From the time I left Los Angeles, I hadn't had a friend, a buddy. I was married, and John and I did not hang out with women, we just hung out with men, and especially not with women my age. John was nine years older than I was. And here was a fun-loving, intelligent woman. She captivated me. I was as close to in love with Cass as I could be to any woman in my life at that point. She also represented something to me: freedom. Everything she did was because she wanted to do it. She was completely independent and I admired her and was in awe of her. And later on, Cass would be the one to tell me not to let John run my life. And John hated her for that." Either Elliot had brought round Meet The Beatles, the Beatles' first Capitol album, for everyone to listen to, or Denny Doherty already had it, but either way Elliot and Doherty were by this time already Beatles fans. Michelle, being younger than the rest and not part of the folk scene until she met John, was much more interested in rock and roll than any of them, but because she'd been married to John for a couple of years and been part of his musical world she hadn't really encountered the Beatles music, though she had a vague memory that she might have heard a track or two on the radio. John was hesitant -- he didn't want to listen to any rock and roll, but eventually he was persuaded, and the record was put on while he was on his first acid trip: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "I Want to Hold Your Hand"] Within a month, John Phillips had written thirty songs that he thought of as inspired by the Beatles. The New Journeymen were going to go rock and roll. By this time Marshall Brickman was out of the band, and instead John, Michelle, and Denny recruited a new lead guitarist, Eric Hord. Denny started playing bass, with John on rhythm guitar, and a violinist friend of theirs, Peter Pilafian, knew a bit of drums and took on that role. The new lineup of the group used the Journeymen's credit card, which hadn't been stopped even though the Journeymen were no more, to go down to St. Thomas in the Caribbean, along with Michelle's sister, John's daughter Mackenzie (from whose name Scott McKenzie had taken his stage name, as he was born Philip Blondheim), a pet dog, and sundry band members' girlfriends. They stayed there for several months, living in tents on the beach, taking acid, and rehearsing. While they were there, Michelle and Denny started an affair which would have important ramifications for the group later. They got a gig playing at a club called Duffy's, whose address was on Creeque Alley, and soon after they started playing there Cass Elliot travelled down as well -- she was in love with Denny, and wanted to be around him. She wasn't in the group, but she got a job working at Duffy's as a waitress, and she would often sing harmony with the group while waiting at tables. Depending on who was telling the story, either she didn't want to be in the group because she didn't want her appearance to be compared to Michelle's, or John wouldn't *let* her be in the group because she was so fat. Later a story would be made up to cover for this, saying that she hadn't been in the group at first because she couldn't sing the highest notes that were needed, until she got hit on the head with a metal pipe and discovered that it had increased her range by three notes, but that seems to be a lie. One of the songs the New Journeymen were performing at this time was "Mr. Tambourine Man". They'd heard that their old friend Roger McGuinn had recorded it with his new band, but they hadn't yet heard his version, and they'd come up with their own arrangement: [Excerpt: The New Journeymen, "Mr. Tambourine Man"] Denny later said "We were doing three-part harmony on 'Mr Tambourine Man', but a lot slower... like a polka or something! And I tell John, 'No John, we gotta slow it down and give it a backbeat.' Finally we get the Byrds 45 down here, and we put it on and turn it up to ten, and John says 'Oh, like that?' Well, as you can tell, it had already been done. So John goes 'Oh, ah... that's it...' a light went on. So we started doing Beatles stuff. We dropped 'Mr Tambourine Man' after hearing the Byrds version, because there was no point." Eventually they had to leave the island -- they had completely run out of money, and were down to fifty dollars. The credit card had been cut up, and the governor of the island had a personal vendetta against them because they gave his son acid, and they were likely to get arrested if they didn't leave the island. Elliot and her then-partner had round-trip tickets, so they just left, but the rest of them were in trouble. By this point they were unwashed, they were homeless, and they'd spent their last money on stage costumes. They got to the airport, and John Phillips tried to write a cheque for eight air fares back to the mainland, which the person at the check-in desk just laughed at. So they took their last fifty dollars and went to a casino. There Michelle played craps, and she rolled seventeen straight passes, something which should be statistically impossible. She turned their fifty dollars into six thousand dollars, which they scooped up, took to the airport, and paid for their flights out in cash. The New Journeymen arrived back in New York, but quickly decided that they were going to try their luck in California. They rented a car, using Scott McKenzie's credit card, and drove out to LA. There they met up with Hoyt Axton, who you may remember as the son of Mae Axton, the writer of "Heartbreak Hotel", and as the performer who had inspired Michael Nesmith to go into folk music: [Excerpt: Hoyt Axton, "Greenback Dollar"] Axton knew the group, and fed them and put them up for a night, but they needed somewhere else to stay. They went to stay with one of Michelle's friends, but after one night their rented car was stolen, with all their possessions in it. They needed somewhere else to stay, so they went to ask Jim Hendricks if they could crash at his place -- and they were surprised to find that Cass Elliot was there already. Hendricks had another partner -- though he and Elliot wouldn't have their marriage annulled until 1968 and were still technically married -- but he'd happily invited her to stay with them. And now all her friends had turned up, he invited them to stay as well, taking apart the beds in his one-bedroom apartment so he could put down a load of mattresses in the space for everyone to sleep on. The next part becomes difficult, because pretty much everyone in the LA music scene of the sixties was a liar who liked to embellish their own roles in things, so it's quite difficult to unpick what actually happened. What seems to have happened though is that first this new rock-oriented version of the New Journeymen went to see Frank Werber, on the recommendation of John Stewart. Werber was the manager of the Kingston Trio, and had also managed the Journeymen. He, however, was not interested -- not because he didn't think they had talent, but because he had experience of working with John Phillips previously. When Phillips came into his office Werber picked up a tape that he'd been given of the group, and said "I have not had a chance to listen to this tape. I believe that you are a most talented individual, and that's why we took you on in the first place. But I also believe that you're also a drag to work with. A pain in the ass. So I'll tell you what, before whatever you have on here sways me, I'm gonna give it back to you and say that we're not interested." Meanwhile -- and this part of the story comes from Kim Fowley, who was never one to let the truth get in the way of him taking claim for everything, but parts of it at least are corroborated by other people -- Cass Elliot had called Fowley, and told him that her friends' new group sounded pretty good and he should sign them. Fowley was at that time working as a talent scout for a label, but according to him the label wouldn't give the group the money they wanted. So instead, Fowley got in touch with Nik Venet, who had just produced the Leaves' hit version of "Hey Joe" on Mira Records: [Excerpt: The Leaves, "Hey Joe"] Fowley suggested to Venet that Venet should sign the group to Mira Records, and Fowley would sign them to a publishing contract, and they could both get rich. The trio went to audition for Venet, and Elliot drove them over -- and Venet thought the group had a great look as a quartet. He wanted to sign them to a record contract, but only if Elliot was in the group as well. They agreed, he gave them a one hundred and fifty dollar advance, and told them to come back the next day to see his boss at Mira. But Barry McGuire was also hanging round with Elliot and Hendricks, and decided that he wanted to have Lou Adler hear the four of them. He thought they might be useful both as backing vocalists on his second album and as a source of new songs. He got them to go and see Lou Adler, and according to McGuire Phillips didn't want Elliot to go with them, but as Elliot was the one who was friends with McGuire, Phillips worried that they'd lose the chance with Adler if she didn't. Adler was amazed, and decided to sign the group right then and there -- both Bones Howe and P.F. Sloan claimed to have been there when the group auditioned for him and have said "if you won't sign them, I will", though exactly what Sloan would have signed them to I'm not sure. Adler paid them three thousand dollars in cash and told them not to bother with Nik Venet, so they just didn't turn up for the Mira Records audition the next day. Instead, they went into the studio with McGuire and cut backing vocals on about half of his new album: [Excerpt: Barry McGuire with the Mamas and the Papas, "Hide Your Love Away"] While the group were excellent vocalists, there were two main reasons that Adler wanted to sign them. The first was that he found Michelle Phillips extremely attractive, and the second is a song that John and Michelle had written which he thought might be very suitable for McGuire's album. Most people who knew John Phillips think of "California Dreamin'" as a solo composition, and he would later claim that he gave Michelle fifty percent just for transcribing his lyric, saying he got inspired in the middle of the night, woke her up, and got her to write the song down as he came up with it. But Michelle, who is a credited co-writer on the song, has been very insistent that she wrote the lyrics to the second verse, and that it's about her own real experiences, saying that she would often go into churches and light candles even though she was "at best an agnostic, and possibly an atheist" in her words, and this would annoy John, who had also been raised Catholic, but who had become aggressively opposed to expressions of religion, rather than still having nostalgia for the aesthetics of the church as Michelle did. They were out walking on a particularly cold winter's day in 1963, and Michelle wanted to go into St Patrick's Cathedral and John very much did not want to. A couple of nights later, John woke her up, having written the first verse of the song, starting "All the leaves are brown and the sky is grey/I went for a walk on a winter's day", and insisting she collaborate with him. She liked the song, and came up with the lines "Stopped into a church, I passed along the way/I got down on my knees and I pretend to pray/The preacher likes the cold, he knows I'm going to stay", which John would later apparently dislike, but which stayed in the song. Most sources I've seen for the recording of "California Dreamin'" say that the lineup of musicians was the standard set of players who had played on McGuire's other records, with the addition of John Phillips on twelve-string guitar -- P.F. Sloan on guitar and harmonica, Joe Osborn on bass, Larry Knechtel on keyboards, and Hal Blaine on drums, but for some reason Stephen McParland's book on Sloan has Bones Howe down as playing drums on the track while engineering -- a detail so weird, and from such a respectable researcher, that I have to wonder if it might be true. In his autobiography, Sloan claims to have rewritten the chord sequence to "California Dreamin'". He says "Barry Mann had unintentionally showed me a suspended chord back at Screen Gems. I was so impressed by this beautiful, simple chord that I called Brian Wilson and played it for him over the phone. The next thing I knew, Brian had written ‘Don't Worry Baby,' which had within it a number suspended chords. And then the chord heard 'round the world, two months later, was the opening suspended chord of ‘A Hard Day's Night.' I used these chords throughout ‘California Dreamin',' and more specifically as a bridge to get back and forth from the verse to the chorus." Now, nobody else corroborates this story, and both Brian Wilson and John Phillips had the kind of background in modern harmony that means they would have been very aware of suspended chords before either ever encountered Sloan, but I thought I should mention it. Rather more plausible is Sloan's other claim, that he came up with the intro to the song. According to Sloan, he was inspired by "Walk Don't Run" by the Ventures: [Excerpt: The Ventures, "Walk Don't Run"] And you can easily see how this: [plays "Walk Don't Run"] Can lead to this: [plays "California Dreamin'"] And I'm fairly certain that if that was the inspiration, it was Sloan who was the one who thought it up. John Phillips had been paying no attention to the world of surf music when "Walk Don't Run" had been a hit -- that had been at the point when he was very firmly in the folk world, while Sloan of course had been recording "Tell 'Em I'm Surfin'", and it had been his job to know surf music intimately. So Sloan's intro became the start of what was intended to be Barry McGuire's next single: [Excerpt: Barry McGuire, "California Dreamin'"] Sloan also provided the harmonica solo on the track: [Excerpt: Barry McGuire, "California Dreamin'"] The Mamas and the Papas -- the new name that was now given to the former New Journeymen, now they were a quartet -- were also signed to Dunhill as an act on their own, and recorded their own first single, "Go Where You Wanna Go", a song apparently written by John about Michelle, in late 1963, after she had briefly left him to have an affair with Russ Titelman, the record producer and songwriter, before coming back to him: [Excerpt: The Mamas and the Papas, "Go Where You Wanna Go"] But while that was put out, they quickly decided to scrap it and go with another song. The "Go Where You Wanna Go" single was pulled after only selling a handful of copies, though its commercial potential was later proved when in 1967 a new vocal group, the 5th Dimension, released a soundalike version as their second single. The track was produced by Lou Adler's client Johnny Rivers, and used the exact same musicians as the Mamas and the Papas version, with the exception of Phillips. It became their first hit, reaching number sixteen on the charts: [Excerpt: The 5th Dimension, "Go Where You Wanna Go"] The reason the Mamas and the Papas version of "Go Where You Wanna Go" was pulled was because everyone became convinced that their first single should instead be their own version of "California Dreamin'". This is the exact same track as McGuire's track, with just two changes. The first is that McGuire's lead vocal was replaced with Denny Doherty: [Excerpt: The Mamas and the Papas, "California Dreamin'"] Though if you listen to the stereo mix of the song and isolate the left channel, you can hear McGuire singing the lead on the first line, and occasional leakage from him elsewhere on the backing vocal track: [Excerpt: The Mamas and the Papas, "California Dreamin'"] The other change made was to replace Sloan's harmonica solo with an alto flute solo by Bud Shank, a jazz musician who we heard about in the episode on "Light My Fire", when he collaborated with Ravi Shankar on "Improvisations on the Theme From Pather Panchali": [Excerpt: Ravi Shankar, "Improvisation on the Theme From Pather Panchali"] Shank was working on another session in Western Studios, where they were recording the Mamas and Papas track, and Bones Howe approached him while he was packing his instrument and asked if he'd be interested in doing another session. Shank agreed, though the track caused problems for him. According to Shank "What had happened was that whe

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Sound Opinions
Rock on Film, Opinions on Lizzo, Muna & Perfume Genius

Sound Opinions

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 51:13 Very Popular


This week, hosts Jim DeRogatis and Greg Kot discuss the history of music movies with author Fred Goodman. From The Beatles to Metallica, they explore rock on film. Plus, the hosts review new music by Liz, Muna and Perfume Genius. Join our Facebook Group: https://bit.ly/3sivr9TBecome a member on Patreon: https://bit.ly/3slWZvcSign up for our newsletter: https://bit.ly/3eEvRnGMake a donation via PayPal: https://bit.ly/3dmt9lUSend us a Voice Memo: Desktop: bit.ly/2RyD5Ah  Mobile: sayhi.chat/soundops Featured Songs:Lizzo, "Special," Special, Nice Life/Atlantic, 2022Lizzo, "Grrrls," Special, Nice Life/Atlantic, 2022Lizzo, "Naked," Special, Nice Life/Atlantic, 2022Lizzo, "Everybody's Gay," Special, Nice Life/Atlantic, 2022Perfume Genius, "Pop Song," Ugly Season, Matador, 2022Perfume Genius, "Hellbent," Ugly Season, Matador, 2022Perfume Genius, "Eye in the Wall," Ugly Season, Matador, 2022Lizzo, "About Damn Time," Special, Nice Life/Atlantic, 2022Muna, "Silk Chiffon (feat. Phoebe Bridgers)," Muna, Saddest Factory, 2022Muna, "What I Want," Muna, Saddest Factory, 2022Muna, "Kind of Girl," Muna, Saddest Factory, 2022The Beatles, "A Hard Day's Night," A Hard Day's Night, United Artists, 1964Stillwater, "Fever Dog," Almost Famous (Music From the Motion Picture), DreamWorks, 2000Richard O'Brien, Patricia Quinn, Little Nell, "Time Warp," The Rocky Horror Picture Show, Ode, 1975Lhasa de Sela, "Love Came Here," Lhasa, Audiogram, 2009The Stooges, "Down On the Street," Fun House, Elektra, 1970

Sound Opinions
Maybe the Best Buried Treasures Ever? Plus Listener Feedback

Sound Opinions

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 51:12 Very Popular


Hosts Jim DeRogatis and Greg Kot share new music that isn't getting the attention it deserves- they call them "buried treasures." The show's staff joins in sharing their picks as well. Plus they listen to recent feedback from listeners.Join our Facebook Group: https://bit.ly/3sivr9TBecome a member on Patreon: https://bit.ly/3slWZvcSign up for our newsletter: https://bit.ly/3eEvRnGMake a donation via PayPal: https://bit.ly/3dmt9lUSend us a Voice Memo: Desktop: bit.ly/2RyD5Ah  Mobile: sayhi.chat/soundops Featured Songs:Dehd, "Bad Love," Blue Skies, Fat Possum, 2022Oliana, "Jupiter," Jupiter (Single), Oli x Tooti, 2022Body Type, "Buoyancy," Everything Is Dangerous But Nothing's Surprising, Poison City, 2022Taqbir, "Aisha Qandisha," Taqbir EP, self-released, 2021Momma, "Medicine," Household Name, Polyvinyl, 2022Mayyadda, "BlackGirlMagic (Acoustic Remix)," BlackGirlMagic (Acoustic Remix) (Single), Mayyadda, 2022O.N.E. The Duo, "Stuck In The Middle," Stuck In The Middle (Single), Visionary, 2022Say Sue Me, "To Dream," The Last Thing Left, Damnably, 2022Hater, "Renew, Reject," Sincere, Fire, 2022Ethel Cain, "Crush," Inbred, Daughters of Cain, 2021Holland Patent Public Library, "Joe Pera Sits With You," Joe Pera Talks With You: Season 3 (Original Soundtrack), Adult Swim, 2022The Who, "Baba O'Riley," Who's Next, Polydor, 1971The Venomous Pinks, "No Rules," Vita Mors, SBÄM, 2022Dummy, "Mono Retriever," Mono Retriever (Single), Sub Pop, 2022Crumb, "Balloon," Ice Melt, Crumb, 2021Chime School, "It's True," Chime School, Slumberland, 2021Sharon Jones & the Dap-Kings, "What If We All Stopped Paying Taxes," Soul Time!, Daptone, 2011Trombone Shorty, "I'm Standing Here (feat. Gary Clark Jr.)," Lifted, Blue Note, 2022Tummyache, "Alive Again," Teeth - Single, Tone Tree Music / You + Me, 2022The Beatles, "A Hard Day's Night," A Hard Day's Night, Parlophone, 1964